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Sample records for biodiesel fuels

  1. Biodiesel fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mono-alkyl esters, most commonly the methyl esters of vegetable oils, animal fats, or other materials consisting mainly of triacylglycerols, often referred to as biodiesel, are an alternative to conventional petrodiesel for use in compression-ignition engines. The fatty acid esters that thus com...

  2. BIODIESEL – ALTERNATIVE FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Kiš

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A limited quantity of oil, the purchase of which also involves major expenses has become an important factor for intensive search and use of alternative fuels. Biodiesel is used in diesel engines, and is manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats and recycled edible oils. The production and use of biodiesel are very important not only because of its economic and strategic connotations but also because of its environmental advantages. Favourable conditions in Croatia give good opportunities for a self-sufficient oil rape production, possibility for its intensification and employment of a number of people in both the agricultural production and biodiesel production plants. This paper presents a survey of the biodiesel fuel production, the characteristics and impacts it has on the biodiesel engine features as well as its impact on the environment.

  3. Predicting various biodiesel fuel properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several essential fuel properties of biodiesel are largely determined by the properties of the fatty esters which are its main components. These include cetane number, kinematic viscosity, oxidative stability, and cold flow which are contained in almost all biodiesel standards but also other propert...

  4. Biodegradation of biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel fuel test substances Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Neat Rape Oil (NR), Say Methyl Ester (SME), Soy Ethyl Ester (SEE), Neat Soy Oil (NS), and proportionate combinations of RME/diesel and REE/diesel were studied to test the biodegradability of the test substances in an aerobic aquatic environment using the EPA 560/6-82-003 Shake Flask Test Method. A concurrent analysis of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel was also performed for comparison with a conventional fuel. The highest rates of percent CO2 evolution were seen in the esterified fuels, although no significant difference was noted between them. Ranges of percent CO2 evolution for esterified fuels were from 77% to 91%. The neat rape and neat soy oils exhibited 70% to 78% CO2 evolution. These rates were all significantly higher than those of the Phillips D-2 reference fuel which evolved from 7% to 26% of the organic carbon to CO2. The test substances were examined for BOD5 and COD values as a relative measure of biodegradability. Water Accommodated Fraction (WAF) was experimentally derived and BOD5 and COD analyses were carried out with a diluted concentration at or below the WAF. The results of analysis at WAF were then converted to pure substance values. The pure substance BOD5 and COD values for test substances were then compared to a control substance, Phillips D-2 Reference fuel. No significant difference was noted for COD values between test substances and the control fuel. (p > 0.20). The D-2 control substance was significantly lower than all test substances for BCD, values at p 5 value

  5. Fuel and physical properties of biodiesel components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats or used oils. Specifically, biodiesel is the methyl or other alkyl esters of these oils or fats. Biodiesel also contains minor components such as free fatty acids and acylglycerols. Important fuel properties of biodi...

  6. Opportunities and challenges for biodiesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil fuel resources are decreasing daily. As a renewable energy, biodiesel has been receiving increasing attention because of the relevance it gains from the rising petroleum price and its environmental advantages. This review highlights some of the perspectives for the biodiesel industry to thrive as an alternative fuel, while discussing opportunities and challenges of biodiesel. This review is divided in three parts. First overview is given on developments of biodiesel in past and present, especially for the different feedstocks and the conversion technologies of biodiesel industry. More specifically, an overview is given on possible environmental and social impacts associated with biodiesel production, such as food security, land change and water source. Further emphasis is given on the need for government's incentives and public awareness for the use and benefits of biodiesel, while promoting policies that will not only endorse the industry, but also promote effective land management. (author)

  7. Fuel Properties and Performance of Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    When being used as "alternative" diesel fuel, the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats are referred to as biodiesel. Biodiesel is playing an increasingly important role in the fuel landscape, with production and use growing exponentially and standards established around the world. Co...

  8. Blending biodiesel in fishing boat fuels for improved fuel characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherng-Yuan eLin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a renewable, clean, alternative energy source with advantages such as excellent lubricity, superior biodegradability and high combustion efficiency. Biodiesel is considered for mixing with fishing boat fuels to adjust their fuel characteristics so that toxic pollutants and greenhouse-effect gas emissions from such shipping might be reduced. The effects of blending fishing boat fuels A and B with various weight proportions of biodiesel are experimentally investigated in this study. The results show that biodiesel blending can significantly improve the inferior fuel properties of both fishing boat fuels and particularly fuel B. The flash points of both of these fuels increases significantly with the addition of biodiesel and thus enhances the safety of transporting and storing these blended fuels. The flash point of fishing boat fuel B even increases by 16% with 25 wt% biodiesel blending. The blending of biodiesel with no sulfur content is found to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the high sulfur content of fishing boat fuel, resulting in a reduction in the emission of sulfur oxides. The addition of only 25 wt% biodiesel decreased the sulfur content of the fishing boat fuel by 37%. The high kinematic viscosity of fishing boat fuel B was also observed to be reduced by 63% with the blending of just 25 wt% biodiesel. However, biodiesel blending caused a slight decrease in heating value around 1% to 4.5%.

  9. 10 CFR 490.703 - Biodiesel fuel use credit allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biodiesel fuel use credit allocation. 490.703 Section 490.703 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.703 Biodiesel fuel use credit allocation. (a) DOE shall allocate to a fleet...

  10. Fuel Properties of Biodiesel/Ultra-low Sulfur Diesel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel and fuel extender made from transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats with methanol or ethanol. The National Biodiesel Board estimated that biodiesel production in the United States increased from 250 million gal in 2006 to 450 million gal in 2007. In 20...

  11. Will biodiesel fuels derived from algae perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The issue of sufficient supply and availability of feedstock is one of the major non-technical issues affecting the widespread commercialization of biodiesel. Another aspect is the food vs. fuel issue that biofuels should not be produced from edible feedstocks. In these connections, lipid-producin...

  12. Improving the low temperature properties of biodiesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhale, Purnanand Vishwanathrao; Deshpande, Nishikant V.; Thombre, Shashikant B. [Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Mechanical Engineering, South Ambazari Road, Near Bajaj Nagar, 440011 Nagpur, Maharashtra (India)

    2009-03-15

    The use of biodiesel as a diesel fuel extender and lubricity improver is rapidly increasing. While most of the properties of biodiesel are comparable to petroleum based diesel fuel, improvement of its low temperature flow characteristic still remains one of the major challenges when using biodiesel as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. The biodiesel fuels derived from fats or oils with significant amounts of saturated fatty compounds will display higher cloud points and pour points. This paper is aimed to investigate the cold flow properties of 100% biodiesel fuel obtained from Madhuca indica, one of the important species in the Indian context. In this paper, the cold flow properties of biodiesel were evaluated with and without pour point depressants towards the objectives of identifying the pumping and injecting of these biodiesel in CI engines under cold climates. Effect of ethanol, kerosene and commercial additive on cold flow behavior of this biodiesel was studied. A considerable reduction in pour point has been noticed by using these cold flow improvers. The performance and emission with ethanol blended Mahua biodiesel fuel and ethanol-diesel blended Mahua biodiesel fuel have also been studied. A considerable reduction in emission was obtained. Ethanol blended biodiesel is totally a renewable, viable alternative fuel for improved cold flow behavior and better emission characteristics without affecting the engine performance. (author)

  13. OXIDATIVE STABILITY OF BIODIESEL/JET FUEL BLENDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, an alternative fuel made from transesterification of vegetable oil with methanol, is becoming more readily available for use in blends with conventional diesel fuel for transportation applications. Biodiesel has fuel properties comparable to those of conventional diesel fuel and is known...

  14. Degradation of nitrile rubber fuel hose by biodiesel use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays biodiesel is becoming an increasingly important and popular fuel, obtained from renewable sources, and contributes to pollutant emissions reduction and decreasing fossil fuels dependence. However, its easier oxidation and faster degradation in comparison to diesel led to compatibility problems between biodiesel and various metallic and polymeric materials contacted. Therefore, the objective of this work is to investigate the effect of different mixtures diesel–biodiesel (fuel type B5, B10, B20) used in Baja California, Mexico on the resistance of nitrile rubber fuel hoses at temperatures of 25 °C and 70 °C applying gravimetric tests, tensile strength measurements and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The factors affecting the material mass change were identified using an experimental design analysis. It was found that the fuel temperature did not conduct to significant mass loss of nitrile rubber fuel hose, while biodiesel concentration affected the properties of the elastomer, causing the phenomenon of swelling. The exposure of hoses to fuel with increasing concentrations of biodiesel led to tensile strength decrease. - Highlights: • The biodiesel oxidation led to problems with polymeric materials. • The degradation of a nitrile rubber fuel hose in biodiesel blends was assessed. • The nitrile rubber showed greater affinity for biodiesel than diesel. • The elastomer swelled, cracked and lost its mechanical properties by biodiesel. • SEM analysis confirmed surface morphology changes in higher biodiesel blends

  15. Biodiesel as a motor fuel price stabilization mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article studies the capacity of biofuels to reduce motor fuel price fluctuations. For this purpose, we study dependence between crude oil and biodiesel blend prices in Spain. Copula models are used for this purpose. Results suggest that the practice of blending biodiesel with diesel can protect consumers against extreme crude oil price increases. - Highlights: ► We study the capacity of biofuels to reduce fuel price fluctuations. ► We focus on Spanish biodiesel market. ► Biodiesel and crude oil price dependence is studied using copula functions. ► Biodiesel can protect consumers against extreme crude oil price increases.

  16. Biodiesel fuel costs and environmental issues when powering railway locomotives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirza, Abdul; Ziemer, Norbert; Tatara, Robert; Moraga, Reinaldo; Mirman, Clifford; Vohra, Promod

    2010-09-15

    Issues for adopting biodiesel fuel, instead of petrodiesel, to power railroad locomotives are engine performance and emissions, fuel infrastructure, and fuel cost. These are evaluated for B2 through B100 blends. Biodiesel's solvent action on fuel systems is addressed. With biodiesel, hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and particulate emissions are unchanged or reduced. Nitrogen oxides are elevated but it is believed that engine alterations can minimize these emissions. A Transportation Model, using data from a major railway, has demonstrated that refueling depots can be fully supplied with biodiesel at a pricing premium of 1% to 26%, depending on blend and geographical location.

  17. Research on Biodiesel and Vegetable Oil Fuels - Then and Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    A vegetable oil was used as diesel fuel for the first time in 1900 and the first biodiesel dates from the 1930's. Significant insights into fuel properties were already gained in those times. This article briefly discusses such results and relates the author's own recent work on biodiesel fuel pro...

  18. Kinetic Modeling of Combustion Characteristics of Real Biodiesel Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, C V; Westbrook, C K

    2009-04-08

    Biodiesel fuels are of much interest today either for replacing or blending with conventional fuels for automotive applications. Predicting engine effects of using biodiesel fuel requires accurate understanding of the combustion characteristics of the fuel, which can be acquired through analysis using reliable detailed reaction mechanisms. Unlike gasoline or diesel that consists of hundreds of chemical compounds, biodiesel fuels contain only a limited number of compounds. Over 90% of the biodiesel fraction is composed of 5 unique long-chain C{sub 18} and C{sub 16} saturated and unsaturated methyl esters. This makes modeling of real biodiesel fuel possible without the need for a fuel surrogate. To this end, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed for determining the combustion characteristics of a pure biodiesel (B100) fuel, applicable from low- to high-temperature oxidation regimes. This model has been built based on reaction rate rules established in previous studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Computed results are compared with the few fundamental experimental data that exist for biodiesel fuel and its components. In addition, computed results have been compared with experimental data for other long-chain hydrocarbons that are similar in structure to the biodiesel components.

  19. Bio-diesel fuels production: Feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the efforts being made by Italy's national government and private industry to develop diesel engine fuels derived from vegetable oils, in particular, sunflower seed oil. These fuels are being promoted in Italy from the environmental protection stand-point in that they don't contain any sulfur, the main cause of acid rain, and from the agricultural stand-point in that they provide Italian farmers, whose food crop production capacity is limited due to European Communities agreements, with the opportunity to use their set-aside land for the production of energy crops. This paper provides brief notes on the key performance characteristics of bio-diesel fuels, whose application doesn't require any modifications to diesel engines, apart from minor adjustments to the air/fuel mix regulating system, and assesses commercialization prospects. Brief mention is made of the problems being encountered by the Government in the establishing fair bio-fuel production tax rebates which are compatible with the marketing practices of the petroleum industry. One of the strategies being considered is to use the bio-fuels as additives to be mixed with conventional fuel oils so as to derive a fuel which meets the new European air pollution standards

  20. Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

    2012-03-30

    Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

  1. Biodiesel/ULSD blend ratios by analysis of fuel properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel that is made from vegetable oil or animal fat. Biodiesel is often blended with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD; 15 mg/kg maximum sulfur content) in volumetric ratios (VBD) of up to 20 vol% (B20). Government tax credits and other regulatory requirements may depend on ac...

  2. Biodiesel: A fuel, a lubricant, and a solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is well-known as a biogenic alternative to conventional diesel fuel derived from petroleum. It is produced from feedstocks such as plant oils consisting largely of triacylglycerols through transesterification with an alcohol such as methanol. The properties of biodiesel are largely compet...

  3. Improving Biodiesel Fuel Properties by Modifying Fatty Ester Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative to petroleum-derived diesel fuel composed of alkyl esters of vegetable oils, animal fats or other feedstocks such as used cooking oils. The fatty acid profile of biodiesel corresponds to that of its feedstock. Most feedstocks possess fatty acid profiles consisting mainl...

  4. Designing a Biodiesel Fuel with Optimized Fatty Acid Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative to petroleum-derived diesel fuel, although it can replace only a few percent of current petrodiesel production. It is technically competitive with petrodiesel. Technical problems with biodiesel are oxidative stability, cold flow increased nitrogen oxides (NOx) exhaust em...

  5. Biodiesel Fuel Quality and the ASTM Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is usually produced from vegetable oils, animal fats and used cooking oils with alternative feedstocks such as algae receiving increasing interest. The transesterification reaction which produces biodiesel also produces glycerol and proceeds stepwise via mono- and diacylglycerol intermedia...

  6. Biodiesel production via non-catalytic SCF method and biodiesel fuel characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegetable oil (m)ethyl esters, commonly referred to as 'biodiesel,' are prominent candidates as alternative Diesel fuels. Biodiesel is technically competitive with or offers technical advantages compared to conventional petroleum Diesel fuel. The vegetable oils, as alternative engine fuels, are all extremely viscous with viscosities ranging from 10 to 20 times greater than that of petroleum Diesel fuel. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. Transesterifications of vegetable oils in supercritical methanol are performed without using any catalyst. The most important variables affecting the methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil and the reaction temperature. Biodiesel has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. The cost of biodiesel, however, is the main obstacle to commercialization of the product. With cooking oils used as raw material, the viability of a continuous transesterification process and recovery of high quality glycerol as a biodiesel by product are primary options to be considered to lower the cost of biodiesel. Supercritical methanol has a high potential for both transesterification of triglycerides and methyl esterification of free fatty acids to methyl esters for a Diesel fuel substitute. In the supercritical methanol transesterification method, the yield of conversion increases to 95% in 10 min. The viscosity values of vegetable oils are between 27.2 and 53.6 mm2/s, whereas those of vegetable oil methyl esters are between 3.59 and 4.63 mm2/s. The flash point values of vegetable oil methyl esters are much lower than those of vegetable oils. An increase in density from 860 to 885 kg/m3 for vegetable oil methyl esters or biodiesels increases the viscosity from 3.59 to 4.63 mm2/s. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly fuel that can be used in any Diesel engine without modification

  7. Biodiesel of distilled hydrogenated fat and biodiesel of distilled residual oil: fuel consumption in agricultural tractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camara, Felipe Thomaz da; Lopes, Afonso; Silva, Rouverson Pereira da; Oliveira, Melina Cais Jejcic; Furlani, Carlos Eduardo Angeli [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil); Dabdoub, Miguel Joaquim [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Great part of the world-wide oil production is used in fry process; however, after using, such product becomes an undesirable residue, and the usual methods of discarding of these residues, generally contaminate the environment, mainly the rivers. In function of this, using oil and residual fat for manufacturing biodiesel, besides preventing ambient contamination, turning up an undesirable residue in to fuel. The present work had as objective to evaluate the fuel consumption of a Valtra BM100 4x2 TDA tractor functioning with methylic biodiesel from distilled hydrogenated fat and methylic biodiesel from distilled residual oil, in seven blends into diesel. The work was conducted at the Department of Agricultural Engineering, at UNESP - Jaboticabal, in an entirely randomized block statistical design, factorial array of 2 x 7, with three repetitions. The factors combinations were two types of methylic distilled biodiesel (residual oil and hydrogenated fat) and seven blends (B{sub 0}, B{sub 5}, B{sub 1}5, B{sub 2}5, B{sub 5}0, B{sub 7}5 and B{sub 1}00). The results had evidenced that additioning 15% of biodiesel into diesel, the specific consumption was similar, and biodiesel of residual oil provided less consumption than biodiesel from hydrogenated fat. (author)

  8. Fuel Pellets Production from Biodiesel Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawalin Chaiyaomporn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research palm fiber and palm shell were used as raw materials to produce pelletised fuel, and waste glycerol were used as adhesive to reduce biodiesel production waste. The aim of this research is to find optimum ratio of raw material (ratio of palm fiber and palm shell, raw material size distribution, adhesive temperature, and ratio of ingredients (ratio of raw material, waste glycerol, and water. The optimum ratio of pelletized fuel made only by palm fiber was 50:10:40; palm fiber, water, and waste glycerol respectively. In the best practice condition; particle size was smaller than 2 mm, adhesive glycerol was heated. From the explained optimum ratio and ingredient, pelletizing ratio was 62.6%, specific density was 982.2 kg/m3, heating value was 22.5 MJ/kg, moisture content was 5.9194%, volatile matter was 88.2573%, fix carbon content was 1.5894%, and ash content was 4.2339% which was higher than the standard. Mixing palm shell into palm fiber raw material reduced ash content of the pellets. The optimum raw material ratio, which minimizes ash content, was 80 to 20 palm fiber and palm shell respectively. Adding palm shell reduced ash content to be 2.5247% which was higher than pelletized fuel standard but followed cubed fuel standard. At this raw material ratio, pelletizing ratio was 70.5%, specific density was 774.8 kg/m3, heating value was 19.71 MJ/kg, moisture content was 9.8137%, volatile matter was 86.2259%, fix carbon content was 1.4356%, and compressive force was 4.83 N. Pelletized fuel cost at optimum condition was 1.14 baht/kg.

  9. Exhaust gas emissions and mutagenic effects of modern diesel fuels, GTL, biodiesel and biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schroeder, Olaf [Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: axel.munack@vti.bund.de; Krahl, Juergen [Coburg Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany); Buenger, Juergen [University of Bochum (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Biodiesel can be used alone (B100) or blended with petroleum diesel in any proportion. The most popular biodiesel blend in the U.S.A. is B20 (20% biodiesel, 80% diesel fuel), which can be used for Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) compliance. In the European Union, the use of biofuel blends is recommended and was introduced by federal regulations in several countries. In Germany, biodiesel is currently blended as B5 (5% biodiesel) to common diesel fuel. In 2008, B7 plus three percent hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) as well is intended to become mandatory in Germany. To investigate the influence of blends on the emissions and possible health effects, we performed a series of studies with several engines (Euro 0, III and IV) measuring regulated and non-regulated exhaust compounds and determining their mutagenic effects. Emissions of blends showed an approximate linear dependence on the blend composition, in particular when regulated emissions are considered. However, a negative effect of blends was observed with respect to mutagenicity of the exhaust gas emissions. In detail, a maximum of the mutagenic potency was found in the range of B20. From this point of view, B20 must be considered as a critical blend, in case diesel fuel and biodiesel are used as binary mixtures. (author)

  10. Biodiesel Fuel Production from Algae as Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B.M. Sharif Hossain

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is biodegradable, less CO2 and NOx emissions. Continuous use of petroleum sourced fuels is now widely recognized as unsustainable because of depleting supplies and the contribution of these fuels to the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the environment. Renewable, carbon neutral, transport fuels are necessary for environmental and economic sustainability. Algae have emerged as one of the most promising sources for biodiesel production. It can be inferred that algae grown in CO2-enriched air can be converted to oily substances. Such an approach can contribute to solve major problems of air pollution resulting from CO2 evolution and future crisis due to a shortage of energy sources. This study was undertaken to know the proper transesterification, amount of biodiesel production (ester and physical properties of biodiesel. In this study we used common species Oedogonium and Spirogyra to compare the amount of biodiesel production. Algal oil and biodiesel (ester production was higher in Oedogonium than Spirogyra sp. However, biomass (after oil extraction was higher in Spirogyra than Oedogonium sp. Sediments (glycerine, water and pigments was higher in Spirogyra than Oedogonium sp. There was no difference of pH between Spirogyra and Oedogonium sp. These results indicate that biodiesel can be produced from both species and Oedogonium is better source than Spirogyra sp.

  11. An alternative fuel for urban buses-biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, L.G.; Weber, J.A.; Russell, M.D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative biodiesel fueling performance and operational data have been collected from urban mass transit buses at Bi-State Development Agency in St. Louis Missouri. A total of 10 vehicles were selected for fueling; 5-6V92 TA Detroit Diesel engines have been fueled with a 20/80 biodiesel/diesel fuel blend and 5-6V92 TA Detroit Diesel control vehicles have been fueled on petroleum based low sulfur diesel fuel (LSD). The real-world impact of a biodiesel blend on maintenance, reliability, cost, fuel economy and safety compared to LSD will be presented. In addition, engine exhaust emissions data collected by the University of West Virginia Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored mobile emissions laboratory will be presented. Operational data from Bi-State Development Agency is collected by the University of Missouri and quality control procedures are performed prior to placing the data in the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC). The AFDC is maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. This effort, which enables transit operators to review a real-world comparison of biodiesel and LSD, has been funded by the National Biodiesel Board with funds provided by the United Soybean Board with national checkoff dollars and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  12. Castor oil biodiesel as an alternative fuel for diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a study related to the production and use of castor oil biodiesel is presented. The maximum methyl esters yield of the castor oil transesterification reaction is obtained under the following conditions: ambient temperature, a molar ratio of methanol to vegetable oil equal to 9 and a catalyst percentage equal to 0.8%. The castor oil biodiesel can be blended with petroleum diesel as far as 15% in such way that the resulting blend complies with national and international technical standards for diesel fuels. Its high viscosity becomes the main difficulty for using castor oil biodiesel in engines. However this biofuel exhibits excellent cold flow properties (low values of cloud and pour points). The motor tests using castor oil biodiesel petroleum diesel blends, for the biodiesel proportion tested; show that a biodiesel percentage increase leads to an increase in the specific fuel consumption, a decrease in the fuel air ratio, a slight decrease in smoke opacity, while the fuel conversion efficiency and the CO and CO2 emissions practically remain constants

  13. Biodiesel Fuel Property Effects on Particulate Matter Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.; Black, S.; McCormick, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    Controlling diesel particulate emissions to meet the 2007 U.S. standard requires the use of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The reactivity of soot, or the carbon fraction of particulate matter, in the DPF and the kinetics of soot oxidation are important in achieving better control of aftertreatment devices. Studies showed that biodiesel in the fuel can increase soot reactivity. This study therefore investigated which biodiesel fuel properties impact reactivity. Three fuel properties of interest included fuel oxygen content and functionality, fuel aromatic content, and the presence of alkali metals. To determine fuel effects on soot reactivity, the performance of a catalyzed DPF was measured with different test fuels through engine testing and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Results showed no dependence on the aromatic content or the presence of alkali metals in the fuel. The presence and form of fuel oxygen was the dominant contributor to faster DPF regeneration times and soot reactivity.

  14. Acute aquatic toxicity and biodegradation potential of biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies on the biodegradation potential and aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels are reviewed. Biodegradation data were obtained using the shaker flask method observing the appearance of CO2 and by observing the disappearance of test substance with gas chromatography. Additional BOD5 and COD data were obtained. The results indicate the ready biodegradability of biodiesel fuels as well as the enhanced co-metabolic biodegradation of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel mixtures. The study examined reference diesel, neat soy oil, neat rape oil, and the methyl and ethyl esters of these vegetable oils as well as various fuel blends. Acute toxicity tests on biodiesel fuels and blends were performed using Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow Trout) in a static non-renewal system and in a proportional dilution flow replacement system. The study is intended to develop data on the acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels and blends under US EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. The test procedure is designed from the guidelines outlined in Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms and the Fish Acute Aquatic Toxicity Test guideline used to develop aquatic toxicity data for substances subject to environmental effects test regulations under TSCA. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an LC50, a lethal concentration effecting mortality in 50% of the test population

  15. A comprehensive combustion model for biodiesel-fueled engine simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakora, Jessica L.

    Engine models for alternative fuels are available, but few are comprehensive, well-validated models that include accurate physical property data as well as a detailed description of the fuel chemistry. In this work, a comprehensive biodiesel combustion model was created for use in multi-dimensional engine simulations, specifically the KIVA3v R2 code. The model incorporates realistic physical properties in a vaporization model developed for multi-component fuel sprays and applies an improved mechanism for biodiesel combustion chemistry. A reduced mechanism was generated from the methyl decanoate (MD) and methyl-9-decenoate (MD9D) mechanism developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It was combined with a multi-component mechanism to include n-heptane in the fuel chemistry. The biodiesel chemistry was represented using a combination of MD, MD9D and n-heptane, which varied for a given fuel source. The reduced mechanism, which contained 63 species, accurately predicted ignition delay times of the detailed mechanism over a range of engine-specific operating conditions. Physical property data for the five methyl ester components of biodiesel were added to the KIVA library. Spray simulations were performed to ensure that the models adequately reproduce liquid penetration observed in biodiesel spray experiments. Fuel composition impacted liquid length as expected, with saturated species vaporizing more and penetrating less. Distillation curves were created to ensure the fuel vaporization process was comparable to available data. Engine validation was performed against a low-speed, high-load, conventional combustion experiments and the model was able to predict the performance and NOx formation seen in the experiment. High-speed, low-load, low-temperature combustion conditions were also modeled, and the emissions (HC, CO, NOx) and fuel consumption were well-predicted for a sweep of injection timings. Finally, comparisons were made between the results of biodiesel

  16. 76 FR 78290 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Usage of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Within Marine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... Register (73 FR 3316). Cooperative Research and Development Agreements Cooperative Research and Development... SECURITY Coast Guard Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Usage of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Within... technology enhancements, performance, costs, and other issues associated with using biodiesel fuel blends...

  17. Particulate filter behaviour of a Diesel engine fueled with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel is an alternative and renewable fuel made from plant and animal fat or cooked oil through a transesterification process to produce a short chain ester (generally methyl ester). Biodiesel fuels have been worldwide studied in Diesel engines and they were found to be compatible in blends with Diesel fuel to well operate in modern Common Rail engines. Also throughout the world the diffusion of biofuels is being promoted in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the environmental impact of transport, and to increase security of supply. To meet the current exhaust emission regulations, after-treatment devices are necessary; in particular Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) are essential to reduce particulate emissions of Diesel engines. A critical requirement for the implementation of DPF on a modern Biodiesel powered engine is the determination of Break-even Temperature (BET) which is defined as the temperature at which particulate deposition on the filter is balanced by particulate oxidation on the filter. To fit within the exhaust temperature range of the exhaust line and to require a minimum of active regeneration during the engine running, the BET needs to occur at sufficiently low temperatures. In this paper, the results of an experimental campaign on a modern, electronic controlled fuel injection Diesel engine are shown. The engine was fuelled either with petroleum ultralow sulphur fuel or with Biodiesel: BET was evaluated for both fuels. Results show that on average, the BET is lower for biodiesel than for diesel fuel. The final goal was to characterize the regeneration process of the DPF device depending on the adopted fuel, taking into account the different combustion process and the different nature of the particulate matter. Overall the results suggest significant benefits for the use of biodiesel in engines equipped with DPFs. - Highlights: ► We compare Diesel Particulate Trap (DPF) performance with Biodiesel and Diesel fuel. ► The Break

  18. Comparative study of Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled by Emulsified Biodiesel/Diethyl Ether Blended Biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    R. Marappan; T.K. Kannan

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels are playing important role in recent decades as substitutes for petro diesel. Biodiesel derived from vegetable oils are found to give comparable performance and emission characteristics. In this paper a comparative study has been done between two fuels combinations i.e., emulsified biodiesel and DEE (Diethyl Ether) blended biodiesel to find the suitable combination of fuel in reducing the emissions and improving the performance of the diesel engine. Experiments have been conducted in...

  19. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 306 - Summary of Labeling Requirements for Biodiesel Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Biodiesel Fuels A Appendix A to Part 306 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER... Part 306—Summary of Labeling Requirements for Biodiesel Fuels (Part 1 of 2) Fuel type Blends of 5 percent or less Blends of more than 5 but not more than 20 percent Header Text Color Biodiesel No...

  20. Biodiesel Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-07-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends and specifications. It also covers how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance (including in cold weather) and whether there are adverse effects on engines or other systems. Finally, it discusses biodiesel fuel quality and standards, and compares biodiesel emissions to those of diesel fuel.

  1. Biodiesel and the “Social Fuel Seal” in Brazil: Fuel of Social Inclusion?

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Santana Silva; Fábio Matos Fernandes; Francisco Lima Cruz Teixeira; Ednildo Andrade Torres; Angela Machado Rocha

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the Brazilian government started the commercial production of biodiesel through the implementation of the National Program for Production and Use of Biodiesel (PNPB). From that year until 2012, the country became one of the largest biodiesel producers in terms of volume. The present study aims to critically analyze the Social Fuel Seal (SCS) established in PNPB as well as lifting the scenario on the effective participation of family farming in the program. This work is characterized ...

  2. Concentration measurements of biodiesel in engine oil and in diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work comprised a method for concentration measurements of biodiesel in engine oil as well as biodiesel in diesel fuel by a measurement of the permittivity of the mixture at a frequency range from 100 Hz to 20 kHz. For this purpose a special designed measurement cell with high sensitivity was designed. The results for the concentration measurements of biodiesel in the engine oil and diesel fuel shows linearity to the measurement cell signal for the concentration of biodiesel in the engine oil between 0.5% Vol. to 10% Vol. and for biodiesel in the diesel fuel between 0% Vol. to 100% Vol. The method to measure the concentration of biodiesel in the engine oil or the concentration of biodiesel in the diesel fuel is very accurate and low concentration of about 0.5% Vol. biodiesel in engine oil or in diesel fuel can be measured with high accuracy.

  3. Low-temperature Flow Properties of Biodiesel/Jet Fuel (BioJet) Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel that is made from transesterification of vegetable oil, animal fat or other lipid feedstocks with a simple alcohol such as methanol. Biodiesel may be blended with jet fuel (JP-8) to reduce dependence on petroleum imports and improve ground-level emissions. Biodiesel i...

  4. Fuel property enhancement of biodiesel fuels from common and alternative feedstocks via complementary blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) prepared from field pennycress and meadowfoam seed oils were blended with methyl esters from camelina, cottonseed, palm, and soybean oils in an effort to ameliorate technical deficiencies inherent to these biodiesel fuels. For instance, camelina, cottonseed, and ...

  5. Biodiesel: Fuel properties, its “Design” and a source of “Designer” fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fuel properties of biodiesel, a biogenic alternative to petrodiesel, are largely determined by its component fatty acid alkyl esters, most commonly methyl esters. These esters have vastly different properties. The properties of biodiesel are an aggregate of the properties of its components and t...

  6. Study of fuel properties of rubber seed oil based biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • This article presents the comparative studies of the fuel properties of rubber seed oil based biodiesel. • The design expert has been adopted for the optimization of the process variables. • The FTIR, cold flow properties and oxidation stability are the findings of present study. • All the fuel properties met the standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. • Present study reveals that rubber seed oil as a non-edible source potentially contributes for esters production. - Abstract: The scarcity of the fossil fuel, environmental pollution and food crisis are the world’s major issues in current era. Biodiesel is an alternative to diesel fuel, environment friendly and biodegradable and is produced from either edible or non-edible oils. In this study, a non-edible rubber seed oil (RSO) with high free fatty acid (FFA) content of 45% were used for the production of biodiesel. The process comprises of two steps. The first step is the acid esterification to reduce the FFA value and the second step is the base transesterification. The response surface methodology (RSM) was used for parametric optimization of the two stage processes i.e. acid esterification and base transesterification. The yield of biodiesel was analyzed using gas chromatography. The FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red) spectrum was also determined to confirm the conversion of fatty acid to methyl esters. The fuel properties were analyzed according to the ASTM D6751 and EN14214 and were compared with the previous finding of researchers. All analyzed properties fulfilled the biodiesel standard criteria

  7. Noncatalytic biodiesel fuel production from croton megalocarpus oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafuku, G.; Mbarawa, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Tan, K.T.; Lee, K.T. [School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, Seri Ampangan, Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2011-11-15

    Biodiesel is currently considered as the most promising substitute for diesel fuel because of its similar properties to diesel. This study presents the use of the supercritical methanol method in the production of biodiesel from Croton megalocarpus oil. The reaction parameters such as methanol-to-oil ratio, reaction temperature and reaction time were varied to obtain the optimal reaction conditions by design of experiment, specifically, response surface methodology based on three-variable central composite design with {alpha}=2. It has been shown that it is possible to achieve methyl ester yields as high as 74.91 % with reaction conditions such as 50:1 methanol-to-oil molar ratio, 330 C reaction temperature and a reaction period of 20 min. However, Croton-based biodiesel did not sustain higher temperatures due to decomposition of polyunsaturated methyl linoleate, which is dominant in biodiesel. Lower yields were observed when higher temperatures were used during the optimization process. The supercritical methanol method showed competitive biodiesel yields when compared with catalytic methods. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Relationships among the physical properties of biodiesel and engine fuel system design requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Lakshmi Narayana Rao, A.S. Ramadhas, N. Nallusamy, P.Sakthivel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel, an alternative fuel can be used in diesel engines as neat or blended with diesel. The physio-chemical properties of fuel are important in design of fuel system for compression ignition engines run on diesel, biodiesel or biodiesel blends. Biodiesel (B100 standards specify the limit values of these properties for blending with diesel. However, there are variations in the properties of biodiesel. The properties of biodiesel vary depending on the feedstock, vegetable oil processing, production methods and degree of purification. The objective of this study is to estimate the mathematical relationships between viscosity, density, heating values and flash point among various biodiesel samples. There is a high regression between various properties of biodiesel and the relationships between them are observed to be considerably regular.

  9. Annex 34 : task 1 : analysis of biodiesel options : biomass-derived diesel fuels : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Aakko-Saksa, P.; Nylund, N.O. [TransEnergy Consulting Ltd., Helsinki (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    Biofuels are derived from woody biomass, non-woody biomass, and organic wastes. The properties of vegetable oil feedstocks can have profound effects on the properties of the finished biodiesel product. However, all biodiesel fuels have beneficial effects on engine emissions. This report discussed the use of biodiesel fuels as replacements for part of the diesel fuel consumed throughout the world. Biodiesel fuels currently being produced from fatty acid esters today were reviewed, as well as some of the more advanced diesel replacement fuels. The report was produced as part of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Advanced Motor Fuels (AMF) Implementing Agreement Annex 34, and was divided into 14 sections: (1) an introduction, (2) biodiesel and biomass, (3) an explanation of biodiesel, (4) properties of finished biodiesel fuels, (5) exhaust emissions of finished biodiesel fuels and blends, (6) life-cycle emissions and energy, (7) international biodiesel (FAME) technical standards and specifications, (8) growth in production and use of biodiesel fuels, (9) biofuel refineries, (10) process technology, (11) development and status of biorefineries, (12) comparison of options to produce biobased diesel fuels, (13) barriers and gaps in knowledge, and (14) references. 113 refs., 37 tabs., 74 figs.

  10. Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-06-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  11. Effects of NOx-inhibitor agent on fuel properties of three-phase biodiesel emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel is one of the more promising alternative clean fuels to fossil fuel, which can reduce the emissions of fossil fuel burning, and possibly resolve the energy crisis caused by the exhaustion of petroleum resources in the near future. The burning of biodiesel emits much less gaseous emissions and particulate matter primarily because of its dominant combustion efficiency. However, the high oxygen content in biodiesel not only promotes the burning process but also enhances NOx formation when biodiesel is used as fuel. Biodiesel emulsion and the additive of NOx-inhibitor agent are considered to reduce levels of NOx emissions in this experimental study. The biodiesel was produced by transesterification reaction accompanied with peroxidation process. A three-phase biodiesel emulsion of oil-in water drops-in oil (O/W/O) and an O/W/O biodiesel emulsion containing aqueous ammonia were prepared afterwards. The effect of the existence of NOx-inhibitor agent on the fuel properties and the emulsion characteristics of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsions were investigated. The experimental results show that the burning of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion and the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion containing aqueous ammonia had larger fraction of fuel burnt and thus larger heat release than the neat biodiesel if water content is not considered for the calculation of heating value. The addition of aqueous ammonia within the dispersed phase of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion appeared to deteriorate the emulsification characteristics. A smaller quantity of emulsion and greater kinematic viscosity were formed while a larger carbon residue and actual reaction-heat release also appeared for this O/W/O biodiesel emulsion. Aqueous ammonia in the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion produces a higher pH value as well. In addition, the number as well as the volumetric fraction of the dispersed water droplets is reduced for the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion that contains aqueous ammonia. (author)

  12. Microalgal biodiesel and the Renewable Fuel Standard's greenhouse gas requirement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires 15.2 billion gallons of domestic alternative fuels per year by 2012, of which 2 billion gallons must be from advanced biofuel and emit 50% less life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than petroleum-based transportation fuels. Microalgal biodiesel, one type of advanced biofuel, has the qualities and potential to meet the RFS's requirement. A comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) of four microalgal biodiesel production conditions was investigated using a process LCA model with Monte Carlo simulation to assess global warming potential (GWP), eutrophication, ozone depletion and ecotoxicity potentials. The four conditions represent minimum and maximum production efficiencies and different sources of carbon dioxide and nutrient resources, i.e. synthetic and waste resources. The GWP results of the four CO2 microalgal biodiesel production conditions showed that none of the assumed production conditions meet the RFS's GHG requirement. The GWP results are sensitive to energy consumption in harvesting process. Other impacts such as eutrophication, ozone depletion and ecotoxicity potentials, are sensitive to percent lipid content of microalgae, service lifetime of PBRs and quantity of hexane in extraction process, respectively. Net energy ratio and other emissions should be included in future RFS for a more sustainable fuel. - Highlights: ► Conducted a comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) on four different microalgal biodiesel production conditions. ► Evaluated environmental impacts using a process LCA model with Monte Carlo simulation. ► None of the investigated production conditions meets the Renewable Fuel Standard's greenhouse gas requirement. ► The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions does not always result in the reduction of other environmental impacts.

  13. Quantitative Investigations of Biodiesel Fuel Using Infrared Spectroscopy: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment for Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Andrew P.; Pomeroy, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel has gained attention in recent years as a renewable fuel source due to its reduced greenhouse gas and particulate emissions, and it can be produced within the United States. A laboratory experiment designed for students in an upper-division undergraduate laboratory is described to study biodiesel production and biodiesel mixing with…

  14. Antioxidant Effect on Oxidation Stability of Blend Fish Oil Biodiesel with Vegetable Oil Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hossain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different phenolic synthetic antioxidants were used to improve the oxidation stability of fish oil biodiesel blends with vegetable oil biodiesel and petroleum diesel. Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT most effective for improvement of the oxidation stability of petro diesel, whereas  tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ showed good performance in fish oil biodiesel. Fish oil/Rapeseed oil biodiesel mixed showed some acceptable results in higher concentration ofantioxidants. TBHQ showed better oxidation stability than BHT in B100 composition. In fish oil biodiesel/diesel mixed fuel, BHT was more effective antioxidant than TBHQ to increase oxidationstability because BHT is more soluble than TBHQ. The stability behavior of biodiesel/diesel blends with the employment of the modified Rancimat method (EN 15751. The performance ofantioxidants was evaluated for treating fish oil biodiesel/Rapeseed oil biodiesel for B100, and blends with two type diesel fuel (deep sulfurization diesel and automotive ultra-low sulfur or zero sulfur diesels. The examined blends were in proportions of 5, 10, 15, and 20% by volume of fish oilbiodiesel.

  15. Performance and emissions of an engine fuelled with a biodiesel fuel produced from animal fats

    OpenAIRE

    Taymaz Imdat; Coban Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Oil reserves which are located around the world are declining day by day, so new alternative energy sources must be invented for engines of internal combustion and compression ignition, so biodiesel that is an alternative fuel source for diesel engines and it is a renewable energy resource. Biodiesel is a fuel made from vegetable oils, animals’ fats and waste oils. In this study, physical and chemical properties of biodiesel were analyzed and matched to the diesel fuel. In the experimen...

  16. PERFORMANCE OF BIODIESEL COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL DIESEL FUEL IN STATIONARY INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

    OpenAIRE

    B.K. HIGHINA; I. M. Bugaje; B.UMAR

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the technical specification of an internal combustion engine designed for diesel fuel was used for biodiesel. The changes in engine performance, and cycle by cycle (CBC) variations were observed, and their causes were studied. When biodiesel was used as the fuel, acceptable changes occurred in the performance values. The maximum brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) obtained with the biodiesel was slightly higher than that obtained with the diesel fuel, with the difference being...

  17. Fuel Property of Biodiesel Made from Microalgae (Chlorella Sp.)

    OpenAIRE

    S. V. Kelaiya,; P. M. Chauhan; S. H. Akbari

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae chlorella is an organism capable of photosynthesis that is less than 2mm in diameter. The biodiesel extracted from algae using chloroform/methanol extraction solvent system then undergone three different transesterification processes based on three different catalysts viz. Alkali catalyst, Acid catalyst and Enzymatic catalyst with two temperature (50°C and 60 °C) and with 1:5 methanol to bio-oil ratio. After transesterification using different catalysts, the fuel properties were ...

  18. Life-cycle assessment of biodiesel versus petroleum diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.; Camobreco, V.; Sheehan, J.; Duffield, J.

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Technologies, DOE`s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the US Department of Agriculture`s Office of Energy, and Ecobalance are carrying out a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of soy-based diesel fuel (biodiesel) to quantify the environmental aspects of the cradle-to-grave production and use of biodiesel. The purpose of the project is to produce an analytical tool and database for use by industry and government decision makers involved in alternative fuel use and production. The study also includes a parallel effort to develop a life-cycle model for petroleum diesel fuel. The two models are used to compare the life-cycle energy and environmental implications of petroleum diesel and biodiesel derived from soybean. Several scenarios are studied, analyzing the influence of transportation distances, agricultural practice and allocation rules used. The project also includes effort to integrate spatial data into the inventory analysis and probabilistic uncertainty considerations into the impact assessment stage. Traditional life-cycle inventory analysis includes an aggregation process that eliminates spatial, temporal, and threshold information. This project will demonstrate an approach to life-cycle inventory analysis that retains spatial data for use in impact assessment. Explicit probabilistic treatment of uncertainty in impact assessment will take account of scientific uncertainties, and will attempt to identify the level of spatial detail that most efficiently reduces impact assessment uncertainties.

  19. Life-cycle assessment of biodiesel versus petroleum diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, J.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Duffield, J.A. [Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy; Coulon, R.B.; Camobreco, V.J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Technologies, DOE`s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the US Department of Agriculture`s Office of Energy and Ecobalance are carrying out a comprehensive Life Cycle Assessment of soy-based diesel fuel (biodiesel) to quantify the environmental aspects f the cradle-to-grave production and use of biodiesel. The purpose of the project (initiated in November 1995) is to produce an analytical tool and database for use by industry and government decision makers involved in alternative fuel use and production. The study also includes a parallel effort to develop a life cycle model for petroleum diesel fuel. The two models are used to compare the life cycle energy and environmental implications of petroleum diesel and biodiesel derived from soybean. Several scenarios are studied, analyzing the influence of transportation distances, agricultural practice and allocation rules used. The results of an LCA such as this are strongly influenced by decisions made at the study outset, related to scoping, modeling, and methodology. Objectivity as well as acceptable of the results depend upon careful definition and consideration of such issues. This paper communicates the project scoping decisions which have been made in response to a series of stakeholder peer reviews. At the submission stage of this paper, no intermediate results were available for publication. They will be presented during the conference.

  20. Life-cycle assessment of biodiesel versus petroleum diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the US Department of Agriculture's Office of Energy, and Ecobalance are carrying out a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of soy-based diesel fuel (biodiesel) to quantify the environmental aspects of the cradle-to-grave production and use of biodiesel. The purpose of the project is to produce an analytical tool and database for use by industry and government decision makers involved in alternative fuel use and production. The study also includes a parallel effort to develop a life-cycle model for petroleum diesel fuel. The two models are used to compare the life-cycle energy and environmental implications of petroleum diesel and biodiesel derived from soybean. Several scenarios are studied, analyzing the influence of transportation distances, agricultural practice and allocation rules used. The project also includes effort to integrate spatial data into the inventory analysis and probabilistic uncertainty considerations into the impact assessment stage. Traditional life-cycle inventory analysis includes an aggregation process that eliminates spatial, temporal, and threshold information. This project will demonstrate an approach to life-cycle inventory analysis that retains spatial data for use in impact assessment. Explicit probabilistic treatment of uncertainty in impact assessment will take account of scientific uncertainties, and will attempt to identify the level of spatial detail that most efficiently reduces impact assessment uncertainties

  1. Effects of different chemical additives on biodiesel fuel properties and engine performance. A comparison review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Obed Majeed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel fuel can be used as an alternative to mineral diesel, its blend up to 20% used as a commercial fuel for the existing diesel engine in many countries. However, at high blending ratio, the fuel properties are worsening. The feasibility of pure biodiesel and blended fuel at high blending ratio using different chemical additives has been reviewed in this study. The results obtained by different researchers were analysed to evaluate the fuel properties trend and engine performance and emissions with different chemical additives. It found that, variety of chemical additives can be utilised with biodiesel fuel to improve the fuel properties. Furthermore, the chemical additives usage in biodiesel is inseparable both for improving the cold flow properties and for better engine performance and emission control. Therefore, research is needed to develop biodiesel specific additives that can be adopted to improve the fuel properties and achieve best engine performance at lower exhaust emission effects.

  2. Improvement of engine emissions with conventional diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabi, M.N.; Akhter, M.S.; Shahadat, M.M.Z. [Rajshahi Univ. of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-02-15

    In this report combustion and exhaust emissions with neat diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends have been investigated. In the investigation, firstly biodiesel from non-edible neem oil has been made by esterification. Biodiesel fuel (BDF) is chemically known as mono-alkyl fatty acid ester. It is renewable in nature and is derived from plant oils including vegetable oils. BDF is non-toxic, biodegradable, recycled resource and essentially free from sulfur and carcinogenic benzene. In the second phase of this investigation, experiment has been conducted with neat diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends in a four stroke naturally aspirated (NA) direct injection (DI) diesel engine. Compared with conventional diesel fuel, diesel-biodiesel blends showed lower carbon monoxide (CO), and smoke emissions but higher oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emission. However, compared with the diesel fuel, NO{sub x} emission with diesel-biodiesel blends was slightly reduced when EGR was applied. (author)

  3. Characterization of particle size distribution from diesel engines fueled with palm-biodiesel blends and paraffinic fuel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Chia-Fon; Fang, Tiegang

    Biodiesels are promoted as alternative fuels and their applications in diesel engines have been investigated by many researchers. However, the particle size distribution emitted from heavy-duty diesel engines fueled with palm-biodiesel blended with premium diesel fuel and paraffinic fuel blended with palm-biodiesel has seldom been addressed. Thus, five test fuels were used in this work to study the particle size distribution: D100 (premium diesel fuel), B100 (100% palm-biodiesel), B20 (20 vol% palm-biodiesel+80 vol% D100), BP9505 (95 vol% paraffinic fuel+5 vol% palm-biodiesel) and BP8020 (80 vol% paraffinic fuel+20 vol% palm-biodiesel). A Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) equipped with aluminum filters was used to collect size-resolved samples. Experimental results indicated that palm-biodiesel blends and paraffinic fuel blends could improve combustion efficiency in diesel engines, but pure palm-biodiesel could cause incomplete combustion. Adding palm-biodiesel to diesel fuel would slightly increase particles with diameter fuel blends could decrease particles with diameter fuels. On the other hand, a greater fraction of particulate matter of BP9505 and BP8020 existed in coarse particles (diameter: 2.5-10 μm). Energy efficiency also increases significantly by 12.3-15.1% with the introduction of paraffinic fuel blends into the engine. Nevertheless, paraffinic fuel blends also reduce the emission of particulate matters by 36.0-38.4%. Carbon monoxide was decreased by 36.8-48.5%. Total hydrocarbon is 39.6-41.7% less than diesel fuel combustion. Nitrogen oxides emission is about 5% lower for paraffinic fuel. These results show that paraffinic fuel can be very competitive and replaced diesel fuels in the future.

  4. Fuel Property of Biodiesel Made from Microalgae (Chlorella Sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kelaiya,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae chlorella is an organism capable of photosynthesis that is less than 2mm in diameter. The biodiesel extracted from algae using chloroform/methanol extraction solvent system then undergone three different transesterification processes based on three different catalysts viz. Alkali catalyst, Acid catalyst and Enzymatic catalyst with two temperature (50°C and 60 °C and with 1:5 methanol to bio-oil ratio. After transesterification using different catalysts, the fuel properties were measured. All the properties were compared with standard value of ASTM D 6751 standards. Alkali catalyst yield highest biodiesel (92 % at 60 °C temperature. Also, the closest value of different fuel properties found at par with standard value of ASTM D 6751 standards viz. moisture content, carbon residue, calorific value, specific gravity, acid value, flash point, viscosity, density, viscosity were found to be 0.01%, 0.04%, 40.41 MJ/kg, 0.83, 0.23 mg KOH/g, 143.67 °C, 5.16 mm2/s, 0.83 g/cm3 respectively in the biodiesel which was yield by transesterification done using Alkali catalyst (0.56 % NaOH at 60 °C temperature.

  5. Using stated preferences to estimate the environmental benefits of using biodiesel fuel in diesel engines

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanty, Pierre Wilner; Hitzhusen, Frederick J.

    2007-01-01

    Using biodiesel fuel to reduce emissions from diesel engines is an area of increasing interest. Many environmental benefits associated with biodiesel are not traded in markets and their estimation requires economic valuation methods applied to non-market goods and services. This paper presents the results of a contingent valuation survey conducted in 2006 in two Ohio regions to estimate willingness to pay for air pollution reduction arising from using biodiesel fuel in diesel engines. The dou...

  6. Analysis of Performance and Emmissions in a Diesel Engine Fueled with Biodiesel and Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Necati ÖZSEZEN

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance and emission characteristics of biodiesel based waste palm oil and its blends with petroleum based diesel fuel (PBDF was analyzed by means of three dimensional maps. In order to determine the engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics, the engine was exposed with full load and varied speed tests. In the result of analyze, it was seen that the brake specific fuel consumptions increased with the increase of biodiesel percentage in the fuel blend, but brake torque decreased depending upon biodiesel percentage in the fuel. In the result of emission analyze, it has determined that biodiesel and its blends has provided significant improvements in HC, CO and smoke opacity emissions. However, the stable behaviors in NOx and CO2 emissions of biodiesel and its blends did not seen in terms of the engine speed.

  7. Emissions from nine heavy trucks fueled by diesel and biodiesel blend without engine modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel, a fuel that can be made from renewable biological sources such as vegetable oils or animal fats, has been recognized recently as an environment friendly alternative fuel for diesel engines. In this paper, the authors describe a study that compared exhaust emissions from in-use heavy trucks fueled with a biodiesel blend with those from trucks fueled with petroleum diesel. The biodiesel blend tested is a mixture of 35% biodiesel and 65% petroleum diesel, a blend designated as B35. The study is based on the field test results from West Virginia University's Transportable Heavy Duty Chassis Dynamometer Emissions Testing Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The heavy trucks the authors tested performed well when the originally equipped compression-ignition engine (diesel engine) was fueled with B35 without any engine modifications. Fuel economy (in terms of gallon per mile) of the two fuels was about the same. The emissions test results have shown that the heavy trucks fueled by B35 emitted significantly lower particulate matter (PM) and moderately lower carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) than the same trucks fueled by no. 2 diesel (D2). Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions from B35 and D2, however, were generally in the same level. Emissions variations from two different engine models and two driving cycles were also observed. Although the authors recommend more tests for biodiesel vehicles, the data obtained in this study indicate that biodiesel has promise as an emissions-reducing alternative fuel for diesel engines

  8. Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Carbon in the Emissions of a Compression-Ignition Engine Fueled with Biodiesel Blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental tests were conducted on a Cummins 85.9 direct-injected diesel engine fueled with biodiesel blends. 20% and 50% blend levels were tested, as was 100% (neat) biodiesel. Emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrocarbons (HC) and CO were measured under steady-state operating conditions. The effect of biodiesel on PM emissions was mixed; however, the contribution of the volatile organic fraction to total PM was greater for the higher biodiesel blend levels. When only non-volatile PM mass was considered, reductions were observed for the biodiesel blends as well as for neat biodiesel. The biodiesel test fuels increased NOx, while HC and CO emissions were reduced. PM collected on quartz filters during the experimental runs were analyzed for carbon-14 content using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMs). These measurements revealed that carbon from the biodiesel portion of the blended fuel was marginally less likely to contribute to PM, compared to the carbon from the diesel portion of the fuel. The results are different than those obtained in previous tests with the oxygenate ethanol, which was observed to be far less likely contribute to PM than the diesel component of the blended fuel. The data suggests that chemical structure of the oxygen- carbon bonds in an oxygenate affects the PM formation process

  9. Enhancing clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production and improving fuel properties of ABE-enriched biodiesel by extractive fermentation with biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Cai, Hao; Hao, Bo; Zhang, Congling; Yu, Ziniu; Zhou, Shengde; Chenjuan, Liu

    2010-12-01

    The extractive acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum were evaluated using biodiesel as the in situ extractant. The biodiesel preferentially extracted butanol, minimized product inhibition, and increased production of butanol (from 11.6 to 16.5 g L⁻¹) and total solvents (from 20.0 to 29.9 g L⁻¹) by 42% and 50%, respectively. The fuel properties of the ABE-enriched biodiesel obtained from the extractive fermentations were analyzed. The key quality indicators of diesel fuel, such as the cetane number (increased from 48 to 54) and the cold filter plugging point (decreased from 5.8 to 0.2 °C), were significantly improved for the ABE-enriched biodiesel. Thus, the application of biodiesel as the extractant for ABE fermentation would increase ABE production, bypass the energy intensive butanol recovery process, and result in an ABE-enriched biodiesel with improved fuel properties. PMID:20585897

  10. Production and Testing of Coconut Oil Biodiesel Fuel and its Blend

    OpenAIRE

    Oguntola J. ALAMU; Opeoluwa DEHINBO; Adedoyin M SULAIMAN

    2010-01-01

    Many researchers have successfully worked on generating energy from different alternative sources including solar and biological sources such as the conversion of trapped energy from sunlight to electricity and conversion of some renewable agricultural products to fuel. This work considers the use of coconut oil for the production of alternative renewable and environmental friendly biodiesel fuel as an alternative to conventional diesel fuel. Test quantities of coconut oil biodiesel were prod...

  11. Synthesis of biodiesel fuel additives from glycerol using green chemistry and supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    For every 3 moles of fatty acid esters produced, 1 mole of glycerol remains, ~11% of the biodiesel volume. One new method of glycerol use could be as a biodiesel fuel additive/extender using eco-friendly heterogeneous catalysts and supercritical fluids (SFs). SFs have advantages such as greater diff...

  12. Performance and emissions of an engine fuelled with a biodiesel fuel produced from animal fats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymaz Imdat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil reserves which are located around the world are declining day by day, so new alternative energy sources must be invented for engines of internal combustion and compression ignition, so biodiesel that is an alternative fuel source for diesel engines and it is a renewable energy resource. Biodiesel is a fuel made from vegetable oils, animals’ fats and waste oils. In this study, physical and chemical properties of biodiesel were analyzed and matched to the diesel fuel. In the experimental study, biodiesel was made from animal fats and compared to diesel fuel. Its effects on engine performance and emissions are studied. A single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injected diesel engine with air cooling system are used as test equipment in different cycles. After the experimental study, it is concluded that the reduction of the emissions of CO and HC as biodiesel has the advantage of emission output. Environmentalist property of biodiesel is the most important characteristic of it. But the sight of engine performance diesel fuel has more advantage to biodiesel fuel.

  13. Effect of biodiesel blends on engine performance and exhaust emission for diesel dual fuel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Engine and emission characteristics of biodiesel DDF engine system were measured. • Biodiesel DDF fuelled system produced high engine performance. • Lower hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide was emitted by biodiesel DDF system. • Biodiesel DDF produced slightly higher carbon monoxide and nitric oxides emission. - Abstract: Biodiesel derived from biomass is a renewable source of fuel. It is renovated to be the possible fuel to replace fossil derived diesel due to its properties and combustion characteristics. The integration of compressed natural gas (CNG) in diesel engine known as diesel dual fuel (DDF) system offered better exhaust emission thus become an attractive option for reducing the pollutants emitted from transportation fleets. In the present study, the engine performance and exhaust emission of HINO H07C DDF engine; fuelled by diesel, biodiesel, diesel–CNG, and biodiesel–CNG, were experimentally studied. Biodiesel and diesel fuelled engine system respectively generated 455 N m and 287 N m of torque. The horse power of biodiesel was found to be 10–20% higher compared to diesel. Biodiesel–CNG at 20% (B20-DDF) produced the highest engine torque compared to other fuel blends Biodiesel significantly increase the carbon monoxide (15–32%) and nitric oxides (6.67–7.03%) but in contrast reduce the unburned hydrocarbons (5.76–6.25%) and carbon dioxide (0.47–0.58%) emissions level. These results indicated that biodiesel could be used without any engine modifications as an alternative and environmentally friendly fuel especially the heavy transportation fleets

  14. Effects on Fuel Properties of Various Biodiesel Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is generally defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats. As a result, the fatty acid composition of biodiesel corresponds to that of the parent oil or fat. Besides the fatty esters as the major components of biodiesel, minor components such as free fatty acids as w...

  15. Biodiesel from Mustard oil: a Sustainable Engine Fuel Substitute for Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Alam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Various attractive features of mustard oil based biodiesel as a potential substitute for engine fuel are investigated in this paper for use in Bangladesh. Although the use of mustard oil as edible oil has been reduced, Bangladesh still produces 0.22 million metric tons of mustard oil per year. This surplus mustard oil would satisfactorily be used as an alternative to diesel fuel, and thus could contribute in reducing the expenses for importing fuel from foreign countries. Moreover, the rural people of Bangladesh are capable of producing mustard oil themselves using indigenous machines. Fuel properties of biodiesel obtained from mustard oil were determined in the laboratory using standard procedure and an experimental setup was constructed to study the performance of a small diesel engine. It is observed that with biodiesel, the engine is capable of running without difficulty. Initially different lower blends of biodiesel (e.g., B20, B30 etc. have been used to avoid complicated modification of the engine and the fuel supply system. It is also found in some condition that mustard oil based biodiesel have better properties than those made from other vegetable oils. These properties of mustard oil based biodiesel were evaluated to validate its sustainability in Bangladesh. Keywords: biodiesel, indigenous machines, mustard oil, renewable energy policy, sustainability

  16. Assessment of microalgae biodiesel fuels using a fuel property estimation methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrens, Jonas Colen Ladeia; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho; Mariano, Andre Bellin [Center for Research and Development of Sustainable Energy. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Recently, depleting supplies of petroleum and the concerns about global warming are drawing attention to alternative sources of energy. In this context, advanced biofuels, derived from non edible superior plants and microorganisms, are presented as promising options for the transportation sector. Biodiesel, which is the most prominent alternative fuel for compression ignition engines, have a large number as potential feedstock, such as plants (e.g., soybean, canola, palm) and microorganism (i.e., microalgae, yeast, fungi and bacterium). In order to determine their potential, most studies focus on the economic viability, but few discuss the technical viability of producing high quality fuels from such feedstock. Since the fuel properties depend on the composition of the parent oil, and considering the variability of the fatty acid profile found in these organisms, it is clear that the fuels derived may present undesirable properties, e.g., high viscosity, low cetane number, low oxidative stability and poor cold flow properties. Therefore, it is very important to develop ways of analysing the fuel quality prior to production, specially considering the high cost of producing and testing several varieties of plants and microorganisms. In this aim, this work presents the use of fuel properties estimation methods on the assessment of the density, viscosity, cetane number and cold filter plugging point of several microalgae derived biofuels, comparing then to more conventional biodiesel fuels. The information gathered with these methods helps on the selection of species and cultivation parameters, which have a high impact on the derived fuel quality, and have been successfully employed on the Center for Research and Development of Sustainable Energy. The results demonstrate that some species of microalgae have the potential to produce high quality biodiesel if cultivated with optimised conditions, associated with the possibility of obtaining valuable long chain

  17. Experimental Investigation Of Biogas-Biodiesel Dual Fuel Combustion In A Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesha D. K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt at achieving diesel fuel equivalent performance from diesel engines with maximum substitution of diesel with renewable fuels. In this context the study has been designed to analyze the influence of B20 algae biodiesel as a pilot fuel in a biodiesel biogas dual fuel engine, and results are compared to those of biodiesel and diesel operation at identical engine settings. Experiments were performed at various loads from 0 to 100 % of maximum load at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. In general, B20 algae biodiesel is compatible with diesel in terms of performance and combustion characteristics. Dual fuel mode operation displays lower thermal efficiency and higher fuel consumption than for other fuel modes of the test run across the range of engine loads. Dual fuel mode displayed lower emissions of NOx and Smoke opacity while HC and CO concentrations were considerably higher as compared to other fuels. In dual fuel mode peak pressure and heat release rate were slightly higher compared to diesel and biodiesel mode of operation for all engine loads.

  18. Evaluation of Soya Bio-Diesel as a Gas Turbine Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, K. K.; Rehman, A; R.M.Sarviya

    2010-01-01

    In the recent past, the crude oil prices have increased immensely as the fossil fuels are depleting, biodiesel has emerged as an alternative fuel for the petroleum. In this context the use of bio-diesel in the gas turbine seems a solution for power generation problems and their environmental concerns. Vegetable oils, due to their agricultural origin, are able to reduce net carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. However, there are several operational and durability problems which may aris...

  19. Five Approaches to Improving the Fuel Properties of Biodiesel Including "Designer" Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is usually produced from vegetable oils or animal fats or used cooking oils by a transesterification reaction with an alcohol, usually methanol, to give the corresponding mono-alkyl esters with glycerol as co-product. With a few exceptions, most common biodiesel feedstocks possess fatty a...

  20. Fuel properties of biodiesel produced from the crude fish oil from the soapstock of marine fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan; Li, Rong-Ji [Department of Marine Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean, University, Keelung 20224 (China)

    2009-01-15

    The soapstock of a mixture of marine fish was used as the raw material to produce the biodiesel in this study. The soapstock was collected from discarded fish products. Crude fish oil was squeezed from the soapstock of the fish and refined by a series of processes. The refined fish oil was transesterified to produce biodiesel. The fuel properties of the biodiesel were analyzed. The experimental results showed that oleic acid (C18:1) and palmitic acid (C16:0) were the two major components of the marine fish-oil biodiesel. The biodiesel from the mixed marine fish oil contained a significantly greater amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids than did the biodiesel from waste cooking oil. In addition, the marine fish-oil biodiesel contained as high as 37.07 wt.% saturated fatty acids and 37.3 wt.% long chain fatty acids in the range between C20 and C22. Moreover, the marine fish-oil biodiesel appeared to have a larger acid number, a greater increase in the rate of peroxidization with the increase in the time that it was stored, greater kinematic viscosity, higher heating value, higher cetane index, more carbon residue, and a lower peroxide value, flash point, and distillation temperature than those of waste cooking-oil biodiesel. (author)

  1. Use of Palm oil Biodiesel Blends as a Fuel for Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Deepanraj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The increasing awareness of the environmental hazards and the alarming levels of air pollution have led to more restrictive regulations on engines emission control in recent years. Approach: The dwindling resources and rising cost of crude oil have resulted in an intensified search for alternate fuels. In the present study biodiesel (palm oil methyl ester blends with diesel was investigated in a direct injection stationary diesel engine. The stationary engine test bed used consists of a single-cylinder four stroke diesel engine, eddy current dynamometer with computer control data acquisition system and exhaust emissions analyzer. Results: Engine tests were conducted at constant speed using neat diesel fuel and various proportions of biodiesel blends. The exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NOx were measured using exhaust gas analyzer. Performance characteristics like brake thermal efficiency and specific fuel consumption were recorded. The differences in the measured emissions and performance of the biodiesel-diesel fuel blends from the baseline operation of the engine, i.e., when working with neat diesel fuel were determined and compared. Conclusion: It was concluded that the lower blends of biodiesel increased the brake thermal efficiency and reduced the fuel consumption. Biodiesel blends produces lower engine emissions than diesel. From the result, it has been established that 20-40% of palm oil biodiesel can be use as a substitute for diesel without any engine modifications.

  2. Life cycle assessment of camelina oil derived biodiesel and jet fuel in the Canadian Prairies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the environmental impact of biodiesel and hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel derived from camelina oil in terms of global warming potential, human health, ecosystem quality, and energy resource consumption. The life cycle inventory is based on production activities in the Canadian Prairies and encompasses activities ranging from agricultural production to oil extraction and fuel conversion. The system expansion method is used in this study to avoid allocation and to credit input energy to co-products associated with the products displaced in the market during camelina oil extraction and fuel processing. This is the preferred allocation method for LCA analysis in the context of most renewable and sustainable energy programs. The results show that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1 MJ of camelina derived biodiesel ranged from 7.61 to 24.72 g CO2 equivalent and 3.06 to 31.01 kg CO2/MJ equivalent for camelina HRJ fuel. Non-renewable energy consumption for camelina biodiesel ranged from 0.40 to 0.67 MJ/MJ; HRJ fuel ranged from − 0.13 to 0.52 MJ/MJ. Camelina oil as a feedstock for fuel production accounted for the highest contribution to overall environmental performance, demonstrating the importance of reducing environmental burdens during the agricultural production process. Attaining higher seed yield would dramatically lower environmental impacts associated with camelina seed, oil, and fuel production. The lower GHG emissions and energy consumption associated with camelina in comparison with other oilseed derived fuel and petroleum fuel make camelina derived fuel from Canadian Prairies environmentally attractive. - Highlights: • LCA of camelina-derived biodiesel and jet fuel was based on the Canadian Prairies. • Overall, camelina-derived biodiesel had lower GHG emissions than is biojet fuel. • Camelina jet fuel had lower non-renewable energy (NRE) use than its biodiesel. • Camelina biofuels reduced GHG emissions and NRE use relative

  3. Life cycle assessment of camelina oil derived biodiesel and jet fuel in the Canadian Prairies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xue; Mupondwa, Edmund, E-mail: Edmund.Mupondwa@agr.gc.ca

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the environmental impact of biodiesel and hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel derived from camelina oil in terms of global warming potential, human health, ecosystem quality, and energy resource consumption. The life cycle inventory is based on production activities in the Canadian Prairies and encompasses activities ranging from agricultural production to oil extraction and fuel conversion. The system expansion method is used in this study to avoid allocation and to credit input energy to co-products associated with the products displaced in the market during camelina oil extraction and fuel processing. This is the preferred allocation method for LCA analysis in the context of most renewable and sustainable energy programs. The results show that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1 MJ of camelina derived biodiesel ranged from 7.61 to 24.72 g CO{sub 2} equivalent and 3.06 to 31.01 kg CO{sub 2}/MJ equivalent for camelina HRJ fuel. Non-renewable energy consumption for camelina biodiesel ranged from 0.40 to 0.67 MJ/MJ; HRJ fuel ranged from − 0.13 to 0.52 MJ/MJ. Camelina oil as a feedstock for fuel production accounted for the highest contribution to overall environmental performance, demonstrating the importance of reducing environmental burdens during the agricultural production process. Attaining higher seed yield would dramatically lower environmental impacts associated with camelina seed, oil, and fuel production. The lower GHG emissions and energy consumption associated with camelina in comparison with other oilseed derived fuel and petroleum fuel make camelina derived fuel from Canadian Prairies environmentally attractive. - Highlights: • LCA of camelina-derived biodiesel and jet fuel was based on the Canadian Prairies. • Overall, camelina-derived biodiesel had lower GHG emissions than is biojet fuel. • Camelina jet fuel had lower non-renewable energy (NRE) use than its biodiesel. • Camelina biofuels reduced GHG emissions and NRE

  4. Cuphea Oil as Source of Biodiesel with Improved Fuel Properties Caused by High Content of Methyl Decanoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils and animal fats, is an alternative to conventional petroleum-based diesel fuel. Biodiesel has been prepared from numerous common vegetable oils or fats as well as new or less common feedstocks. Major issues facing biodiesel include seve...

  5. Evaluation of Soya Bio-Diesel as a Gas Turbine Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Gupta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, the crude oil prices have increased immensely as the fossil fuels are depleting, biodiesel has emerged as an alternative fuel for the petroleum. In this context the use of bio-diesel in the gas turbine seems a solution for power generation problems and their environmental concerns. Vegetable oils, due to their agricultural origin, are able to reduce net carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. However, there are several operational and durability problems which may arise in using straight vegetable oils, which are because of their higher viscosity and low volatility compared to mineral diesel fuel. Bio-fuels, an alternative fuels are having environmental benefit as; they are made from renewable sources. It can be blended in any proportion with mineral Diesel. Many performance and emission tests are being carried out in reciprocating diesel engines that use bio fuel but there are very few tests has been done on gas turbine engines. The gas turbine combustion is steady flame combustion. This feature creates the wide range for the different alternative fuels for clean combustion in the gas turbine, such as natural gas, petroleum distillates, pyrolysis wood gas, biogas of methanisation, bio-diesel etc. The present work is an analysis of the Soya bio-diesel productionprocess i.e. trans-esterification, the different parameters affecting on trans-esterification. The different physical and chemical properties of this bio-diesel and diesel has been determined and compared to establish the suitability of the bio-diesel in the gas turbine. An analysis on High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC has been done to find out the composition of the different fatty acid esters. The effect of these fatty acids onthe property of the bio-diesel has also been explained such as viscosity, heat of combustion, cetane No, cold flow properties, lubricity and oxidative stability etc. This will also help us to select best suited bio-diesel for the

  6. Eucalyptus Biodiesel as an Alternative to Diesel Fuel: Preparation and Tests on DI Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabet, Lyes; Loubar, Khaled; Lounici, Mohand Said; Hanchi, Samir; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the increasing oil consumption throughout the world induces crucial economical, security, and environmental problems. As a result, intensive researches are undertaken to find appropriate substitution to fossil fuels. In view of the large amount of eucalyptus trees present in arid areas, we focus in this study on the investigation of using eucalyptus biodiesel as fuel in diesel engine. Eucalyptus oil is converted by transesterification into biodiesel. Eucalyptus biodiesel characterization shows that the physicochemical properties are comparable to those of diesel fuel. In the second phase, a single cylinder air-cooled, DI diesel engine was used to test neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel in various ratios (75, 50, and 25 by v%) at several engine loads. The engine combustion parameters such as peak pressure, rate of pressure rise, and heat release rate are determined. Performances and exhaust emissions are also evaluated at all operating conditions. Results show that neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends present significant improvements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon, and particulates emissions especially at high loads with equivalent performances to those of diesel fuel. However, the NOx emissions are slightly increased when the biodiesel content is increased in the blend. PMID:22675246

  7. Eucalyptus Biodiesel as an Alternative to Diesel Fuel: Preparation and Tests on DI Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyes Tarabet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the increasing oil consumption throughout the world induces crucial economical, security, and environmental problems. As a result, intensive researches are undertaken to find appropriate substitution to fossil fuels. In view of the large amount of eucalyptus trees present in arid areas, we focus in this study on the investigation of using eucalyptus biodiesel as fuel in diesel engine. Eucalyptus oil is converted by transesterification into biodiesel. Eucalyptus biodiesel characterization shows that the physicochemical properties are comparable to those of diesel fuel. In the second phase, a single cylinder air-cooled, DI diesel engine was used to test neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel in various ratios (75, 50, and 25 by v% at several engine loads. The engine combustion parameters such as peak pressure, rate of pressure rise, and heat release rate are determined. Performances and exhaust emissions are also evaluated at all operating conditions. Results show that neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends present significant improvements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon, and particulates emissions especially at high loads with equivalent performances to those of diesel fuel. However, the NOx emissions are slightly increased when the biodiesel content is increased in the blend.

  8. OXIDATIVE STABILITY OF BIODIESEL/JET FUEL BLENDS BY OIL STABILITY INDEX (OSI) ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, an alternative fuel made by transesterification of vegetable oil with methanol, is becoming more readily available for use in blends with conventional diesel fuel for transportation and other "off-road" applications. One such off-road application is in blends with aviation fuels to impro...

  9. Combustion and emissions of the diesel engine using bio-diesel fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The combustion and heat release of engines using diesel fuel and bio-diesel fuel have been investigated.The results illustrate that the combustion happens in advance and the ignition delay period is shortened.The initial heat release peak declines a little,the corresponding crankshaft angle changes in advance,and the combustion duration is prolonged.The economic performance and emission features of diesel engines using diesel fuel and bio-diesel fuel are compared.The results also show that the specific fuel consumption of bio-diesel increases by about 12% .The emissions,such as CO,HC,and particulate matter decrease remarkably whereas NOx increases a little.

  10. Theoretical modeling of iodine value and saponification value of biodiesel fuels from their fatty acid composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopinath, A.; Puhan, Sukumar; Nagarajan, G. [Internal Combustion Engineering Division, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai 600 025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2009-07-15

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel consisting of alkyl esters of fatty acids from vegetable oils or animal fats. The properties of biodiesel depend on the type of vegetable oil used for the transesterification process. The objective of the present work is to theoretically predict the iodine value and the saponification value of different biodiesels from their fatty acid methyl ester composition. The fatty acid ester compositions and the above values of different biodiesels were taken from the available published data. A multiple linear regression model was developed to predict the iodine value and saponification value of different biodiesels. The predicted results showed that the prediction errors were less than 3.4% compared to the available published data. The predicted values were also verified by substituting in the available published model which was developed to predict the higher heating values of biodiesel fuels from their iodine value and the saponification value. The resulting heating values of biodiesels were then compared with the published heating values and reported. (author)

  11. Effects of emulsification variables on fuel properties of two- and three-phase biodiesel emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherng-Yuan Lin; Shiou-An Lin [National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung (Taiwan). Department of Marine Engineering

    2007-01-15

    Biodiesel has attractive fuel properties such as excellent biodegradability and lubricity, almost no emissions of sulfur oxides, PAH and n-PAH, reduced CO{sub 2}, PM and CO emission, superior combustion efficiency, etc. However, burning of biodiesel generally produces higher levels of NOx emissions, primarily due to its high oxygen content. In this study, the emulsification technology has been considered to reduce the NOx emission level of fossil fuel. Biodiesel, produced by means of transesterification reaction accompanied with a peroxidation process, was emulsified to form two-phase W/O and three-phase O/W/O emulsions. The effects of the emulsification variables such as hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB), and water content on the fuel properties and emulsion characteristics of W/O and O/W/O emulsions were investigated in this study. The experimental results show that the surfactant mixture with HLB = 13 produced the highest emulsification stability while HLB = 6 produced the lowest emulsification stability and the most significant extent of water-oil separation among the various HLB values for O/W/O biodiesel emulsion. The kinematic viscosity, specific gravity and carbon residual of the biodiesel emulsions were larger than those of the neat biodiesel. In addition, the W/O biodiesel emulsion was found to have a smaller mean droplet size, lower volumetric fraction of the dispersed phase than the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion, and the highest heating value among the test fuels, if the water content is deducted from the calculation of the heating value. 17 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Petroleum Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels Used in a Direct Hydrocarbon Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchen Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a direct hydrocarbon phosphoric acid fuel cell, PAFC, was investigated using petroleum diesel, biodiesel, and n-hexadecane as the fuels. We believe this is the first study of a fuel cell being operated with petroleum diesel as the fuel at the anode. Degradation in fuel cell performance was observed prior to reaching steady state. The degradation was attributed to a carbonaceous material forming on the surface of the anode. Regardless of the initial degradation, a steady-state operation was achieved with each of the diesel fuels. After treating the anode with water the fuel cell performance recovered. However, the fuel cell performance degraded again prior to obtaining another steady-state operation. There were several observations that were consistent with the suggestion that the carbonaceous material formed from the diesel fuels might be a reaction intermediate necessary for steady-state operation. Finally, the experiments indicated that water in the phosphoric acid electrolyte could be used as the water required for the anodic reaction. The water formed at the cathode could provide the replacement water for the electrolyte, thereby eliminating the need to provide a water feed system for the fuel cell.

  13. Production and Testing of Coconut Oil Biodiesel Fuel and its Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguntola J ALAMU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have successfully worked on generating energy from different alternative sources including solar and biological sources such as the conversion of trapped energy from sunlight to electricity and conversion of some renewable agricultural products to fuel. This work considers the use of coconut oil for the production of alternative renewable and environmental friendly biodiesel fuel as an alternative to conventional diesel fuel. Test quantities of coconut oil biodiesel were produced through transesterification reaction using 100g coconut oil, 20.0% ethanol (wt% coconut oil, 0.8% potassium hydroxide catalyst at 65°C reaction temperature and 120 min. reaction time. The experiment was carried out three times and average results evaluated. Low yield of the biodiesel (10.4% was obtained. The coconut oil biodiesel produced was subsequently blended with petroleum diesel and characterized as alternative diesel fuel through some ASTM standard fuel tests. The products were further evaluated by comparing specific gravity and viscosity of the biodiesel blend, the raw coconut oil and conventional petroleum diesel.

  14. Comprehensive study of biodiesel fuel for HSDI engines in conventional and low temperature combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormos, Bernardo; Novella, Ricardo; Garcia, Antonio; Gargar, Kevin [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia, ES, Campus de Vera, s/n, Edificio 6D. Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    In this research, an experimental investigation has been performed to give insight into the potential of biodiesel as an alternative fuel for High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) diesel engines. The scope of this work has been broadened by comparing the combustion characteristics of diesel and biodiesel fuels in a wide range of engine loads and EGR conditions, including the high EGR rates expected for future diesel engines operating in the low temperature combustion (LTC) regime. The experimental work has been carried out in a single-cylinder engine running alternatively with diesel and biodiesel fuels. Conventional diesel fuel and neat biodiesel have been compared in terms of their combustion performance through a new methodology designed for isolating the actual effects of each fuel on diesel combustion, aside from their intrinsic differences in chemical composition. The analysis of the results has been sequentially divided into two progressive and complementary steps. Initially, the overall combustion performance of each fuel has been critically evaluated based on a set of parameters used as tracers of the combustion quality, such as the combustion duration or the indicated efficiency. With the knowledge obtained from this previous overview, the analysis focuses on the detailed influence of biodiesel on the different diesel combustion stages known ignition delay, premixed combustion and mixing controlled combustion, considering also the impact on CO and UHC (unburn-hydrocarbons) pollutant emissions. The results of this research explain why the biodiesel fuel accelerates the diesel combustion process in all engine loads and EGR rates, even in those corresponding with LTC conditions, increasing its possibilities as alternative fuel for future DI diesel engines. (author)

  15. Cuphea oil as a potential biodiesel feedstock to improve fuel properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the approaches to improving the fuel properties of biodiesel, a fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats, or other triacylglycerol-containing materials, is to use a feedstock with an inherently different fatty acid profile than most common feedstocks such as commodity vegetable oils. Cup...

  16. INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURE OF ESTERS OF FATTY ACIDS ON BIODIESEL FUEL PROPERTIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is becoming a well-established "alternative" diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils or animal fats. This fuel is being produced and used commercially in numerous countries around the world. In almost all cases, the vegetable oil or animal fat is transesterified with methanol to give the...

  17. Evaluation of castor and lesquerella oil derivatives as additives in biodiesel and ultralow sulfur diesel fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of petroleum-derived additives is ubiquitous in fuels production, including biodiesel (BD) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels. Development and employment of domestically derived, biodegradable, renewable, and non-toxic additives is an attractive goal. As such, estolides (1, 2) and 2-...

  18. Experimental Investigations on Conventional and Semi-Adiabatic Diesel Engine Using Simarouba Biodiesel as Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, M. U.; Reddy, C. P.; Ravindranath, K.

    2013-04-01

    In view of fast depletion of fossil fuels and the rapid rate at which the fuel consumption is taking place all over the world, scientists are searching for alternate fuels for maintaining the growth industrially and economically. Hence search for alternate fuel(s) has become imminent. Out of the limited options for internal combustion engines, the bio diesel fuel appears to be the best. Many advanced countries are implementing several biodiesel initiatives and developmental programmes in order to become self sufficient and reduce the import bills. Biodiesel is biodegradable and renewable fuel with the potential to enhance the performance and reduce engine exhaust emissions. This is due to ready usage of existing diesel engines, fuel distribution pattern, reduced emission profiles, and eco-friendly properties of biodiesel. Simarouba biodiesel (SBD), the methyl ester of Simarouba oil is one such alternative fuel which can be used as substitute to conventional petro-diesel. The present work involves experimental investigation on the use of SBD blends as fuel in conventional diesel engine and semi-adiabatic diesel engine. The oil was triple filtered to eliminate particulate matter and then transesterified to obtain biodiesel. The project envisaged aims at conducting analysis of diesel with SBD blends (10, 20, 30 and 40 %) in conventional engine and semi-adiabatic engine. Also it was decided to vary the injection pressure (180, 190 and 200 bar) and observe its effect on performance and also suggest better value of injection pressure. The engine was made semi adiabatic by coating the piston crown with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). Kirloskar AV I make (3.67 kW) vertical, single cylinder, water cooled diesel engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer with suitable measuring instrumentation/accessories used for the study. Experiments were initially carried out using pure diesel fuel to provide base line data. The test results were compared based on the performance

  19. Application of mesoporous catalysts over palm-oil biodiesel for adjusting fuel properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The catalysts MCM-41 and SiO2/Fe3O4 were used to reduce the low-temperature fluidity of biodiesel. ► The catalyst SiO2/Fe3O4 was found to be more effective than MCM-41 for dehydrogenation and cracking reaction. ► Biodiesel had a lower water formation rate when the catalysts were used in the reaction. ► Biodiesel catalyzed by SiO2/Fe3O4 at 600 °C produced the lowest CFPP and the highest iodine value. - Abstract: Biodiesel has superior fuel characteristics, including a higher flash point, better lubricity, and higher oxygen content, and is thus considered a promising alternative clean fuel to petroleum diesel. The cold filter plugging point (CFPP) is the most significant indicator of the low-temperature fluidity of biodiesel. The CFPP of biodiesel is generally higher than that of petroleum diesel primarily due to the longer carbon-chain structures of the fatty acids in the former. Raw materials such as palm oil and waste cooking oil are widely used as the feedstock to produce biodiesel because of their low cost, good availability, and stable lipid provision. However, they generally have a poor low-temperature fluidity, which limits their application in colder climates. In this experimental study, the catalytic dehydrogenation and cracking reaction technique was used to reduce the CFPP of palm-oil biodiesel with an initial CFPP of as high as 14 °C. The catalytic variables of the type of mesoporous catalyst and operating temperature are considered in this study. The resultant fuel properties of palm-oil biodiesel catalyzed by MCM-41 and SiO2/Fe3O4 were compared with biodiesel thermally cracked without a catalyst. The operating temperature of the catalyzed dehydrogenation and cracking reaction was controlled in the range between 400 and 600 °C. The CFPP decrease reached a maximum of 12 °C when the biodiesel was catalyzed by SiO2/Fe3O4 at 600 °C. The maximum water content was produced when the biodiesel sample was thermally cracked with no

  20. Influence of biodiesel and diesel fuel blends on the injection rate and spray injection under cold conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Tinprabath, Padipan; Hespel, Camille; Chanchaona, Somchai; Foucher, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    International audience Fossil fuel supplies are decreasing every day due to excessive energy requirements. This problem can be solved by partly replacing fossil fuel with renewable biodiesel fuel. However, during the star-up of the engines under cold temperatures conditions can be different where biodiesel are used due to the low fuel injection pressure and the high cloud point and high pour point. It is consequently of interest to understand the behavior of the injector under cold conditi...

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions and energy balances of jatropha biodiesel as an alternative fuel in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates GHG emissions and energy balances (i.e. net energy value (NEV), net renewable energy value (NREV) and net energy ratio (NER)) of jatropha biodiesel as an alternative fuel in Tanzania by using life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. The functional unit (FU) was defined as 1 tonne (t) of combusted jatropha biodiesel. The findings of the study prove wrong the notion that biofuels are carbon neutral, thus can mitigate climate change. A net GHG equivalent emission of about 848 kg t−1 was observed. The processes which account significantly to GHG emissions are the end use of biodiesel (about 82%) followed by farming of jatropha for about 13%. Sensitivity analysis indicates that replacing diesel with biodiesel in irrigation of jatropha farms decreases the net GHG emissions by 7.7% while avoiding irrigation may reduce net GHG emissions by 12%. About 22.0 GJ of energy is consumed to produce 1 t of biodiesel. Biodiesel conversion found to be a major energy consuming process (about 64.7%) followed by jatropha farming for about 30.4% of total energy. The NEV is 19.2 GJ t−1, indicating significant energy gain of jatropha biodiesel. The NREV is 23.1 GJ t−1 while NER is 2.3; the two values indicate that large amount of fossil energy is used to produce biodiesel. The results of the study are meant to inform stakeholders and policy makers in the bioenergy sector. -- Highlights: • Production and use of jatropha biodiesel in Tanzania result into positive net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. • The net GHG emission is highly influenced by end use of biodiesel in a diesel engine followed by soil N2O emissions during farming of Jatropha. • Jatropha biodiesel results into significant net energy gain; however its production requires large quantity of fossil energy input. • Biodiesel conversion found to be a major energy consuming process followed by jatropha farming. • The results of the study are meant to inform stakeholders and policy makers in the

  2. Transesterified Chinese Spicehush (Lindera communis) seed oil as a biodiesel fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei-gang; Ma Lei; Jiang Jian-xin; Jiang Li; Zhang Zhi-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the transesterification of the Chinese Spicehush (Lindera communis) seed (LCS) oil with methanol for the production of biodiesel. The methyl esters of LCS oil were compared with soybean esters to determine biodiesel fuel performance and properties. The fatty acids content in the seed kernel oil (LKO) and coat oil (LCO) were quantified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry method (GC-MS). LKO contains 95.1% saturated acids (capric, lauric, myristic and palmitic)and 2.3% unsaturated acids (oleic). LCO contains 24.6% saturated acids (palmitic and stearic) and 73.6% unsaturated acids (oleic,linoleic and palmitoleic). The kinematic viscosity, cold filter plugging point, cloud point, flash point and cetane index were determined. The methyl esters of LKO had a higher kinematic viscosity and a lower cold filter plugging point value, so it has better performance in cold weather. The biodiesel of LCS oil has fuel properties within the limits prescribed by American (ASTM D 6751-02)standards, except for a slightly lower flash point of LKO biodiesel than that prescribed by these standards (130℃). Thus, LKO and LCO biodiesel have great potential to be used on a large scale as fuel for diesel engines.

  3. Performance and emission parameters of single cylinder diesel engine using castor oil bio-diesel blended fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Ghobadian, B.; Najafi, G.; Jaliliantabar, F.; Mamat, R.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance and emission parameters of a CI single cylinder diesel engine operating on biodiesel-diesel blends (B0, B5, B10, B15 and E20: 20% biodiesel and 80% diesel by volume). A reactor was designed, fabricated and evaluated for biodiesel production. The results showed that increasing the biodiesel content in the blend fuel will increase the performance parameters and decrease the emission parameters. Maximum power was detected for B0 at 2650 rpm and maximum torque was belonged to B20 at 1600 rpm. The experimental results revealed that using biodiesel-diesel blended fuels increased the power and torque output of the engine. For biodiesel blends it was found that the specific fuel consumption (sfc) was decreased. B10 had the minimum amount for sfc. The concentration of CO2 and HC emissions in the exhaust pipe were measured and found to be decreased when biodiesel blends were introduced. This was due to the high oxygen percentage in the biodiesel compared to the net diesel fuel. In contrast, the concentration of CO and NOx was found to be increased when biodiesel is introduced.

  4. Evaluation and Development of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Biodiesel and Diesel Fuel Surrogates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the existing chemical kinetic mechanism reduction techniques. From here, an appropriate reduction scheme was developed to create compact yet comprehensive surrogate models for both diesel and biodiesel fuels for diesel engine applications. The reduction......-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study. A new reduction scheme was therefore formulated. A 68-species mechanism for biodiesel surrogate and a 49-species mechanism for diesel surrogate were successfully derived from the respective detailed mechanisms. An overall 97% reduction in species number and......-hexadecane mechanism is expected to be a better representative of surrogate component for various transportation fuels such as biodiesel. Additionally, it can be applied to predict the reactivity of other n-alkane or interchange with one another for kinetic and CFD simulations....

  5. Combustion characteristics, performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fueled with a waste cooking oil biodiesel mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • High quality biodiesel fuels can be produced by using different waste cooking oils. • Biodiesel fuel blends (in 5 and 10% vol) can be used without any negative effects. • Effects of biodiesel addition on the combustion and exhaust emissions were investigated. - Abstract: In this study, a mixture of biodiesel fuels produced from two different kinds of waste cooking oils was blended in 5% and 10% with No. 2 diesel fuel. The biodiesel/No. 2 diesel fuel blends were tested in a single-cylinder, direct injection, four-stroke, natural aspirated diesel engine under four different engine loads (BMEP 0.48–0.36–0.24–0.12 MPa) and 2200 rpm engine speed. Despite of the earlier start of injection, the detailed combustion and engine performance results showed that the ignition delay with the biodiesel addition was decreased for the all engine loads with the earlier combustion timings due to higher cetane number of biodiesel fuel. Meanwhile the maximum heat release rate and the in-cylinder pressure rise rate were slightly decreased and the combustion duration was generally increased with the biodiesel addition. However, significant changings were not observed on the maximum in-cylinder pressures. In addition, it was observed that the indicated mean effective pressure values were slightly varied depending on the start of combustion timing and the center of heat release location. It was found that 5% and 10% biodiesel fuel addition resulted in slightly increment on break specific fuel consumption (up to 4%) and reduction on break thermal efficiency (up to 2.8%). The biodiesel additions also increased NOx emissions up to 8.7% and decreased smoke and total hydrocarbon emissions for the all engine loads. Although there were no significant changes on CO emissions at the low and medium engine loads, some reductions were observed at the full engine load. Also, CO2 emissions were slightly increased for the all engine loads

  6. ALKALI – CATALYSED PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FUEL FROM NIGERIAN CITRUS SEEDS OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarry, S.E

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of oil extracted from the seeds of three different Nigerian citrus fruits for biodiesel production was investigated. Fatty acid alkyl esters were produced from orange seed oil, grape seed oil and tangerine seed oil by transesterification of the oils with ethanol using potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. In the conversion of the citrus seed oils to alkyl esters (biodiesel, the grape seed oil gave the highest yield of 90.6%, while the tangerineseed oil and orange seed oil gave a yield of 83.1% and 78.5%, respectively. Fuel properties of the seed oil and its biodiesel were determined. The results showed that orange seed oil had a density of 730 Kg/m3, a viscosity of 36.5 mm2/s, and a pour point of - 14oC; while its biodiesel fuel had a density of 892 Kg/m3, a viscosity of 5.60 mm2/s, and a pour point of - 25oC. Grape seed oil had a density of 675 Kg/m3, a viscosity of 39.5 mm2/s, and a pour point of - 12 oC, while its biodiesel fuel had a density of 890 Kg/m3, a viscosity of 4.80 mm2/s, and a pour point of - 22oC. Tangerine seed oil had an acid value of 1.40 mg/g, a density of 568 Kg/m3, a viscosity of 37.3mm2/s, and a pour point of - 15oC, while its biodiesel fuel had an acid value of 0.22 mg/g, a density of 895 Kg/m3, a viscosity of 5.30 mm2/s, and a pour point of - 24oC.

  7. Evaluation of the impacts of biodiesel and second generation biofuels on NO(x) emissions for CARB diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajbabaei, Maryam; Johnson, Kent C; Okamoto, Robert A; Mitchell, Alexander; Pullman, Marcie; Durbin, Thomas D

    2012-08-21

    The impact of biodiesel and second generation biofuels on nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) emissions from heavy-duty engines was investigated using a California Air Resources Board (CARB) certified diesel fuel. Two heavy-duty engines, a 2006 engine with no exhaust aftertreatment, and a 2007 engine with a diesel particle filter (DPF), were tested on an engine dynamometer over four different test cycles. Emissions from soy- and animal-based biodiesels, a hydrotreated renewable diesel, and a gas to liquid (GTL) fuel were evaluated at blend levels from 5 to 100%. NO(x) emissions consistently increased with increasing biodiesel blend level, while increasing renewable diesel and GTL blends showed NO(x) emissions reductions with blend level. NO(x) increases ranged from 1.5% to 6.9% for B20, 6.4% to 18.2% for B50, and 14.1% to 47.1% for B100. The soy-biodiesel showed higher NO(x) emissions increases compared to the animal-biodiesel. NO(x) emissions neutrality with the CARB diesel was achieved by blending GTL or renewable diesel fuels with various levels of biodiesel or by using di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP). It appears that the impact of biodiesel on NO(x) emissions might be a more important consideration when blended with CARB diesel or similar fuels, and that some form of NO(x) mitigation might be needed for biodiesel blends with such fuels. PMID:22788711

  8. Combustion and emissions characteristics of diesel engine fueled by biodiesel at partial load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Impact of engine load on engine’s performance, combustion and emission characteristics. ► The brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) increases significantly at partial load conditions. ► The brake thermal efficiency (BTE) drops at lower engine loads, and increases at higher loads. ► The partial load also influences the trend of CO emissions. -- Abstract: This paper investigated the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of diesel engine fueled by biodiesel at partial load conditions. Experiments were conducted on a common-rail fuel injection diesel engine using ultra low sulfur diesel, biodiesel (B100) and their blend fuels of 10%, 20%, 50% (denoted as B10, B20 and B50 respectively) under various loads. The results show that biodiesel/blend fuels have significant impacts on the engine’s brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and brake thermal efficiency (BTE) at partial load conditions. The increase in BSFC for B100 is faster than that of pure diesel with the decrease of engine load. A largest increase of 28.1% in BSFC is found at 10% load. Whereas for BTE, the results show that the use of biodiesel results in a reduced thermal efficiency at lower engine loads and improved thermal efficiency at higher engine loads. Furthermore, the characteristics of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions are also changed at partial load conditions. When running at lower engine loads, the CO emission increases with the increase of biodiesel blend ratio and the decrease of engine speed. However, at higher engine loads, an opposite trend is obtained.

  9. Decolorization improves the fuel properties of algal biodiesel from Isochrysis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from the comprehensive fuel testing according to the American Society for Testing and Materials International (ASTM) standards of an alkenone-free and decolorized biodiesel produced from the industrially grown marine microalgae Isochrysis sp. are presented. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) pro...

  10. Generation and characterization of diesel engine combustion emissions from petroleum diesel and soybean biodiesel fuels and application for inhalation exposure studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel made from the transesterification of plant- and anmal-derived oils is an important alternative fuel source for diesel engines. Although numerous studies have reported health effects associated with petroleum diesel emissions, information on biodiesel emissions are more ...

  11. Conceptual design and selection of a biodiesel fuel processor for a vehicle fuel cell auxiliary power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specchia, S.; Tillemans, F. W. A.; van den Oosterkamp, P. F.; Saracco, G.

    Within the European project BIOFEAT (biodiesel fuel processor for a fuel cell auxiliary power unit for a vehicle), a complete modular 10 kW e biodiesel fuel processor capable of feeding a PEMFC will be developed, built and tested to generate electricity for a vehicle auxiliary power unit (APU). Tail pipe emissions reduction, increased use of renewable fuels, increase of hydrogen-fuel economy and efficient supply of present and future APU for road vehicles are the main project goals. Biodiesel is the chosen feedstock because it is a completely natural and thus renewable fuel. Three fuel processing options were taken into account at a conceptual design level and compared for hydrogen production: (i) autothermal reformer (ATR) with high and low temperature shift (HTS/LTS) reactors; (ii) autothermal reformer (ATR) with a single medium temperature shift (MTS) reactor; (iii) thermal cracker (TC) with high and low temperature shift (HTS/LTS) reactors. Based on a number of simulations (with the AspenPlus® software), the best operating conditions were determined (steam-to-carbon and O 2/C ratios, operating temperatures and pressures) for each process alternative. The selection of the preferential fuel processing option was consequently carried out, based on a number of criteria (efficiency, complexity, compactness, safety, controllability, emissions, etc.); the ATR with both HTS and LTS reactors shows the most promising results, with a net electrical efficiency of 29% (LHV).

  12. Non-catalytic alcoholysis process for production of biodiesel fuel by using bubble column reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, S.; Nabetani, H.; Nakajima, M.

    2015-04-01

    Biodiesel fuel is a replacement for diesel as a fuel produced from biomass resources. It is usually defined as a fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) derived from vegetable oil or animal fat. In European countries, such as Germany and France, biodiesel fuel is commercially produced mainly from rapeseed oil, whereas in the United States and Argentina, soybean oil is more frequently used. In many other countries such as Japan and countries in Southeast Asia, lipids that cannot be used as a food source could be more suitable materials for the production of biodiesel fuel because its production from edible oils could result in an increase in the price of edible oils, thereby increasing the cost of some foodstuffs. Therefore, used edible oil, lipids contained in waste effluent from the oil milling process, byproducts from oil refining process and crude oils from industrial crops such as jatropha could be more promising materials in these countries. The materials available in Japan and Southeast Asia for the production of biodiesel fuel have common characteristics; they contain considerable amount of impurities and are high in free fatty acids (FFA). Superheated methanol vapor (SMV) reactor might be a promising method for biodiesel fuel production utilizing oil feedstock containing FFA such as waste vegetable oil and crude vegetable oil. In the conventional method using alkaline catalyst, FFA contained in waste vegetable oil is known to react with alkaline catalyst such as NaOH and KOH generating saponification products and to inactivate it. Therefore, the FFA needs to be removed from the feedstock prior to the reaction. Removal of the alkaline catalyst after the reaction is also required. In the case of the SMV reactor, the processes for removing FFA prior to the reaction and catalyst after the reaction can be omitted because it requires no catalyst. Nevertheless, detailed study on the productivity of biodiesel fuel produced from waste vegetable oils and other non

  13. Characteristics of SME biodiesel-fueled diesel particle emissions and the kinetics of oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heejung; Kittelson, David B; Zachariah, Michael R

    2006-08-15

    Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternative diesel fuels. As diesel emission regulations have become more stringent, the diesel particulate filter (DPF) has become an essential part of the aftertreatment system. Knowledge of kinetics of exhaust particle oxidation for alternative diesel fuels is useful in estimating the change in regeneration behavior of a DPF with such fuels. This study examines the characteristics of diesel particulate emissions as well as kinetics of particle oxidation using a 1996 John Deere T04045TF250 off-highway engine and 100% soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel (B100) as fuel. Compared to standard D2 fuel, this B100 reduced particle size, number, and volume in the accumulation mode where most of the particle mass is found. At 75% load, number decreased by 38%, DGN decreased from 80 to 62 nm, and volume decreased by 82%. Part of this decrease is likely associated with the fact that the particles were more easily oxidized. Arrhenius parameters for the biodiesel fuel showed a 2-3times greater frequency factor and approximately 6 times higher oxidation rate compared to regular diesel fuel in the range of 700-825 degrees C. The faster oxidation kinetics should facilitate regeneration when used with a DPF. PMID:16955891

  14. Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

    2010-09-30

    In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

  15. Effect of fuel injection pressure and injection timing of Karanja biodiesel blends on fuel spray, engine performance, emissions and combustion characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of FIP on microscopic spray characteristics. • Effect of FIP and SOI timing on CRDI engine performance, emissions and combustion. • Fuel injection duration shortened, peak injection rate increased with increasing FIP. • SMD (D32) and AMD (D10) of fuel droplets decreased for lower biodiesel blends. • Increase in biodiesel blend ratio and FIP, fuel injection duration decreased. - Abstract: In this investigation, effect of 10%, 20% and 50% Karanja biodiesel blends on injection rate, atomization, engine performance, emissions and combustion characteristics of common rail direct injection (CRDI) type fuel injection system were evaluated in a single cylinder research engine at 300, 500, 750 and 1000 bar fuel injection pressures at different start of injection timings and constant engine speed of 1500 rpm. The duration of fuel injection slightly decreased with increasing blend ratio of biodiesel (Karanja Oil Methyl Ester: KOME) and significantly decreased with increasing fuel injection pressure. The injection rate profile and Sauter mean diameter (D32) of the fuel droplets are influenced by the injection pressure. Increasing fuel injection pressure generally improves the thermal efficiency of the test fuels. Sauter mean diameter (D32) and arithmetic mean diameter (D10) decreased with decreasing Karanja biodiesel content in the blend and significantly increased for higher blends due to relatively higher fuel density and viscosity. Maximum thermal efficiency was observed at the same injection timing for biodiesel blends and mineral diesel. Lower Karanja biodiesel blends (up to 20%) showed lower brake specific hydrocarbon (BSHC) and carbon monoxide (BSCO) emissions in comparison to mineral diesel. For lower Karanja biodiesel blends, combustion duration was shorter than mineral diesel however at higher fuel injection pressures, combustion duration of 50% blend was longer than mineral diesel. Up to 10% Karanja biodiesel blends in a CRDI engines

  16. Biodiesel: The Use of Vegetable Oils and Methyl Esters as Alternative Diesel Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramesh Mamilla

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available On the face of the upcoming energy crisis, vegetable oils have come up as a promisingsource of fuel. They are being studied widely because of their abundant availability,renewable nature and better performance when used in engines. Many vegetable oilshave been investigated in compression ignition engine by fuel modification or enginemodification. The vegetable oils have very high density and viscosity, so we have used themethyl ester of the oil to overcome these problems. Their use in form of methyl esters innon modified engines has given encouraging results.Vegetable oils and their derivatives are attractive as alternative fuels, fuel extenders, andan additive for compression ignition (diesel engines because they also enhance engineperformance. Worldwide there is interest in biodiesel as a renewable transportation fueland blending agent. Biodiesel has the potential to displace petroleum, lower net globalwarming gas emissions from the transportation sector and reduce the mass andcarcinogenicity of particulate matter emissions.

  17. Properties and use of Moringa oleifera biodiesel and diesel fuel blends in a multi-cylinder diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Potential of biodiesel production from crude Moringa oleifera oil. • Characterization of M. oleifera biodiesel and its blend with diesel fuel. • Evaluation of M. oleifera biodiesel blend in a diesel engine. - Abstract: Researchers have recently attempted to discover alternative energy sources that are accessible, technically viable, economically feasible, and environmentally acceptable. This study aims to evaluate the physico-chemical properties of Moringa oleifera biodiesel and its 10% and 20% by-volume blends (B10 and B20) in comparison with diesel fuel (B0). The performance and emission of M. oleifera biodiesel and its blends in a multi-cylinder diesel engine were determined at various speeds and full load conditions. The properties of M. oleifera biodiesel and its blends complied with ASTM D6751 standards. Over the entire range of speeds, B10 and B20 fuels reduced brake power and increased brake specific fuel consumption compared with B0. In engine emissions, B10 and B20 fuels reduced carbon monoxide emission by 10.60% and 22.93% as well as hydrocarbon emission by 9.21% and 23.68%, but slightly increased nitric oxide emission by 8.46% and 18.56%, respectively, compared with B0. Therefore, M. oleifera is a potential feedstock for biodiesel production, and its blends B10 and B20 can be used as diesel fuel substitutes

  18. Emission comparison of urban bus engine fueled with diesel oil and 'biodiesel' blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turrio-Baldassarri, Luigi; Battistelli, Chiara L.; Conti, Luigi; Crebelli, Riccardo; De Berardis, Barbara; Iamiceli, Anna Laura [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Gambino, Michele; Iannaccone, Sabato [Istituto Motori - CNR, via Marconi 8, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2004-07-05

    The chemical and toxicological characteristics of emissions from an urban bus engine fueled with diesel and biodiesel blend were studied. Exhaust gases were produced by a turbocharged EURO 2 heavy-duty diesel engine, operating in steady-state conditions on the European test 13 mode cycle (ECE R49). Regulated and unregulated pollutants, such as carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrated derivatives (nitro-PAHs), carbonyl compounds and light aromatic hydrocarbons were quantified. Mutagenicity of the emissions was evaluated by the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay. The effect of the fuels under study on the size distribution of particulate matter (PM) was also evaluated. The use of biodiesel blend seems to result in small reductions of emissions of most of the aromatic and polyaromatic compounds; these differences, however, have no statistical significance at 95% confidence level. Formaldehyde, on the other hand, has a statistically significant increase of 18% with biodiesel blend. In vitro toxicological assays show an overall similar mutagenic potency and genotoxic profile for diesel and biodiesel blend emissions. The electron microscopy analysis indicates that PM for both fuels has the same chemical composition, morphology, shape and granulometric spectrum, with most of the particles in the range 0.06-0.3 {mu}m.

  19. Production of Biodiesel Fuel from Waste Soya bean Cooking Oil by Alkali Trans-esterification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajinkya Dipak Deshpande*,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is biodegradable, clean-burning, non-toxic, renewable, high-quality, and cheap diesel fuel made primarily from waste vegetable oil which can be used without any alterations in engine design. The paper is concerned with the extraction and quality evaluation of the biodiesel fuels synthesized from waste soya bean cooking oil. Waste soya bean cooking oil had high amount of free fatty acid. Thus, single step transesterification process with the aid of homogeneous catalyst as 1% potassium hydroxide were implemented in this experiment. Methanol was chosen as alcohol solvent. In the transesterification process, the triglycerides in waste cooking oil was reacted with a methanol to form esters and glycerol as by product.The biodiesel were extracted for different oil to methanol ratio as 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4. The highest biodiesel yield of 76% was obtained at 1:3 volumetric ratio for 60 ºC reaction temperature and 1250 rpm stirring speed. Results show that the optimal methyl ester yield of 90% occurred at methanol: oil volume ratio of 3:1. The product met the ASTM fuel standards for relative density, acid value, relative density, calorific value, flash point and kinematic viscosity.

  20. Fuel properties and engine performance of biodiesel from waste cooking oil collected in Dhaka city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R. B.; Islam, R.; Uddin, M. N.; Ehsan, Md.

    2016-07-01

    Waste cooking oil can be a potential source of biodiesel that has least effect on the edible oil consumption. Increasing number of hotel-restaurants and more active monitoring by health authorities have increased the generation of waste cooking oil significantly in densely populated cities like Dhaka. If not used or disposed properly, waste cooking oil itself may generate lot of environmental issues. In this work, waste cooking oils from different restaurants within Dhaka City were collected and some relevant properties of these waste oils were measured. Based on the samples studied one with the highest potential as biodiesel feed was identified and processed for engine performance. Standard trans-esterification process was used to produce biodiesel from the selected waste cooking oil. Biodiesel blends of B20 and B40 category were made and tested on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Engine performance parameters included - bhp, bsfc and exhaust emission for rated and part load conditions. Results give a quantitative assessment of the potential of using biodiesel from waste cooking oil as fuel for diesel engines in Bangladesh.

  1. Antioxidant Effect on Oxidation Stability of Blend Fish Oil Biodiesel with Vegetable Oil Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, M; S.M.A Sujan; M.S. Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Two different phenolic synthetic antioxidants were used to improve the oxidation stability of fish oil biodiesel blends with vegetable oil biodiesel and petroleum diesel. Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) most effective for improvement of the oxidation stability of petro diesel, whereas  tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) showed good performance in fish oil biodiesel. Fish oil/Rapeseed oil biodiesel mixed showed some acceptable results in higher concentration ofantioxidants. TBHQ showed better oxidation s...

  2. A critical review of bio-diesel as a vehicular fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of vegetable oils as alternative fuels has been around for one hundred years when the inventor of the diesel engine Rudolph Diesel first tested peanut oil, in his compression-ignition engine. In 1970, scientists discovered that the viscosity of vegetable oils could be reduced by a simple chemical process and that it could perform as diesel fuel in modern engine. Considerable efforts have been made to develop vegetable oil derivatives that approximate the properties and performance of the hydrocarbon-based diesel fuels. Bio-diesel is an alternative to petroleum-based fuels derived from vegetable oils, animal fats, and used waste cooking oil including triglycerides. Bio-diesel production is a very modern and technological area for researchers due to the relevance that it is winning everyday because of the increase in the petroleum price and the environmental advantages. Transesterification is the most common method and leads to monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils and fats, now called bio-diesel when used for fuel purposes. (author)

  3. A critical review of bio-diesel as a vehicular fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of vegetable oils as alternative fuels has been around for one hundred years when the inventor of the diesel engine Rudolph Diesel first tested peanut oil, in his compression-ignition engine. In 1970, scientists discovered that the viscosity of vegetable oils could be reduced by a simple chemical process and that it could perform as diesel fuel in modern engine. Considerable efforts have been made to develop vegetable oil derivatives that approximate the properties and performance of the hydrocarbon-based diesel fuels. Bio-diesel is an alternative to petroleum-based fuels derived from vegetable oils, animal fats, and used waste cooking oil including triglycerides. Bio-diesel production is a very modern and technological area for researchers due to the relevance that it is winning everyday because of the increase in the petroleum price and the environmental advantages. Transesterification is the most common method and leads to monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils and fats, now called bio-diesel when used for fuel purposes

  4. Life Cycle Assessment of New Oxy-Fuels from Biodiesel-Derived Glycerol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Asdrubali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is obtained by the process of transesterification of vegetable oils and animal fats and crude glycerol is the main by-product of the biodiesel manufacturing chain. As a result glycerol production has rapidly increased in the last decades. This work focuses on the development and the validation of a process to convert biodiesel-derived glycerol into a fuel for internal combustion engines. In order to obtain a higher conversion efficiency it was necessary to convert crude glycerol to tert-butyl ethers by means of an etherification process that was carried out in the laboratory. Then the obtained glycol-ethers mixture (GEM was blended with a commercial diesel fuel to improve its thermal efficiency. In this paper a life cycle analysis for these GEM/diesel blends was carried out using a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA methodology, in order to evaluate the environmental impacts of these new oxy-fuels; from GEM production to GEM use as an additive for diesel fuel. The LCA results highlight that the use of these new oxy-fuels in diesel engines can lead to an effective reduction in terms of greenhouse gases emissions throughout the entire life cycle.

  5. Life-cycle analysis of camelina biodiesel and jet-fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangol, Namrata

    Camelina sativa (Camelina) could be a potential feedstock to help meet the goal of 36 billion gallons of biofuel production in the United States by 2022, as set forth by EISA of 2007. This research is focused on assessing the energy balance and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from camelina biodiesel grown and produced in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the USA. Data were collected from a camelina farm in the region and compared to literature values. Energy used in camelina crushing and transesterification were measured at the University of Idaho. Life cycle analysis showed that use of camelina biodiesel reduces GHG emissions by 72% compared to 2005 baseline diesel fuel. Camelina biodiesel at B100 level, however, did not meet the ASTM D6751 specification for oxidative stability without any additives but could be corrected with proper additive. Camelina had a smaller seed size compared to canola and consequently required 23% more energy for crushing. Despite higher energy use for crushing, the net energy ratio for camelina biodiesel was found to be 3.68. From the agronomic standpoint, camelina can be incorporated as a rotational crop into low rainfall areas of the PNW. Wheat areas of PNW with annual rainfall from 19 to 38 cm (7.5--15") and currently incorporating fallow into their rotations were considered as potential areas for camelina. There were 846,500 hectares (2.1 million acres) of land available in the region that could potentially produce 443.0 million L of biodiesel (117.1 million gal) and 1.2 billion kg of meal per year. This meal quantity is about 12.1% of the potential camelina meal that could be used as livestock feed in the PNW. Therefore, it was concluded that the meal has adequate market to be consumed locally as livestock feed. This research also conducted the life cycle analysis of camelina jet fuel produced in the laboratory scale facility. The jet fuel was produced via deoxygenation of the camelina oil in an inert environment, in the

  6. Life cycle assessment of camelina oil derived biodiesel and jet fuel in the Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Mupondwa, Edmund

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the environmental impact of biodiesel and hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel derived from camelina oil in terms of global warming potential, human health, ecosystem quality, and energy resource consumption. The life cycle inventory is based on production activities in the Canadian Prairies and encompasses activities ranging from agricultural production to oil extraction and fuel conversion. The system expansion method is used in this study to avoid allocation and to credit input energy to co-products associated with the products displaced in the market during camelina oil extraction and fuel processing. This is the preferred allocation method for LCA analysis in the context of most renewable and sustainable energy programs. The results show that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1 MJ of camelina derived biodiesel ranged from 7.61 to 24.72 g CO2 equivalent and 3.06 to 31.01 kg CO2/MJ equivalent for camelina HRJ fuel. Non-renewable energy consumption for camelina biodiesel ranged from 0.40 to 0.67 MJ/MJ; HRJ fuel ranged from -0.13 to 0.52 MJ/MJ. Camelina oil as a feedstock for fuel production accounted for the highest contribution to overall environmental performance, demonstrating the importance of reducing environmental burdens during the agricultural production process. Attaining higher seed yield would dramatically lower environmental impacts associated with camelina seed, oil, and fuel production. The lower GHG emissions and energy consumption associated with camelina in comparison with other oilseed derived fuel and petroleum fuel make camelina derived fuel from Canadian Prairies environmentally attractive. PMID:24572928

  7. Biodiesel Fuel Production from Marine Microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and Measurement of its Viscosity and Density

    OpenAIRE

    T. Sujin Jeba Kumar; C.K. Balavigneswaran; K.P. Srinivasakumar

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel is a fuel derives from transesterification of fats and oils. It is renewable and non-toxic ecofriendly fuel with less CO2 and NO2 emissions. Microalgae are known to contain more lipid content than macroalgae and most other oil crops. In this study, we extracted biodiesel from three microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and also measured the density and viscosity of biofuel obtained from these microalgae. Pavlova lutheri yielded more oil than the other two...

  8. Effect of engine parameters on NOx emissions with Jatropha biodiesel as fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jindal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Depleting petroleum reserves on the earth and increasing concerns about the environment leads to the quest for fuels which are eco-friendly and safe for human beings. It is now well established that lower blends of biodiesel and diesel works well in the existing engines without any modifications. Use of the higher blends is restricted due to loss of efficiency and long term problems in the engine. For using higher blends of biodiesel, the engine operating parameters must be changed for recovery of power and efficiency. But these changes may affect the emissions. This study targets on investigating the effects of the engine operating parameters viz. compression ratio, fuel injection pressure, injection timing and engine speed on emissions of NOx with pure biodiesel as fuel in a small diesel engine commonly used in agricultural applications. It is found that the combined increase of compression ratio and injection pressure and retarding injection results in lower emissions of NOx as compared to the diesel fuel.

  9. Design of a Small Scale Pilot Biodiesel Production Plant and Determination of the Fuel Properties of Biodiesel Produced With This Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzer Eryılmaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A small scale pilot biodiesel production plant that has a volume of 65 liters/day has been designed, constructed and tested. The plant was performed using oil mixture (50% wild mustard seed oil + 50% refined canola oil and methanol with sodium hydroxide (NaOH catalyst. The fuel properties of biodiesel indicated as density at 15oC (889.64 kg/m3, kinematic viscosity at 40oC (6.975 mm2/s, flash point (170oC, copper strip corrosion (1a, water content (499.87 mg/kg, and calorific value (39.555 MJ/kg, respectively.

  10. Design of a Small Scale Pilot Biodiesel Production Plant and Determination of the Fuel Properties of Biodiesel Produced With This Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Tanzer Eryılmaz; Muttalip Erkan

    2014-01-01

    A small scale pilot biodiesel production plant that has a volume of 65 liters/day has been designed, constructed and tested. The plant was performed using oil mixture (50% wild mustard seed oil + 50% refined canola oil) and methanol with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) catalyst. The fuel properties of biodiesel indicated as density at 15oC (889.64 kg/m3), kinematic viscosity at 40oC (6.975 mm2/s), flash point (170oC), copper strip corrosion (1a), water content (499.87 mg/kg), and calorific value (39....

  11. Use of Palm oil Biodiesel Blends as a Fuel for Compression Ignition Engine

    OpenAIRE

    B. Deepanraj; C. Dhanesh; R. Senthil; Kannan, M; Santhoshkumar, A; Lawrence, P.

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The increasing awareness of the environmental hazards and the alarming levels of air pollution have led to more restrictive regulations on engines emission control in recent years. Approach: The dwindling resources and rising cost of crude oil have resulted in an intensified search for alternate fuels. In the present study biodiesel (palm oil methyl ester) blends with diesel was investigated in a direct injection stationary diesel engine. The stationary engine test bed used...

  12. Biodiesel development from rice bran oil: Transesterification process optimization and fuel characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased environmental awareness and depletion of resources are driving industry to develop viable alternative fuels from renewable resources that are environmentally more acceptable. Vegetable oil is a potential alternative fuel. The most detrimental properties of vegetable oils are its high viscosity and low volatility, and these cause several problems during their long duration usage in compression ignition (CI) engines. The most commonly used method to make vegetable oil suitable for use in CI engines is to convert it into biodiesel, i.e. vegetable oil esters using process of transesterification. Rice bran oil is an underutilized non-edible vegetable oil, which is available in large quantities in rice cultivating countries, and very little research has been done to utilize this oil as a replacement for mineral Diesel. In the present work, the transesterification process for production of rice bran oil methyl ester has been investigated. The various process variables like temperature, catalyst concentration, amount of methanol and reaction time were optimized with the objective of producing high quality rice bran oil biodiesel with maximum yield. The optimum conditions for transesterification of rice bran oil with methanol and NaOH as catalyst were found to be 55 deg. C reaction temperature, 1 h reaction time, 9:1 molar ratio of rice bran oil to methanol and 0.75% catalyst (w/w). Rice bran oil methyl ester thus produced was characterized to find its suitability to be used as a fuel in engines. Results showed that biodiesel obtained under the optimum conditions has comparable properties to substitute mineral Diesel, hence, rice bran oil methyl ester biodiesel could be recommended as a mineral Diesel fuel substitute for compression ignition (CI) engines in transportation as well as in the agriculture sector

  13. Biodiesel fuel production with solid amorphous-zirconia catalysis in fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous zirconia catalysts, titanium-, aluminum-, and potassium-doped zirconias, were prepared and evaluated in the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol at 250 deg. C, and the esterification of n-octanoic acid with methanol at 175-200 deg. C. Titanium- and aluminum-doped zirconias are promising solid catalysts for the production of biodiesel fuels from soybean oil because of their high performance, with over 95% conversion in both of the esterifications

  14. Vibration signatures of a biodiesel fueled CI engine and effect of engine parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jindal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing emphasis on use of biodiesel in compression ignition engines, the long term effects are yet to be evaluated. Through many studies, the suitability of biodiesel blends upto 20% are well established and are being adopted by many organizations with recommended use of biodiesel. But in all of these studies the combustion and emission evaluations are the main characteristics which received the attention of researchers and the objectives targeted are good performance and low emissions. The long term effects are difficult to be assessed as it requires long time as well as consistent conditions of operation. A short route is suggested in this study using the vibration signatures of the engine cylinder and head vibrations. The comparison between the vibration signatures of an engine fueled with diesel and biodiesel blends under different compression ratio and injection pressures show significant changes in the vibration patterns and the difference can be used to asses the long term effects. The method is based on fundamental relationship between the engines vibration pattern and the relative characteristics of the combustion process under different operating conditions.

  15. A numerical study on RCCI engine fueled by biodiesel/methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Numerical study is done to investigate RCCI engine fueled by biodiesel/methanol. • A new biodiesel/methanol dual-fuel chemical reaction mechanism is developed. • Engine performance is improved with fuel reactivity stratification formed. • Soot and NOx significant reduce with methanol induction and fuel reactivity stratification. - Abstract: A 3-D numerical simulation platform based on the KIVA4-CHEMKIN code was constructed by incorporating a newly developed skeletal chemical kinetics mechanism to study the reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine performance, combustion and emission characteristics. In the present study, methanol is assumed to be induced into the engine through the intake port, while biodiesel is directly injected into the engine by the end of the compression stroke. The skeletal biodiesel and methanol dual fuel chemical reaction mechanism coupled with CO, NOx and soot formation mechanisms was developed and validated by comparing the ignition delay predicted by the developed mechanism with that of the detailed biodiesel and methanol mechanisms, and also by comparing the simulation results of KIVA-CHEMKIN with the experimental results under different engine operating conditions. A good agreement has been achieved in terms of ignition delay, in-cylinder pressure and heat release rate (HRR). The methanol mass fraction was varied from 0% to 80% at an interval of 20% to form different reactivity stratification. Simulation results revealed that under 10% load conditions, the increasing methanol reduced the peak pressure and heat release rate, whereas under 50% and 100% loads, the peak pressure both appeared at 60% methanol induction. Also, the reactivity distribution and ringing intensity were discussed, aiming at investigating the fuel gradient effects and knocking level, respectively. For the emissions, a general decreasing trend on CO emission was observed at both 50% and 100% loads while at 10% load, a slight

  16. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions of biodiesel fuels derived from castor oil, palm oil, and waste cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Bernadete Neiva Lemos; de Araújo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; da Cruz, Andrea Cristina Santos; Pereira, Solange Andrade; do Nascimento, Núbia Costa

    2011-04-01

    Concerns over the sustained availability of fossil fuels and their impact on global warming and pollution have led to the search for fuels from renewable sources to address worldwide rising energy demands. Biodiesel is emerging as one of the possible solutions for the transport sector. It shows comparable engine performance to that of conventional diesel fuel, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the toxicity of products and effluents from the biodiesel industry has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Brazil has a very high potential as a biodiesel producer, in view of its climatic conditions and vast areas for cropland, with consequent environmental risks because of possible accidental biodiesel spillages into water bodies and runoff to coastal areas. This research determined the toxicity to two marine organisms of the water-soluble fractions (WSF) of three different biodiesel fuels obtained by methanol transesterification of castor oil (CO), palm oil (PO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Microalgae and sea urchins were used as the test organisms, respectively, for culture-growth-inhibition and early-life-stage-toxicity tests. The toxicity levels of the analyzed biodiesel WSF showed the highest toxicity for the CO, followed by WCO and the PO. Methanol was the most prominent contaminant; concentrations increased over time in WSF samples stored up to 120 d. PMID:21184529

  17. Life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel as transportation fuel in rural India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2003 India has been actively promoting the cultivation of Jatropha on unproductive and degraded lands (wastelands) for the production of biodiesel suitable as transportation fuel. In this paper the life cycle energy balance, global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and land use impact on ecosystem quality is evaluated for a small scale, low-input Jatropha biodiesel system established on wasteland in rural India. In addition to the life cycle assessment of the case at hand, the environmental performance of the same system expanded with a biogas installation digesting seed cake was quantified. The environmental impacts were compared to the life cycle impacts of a fossil fuel reference system delivering the same amount of products and functions as the Jatropha biodiesel system under research. The results show that the production and use of Jatropha biodiesel triggers an 82% decrease in non-renewable energy requirement (Net Energy Ratio, NER = 1.85) and a 55% reduction in global warming potential (GWP) compared to the reference fossil-fuel based system. However, there is an increase in acidification (49%) and eutrophication (430%) from the Jatropha system relative to the reference case. Although adding biogas production to the system boosts the energy efficiency of the system (NER = 3.40), the GWP reduction would not increase (51%) due to additional CH4 emissions. For the land use impact, Jatropha improved the structural ecosystem quality when planted on wasteland, but reduced the functional ecosystem quality. Fertilizer application (mainly N) is an important contributor to most negative impact categories. Optimizing fertilization, agronomic practices and genetics are the major system improvement options.

  18. Life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel as transportation fuel in rural India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achten, Wouter M.J. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Division Forest, Nature and Landscape, Celestijnenlaan 200 E-2411, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) Regional Office for South Asia, CG Block, 1st Floor, National Agricultural Science Centre, Dev Prakash Shastri Marg, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Almeida, Joana [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Division Forest, Nature and Landscape, Celestijnenlaan 200 E-2411, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Grupo de Disciplinas da Ecologia da Hidrosfera, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Fobelets, Vincent; Bolle, Evelien; Muys, Bart [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Division Forest, Nature and Landscape, Celestijnenlaan 200 E-2411, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Mathijs, Erik [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Division Agricultural and Food Economics, Celestijnenlaan 200 E-2411, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Singh, Virendra P. [World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) Regional Office for South Asia, CG Block, 1st Floor, National Agricultural Science Centre, Dev Prakash Shastri Marg, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Tewari, Dina N. [Utthan NGO, Centre for Sustainable Development and Poverty Alleviation, 18-A, Auckland Road, Civil Lines, Allahabad 211 001 (India); Verchot, Louis V. [Centre for International Forestry Research, P.O. Box 0113 BOCBD, Bogor 16000 (Indonesia)

    2010-12-15

    Since 2003 India has been actively promoting the cultivation of Jatropha on unproductive and degraded lands (wastelands) for the production of biodiesel suitable as transportation fuel. In this paper the life cycle energy balance, global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and land use impact on ecosystem quality is evaluated for a small scale, low-input Jatropha biodiesel system established on wasteland in rural India. In addition to the life cycle assessment of the case at hand, the environmental performance of the same system expanded with a biogas installation digesting seed cake was quantified. The environmental impacts were compared to the life cycle impacts of a fossil fuel reference system delivering the same amount of products and functions as the Jatropha biodiesel system under research. The results show that the production and use of Jatropha biodiesel triggers an 82% decrease in non-renewable energy requirement (Net Energy Ratio, NER = 1.85) and a 55% reduction in global warming potential (GWP) compared to the reference fossil-fuel based system. However, there is an increase in acidification (49%) and eutrophication (430%) from the Jatropha system relative to the reference case. Although adding biogas production to the system boosts the energy efficiency of the system (NER = 3.40), the GWP reduction would not increase (51%) due to additional CH{sub 4} emissions. For the land use impact, Jatropha improved the structural ecosystem quality when planted on wasteland, but reduced the functional ecosystem quality. Fertilizer application (mainly N) is an important contributor to most negative impact categories. Optimizing fertilization, agronomic practices and genetics are the major system improvement options. (author)

  19. Permeation of gasoline, diesel, bioethanol (E85), and biodiesel (B20) fuels through six glove materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jo-Yu; Batterman, Stuart A

    2010-07-01

    Biofuels and conventional fuels differ in terms of their evaporation rates, permeation rates, and exhaust emissions, which can alter exposures of workers, especially those in the fuel refining and distribution industries. This study investigated the permeation of biofuels (bioethanol 85%, biodiesel 20%) and conventional petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel) through gloves used in occupational settings (neoprene, nitrile, and Viton) and laboratories (latex, nitrile, and vinyl), as well as a standard reference material (neoprene sheet). Permeation rates and breakthrough times were measured using the American Society for Testing and Materials F739-99 protocol, and fuel and permeant compositions were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, we estimated exposures for three occupational scenarios and recommend chemical protective clothing suitable for use with motor fuels. Permeation rates and breakthrough times depended on the fuel-glove combination. Gasoline had the highest permeation rate among the four fuels. Bioethanol (85%) had breakthrough times that were two to three times longer than gasoline through neoprene, nitrile Sol-Vex, and the standard reference materials. Breakthrough times for biodiesel (20%) were slightly shorter than for diesel for the latex, vinyl, nitrile examination, and the standard neoprene materials. The composition of permeants differed from neat fuels, e.g., permeants were significantly enriched in the lighter aromatics including benzene. Viton was the best choice among the tested materials for the four fuels tested. Among the scenarios, fuel truck drivers had the highest uptake via inhalation based on the personal measurements available in the literature, and gasoline station attendants had highest uptake via dermal exposure if gloves were not worn. Appropriate selection and use of gloves can protect workers from dermal exposures; however, current recommendations from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and

  20. Variation of Engineering Performance and Emissions using Biodiesel Fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Abuhabaya, Abdullah; John D. Fieldhouse; Brown, D R

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable concern over the increasing demand on our limited supply fossil fuel and as a result initiatives are being considered to extend the use of such fossil fuels. In addition there is international concern regarding the associated pollution levels and it is these collective concerns that have increased the demand for alternative fuels to be used in internal combustion engines. This study investigates the engine performance and exhaust emissions of a compression ignition CI en...

  1. Thermal Decomposition of Methyl Esters in Biodiesel Fuel: Kinetics, Mechanisms and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ming

    Biodiesel continues to enjoy increasing popularity. However, recent studies on carbonyl compounds emissions from biodiesel fuel are inconclusive. Emissions of carbonyl compounds from petroleum diesel fuels were compared to emissions from pure biodiesel fuels and petroleum-biodiesel blends used in a non-road diesel generator. The concentration of total carbonyl compounds was the highest when the engine was idling. The carbonyl emissions, as well as ozone formation potential, from biodiesel fuel blends were higher than those emitted from petroleum diesel fuel. The sulfur content of diesel fuel and the source of biodiesel fuel were not found to have a significant impact on emissions of carbonyl compounds. Mechanism parameters of the thermal decomposition of biodiesel-range methyl esters were obtained from the results of thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The overall reaction orders are between 0.49 and 0.71 and the energies of activation are between 59.9 and 101.3 kJ/mole. Methyl esters in air have lower activation energies than those in nitrogen. Methyl linoleate has the lowest activation energy, followed by methyl oleate, and methyl stearate. The pyrolysis and oxidation of the three methyl esters were investigated using a semi-isothermal tubular flow reactor. The profiles of major products versus reaction temperature are presented. In the pyrolysis of methyl stearate, the primary reaction pathway is the decarboxylic reaction at the methyl ester functional group. Methyl oleate's products indicate more reactions on its carbon-carbon double bond. Methyl linoleate shows highest reactivity among the three methyl esters, and 87 products were detected. The oxidation of three methyl esters resulted in more products in all compound classes, and 55, 114, and 127 products were detected, respectively. The oxidation of methyl esters includes decarboxylation on ester group. The methyl ester's carbon chain could be oxidized as a hydrocarbon compound and form oxidized esters and

  2. Bioethanol and Biodiesel: Alertnative Liquid Fuels for Future Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global population is expected to increase by approximately three billion by 2050 and with this increase in population, industry, transportation, and the cost of fossil fuels will increase dramatically . New technology is needed for fuel extraction using feedstocks which do not threaten food security...

  3. Renewable fuels from agricultural sources - ethanol, biodiesel, biogas; Foernybara drivmedel fraan jordbruket - etanol, biodiesel, biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolke, Camilla L.; Einarson, Elin; Ekloef, Patrik

    2011-07-01

    In this report we give a status report of the biofuels market. We describe some of the issues which are linked to environmental and land use. We also explain why different actors reach different assessments regarding the greenhouse gas emissions, land use and food security. Biofuels have been highlighted as a way to reduce the transport sector large emissions of greenhouse gases and thus as a climate measure. But when several countries have increased their production and consumption and set targets for bio-renewable fuels the biofuels impact has been questioned. Are emissions really reduced? What happens to the direct and indirect land use? How does the production of more biofuels affect the security in food production?

  4. Fuel spray combustion of waste cooking oil and palm oil biodiesel: Direct photography and detailed chemical kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole

    2013-10-14

    This paper studies the ignition processes of two biodiesel from two different feedstock sources, namely waste cooked oil (WCO) and palm oil (PO). They were investigated using the direct photography through high-speed video observations and detailed chemical kinetics. The detailed chemical kinetics modeling was carried out to complement data acquired using the high-speed video observations. For the high-speed video observations, an image intensifier combined with OH* filter connected to a high-speed video camera was used to obtain OH* chemiluminscence image near 313 nm. The OH* images were used to obtain the experimental ignition delay of the biodiesel fuels. For the high-speed video observations, experiments were done at an injection pressure of 100, 200 and 300 MPa using a 0.16 mm injector nozzle. Also a detailed chemical kinetics for the biodiesel fuels was carried out using ac chemical kinetics solver adopting a 0-D reactor model to obtain the chemical ignition delay of the combusting fuels. Equivalence ratios obtained from the experimental ignition delay were used for the detailed chemical kinetics analyses. The Politecnico di Milano\\'s thermochemical and reaction kinetic data were adopted to simulate the ignition processes of the biodiesels using the five fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) major components in the biodiesel fuels. From the high-speed video observations, it was observed that at increasing injection pressure, experimental ignition delay increased as a result of improvement in fuel and air mixing effects. Also the palm oil biodiesel has a shorter ignition delay compared to waste cooked oil biodiesel. This phenomenon could be attributed to the higher cetane number of palm biodiesel. The fuel spray ignition properties depend on both the physical ignition delay and chemical ignition delay. From the detailed chemical kinetic results it was observed that at the low temperature, high ambient pressure conditions reactivity increased as equivalent ratio

  5. Comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) of biodiesel and fossil diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complementary to VlTO's demonstration project on the use of biodiesel as engine fuel (including on the road emission measurements) in Flanders, Belgium, a comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) has been carried out for rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and fossil diesel fuel. The primary concern of this study is the question as to whether or not the production of biodiesel is comparable to the production of fossil diesel fuel from an environmental point of view, taking into account all stages of the life cycle of these two products. The study covers: (1) a description of the LCA methodology used; (2) a definition of the goal and scope of the study: (3) an inventory of the consumption of energy and materials and the discharges to the environment, from the cradle to the grave, for both alternative fuels: (4) a comparative impact assessment; and (5) the interpretation of the results. The results of this comparative LCA can be used in the final decision making process next to the results of a social and economical assessment. 6 refs

  6. An investigation of effect of biodiesel and aviation fuel jeta-1 mixtures performance and emissions on diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamik Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines which doesn’t contain pollutants and sulfur; on the contrary it contains oxygen. In addition, both physical and chemical properties of sunflower oil methyl ester (SME are identical to diesel fuel. Conversely, diesel and biodiesel fuels are widely used with some additives to reduce viscosity, increase the amount of cetane, and improve combustion efficiency. This study uses diesel fuel, SME and its mixture with aviation fuel JetA-1 which are widely used in the aviation industry. . Fuel mixtures were used in 1-cylinder, 4-stroke diesel engine under full load and variable engine speeds. In this experiment, engine performance and emission level are investigated. As a conclusion, as the JetA-1 ratio increases in the mixture, lower nitrogen oxide (NOx emission is measured. Also, specific fuel consumption is lowered.

  7. Effect of the use of olive–pomace oil biodiesel/diesel fuel blends in a compression ignition engine: Preliminary exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Olive–pomace oil (OPO) biodiesel constitute a new second-generation biofuel. • Exergy efficiency and performance of OPO biodiesel, straight and blended with diesel fuel was evaluated. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided similar performance parameters. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided similar exergy efficiency compared to diesel fuel. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided no exergy cost increment compared to diesel fuel. - Abstract: Although biodiesel is among the most studied biofuels for diesel engines, it is usually produced from edible oils, which gives way to controversy between the use of land for fuel and food. For this reason, residues like olive–pomace oil are considered alternative raw materials to produce biodiesel that do not compete with the food industry. To gain knowledge about the implications of its use, olive–pomace oil methyl ester, straight and blended with diesel fuel, was evaluated as fuel in a direct injection diesel engine Perkins AD 3-152 and compared to the use of fossil diesel fuel. Performance curves were analyzed at full load and different speed settings. To perform the exergy balance of the tested fuels, the operating conditions corresponding to maximum engine power values were considered. It was found that the tested fuels offer similar performance parameters. When straight biodiesel was used instead of diesel fuel, maximum engine power decreased to 5.6%, while fuel consumption increased up to 7%. However, taking into consideration the Second Law of the Thermodynamics, the exergy efficiency and unitary exergetic cost reached during the operation of the engine under maximum power condition for the assessed fuels do not display significant differences. Based on the exergy results, it may be concluded that olive–pomace oil biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel may substitute the use of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines without any exergy cost increment

  8. Coriander seed oil methyl esters as biodiesel fuel: Unique fatty acid composition and excellent oxidative stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt%) acid. Most of the remaining fatty acid profile consisted of common 18 carbon constituents such as linoleic (9Z,12Z-octadeca-dienoic; 13.0 wt%), oleic (9Z-octadecenoic; 7.6 wt%) and stearic (octadecanoic; 3.1 wt%) acids. A standard transesterification procedure with methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst was used to provide C. sativum oil methyl esters (CSME). Acid-catalyzed pretreatment was necessary beforehand to reduce the acid value of the oil from 2.66 to 0.47 mg g-1. The derived cetane number, kinematic viscosity, and oxidative stability (Rancimat method) of CSME was 53.3, 4.21 mm2 s-1 (40 oC), and 14.6 h (110 oC). The cold filter plugging and pour points were -15 oC and -19 oC, respectively. Other properties such as acid value, free and total glycerol content, iodine value, as well as sulfur and phosphorous contents were acceptable according to the biodiesel standards ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Also reported are lubricity, heat of combustion, and Gardner color, along with a comparison of CSME to soybean oil methyl esters (SME). CSME exhibited higher oxidative stability, superior low temperature properties, and lower iodine value than SME. In summary, CSME has excellent fuel properties as a result of its unique fatty acid composition.

  9. Experimental study of the oxidation of large surrogates for diesel and biodiesel fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Hichem Hakka, Mohammed; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Battin Leclerc, Frédérique

    2009-01-01

    The experimental study of the oxidation of two blend surrogates for diesel and biodiesel fuels, n decane/n-hexadecane and n-decane/methyl palmitate (74/26 mol/mol), has been performed in a jet stirred reactor over a wide range of temperatures covering both low, and high-temperature regions (550-1100 K), at a residence time of 1.5 s, at quasi atmospheric pressure with high dilution in helium (hydrocarbon inlet mole fraction of 0.002) and at stoichiometric conditions. Numerous reaction products...

  10. Determination of Compatibility of Some Biodiesel Properties Produced under Turkey Conditions to Standards and Effects of Fuel Spraying Amount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Guven

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, viscosity values that is one of the rheological properties of biodiesel samples that have been produced under Turkey conditions. In addition to this, specific weight values that are effective on directly to engine performance curves were also determined. Compatibility of these values to standards were examined. Kinematic viscosity measurements at two different temperatures namely 20 and 40 °C were carried out to determine the effect of temperature on viscosity change. Density measurements according to the standard at 15 °C was also set. In this study, eight biodiesel samples were collected from markets (4 of them are enrolled to Industry and Commerce provincial Directorates, the other four are not registered, and 1 diesel sample as comparison sample were used. In addition to viscosity and specific weight measurements, effect of viscosity and specific weight changes on the amount of fuel sprayed from injector by using 3 different types injectors that are used in different brand widely used tractor engines was determined. In addition to these effects of fuel with different density and viscosity on distribution of sprayed fuel in combustion chamber was determined by manufacturing a model combustion chamber that has identical with tractor combustion chambers. According to research results, increasing of the temperature decreased the viscosity values highly. Including the registered samples, in the great majority of biodiesel samples viscosity and specific weight values were determined to be non-standard. Due to high specific weight and viscosity, amount the sprayed fuel were found higher for all injector and biodiesel samples compared to sprayed diesel amount. According to distrubition in combustion chamber, the highest fuel amount was found for biodiesel 9 that has the maximum viscosity. Diesel was spryed the furthest points in combustion chamber and its distribution was found more homogenity compared with those biodiesel samples.

  11. Combustion Analysis of a CI Engine Performance Using Waste Cooking Biodiesel Fuel with an Artificial Neural Network Aid

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamhassan NAJAFI; Ghobadian, Barat; Talal F. YUSAF; Hadi RAHIMI

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive combustion analysis has been conducted to evaluate the performance of a commercial DI engine, water cooled two cylinders, in-line, naturally aspirated, RD270 Ruggerini diesel engine using waste vegetable cooking oil as an alternative fuel. In order to compare the brake power and the torques values of the engine, it has been tested under same operating conditions with diesel fuel and waste cooking biodiesel fuel blends. The results were found to be very comparable. The properti...

  12. Effectiveness of paper-structured catalyst for the operation of biodiesel-fueled solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang-Tuyen, Tran; Kaida, Taku; Sakamoto, Mio; Sasaki, Kazunari; Shiratori, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    Mg/Al-hydrotalcite (HDT)-dispersed paper-structured catalyst (PSC) was prepared by a simple paper-making process. The PSC exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the steam reforming of model biodiesel fuel (BDF), pure oleic acid methyl ester (oleic-FAME, C19H36O2) which is a mono-unsaturated component of practical BDFs. The PSC exhibited fuel conversion comparable to a pelletized catalyst material, here, conventional Ni-zirconia cermet anode for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with less than one-hundredth Ni weight. Performance of electrolyte-supported cell connected with the PSC was evaluated in the feed of oleic-FAME, and stable operation was achieved. After 60 h test, coking was not observed in both SOFC anode and PSC.

  13. Modeling analysis of urea direct injection on the NOx emission reduction of biodiesel fueled diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effects of urea direct injection on NOx emissions reduction was investigated. • Aqueous urea solution was proposed to be injected after the fuel injection process. • The optimized injection strategy achieved a reduction efficiency of 58%. • There were no severe impacts on the CO emissions and BSFC. - Abstract: In this paper, a numerical simulation study was conducted to explore the possibility of an alternative approach: direct aqueous urea solution injection on the reduction of NOx emissions of a biodiesel fueled diesel engine. Simulation studies were performed using the 3D CFD simulation software KIVA4 coupled with CHEMKIN II code for pure biodiesel combustion under realistic engine operating conditions of 2400 rpm and 100% load. The chemical behaviors of the NOx formation and urea/NOx interaction processes were modeled by a modified extended Zeldovich mechanism and urea/NO interaction sub-mechanism. To ensure an efficient NOx reduction process, various aqueous urea injection strategies in terms of post injection timing, injection angle, and injection rate and urea mass fraction were carefully examined. The simulation results revealed that among all the four post injection timings (10 °ATDC, 15 °ATDC, 20 °ATDC and 25 °ATDC) that were evaluated, 15 °ATDC post injection timing consistently demonstrated a lower NO emission level. The orientation of the aqueous urea injection was also shown to play a critical role in determining the NOx removal efficiency, and 50 degrees injection angle was determined to be the optimal injection orientation which gave the most NOx reduction. In addition, both the urea/water ratio and aqueous urea injection rate demonstrated important roles which affected the thermal decomposition of urea into ammonia and the subsequent NOx removal process, and it was suggested that 50% urea mass fraction and 40% injection rate presented the lowest NO emission levels. At last, with the optimized injection strategy, the

  14. Biodiesel and its properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a bio-based alternative to conventional diesel fuel derived from petroleum. It consists mainly of the fatty acid esters of vegetable oils or other triacylglycerol feedstocks. This chapter provides a background on biodiesel as well as an overview of biodiesel production, analysis, and pr...

  15. Biodiesel Fuel Production from Marine Microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and Measurement of its Viscosity and Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sujin Jeba Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a fuel derives from transesterification of fats and oils. It is renewable and non-toxic ecofriendly fuel with less CO2 and NO2 emissions. Microalgae are known to contain more lipid content than macroalgae and most other oil crops. In this study, we extracted biodiesel from three microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and also measured the density and viscosity of biofuel obtained from these microalgae. Pavlova lutheri yielded more oil than the other two algae with biomass left over Dunaliella salina was more. The density of biodiesel obtained from these microalgae was between 0.86 g/cm3 and 0.90 g/cm3 with viscosity in the range 3.92 mm2/sec to 4.5 mm2/sec showing high density than the other oils.

  16. Role of a biodiesel blend in sustaining the energy and environment as a CI engine fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Saravanan, G.Nagarajan, G.Lakshmi Narayana rao, S.Sampath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, biodiesel derived from high free fatty acid (FFA crude rice bran oil, (CRBO a non-edible vegetable oil was tested as a fuel in a compression ignition engine in blended form to test its suitability and also its ability to create a sustainable environment. A 4.4 kW direct injection stationary diesel engine was used for experimentation. Biodiesel (crude rice bran oil methyl ester blend was prepared by mixing 20 % crude rice bran oil methyl ester (CRBME with 80 % diesel on volume basis. An enhanced thermal oxidation was observed for the CRBME blend which oxidizes most of the UBHC into CO and CO2. As a result of this, UBHC emission and smoke density were reduced by 28 % and 35 % respectively with a marginal increase in CO and NOx emission than diesel. It was also observed that by blending CRBME with diesel, the brake thermal efficiency of the engine decreased only marginally which ensures the suitability of CRBME blend as a CI engine fuel. Experimental results show almost similar performance in CRBME blend when compared to diesel which strengthens its ability to have a sustainable environment. This research work can be extended to improve the thermal oxidation process which may result in further reduction in CO, UBHC and particulate emission than that of the emissions reported in this paper.

  17. Fuel properties of highly polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters: Prediction of fuel properties of algal biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils and animal fats, can be derived from other triacylglycerol-containing feedstocks. Especially algae are being considered for this purpose due to their claimed high production potential. However, there are no comprehensive reports regarding...

  18. Study of induction periods of biodiesel fuels oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation in the air of methyl esters based on rapeseed oil (MERO) and methyl esters based on frying oils (MEFRIT) used as the alternative diesel fuels, unstabilized and stabilized by pyrogallol (PY) 0.04 wt. % and butyl-hydroxytoluene (BHT) 0.05 wt. %, has been studied by differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetry (DT/TG) under non-isothermal conditions for various heating rates and by Rancimat test under isothermal conditions. Low oxidation stability of the undistilled methyl esters was measured. The induction period increased expressively by the addition of low quantities of selected antioxidants. Especially high stabilising effect was reached for pyrogallol. The parameters of an Arrhenius-like equation describing the temperature dependence of oxidation induction period have been obtained. The results obtained by the both methods are compared and the differences are accounted for by the oxygen diffusion within the samples. The DT/TG method is suitable for the evaluation of the oxidation stability of the studied esters. (authors)

  19. 4个生物柴油树种燃料特性的评价%Assessment-on Fuel Properties of Four Woody Biodiesel Plants Species in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王利兵; 于海燕; 贺晓辉

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we studied oil contents of the fruits or seed kernels, fatty acid composition and biodiesel fuel properties of four major potential woody biodiesel plant species ( Pistacia chinensis, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Armeniaca sibirica and Armeniaca mandshurica) in the northern region of China. The evaluated biodiesel fuel properties include the density, kinematic viscosity, cetane number, cold filter plugging point and oxidation stability. The results showed that fruits or seed kernels of the four woody plants had high oil content ( 35. 0% , 58. 9% , 50. 2% and 47. 2% , respectively). The Fatty acid composition of their oils accorded with the ideal biodiesel feedstock standard. The four woody plants had good biodiesel fuel properties, especially the cetane number that was conformed to ASTM D6751 standards (P. chinensis met the specification from the EN 14214 biodiesel standard) , and the cold fluidity of A. sibirica and A. mandshurica were excellent (cold filter plugging point of -14℃) . In conclusion, the four woody biodiesel plants have been identified as the promising biodiesel feedstock, which result would provide references for the exploitation and utilization of biodiesel plants in the northern region of China.

  20. Catalytic Technologies for Biodiesel Fuel Production and Utilization of Glycerol: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Maeda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 10 million tons of biodiesel fuel (BDF have been produced in the world from the transesterification of vegetable oil with methanol by using acid catalysts (sulfuric acid, H2SO4, alkaline catalysts (sodium hydroxide, NaOH or potassium hydroxide, KOH, solid catalysts and enzymes. Unfortunately, the price of BDF is still more expensive than that of petro diesel fuel due to the lack of a suitable raw material oil. Here, we review the best selection of BDF production systems including raw materials, catalysts and production technologies. In addition, glycerol formed as a by-product needs to be converted to useful chemicals to reduce the amount of glycerol waste. With this in mind, we have also reviewed some recent studies on the utilization of glycerol.

  1. Exposures to Emissions from Combustion of Biodiesel Fuels (B100/B20) Elicit Differential Responses in Redox-Sensitive Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with higher risk for cardiopulmonary diseases but mechanisms for the effects remain unknown. Combustion of biodiesel fuels (BD) is associated with lower emission of PM but the health consequences of exposure to exhaust fr...

  2. Temperature effects on particulate emissions from DPF-equipped diesel trucks operating on conventional and biodiesel fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two diesel trucks equipped with a particulate filter (DPF) were tested at two ambient temperatures (70oF and 20oF), fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel (B20)) and operating loads (a heavy and light weight). The test procedure included three driving cycles, a cold ...

  3. Combustion of biodiesel fuel produced from hazelnut soapstock/waste sunflower oil mixture in a diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usta, N.; Conkur, E.S.; Can, A.C.; Topcu, M. [Pamukkale University (Turkey). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Ozturk, E.; Can, O. [Pamukkale University (Turkey). Automotive Dept.; Nas, S.; Con, A.H. [Pamakulle University (Turkey). Food Engineering Dept.

    2005-03-01

    Biodiesel is considered as an alternative fuel to Diesel fuel No. 2, which can be generally produced from different kinds of vegetable oils. Since the prices of edible vegetable oils are higher than that of Diesel fuel No. 2, waste vegetable oils and non-edible crude vegetable oils are preferred as potential low priced biodiesel sources. In addition, it is possible to use soapstock, a by-product of edible oil production, for cheap biodiesel production. In this study, a methyl ester biodiesel was produced from a hazelnut soapstock/waste sunflower oil mixture using methanol, sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide in a two-stage process. The effects of the methyl ester addition to Diesel No. 2 on the performance and emissions of a four cycle, four cylinder, turbocharged indirect injection (IDI) Diesel engine were examined at both full and partial loads. Experimental results showed that the hazelnut soapstock/waste sunflower oil methyl ester can be partially substituted for the Diesel fuel at most operating conditions in terms of the performance parameters and emissions without any engine modification and preheating of the blends. (author)

  4. THE EFFECT OF BIODIESEL AND BIOETHANOL BLENDED DIESEL FUEL ON THE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A DIRECT INJECTION DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Venkata Subbaiah

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available History has seen fuel innovations being driven majorly by transportation needs rather than the overall need to revolutionize the energy needs of the society. Biofuels such as biodiesel and bioethanol are now receiving the impetus required for becoming a fuel source for the future. One of the ways to reduce the dependence on fossil diesel is the blending of bioethanol with conventional diesel. However, an emulsifier or a co-solvent is required to stabilize the blend. The ricebran oil biodiesel offers an alternative application as an emulsifier for diesel-ethanol blends to form diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blends. In the present study the rice bran oil biodiesel was used in different ways such as pure biodiesel, blending with diesel and diesel- ethanol blends. The performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection (DI diesel engine when fuelled with conventional diesel fuel, pure biodiesel, a blend of diesel and biodiesel and three blends of diesel-biodiesel-ethanol were studied over the entire range of load on the engine. The experimental results showed that the highest brake thermal efficiency was observed with 30% ethanol in diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blends. The exhaust gas temperature and sound reduced with the increase of ethanol percentage in diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blends. The Carbon monoxide, smoke, exhaust gas temperature and sound reduced with the increase of ethanol percentage in diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blends. The minimum values of Carbon monoxides, smoke, exhaust gas temperature and sound intensity were observed with the blend BE30 and were respectively 41.23%, 14.5%, 0.57% and 11.53% lower than that of the diesel fuel. The Oxides of nitrogen and carbon dioxide emissions increased with the increased percentage of ethanol in diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blends. The hydrocarbon emissions increased with ethanol but lower than that of the diesel fuel by a maximum of 35.35% with 10% ethanol in diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blend. The

  5. Combustion Analysis of a CI Engine Performance Using Waste Cooking Biodiesel Fuel with an Artificial Neural Network Aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhassan NAJAFI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive combustion analysis has been conducted to evaluate the performance of a commercial DI engine, water cooled two cylinders, in-line, naturally aspirated, RD270 Ruggerini diesel engine using waste vegetable cooking oil as an alternative fuel. In order to compare the brake power and the torques values of the engine, it has been tested under same operating conditions with diesel fuel and waste cooking biodiesel fuel blends. The results were found to be very comparable. The properties of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oil was measured based on ASTM standards. The total sulfur content of the produced biodiesel fuel was 18 ppm which is 28 times lesser than the existing diesel fuel sulfur content used in the diesel vehicles operating in Tehran city (500 ppm. The maximum power and torque produced using diesel fuel was 18.2 kW and 64.2 Nm at 3200 and 2400 rpm respectively. By adding 20% of waste vegetable oil methyl ester, it was noticed that the maximum power and torque increased by 2.7 and 2.9% respectively, also the concentration of the CO and HC emissions have significantly decreased when biodiesel was used. An artificial neural network (ANN was developed based on the collected data of this work. Multi layer perceptron network (MLP was used for nonlinear mapping between the input and the output parameters. Different activation functions and several rules were used to assess the percentage error between the desired and the predicted values. The results showed that the training algorithm of Back Propagation was sufficient enough in predicting the engine torque, specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas components for different engine speeds and different fuel blends ratios. It was found that the R2 (R: the coefficient of determination values are 0.99994, 1, 1 and 0.99998 for the engine torque, specific fuel consumption, CO and HC emissions, respectively.

  6. Biodiesel biorefinery: opportunities and challenges for microbial production of fuels and chemicals from glycerol waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida João R M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The considerable increase in biodiesel production worldwide in the last 5 years resulted in a stoichiometric increased coproduction of crude glycerol. As an excess of crude glycerol has been produced, its value on market was reduced and it is becoming a “waste-stream” instead of a valuable “coproduct”. The development of biorefineries, i.e. production of chemicals and power integrated with conversion processes of biomass into biofuels, has been singled out as a way to achieve economically viable production chains, valorize residues and coproducts, and reduce industrial waste disposal. In this sense, several alternatives aimed at the use of crude glycerol to produce fuels and chemicals by microbial fermentation have been evaluated. This review summarizes different strategies employed to produce biofuels and chemicals (1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, ethanol, n-butanol, organic acids, polyols and others by microbial fermentation of glycerol. Initially, the industrial use of each chemical is briefly presented; then we systematically summarize and discuss the different strategies to produce each chemical, including selection and genetic engineering of producers, and optimization of process conditions to improve yield and productivity. Finally, the impact of the developments obtained until now are placed in perspective and opportunities and challenges for using crude glycerol to the development of biodiesel-based biorefineries are considered. In conclusion, the microbial fermentation of glycerol represents a remarkable alternative to add value to the biodiesel production chain helping the development of biorefineries, which will allow this biofuel to be more competitive.

  7. Predicting the physical–chemical properties of biodiesel fuels assessing the molecular structure with the SAFT−γ group contribution approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of biodiesel as fuel are strongly defined by the molecular structure of its constituent species (saturated, unsaturated and hydroxylated fatty acid alkyl esters). Improving fuel properties and energetic patterns in biodiesel implies optimising its fatty ester structures and compositions. Biodiesel fuels derived from different sources can have significantly varying fatty acid profiles and properties, which claims for the theoretical prediction of the thermophysical and phase equilibria properties of biodiesel compounds and its mixtures. In this work the SAFT-γ (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory by group contribution) is applied for predicting these properties in biodiesel fuels by adequately representing the physical behaviour and stereochemistry of biodiesel molecules. A realistic representation of the molecular structure of long chain methyl esters and esters that contains hydroxyl groups, which are the typical biodiesel fuel constituents, is obtained. We implemented a simplex simulated annealing algorithm as global optimisation method to determine the SAFT-γ parameters for the groups that fully represent the biodiesel compounds, which were fitting to experimental data available for analogous chemical families like secondary alkanols and short chain esters. These parameters are theoretically justifiable following physically meaningful trends and can be generalised to others fatty acid methyl esters in the same homologous series. The group of like and unlike parameters obtained were used to represent the thermophysical properties of several commercial biodiesel fuels. The theory provides a very good description of the liquid vapour equilibria behaviour of the chemical families used to estimate the set of parameters. With the proposed model, any potential biodiesel fuel from any feedstock can be represented and modelled. - Highlights: • Biodiesel fuels are modelled using the molecular thermodynamic based group con-tribution approach SAFT-γ.

  8. Performance and emissions of a diesel engine fueled by biodiesel–diesel, biodiesel–diesel-additive and kerosene–biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Various biodiesel blends are tested in a diesel engine for performance and emissions. • A new biodiesel additive, Wintro XC 30 is studied for combustion in a diesel engine. • Kerosene–biodiesel series show improved performance and emissions at high load. • NO2 at low load condition has a significant share in total NOx for all fuels. • B5A has lower cloud point, CO and HC emissions, but improved efficiency than diesel. - Abstract: This study investigates the performance and emissions of a direct injection (DI) diesel engine with three fuel series: biodiesel–diesel, biodiesel–diesel-additive and kerosene–biodiesel. Biodiesel is produced from canola oil and the effect of a new biodiesel additive, Wintron XC 30 (2 vol.%), is examined for engine performance and emissions. Systematic tests are undertaken over different blends, such as 0, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 volume percent of biodiesel in biodiesel–diesel and biodiesel–diesel-additive blends, and 0, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 volume percent of kerosene in kerosene–biodiesel blends. Engine performance and emissions at rated engine speed of 1800 rpm under three different loading conditions (low, medium and high) are investigated. Brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) and fuel conversion efficiency (ηf) are used to compare engine performance, and emission analysis is based on parameters such as carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx)

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of spray-atomization characteristics of biodiesel fuel in various fuel and ambient temperatures conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to reveal the effects of fuel temperatures and ambient gas conditions on the spray-atomization behavior of soybean oil methyl ester (SME) fuel. The spray-atomization behavior was analyzed through spray parameters such as the axial distance from the nozzle tip, local and overall Sauter mean diameter (SMD). These parameters were obtained from a spray visualization system and a droplet measuring system. In addition, the experimental results were compared with the numerical results calculated by the KIVA-3V code. It was revealed that the increase of the fuel temperature (from 300 K to 360 K) little affects the spray liquid tip penetration. The increase of the ambient gas temperature (from 300 K to 450 K) caused a increase in the spray liquid tip penetration. Also, biodiesel fuel evaporation actively occurred due to the increase in the fuel temperature and the ambient gas temperature. Of special significance was that the highest vapor fuel mass concentration was observed at the center region of the spray axis. In the results of the microscopic characteristics, the detected local droplet size at the axial direction and overall droplet size at the axial and radial direction in a control volume increased when the fuel temperature increased. This is believed to be due to an increase in the number of small droplets that quickly evaporated. In addition, the increased fuel temperature caused the decrease of the number of droplets and the increase of the vapor fuel mass. The mean axial velocity of droplets decreased with increasing fuel temperature.

  10. Emission Performance of Selected Biodiesels Fuels - VTT's Contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakko, P.; Westerholm, M.

    2000-10-15

    The target of the IEA/AMF Annex XIII 'Performance of biodiesel' was to perform an extensive analysis of exhaust emissions using biodiesel in new diesel engines. The participants of the project were Belgium, Canada, Finland, Japan, Sweden, USA, and the Netherlands. The work of Annex XIII was carried out both at ORNL and at VTT. This report includes only VTT's results. A summary report of the results of both laboratories will be prepared later. The major part of the tests was carried out with a Euro 2 emission level Volvo bus engine. Tests were made without a catalyst, with an oxidation catalyst and with a CRT particulate trap. Some tests were also carried out with a medium-duty Valmet farm tractor engine and with a light-duty Audi TDI vehicle. Several test cycles were used in the tests. In addition, engine mapping tests were carried out with the Volvo and the Valmet engine. The vegetable oil esters studied were rapeseed methyl ester (RME), soy bean oil methyl ester (SME) and used vegetable oil methyl ester (UVOME). RME and SME were tested as 30% blends in European grade diesel fuel (EN590) and as neat esters. RME was also blended (30%) into Swedish Environmental Class 1 diesel fuel (RFD). The test fuel matrix also included Canadian diesel fuel blended with 10% hydrated tall oil (TO10) and an emulsion of Swedish Environmental Class 1 diesel and some 15% ethanol (EtDI). Compared to hydrocarbon fuels, the bioesters reduced CO end HC emissions in most cases. Adding 30% ester in the EN590 fuel did not affect the NOx emission significantly, whereas neat ester resulted in an increase of around 10% in the NOx emission. When 30% ester was blended into the RDF fuel, the NOx emission increased by some 5% with the bus and the tractor engine, but decreased by about 5% with the TDI vehicle. The EtDI fuel resulted in a lower NOx emission than the EN590 fuel with the bus engine, but a higher emission with the TDI vehicle. The effect of esters on the formaldehyde

  11. Catalytic Synthesis of Glycerol tert-Butyl Ethers as Fuel Additives from the Biodiesel By-Product Glycerol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol is a major by-product in the biodiesel production process. Every 100 kg of biodiesel produced generates approximately 10 kg of crude glycerol. As the biodiesel industry has expanded rapidly in recent years, finding new uses of the excess crude glycerol is important. Many studies have examined alternative uses of crude glycerol. One of them is the use of glycerol derivatives, such as glycerol tert-butyl ethers as fuel additives. In this paper, the etherification kinetics of glycerol with tert-butyl alcohol to glycerol tert-butyl ethers was studied using an Amberlyst catalyst. The influences of the catalyst type and loading, reaction time, molar ratio, and temperature were investigated in detail.

  12. Biodiesel: o ônus e o bônus de produzir combustível Biodiesel: the charge and the bond of the fuel producing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Regis Ferreira da Silva

    2008-06-01

    do óleo diesel, mas as vantagens ambientais e agrícolas dependem de estudos pendentes em vários elos da cadeia produtiva.The petroleum dependence and the pollution generated by its use are the big disadvantages of this fuel, which demand look for another source of energy. Biodiesel is the fuel obtained from vegetables oils or animal fat, which can substitute petroleum diesel, total or partially. Three processes are possible to obtain biodiesel: cracking, tranesterfication or esterification, having glycerin as a derivate. The Brazilian National Program for Production and Use of Biodiesel stimulates the transesterification process, which is the chemical reaction of the triglycerides with alcohols (methanol or ethanol using a catalyst (NaOH. The goal of this revision was to discuss the advantages and disadvantages that biodiesel production can bring for agriculture and environmental and the competition that could occur for natural resources between food and fuel production. The biodiesel obtained from renewable sources has as advantages the lower pollutant it gases emission and lower persistence in the soil. However, it has a higher cost production than petroleum diesel and the energy balance is less favourable, although it can vary with the system production used. The higher demand for oleaginous grains will increase the number of species used in crop production. In the south of Brazil, the species more stimulated are soybean, sunflower, canola and castor plant. Castor, that is an alternative for drought regions, is being genetically modified for fuel production, but it has the big disadvantage of ricin production, which is very poisonous for human and environment. Sunflower produces a very healthy oil for human use, with high levels of fat poliinsaturated acids. Biodiesel is a good alternative to substitute partial or totally petroleum diesel, but the environmental and agricultural advantages depend on studies in every link of its production chain.

  13. BIOFEAT: Biodiesel fuel processor for a vehicle fuel cell auxiliary power unit. Study of the feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, M.; Bollito, G.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, S.

    An integrated auxiliary power unit (APU) based on a 10 kW e integrated biodiesel fuel processor has been designed and is being developed. Auto-thermal reforming (ATR) and thermal cracking (TC) were considered for converting the fuel into a hydrogen-rich gas suitable for PEM fuel cells. The fuel processor includes also a gas clean-up system that will reduce the carbon monoxide in the primary processor exit gas to below 10 ppm via a new heat-integrated CO clean-up unit, based on the assembly of catalytic heat exchange plates, so as to meet the operational requirements of a PEMFC stack. This article is devoted to the study and selection of the proper feed strategy for the primary fuel processor. Different pre-treatment and feed alternatives (e.g. based on nozzles or simple coils) were devised and tested for the ATR processors, which turned out to be the preferred primary processing route. A nozzle-based strategy was finally selected along with special recommendations about the constituent materials and the operating procedures to be adopted to avoid coking and nozzle corrosion as well as to allow a wide turn down ratio.

  14. Investigation on utilization of biogas and Karanja oil biodiesel in dual fuel mode in a single cylinder DI diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabani Prasanna Pattanaik, Chandrakanta Nayak, Basanta Kumar Nanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experiments were performed on a single cylinder DI diesel engine by using bio-gas as a primary fuel and Karanja oil biodiesel and diesel oil as secondary fuels in dual fuel operation. The experiments were performed to measure performance parameters i.e. (brake specific fuel consumption, brake thermal efficiency and exhaust gas temperature and emission parameters such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide unburned hydro carbon and smoke etc. at different load conditions. For the dual-fuel system, the intake system of the test engine was modified to convert into biogas and biodiesel of a dual-fueled combustion engine. Biogas was injected during the intake process by gas injectors. The study showed that, the engine performance parameters like BP, BTE and EGT gradually increase with increase in engine load for all test conditions using both pilot fuels diesel and KOBD. However, the BSFC of the engine showed decreasing slope with increase in engine load for all test conditions. Above 40% engine load the BSFC values for all test fuels are very close to each other. The engine emission analysis showed that the CO2, CO and NOx emissions increase with increase in engine load for both single and dual fuel mode operation using both pilot fuels. The NOx concentration of exhaust gases in dual fuel mode is superior than that of single mode.

  15. Assessment of energy performance and air pollutant emissions in a diesel engine generator fueled with water-containing ethanol-biodiesel-diesel blend of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass based oxygenated fuels have been identified as possible replacement of fossil fuel due to pollutant emission reduction and decrease in over-reliance on fossil fuel energy. In this study, 4 v% water-containing ethanol was mixed with (65-90%) diesel using (5-30%) biodiesel (BD) and 1 v% butanol as stabilizer and co-solvent respectively. The fuels were tested against those of biodiesel-diesel fuel blends to investigate the effect of addition of water-containing ethanol for their energy efficiencies and pollutant emissions in a diesel-fueled engine generator. Experimental results indicated that the fuel blend mix containing 4 v% of water-containing ethanol, 1 v% butanol and 5-30 v% of biodiesel yielded stable blends after 30 days standing. BD1041 blend of fuel, which composed of 10 v% biodiesel, 4 v% of water-containing ethanol and 1 v% butanol demonstrated -0.45 to 1.6% increase in brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC, mL kW-1 h-1) as compared to conventional diesel. The better engine performance of BD1041 was as a result of complete combustion, and lower reaction temperature based on the water cooling effect, which reduced emissions to 2.8-6.0% for NOx, 12.6-23.7% particulate matter (PM), 20.4-23.8% total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 30.8-42.9% total BaPeq between idle mode and 3.2 kW power output of the diesel engine generator. The study indicated that blending diesel with water-containing ethanol could achieve the goal of more green sustainability. -- Highlights: → Water-containing ethanol was mixed with diesel using biodiesel and butanol as stabilizer and co-solvent, respectively. → Fuel blends with 4 v% water-containing ethanol, 1 v% butanol, 5-30 v% biodiesel and conventional diesel yielded a stable blended fuel after more than 30 days. → Due to more complete combustion and water quench effect, target fuel BD1041 was gave good energy performance and significant reduction of PM, NOx, total PAH and total BaPeq emissions. → Study

  16. Experimental analysis of a Diesel Engine fuelled with Biodiesel Blend using Di-ethyl ether as fuel additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR.Manickam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the use of di-ethyl ether (DEE as an oxygenated additive with 20% Karanja methyl ester diesel blend (B20. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of adding 5%, 10% and 15% di-ethyl ether (DEE with Karanja methyl ester (KME on performance, emission and combustion characteristics of a direct injection diesel engine operated at a constant speed of 1500 rpm at different operating conditions. The results showed that the brake thermal efficiency slightly increased and the exhaust emissions are significantly decreased with DEE with biodiesel at full load conditions. The results revealed that an optimum blend of 10% DEE added with biodiesel resulted in a slight decrease in brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC of 8.6% while the brake thermal efficiency increased by 4.8%. DEE added with 20% biodiesel showed lower nitrogen oxide (NO emission and slightly higher carbon dioxide (CO2 emission as compared to diesel. Carbon monoxide (CO, hydrocarbon (HC and smoke emissions decreased by 40%, 26% and 12% respectively compared to B20 biodiesel. The combustion characteristics like higher cylinder pressure, heat release rate and shorter ignition delay period were observed with DEE added biodiesel at full load conditions.

  17. Production and comparative fuel properties of biodiesel from non-edible oils: Jatropha curcas, Sterculia foetida and Ceiba pentandra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Biodiesel is an effective way to overcome environmental issue by diesel fuel. • Two stage acid (H2SO4) and base (NaOH) catalyst transesterification process ware carried out to produce methyl ester. • Properties of produced jatropha, sterculia and ceiba methyl ester are within the ASTM D6751 standard. • The methyl ester content was 96.75%, 97.50% and 97.72% for JCME, SFME and CPME respectively. - Abstract: Biodiesel production from non-edible vegetable oil is one of the effective ways to overcome the problems associated with energy crisis and environmental issues. The non-edible oils represent potential sources for future energy supply. In this study, the physical and chemical properties of crude Jatropha curcas oil (CJCO), crude Sterculia foetida oil (CSFO) and crude Ceiba pentandra oil (CCPO) and its methyl ester have been studied. The acid values of three oils were found to be 12.78 mg KOH per g, 5.11 mg KOH per g and 11.99 mg KOH per g which required acid-esterification and alkali-transesterification process. Acid value was decreased by esterification process using sulfuric acid anhydrous (H2SO4) as a catalyst and alkaline (NaOH) catalyst transesterification was carried out for the conversion of crude oil to methyl esters. The optimal conditions of FAME yield achieved for those three biodiesel were 96.75%, 97.50% and 97.72% respectively. Furthermore, the fuel properties of J. curcas methyl ester (JCME), S. foetida methyl ester (SFME) and C. pentandra methyl ester (CPME) were determined and evaluated. As a result, those produced biodiesel matched and fulfilled ASTM 6751 and EN 14214 biodiesel standards. Based on the results, JCME, SFME and CPME are potential non-edible feedstock for biodiesel production

  18. Characterization and Effect of Using Mahua Oil Biodiesel as Fuel in Compression Ignition Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.Kapilan; T.P.Ashok Babu; R.P.Reddy

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in India, to search for suitable alternative fuels that are environment friendly. This led to the choice of Mahua Oil (MO) as one of the main alternative fuels to diesel. In this investigation, Mahua Oil Biodiesel (MOB) and its blend with diesel were used as fuel in a single cylinder, direct injection and com-pression ignition engine. The MOB was prepared from MO by transesterification using methanol and potassium hydroxide. The fuel properties of MOB are close to the diesel and confirm to the ASTM standards. From the en-gine test analysis, it was observed that the MOB, B5 and B20 blend results in lower CO, HC and smoke emis-sions as compared to diesel. But the B5 and B20 blends results in higher efficiency as compared to MOB. Hence MOB or blends of MOB and diesel 035 or B20) can be used as a substitute for diesel in diesel engines used in transportation as well as in the agriculture sector.

  19. Impact of a Diesel High Pressure Common Rail Fuel System and Onboard Vehicle Storage on B20 Biodiesel Blend Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Earl; McCormick, Robert L.; Sigelko, Jenny; Johnson, Stuart; Zickmann, Stefan; Lopes, Shailesh; Gault, Roger; Slade, David

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of high-pressure common-rail (HPCR) fuel systems, which subject diesel fuels to higher temperatures and pressures, has brought into question the efficacy of ASTM International specifications for biodiesel and biodiesel blend oxidation stability, as well as the lack of any stability parameter for diesel fuel. A controlled experiment was developed to investigate the impact of a light-duty diesel HPCR fuel system on the stability of 20% biodiesel (B20) blends under conditions of intermittent use and long-term storage in a relatively hot and dry climate. B20 samples with Rancimat induction periods (IPs) near the current 6.0-hour minimum specification (6.5 hr) and roughly double the ASTM specification (13.5 hr) were prepared from a conventional diesel and a highly unsaturated biodiesel. Four 2011 model year Volkswagen Passats equipped with HPCR fuel injection systems were utilized: one on B0, two on B20-6.5 hr, and one on B20-13.5 hr. Each vehicle was operated over a one-hour drive cycle in a hot running loss test cell to initially stress the fuel. The cars were then kept at Volkswagen's Arizona Proving Ground for two (35 degrees C average daily maximum) to six months (26 degrees C average daily maximum). The fuel was then stressed again by running a portion of the one-hour dynamometer drive cycle (limited by the amount of fuel in the tank). Fuel rail and fuel tank samples were analyzed for IP, acid number, peroxide content, polymer content, and ester profile. The HPCR fuel pumps were removed, dismantled, and inspected for deposits or abnormal wear. Analysis of fuels collected during initial dynamometer tests showed no impact of exposure to HPCR conditions. Long-term storage with intermittent use showed that IP remained above 3 hours, acid number below 0.3 mg KOH/g, peroxides low, no change in ester profile, and no production of polymers. Final dynamometer tests produced only small changes in fuel properties. Inspection of the HPCR fuel pumps revealed no

  20. Supercritical Synthesis of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Vaultier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of biodiesel fuel from lipids (vegetable oils and animal fats has gained in importance as a possible source of renewable non-fossil energy in an attempt to reduce our dependence on petroleum-based fuels. The catalytic processes commonly used for the production of biodiesel fuel present a series of limitations and drawbacks, among them the high energy consumption required for complex purification operations and undesirable side reactions. Supercritical fluid (SCF technologies offer an interesting alternative to conventional processes for preparing biodiesel. This review highlights the advances, advantages, drawbacks and new tendencies involved in the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs for biodiesel synthesis.

  1. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-21

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

  2. Analysis of power tiller noise using diesel-biodiesel fuel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Keramat Siavash

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are several sources of noise in an industrial and agriculture environment. Machines with rotating or reciprocating engines are sound-producing sources. Also, the audio signal can be analyzed to discover how well a machine operates. Diesel engines complex noise SPL and sound frequency content both strongly depend on fuel combustion, which produces the so-called combustion noise. Actually, the unpleasant sound signature of diesel engines is due to the harsh and irregular self-ignition of the fuel. Therefore, being able to extract combustion noise from the overall noise would be of prime interest. This would allow engineers to relate the sound quality back to the combustion parameters. The residual noise produced by various sources, is referred to as mechanical noise. Since diesel engine noise radiation is associated with the operators’ and pedestrians’ discomfort, more and more attention to being paid to it. The main sources of noise generation in a diesel engine are exhaust system, mechanical processes such as valve train and combustion that prevail over the other two. In the present work, experimental tests were conducted on a single cylinder diesel engine in order to investigate the combustion noise radiation during stationary state for various diesel and biodiesel fuel blends. Materials and Methods: The engine used in the current study is an ASHTAD DF120-RA70 that is a single cylinder 4 stroke water cooled diesel engine and its nominal power is 7.5 hp at 2200 rpm. The experiment has been done at three positions (Left ear of operator, 1.5 and 7.5 meter away from exhaust based on ISO-5131 and SAE-J1174 standards. For engine speed measurement the detector Lurton 2364 was utilized with a measurement accuracy of 0.001 rpm. To obtain the highest accuracy, contact mode of detector was used. The engine noise was measured by HT157 sound level meter and was digitalized and saved with Sound View software. HT157 uses alow impedance

  3. An experimental study on usage of plastic oil and B20 algae biodiesel blend as substitute fuel to diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesha, D K; Kumara, G Prema; Lalsaheb; Mohammed, Aamir V T; Mohammad, Haseeb A; Kasma, Mufteeb Ain

    2016-05-01

    Usage of plastics has been ever increasing and now poses a tremendous threat to the environment. Millions of tons of plastics are produced annually worldwide, and the waste products have become a common feature at overflowing bins and landfills. The process of converting waste plastic into value-added fuels finds a feasible solution for recycling of plastics. Thus, two universal problems such as problems of waste plastic management and problems of fuel shortage are being tackled simultaneously. Converting waste plastics into fuel holds great promise for both the environmental and economic scenarios. In order to carry out the study on plastic wastes, the pyrolysis process was used. Pyrolysis runs without oxygen and in high temperature of about 250-300 °C. The fuel obtained from plastics is blended with B20 algae oil, which is a biodiesel obtained from microalgae. For conducting the various experiments, a 10-HP single-cylinder four-stroke direct-injection water-cooled diesel engine is employed. The engine is made to run at 1500 rpm and the load is varied gradually from 0 to 100 %. The performance, emission and combustion characteristics are observed. The BTE was observed to be higher with respect to diesel for plastic-biodiesel blend and biodiesel blend by 15.7 and 12.9 %, respectively, at full load. For plastic-biodiesel blend, the emission of UBHC and CO decreases with a slight increase in NO x as compared to diesel. It reveals that fuel properties are comparable with petroleum products. Also, the process of converting plastic waste to fuel has now turned the problems into an opportunity to make wealth from waste. PMID:26695415

  4. Fuel properties of biodiesel from vegetable oils and oil mixtures. Influence of methyl esters distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the quality of biodiesel produced by basic transesterification from several vegetable oils (soybean, rapeseed, sunflower, high oleic sunflower, Cynara Cardunculus L., Brassica Carinata and Jatropha Curca) cultivated in Extremadura has been studied in detail. The influence of raw material composition on properties such as density, viscosity, cetane number, higher heating value, iodine and saponification values and cold filter plugging point has been verified. Other biodiesel properties such as acid value, water content and flash and combustion points were more dependent on characteristics of production process. Biodiesel produced by rapeseed, sunflower and high oleic sunflower oils transesterification have been biofuels with better properties according to Norm EN 14214. Finally, it has been tested that it is possible to use oils mixtures in biodiesel production in order to improve the biodiesel quality. In addition, with the same process conditions and knowing properties of biodiesel from pure oils; for biodiesel from oils mixtures, its methyl esters content, and therefore properties dependent this content can be predicted from a simple mathematical equation proposed in this work. - Highlights: • Biodiesel quality produced by basic transesterification from vegetable oils. • We examine influences of methyl esters distribution on biodiesel properties. • Biofuels from soybean, sunflower and rapeseed oils were with better properties. • Oils mixtures improve biodiesel quality to fulfill Norm EN 14214. • An equation to predict properties of biodiesel from oil mixtures is proposed

  5. Multi-zone modeling of Diesel engine fuel spray development with vegetable oil, bio-diesel or Diesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a model of fuel sprays development in the cylinders of Diesel engines that is two-dimensional, multi-zone, with the issuing jet (from the nozzle) divided into several discrete volumes, called 'zones', formed along the direction of the fuel injection as well as across it. The model follows each zone, with its own time history, as the spray penetrates into the swirling air environment of the combustion chamber before and after wall impingement. After the jet break up time, a group of droplets is generated in each zone, with the model following their motion during heating, evaporation and mixing with the in-cylinder air. The model is applied for the interesting case of using vegetable oils or their derived bio-diesels as fuels, which recently are considered as promising alternatives to petroleum distillates since they are derived from biological sources. Although there are numerous experimental studies that show curtailment of the emitted smoke with possible increase of the emitted NO x against the use of Diesel fuel, there is an apparent scarcity of theoretical models scrutinizing the formation mechanisms of combustion generated emissions when using these biologically derived fuels. Thus, in the present work, a theoretical detailed model of spray formation is developed that is limited to the related investigation of the physical processes by decoupling it from the chemical effects after combustion initiation. The analysis results show how the widely differing physical properties of these fuels, against the normal Diesel fuel, affect greatly the spray formation and consequently the combustion mechanism and the related emissions

  6. DETERMINATION OF HIGHER HEATING VALUE OF BIODIESELS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Sivaramakrishnan; Dr.P.RAVIKUMAR

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel, an alternative fuel can be used in diesel engine as neat or blended with diesel. The physiochemical properties of fuel are important in design of fuel system for compression ignition engine run on diesel,biodiesel or biodiesel blend. The HHV is an important property which characterizes the energy content of a fuel such as solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. The biodiesels were characterized for their physical and main fuel properties including viscosity, density, flash point and highe...

  7. Biodiesel production, properties and feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is an environmentally attractive alternative to conventional petroleum diesel fuel (petrodiesel). Produced by transesterification with a monohydric alcohol, usually methanol, biodiesel has many important technical advantag...

  8. Business management for biodiesel producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerpen, Jon Van [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The material in this book is intended to provide the reader with information about the biodiesel and liquid fuels industry, biodiesel start-up issues, legal and regulatory issues, and operational concerns.

  9. Market penetration of biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Szulczyk, Bruce A. McCarl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research examines in detail the technology and economics of substituting biodiesel for diesel #2. This endeavor examines three areas. First, the benefits of biodiesel are examined, and the technical problems of large-scale implementation. Second, the biodiesel production possibilities are examined for soybean oil, corn oil, tallow, and yellow grease, which are the largest sources of feedstocks for the United States. Examining in detail the production possibilities allows to identity the extent of technological change, production costs, byproducts, and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Finally, a U.S. agricultural model, FASOMGHG was used to predict market penetration of biodiesel, given technological progress, variety of technologies and feedstocks, market interactions, energy prices, and carbon dioxide equivalent prices. FASOMGHG has several interesting results. First, diesel fuel prices have an expansionary impact on the biodiesel industry. The higher the diesel fuel prices, the more biodiesel is produced. However, given the most favorable circumstances, the maximum biodiesel market penetration is 9% in 2030 with a wholesale diesel price of $4 per gallon. Second, the two dominant sources of biodiesel are from corn and soybeans. Sources like tallow and yellow grease are more limited, because they are byproducts of other industries. Third, GHG prices have an expansionary impact on the biodiesel prices, because biodiesel is quite GHG efficient. Finally, U.S. government subsidies on biofuels have an expansionary impact on biodiesel production, and increase market penetration at least an additional 3%.

  10. Biodiesel production from inedible animal tallow and an experimental investigation of its use as alternative fuel in a direct injection diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a substitute fuel for diesel engines was produced from inedible animal tallow and its usability was investigated as pure biodiesel and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel in a diesel engine. Tallow methyl ester as biodiesel fuel was prepared by base-catalyzed transesterification of the fat with methanol in the presence of NaOH as catalyst. Fuel properties of methyl ester, diesel fuel and blends of them (5%, 20% and 50% by volume) were determined. Viscosity and density of fatty acid methyl ester have been found to meet ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 specifications. Viscosity and density of tallow methyl esters are found to be very close to that of diesel. The calorific value of biodiesel is found to be slightly lower than that of diesel. An experimental study was carried out in order to investigate of its usability as alternative fuel of tallow methyl ester in a direct injection diesel engine. It was observed that the addition of biodiesel to the diesel fuel decreases the effective efficiency of engine and increases the specific fuel consumption. This is due to the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to diesel fuel. However, the effective engine power was comparable by biodiesel compared with diesel fuel. Emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and smoke opacity were reduced around 15%, 38.5%, 72.7% and 56.8%, respectively, in case of tallow methyl esters (B100) compared to diesel fuel. Besides, the lowest CO, NOx emissions and the highest exhaust temperature were obtained for B20 among all other fuels. The reductions in exhaust emissions made tallow methyl esters and its blends, especially B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and thus could help in controlling air pollution. Based on this study, animal tallow methyl esters and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel can be used a substitute for diesel in direct injection diesel engines without any engine modification. (author)

  11. Diesel engine performance and exhaust emission analysis using waste cooking biodiesel fuel with an artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghobadian, B.; Rahimi, H.; Nikbakht, A.M.; Najafi, G. [Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran); Yusaf, T.F. [University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba 4350 QLD (Australia)

    2009-04-15

    This study deals with artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of a diesel engine using waste cooking biodiesel fuel to predict the brake power, torque, specific fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of the engine. To acquire data for training and testing the proposed ANN, a two cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with waste vegetable cooking biodiesel and diesel fuel blends and operated at different engine speeds. The properties of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oil was measured based on ASTM standards. The experimental results revealed that blends of waste vegetable oil methyl ester with diesel fuel provide better engine performance and improved emission characteristics. Using some of the experimental data for training, an ANN model was developed based on standard Back-Propagation algorithm for the engine. Multi layer perception network (MLP) was used for non-linear mapping between the input and output parameters. Different activation functions and several rules were used to assess the percentage error between the desired and the predicted values. It was observed that the ANN model can predict the engine performance and exhaust emissions quite well with correlation coefficient (R) 0.9487, 0.999, 0.929 and 0.999 for the engine torque, SFC, CO and HC emissions, respectively. The prediction MSE (Mean Square Error) error was between the desired outputs as measured values and the simulated values were obtained as 0.0004 by the model. (author)

  12. Experimental studies on spray and gas entrainment characteristics of biodiesel fuel: Implications of gas entrained and fuel oxygen content on soot formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed inside the constant volume vessel to simulate the real diesel engine conditions. The LIF–PIV (Laser Induced Florescence – Particulate Image Velocimetry) technique was used to characterize the spray and gas entrainment characteristics of the fuels while the OH-chemiluminescence and two color pyrometry were applied to obtain information about the combustion processes. Biodiesel from palm oil (BDF (Biodiesel Fuel)) and the JIS #2 diesel fuel were utilized. It was observed that the SMD (Sauter mean diameter) obtained through an empirical equation decreased by increasing the injection pressure from 100 to 300 MPa and reducing the nozzle diameter from 0.16 to 0.08 mm. BDF has higher SMD values compared to diesel thus signifying inferior atomization. By increasing the injection pressure up to 300 MPa and reducing the nozzle diameter to 0.08 mm, the normal velocity and total mass flow rate of the entrained gas by the fuels increased. Due to higher viscosity and density properties, BDF possessed inferior atomization characteristics which made the normal velocity and total mass flow rate of the entrained gas lower compared to diesel. Due to inferior atomization which led to less gas being entrained upstream of the lift-off flame, the fuel oxygen content in BDF played a significant role in soot formation processes. - Highlights: • Spray and gas entrainment characteristics of biodiesel (BDF (Biodiesel Fuel)) and fuel were investigated. • Effect of injector parameters on BDF spray and gas entrainment characteristics was identified. • Higher viscosity and density of BDF yielded inferior spray atomization processes. • Gas entrainment velocity and mass flow rate of gas entrained by BDF lower. • Gas entrained had less effect on BDF's soot formation

  13. Orychophragmus violaceus L., a marginal land-based plant for biodiesel feedstock: Heterogeneous catalysis, fuel properties, and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The potential of Orychophragmus violaceus L. and the resulting biodiesel were reported for the first time. • O. violaceus seed samples possessed high oil contents (30.59–36.81 wt%) and acceptable acid values (2.76–5.68 mg KOH/g). • O. violaceus biodiesel samples provided superior fuel properties. • As a karst-adaptable plant, O. violaceus could be used successfully as a marginal land-based biomass feedstock. - Abstract: The development of biomass on marginal lands has been investigated and proven to be feasible. Orychophragmus violaceus grows naturally in the karst region and shows a stronger bicarbonate-use capacity and adaptability than some other plants. In the present study, the systemic parameters of seed samples from four locations were determined, including the oil contents (30.59–36.81 wt%), acid values (2.76–5.68 mg KOH/g), iodine values (111.02–147.58 g I2/100 g), and fatty acid composition. O. violaceus oil was mainly composed of palmitic acid (C16:0, 10.65–13.06 wt%), stearic acid (C18:0, 6.41–8.31 wt%), oleic acid (C18:1, 16.56–25.58 wt%), and linoleic acid (C18:2, 46.07–52.16 wt%). O. violaceus seed oil from Guiyang was converted to biodiesel by calcined porous calcite. The catalyst amount was optimised, and refined biodiesel was prepared by vacuum distillation. The fuel properties of the O. violaceus biodiesel samples all met the EN 14214 (2012) standards, except for the cetane number and oxidation stability. In summary, O. violaceus from the karst marginal land is highly recommended as a biomass feedstock

  14. Fungal production of single cell oil using untreated copra cake and evaluation of its fuel properties for biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Mahesh; Gupta, Rohini; Barve, Kadambari; Zinjarde, Smita; Govindwar, Sanjay; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the microbial conversion of coconut oil waste, a major agro-residue in tropical countries, into single cell oil (SCO) feedstock for biodiesel production. Copra cake was used as a low-cost renewable substrate without any prior chemical or enzymatic pretreatment for submerged growth of an oleaginous tropical mangrove fungus, Aspergillus terreus IBB M1. The SCO extracted from fermented biomass was converted into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by transesterification and evaluated on the basis of fatty acid profiles and key fuel properties for biodiesel. The fungus produced a biomass (8.2 g/l) yielding 257 mg/g copra cake SCO with ~98% FAMEs. The FAMEs were mainly composed of saturated methyl esters (61.2%) of medium-chain fatty acids (C12-C18) with methyl oleate (C18:1; 16.57%) and methyl linoleate (C18:2; 19.97%) making up the unsaturated content. A higher content of both saturated FAMEs and methyl oleate along with the absence of polyunsaturated FAMEs with ≥4 double bonds is expected to impart good fuel quality. This was evident from the predicted and experimentally determined key fuel properties of FAMEs (density, kinematic viscosity, iodine value, acid number, cetane number), which were in accordance with the international (ASTM D6751, EN 14214) and national (IS 15607) biodiesel standards, suggesting their suitability as a biodiesel fuel. The low cost, renewable nature, and easy availability of copra cake, its conversion into SCO without any thermochemical pretreatment, and pelleted fungal growth facilitating easier downstream processing by simple filtration make this process cost effective and environmentally favorable. PMID:25341469

  15. Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of a biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate fuel: methyl octanoate-ethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, C; May-Carle, J-B; Dayma, G; Dagaut, P

    2010-03-25

    There is a growing interest for using bioethanol-biodiesel fuel blends in diesel engines but no kinetic data and model for their combustion were available. Therefore, the kinetics of oxidation of a biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate fuel (methyl octanoate-ethanol) was studied experimentally in a jet-stirred reactor at 10 atm and constant residence time, over the temperature range 560-1160 K, and for several equivalence ratios (0.5-2). Concentration profiles of reactants, stable intermediates, and final products were obtained by probe sampling followed by online FTIR, and off-line gas chromatography analyses. The oxidation of this fuel in these conditions was modeled using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism consisting of 4592 reversible reactions and 1087 species. The proposed kinetic reaction mechanism yielded a good representation of the kinetics of oxidation of this biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate under the JSR conditions. The modeling was used to delineate the reactions triggering the low-temperature oxidation of ethanol important for diesel engine applications. PMID:20235606

  16. FEATURES OF BIODIESEL PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Рябцев, Геннадій Леонідович; Литвиненко, Євгеній Юрійович; Бурлаков, Володимир Михайлович

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel has several advantages compared with conventional fuels, both environmental and operational. But these benefits should not be offset by the potential negative environmental impacts associated with land use or improper use of obsolete technologies.Biodiesel is not a panacea for energy diseases. Its implementation requires solving a number of problems: biodiesel are usually made from plant material, the scope of which is limited to the needs of the food industry; use of energy efficie...

  17. Biodiesel potential in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Borkowska, Swietlana, 1980-

    2009-01-01

    The importance of increasing the global share of biofuels in transportation goes without saying. Iceland, where the consumption of fossil fuels is considerable, has a viable potential for introducing biodiesel in its otherwise exceptional renewable overall energy portfolio. In this study, a full picture of the possibilities of biodiesel production in Iceland was provided. After the theoretical introduction of allmajor aspects of a biodiesel economy, an assessment of i...

  18. Low - temperature properties of rape seed oil biodiesel fuel and its blending with other diesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of commercial bio diesel fuel depend upon the refining technique and the nature of the renewable lipids from which it is produced. The examined bio diesel fuel produced from rape seed oil by the Latvian SIA 'Delta Riga' has better low-temperature properties than many other bio diesels; but a considerably higher cloud point (-5,7 deg C), cold filter plugging point (-7 deg C) and pour point (-12 deg C) than the examined petrodiesel (grade C, LST EN 590:2000) from AB 'Mazeikiu nafta'. The low-temperature properties considerably improve if blending of these fuels is used. The blended fuels with bio diesel contents up to 90% have lower cold filter plugging points than petrodollar's. The estimated viscosity variations with temperature show that the blended fuels are Arrenius-type liquids, which lose this property near the cold filter plugging point. (authors)

  19. Comparative study of macroscopic spray parameters and fuel atomization behaviour of SVO (Jatropha, its biodiesel and blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Avinash K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combustion and emission characteristics of vegetable oils and derivatives are quite different from mineral diesel due to their relatively high viscosity, density and vaporisation characteristics. These properties affect the fuel spray and the interaction of the spray with air in the combustion chamber therefore it is important to analyze the spray characteristics e.g. spray tip penetration, spray cone angle, spray area and fuel atomization. Optical techniques for spray visualization and image processing are very efficient to analyse the comparative spray parameters for these fuels. Present research investigates the effect of chamber pressure on spray characteristics of Jatropha SVO (J100/ blends (J5, J20, and Jatropha biodiesel (JB100/ blends (JB5, JB20 vis-a-vis baseline data of mineral diesel. Experiments were performed for all these fuels/ blends injected in a constant volume spray visualisation chamber (cold chamber at four different chamber pressure (1, 4, 7 and 9 bar respectively. It was found that J100 and JB100 have the highest spray tip penetration, cone angle and the spray area followed by J20, J5, mineral diesel and JB20, JB5, mineral diesel respectively however J20, J5 and JB20, JB5 have better atomization characteristics as compared to J100 and JB100 respectively. Cone angle was higher for biodiesel blends as compared to SVO blends at atmospheric pressure however as the chamber pressure was increased to 9 bars, it became almost equal for both fuel types. Spray parameters are found to be excellent for mineral diesel followed by Jatropha biodiesel and Jatropha oil. It was found that atomization of fuel becomes superior with increasing chamber pressure.

  20. Wild Brazilian Mustard (Brassica Juncea L.) Seed Oil Methyl Esters as Biodiesel Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild mustard (Brassica juncea L.) oil is evaluated for the first time as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. Biodiesel was obtained in 94 wt % yield by a standard transesterification procedure with methanol and 0.50 wt % sodium methoxide catalyst at 60 deg C and an alcohol to oil molar...

  1. Biodiesel production from Norouzak (Salvia lerifolia) seeds as an indigenous source of bio fuel in Iran using ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Salvia lerifolia seed oil is introduced as an indigenous source of biodiesel production in Iran. • Biodiesel was obtained from the samples by basic trans-esterification method using ultrasounds device. • Norouzak oil profile was extracted based on BF3 method, and it was determined by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Metcalf method. • The produced biodiesel characteristics from Norouzak oil seed is suitable for use in CI engines with low air pollutions. - Abstract: Population growth with increased demand for fossil fuels and also significant increases in air pollution has confirmed necessity of using alternative fuels such as biodiesel. In this paper, Norouzak (Salvia lerifolia) seed oil is introduced as an indigenous source of biodiesel production in Iran. The seeds were collected from desert area of South Khorasan province Northeastern-Iran. In this regards, kinematic and dynamic viscosity, density, amount of free fatty acids, soap value, acid value and water content of the Noruzak oil are measured which are 28.435 (mP s), 31.433 (mm2/s), 0.9046 (g/cm2), 0.71%, 160.25 (mg/1 g), 1.4139 (mg) and 0/3% respectively. Also, fatty acid methyl esters C16:0, C16:1, C18:0, C18:1, C18:1c, C18:2, C18:2c, C18:3, C20, C20:1, C22, C22:1, C24, C24:1 are known by Gas Chromatography (GC) and BF3 method which results shows C18:2 (40.8%) and C18:1 (24) have the highest proportion of methyl ester in this oil. Norouzak biodiesel was obtained by basic trans-esterification method using ultrasounds device as a new sustainable and environmentally-friendly green technique under ultrasonic amplitude of 60% and 9 min at 45 °C, with methanol ratio of 1:5, 1:6, 1:7 and 1% potassium hydroxide as catalyst. The results showed that there is maximum performance of methyl ester production (97.60) with methanol molar ratio of 1:6 which shows significant improvement in the bio fuel production yield using ultrasound technology under the operating conditions. then, according to the EN

  2. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg−1. •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg−1 for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg−1 for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg−1 for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are comparable to

  3. Biodiesel: Current Trends and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, an alternative to petroleum-derived diesel fuel, is defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils and animal fats. Several current issues affecting biodiesel that are briefly discussed include the role of new feedstocks in meeting increased demand for biodiesel and circumventing the...

  4. Two-zone modeling of diesel / biodiesel blended fuel operated ceramic coated direct injection diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rajendra Prasath, P. Tamil Porai, Mohd. F. Shabir

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive computer code using ”C” language was developed for compression ignition (C.I engine cycle and modified in to low heat rejection (LHR engine through wall heat transfer model. Combustion characteristics such as cylinder pressure, heat release, heat transfer and performance characteristics such as work done, specific fuel consumption (SFC and brake thermal efficiency (BTE were analysed. On the basis of first law of thermodynamics the properties at each degree crank angle was calculated. Preparation and reaction rate model was used to calculate the instantaneous heat release rate. The effect of coating on engine heat transfer was analysed using a gas-wall heat transfer calculations and total heat transfer was based on ANNAND’s combined heat transfer model. The predicted results are validated through the experiments on the test engine under identical operating conditions on a turbocharged D.I diesel engine. In this analysis 20% of biodiesel (derived from Jatropha seed oil blended with diesel was used in both conventional and LHR engine. The simulated combustion and performance characteristics are found satisfactory with the experimental results.

  5. Biodiesel from microalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Aullón Alcaine, Anna

    2010-01-01

    In this project we will travel back in time to the nineteenth century to discover the inventor of the diesel engine, Rudolf Diesel, and his renewable fuel vision that is only now being realized. Biodiesel has received considerable attention in recent years as it is biodegradable, renewable and non-toxic fuel. It emits less gaseous pollutants than conventional diesel fuel, and can work directly in diesel engines with no required modifications. The most common way to produce biodiesel is by tra...

  6. Effect of Biodiesel of Spent Cooking Oil Addition at Diesel Fuel to Opacity and Gas Emission Throw Away of CO, CO2 and HC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation of biodiesel spent cooking oil addition effect at diesel fuel to opacity and gas emission throw away on various engine rotation speed has been done. The variables observed were fuel specific used i.e. pure diesel fuel, biodiesel mix 5% (B5), mix 10% (B10), mix 15% (B15), mix 20% (B20) and engine rotation speed. Gas emission throw away observed were CO, CO2, HC and opacity. Opacity and gas emission throwaway were observed by Opacity Sagem apparatus and gas analyzer. Result of experiment showed that biodiesel addition at diesel fuel was very decreasing opacity and gas emission throw away. The opacity lowest on B20, gas emission throw away lowest of CO on B10, CO2 on B10 and HC on B20. (author)

  7. Emissions From Various Biodiesel Sources Compared to a Range of Diesel Fuels in DPF Equipped Diesel Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.; Tester, J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of various sources of petroleum-based and bio-based diesel fuels on regulated emissions and fuel economy in diesel particulate filter (DPF) equipped diesel engines. Two model year 2008 diesel engines were tested with nine fuels including a certification ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), local ULSD, high aromatic ULSD, low aromatic ULSD, and twenty percent blends of biodiesel derived from algae, camelina, soy, tallow, and yellow grease. Regulated emissions were measured over the heavy duty diesel transient test cycle. Measurements were also made of DPF-out particle size distribution and total particle count from a 13-mode steady state test using a fast mobility particle sizer. Test engines were a 2008 Cummins ISB and a 2008 International Maxx Force 10, both equipped with actively regenerated DPFs. Fuel consumption was roughly 2% greater over the transient test cycle for the B20 blends versus certification ULSD in both engines, consistent with the slightly lower energy content of biodiesel. Unlike studies conducted on older model engines, these engines equipped with diesel oxidation catalysts and DPFs showed small or no measurable fuel effect on the tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). No differences in particle size distribution or total particle count were seen in a comparison of certification ULSD and B20 soy, with the exception of engine idling conditions where B20 produced a small reduction in the number of nucleation mode particles. In the Cummins engine, B20 prepared from algae, camelina, soy, and tallow resulted in an approximately 2.5% increase in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compared to the base fuel. The International engine demonstrated a higher degree of variability for NO{sub x} emissions, and fuel effects could not be resolved (p > 0.05). The group of petroleum diesel test fuels produced a range of NO{sub x} emissions very similar to that

  8. Numerical studies of spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel and diesel fuels using reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole

    2014-04-01

    Spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel (PO) and conventional diesel fuels were simulated using the CONVERGE CFD code. Thermochemical and reaction kinetic data (115 species and 460 reactions) by Luo et al. (2012) and Lu et al. (2009) (68 species and 283 reactions) were implemented in the CONVERGE CFD to simulate the spray and combustion processes of the two fuels. Tetradecane (C14H30) and n- heptane (C7H 16) were used as surrogates for diesel. For the palm biodiesel, the mixture of methyl decanoate (C11H20O2), methyl-9-decenoate (C11H19O2) and n-heptane was used as surrogate. The palm biodiesel surrogates were combined in proportions based on the previous GC-MS results for the five major biodiesel components namely methyl palmitate, methyl stearate, methyl oleate, methyl linoleate and methyl linolenate. The Favre-Averaged Navier Stokes based simulation using the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulent model was implemented in the numerical calculations of the spray formation processes while the SAGE chemical kinetic solver is used for the detailed kinetic modeling. The SAGE chemical kinetic solver is directly coupled with the gas phase calculations by renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulent model using a well-stirred reactor model. Validations of the spray liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length data were performed against previous experimental results. The simulated liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length were validated at an ambient density of 15kg/m3, and injection pressure conditions of 100, 200 and 300 MPa were utilized. The predicted liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length agree with the trends obtained in the experimental data at all injection conditions. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  9. ARS Biodiesel Research Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel activities within ARS are concerned with the production, quality, and properties of this alternative fuel from agriculturally derived fats and oils. Currently, in the absence of tax incentives, biodiesel production when using refined fats and oils and conventional alkali transesterificati...

  10. Comparative study of regulated and unregulated gaseous emissions during NEDC in a light-duty diesel engine fuelled with Fischer Tropsch and biodiesel fuels

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In this study, regulated and unregulated gaseous emissions and fuel consumption with five different fuels were tested in a 4-cylinder, light-duty diesel EURO IV typically used for the automotive vehicles in Europe. Three different biodiesel fuels obtained from soybean oil, rapeseed oil and palm oil, a Fischer Tropsch fuel and an ultra low sulphur diesel were studied. The test used was the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), this allowed tests to be carried out on an engine ...

  11. Effect of antioxidant on the performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with palm biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of antioxidant treatment on 20% PME in diesel on fuel properties were studied. • Effect on engine performance and emission was enumerated in a turbocharged diesel engine. • Stabilized blends produced 0.3–0.6% higher avg. BP and 0.18–0.64% lower avg. BSFC compared to B20. • Stabilized blends reduced about 9.8–12.6% avg. NOx compared to non-stabilized B20. - Abstract: Biodiesel is a clean-burning alternative fuel produced from renewable resources. However, it is susceptible to oxidative degradation due to autoxidation in the presence of oxygen, which hinders its widespread use. Antioxidant addition is a prospective solution to this problem. It is expected that antioxidants may affect the clean-burning characteristic of biodiesel. Palm biodiesel (PME) is the most used biodiesel in Malaysia. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the effect of antioxidant addition to palm biodiesel on engine performance and emission characteristics. PME was produced by transesterification using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as catalyst. Two monophenolic antioxidants, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHA) and 2(3)-tert-butyl-4-methoxy phenol (BHT), were added at 1000 ppm concentration to 20% PME (B20) to study their effect. The addition of antioxidants increased oxidation stability without causing any significant negative effect on physicochemical properties. BHA showed greater capability to increase the stability of B20. A 42-kW, 1.8-L, four-cylinder diesel engine was used to carry out tests under conditions of constant load and varying speed. The results show that B20 and antioxidant-treated B20 produced 0.68–1.02% lower brake power (BP) and 4.03–4.71% higher brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) compared to diesel. Both of the antioxidants reduced NOx by a mean of 9.8–12.6% compared to B20. However, compared to B20, mean increases in carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions of 8.6–12.3% and 9.1–12.0%, respectively

  12. FTIR Detection of Unregulated Emissions from a Diesel Engine with Biodiesel Fuel%生物柴油发动机非常规排放的FTIR检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丕强; 胡志远; 楼狄明

    2012-01-01

    采用傅里叶变换红外光谱FTIR,研究了汽车发动机燃用生物柴油的非常规排放物.所用燃料分别为纯柴油、纯生物柴油、生物柴油掺混比为20%的B20混合燃料.结果表明,该机燃用纯柴油和B320燃油的甲醛排放差别不大,纯生物柴油的甲醛排放则明显高于柴油.燃用B20燃油的乙醛排放略低于纯柴油;纯生物柴油的乙醛排放在中低负荷低于纯柴油,在高负荷时高于柴油及B20燃油.燃用B20燃油和纯生物柴油的丙酮排放要高于柴油,但排放量均较低.随着生物柴油掺混比例的增加,发动机甲苯和二氧化硫均呈逐渐下降趋势,纯生物柴油的二氧化硫排放大幅降低.燃用生物柴油后,发动机的二氧化碳排放有所降低,表明了生物柴油有利于温室气体的控制.%Biodiesel, as one of the most promising alternative fuels, has received more attention because of limited fossil fuels. A comparison of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel is discussed as regards engine unregulated exhaust emissions. A diesel fuel, a pure biodiesel fuel, and fuel with 20% V/V biodiesel blend ratio were tested without engine modification. The present study examines six typical unregulated emissions by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method: formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (C2H4O), acetone (C3H6O) , toluene (C7H8) , sulfur dioxide (SO2) , and carbon dioxide (CO2). The results show addition of biodiesel fuel increases the formaldehyde emission, and B20 fuel has little change, but the formaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel shows a clear trend of addition. Compared with the pure diesel fuel, the acetaldehyde of B20 fuel has a distinct decrease, and the acetaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel is lower than that of the pure diesel fuel at low and middle engine loads, but higher at high engine load. The acetone emission is very low, and increases for B20 and pure biodiesel fuels as compared to diesel fuel. Compared with the

  13. First performance assessment of blends of jatropha, palm oil and soya bean biodiesel with kerosene as fuel for domestic purposes in rural-Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quansah, E.; Preko, K.; Amekudzi, L.K. [Department of Physics, Kwame Nkrumah, University of Science and Technology (KNUST), University Post Office, PMB Kumasi (Ghana)

    2011-07-01

    Performance assessments of jatropha, palm oil and soya bean based biodiesel were carried out to investigate their potential use as conventional substitute for kerosene for domestic purposes in rural- Ghana. The assessments were done by comparing some of the combustion characteristics of blends of the biodiesel with kerosene. The blends were categorised as B100 (100% biodiesel), B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% kerosene), B60 (60% biodiesel and 40% kerosene), B40 (40% biodiesel and 60% kerosene), B20 (20% biodiesel and 80% kerosene) and B0 (pure kerosene). The results showed that the calorific values of the B100s were less than that of the B0 and decreasing in the order of jatropha, soya bean and palm oil. The wick wastage results for both the B100s and B0, revealed higher rates in the WTL than the BB even though the BB recorded low fuel consumption rates than the WTL for both B100s and B0. Similarly, the luminous intensity test with the B100s showed low values in WTL than the BB in a decreasing order of jatropha, soya bean and palm oil. However, B0 recorded higher luminous intensity values that were quite comparable in both WTL and BB.

  14. Biodiesel from conventional feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2012-01-01

    At present, traditional fossil fuels are used predominantly in China, presenting the country with challenges that include sustainable energy supply, energy efficiency improvement, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In 2007, China issued The Strategic Plan of the Mid-and-Long Term Development of Renewable Energy, which aims to increase the share of clean energy in the country's energy consumption to 15% by 2020 from only 7.5% in 2005. Biodiesel, an important renewable fuel with significant advantages over fossil diesel, has attracted great attention in the USA and European countries. However, biodiesel is still in its infancy in China, although its future is promising. This chapter reviews biodiesel production from conventional feedstocks in the country, including feedstock supply and state of the art technologies for the transesterification reaction through which biodiesel is made, particularly the enzymatic catalytic process developed by Chinese scientists. Finally, the constraints and perspectives for China's biodiesel development are highlighted. PMID:22085921

  15. Construction of combustion models for rapeseed methyl ester bio-diesel fuel for internal combustion engine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovitchev, Valeri I; Yang, Junfeng

    2009-01-01

    Bio-diesel fuels are non-petroleum-based diesel fuels consisting of long chain alkyl esters produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils, that are intended for use (neat or blended with conventional fuels) in unmodified diesel engines. There have been few reports of studies proposing theoretical models for bio-diesel combustion simulations. In this study, we developed combustion models based on ones developed previously. We compiled the liquid fuel properties, and the existing detailed mechanism of methyl butanoate ester (MB, C(5)H(10)O(2)) oxidation was supplemented by sub-mechanisms for two proposed fuel constituent components, C(7)H(16) and C(7)H(8)O (and then, by mp2d, C(4)H(6)O(2) and propyne, C(3)H(4)) to represent the combustion model for rapeseed methyl ester described by the chemical formula, C(19)H(34)O(2) (or C(19)H(36)O(2)). The main fuel vapor thermal properties were taken as those of methyl palmitate C(19)H(36)O(2) in the NASA polynomial form of the Burcat database. The special global reaction was introduced to "crack" the main fuel into its constituent components. This general reaction included 309 species and 1472 reactions, including soot and NO(x) formation processes. The detailed combustion mechanism was validated using shock-tube ignition-delay data under diesel engine conditions. For constant volume and diesel engine (Volvo D12C) combustion modeling, this mechanism could be reduced to 88 species participating in 363 reactions. PMID:19409477

  16. EXPERIMENTAL COMBUSTION ANALYSIS OF A HSDI DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH PALM OIL BIODIESEL-DIESEL FUEL BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN AGUDELO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the chemical nature between petroleum diesel fuels and vegetable oils-based fuels lead to differences in their physical properties affecting the combustion process inside the engine. In this work a detailed combustion diagnosis was applied to a turbocharged automotive diesel engine operating with neat palm oil biodiesel (POB, No. 2 diesel fuel and their blends at 20 and 50% POB by volume (B20 and B50 respectively. To isolate the fuel effect, tests were executed at constant power output without carrying out any modification of the engine or its fuel injection system. As the POB content in the blend increased, there was a slight reduction in the fuel/air equivalence ratio from 0.39 (B0 to 0.37 (B100, an advance of injection timing and of start of combustion. Additionally, brake thermal efficiency, combustion duration, maximum mean temperature, temperature at exhaust valve opening and exhaust gas efficiency decreased; while the peak pressure, exergy destruction rate and specific fuel consumption increased. With diesel fuel and the blends B20 and B50 the same combustion stages were noticed. However, as a consequence of the differences pointed out, the thermal history of the process was affected. The diffusion combustion stage became larger with POB content. For B100 no premixed stage was observed.

  17. Real-world comparison of probe vehicle emissions and fuel consumption using diesel and 5% biodiesel (B5) blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instrumented EURO I Ford Mondeo was used to perform a real-world comparison of vehicle exhaust (carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen) emissions and fuel consumption for diesel and 5% biodiesel in diesel blend (B5) fuels. Data were collected on multiple replicates of three standardised on-road journeys: (1) a simple urban route; (2) a combined urban/inter-urban route; and, (3) an urban route subject to significant traffic management. At the total journey measurement level, data collected here indicate that replacing diesel with a B5 substitute could result in significant increases in both NOx emissions (8-13%) and fuel consumption (7-8%). However, statistical analysis of probe vehicle data demonstrated the limitations of comparisons based on such total journey measurements, i.e., methods analogous to those used in conventional dynamometer/drive cycle fuel comparison studies. Here, methods based on the comparison of speed/acceleration emissions and fuel consumption maps are presented. Significant variations across the speed/acceleration surface indicated that direct emission and fuel consumption impacts were highly dependent on the journey/drive cycle employed. The emission and fuel consumption maps were used both as descriptive tools to characterise impacts and predictive tools to estimate journey-specific emission and fuel consumption effects. (author)

  18. Biodiesel production from inedible animal tallow and an experimental investigation of its use as alternative fuel in a direct injection diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oener, Cengiz [Technical Education Faculty, Automotive Division, Firat University, 23119 Elazig (Turkey); Altun, Sehmus [Technical Education Faculty, Automotive Division, Batman University, 72060 Batman (Turkey)

    2009-10-15

    In this study, a substitute fuel for diesel engines was produced from inedible animal tallow and its usability was investigated as pure biodiesel and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel in a diesel engine. Tallow methyl ester as biodiesel fuel was prepared by base-catalyzed transesterification of the fat with methanol in the presence of NaOH as catalyst. Fuel properties of methyl ester, diesel fuel and blends of them (5%, 20% and 50% by volume) were determined. Viscosity and density of fatty acid methyl ester have been found to meet ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 specifications. Viscosity and density of tallow methyl esters are found to be very close to that of diesel. The calorific value of biodiesel is found to be slightly lower than that of diesel. An experimental study was carried out in order to investigate of its usability as alternative fuel of tallow methyl ester in a direct injection diesel engine. It was observed that the addition of biodiesel to the diesel fuel decreases the effective efficiency of engine and increases the specific fuel consumption. This is due to the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to diesel fuel. However, the effective engine power was comparable by biodiesel compared with diesel fuel. Emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and smoke opacity were reduced around 15%, 38.5%, 72.7% and 56.8%, respectively, in case of tallow methyl esters (B100) compared to diesel fuel. Besides, the lowest CO, NO{sub x} emissions and the highest exhaust temperature were obtained for B20 among all other fuels. The reductions in exhaust emissions made tallow methyl esters and its blends, especially B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and thus could help in controlling air pollution. Based on this study, animal tallow methyl esters and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel can be used a substitute for diesel in direct injection diesel engines without any engine modification. (author)

  19. Re-envisioning the renewable fuel standard to minimize unintended consequences: A comparison of microalgal diesel with other biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Conducted a life cycle assessment (LCA) of microalgal diesel from PBR to combustion. • Compared the results with other existing LCA results of petroleum and other biodiesels. • Assessed the current Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2). • Proposed an approach to set emission thresholds for eutrophication (EP) and smog formation potentials (PSP). • Future RFS should include a life-cycle emissions threshold for EP and PSP. - Abstract: The Renewable Fuel Standard 2 (RFS2) program under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 set a life-cycle emission reduction threshold to only greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; this type of single-dimensional threshold could lead to the unintended trading of one environmental problem for another. Many of the environmental impacts resulting over the life cycle of oil-crop biodiesel fuels manifest in the agricultural phase of production in the form of water quality degradation. This study investigated the extent to which different biofuels meet the RFS GHG requirement, and presents alternative strategies for minimizing unintended consequences. In addition to life-cycle global warming potential (GWP), the eutrophication potential (EP) and photochemical smog formation potential (PSP) from microalgal diesel were compared to the impacts resulting from petroleum-based diesel, soybean diesel and canola diesel. The results showed tradeoffs between GWP and eutrophication potential when microalgal diesel was compared to soybean diesel. Future RFS criteria should include EP and PSP metrics, however establishing thresholds like the GHG management approach may not be appropriate for these other impacts. Two possible strategies to setting life-cycle eutrophication standards are to establish a threshold based on first generation biofuels, as opposed to petro-fuels or to set maximum levels of EP loads for major watersheds or coastal areas. To decrease PSP, together with existing standards for tailpipe emissions, future RFSs

  20. Effect of fuel oxygen on the energetic and exergetic efficiency of a compression ignition engine fuelled separately with palm and karanja biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exergy analysis of any thermodynamic system can take care of the limitations of energy analysis such as irreversible losses, their magnitude and the source of thermodynamic inefficiencies apart from energy losses. In the present study, both the analyses along with heat release analysis are conducted on a natural aspirated diesel engine fuelled separately with palm biodiesel (PB), karanja biodiesel (KB), and petrodiesel (PD) using the experimental data. Since the engine performs best at about 85% loading condition, the energetic and exergetic performance parameters of the engine are evaluated at 85% loading condition for each type of fuel. The aim of the study is to determine the effect of fuel oxygen on energy and exergy efficiencies of a CI (compression ignition) engine. Various exergy losses, exergy destruction and their ratios associated with the heat transfer through cooling water, radiation, exhaust gas, friction, and some uncounted exergy destruction are investigated. Apart from exergy loss due to heat transfer; the uncounted exergy destruction (due to combustion) also plays a major role in the system inefficiency. Based on the comparative assessment of the obtained results, it is concluded that a better combustion with less irreversibility is possible with the increase in O2 content in the fuel. - Highlights: • Efficiency of a CI engine increases with the increase in oxygen quantity in the fuel. • Irreversibility of a CI engine decreases with increase in oxygen content in the fuel. • Palm biodiesel performs better than karanja biodiesel and petrodiesel for a CI engine

  1. ALKALI – CATALYSED PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FUEL FROM NIGERIAN CITRUS SEEDS OIL

    OpenAIRE

    Agarry, S.E; M.O Aremu; Ajani, A.O; Aworanti, O.A

    2013-01-01

    The potential of oil extracted from the seeds of three different Nigerian citrus fruits for biodiesel production was investigated. Fatty acid alkyl esters were produced from orange seed oil, grape seed oil and tangerine seed oil by transesterification of the oils with ethanol using potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. In the conversion of the citrus seed oils to alkyl esters (biodiesel), the grape seed oil gave the highest yield of 90.6%, while the tangerineseed oil and orange seed oil gave a y...

  2. Production and comparison of fuel properties, engine performance, and emission characteristics of biodiesel from various non-edible vegetable oils: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Overview of current energy situation. • Overview of biology, distribution and chemistry of various non-edible oil resources. • Comparison of fuel properties of various biodiesels produced from various non-edible oils. • Comparison of engine performance and emission characteristics of reviewed biodiesels. - Abstract: Energy demand is increasing dramatically because of the fast industrial development, rising population, expanding urbanization, and economic growth in the world. To fulfill this energy demand, a large amount of fuel is widely used from different fossil resources. Burning of fossil fuels has caused serious detrimental environmental consequences. The application of biodiesel has shown a positive impact in resolving these issues. Edible vegetable oils are one of the potential feedstocks for biodiesel production. However, as the use of edible oils will jeopardize food supplies and biodiversity, non-edible vegetable oils, also known as second-generation feedstocks, are considered potential substitutes of edible food crops for biodiesel production. This paper introduces some species of non-edible vegetables whose oils are potential sources of biodiesel. These species are Pongamia pinnata (karanja), Calophyllum inophyllum (Polanga), Maduca indica (mahua), Hevea brasiliensis (rubber seed), Cotton seed, Simmondsia chinesnsis (Jojoba), Nicotianna tabacum (tobacco), Azadirachta indica (Neem), Linum usitatissimum (Linseed) and Jatropha curcas (Jatropha). Various aspects of non-edible feedstocks, such as biology, distribution, and chemistry, the biodiesel’s physicochemical properties, and its effect on engine performance and emission, are reviewed based on published articles. From the review, fuel properties are found to considerably vary depending on feedstocks. Analysis of the performance results revealed that most of the biodiesel generally give higher brake thermal efficiency and lower brake-specific fuel consumption. Emission results

  3. Biodiesel Basics (Spanish Version); Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    This Spanish-language fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of multifunctional branched diesters as fuel property enhancers for biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of eight highly branched diesters were prepared by Fischer esterification of alcohols to acids in high yield that were similar in molecular weight to typical fatty acid methyl esters encountered in biodiesel. Examination of the properties of the synthetic diesters revealed that several poss...

  5. Use of water containing acetone–butanol–ethanol for NOx-PM (nitrogen oxide-particulate matter) trade-off in the diesel engine fueled with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel blends that contain biodiesel are known to produce greater NOx (nitrogen oxide) emissions in diesel engine exhaust than regular diesel, and this is one of the key barriers to the wider adoption of biodiesel as an alternative fuel. In this study, a water-containing ABE (acetone–butanol–ethanol) solution, which simulates products that are produced from biomass fermentation without dehydration processing, was tested as a biodiesel-diesel blend additive to lower NOx emissions from diesel engines. The energy efficiency and the PM (particulate matter) and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) emissions were investigated and compared under various operating conditions. Although biodiesel had greater NOx emissions, the blends that contained 25% of the water-containing ABE solution had significantly lower NOx (4.30–30.7%), PM (10.9–63.1%), and PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) emissions (26.7–67.6%) than the biodiesel–diesel blends and regular diesel, respectively. In addition, the energy efficiency of this new blend was 0.372–7.88% higher with respect to both the biodiesel–diesel blends and regular diesel. Because dehydration and surfactant addition are not necessary, the application of ABE–biodiesel–diesel blends can simplify fuel production processes, reduce energy consumption, and lower pollutant emissions, meaning that the ABE–biodiesel–diesel blend is a promising green fuel. - Highlights: • Water-containing ABE (acetone–butanol–ethanol)–biodiesel–diesel was tested in a diesel engine. • The addition of ABE to biodiesel–diesel blends can enhance the energy efficiency. • The addition of ABE can solve the problem of NOx-PM (nitrogen oxide-particulate matter) trade-off when using biodiesel. • PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) can be further reduced by adding ABE in biodiesel–diesel blends. • Fuel production was simplified due to the acceptance of water in ABE

  6. The possibilities and the feasibility of the use of Bioethanol as well as Biodiesel as fuels for the Mexican transport; Potenciales y Viabilidad del Uso de Bioetanol y Biodiesel para el Transporte en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masera Cerutti, Omar [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez Martinez, Nicolas [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ignacio Lazcano Martinez (and others)

    2006-07-01

    It is contained in this report a thorough study about the possibilities of the use of bioethanol or biodiesel as fuels for the Mexican transport. Such study was coordinated by the Mexican Secretary of Energy (SENER) and it was sponsored by both the Inter-American Development Bank (project ME-T1007 - ATN/DO-9375-ME) and the GTZ (German Technical Cooperation) (Project PN 04.21487.7-001.00) commissioned by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). Having hired a group of Mexican and International consultants, in order to carry out the different activities of this study. Following, it will be presented the major results of the study of each of the analyzed fuels: bioethanol and biodiesel. As a result of the individual analysis that was carried out, the problems and the technological alternatives as well as those concerning the policies are quiet specifics for each of the fuels, despite the common properties they have. It is found on the final document of the project (Final report), the detailed reports of each of these activities for both ethanol and biodiesel. [Spanish] Este reporte contiene un estudio exhaustivo sobre las posibilidades del bioetanol y el biodiesel como combustibles para el transporte en Mexico. El estudio fue coordinado por la Secretaria de Energia de Mexico (SENER) y patrocinado por el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (Proyecto ME-T1007 - ATN/DO-9375-ME) y la GTZ (Cooperacion Tecnica Alemana) (Proyecto PN 04.2148.7-001.00) por encargo del Ministerio de Cooperacion Economica y de Desarrollo (BMZ). Para la realizacion de las diferentes actividades de este estudio se contrato un grupo de consultores mexicanos e internacionales. A continuacion se presentan los principales resultados del estudio para cada uno de los combustibles analizados: bioetanol y biodiesel. Aunque existen aspectos comunes a estos combustibles, la problematica y las opciones tecnologicas y de politica son muy especificas a cada uno de ellos, lo que

  7. Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doon, Ben; Quintana, Dan

    2011-08-25

    The Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project has demonstrated the compatibility of biodiesel technology and economics on a local scale. The project has been committed to making homegrown biodiesel a viable form of community economic development. The project has benefited by reducing risks by building the facility gradually and avoiding large initial outlays of money for facilities and technologies. A primary advantage of this type of community-scale biodiesel production is that it allows for a relatively independent, local solution to fuel production. Successfully using locally sourced feedstocks and putting the fuel into local use emphasizes the feasibility of different business models under the biodiesel tent and that there is more than just a one size fits all template for successful biodiesel production.

  8. Hydrogen rich gas production by the autothermal reforming of biodiesel (FAME) for utilization in the solid-oxide fuel cells: A thermodynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahar, Gaurav A. [R and D Unit, Aerozyme Pvt Ltd, Pune 411033 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The thermodynamics of the autothermal reforming (ATR) of biodiesel (FAME) for production of hydrogen is simulated and evaluated using Gibbs free minimization method. Simulations are performed with water-biodiesel molar feed ratios (WBFR) between 3 and 12, and oxygen-biodiesel molar feed ratio (O{sub X}BFR) from 0 to 4.8 at reaction temperature between 300 and 800 C at 1 atm. Yields of H{sub 2} and CO are calculated as functions of WBFR, O{sub X}BFR and temperature at 1 atm. Hydrogen rich gas can be produced by the ATR of biodiesel for utilization in solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The best operating conditions for the ATR reformer are WBFR{>=}9 and O{sub X}BFR = 4.8 at 800 C by optimization of the operating parameters. Yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide are 68.80% and 91.66% with 54.14% and 39.2% selectivities respectively at the above conditions. The hydrogen yield from biodiesel is higher than from unmodified oils i.e., transesterification increases hydrogen yield. Increase in saturation of the esters, results in increase in methane selectivity, while an increase in unsaturation results in a decrease in methane selectivity. Increase in degree of both saturation and unsaturation of esters, increases coke selectivity. Similarly an increase in the linoleic content of esters, increases coke selectivity. (author)

  9. Biodiesel research progress 1992-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyson, K.S. [ed.

    1998-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fuels Development began evaluating the potential of various alternative fuels, including biodiesel, as replacement fuels for traditional transportation fuels. Biodiesel is derived from a variety of biological materials from waste vegetable grease to soybean oil. This alkyl ester could be used as a replacement, blend, or additive to diesel fuel. This document is a comprehensive summary of relevant biodiesel and biodiesel-related research, development demonstration, and commercialization projects completed and/or started in the US between 1992 and 1997. It was designed for use as a reference tool to the evaluating biodiesel`s potential as a clean-burning alternative motor fuel. It encompasses, federally, academically, and privately funded projects. Research projects are presented under the following topical sections: Production; Fuel characteristics; Engine data; Regulatory and legislative activities; Commercialization activities; Economics and environment; and Outreach and education.

  10. Performance and Emission analysis of Compression Ignition engine in Dual fuel mode using Rice bran biodiesel and LPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariram Venkatesan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world, pollution levels are increasing to a great extent mainly due to vehicular emissions which drives the industries towards finding alternative fuel sources like Hydrogen, CNG, LPG, Vegetable oil and many more. In the present study, Rice bran biodiesel was used along with liquefied petroleum gas in the dual fuel mode in a single cylinder, air cooled compression ignition engine and its performance and emission characteristics were studied. Rice bran ethyl ester was derived using ethanol and sodium hydroxide through Transesterification process. 7.5 mg/cycle of rice bran ethyl ester was injected with liquefied petroleum gas as pilot fuel. The experimental investigation revealed that the brake thermal efficiency was found to be comparatively better than straight diesel. The brake specific energy consumption was noticed to be lower for dual fuel mode than straight diesel mainly at part load operations. The CO and UBHC emissions was found to be reducing with an increase in NOx at high loading condition due to better combustion.

  11. Experimental Studies for CPF and SCR Model, Control System, and OBD Development for Engines Using Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, John; Naber, Jeffrey; Parker, Gordon; Yang, Song-Lin; Stevens, Andrews; Pihl, Josh

    2013-04-30

    The research carried out on this project developed experimentally validated Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) high‐fidelity models that served as the basis for the reduced order models used for internal state estimation. The high‐fidelity and reduced order/estimator codes were evaluated by the industrial partners with feedback to MTU that improved the codes. Ammonia, particulate matter (PM) mass retained, PM concentration, and NOX sensors were evaluated and used in conjunction with the estimator codes. The data collected from PM experiments were used to develop the PM kinetics using the high‐fidelity DPF code for both NO2 assisted oxidation and thermal oxidation for Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (ULSF), and B10 and B20 biodiesel fuels. Nine SAE papers were presented and this technology transfer process should provide the basis for industry to improve the OBD and control of urea injection and fuel injection for active regeneration of the PM in the DPF using the computational techniques developed. This knowledge will provide industry the ability to reduce the emissions and fuel consumption from vehicles in the field. Four MS and three PhD Mechanical Engineering students were supported on this project and their thesis research provided them with expertise in experimental, modeling, and controls in aftertreatment systems.

  12. Study of turbocharged diesel engine operation, pollutant emissions and combustion noise radiation during starting with bio-diesel or n-butanol diesel fuel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Turbocharged diesel engine emissions during starting with bio-diesel or n-butanol diesel blends. → Peak pollutant emissions due to turbo-lag. → Significant bio-diesel effects on combustion behavior and stability. → Negative effects on NO emissions for both blends. → Positive effects on smoke emissions only for n-butanol blend. -- Abstract: The control of transient emissions from turbocharged diesel engines is an important objective for automotive manufacturers, as stringent criteria for exhaust emissions must be met. Starting, in particular, is a process of significant importance owing to its major contribution to the overall emissions during a transient test cycle. On the other hand, bio-fuels are getting impetus today as renewable substitutes for conventional fuels, especially in the transport sector. In the present work, experimental tests were conducted at the authors' laboratory on a bus/truck, turbocharged diesel engine in order to investigate the formation mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO), smoke, and combustion noise radiation during hot starting for various alternative fuel blends. To this aim, a fully instrumented test bed was set up, using ultra-fast response analyzers capable of capturing the instantaneous development of emissions as well as various other key engine and turbocharger parameters. The experimental test matrix included three different fuels, namely neat diesel fuel and two blends of diesel fuel with either bio-diesel (30% by vol.) or n-butanol (25% by vol.). With reference to the neat diesel fuel case during the starting event, the bio-diesel blend resulted in deterioration of both pollutant emissions as well as increased combustion instability, while the n-butanol (normal butanol) blend decreased significantly exhaust gas opacity but increased notably NO emission.

  13. WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

    2009-04-30

    In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of “product quality issues” that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and

  14. Biodiesel properties and alternative feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defined as the long-chain fatty acid monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils, animal fats, or other lipids, biodiesel is an environmentally attractive alternative to conventional petroleum diesel fuel (petrodiesel). Produced by transesterification with a monohydric alcohol, usually methanol, biodiesel h...

  15. Biodiesel lubricity and other properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is an “alternative” diesel fuel that is becoming accepted in a steadily growing number of countries worldwide. Since the source of biodiesel varies with the location, and other sources such as recycled oils are continuousl...

  16. Biodiesel from Jojoba oil-wax: Transesterification with methanol and properties as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canoira, Laureano; Alcantara, Ramon; Garcia-Martinez, Jesus; Carrasco, Jesus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Fuels, School of Mines, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Rios Rosas 21, 28003-Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    The Jojoba oil-wax is extracted from the seeds of the Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis Link Schneider), a perennial shrub that grows in semi desert areas in some parts of the world. The main uses of Jojoba oil-wax are in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, but new uses could arise related to the search of new energetic crops. This paper summarizes a process to convert the Jojoba oil-wax to biodiesel by transesterification with methanol, catalysed with sodium methoxide (1wt% of the oil). The transesterification reaction has been carried out in an autoclave at 60 deg C, with a molar ratio methanol/oil 7.5:1, and vigorous stirring (600rpm), reaching a quantitative conversion of the oil after 4h. The separation of the fatty acid methyl esters (the fraction rich in FAME, 79% FAME mixture; 21% fatty alcohols; 51% of methyl cis-11-eicosenoate) from the fatty alcohols rich fraction (72% fatty alcohols; 28% FAME mixture; 26% of cis-11-eicosen-1-ol, 36% of cis-13-docosen-1-ol) has been accomplished in a single crystallization step at low temperature (-18 deg C) from low boiling point petroleum ether. The fraction rich in FAME has a density (at 15 deg C), a kinematic viscosity (at 40 deg C), a cold filter plugging point and a high calorific value in the range of the European standard for biodiesel (EN 14214)

  17. Comparative study of regulated and unregulated gaseous emissions during NEDC in a light-duty diesel engine fuelled with Fischer Tropsch and biodiesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, Vicente; Lujan, Jose M.; Pla, Benjamin; Linares, Waldemar G. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    In this study, regulated and unregulated gaseous emissions and fuel consumption with five different fuels were tested in a 4-cylinder, light-duty diesel EURO IV typically used for the automotive vehicles in Europe. Three different biodiesel fuels obtained from soybean oil, rapeseed oil and palm oil, a Fischer Tropsch fuel and an ultra low sulphur diesel were studied. The test used was the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), this allowed tests to be carried out on an engine warmed up beforehand to avoid the effect of cold starts and several tests a day. Regulated emissions of NO{sub X}, CO, HC and CO{sub 2} were measured for each fuel. Unburned Hydrocarbon Speciation and formaldehyde were also measured in order to determine the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) of the gaseous emissions. Pollutants were measured without the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) to gather data about raw emissions. When biodiesel was used, increases in regulated and unregulated emissions were observed and also significant increases in engine fuel consumption. The use of Fischer Tropsch fuel, however, caused lower regulated and unregulated emissions and fuel consumption than diesel. (author)

  18. Optimization of Biodiesel-Diesel Blended Fuel Properties and Engine Performance with Ether Additive Using Statistical Analysis and Response Surface Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed M. Ali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the fuel properties and engine performance of blended palm biodiesel-diesel using diethyl ether as additive have been investigated. The properties of B30 blended palm biodiesel-diesel fuel were measured and analyzed statistically with the addition of 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% (by volume diethyl ether additive. The engine tests were conducted at increasing engine speeds from 1500 rpm to 3500 rpm and under constant load. Optimization of independent variables was performed using the desirability approach of the response surface methodology (RSM with the goal of minimizing emissions and maximizing performance parameters. The experiments were designed using a statistical tool known as design of experiments (DoE based on RSM.

  19. Cell toxicity and oxidative potential of engine exhaust particles: impact of using particulate filter or biodiesel fuel blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlofs-Nijland, Miriam E; Totlandsdal, Annike I; Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Leseman, Daan L A C; Samaras, Zissis; Låg, Marit; Schwarze, Per; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Cassee, Flemming R

    2013-06-01

    The link between emissions of vehicular particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects is well established. However, the influence of new emission control technologies and fuel types on both PM emissions and health effects has been less well investigated. We examined the health impact of PM emissions from two vehicles equipped with or without a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Both vehicles were powered either with diesel (B0) or a 50% v/v biodiesel blend (B50). The DPF effectively decreased PM mass emissions (∼85%), whereas the fuel B50 without DPF lead to less reduction (∼50%). The hazard of PM per unit distance driven was decreased for the DPF-equipped vehicle as indicated by a reduced cytotoxicity, oxidative, and pro-inflammatory potential. This was not evident and even led to an increase when the hazard was expressed on a per unit of mass basis. In general, the PM oxidative potential was similar or reduced for the B50 compared to the B0 powered vehicle. However, the use of B50 resulted in increased cytotoxicity and IL-6 release in BEAS-2B cells irrespective of the expression metric. This study shows that PM mass reduction achieved by the use of B50 will not necessarily decrease the hazard of engine emissions, while the application of a DPF has a beneficial effect on both PM mass emission and PM hazard. PMID:23597117

  20. Effects of Canola Oil Biodiesel Fuel Blends on Combustion, Performance, and Emissions Reduction in a Common Rail Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Ki Yoon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of canola oil biodiesel (BD to improve combustion and exhaust emissions in a common rail direct injection (DI diesel engine using BD fuel blended with diesel. Experiments were conducted with BD blend amounts of 10%, 20%, and 30% on a volume basis under various engine speeds. As the BD blend ratio increased, the combustion pressure and indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP decreased slightly at the low engine speed of 1500 rpm, while they increased at the middle engine speed of 2500 rpm. The brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC increased at all engine speeds while the carbon monoxide (CO and particulate matter (PM emissions were considerably reduced. On the other hand, the nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions only increased slightly. When increasing the BD blend ratio at an engine speed of 2000 rpm with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR rates of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%, the combustion pressure and IMEP tended to decrease. The CO and PM emissions decreased in proportion to the BD blend ratio. Also, the NOx emissions decreased considerably as the EGR rate increased whereas the BD blend ratio only slightly influenced the NOx emissions.

  1. Marine biodiesel use in the Puget Sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation explored the use of marine biodiesel in the Puget Sound region. Marine vessels are now adopting biodiesel fuels as a means of expressing corporate commitments to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the environmental impacts of hydrocarbons released into marine environments. Various biodiesel blends have been designed for use in small commercial, recreational, and research vessels. Biodiesel has also been adopted by charter and whale watching vessels in the Puget Sound. The Guemes Island Ferry has recently been re-configured to use biodiesel fuels, with 2 fuel tanks capable of receiving 2200 gallons at a time. The ferry adopted biodiesel after receiving soot complaints from marinas, and hopes to serve as a model for other vessels in the region. Four fueling docks supply the biodiesel blend to marine vessels. The sale of biodiesel has doubled in some marinas over the last 5 years. Deterrents to biodiesel use include parts incompatibilities and warranty problems. Some marinas have stopped selling biodiesel as a result of low sales and high prices. It was concluded that educational programs are needed to ensure the widespread adoption of biodiesel in the Puget Sound. refs., tabs., figs

  2. Biodiesel, rapeseed oil, gas-to-liquid, and a premium diesel fuel in heavy duty diesel engines: endurance, emissions and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahl, Juergen [University of Applied Sciences Coburg, Coburg (Germany); Munack, Axel; Grope, Norbert; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schroeder, Olaf [Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL), Braunschweig (Germany); Buenger, Juergen [Ruhr-University of Bochum (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    To investigate influences of fuel design on regulated and non-regulated emissions of heavy-duty diesel engines, a Mercedes-Benz OM 906 Euro 3 engine was run with common diesel fuel (DF), first- and second-generation alternative fuels (Gas-to-liquid (GTL) as prototype for biomass-to-liquid (BTL)), and blends of these. Secondly, an IVECO (Industrial Vehicles Corporation) Tector F4A Euro 4 test engine equipped with a urea based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) pilot series system was subjected to a 1000 h endurance test using high-phosphorous (10 ppm) biodiesel. To unveil possible effects on catalyst efficiency, emissions were studied before and after this endurance test by performing European Stationary Cycle (ESC) tests with common DF and biodiesel with high and low phosphorus content. For both engines, the NO{sub x} content in the exhaust gas became most critical with respect to the regulated limits. Among non-regulated emissions, particle size distributions were determined with special focus on ultra fine particles (UFP), which are suspected to induce severe health problems. Additionally, Ames-tests were carried out to determine the mutagenic potency of particulate matter extracts. Both UFP and mutagenicity appeared to be negatively influenced with blends, biodiesel with high P-content, and rapeseed oil. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  4. The role of renewable liquid transportation fuels in Canada's climate action plan: Pros and cons, and stages of development of ethanol, biodiesel, and thermal depolymerization oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using ethanol from grain as a partial replacement for gasoline is examined. Although ethanol is widely seen as a desirable renewable transportation fuel, there are concerns about the amount of fossil fuel energy used in its production, both at the farm and the factory level. Indeed, some people claim that there is, in fact, a net energy loss when ethanol is produced from grain, not to mention the concerns about the use of grain for fuel instead of food in a world where millions of people go hungry every day of their life. The emission from ethanol plants and the cost of producing ethanol from grain are related issues that cause concern. The report urges examination of alternatives to fermentation of plant materials such as gasification, and materials other than corn, such as woody material or hay which, although more complex and not yet commercially developed, are showing promise, and deserve further attention. Other renewable liquid transportation fuels such as biodiesel from canola oil, and thermal depolymerization oils that can be derived from a wide variety of waste renewable organic materials, are also suggested as potential fuel sources. Both of these appear promising and require testing to determine implications of further developing these technologies as replacement transportation fuels. The report contains a bibliography of 37 items for ethanol, 12 items for biodiesel, and two items for thermal depolymerization oil

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their genotoxicity in exhaust emissions from a diesel engine during extended low-load operation on diesel and biodiesel fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal; Pechout, Martin; Dittrich, Luboš; Beránek, Vít; Kotek, Martin; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Vodička, Petr; Milcová, Alena; Rossnerová, Andrea; Ambrož, Antonín; Topinka, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the effects of emissions including carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (cPAH) of a conventional diesel engine without a particle filter. Experiments were carried on during extended idle and during a loaded operation immediately following the extended idle. Extended low-load operation of diesel engines due to idling and creep at border crossings, loading areas and in severe congestion has been known to deteriorate the combustion and catalytic device performance and to increase the emissions of particulate matter (PM). A conventional diesel engine was coupled to a dynamometer and operated on diesel fuel and neat biodiesel alternately at idle speed and 2% of rated power and at 30% and 100% load at intermediate speed. Exhaust was sampled on fiber filters, from which the content of elemental and organic carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including cPAH and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been determined. The emissions of cPAH and B[a]P have increased 4-6 times on diesel fuel and by 4-21% on biodiesel during extended idling relative to a short idle and 8-12 times on diesel fuel and 2-20 times on biodiesel during subsequent operation at full load relative to stabilized operation at full load. The total "excess" cPAH emissions after the transition to full load were on the same order of magnitude as the total "excess" cPAH during extended idling. The absolute levels of PAH, cPAH and B[a]P emissions under all operating conditions were lower on biodiesel compared to diesel fuel. Genotoxicity of organic extracts of particles was analysed by acellular assay with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and was consistently higher for diesel than for biodiesel. The exhaust generated during extended idle and subsequent full load exhibited the highest genotoxicity for both fuels. These two regimes are characterized by significant formation of cPAH as well as other DNA reactive compounds substantially contributing to the total genotoxicity. Oxidative

  6. State of the art of NOx mitigation technologies and their effect on the performance and emission characteristics of biodiesel-fueled Compression Ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Different NOx reduction technologies are discussed along with their implementation. • EGR rate up to 25% is feasible considering engine performance and other emissions. • ITR technology reduces NOx fairly but increases other emissions, it also reduces performance. • LTC reduces NOx and PM emissions simultaneously but increases HC and CO emissions. • Water injection and emulsion reduce NOx (up to 38%) and PM but increases HC and CO emissions. - Abstract: Biodiesel fuels have the potential to become a reliable substitute for diesel which is used moderately to meet the current energy demands. This fuel can be produced from new or used vegetable oils, non-edible sources and animal fats, which are non-toxic, biodegradable and renewable. In spite of the many advantages of using biodiesel, most of the researchers have reported that they produce higher NOx emissions compared to diesel, which is a deterrent to the market expansion of these fuels. In this study, the different paths to reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines by applying several technologies, such as using additives into fuel, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), water injection (WI), emulsion technology (ET), injection timing retardation (ITR), simultaneous technology (ST) and low temperature combustion (LTC) mode are reviewed briefly. The impacts of different NOx mitigation technologies on biodiesel-fueled diesel engine performance and emissions are also analyzed critically and different methods of their implementation are shown. This paper also provides a comparison of different NOx mitigation technologies based on previous articles related to this topic. From this comparative study, it was found that the average reduction of NOx emissions by using additives, EGR, WI and ET, ITR, ST and LTC are in the ranges 4–45%, 26–84%, 10–38%, 9.77–37%, 22–95% and 66–93% respectively, compared to biodiesel combustion without applying technologies. However, the average reduction of NOx

  7. BioTfueL project : targeting the development of second-generation biodiesel and biojet fuels.

    OpenAIRE

    Viguié, Jean-Christophe; Ullrich, Norbert; Porot, Pierre; Bournay, Laurent; Hecquet, Michaël; Rousseau, Julien

    2013-01-01

    2nd generation biofuels will have an important part to take in the energy transition as far as fuels are concerned. Using non edible biomass, they will avoid any direct competition with food usage. Within 2nd generation biofuels, the BTL route consists in the production of middle distillates (Diesel and jet fuel) via gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. These fuels are called "drop in" fuels; this means that to be used they technically do not request any modification in the vehicl...

  8. New regulatory landmark for biodiesel use; Novo marco regulatorio para usos de biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Rosangela Moreira de [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Brazilian Biodiesel Production and Use of Biodiesel - PNPB, made possible the insert of Biodiesel in the Brazilian energy matrix. The National Agency of the Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels - ANP was responsible to create the outline regulatory that established the rules for entrance and commercialization of this new fuel in the country. This work seeks to present the effects of the implantation of the new relative rules to the biodiesel use. (author)

  9. Chemical alternative to the energetic use of biodiesel; Chemische Alternativen zur energetischen Nutzung von Biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwel, S; Ruesch genannt Klaas, M.; Harperscheid, M. [Bundesanstalt fuer Getreide-, Kartoffel- und Fettforschung, Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemie und Technologie der Fette - H.P. Kaufmann-Inst.

    1996-12-31

    Biodiesel is environment-friendly, but much more costly to produce than `normal` diesel fuel. Higher economic efficiency can be achieved by using biodiesel as a chemical feedstock instead. Tenside and polymers offer a wide range of applications. (orig) [Deutsch] Biodiesel ist ein umweltfreundlicher Kraftstoff, jedoch in der Herstellung deutlich teurer als Mineraloel-Dieselkraftstoff. Eine signifikant hoehere Wertschoepfung koennte errreicht werden, wenn Biodiesel nicht im Kraftstoffsektor, sondern als chemischer Rohstoff verwendet wird. Tenside und Polymere sind hierbei grossvolumige Einsatzbereiche. (orig)

  10. Why Teach about Biodiesel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Proposes that study of biodiesel as a healthier alternative to petroleum diesel be included in the curriculum. Suggests that teachers will play a critical role during the transition away from fossil fuel technologies. Provides background information and web-based resources. (DLH)

  11. Systematic sustainable process design and analysis of biodiesel processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Ismail, Muhammad Imran; Babi, Deenesh Kavi;

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel is a promising fuel alternative compared to traditional diesel obtained from conventional sources such as fossil fuel. Many flowsheet alternatives exist for the production of biodiesel and therefore it is necessary to evaluate these alternatives using defined criteria and also from...... a biodiesel production case study....

  12. Toxicological effects of emission particles from fossil- and biodiesel-fueled diesel engine with and without DOC/POC catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalava, Pasi I; Tapanainen, Maija; Kuuspalo, Kari; Markkanen, Ari; Hakulinen, Pasi; Happo, Mikko S; Pennanen, Arto S; Ihalainen, Mika; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Makkonen, Ulla; Teinilä, Kimmo; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Salonen, Raimo O; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2010-12-01

    There is increasing demand for renewable energy and the use of biodiesel in traffic is a major option when implying this increment. We investigated the toxicological activities of particulate emissions from a nonroad diesel engine, operated with conventional diesel fuel (EN590), and two biodiesels: rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and hydrotreated fresh vegetable oil (HVO). The engine was operated with all fuels either with or without catalyst (DOC/POC). The particulate matter (PM(1)) samples were collected from the dilution tunnel with a high-volume cascade impactor (HVCI). These samples were characterized for ions, elements, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to the PM samples for 24 h. Inflammatory mediators, (TNF-α and MIP-2), cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species [ROS]) were measured. All the samples displayed mostly dose-dependent toxicological activity. EN590 and HVO emission particles had larger inflammatory responses than RME-derived particles. The catalyst somewhat increased the responses per the same mass unit. There were no substantial differences in the cytotoxic responses between the fuels or catalyst use. Genotoxic responses by all the particulate samples were at same level, except weaker for the RME sample with catalyst. Unlike other samples, EN590-derived particles did not significantly increase ROS production. Catalyst increased the oxidative potential of the EN590 and HVO-derived particles, but decreased that with RME. Overall, the use of biodiesel fuels and catalyst decreased the particulate mass emissions compared with the EN590 fuel. Similar studies with different types of diesel engines are needed to assess the potential benefits from biofuel use in engines with modern technologies. PMID:21029031

  13. Effects of Pilot Injection Timing and EGR on Combustion, Performance and Exhaust Emissions in a Common Rail Diesel Engine Fueled with a Canola Oil Biodiesel-Diesel Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cong Ge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel as a clean energy source could reduce environmental pollution compared to fossil fuel, so it is becoming increasingly important. In this study, we investigated the effects of different pilot injection timings from before top dead center (BTDC and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR on combustion, engine performance, and exhaust emission characteristics in a common rail diesel engine fueled with canola oil biodiesel-diesel (BD blend. The pilot injection timing and EGR rate were changed at an engine speed of 2000 rpm fueled with BD20 (20 vol % canola oil and 80 vol % diesel fuel blend. As the injection timing advanced, the combustion pressure, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC, and peak combustion pressure (Pmax changed slightly. Carbon monoxide (CO and particulate matter (PM emissions clearly decreased at BTDC 20° compared with BTDC 5°, but nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions increased slightly. With an increasing EGR rate, the combustion pressure and indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP decreased slightly at BTDC 20° compared to other injection timings. However, the Pmax showed a remarkable decrease. The BSFC and PM emissions increased slightly, but the NOx emission decreased considerably.

  14. Cytotoxic and mutagenic effects, particle size and concentration analysis of diesel engine emissions using biodiesel and petrol diesel as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenger, J.; Mueller, M.M.; Westphal, G.; Ruhnau, P.; Schulz, T.G.; Hallier, E. [Inst. fuer Arbeits- und Sozialmedizin, Georg-August-Univ., Goettingen (Germany); Krahl, J.; Baum, K.; Schroeder, O. [Inst. fuer Technologie und Biosystemtechnik, Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    Diesel engine exhaust particles (DEP) contribute substantially to ambient air pollution. They cause acute and chronic adverse health effects in humans. Biodiesel (rapeseed oil methyl ester, RME) is used as a ''green fuel'' in several countries. For a preliminary assessment of environmental and health effects of RME, the particulate-associated emissions from the DEP of RME and common fossil diesel fuel (DF) and their in vitro cytotoxic and mutagenic effects were compared. A test tractor was fuelled with RME and DF and driven in a European standard test cycle (ECE R49) on an engine dynamometer. Particle numbers and size distributions of the exhausts were determined at the load modes ''idling'' and ''rated power''. Filter-sampled particles were extracted and their cytotoxic properties tested using the neutral red assay. Mutagenicity was tested using the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome assay. Despite higher total particle emissions, solid particulate matter (soot) in the emissions from RME was lower than in the emissions from DF. While the size distributions and the numbers of emitted particles at ''rated power'' were nearly identical for the two fuels, at ''idling'' DF emitted substantially higher numbers of smaller particles than RME. The RME extracts caused fourfold stronger toxic effects on mouse fibroblasts at ''idling'' but not at ''rated power'' than DF extracts. The extracts at both load modes were significantly mutagenic in TA98 and TA100. However, extracts of DF showed a fourfold higher mutagenic effect in TA98 (and twofold in TA100) than extracts of RME. These results indicate benefits as well as disadvantages for humans and the environment from the use of RME as a fuel for tractors. The lower mutagenic potency of DEP from RME compared to DEP from DF is probably due to lower emissions of polycyclic aromatic compounds

  15. Impacts of NOx reducing antioxidant additive on performance and emissions of a multi-cylinder diesel engine fueled with Jatropha biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Environmental benefits of JB blends were found but adverse impact on NOx. • Addition of 0.15% (m) DPPD in JB20, average reduction in NO up to 16.54%. • In some cases, engine power is reduced with DPPD additive. • Emissions of HC and CO for JB blends with DPPD were lower compared to diesel. • Addition of DPPD in JB blends reduction of EGT was found. - Abstract: Energy requirements are increasing rapidly due to fast industrialization and the increased number of vehicles on the road. The use of biodiesel in diesel engines instead of diesel results in the proven reduction of harmful exhaust emissions. However, most researchers have reported that they produce higher NOx emissions compared to diesel, which is a deterrent to the expansion of the market for these fuels. Several proposed pathways try to account for NOx formation during the combustion process. Among them, the Fenimore mechanism explains that fuel radicals formed during the combustion process react with nitrogen from the air to form NOx. It could be proposed that if these radical reactions could be terminated, the NOx formation rate for biodiesel combustion would decrease. An experimental study was conducted on a four-cylinder diesel engine to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of Jatropha biodiesel blends (JB5, JB10, JB15 and JB20) with and without the addition of N,N′-diphenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DPPD) antioxidant. For each tested fuel, the engine performance and emissions were measured at engine speeds 1000–4000 rpm at an interval of 500 rpm under the full throttle condition. The results showed that this antioxidant additive could reduce NOx emissions significantly with a slight penalty in terms of engine power and Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) as well as CO and HC emissions. However, when compared to diesel combustion, the emissions of HC and CO with the addition of the DPPD additive were found to be nearly the same or lower. By the addition of 0

  16. Effect of Biodiesel on Thermal NO Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraja, J.; Mehta, P. S.

    2015-04-01

    Biodiesel is an attractive alternative to diesel fuel which is renewable in nature. This fuel has excellent lubricity, low smoke and potential for replacement of fossil diesel without major engine modifications or requirement of any additives. However, a higher nitric oxide (NO) emission from biodiesel is widely cited as their undesired emission characteristics. The present study analyses and describes the various reasons for higher NO formation with biodiesel relative to diesel fuel. To explore this so called biodiesel NO penalty, experiments were conducted on a four cylinder compression ignition engine with neat Karanja biodiesel and fossil diesel. Neat Karanja implies an unblended pure biodiesel. The experimental NO concentration with biodiesel and diesel fuel is validated using extended Zeldovich mechanism. Results suggest that the increase in NO emission with biodiesel fuel could not be opined to a change in a single fuel property but rather, it is the result of a number of coupled pathways whose effects may dominate or cancel one another under different conditions, depending on biodiesel compositional characteristics.

  17. Characterization of real-world activity, fuel use, and emissions for selected motor graders fueled with petroleum diesel and B20 biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H Christopher; Kim, Kangwook; Pang, Shih-Hao; Rasdorf, William J; Lewis, Phil

    2008-10-01

    Motor graders are a common type of nonroad vehicle used in many road construction and maintenance applications. In-use activity, fuel use, and emissions were measured for six selected motor graders using a portable emission measurement system. Each motor grader was tested with petroleum diesel and B20 biodiesel. Duty cycles were quantified in terms of the empirical cumulative distribution function of manifold absolute pressure (MAP), which is an indicator of engine load. The motor graders were operated under normal duty cycles for road maintenance and repair at various locations in Wake and Nash Counties in North Carolina. Approximately 3 hr of quality-assured, second-by-second data were obtained during each test. An empirical modal-based model of vehicle fuel use and emissions was developed, based on stratifying the data with respect to ranges of normalized MAP, to enable comparisons between duty cycles, motor graders, and fuels. Time-based emission factors were found to increase monotonically with MAP. Fuel-based emission factors were mainly sensitive to differences between idle and non-idle engine operation. Cycle average emission factors were estimated for road "resurfacing," "roading," and "shouldering" activities. On average, the use of B20 instead of petroleum diesel leads to a negligible decrease of 1.6% in nitric oxide emission rate, and decreases of 19-22% in emission rates of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. Emission rates decrease significantly when comparing newer engine tier vehicles to older ones. Significant reductions in tailpipe emissions accrue especially from the use of B20 and adoption of newer vehicles. PMID:18939774

  18. Progress in biodiesel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel is a notable alternative to the widely used petroleum-derived diesel fuel since it can be generated by domestic natural sources such as soybeans, rapeseeds, coconuts, and even recycled cooking oil, and thus reduces dependence on diminishing petroleum fuel from foreign sources. The injection and atomization characteristics of the vegetable oils are significantly different than those of petroleum-derived diesel fuels, mainly as the result of their high viscosities. Modern diesel engines have fuel-injection system that is sensitive to viscosity change. One way to avoid these problems is to reduce fuel viscosity of vegetable oil in order to improve its performance. The conversion of vegetable oils into biodiesel is an effective way to overcome all the problems associated with the vegetable oils. Dilution, micro-emulsification, pyrolysis, and transesterification are the four techniques applied to solve the problems encountered with the high fuel viscosity. Transesterification is the most common method and leads to monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils and fats, now called biodiesel when used for fuel purposes. The methyl ester produced by transesterification of vegetable oil has a high cetane number, low viscosity and improved heating value compared to those of pure vegetable oil which results in shorter ignition delay and longer combustion duration and hence low particulate emissions.

  19. Applications of NMR to Biodiesel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats or used frying oils, is technically competitive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. Technical issues facing biodiesel include oxidative stability, improvement of cold flow properties and reduction of nitrogen oxides exha...

  20. Cold weather properties and performance of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oil or animal fat that can be employed in compression-ignition (diesel) engines. Biodiesel is more prone to start-up and operability problems during cold weather than conventional diesel fuels (petrodiesel). This work reviews impacts that exposu...

  1. Biodiesel from alternative oilseed feedstocks: camelina and field pennycress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as mono-alkyl esters derived from plant oils or animal fats, is an environmentally attractive alternative to conventional petroleum diesel fuel (petrodiesel). Produced by transesterification with a monohydric alcohol, usually methanol, biodiesel possesses several technical advanta...

  2. 10 CFR 490.707 - Increasing the qualifying volume of the biodiesel component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Increasing the qualifying volume of the biodiesel... TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.707 Increasing the qualifying volume of the biodiesel component. DOE may increase the qualifying volume of the biodiesel component of fuel for purposes...

  3. Industrial Products from Biodiesel Glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    The continual rise in demand for and cost of petroleum fuels has resulted in an increased demand for alternative fuels. This has resulted in a worldwide surge in the use of biodiesel, a renewable fuel derived from oils and fats, with world production projected to approach 1 billion gallons by the e...

  4. Optimizing biodiesel composition and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel prepared from vegetable oils, animal fats or other oil-containing materials. While it is technically competitive with conventional diesel fuel derived from petroleum, some of its fuel properties still require improvement. This article briefly summarizes the t...

  5. Industrial Products from Biodiesel Glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rise in cost of petroleum fuels has caused an increased interest in alternative fuels. This has resulted in a worldwide surge in the use of biodiesel, a renewable fuel derived from oils and fats, with world production projected to approach 1 billion gallons by the end of 2006. This rapid growt...

  6. Forensic analysis of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael R; Kaley, Elizabeth A; Finney, Eric E

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of four different biodiesel blends, as well as homemade biodiesel prepared from vegetable oil, has been performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The identification of methyl esters within the biodiesel along with any background components is made possible by recognizing their mass spectral fragmentation patterns. These fuels were subjected to typical fire scene environments, specifically weathering and microbial degradation, to investigate how these environments affect the analysis. A matrix study was also performed on wood, carpet, and clothing in order to identify any interferences from these substrates. The data obtained herein will provide the forensic science community with the data needed to help recognize these increasingly common ignitable liquids. PMID:27060442

  7. Biodiesel Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. What are the greatest challenges facing the biodiesel industry today? The greatest challenges are probably related to the amount of feedstock being available if the current expansion in biodiesel production and use continues. This challenge is addressed below under question 2 regarding the hur...

  8. Performance and emission characteristics of double biodiesel blends with diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuthalingam Arun Balasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on biodiesel focused on performance of single biodiesel and its blends with diesel. The present work aims to investigate the possibilities of the application of mixtures of two biodiesel and its blends with diesel as a fuel for diesel engines. The combinations of Pongamia pinnata biodiesel, Mustard oil biodiesel along with diesel (PMD and combinations of Cotton seed biodiesel, Pongamia pinnata biodiesel along with diesel (CPD are taken for the experimental analysis. Experiments are conducted using a single cylinder direct-injection diesel engine with different loads at rated 3000 rpm. The engine characteristics of the two sets of double biodiesel blends are compared. For the maximum load, the value of Specific Fuel consumption and thermal efficiency of CPD-1 blend (10:10:80 is close to the diesel values. CPD blends give better engine characteristics than PMD blends. The blends of CPD are suitable alternative fuel for diesel in stationary/agricultural diesel engines.

  9. Optimization of biodiesel production and purification for maximizing biodiesel yield from camelina oil

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xuan; 吴璇

    2012-01-01

    Because of the depletion of the world’s petroleum reserves and the increasing environmental concerns, biodiesel, as a low-emission renewable fuel and one of the best substitutes for petro-diesel fuel, has attracted great public interest over the past decades. At present, camelina oil has been considered as a low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production because of its high oil content and environmental benefits. In the present study, the optimization of biodiesel production and purificatio...

  10. Analysis of power tiller noise using diesel-biodiesel fuel blends

    OpenAIRE

    N Keramat Siavash; Gh Najafi; S. R Hassan Beigi Bidgoli; B Ghobadian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There are several sources of noise in an industrial and agriculture environment. Machines with rotating or reciprocating engines are sound-producing sources. Also, the audio signal can be analyzed to discover how well a machine operates. Diesel engines complex noise SPL and sound frequency content both strongly depend on fuel combustion, which produces the so-called combustion noise. Actually, the unpleasant sound signature of diesel engines is due to the harsh and irregular sel...

  11. Availability of oilseed rape for biodiesel; Beschikbaarheid koolzaad voor biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, B.; Prins, H.; Van der Voort, M.; Meeusen, B.M. [Praktijkonderzoek Plant en Omgeving, Wageningen (Netherlands); Smit, B.; Annevelink, B. [Agrotechnology en Food Innovations, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    This report provides an insight into the conditions under which the Dutch agricultural industry will cultivate oilseed rape for biodiesel. The Dutch agricultural entrepreneur occupies a central role in this. The possibilities relating to the cultivation of oilseed rape are assessed from the perspective of the Dutch farmer, within the framework of the EU directive regarding the substitution of 2% of transport fuels with bio transport fuels in the Netherlands. Along with bio-ethanol, biodiesel is an important bio transport fuel. One of the raw materials used in the production of biodiesel is (cultivated) oilseed rape. [Dutch] Dit rapport geeft inzicht in de voorwaarden waaronder het Nederlandse landbouwbedrijfsle-ven koolzaad zullen telen voor biodiesel. Daarbij staat de Nederlandse landbouwondernemer centraal. Vanuit het perspectief van de Nederlandse landbouwer worden de mogelijkheden voor koolzaadteelt beoordeeld. Dit in het kader van de EU-richtlijn om te komen tot een vervanging van 2% van de transportbrandstoffen door biotransportbrandstoffen in Nederland. Naast bio-ethanol is biodiesel daarin een belangrijke (bio)transportbrandstof. Een van de grondstoffen voor biodiesel is (geteelde) koolzaad.

  12. Correlating Engine NOx Emission with Biodiesel Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaseelan, Thangaraja; Mehta, Pramod Shankar

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel composition comprising of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters has a significant influence on its properties and hence the engine performance and emission characteristics. This paper proposes a comprehensive approach for composition-property-NOx emission analysis for biodiesel fuels and highlights the pathways responsible for such a relationship. Finally, a procedure and a predictor equation are developed for the assessment of biodiesel NOx emission from its composition details.

  13. Boiler Retrofit for the Utilization of Biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    Leily Nurul Komariah; Marwani Marwani

    2016-01-01

    Fuel oil used in the boiler is able to substitute with biodiesel. In lower blends, there are no engine modification needed, but some researchers recommended some technical adjustments in order to maintain the boiler's performance and equipment durability. This study consists of the comparison between the performance of boiler before and after retrofitting on the use of biodiesel. The diesel oil was introduced in biodiesel blends of 10% (B10), 20% (B20) and 25% (B25). A fire tube boiler was us...

  14. Genetic engineering of microorganisms for biodiesel production

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Shen, Qi; Zhan, Jumei; Zhao, YuHua

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel, as one type of renewable energy, is an ideal substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel and is usually made from triacylglycerides by transesterification with alcohols. Biodiesel production based on microbial fermentation aiming to establish more efficient, less-cost and sustainable biodiesel production strategies is under current investigation by various start-up biotechnology companies and research centers. Genetic engineering plays a key role in the transformation of microbes in...

  15. Optimizing biodiesel production in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India is expected to at least double its fuel consumption in the transportation sector by 2030. To contribute to the fuel supply, renewable energies such as jatropha appear to be an attractive resource for biodiesel production in India as it can be grown on waste land and does not need intensive water supply. In order to produce biodiesel at a competitive cost, the biodiesel supply chain - from biomass harvesting to biodiesel delivery to the consumers - is analyzed. A mixed integer linear programming model is used in order to determine the optimal number and geographic locations of biodiesel plants. The optimization is based on minimization of the costs of the supply chain with respect to the biomass, production and transportation costs. Three biodiesel blends are considered, B2, B5 and B10. For each blend, 13 scenarios are considered where yield, biomass cost, cake price, glycerol price, transport cost and investment costs are studied. A sensitivity analysis is carried out on both those parameters and the resulting locations of the plants. The emissions of the supply chain are also considered. The results state that the biomass cost has most influence on the biodiesel cost (an increase of feedstock cost increases the biodiesel cost by about 40%) and to a lower effect, the investment cost and the glycerol price. Moreover, choosing the right set of production plant locations highly depends on the scenarios that have the highest probability to occur, for which the production plant locations still produce a competitive biodiesel cost and emissions from the transportation are minimum. In this study, one set of plant locations happened to meet these two requirements. (author)

  16. Optimizing biodiesel production in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India is expected to at least double its fuel consumption in the transportation sector by 2030. To contribute to the fuel supply, renewable energies such as jatropha appear to be an attractive resource for biodiesel production in India as it can be grown on waste land and does not need intensive water supply. In order to produce biodiesel at a competitive cost, the biodiesel supply chain - from biomass harvesting to biodiesel delivery to the consumers - is analyzed. A mixed integer linear programming model is used in order to determine the optimal number and geographic locations of biodiesel plants. The optimization is based on minimization of the costs of the supply chain with respect to the biomass, production and transportation costs. Three biodiesel blends are considered, B2, B5 and B10. For each blend, 13 scenarios are considered where yield, biomass cost, cake price, glycerol price, transport cost and investment costs are studied. A sensitivity analysis is carried out on both those parameters and the resulting locations of the plants. The emissions of the supply chain are also considered. The results state that the biomass cost has most influence on the biodiesel cost (an increase of feedstock cost increases the biodiesel cost by about 40%) and to a lower effect, the investment cost and the glycerol price. Moreover, choosing the right set of production plant locations highly depends on the scenarios that have the highest probability to occur, for which the production plant locations still produce a competitive biodiesel cost and emissions from the transportation are minimum. In this study, one set of plant locations happened to meet these two requirements.

  17. 柴油机燃用甲醇——生物柴油混合燃料的性能与排放研究%Performance and Emission of Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol-biodiesel Blended Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯令川; 王忠; 安玉光; 侯乐福; 陈林

    2011-01-01

    On an 186FA diesel engine, the experiments of diesel, biodiesel and methanol-biodiesel were carried out and the influences of methanol-biodiesel on engine performance were analyzed. The results show that, compared with pure biodiesel,biodiesel blended with 5% and 10%, which refer to the mass ratio, methanol respectively leads to 7.4% and 17.8% decrease of rated power, 5.7% and 15.0% increase of brake specific fuel consumption, 40.0% and 80.0% increase of CO emission,66.7% and 155.6% increase of HC emission, 15.0% and 33.3% decrease of NOx emission and 3.8% and 23.1% decrease of exhaust smoking.%在186FA柴油机上,进行了燃用柴油、生物柴油和甲醇--生物柴油混合燃料的性能试验,分析了生物柴油掺烧甲醇对柴油机性能的影响规律.试验结果表明:与燃用生物柴油相比,生物柴油掺烧5%和10%(质量比)的甲醇时,柴油机的标定功率分别降低7.4%和17.8%,标定工况时能量消耗率增加5.7%和15.0%,CO排放升高40.0%和80.0%,HC排放升高66.7%和155.6%,NOx排放降低15.0%和33.3%,排气烟度降低3.8%和23.1%.

  18. Prospects and grounds for the application of a biodiesel in marine power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Shuytasov Nariman Nurullaevich; Tamandzha Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    The essence for the application of a biodiesel in marine power plants is considered in the paper. Basic characteristics of a biodiesel are analyzed; rec-ommendations concerning peculiarities of its storage, preparation and organiza-tion of a working process of the engine while using the biodiesel are given. The influence of the biodiesel on the parameters of the marine power plant is investi-gated. Main advantages of biodiesel fuel compared to the traditional diesel fuel are considered. Basic...

  19. Production of biodiesel fuel from canola oil with dimethyl carbonate using an active sodium methoxide catalyst prepared by crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Takami; Mak, Goon Lum; Wada, Shohei; Nakazato, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Uemura, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel method for the production of biodiesel under mild conditions using fine particles of sodium methoxide formed in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is proposed. Biodiesel is generally produced from vegetable oils by the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. However, this reaction produces glycerol as a byproduct, and raw materials are not effectively utilized. Transesterification with DMC has recently been studied because glycerol is not formed in the process. Although solid-state sodium methoxide has been reported to be inactive for this reaction, the catalytic activity dramatically increased with the preparation of fine catalyst powders by crystallization. The transesterification of canola oil with DMC was studied using this catalyst for the preparation of biodiesel. A conversion greater than 96% was obtained at 65°C for 2h with a 3:1M ratio of DMC and oil and 2.0 wt% catalyst. PMID:24813567

  20. DETERMINATION OF HIGHER HEATING VALUE OF BIODIESELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.SIVARAMAKRISHNAN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel, an alternative fuel can be used in diesel engine as neat or blended with diesel. The physiochemical properties of fuel are important in design of fuel system for compression ignition engine run on diesel,biodiesel or biodiesel blend. The HHV is an important property which characterizes the energy content of a fuel such as solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. The biodiesels were characterized for their physical and main fuel properties including viscosity, density, flash point and higher heating value. The viscosities of biodiesels were much less than those of pure oils and their HHV’s of approximately 42 MJ/kg were 10% less than those of petro diesel fuels. The HHVs of vegetable oils and their biodiesels were measured and correlated using linear least square regression analysis. An equation was developed relating HHV and thermal properties. The predicted higher heating values compare well with the measured Higher Heating Values. This work establishes the general dependence of higher heating value on thermal properties of biodiesel.

  1. Optimization of Biodiesel Composition and Comparison to Renewable Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is technically competitive with petrodiesel fuel. Biodiesel is obtained from an oil or fat by means of a transesterification reaction with glycerol as a co-product. Problems when using biodiesel include oxidative stabili...

  2. Bio-diesel: uncertain future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel in a renewable source of energy. It is also less polluting in terms of emission of pollutants like CO2, CO, NO and particulate matter than the standard diesel. As it contains no sulfur, it emits no SO2. However its claim for environmental protection is disputed and its high production cost makes it economically unattractive. Present status of biodiesel production and research studies going on to cut the cost and to improve the quality of biodiesel are reviewed. Increasing yield of vegetable oils, using animal fats and frying oil wastes and improving the esterification process used for producing biodiesel from vegetable oils are some of the ways to cut the cost. To improve the quality of biodiesel, attempts are being made to produce biodiesel with a lower glycerin content so that clogging of injection nozzles during combustion is reduced and performance of biodiesel is improved. Biotechnological developments are in the direction of generically modifying oil plants to produce new types of oil to specifications. Controversy in the European Economic Community regarding giving subsidies to biofuel and exemption from fossil fuel taxes is described. (M.G.B.)

  3. Phytotoxicity of three plant-based biodiesels, unmodified castor oil, and Diesel fuel to alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus), and wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamgbose, Ifeoluwa; Anderson, Todd A

    2015-12-01

    The wide use of plant-based oils and their derivatives, in particular biodiesel, have increased extensively over the past decade to help alleviate demand for petroleum products and improve the greenhouse gas emissions profile of the transportation sector. Biodiesel is regarded as a clean burning alternative fuel produced from livestock feeds and various vegetable oils. Although in theory these animal and/or plant derived fuels should have less environmental impact in soil based on their simplified composition relative to Diesel, they pose an environmental risk like Diesel at high concentrations when disposed. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the phytotoxicity of three different plant-derived biodiesels relative to conventional Diesel. For phytotoxicological analysis, we used seeds of four crop plants, Medicago sativa, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus, and Triticum aestivum to analyze the germination of seeds in contaminated soil samples. The toxicological experiment was conducted with two different soil textures: sandy loam soil and silt loam soil. The studied plant-based biodiesels were safflower methyl-ester, castor methyl ester, and castor ethyl-ester. Biodiesel toxicity was more evident at high concentrations, affecting the germination and survival of small-seeded plants to a greater extent. Tolerance of plants to the biodiesels varied between plant species and soil textures. With the exception of R. sativus, all plant species were affected and exhibited some sensitivity to the fuels, such as delayed seedling emergence and slow germination (average=10 days) at high soil concentrations (0.85% for Diesel and 1.76% for the biodiesels). Tolerance of plants to soil contamination had a species-specific nature, and on average, decreased in the following order: Raphanus sativus (0-20%)>Triticum aestivum (10-40%) ≥ Medicago sativa> Lactuca sativa (80-100%). Thus, we conclude that there is some phytotoxicity associated with plant-based biodiesels. Further

  4. Development and validation of a generic reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for CFD spray combustion modelling of biodiesel fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Xinwei; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ho, Jee Hou;

    2015-01-01

    In this reported work, a generic reduced biodiesel chemical kinetic mechanism, with components of methyl decanoate (C11H22O2, MD), methyl-9-decenoate (C11H20O2, MD9D) and n-heptane (C7H16) was built to represent the methyl esters of coconut, palm, rapeseed and soybean. The reduced biodiesel...... and detailed mechanism predictions, for each zero-dimensional (0D) auto-ignition and extinction process using CHEMKIN-PRO. Maximum percentage errors of less than 40.0% were recorded when the predicted ignition delay (ID) periods for coconut, palm, rapeseed and soybean methyl esters were compared to those...

  5. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  6. Biodiesel production from Cynara cardunculus L. and Brassica carinata A. Braun seeds and their suitability as fuels in compression ignition engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania De Domenico

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of energy crops can provide environmental benefits and may represent an opportunity to improve agriculture in areas considered at low productivity. In this work, we studied the energy potential of two species (Brassica carinata A. Braun and Cynara cardunculus L. and their seed oil productivity under different growth conditions. Furthermore, the biodiesel from the oil extracted from the seeds of these species was produced and analysed in term of utilisation as fuels in compression ignition engines. In particular, the spray penetration and shape ratio were measured in a constant-volume chamber and compared with the results obtained with a standard diesel fuel. These results were obtained using a standard common rail injection system at different injection pressure, injection duration, and constant-volume chamber pressure.

  7. Lubricity studies with biodiesel and related compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, the alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, possesses excellent lubricity. This feature has rendered biodiesel of special interest for blending with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels with poor lubricity. However, some minor components, mainly free fatty acids and monoacylglycerols, of ...

  8. Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel: A Critical Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several types of fuels can be obtained from lipid feedstocks. These include biodiesel and what is termed renewable diesel. While biodiesel retains the ester moiety occurring in triacylglycerols in converted form as mono-alkyl esters, the composition of renewable diesel, hydrocarbons, emulates that ...

  9. Antioxidants for improving storage stability of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oil or animal fat that may be burned in a compression-ignition (diesel) engine. The chemical nature of biodiesel makes it more susceptible to oxidation or autoxidation during long-term storage than conventional petroleum-based diesel (petr...

  10. 10 CFR 490.706 - Procedure for modifying the biodiesel component percentage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for modifying the biodiesel component percentage... TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.706 Procedure for modifying the biodiesel component percentage. (a) DOE may, by rule, lower the 20 percent biodiesel volume requirement of this subpart...

  11. Experimental Performance Analysis of Biodiesel, Traditional Diesel and Biodiesel with Glycerine

    OpenAIRE

    Özkan, Muammer; ERGENÇ, Alp T.; DENİZ, Orhan

    2005-01-01

    Biodiesel, traditional Diesel and biodiesel with glycerine were used as the fuel of a direct injection compression ignition engine. The torque, brake power and fuel consumption values associated with these fuels were determined under certain operating conditions. Effective efficiency, effective pressure and SFC values were calculated according to the formulae given in the Appendix. The obtained results were compared and it was noted that all fuels yielded similar results at some poi...

  12. Production of Biodiesel from Vegetable Oil Using Microware Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    N. Kapilan

    2012-01-01

    The petroleum oil supply crisis, the increase in demand and the price eruption have led to a search for an alternative fuel of bio-origin in India. Among the alternative fuels, biodiesel is considered as a sustainable renewable alternative fuel to fossil diesel. Non-edible jatropha oil has considerable potential for the production of biodiesel in India. The production of biodiesel from jatropha oil using a conventional heating method takes more than 1h. In this work, microwave irradiation has...

  13. Biodiesel separation and purification: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atadashi, I.M.; Aroua, M.K.; Aziz, A. Abdul [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    Biodiesel as a biodegradable, sustainable and clean energy has worldwide attracted renewed and growing interest in topical years, chiefly due to development in biodiesel fuel and ecological pressures which include climatic changes. In the production of biodiesel from biomass, separation and purification of biodiesel is a critical technology. Conventional technologies used for biodiesel separation such as gravitational settling, decantation, filtration and biodiesel purification such as water washing, acid washing, and washing with ether and absorbents have proven to be inefficient, time and energy consumptive, and less cost effective. The involvement of membrane reactor and separative membrane shows great promise for the separation and purification of biodiesel. Membrane technology needs to be explored and exploited to overcome the difficulties usually encountered in the separation and purification of biodiesel. In this paper both conventional and most recent membrane technologies used in refining biodiesel have been critically reviewed. The effects of catalysts, free fatty acids, water content and oil to methanol ratios on the purity and quality of biodiesel are also examined. (author)

  14. Biodiesel separation and purification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel as a biodegradable, sustainable and clean energy has worldwide attracted renewed and growing interest in topical years, chiefly due to development in biodiesel fuel and ecological pressures which include climatic changes. In the production of biodiesel from biomass, separation and purification of biodiesel is a critical technology. Conventional technologies used for biodiesel separation such as gravitational settling, decantation, filtration and biodiesel purification such as water washing, acid washing, and washing with ether and absorbents have proven to be inefficient, time and energy consumptive, and less cost effective. The involvement of membrane reactor and separative membrane shows great promise for the separation and purification of biodiesel. Membrane technology needs to be explored and exploited to overcome the difficulties usually encountered in the separation and purification of biodiesel. In this paper both conventional and most recent membrane technologies used in refining biodiesel have been critically reviewed. The effects of catalysts, free fatty acids, water content and oil to methanol ratios on the purity and quality of biodiesel are also examined. (author)

  15. Thermoanalytical characterization of castor oil biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, Marta M.; Fernandes, Valter J. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Quimica, Laboratorio de Combustiveis, Natal, RN, Lagoa Nova, CEP 59072970 (Brazil); Candeia, Roberlucia A.; Bezerra, Aline F.; Souza, Antonio G. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento Quimica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Silva, Fernando C. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    The castor oil seed has 47-49% of oil. Biodiesel obtained from castor oil has a lower cost compared to the ones obtained from other oils, as due its solvability in alcohol transesterification occurs without heating. The use of biodiesel will allow a reduction on the consumption of petroleum-derived fuels minimizing the harmful effects on the environment. This work wants to provide a thermoanalytical and physical-chemistry characterization of castor oil and biodiesel. Biodiesel was obtained with methyl alcohol and characterized through several techniques. Gas chromatography indicated methyl ester content of 97.7%. The volatilization of biodiesel starts and finishes under inferior temperatures than the beginning and final volatilization temperatures of castor oil. Biodiesel data are very close to the volatilization temperatures of conventional diesel. (author)

  16. Three years operational experience with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TSI Terminal Systems Inc. is the largest container terminal operator in Canada, and has an annual payroll exceeding $150 million. The company started a biodiesel test program with the Canadian Bioenergy Corporation in order to assess the emission reduction impacts of using biodiesel. The pilot was tested with 6 different pieces of equipment used at the terminal over an initial period of 3 weeks. Emissions testing was then conducted for different biodiesel blend levels and compared with baseline data in relation to particulate matter, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrous oxides (NOx). Results of the tests confirmed that the biodiesel blends significantly reduced emissions at the terminal and confirmed the operability of biodiesel. Overall emissions were reduced by 30 per cent. The fuel is now being used in all the company's equipment. The use of the biodiesel has not resulted in any engine failures or power losses. tabs., figs

  17. Comments on the Manuscript, "Biodiesel Production from Freshwater Algae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    A recent publication (Vijayaragahavan, K.; Hemanathan, K., Biodiesel from freshwater algae, Energy Fuels, 2009, 23(11):5448-5453) on fuel production from algae is evaluated. It is discussed herein that the fuel discussed in that paper is not biodiesel, rather it probably consists of hydrocarbons. ...

  18. Empirical Study of the Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, R. L.; Westbrook, S. R.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a database that supports specific proposals for a stability test and specification for biodiesel and biodiesel blends. B100 samples from 19 biodiesel producers were obtained in December of 2005 and January of 2006 and tested for stability. Eight of these samples were then selected for additional study, including long-term storage tests and blending at 5% and 20% with a number of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels.

  19. The uses of biodiesel in buses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 2001 in Naukseni, Valmiera district the biodiesel - methyl ester of rapeseed oil (RME) - plant first in Latvia and in all Baltic States began to work. The production capacity of the plant is 2500 t of biodiesel per year. In the summer and autumn period of the last year the first experiment using 100% RME on one city bus line was carried out. The bus Ikarus-280 in total turned 30700 km consuming 11 tons or 12600 litres of biodiesel. The fuel consumption with biodiesel was 0.9 kg/h (14.2%) or 3.01/100 km higher as with fossil diesel fuel. The engine power and the driving speed on the line were practically unchanged in spite that the heat capacity of biodiesel is lower than of ordinary diesel fuel (according 37.1 l and 42.1 MJ/kg). Using biodiesel the toxicity of the exhaust gases dropped down very essentially. It was controlled regularly by measuring the absorption coefficient and smokiness. At the end of second month of the experiment the absorption coefficient was 2.09 m-1 and 47.8%. This shows that by the influence of biodiesel the compression chambers of the engine clean from burnt parts and the combustion process most completely thanks to the oxygen content in the biodiesel (authors)

  20. 供油提前角对生物柴油发动机性能影响的研究%Research on Influence of Fuel Supply Timing on Engine Performance of Biodiesel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆克久

    2013-01-01

    在一台4缸涡轮增压直喷式柴油机上进行了柴油、生物柴油和生物柴油混合燃料的对比试验,研究了供油提前角对生物柴油发动机的动力性、经济性和排放特性的影响.研究结果表明:推迟供油提前角后生物柴油的动力性下降,对于B0和B20混合燃料,供油提前角提前2°CA时动力性最好,对于B100燃料,原机的供油提前角的动力性最好;柴油机供油提前角提前,3种燃料的经济性稍有改善,碳烟排放减少,NOx排放增多,在高转速时HC和CO排放基本不变.%Comparison test is made in a 4-cylinder turbocharged direct injection diesel engine by using diesel oil, biodiesel and biodiesel blended fuel to study the effect of fuel supply timing on engine performance of biodiesel on engine power, economy performance and emission characteristics. Results show that; delay of the fuel supply advance angle causes the reduction of dynamic property of biodiesel; for the BO and B20 blended fuel, while fuel supply advance angle increases by 2℃ A, the dynamic property is the best. And for diesel B100, the original machines power supply advance angle is the best; if fuel supply advance angle increases, fuel economy of the 3 kinds of fuel is slightly improved; soot emissions are reduced, NOx emissions increase. When running at high speed, the HC and CO emissions remain basically unchanged.

  1. Comparison of parallel flow and concentric micronebulizers for elemental determination in lubricant oil, residual fuel oil and biodiesel by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two micronebulizers, PFA-100 and Miramist, were evaluated using a method for elemental determination by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP OES) in lubricant and residual fuel oils diluted in xylene. The facility and speed of direct sample dilution in organic solvents, without additional pretreatment, combined with the multielemental capacity and robustness of ICP OES are advantageous. The operational conditions were optimized through factorial design. Improvement in the signal-to-background ratio was observed for Ag, Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Si, Ti and V. Higher sensitivity was obtained with the PFA-100 micronebulizer, although the limits of detection (LOD) obtained for both micronebulizers were similar, between 0.3 μg kg-1 (Mg) and 18 μg kg-1 (Ni). The certified reference materials NIST 1634c and NIST 1085b were used for method validation and good recoveries were obtained with values between 93% (Pb) and 102% (P) for PFA-100 and 90% (Pb) and 103% (P) for Miramist. The method was also validated for analysis of biodiesel samples by recovery tests, with results from 89% to 103%. The proposed method was employed for the analysis of crude oil, lubricant oil and biodiesel from different raw materials.

  2. Biodiesel fuels from palm oil via the non-catalytic transesterification in a bubble column reactor at atmospheric pressure: A kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joelianingsih [National Food Research Institute, 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8642 (Japan); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institut Teknologi Indonesia, Jl. Raya Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15320 (Indonesia); Department of Global Agricultural Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 8657 (Japan); Graduate School, Agricultural Engineering Science, Bogor Agricultural University, Darmaga Campus, P.O. Box 220, Bogor 16002 (Indonesia); Maeda, Hitoshi [National Food Research Institute, 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8642 (Japan); Department of Global Agricultural Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 8657 (Japan); Hagiwara, Shoji; Nabetani, Hiroshi [National Food Research Institute, 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8642 (Japan); Sagara, Yasuyuki [Department of Global Agricultural Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 8657 (Japan); Soerawidjaya, Tatang H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, LABTEK X, Jl. Ganesha No. 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Tambunan, Armansyah H.; Abdullah, Kamaruddin [Graduate School, Agricultural Engineering Science, Bogor Agricultural University, Darmaga Campus, P.O. Box 220, Bogor 16002 (Indonesia)

    2008-07-15

    Biodiesel has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits and the fact that it is made from renewable resources. Transesterification of vegetable oils with short-chain alcohol has long been a preferred method for producing biodiesel fuel. A new reactor was developed to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) by blowing bubbles of superheated methanol vapor continuously into vegetable oil without using any catalysts. A kinetic study on the non-catalytic transesterification of palm oil was made in a reactor without stirring at atmospheric pressure. The effects of reaction temperatures (523, 543, and 563 K) on the rate constant, conversion, yield of methyl esters (ME) and composition of the reaction product under semi-batch mode operation are investigated. The activation energy and the frequency factor values of the transesterification reaction obtained in this experiment are 31 kJ/mol and 4.2, respectively. The optimum reaction temperature which gives the highest ME content (95.17% w/w) in the reaction product is 523 K, while the rate constant of the total system increased with reaction temperature. (author)

  3. Snohomish County Biodiesel Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrill Chang; Deanna Carveth

    2010-02-01

    Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to “grow” this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

  4. Determination of Compatibility of Some Biodiesel Properties Produced under Turkey Conditions to Standards and Effects of Fuel Spraying Amount

    OpenAIRE

    Guven, O.; Aktas, T.; Kilic, E

    2010-01-01

    In this study, viscosity values that is one of the rheological properties of biodiesel samples that have been produced under Turkey conditions. In addition to this, specific weight values that are effective on directly to engine performance curves were also determined. Compatibility of these values to standards were examined. Kinematic viscosity measurements at two different temperatures namely 20 and 40 °C were carried out to determine the effect of temperature on viscosity change. Densit...

  5. Fleet Services makes the switch to biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    West, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    As part of their Green Fleet Initiative and in an effort to meet customer's demand for alternative fuel sources, Virginia Tech Fleet Services will begin using B-10 Biodiesel for diesel powered vehicles.

  6. Acute aqueous toxicities of diesel-biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Ho, N.; Landriault, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environmental Science and Technology Centre; Harrison, S. [Science Applications International Corp., SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Doe, K.; Jackman, P. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada). Toxicology Laboratory, Environmental Science Centre

    2008-07-01

    The renewed interest in biodiesels as a new transportation fuel was discussed. Although there are several advantages to using biodiesels, their environmental behaviours and effects need to be evaluated along with the risks associated with their use, such as accidental releases of these biodiesels to the environment. The wide variability of biodiesels may result in different toxicological impacts, depending on the fuel feedstock. This study evaluated the aqueous effects of biodiesels from several commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesel. Since most of the commercial uses of these products are currently focused on road-use, this study focused on the effects of these fuels in fresh-water. Biodiesels derived from soy, canola and waste restaurant oil feedstocks were used in the study. The acute toxicities of these biodiesels and biodiesel/petroleum diesel fuel blends were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, notably rainbow trout, the water flea, and a luminescent bacterium. The correlations between acute toxicity, water accommodated fractions (WAF) concentrations and fuel property data were examined. The study revealed that biodiesel is significantly less acutely toxic than petroleum diesels in potential ecological impacts. However, the biodiesel-diesel blends were found to be more acutely toxic than a linear dilution model predicts. 11 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. Process Simulation of enzymatic biodiesel production -at what cost can biodiesel be made with enzymes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Christensen, Knud Villy; Rong, Benguang;

    The industrial production of biodiesel has had a very turbulent lifetime due to drastic changes in prices of raw materials and fossil fuels as well as regulatory changes and produced amounts of biodiesel. Biodiesel production is carried out by various forms of catalysts, but industrially only...... as well as environmental impacts of the alternative process must be evaluated towards the conventional process. With process simulation tools, an evaluation will be carried out looking at what it will cost to produce biodiesel with enzymes. Different scenarios will be taken into account with variations...

  8. Technical aspects of production and analysis of biodiesel from used cooking oil. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enweremadu, C.C.; Mbarawa, M.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 001 (South Africa)

    2009-12-15

    The increasing awareness of the depletion of fossil fuel resources and the environmental benefits of biodiesel fuel has made it more attractive in recent times. The cost of biodiesel, however, is the major hurdle to its commercialization in comparison to petroleum-based diesel fuel. The high cost is primarily due to the raw material, mostly neat vegetable oil. Used cooking oil is one of the economical sources for biodiesel production. However, the products formed during frying, can affect the transesterification reaction and the biodiesel properties. This paper attempts to review various technological methods of biodiesel production from used cooking oil. The analytical methods for high quality biodiesel fuel from used cooking oil like GC, TLC, HPLC, GPC and TGA have also been summarized in this paper. In addition, the specifications provided by different countries are presented. The fuel properties of biodiesel fuel from used cooking oil were also reviewed and compared with those of conventional diesel fuel. (author)

  9. Eco-compatibility in the Brazilian energy matrix: biodiesel fuel can be considered environmentally friendly?; Eco-compatibilidade na matriz energetica brasileira: o biodiesel pode ser considerado como combustivel ambientalmente correto?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; Santos, Jarsia Melo dos; Cruz, Andrea Cristina da; Leite, Maria Bernadete Neiva Lemos [Faculdade de Tecnologia e Ciencias, Salvador, BA (Brazil)], e-mail: iracema@ftc.br; Pereira, Solange Andrade; Nascimento, Mauricio Andrade [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    2008-07-01

    Based on the law 11.097/05, Brazil begins the compulsory use of biodiesel from 2008, persuading the compliance of economical, technological, social and environmental objectives. The country uses 40 billions litters of diesel per year, 15% to 17% imported, which represented in 2007, a cost superior to two billion dollars. The addition of biodiesel to diesel from 2%, 5% to 20% (limit proved as technically secure), besides providing economical and social benefits, represents environmental gains, due to emissions reduction in relation to diesel fossil. However, besides the acrolein, which can result from the burnt of possible remaining glycerin in biodiesel, the soluble fractions of this biofuel and the effluents generated during its productive processes may cause possible pollution in soil and water bodies. Eco toxicological information of co-products is incomplete, and due to technical and economical restraints for the use of ethanol, methanol is mostly used for the transesterification process of biodiesel production, even though its toxicological properties are already biodiesel/year. However, the estimated production capacity is supposed to reach 3,8 billions L by 2009, what may represent environmental constraints. The present work does not discuss all the ecological risks associated to the biodiesel productive chain. It aims to determine the toxicity of the soluble water fraction (FSA) of three different types of biodiesel: castor base oil (methylic route and homogeneous basic catalysis - NaOH), 'dende' base oil (methylic route and acid catalysis) and residual cooking oil OGR-biodiesel (methylic route and acid and basic catalysis), using as organism-test (Echinometra lucunter) and, as biochemical biomarker, the activity of acid phosphatase, measured in hepatocytes of exposed fishes (Oreochromis niloticus). The results showed that the FSA of mamona (castor oil) biodiesel was the most toxic (5,0 mU/mg), followed by OGR (3,9 mU/mg) and dende biodiesel (2

  10. The Analysis of Biodiesel Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stability is one of the major technical issues facing biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats or used frying oils. The content of unsaturated fatty acids, especially those with bis-allylic methylene positions, is the main cause of this problem. Besi...

  11. Effects of monoacylglycerols on low-temperature viscosity and cold filter plugging point of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is composed of mono-alkyl fatty acid esters made from the transesterification of vegetable oil or animal fat with methanol or ethanol. Biodiesel must meet rigorous standard fuel specifications (ASTM D 6751; CEN EN 14214) to be classified as an alternative fuel. Nevertheless, biodiesel that...

  12. Comparative characterization of Jatropha, soybean and commercial biodiesel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvain-Didier B. Kouame

    2011-01-01

    Oil was extracted from seeds of Jatropha Curcas, in high yields (up to 40% by weight). The extracted Jatropha oil was converted in a laboratory reactor to biodiesel by transesterification. Analysis of Jatropha oil and Jatropha biodiesel by GC/MS and GC/SIMDIS showed that Jatropha oil could be readily converted to a biodiesel product through NaOH catalyzed transesterification.The resulting biodiesel has desirable properties such as high cetane number and low flash point, which are major improvements over the properties of commercial biodiesel fuels.

  13. Engineering challenges in biodiesel production from microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Ana-Maria; Bassi, Amarjeet; Saxena, Priyanka

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the not too distant exhaustion of fossil fuels is becoming apparent. Apart from this, the combustion of fossil fuels leads to environmental concerns, the emission of greenhouse gases and issues with global warming and health problems. Production of biodiesel from microalgae may represent an attractive solution to the above mentioned problems, and can offer a renewable source of fuel with fewer pollutants. This review presents a compilation of engineering challenges related to microalgae as a source of biodiesel. Advantages and current limitations for biodiesel production are discussed; some aspects of algae cells biology, with emphasis on cell wall composition, as it represents a barrier for fatty acid extraction and lipid droplets are also presented. In addition, recent advances in the different stages of the manufacturing process are included, starting from the strain selection and finishing in the processing of fatty acids into biodiesel. PMID:22804334

  14. Estimativa dos poluentes emitidos pelos ônibus e microônibus de Campo Grande/MS, empregando como combustível diesel, biodiesel ou gás natural Estimation of the atmospheric pollutants emitted in Campo Grande/MS, by buses and minibuses which employ diesel, biodiesel or natural gas as fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauco Rodrigo Kozerski

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available É apresentada uma estimativa do total de poluentes emitidos mensalmente por ônibus e microônibus em Campo Grande (MS, empregando-se diesel, biodiesel ou gás natural como combustíveis. O método "bottom-up" foi utilizado para os cálculos das emissões gasosas. Os estudos realizados permitem inferir que a substituição do diesel pelo biodiesel resultaria em diminuição das emissões de poluentes, geração de novos postos de empregos a partir de atividades agrícolas e industriais, e a diminuição na importação de petróleo, já que o Brasil importa petróleo, basicamente, para suprir a demanda de diesel.The present work deals with the estimation of the atmospheric pollutants emitted monthly in Campo Grande/MS by buses and minibuses, which employ diesel, biodiesel or natural gas as fuels. For the gaseous emissions calculations was used a "bottom-up" technique. The results obtained show that the substitution of diesel by biodiesel would diminish the emissions of pollutants, create novel job opportunities from agricultural and industrial activities, and reduce the Brazilian petroleum imports, which are basically used for meeting the demands in diesel.

  15. Diesel Internal Combustion Engine Emissions Measurements for Methanol-Based and Ethanol-Based Biodiesel Blends

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    There is a recent interest for the utilisation of renewable and alternative fuel, which is regulated by the European Union, that currently imposes a lower limit of 7% by volume of biodiesel fuel blend in diesel fuel. The biodiesel physical characteristics, as well as the percentage of biodiesel blend in diesel fuel, affect the injector nozzle flow, the spray characteristics, the resulting air/fuel mixture, and subsequently the combustion quality and emissions, as well as the overall engine pe...

  16. Effect of temperature on oil stability index (OSI) of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is primarily composed of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid alkyl esters. Fuel suppliers, terminal operators and users are becoming more concerned with monitoring and maintaining good biodiesel fuel quality with respect to oxidative degradation during storage. Oil stability index (OSI)...

  17. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lumley, T.C.; Landriault, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Doe, K.; Jackman, P. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada). Toxicology Laboratory, Environmental Science Centre

    2007-07-01

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  18. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  19. Cetane numbers of biodiesel and its components

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cetane number is one of the prime fuel quality indicators of a petrodiesel or biodiesel fuel as it relates to the tendency of the fuel to ignite in the combustion chamber. It has been established that compound structure, including chain length, branching, and the presence of double bonds, is a m...

  20. Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel: A Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    The search for alternatives to petroleum-based fuels has led to the development of fuels from various sources, including renewable feedstocks such as fats and oils. Several types of fuels can be derived from these triacylglycerol-derived feedstocks. One of them is biodiesel, which is defined as the ...

  1. Biodiesel production by microalgae and macroalgae from north littoral portuguese coast

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Joana; Ribeiro, André; Castro, Joana Daniela Fernandes de; Vilarinho, Cândida; Castro, F.

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel, has many benefits. It is biodegradable, non-toxic and compared to petroleum-based diesel, has a more favorable combustion emission profile, such as low emissions of carbon monoxide, particulate matter and unburned hydrocarbons. In brief, these merits make biodiesel a good alternative to petroleum based fuel. Biodiesel feedstocks derived from microalgae and macroalgae have emerged as one of the most promising alternative sources of lipid for use in biodiesel ...

  2. Dynamics of Peroxy and Alkenyl Radicals Undergoing Competing Rearrangements in Biodiesel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibble, Theodore S. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Biodiesel fuel is increasingly being used worldwide. Although we have a fair understanding of the molecular details of the chemistry of peroxy radicals derived from alkanes, biodiesel fuels contain ester and olefin groups which significantly impact the thermodynamics and kinetics of biodiesel ignition. The broader goal of this research is to carry out systematic computational studies of the elementary kinetics of the chemistry of ROO•, QOOH and •OOQOOH compounds that are models for biodiesel ignition.

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Biodiesel Deposits Formed on a Hot Metal Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Westberg, Emilie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate the formation of deposits from thermally degraded biodiesel on a hot metal surface under the influence of sodium or copper contaminations. Biodiesel or Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs) is a widely utilized biofuel with the potential to replace fossil fuels, however, issues regarding the thermal and oxidative stability prevent the progress of biodiesel for utilization as vehicle fuel. The thermal degradation of biodiesel causes formation of deposits often occurr...

  4. What ails India's biodiesel programme?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With more than 95% of India's surface transport dependent on imported fossil fuel, India has made a concerted effort to promote biofuel. The newly announced biofuel policy of India stipulates a blending target of 20% for both bioethanol and biodiesel. In the case of biodiesel, complement to fossil fuel diesel, India's predominant transport fuel, this target is to be achieved by cultivating non-edible oil seed plants in wastelands and fallow land. In spite of best effort, very little progress has been made on the ground. As the result, the deadline for blending target of 20% for biodiesel has been postponed from 2011–2012 to 2006–2017. This paper makes an attempt to understand the factors behind the tardy progress in India's biodiesel scene and suggests policy remedies. - Highlights: ► Even after a decade of efforts in promoting biofuel, India's achievement does not augur well. ► Objective is to understand the factors behind tardy progress. ► Suggests policy remedies.

  5. Mackerel biodiesel production from the wastewater containing fish oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine fish such as mackerel are important for coastal fisheries in Taiwan. Nearly 60,000 tons of mackerel are produced in Suao, I-lan, Taiwan every year. In this study, oil from the discarded parts of mackerel fish contained in wastewater stream were used as the raw material to produce biodiesel through transesterification reaction. The major fuel properties of MB (mackerel biodiesel), including the iodine value, dynamic viscosity, flash point, and heat value, were determined and compared with sunflower seed oil methyl ester (SFM), JCB (Jatropha curcas biodiesel), and premium diesel (D). MB had a higher iodine value, dynamic viscosity, density, and flash point, but a lower heat value, than did D. MB was also used as fuel in a regular diesel engine to verify its emission characteristics. The MB fuel used for exhaust emission test included pure MB (MB100) and a 20% MB blend with premium diesel (MB20). The exhaust emission of MB was also compared with the exhaust emissions of D and JCB. The results showed that MB20 provided a significant reduction in NO, NOx, and SO2 emissions under varied engine loads, and required no engine modification. - Highlights: • Biodiesel was produced from wastewater containing mackerel fish oil. • Mackerel biodiesel is compared with Jatropha biodiesel and sunflower seed biodiesel. • MBE (mackerel biodiesel) was found to contain higher amount of unsaturated fatty acids. • Mackerel biodiesel, diesel, and Jatropha biodiesel emissions are compared

  6. Ecological Impact of Biodiesel Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The paper presents a study of biodiesel application and its ecological impacts. Our study is based on the comparison of exhaust emission composition produced by the combustion of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME) and conventional diesel fuel (DD) and its blends in a direct injection diesel engine XD2P (YTT). The engine was tested in biofuels laboratory of LUA Motor Vehicle Institute. Fuelling the engine with biodiesel and biodiesel/diesel blend reduced oxides of nitrogen by 17.5% (100RME) and by 5.6% (35RME) and carbon monoxide by 49.8% (100RME) and by 45.3% (35RME). Fuelling the engine with biodiesel and different biodiesel/diesel blends reduced the absorbtion coefficient by 33.9% (5RME), by 44.3% (20RME) and by 51.2% (100RME) on free acceleration regime. In these tests soot reduced by 28...76.7% at full opened throttle position with 100RME. (Authors)

  7. Influence of Residence Time on Fuel Spray Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and emissions using Biodiesel and its Blends in a Low NOx Gas Turbine Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Altaher, MA; Li, H.; Andrews, GE

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesels have advantages of low carbon footprint, reduced toxic emissions, improved energy supply security and sustainability and therefore attracted attentions in both industrial and aero gas turbines sectors. Industrial gas turbine applications are more practical biodiesels due to low temperature waxing and flow problems at altitude for aero gas turbine applications. This paper investigated the use of biodiesels in a low NOx radial swirler, as used in some industrial low NOx gas turbines....

  8. Degradation of automotive materials in palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As compared to petroleum diesel, biodiesel is more corrosive for automotive materials. Studies on the characterization of corrosion products of fuel exposed automotive materials are scarce. Automotive fuel system and engine components are made from different ferrous and non-ferrous materials. The present study aims to investigate the corrosion products of different types of automotive materials such as copper, brass, aluminum and cast iron upon exposure to diesel and palm biodiesel. Changes in fuel properties due to exposure of different materials were also examined. Degradation of metal surface was characterized by digital camera, SEM/EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Fuel properties were examined by measuring TAN (total acid number), density and viscosity. Among the metal investigated, copper is found to be least resistant in biodiesel and formed comparatively more corrosion products than other metals. Upon exposure of metals in biodiesel, TAN number crosses the limit given by standard while density and viscosity remain within the acceptable range of limit. -- Highlights: ► Order of incompatible metals in palm biodiesel: copper > brass > aluminum > cast iron. ► The possible reactions for the degradation of copper and cast iron have been discussed. ► For metal exposed biodiesel, only TAN number crosses the limit while density and viscosity remain within the limit. ► Copper and copper based alloy (brass) increase TAN number comparatively more than other metals.

  9. Energy aspects of microalgal biodiesel production

    OpenAIRE

    Edith Martinez-Guerra; Veera Gnaneswar Gude

    2016-01-01

    Algal biodiesel production will play a significant role in sustaining future transportation fuel supplies. A large number of researchers around the world are investigating into making this process sustainable by increasing the energy gains and by optimizing resource-utilization efficiencies. Although, research is being pursued aggressively in all aspects of algal biodiesel production from microalgal cell cultivation, cell harvesting, and extraction and transesterification steps to the final p...

  10. Current biodiesel production technologies: A comparative review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► In this paper we review the technologies related to biodiesel production. ► 4 Primary approaches reviewed are direct use and blending of oils, micro-emulsions, pyrolysis and transesterification method. ► Both advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel production methods are also discussed. ► The most common technology of biodiesel production is transesterification of oils. ► Selection of a transesterification method depends on the amount of FFA and water content of the feedstock. - Abstract: Despite the high energy demand in the industrialized world and the pollution problems caused by widespread use of fossil fuels, the need for developing renewable energy sources with less environmental impacts are increasing. Biodiesel production is undergoing rapid and extensive technological reforms in industries and academia. The major obstacle in production and biodiesel commercialization path is production cost. Thus, in previous years numerous studies on the use of technologies and different methods to evaluate optimal conditions of biodiesel production technically and economically have been carried out. In this paper, a comparative review of the current technological methods so far used to produce biodiesel has been investigated. Four primary approaches to make biodiesel are direct use and blending of vegetable oils, micro-emulsions, thermal cracking (pyrolysis) and transesterification. Transesterification reaction, the most common method in the production of biodiesel, is emphasized in this review. The two types of transestrification process; catalytic and non-catalytic are discussed at length in the paper. Both advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel production methods are also discussed.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF BRAKE THERMAL EFFICIENCY AND BRAKE SPECIFIC FUEL CONSUMPTION OF DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH BIO-DIESEL

    OpenAIRE

    M. SHIVA SHANKAR; A. V. KRISHNA REDDY; K. APPARAO

    2010-01-01

    The rapid depletion in world petroleum reserves and uncertainty in petroleum supply due to political and economical reasons, as well as, the sharp escalations in the petroleum prices have stimulated the search for alternatives to petroleum fuels. The situation is very grave in developing countries like India which imports 70% of the required fuel, spending 30% of her total foreign exchange earnings on oil imports. Petroleum fuels are being consumed by agriculture and transport sector for whic...

  12. Solid Catalysts and theirs Application in Biodiesel Production

    OpenAIRE

    Ramli Mat; Rubyatul Adawiyah Samsudin; Mahadhir Mohamed; Anwar Johari

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of oil resources and increasing petroleum price has led to the search for alternative fuel from renewable resources such as biodiesel. Currently biodiesel is produced from vegetable oil using liquid catalysts. Replacement of liquid catalysts with solid catalysts would greatly solve the problems associated with expensive separation methods and corrosion problems, yielding to a cleaner product and greatly decreasing the cost of biodiesel production. In this paper, the development ...

  13. Producción de biodiesel asistida por ultrasonidos

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez Bastante, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The continuous increase of fossil fuel prices has raised interest in searching for new forms of energy to power internal combustion engines. Among the most promising options is biodiesel. According to ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials Standard) specifications, biodiesel is described as monoalkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from renewable lipids such as vegetable oils or animal fats used in ignition engines. The process leading to biodiesel is called ...

  14. Analysis, Design and Implementation of Biodiesel Projects in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva Junior, Aziz Galvao; Perez, Ronaldo; de Oliveira, Rodolfo Osorio

    2008-01-01

    During the oil crisis of the seventies, Brazil has developed a successful program for gasoline substitution by ethanol (Proálcool). Nowadays the biomass accounts for 27% of total national energy consumed in Brazil and the ethanol participates with 40% of the total national fuel consumption of Otto cycle vehicles. In 2004, the National Program for the Production and Use of Biodiesel (Biodiesel Program) was launched. One priority of the Biodiesel Program is the inclusion of family agriculture a...

  15. Calorific value for compositions with biodiesel of fat chicken and diesel oil; Valor calorifico para composicoes com biodiesel da gordura de frango e oleo diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcelo Jose da [Universidade de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola], email: marcelo.jose@feagri.unicamp.br; Souza, Samuel N.M. de; Souza, Abel A. de; Martins, Gislaine I. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (CCET/UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas], emails: ssouza@unioeste.br, abel.sza@hotmail.com, iastiaque@yahoo.com.br

    2011-07-01

    The biodiesel fuel is a renewable source of alternative fuel used in diesel cycle engines. The production of biodiesel involves the reaction of methanol with fatty acids of animal or vegetable. The production of biodiesel from chicken fat can be very attractive for some regions from Brazil with high poultry production, as in the Parana West and Santa Catarina West. In this study , the goal was the lower calorific value of the compositions between biodiesel and diesel oil: 100% Diesel oil (B0), 20% biodiesel (B20), 40% biodiesel (B40), 60% biodiesel (B60), 80% biodiesel (B80 ), 100% biodiesel (B100). The biodiesel used was acquired in the Centre for Development and Diffusion of technologies on the Assis Gurgacz College, in Cascavel city. The nominal production capacity of the unit is 900 liters on period of 8 hours. The model of the calorimeter used, was the E2K. The lower calorific value of B100 composition was 35.388 MJ kg-1 and the diesel oil was 41.299 MJ kg-1. With the measuring of the caloric value of six samples mix of diesel oil and biodiesel, was obtained a linear function decrease of the calorific value when increased it the proportion of biodiesel from chicken fat into fuel. (author)

  16. Application of thermal lens technique to measure the thermal diffusivity of biodiesel blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A. S. M.; Mehdipour, Lotf Ali; Noura, Amin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2015-04-01

    Thermal diffusivity of palm biodiesel blends was measured using a thermal lens double beam setup. Palm biodiesel blends were prepared from a mixture of normal palm oil biodiesel and diesel fuel with the percentage of the mixture set in the range of 10-90 %. The thermal diffusivity of the palm biodiesel blends consistently increased by increasing the concentration of palm biodiesel from 0.784 × 10-7 to 1.056 × 10-7 m2/s and average of measurement limitation was 0.629 × 10-7 m2/s. Hence, thermal lens technique is suitable and accurate to assess the thermal diffusivity of palm biodiesel.

  17. Moringa oleifera oil: a possible source of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Umer; Anwar, Farooq; Moser, Bryan R; Knothe, Gerhard

    2008-11-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative to petroleum-based conventional diesel fuel and is defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils and animal fats. Biodiesel has been prepared from numerous vegetable oils, such as canola (rapeseed), cottonseed, palm, peanut, soybean and sunflower oils as well as a variety of less common oils. In this work, Moringa oleifera oil is evaluated for the first time as potential feedstock for biodiesel. After acid pre-treatment to reduce the acid value of the M. oleifera oil, biodiesel was obtained by a standard transesterification procedure with methanol and an alkali catalyst at 60 degrees C and alcohol/oil ratio of 6:1. M. oleifera oil has a high content of oleic acid (>70%) with saturated fatty acids comprising most of the remaining fatty acid profile. As a result, the methyl esters (biodiesel) obtained from this oil exhibit a high cetane number of approximately 67, one of the highest found for a biodiesel fuel. Other fuel properties of biodiesel derived from M. oleifera such as cloud point, kinematic viscosity and oxidative stability were also determined and are discussed in light of biodiesel standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. The 1H NMR spectrum of M. oleifera methyl esters is reported. Overall, M. oleifera oil appears to be an acceptable feedstock for biodiesel. PMID:18474424

  18. Electric properties of biodiesel in the range from 20 Hz to 20 MHz. Comparison with diesel fossil fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Prieto, L.E. [Grupo de Energias Renovables, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Av. Paseo Colon 850, Buenos Aires, 1063 (Argentina); Sorichetti, P.A. [Laboratorio de Sistemas Liquidos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Romano, S.D. [Grupo de Energias Renovables, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Av. Paseo Colon 850, Buenos Aires, 1063 (Argentina); CONICET: Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Buenos Aires, 1033 (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    Determination of electric properties at the different steps of biodiesel (BD) production contributes to a better understanding of the influence of the variables. Measurements of complex permittivity and conductivity make possible to survey efficiently the diverse steps of the industrial-scale production process, from the conditioning of the raw material to the quality control of the final product. Moreover, electrical measurements are 'non-destructive' and require relatively small sample volumes. In this work, complex permittivity spectra of BD and DF from 20 Hz to 20 MHz are presented. Experimental data were taken in a range of temperatures from 25 to 75 C, measured with an accuracy of {+-}0.1 C. The measuring system used in this work requires a sample volume of 25cm{sup 3} and gives the real part of permittivity ({epsilon}{sup '}) with an accuracy better than 1%. Dielectric loss (tg{delta}) can be measured between 10{sup -2} and 10{sup 2}. (author)

  19. Physical characterization of fine particulate matter inside the public transit buses fueled by biodiesel in Toledo, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the physical characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM) collected inside the urban-public transit buses in Toledo, OH. These buses run on 20% biodiesel blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) (B20). For risk analysis, it is crucial to know the modality of the size distribution and the shape factor of PM collected inside the bus. The number-size distribution, microstructure, and aspect ratio of fine PM filter samples collected in the urban-public transit buses were measured for three years (2007-2009), using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Only the reproducible results from repeated experiments on ESEM and size distribution obtained by the GRIMM dust monitor were used in this study. The size distribution was found bi-modal in the winter and fall months and was primarily uni-modal during spring and summer. The aspect ratio for different filter samples collected inside the bus range from 2.4 to 3.6 in average value, with standard deviation ranging from 0.9 to 7.4. The square-shaped and oblong-shaped particles represent the single inhalable particle's morphology characteristics in the air of the Toledo transit buses.

  20. Alternate feedstocks and technologies for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. biodiesel production is presently estimated at 800 million gallons annually, and this fuel is no longer a research curiosity - it is entering the nation’s fuel infrastructure. Some estimates are that production will reach nearly twice that value in the next 10 to 12 years. This would stress a...

  1. BIODIESEL IN THE WILD BLUE YONDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel derived from transesterification of agricultural lipids with a simple alcohol. It has many on- and off-road applications including transportation, locomotive, underground mining, marine, power generation and home heating oil fuels. Recently, the formulation of alte...

  2. Complete utilization of spent coffee grounds to produce biodiesel, bio-oil and biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents the complete utilization of spent coffee grounds to produce biodiesel, bio-oil and biochar. Lipids extracted from spent grounds were converted to biodiesel to evaluate neat and blended (B5 and B20) fuel properties against ASTM and EN standards. Although neat biodiesel displayed h...

  3. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of extracts of diesel and biodiesel exhaust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractContext: Biodiesel and biodiesel-blend fuels offer a renewable alternative to petroleum diesel, but few data are available concerning the carcinogenic potential of biodiesel exhausts. Objectives: We compared the formation of covalent DNA adducts by the in vitro metabol...

  4. Characteristics of a tractor engine using mineral and biodiesel fuels blended with rapeseed oil Características de um motor de trator alimentado com combustíveis mineral e biodisel misturados com óleo de colza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Godeša

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most unfavourable characteristics of crude vegetable oil when used as the fuel is the high viscosity. To improve this weakness, oil can be blended with mineral diesel or biodiesel fuels. This study was designed to evaluate how the use of mineral diesel or biodiesel blend with cold pressed rapeseed (Brassica napus oil affects the engine power, torque and fuel consumption. A tractor equipped with direct injection, water cooling system and three-cylinder diesel engine was used for the experiment. Fuels used were standard diesel fuel (diesel, rapeseed oil methyl ester - biodiesel (B100 and their mixtures with 10, 30 and 50 vol. % of cold pressed rapeseed oil (RO. Increased portion of RO in diesel fuel blends had almost no effect on the torque measured on the tractor PTO shaft; it however decreased the maximal power. Fuel blends with B100 and rising RO content (up to 50% gave a positive correlation with maximal torque and power. By increasing the portion of RO from 0 to 50%, the minimal specific fuel consumption increased by 6.65% with diesel and decreased by 2.98% with B100 based fuel.Uma das características mais desfavoráveis dos óleos vegetais crus usados como combustível é a alta viscosidade. Para melhorar este ponto fraco, o óleo pode ser misturado com diesel mineral ou biodiesel. Este estudo foi desenvolvido para avaliar como o uso de diesel mineral ou biodiesel misturado a oleo de colza (Brassica napus extraído por pressão a frio afeta a potência do motor, o torque e o consumo de combustível, empregando um trator equipado com injeção direta, sistema de refrigeração de água e um motor de três cilindros. Os combustíveis utilizados foram o diesel padrão (diesel, éster metílico de óleo de sementes de colza - biodiesel (B100 e suas misturas com 10, 30 e 50 % vol. de óleo de semente de colza pressionado a frio (RO. Maiores proporções de RO nas misturas de diesel praticamente não tiveram efeito sobre o torque

  5. Biodiesel production by transesterification using immobilized lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Reena

    2013-04-01

    Biodiesel can be produced by transesterification of vegetable or waste oil catalysed by lipases. Biodiesel is an alternative energy source to conventional fuel. It combines environmental friendliness with biodegradability, low toxicity and renewability. Biodiesel transesterification reactions can be broadly classified into two categories: chemical and enzymatic. The production of biodiesel using the enzymatic route eliminates the reactions catalysed under acid or alkali conditions by yielding product of very high purity. The modification of lipases can improve their stability, activity and tolerance to alcohol. The cost of lipases and the relatively slower reaction rate remain the major obstacles for enzymatic production of biodiesel. However, this problem can be solved by immobilizing the enzyme on a suitable matrix or support, which increases the chances of re-usability. The main factors affecting biodiesel production are composition of fatty acids, catalyst, solvents, molar ratio of alcohol and oil, temperature, water content, type of alcohol and reactor configuration. Optimization of these parameters is necessary to reduce the cost of biodiesel production. PMID:23247566

  6. Characteristics of paddy operations with biodiesel fuelled tractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.; Park, S.H.; Kim, C.K.; Im, D.H.; Kim, H.J.; Chung, S.C. [National Academy of Agricultural Science, Seodundong, Suwon (Korea, Democratic People' s Republic of); Kim, S.S. [Daedong Industrial Co., Chang Nyong-Kun, Kyungnam (Korea, Democratic People' s Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which biofuels were tested for their power and competitiveness in various paddy operations, such as plowing and rotary tilling of paddy fields. The study considered the use of diesel fuel as well as 20 per cent biodiesel (BD20) and 100 per cent biodiesel (BD100) as an alternative fuel for tractors. Ignition problems or abrupt stopping were not monitored during operations of plowing, rotary tilling and travelling on the road. According to tractor power take-off (PTO) test codes, there was no considerable power difference between the 3 fuels. However, fuel consumption rates were quite different between the biodiesels and diesel fuel in the paddy works. Fuel consumption increased when biodiesel content increased. Approximately 35 to 40 per cent more fuel was needed for rotary tilling operations than plowing operations. Within the operations, the maximum difference occurred during the rotary tilling of wet paddy fields. This difference was as high as 20 per cent , between BD100 and diesel fuel. In terms of exhaust gases, more carbon dioxide was discharged from diesel fuel than biodiesels, but more nitrous oxide was discharged with biodiesels. It was difficult to differentiate quantities of carbon monoxide between the 3 different fuels.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Biodegradability of Biodiesel obtained by Conventional and Non-Conventional Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja Y. P

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative to conventional diesel fuel made from renewable resources. No engine modifications are required to use biodiesel in place of crude oil-based diesel. The use of biodiesel resulted in lower emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and particulate matter. Biodiesel also increased catalytic converter efficiency in reducing particulate emissions. Chemical characterization also revealed lower levels of some toxic and reactive hydrocarbon species when biodiesel fuels were used. In the present work, biodiesel is produced by both conventional and non-conventional methods to determine the biodegradability effect using microorganisms obtained from soil collected from the vicinity of a petrol bunk. Also, effect on biodegradability of the biodiesel is studied by the addition of additives and on biodiesel blends especially Honge oil. The distinct advantage of using the oil was that it was cheaper and highly economical in the long run

  8. Biodiesel Production from Microalgae by Extraction – Transesterification Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao; Nguyen Thanh Tin; Bui Xuan Thanh

    2013-01-01

    The environmental impact of using petroleum fuels has led to a quest to find a suitable alternative fuel source. In this study, microalgae were explored as a highly potential feedstock to produce biodiesel fuel. Firstly, algal oil is extracted from algal biomass by using organic solvents (n–hexan).  Lipid is contained in microalgae up to 60% of their weight. Then, Biodiesel is created through a chemical reaction known as transesterification between algal oil and alcohol (methanol) with ...

  9. Waste Cooking Oil as an Alternate Feedstock for Biodiesel Production

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rafiqul Islam; K. Chris Watts; Chhetri, Arjun B.

    2008-01-01

    As crude oil price reach a new high, the need for developing alternate fuels has become acute. Alternate fuels should be economically attractive in order to compete with currently used fossil fuels. In this work, biodiesel (ethyl ester) was prepared from waste cooking oil collected from a local restaurant in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Ethyl alcohol with sodium hydroxide as a catalyst was used for the transesterification process. The fatty acid composition of the final biodiesel esters was ...

  10. Comparative study of macroscopic spray parameters and fuel atomization behaviour of SVO (Jatropha), its biodiesel and blends

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal Avinash K.; Chaudhury Vipul; Agarwal Anuj; Shukla Pravesh C.

    2013-01-01

    The combustion and emission characteristics of vegetable oils and derivatives are quite different from mineral diesel due to their relatively high viscosity, density and vaporisation characteristics. These properties affect the fuel spray and the interaction of the spray with air in the combustion chamber therefore it is important to analyze the spray characteristics e.g. spray tip penetration, spray cone angle, spray area and fuel atomization. Optical techniques for spray visualization...

  11. Particulate emissions from biodiesel fuelled CI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Physical and chemical characterization of biodiesel particulates. • Toxicity of biodiesel particulate due to EC/OC, PAHs and BTEX. • Trace metals and unregulated emissions from biodiesel fuelled diesel engines. • Influence of aftertreatment devices and injection strategy on biodiesel particulates. • Characterization of biodiesel particulate size-number distribution. - Abstract: Compression ignition (CI) engines are the most popular prime-movers for transportation sector as well as for stationary applications. Petroleum reserves are rapidly and continuously depleting at an alarming pace and there is an urgent need to find alternative energy resources to control both, the global warming and the air pollution, which is primarily attributed to combustion of fossil fuels. In last couple of decades, biodiesel has emerged as the most important alternative fuel candidate to mineral diesel. Numerous experimental investigations have confirmed that biodiesel results in improved engine performance, lower emissions, particularly lower particulate mass emissions vis-à-vis mineral diesel and is therefore relatively more environment friendly fuel, being renewable in nature. Environmental and health effects of particulates are not simply dependent on the particulate mass emissions but these change depending upon varying physical and chemical characteristics of particulates. Particulate characteristics are dependent on largely unpredictable interactions between engine technology, after-treatment technology, engine operating conditions as well as fuel and lubricating oil properties. This review paper presents an exhaustive summary of literature on the effect of biodiesel and its blends on exhaust particulate’s physical characteristics (such as particulate mass, particle number-size distribution, particle surface area-size distribution, surface morphology) and chemical characteristics (such as elemental and organic carbon content, speciation of polyaromatic

  12. Overview on the current trends in biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Various method for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil were reviewed. → Such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. → The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. → Finally, the economics of biodiesel production was discussed using Malaysia as a case study. -- Abstract: The finite nature of fossil fuels necessitates consideration of alternative fuels from renewable sources. The term biofuel refers to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include bioethanol, biomethanol, biodiesel and biohydrogen. Biodiesel, defined as the monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is an attractive alternative fuel because it is environmentally friendly and can be synthesized from edible and non-edible oils. Here, we review the various methods for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil, such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. Finally, we analyze the economics of biodiesel production using Malaysia as a case study.

  13. Production and properties of biodiesel from algal oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative to petroleum-based conventional diesel fuel (petrodiesel). A major issue facing biodiesel is sufficient supply of feedstock to replace significant amounts of petrodiesel. This issue has caused a search for sources of triacylglycerol-based oils with high production poten...

  14. Overview on the current trends in biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusuf, N.N.A.N. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Kamarudin, S.K., E-mail: ctie@eng.ukm.m [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yaakub, Z. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Various method for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil were reviewed. {yields} Such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. {yields} The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. {yields} Finally, the economics of biodiesel production was discussed using Malaysia as a case study. -- Abstract: The finite nature of fossil fuels necessitates consideration of alternative fuels from renewable sources. The term biofuel refers to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include bioethanol, biomethanol, biodiesel and biohydrogen. Biodiesel, defined as the monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is an attractive alternative fuel because it is environmentally friendly and can be synthesized from edible and non-edible oils. Here, we review the various methods for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil, such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. Finally, we analyze the economics of biodiesel production using Malaysia as a case study.

  15. Moringa oleifera oil: Studies of characterization and biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    da Silva, Jhosianna P.V.; Serra, Tatiana M.; Meneghetti, Simoni M.P. [Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Instituto de Quimica e Biotecnologia, Laboratorio de Oleoquimica, Maceio, Alagoas, CEP 57072-970 (Brazil); Gossmann, Marcelo; Wolf, Carlos R.; Meneghetti, Mario R. [Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Instituto de Quimica, Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, CEP 92420-280 (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    This work describes studies with the seeds of Moringa oleifera (MO), obtained in the northeast of Brazil, evaluating some properties and chemical composition of the oil, as well any potential application in biodiesel production. The studied physicochemical properties of the MO biodiesel, suggest that this material may be used as fuel in diesel engines, mainly as a mixture to petrodiesel. (author)

  16. Biodiesel by catalytic reactive distillation powered by metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Kiss; A.C. Dimian; G. Rothenberg

    2008-01-01

    The properties and use of biodiesel as a renewable fuel as well as the problems associated with its current production processes are outlined. A novel sustainable esterification process based on catalytic reactive distillation is proposed. The pros and cons of manufacturing biodiesel via fatty acid

  17. Moringa Oleifera Oil: A Possible Source of Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative to petroleum-based conventional diesel fuel and is defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils and animal fats. Biodiesel has been prepared from numerous vegetable oils, such as canola (rapeseed), cottonseed, palm, peanut, soybean and sunflower oils as well as a v...

  18. Lipids from yeasts and fungi: Tomorrow's source of Biodiesel?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the search for new transport fuels from renewable resources, biodiesel from microbial lipids comes into view. We have evaluated the lipid yield and energy use of a process for production of biodiesel from agricultural waste using lipid-accumulating yeast and fungi. We included different bioreacto

  19. Comparisons of Biodiesel Produced from Oils of Various Peanut Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a renewable, clean burning alternative fuel that can be used in standard diesel engines with no engine modification and no perceptible loss in engine performance. Biodiesel production typically involves the transesterification of a seed oil feedstock, with soybean oil being the primary...

  20. Evaluation of Several Horticultural Plants as Biodiesel Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a non-petroleum-based fuel consisting of short chain alkyl (generally methyl or ethyl) esters, made by transesterification of a vegetable oil or an animal fat which can either be used alone, or blended with petroleum diesel in conventional diesel-engine vehicles. Biodiesel has better l...

  1. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF BRAKE THERMAL EFFICIENCY AND BRAKE SPECIFIC FUEL CONSUMPTION OF DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH BIO-DIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SHIVA SHANKAR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid depletion in world petroleum reserves and uncertainty in petroleum supply due to political and economical reasons, as well as, the sharp escalations in the petroleum prices have stimulated the search for alternatives to petroleum fuels. The situation is very grave in developing countries like India which imports 70% of the required fuel, spending 30% of her total foreign exchange earnings on oil imports. Petroleum fuels are being consumed by agriculture and transport sector for which diesel engine happens to be the prime mover. Diesel fuelled vehicles discharge significant amount of pollutants like CO, HC, NOx, soot, lead compounds which are harmful to the universe. Though there are wide varieties of alternative fuels available, the research has not yet provided the right renewable fuel to replace diesel. Vegetable oils due to their properties being close to diesel fuel may be a promising alternative for its use in diesel engines. The high viscosity and low volatility are the major drawbacks of the use of vegetable oils in diesel engines. India is the second largest cotton producing country in the world today. The cotton seeds are available in India at cheaper price. Experiments were conducted on 5.2 BHP single cylinder four stroke water-cooled variable compression diesel engine. Methyl ester of cottonseed oil is blended with the commercially available Xtramile diesel. Cottonseed oil methyl ester (CSOME is blended in four different compositions varying from 10% to 40% in steps of 10 vol%. Using these four blends and Xtramile diesel brake thermal efficiency (BTE and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC are determined at 17.5 compression ratio.

  2. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. PMID:20580809

  3. The economics of producing biodiesel from algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for conventional diesel that is made from natural plant oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils. This paper discusses the economics of producing biodiesel fuel from algae grown in open ponds. There is potential for large-scale production of biodiesel from algal farms on non-arable land; however, previous studies have failed to demonstrate an economically viable process that could be scalable to a commercialized industry. The problems include inconsistent and insufficient algal productivities, uncertain capital and operating costs, volatile market prices and unknown levels of government support. Although intensive work is being done on many technological issues, the economic studies and data are incomplete and out of date. This paper presents an updated financial analysis of the production and economic conditions that could have a profound effect on the success of this important alternative fuel production process. (author)

  4. Market penetration of biodiesel and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczyk, Kenneth Ray

    This dissertation examines the influence that economic and technological factors have on the penetration of biodiesel and ethanol into the transportation fuels market. This dissertation focuses on four aspects. The first involves the influence of fossil fuel prices, because biofuels are substitutes and have to compete in price. The second involves biofuel manufacturing technology, principally the feedstock-to-biofuel conversion rates, and the biofuel manufacturing costs. The third involves prices for greenhouse gas offsets. The fourth involves the agricultural commodity markets for feedstocks, and biofuel byproducts. This dissertation uses the Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model-Greenhouse Gas (FASOM-GHG) to quantitatively examine these issues and calculates equilibrium prices and quantities, given market interactions, fossil fuel prices, carbon dioxide equivalent prices, government biofuel subsidies, technological improvement, and crop yield gains. The results indicate that for the ranges studied, gasoline prices have a major impact on aggregate ethanol production but only at low prices. At higher prices, one runs into a capacity constraint that limits expansion on the capacity of ethanol production. Aggregate biodiesel production is highly responsive to gasoline prices and increases over time. (Diesel fuel price is proportional to the gasoline price). Carbon dioxide equivalent prices expand the biodiesel industry, but have no impact on ethanol aggregate production when gasoline prices are high again because of refinery capacity expansion. Improvement of crop yields shows a similar pattern, expanding ethanol production when the gasoline price is low and expanding biodiesel. Technological improvement, where biorefinery production costs decrease over time, had minimal impact on aggregate ethanol and biodiesel production. Finally, U.S. government subsidies have a large expansionary impact on aggregate biodiesel production. Finally, U.S. government

  5. EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO ON ENERGY AND EMISSION OF VCR DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH DUAL BLENDS OF BIODIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. EKNATH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent 10 years biodiesel fuel was studied extensively as an alternative fuel. Most of researchers reported performance and emission of biodiesel and their blends with constant compression ratio. Also all the research was conducted with use of single biodiesel and its blend. Few reports are observed with the use of variable compression ratio and blends of more than one biodiesel. Main aim of the present study is to analyse the effect of compression ratio on the performance and emission of dual blends of biodiesel. In the present study Blends of Jatropha and Karanja with Diesel fuel was tested on single cylinder VCR DI diesel engine for compression ratio 16 and 18. High density of biodiesel fuel causes longer delay period for Jatropha fuel was observed compare with Karanja fuel. However blending of two biodiesel K20J40D results in to low mean gas temperature which is the main reason for low NOx emission.

  6. BioTfueL Project: Targeting the Development of Second-Generation Bio-diesel and Bio-jet Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2. generation biofuels will have an important part to take in the energy transition as far as fuels are concerned. Using non edible biomass, they will avoid any direct competition with food usage. Within second generation biofuels, the BTL route consists in the production of middle distillates (Diesel and jet fuel) via gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. These fuels are called 'drop in' fuels; this means that to be used they technically do not request any modification in the vehicle whatever the blending rate with conventional fuels. This route is currently at the pre-industrial phase where demonstration is required. This article presents the BioTfueL project which has been created by Axens, CEA, IFP Energies Nouvelles, Sofiproteol, ThyssenKrupp Uhde and Total. This project is focused on the original concept of co-processing (biomass can be gasified together with fossil feedstock) and proposes to develop and demonstrate a full process chain to be commercialized worldwide via licensing. (authors)

  7. Study of oxidation stability of Jatropha curcas biodiesel/ diesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P. [Biofuel Research Laboratory, Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand- 247667 (India)

    2011-07-01

    Biodiesel production is undergoing rapid technological reforms in industries and academia. This has become more obvious and relevant since the recent increase in the petroleum prices and the growing awareness relating to the environmental consequences of the fuel overdependency. However, the possibilities of production of biodiesel from edible oil resources in India is almost impossible, as primary need is to first meet the demand of edible oil that is already imported therefore it is essential to explore non-edible seed oils, like Jatropha curcas and Pongamia as biodiesel raw materials. The oxidation stability of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas oil is very poor. Therefore the aim of the present paper is to study the oxidation stability of Jatropha curcas biodiesel/ diesel blend. Also the effectiveness of various antioxidants is checked with respect to various blends of biodiesel with diesel.

  8. Study of oxidation stability of Jatropha curcas biodiesel/ diesel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Jain, M.P. Sharma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production is undergoing rapid technological reforms in industries and academia. This has become more obvious and relevant since the recent increase in the petroleum prices and the growing awareness relating to the environmental consequences of the fuel overdependency. However, the possibilities of production of biodiesel from edible oil resources in India is almost impossible, as primary need is to first meet the demand of edible oil that is already imported therefore it is essential to explore non-edible seed oils, like Jatropha curcas and Pongamia as biodiesel raw materials. The oxidation stability of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas oil is very poor. Therefore the aim of the present paper is to study the oxidation stability of Jatropha curcas biodiesel/ diesel blend. Also the effectiveness of various antioxidants is checked with respect to various blends of biodiesel with diesel.

  9. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  10. Biodiesel production from waste frying oils and its quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabudak, T; Yildiz, M

    2010-05-01

    The use of biodiesel as fuel from alternative sources has increased considerably over recent years, affording numerous environmental benefits. Biodiesel an alternative fuel for diesel engines is produced from renewable sources such as vegetable oils or animal fats. However, the high costs implicated in marketing biodiesel constitute a major obstacle. To this regard therefore, the use of waste frying oils (WFO) should produce a marked reduction in the cost of biodiesel due to the ready availability of WFO at a relatively low price. In the present study waste frying oils collected from several McDonald's restaurants in Istanbul, were used to produce biodiesel. Biodiesel from WFO was prepared by means of three different transesterification processes: a one-step base-catalyzed, a two-step base-catalyzed and a two-step acid-catalyzed transesterification followed by base transesterification. No detailed previous studies providing information for a two-step acid-catalyzed transesterification followed by a base (CH(3)ONa) transesterification are present in literature. Each reaction was allowed to take place with and without tetrahydrofuran added as a co-solvent. Following production, three different procedures; washing with distilled water, dry wash with magnesol and using ion-exchange resin were applied to purify biodiesel and the best outcome determined. The biodiesel obtained to verify compliance with the European Standard 14214 (EN 14214), which also corresponds to Turkish Biodiesel Standards. PMID:20100653

  11. Critical technical areas for future improvement in biodiesel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article analyses critical technical areas that currently limit the success of biodiesel as a fuel. The production process is currently shifting from homogeneous to heterogeneous using solid catalysts for a cleaner process and ease of product separation. The free fatty acid and moisture contents in the raw materials must be sufficiently low to avoid soap formation. The production of biodiesel with full compliance with ASTM D6751-07 or EN 14214:2003 is an uphill task. Current technologies for biodiesel production still do not provide more significant energy surplus. Biodiesel has relatively lower energy content, causing higher fuel consumption. Biodiesel has a drawback in terms of its cold flow properties. A high iodine value can cause degradation and polymerization of biodiesel components. Unconverted monoglyceride, diglyceride and triglyceride impurities will affect the engine performance. The alcohol content in biodiesel can attack rubber seals and gaskets. Biodiesel also can undergo chemical and biological modification to affect its quality in long-term storage. Biodiesel is also associated with high-level NOx emission, a fact that needs special attention

  12. Biodiesel from soybean promotes cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioda, Adriana; Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I; Amaral, Beatriz Silva; Encarnación-Medina, Jarline; Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D

    2016-08-01

    Toxicological responses of exhaust emissions of biodiesel are different due to variation in methods of generation and the tested biological models. A chemical profile was generated using ICP-MS and GC-MS for the biodiesel samples obtained in Brazil. A cytotoxicity assay and cytokine secretion experiments were evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). Cells were exposed to polar (acetone) and nonpolar (hexane) extracts from particles obtained from fuel exhaust: fossil diesel (B5), pure soybean biodiesel (B100), soybean biodiesel with additive (B100A) and ethanol additive (EtOH). Biodiesel and its additives exhibited higher organic and inorganic constituents on particles when compared to B5. The biodiesel extracts did not exert any toxic effect at concentrations 10, 25, 50, 75, and 100μgmL(-1). In fact quite the opposite, a cell proliferation effect induced by the B100 and B100A extracts is reported. A small increase in concentrations of inflammatory mediators (Interleukin-6, IL-6; and Interleukin-8, IL-8) in the medium of biodiesel-treated cells was observed, however, no statistical difference was found. An interesting finding indicates that the presence of metals in the nonpolar (hexane) fraction of biodiesel fuel (B100) represses cytokine release in lung cells. This was revealed by the use of the metal chelator. Results suggest that metals associated with biodiesel's organic constituents might play a significant role in molecular mechanisms associated to cellular proliferation and immune responses. PMID:27179667

  13. Biodiesel production from sediments of a eutrophic reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediments from eutrophic reservoir Bugach (Siberia, Russia) were tested for possibility to produce biodiesel. We supposed that the sediments could be a promising biodiesel producer. The major reason of high price of biodiesel fuel is cost of a raw material. The use of dredging sediments for biodiesel production reduces production costs, because the dredging sediments are by-products which originated during lake restoration actions, and are free of cost raw materials. Lipid content in sediments was 0.24% of dry weight. To assess the potential of from sediments as a substitute of diesel fuel, the properties of the biodiesel such as cetane number, iodine number and heat of combustion were calculated. All of this parameters complied with limits established by EN 14214 and EN 14213 related to biodiesel quality. -- Highlights: → Dredging sediments were considered as a new feedstock for biodiesel production. → Lipid and fatty acid content in the sediments were determined. → Main properties of the biodiesel were calculated basing on fatty acid composition. → The properties well complied with limits established in biodiesel standards.

  14. Production of Biodiesel by Enzymatic Transesterification: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel E. Ghaly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: The research on the production of biodiesel has increased significantly in recent years because of the need for an alternative fuel which endows with biodegradability, low toxicity and renewability. Plant oils, animal fats, microalgal oils and waste products such as animal rendering, fish processing waste and cooking oils have been employed as feedstocks for biodiesel production. In order to design an economically and environmentally sustainable biodiesel production process, a proper understanding of the factors affecting the process and their relative importance is necessary. Approach: A comprehensive review of the literature on the subject of biodiesel production was carried out. Traditionally biodiesel has been produced using either acid or base catalysts. The multi-step purification of end products, wastewater treatment and energy demand of the conventional process has lead to search for alternative option for production of biodiesel. The use the enzyme lipase as a biocatalyst for the transesterification reaction step in biodiesel production has been extensively investigated. Lipase is produced by all living organisms and can be used intracellularly or extracellularly. Conclusion: To date, the most popular microbes used for their lipases have been filamentous fungi and recombinant bacteria. A summary of lipases used in transesterification and their optimum operating conditions is provided. In addition to the choice of lipase employed, factors which make the transesterification process feasible and ready for commercialization are: enzyme modification, the selection of feedstock and alcohol, use of common solvents, pretreatment of the lipase, alcohol to oil molar ratio, water activity/content and reaction temperature. Optimization of these parameters is necessary in order to reduce the cost of biodiesel production. Use of no/low cost waste materials as feedstocks will have double environmental benefits by reducing the

  15. Study on Emission and Performance of Diesel Engine Using Castor Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2014-01-01

    performance of diesel engine using the castor biodiesel and its blend with diesel from 0% to 40% by volume. The acid-based catalyzed transesterification system was used to produce castor biodiesel and the highest yield of 82.5% was obtained under the optimized condition. The FTIR spectrum of castor biodiesel indicates the presence of C=O and C–O functional groups, which is due to the ester compound in biodiesel. The smoke emission test revealed that B40 (biodiesel blend with 40% biodiesel and 60% diesel had the least black smoke compared to the conventional diesel. Diesel engine performance test indicated that the specific fuel consumption of biodiesel blend was increased sufficiently when the blending ratio was optimized. Thus, the reduction in exhaust emissions and reduction in brake-specific fuel consumption made the blends of caster seed oil (B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and could help in controlling air pollution.

  16. MODEL FOR THE CORRECTION OF THE SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF BIODIESEL FROM RESIDUAL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Aparecida Rosa da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a important fuel with economic benefits, social and environmental. The production cost of the biodiesel can be significantly lowered if the raw material is replaced by a alternative material as residual oil. In this study, the variation of specific gravity with temperature increase for diesel and biodiesel from residual oil obtained by homogeneous basic catalysis. All properties analyzed for biodiesel are within specification Brazil. The determination of the correction algorithm for the specific gravity function of temperature is also presented, and the slope of the line to diesel fuel, methylic biodiesel (BMR and ethylic biodiesel (BER from residual oil were respectively the values -0.7089, -0.7290 and -0.7277. This demonstrates the existence of difference of the model when compared chemically different fuels, like diesel and biodiesel from different sources, indicating the importance of determining the specific algorithm for the operations of conversion of volume to the reference temperature.

  17. BiodieselFAO: An Integrated Decision Support System for Investment Analysis in the Biodiesel Production Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz Galvão da Silva Júnior

    2015-01-01

    In the short and medium terms, biofuels are the most viable alternative to reduce the environmental impact of fossil fuels. The recent controversy over the competition between biofuels and food production increases the complexity of investment decisions in the biodiesel production chain. In this context, decision support tools are highly relevant. The purpose of this article is to describe the BiodieselFAO using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). An integrated analysis considering both agri...

  18. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  19. Multicomponent evaporation model for pure and blended biodiesel droplets in high temperature convective environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, K.; Abu-Ramadan, E.; Li, X. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Renewable energy sources are currently being investigated for their reliability, efficiency, and applicability. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives to conventional diesel fuels in compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reported on a study that compared pure biodiesel, pure diesel and blended fuels using a comprehensive multicomponent droplet vaporization model. The model considers the difference in the gas phase diffusivity of diesel and biodiesel vapors. The paper presented the vaporization characteristics of pure diesel, pure biodiesel fuel droplets as well as the effect of mixing them in different proportions (B20 and B50). The model successfully predicted the vaporization history of a multicomponent droplet. The modeling study revealed that biodiesel droplets evaporate at a slower rate than the diesel droplets because of relatively low vapor pressure. As such, the blending of diesel fuel with small proportions of biodiesel will result in an increase in the evaporation time of diesel fuel to some extent. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Metodologia experimental para avaliação de custos de produção e utilização de biodiesel: estudo de caso de quatro ésteres metílicos e óleo diesel comercial Experimental methodology for assessing the cost of biodiesel production and use biodiesel: a case study of four methyl esters and commercial diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Augusto Fiorese

    2011-11-01

    and specific fuel consumption were evaluated for each biodiesel to determine the difference with the commercial diesel oil. The case study showed advantages for diesel oil, both in cost and consumption. Comparing the biodiesels, the beef tallow showed the lowest production costs and lower consumption.

  1. Performance and Emission Characteristics of Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engine Fueled with Biodiesel and High Speed Diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gopinathan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Depleting petroleum reserves on the earth and increasing concerns about the environment leads to the question for fuels which are eco-friendly safer for human beings. The objective of present study was to investigate the effect of coating on cylinder head of a Diesel engine on the performance and emission characteristics of exhaust gases using Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel (HSD as a fuel. In this study the effect of Tin and Hard Chrome coating on the performance and emission characteristics of diesel engine was investigated using Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel as a fuel. For this purpose the cylinder head of the test engine were coated with a Tin and Hard Chrome of 100 µ thick by the Electroplating method. For comparing the performance of the engine with coated components with the base engine, readings were taken before and after coating. To make the diesel engine to work with Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel a modification was done. The engine’s performance was studied for both Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel with and without Tin, Hard Chrome coating. Also the emissions values are recorded to study the engine’s behavior on emissions. Satisfactory performance was obtained with Tin and Hard Chrome coating compared with a standard diesel engine. The brake thermal efficiency was increased up to 2.08% for High Speed Diesel with Tin coating and there was a significant reduction in the specific fuel consumption. The CO emission in the engine exhaust decreases with coating. Using Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel fuel for a LHR diesel engine causes an improvement in the performance characteristics and significant reduction in exhaust emissions.

  2. Evaluation of properties and storage stability of Madhuca indica biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilan, N; Ashok Babu, T P; Reddy, R P

    2009-01-01

    Mahua Oil (MO) is an underutilized non-edible vegetable oil, which is available in large quantities in India. In the present work, biodiesel was derived from the MO by the transesterification process. The fuel properties of the MO biodiesel were found to be within the limits of biodiesel specifications of many countries. The chemical nature of biodiesel makes it more susceptible to oxidation during long-term storage which leads to degradation of fuel properties that can compromise fuel quality. The effect of long storage condition on the stability of the MO biodiesel was studied in the present work. The biodiesel samples were stored in plastic containers at room temperature. The study was conducted for a period of 12 months and the test sample was kept in the darkness. From the experimental results, it was observed that the acid value and viscosity increases with the storage time, but the iodine value decreased with increasing storage time. This is due to the presence of the double bond in the molecule of the biodiesel which produce a high level of reactivity. This high level reactivity produces formation of hydroperoxides, soluble polymers and other secondary products. From the experimental results, a slight difference in the acid value, iodine value and viscosity of the MO biodiesel stored for a period of 30 days was observed. But after this period, the differences were significant. PMID:19915318

  3. Technoeconomic analysis of an integrated microalgae photobioreactor, biodiesel and biogas production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As fossil fuel prices increase and environmental concerns gain prominence, the development of alternative fuels from biomass has become more important. Biodiesel produced from microalgae is becoming an attractive alternative to share the role of petroleum. Currently it appears that the production of microalgal biodiesel is not economically viable in current environment because it costs more than conventional fuels. Therefore, a new concept is introduced in this article as an option to reduce the total production cost of microalgal biodiesel. The integration of biodiesel production system with methane production via anaerobic digestion is proved in improving the economics and sustainability of overall biodiesel stages. Anaerobic digestion of microalgae produces methane and further be converted to generate electricity. The generated electricity can surrogate the consumption of energy that require in microalgal cultivation, dewatering, extraction and transesterification process. From theoretical calculations, the electricity generated from methane is able to power all of the biodiesel production stages and will substantially reduce the cost of biodiesel production (33% reduction). The carbon emissions of biodiesel production systems are also reduced by approximately 75% when utilizing biogas electricity compared to when the electricity is otherwise purchased from the Victorian grid. The overall findings from this study indicate that the approach of digesting microalgal waste to produce biogas will make the production of biodiesel from algae more viable by reducing the overall cost of production per unit of biodiesel and hence enable biodiesel to be more competitive with existing fuels. (author)

  4. Physico-chemical characterization of biodiesel from pests attacked corn oil; Caracterizacao fisico-quimica do biodiesel de oleo de milho danificado por pragas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fabia M.; Correa, Paulo C.; Martins, Marcio A.; Santos, Silmara B.; Damian, Amanda D. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil)], Emails: copace@ufv.br, aredes@ufv.br, syllmara@vicosa.ufv.br

    2009-07-01

    The biodiesel is a renewable energy source alternative to fossil fuels. The biodiesel synthesis can be made by many types of triglycerides transesterification, it is possible to use this biofuel in vehicles if it has the quality required from Agencia Nacional de Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP). Searching an application for pests attacked corn, there is feasibility technical for the biodiesel production from this corn oil. The biodiesel synthesis was made through ethyl transesterification process with alkaline catalyst using ethanol. The biodiesel physical-chemical characterization was performed using ANP methods. (author)

  5. Experiments and modeling on droplet motion and atomization of diesel and bio-diesel fuels in a cross-flowed air stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an experimental and numerical modeling on microscopic droplet behaviors and macroscopic atomization characteristics of diesel and bio-diesel fuels under the conditions of air cross-flow. In order to obtain the experimental air-assisted-droplet behavior and breakup characteristics, deformation ratio, droplet trajectory, and droplet size distribution were investigated quantitatively for different droplet breakup mechanisms. In order to assess prediction accuracies of the original spray models contained in the standard CFD code and validate the currently modified and suggested models, the computations were implemented using the KIVA-3V code with a three dimensional computational mesh and compared to the experimental results. Because the original TAB model and droplet drag model tend to predict the unphysical breakup characteristics, to improve the calculation accuracy, the model constants of the droplet motion equation in the TAB model and the droplet drag model were modified and optimized. In addition, a new model for determining the droplet size after breakup is currently suggested, because original model does not consider the frictional flow inside a droplet, resulting in impractical droplet size results. Based on inspections of the measured and calculated results, outcomes of atomization characteristics from modified models give a reasonable droplet deformation rate and also show the appropriate droplet trajectory at the first breakup stage. In the results of droplet breakup and atomization, the modified models give improved prediction accuracy on the droplet size distribution better than the standard models. But there still shows a little discrepancy between calculated and measured droplet size and its distribution pattern. It seems to be caused by the own assumption of the TAB model which is based only on the vibration and breakup mechanism.

  6. Influence of biodiesel blending on physicochemical properties and importance of mathematical model for predicting the properties of biodiesel blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Short identification of selected biodiesel feedstock. • Review of physicochemical properties for blended biodiesel. • Mathematical model for predicting properties of various biodiesel blends. - Abstract: The growing demand for green world serves as one of the most significant challenges of modernization. Requirements like largest usage of energy for modern society as well as demand for friendly milieu create a deep concern in field of research. Biofuels are placed at the peak of the research arena for their underlying benefits as mentioned by multiple researches. Out of a number of vegetable oils, only a few are used commercially for biodiesel production. Due to various limitations of edible oil, non-edible oils are becoming a profitable choice. Till today, very little percentage of biodiesel is used successfully in engine. The research is still continuing for improving the biodiesel usage level. Recently, it is found that the blended biodiesel from more than one feedstock provides better performance in engine. This paper reviews the physicochemical properties of different biodiesel blends obtained from various feedstocks with a view to properly understand the fuel quality. Moreover, a short description of each feedstock is given along with graphical presentation of important properties for various blend percentages from B0 to B100. Finally, mathematical model is formed for predicting various properties of biodiesel blend with the help of different research data by using polynomial curve fitting method. The results obtained from a number of literature based on this work shows that the heating value of biodiesel is about 11% lower than diesel except coconut (14.5% lower) whereas kinematic viscosity is in the range of 4–5.4 mm2/s. Flash point of all biodiesels are more than 150 °C, except neem and coconut. Cold flow properties of calophyllum, palm, jatropha, moringa are inferior to others. This would help to determine important properties of

  7. 柴油机燃用乙醇-生物柴油的性能试验研究%Testing research of performance on diesel engine fueled with ethanol-biodiesel blends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾契

    2012-01-01

    Research on the water-resistance, solubility of ethanol and biodiesel, the comparison testing research of economic and emission performance has been done on the ZS195 diesel engine when being fueled with biodiesel, ethanol-biodiesel, hydrous ethanol-biodiesel and pure diesel. The results indicate that B90E10 and B90A10 mixed fuel have good physical stability at 20 ℃. The brake specific fuel consumption of biodiesel, B90E10 and B90A10 is higher than pure diesel. The CO emission is equal to pure diesel at small load, while declining at big load. The Noχ emission is higher than pure diesel at small load while B90El0 and B90A10 blends decreasing successively, and B90A10 is lower than that of pure diesel. NO, emission of the three kinds of fuel are nearly e-qual at big load, which is higher than pure diesel. The THC emission is less than pure diesel, and the declining range of biodiesel is the largest while the case of that for B90E10 blend is the least. The smoke emission of carbon declines larger than pure diesel, and declines successively with the increasing of oxygen that the fuel contain.%对乙醇和生物柴油的互溶性和抗水性进行了研究,在ZS195型柴油机上进行了燃用生物柴油、乙醇-生物柴油、含水乙醇-生物柴油与纯柴油的经济性与排放特性对比试验研究.试验结果表明:B90E10和B90A 10混合燃料能在20℃环境温度下保持良好的物理稳定性;B90E 10,B90A10和生物柴油有效燃油消耗率高于纯柴油;CO排放量,在小负荷时趋于纯柴油的排放水平,大负荷时下降;生物柴油NOx排放量在小负荷时高于纯柴油水平,而B90E10和B90A10较生物柴油依次下降,其中B90A10的NOx排放量低于纯柴油水平,大负荷时3种燃料的NOx排放量接近,均高于纯柴油水平;THC排放量均低于纯柴油水平,其中生物柴油下降幅度最大,B90E10下降幅度最小;碳烟排放较纯柴油大幅度下降,且随着燃料中含氧量的增加依次下降.

  8. A technical evaluation of biodiesel from vegetable oils vs. algae. Will algae-derived biodiesel perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, one of the most prominent renewable alternative fuels, can be derived from a variety of sources including vegetable oils, animal fats and used cooking oils as well as alternative sources such as algae. While issues such as land-use change, food vs. fuel, feedstock availability, and produc...

  9. Biodiesel – a Real Solution for Reducing Air Pollution ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ODAGIU Antonia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Traffic emissions made up of high levels of nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and particulate matter determineserious pollution in urban high agglomerations. One solution in reducing atmospheric pollution is represented byfinding not pollutant alternatives to classic fuel used for urban vehicles and one valuable solution is the replacement ofpollutant fossil fuels with biodiesel/biofuel. The reaction between glycerides and methanol, in presence of a catalystrepresents the basis of biodiesel fuel production. The main plants used for biofuel production are: soybeans, rapeseed(canola, sunflower seed, palm fruit or kernels, coconut and physic nut, etc. The legal approach of biodiesel use includesa series of national and international agreements adopted with the aim of reducing air pollution produced by the use oftraditional fuel in urban traffic, and biodiesel use remains a valuable option, in spite of high production costs.

  10. Biodiesel From Alternative Oilseed Feedstocks: Production and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as potential biodiesel fuels from several alternative oilseed feedstocks, which included camelina (Camelina sativa L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), field mustard (Brassica juncea L.), field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.), and meadowfoam (L...

  11. Two novel approaches used to produce biodiesel from low-cost feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, X.; Chen, F. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition; Wang, X. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Biochemistry

    2010-07-01

    The cost of feedstock has a significant effect of the economic viability of biodiesel production. The paper discussed a preliminary study looking at 2 approaches used to economically produce biodiesel, one from waste cooking oil (WCO) and the other from flaked cottonseed. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis was used to produce biodiesel from WCO, and in situ transesterification was used to produce biodiesel from the flaked cottonseed. The use of WCO solves the problem of waste disposal and also generates an environmentally benign fuel while at the same time lowering the costs involved in producing biodiesel. Ultrasonification has proven to be an efficient, low-cost, energy saving means of producing biodiesel. In situ transesterification makes solvent extraction and oil cleanup prior to biodiesel synthesis unnecessary, thereby simplifying the reaction steps. Based on the results of gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography tests, both approaches are feasible for the production of biodiesel from low-cost feedstock. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  12. BiodieselFAO: An Integrated Decision Support System for Investment Analysis in the Biodiesel Production Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Galvão da Silva Júnior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the short and medium terms, biofuels are the most viable alternative to reduce the environmental impact of fossil fuels. The recent controversy over the competition between biofuels and food production increases the complexity of investment decisions in the biodiesel production chain. In this context, decision support tools are highly relevant. The purpose of this article is to describe the BiodieselFAO using the Unified Modeling Language (UML. An integrated analysis considering both agricultural and industrial sectors was identified as a key requirement to the system. Therefore, farmers and industry are the main actors in the use case diagram. As the raw material represents around 70% of the industrial cost of biodiesel production, the price negotiation of raw material (oilseeds is the central use case. Configuration, agriculture, industry, results and scenarios are the modules, which encompass the functionalities derived from the UML diagrams. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO has made the BiodieselFAO available, free of charge, to around 180 professionals from 17 Latin American countries. Additionally, the developing team has supported the usage of the BiodieselFAO in several biodiesel investment analyses throughout Latin America. The system was also useful in the design and analysis of policy related to biodiesel industry in Brazil.

  13. Marketing Risk Management of Palm Oil Based Biodiesel Agroindustry

    OpenAIRE

    I Gusti Bagus Udayana

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel is fuel generates from vegetable oils that have properties similar to diesel oil. The advantages of biodiesel compared to diesel is an environmentally friendly fuel because it produces much lower emissions (sulfur free, low smoke number) in accordance with global issues, higher cetane number (> 57) so that the combustion efficiency is better than diesel, lubrication properties of the piston engine; biodegradable, a renewable energy because it is made from natural materials, and i...

  14. Biodiesel – a Real Solution for Reducing Air Pollution ?

    OpenAIRE

    ODAGIU Antonia; I. OROIAN; Sonia SANĂ; VÂRBAN D. I.; P. BURDUHOS

    2010-01-01

    Traffic emissions made up of high levels of nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and particulate matter determineserious pollution in urban high agglomerations. One solution in reducing atmospheric pollution is represented byfinding not pollutant alternatives to classic fuel used for urban vehicles and one valuable solution is the replacement ofpollutant fossil fuels with biodiesel/biofuel. The reaction between glycerides and methanol, in presence of a catalystrepresents the basis of biodiesel fu...

  15. Production of Biodiesel from Vegetable Oil Using Microware Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kapilan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The petroleum oil supply crisis, the increase in demand and the price eruption have led to a search for an alternative fuel of bio-origin in India. Among the alternative fuels, biodiesel is considered as a sustainable renewable alternative fuel to fossil diesel. Non-edible jatropha oil has considerable potential for the production of biodiesel in India. The production of biodiesel from jatropha oil using a conventional heating method takes more than 1h. In this work, microwave irradiation has been used as a source of heat for the transesterification reaction. A domestic microwave oven was modified and used for microwave heating of the reactants. The time taken for biodiesel production using microwave irradiation was 1 min. The fuel property analysis shows that the properties of jatropha oil biodiesel satisfy the biodiesel standards, and are close to the fossil diesel standards. From this work, it is concluded that biodiesel can be produced from vegetable oil using microwave irradiation, with a significant reduction in production time.

  16. Optimisation of biodiesel production by sunflower oil transesterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, G. [Universidad de Valladolid (Spain). Dpto. de Ingenieria Quimica; Tinaut, F.V.; Perez, C. [Universidad de Valladolid (Spain). Dpto. de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica; Briceno, Y.; Castano, V.; Ramirez, A.I. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Automocion, Valladolid (Spain)

    2002-06-01

    In this work the transformation process of sunflower oil in order to obtain biodiesel by means of transesterification was studied. Taguchi's methodology was chosen for the optimisation of the most important variables (temperature conditions, reactants proportion and methods of purification), with the purpose of obtaining a high quality biodiesel that fulfils the European pre-legislation with the maximum process yield. Finally, sunflower methyl esters were characterised to test their properties as fuels in diesel engines, such as viscosity, flash point, cold filter plugging point and acid value. Results showed that biodiesel obtained under the optimum conditions is an excellent substitute for fossil fuels. (author)

  17. Investigation of friction and wear characteristics of palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Both wear and friction decrease with the increase of biodiesel concentration. ► Wear and friction appear to decrease more at the range of 10–20% biodiesel in diesel blend. ► The wear of steel ball in biodiesel (B100) was 20% lower than that in diesel (B0). ► Lubricity in terms of wear and friction decreases with the increase of rotating speed. - Abstract: Use of biodiesel in automobile engine is creating tribology related new challenges. The present study aims to assess the friction and wear characteristics of palm biodiesel at different concentration level by using four-ball wear machine. The investigated fuels were biodiesel (B100), diesel (B0) and three different biodiesel blends such as B10 (10% biodiesel in diesel), B20, B50. Tests were conducted at 75 °C under a normal load of 40 kg for 1 h at four different speeds viz, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 rpm. Worn surfaces of the balls were examined by SEM. Results showed that wear and friction decreased with the increase of biodiesel concentration. The wear of steel ball in B100 was appeared to be 20% lower than that in diesel (B0)

  18. Novel process integration for biodiesel blend in membrane reactive divided wall (MRDW column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakhre Vandana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a novel process integration for biodiesel blend in the Membrane assisted Reactive Divided Wall Distillation (MRDW column. Biodiesel is a green fuel and grade of biodiesel blend is B20 (% which consist of 20% biodiesel and rest 80% commercial diesel. Instead of commercial diesel, Tertiary Amyl Ethyl Ether (TAEE was used as an environment friendly fuel for blending biodiesel. Biodiesel and TAEE were synthesized in a pilot scale reactive distillation column. Dual reactive distillation and MRDW were simulated using aspen plus. B20 (% limit calculation was performed using feed flow rates of both TAEE and biodiesel. MRDW was compared with dual reactive distillation column and it was observed that MRDW is comparatively cost effective and suitable in terms of improved heat integration and flow pattern.

  19. ENGINE PERFORMANCE OF BIODIESEL FROM FEEDSTOCK FOR CLEANER ENVIRONMENT: A REVI EW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Waheed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for renewable energy sources is being intensified globally and this includes alternative fuels for compression engine. Biodiesel from inedible oil bearing seeds has been discovered as a good replacement for diesel fuel. This paper is a review of literature of formulae for engine parameters, performance of compression ignition engines when run with biodiesel from the most common feedstocks. Research findings show that biodiesel can replace or substitute dieselfuel and its biorefinery can be set in developing countries like Nigeria. The paper also highlight its advantages of biodiesel for reduce greenhouse emission as a renewable fuel.

  20. The effect of economic variables over a biodiesel production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Influence of the mayor economic parameters for biodiesel production. → Variations of profitability of a biodiesel plant due to changes in the market scenarios. → Comparison of economic indicators of a biodiesel production facility when market variables are modified. - Abstract: Biodiesel appears as one of the possible alternative renewable fuels to substitute diesel fuel derived from petroleum. Several researches have been done on the technical aspects of biodiesel production in an attempt to develop a better and cleaner alternative to the conventional process. Economic studies have been carried out to have a better understanding of the high costs and benefits of different technologies in the biodiesel industry. In this work it is studied the effect of the most important economic variables of a biodiesel production process over the general economy of a conventional plant which employs sodium methoxide as catalyst. It has been analyzed the effect of the oil price, the amount of free fatty acid, the biodiesel price, the cost of the glycerin, the effect due to the modification on the methanol price, the washing water price, and several others. Small variations on some of the major market variables would produce significant effects over the global economy of the plant, making it non profitable in some cases.

  1. The effect of economic variables over a biodiesel production plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, J.M., E-mail: jmarchetti@plapiqui.edu.ar [Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica (UNS-CONICET), Camino La Carrindanga km 7, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Influence of the mayor economic parameters for biodiesel production. {yields} Variations of profitability of a biodiesel plant due to changes in the market scenarios. {yields} Comparison of economic indicators of a biodiesel production facility when market variables are modified. - Abstract: Biodiesel appears as one of the possible alternative renewable fuels to substitute diesel fuel derived from petroleum. Several researches have been done on the technical aspects of biodiesel production in an attempt to develop a better and cleaner alternative to the conventional process. Economic studies have been carried out to have a better understanding of the high costs and benefits of different technologies in the biodiesel industry. In this work it is studied the effect of the most important economic variables of a biodiesel production process over the general economy of a conventional plant which employs sodium methoxide as catalyst. It has been analyzed the effect of the oil price, the amount of free fatty acid, the biodiesel price, the cost of the glycerin, the effect due to the modification on the methanol price, the washing water price, and several others. Small variations on some of the major market variables would produce significant effects over the global economy of the plant, making it non profitable in some cases.

  2. Improvement of the cold flow characteristics of biodiesel containing dissolved polymer wastes using acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Pouya Mohammadi; Meisam Tabatabaei; Nikbakht, Ali M.; Zahra Esmaeili

    2014-01-01

    Due to the fast fossil fuel depletion and at the same time global warming phenomenon anticipated for the next coming years, the necessity of developing alternative fuels e.g. biofuels (i.e. bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas and etc.) has turned into an important concern. Recently, the application of the bio-solvency properties of biodiesel for recycling waste polymers has been highlighted. However, the impact of polymer dissolution on cold flow characteristics of biodiesel was never investigated....

  3. Impact of residual glycerides on viscosity of biodiesel (waste and rapeseed oil blends)

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Jurac; L. Pomenić

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biodiesel, mixture of fatty acid methyl esters is a biodegradable alternative fuel that is obtained from renewable sources as a vegetable oils or animal fats. Use of waste cooking oils reduce the cost of raw materials for biodiesel production and also reduces the environment pollution. Moreover, pure edible vegetable oils for biodiesel production have an ethical significance because food is used to produce fuel. The aim of this work is a presentation of effects that r...

  4. Non-Edible Plant Oils as New Sources for Biodiesel Production

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rafiqul Islam; K. Chris Watts; Suzanne M Budge; Martin S. Tango; Arjun B. Chhetri

    2008-01-01

    Due to the concern on the availability of recoverable fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems caused by the use those fossil fuels, considerable attention has been given to biodiesel production as an alternative to petrodiesel. However, as the biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats, there are concerns that biodiesel feedstock may compete with food supply in the long-term. Hence, the recent focus is to find oil bearing plants that produce non-edible oils as the f...

  5. Compatibility of elastomers in palm biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.; Siang, C.T.; Fazal, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-10-15

    In recent time, environmental awareness and concern over the rapid exhaustion of fossil fuels have led to an increased popularity of biodiesel as an alternative fuel for automobiles. However, there are concerns over enhanced degradation of automotive materials in biodiesel. The present study aims to investigate the impact of palm biodiesel on the degradation behavior of elastomers such as nitrile rubber (NBR), polychloroprene, and fluoro-viton A. Static immersion tests in B0 (diesel), B10 (10% biodiesel in diesel), B100 (biodiesel) were carried out at room temperature (25 C) and at 50 C for 500 h. At the end of immersion test, degradation behavior was investigated by measuring mass, volume, hardness as well as tensile strength and elongation. The exposed elastomer surface was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out to identify the chemical and structural changes. Results showed that the extent of degradation was higher for both polychloroprene and NBR while fluoro-viton exhibited good resistance to degradation and was least attacked. (author)

  6. Sustainable Algae Biodiesel Production in Cold Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudras Baliga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This life cycle assessment aims to determine the most suitable operating conditions for algae biodiesel production in cold climates to minimize energy consumption and environmental impacts. Two hypothetical photobioreactor algae production and biodiesel plants located in Upstate New York (USA are modeled. The photobioreactor is assumed to be housed within a greenhouse that is located adjacent to a fossil fuel or biomass power plant that can supply waste heat and flue gas containing CO2 as a primary source of carbon. Model results show that the biodiesel areal productivity is high (19 to 25 L of BD/m2/yr. The total life cycle energy consumption was between 15 and 23 MJ/L of algae BD and 20 MJ/L of soy BD. Energy consumption and air emissions for algae biodiesel are substantially lower than soy biodiesel when waste heat was utilized. Algae's most substantial contribution is a significant decrease in the petroleum consumed to make the fuel.

  7. Combustion of biodiesel in a large-scale laboratory furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combustion tests in a large-scale laboratory furnace were carried out to assess the feasibility of using biodiesel as a fuel in industrial furnaces. For comparison purposes, petroleum-based diesel was also used as a fuel. Initially, the performance of the commercial air-assisted atomizer used in the combustion tests was scrutinized under non-reacting conditions. Subsequently, flue gas data, including PM (particulate matter), were obtained for various flame conditions to quantify the effects of the atomization quality and excess air on combustion performance. The combustion data was complemented with in-flame temperature measurements for two representative furnace operating conditions. The results reveal that (i) CO emissions from biodiesel and diesel combustion are rather similar and not affected by the atomization quality; (ii) NOx emissions increase slightly as spray quality improves for both liquid fuels, but NOx emissions from biodiesel combustion are always lower than those from diesel combustion; (iii) CO emissions decrease rapidly for both liquid fuels as the excess air level increases up to an O2 concentration in the flue gas of 2%, beyond which they remain unchanged; (iv) NOx emissions increase with an increase in the excess air level for both liquid fuels; (v) the quality of the atomization has a significant impact on PM emissions, with the diesel combustion yielding significantly higher PM emissions than biodiesel combustion; and (vi) diesel combustion originates PM with elements such as Cr, Na, Ni and Pb, while biodiesel combustion produces PM with elements such as Ca, Mg and Fe. - Highlights: • CO emissions from biodiesel and diesel tested are similar. • NOx emissions from biodiesel tested are lower than those from diesel tested. • Diesel tested yields significantly higher PM (particulate matter) emissions than biodiesel tested. • Diesel tested originates PM with Cr, Na, Ni and Pb, while biodiesel tested produces PM with Ca, Mg and Fe

  8. Physicochemical characterization and thermal behavior of biodiesel and biodiesel–diesel blends derived from crude Moringa peregrina seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Properties of M. peregrina biodiesel are determined for the first time. • Biodiesel was produced easily by alkaline transesterification in one step. • The effect of diesel on the properties of biodiesel was examined. • M. peregrina is a potential crop for sustainable production of biodiesel. - Abstract: Moringaceae is a monogeneric family with a single genus i.e. Moringa. This family includes 13 species. All these species are known as medicinal, nutritional and water purification agents. This study reports, for the first time, on characterization of the biodiesel derived from crude Moringaperegrina seed oil and its blends with diesel. The crude oil was converted to biodiesel by the transesterification reaction, catalyzed by potassium hydroxide. High ester content (97.79%) was obtained. M. peregrina biodiesel exhibited high oxidative stability (24.48 h). Moreover, the major fuel properties of M. peregrina biodiesel conformed to the ASTM D6751 standards. However, kinematic viscosity (4.6758 mm2/s), density (876.2 kg/m3) and flash point (156.5 °C) were found higher than that of diesel fuel. In addition, the calorific value of M. peregrina biodiesel (40.119 MJ/kg) was lower than the diesel fuel. The fuel properties of M. peregrina biodiesel were enhanced significantly by blending with diesel fuel. In conclusion, M. peregrina is a suitable feedstock for sustainable production of biodiesel only blended up to 20% with diesel fuel, considering the edibility of all other parts of this tree

  9. Evaluation of Biodiesel Obtained from Cottonseed Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters from vegetable oils have attracted a great deal of interest as substitutes for petrodiesel to reduce dependence on imported petroleum and provide a fuel with more benign environmental properties. In this work biodiesel was prepared from cottonseed oil by transesterification with methanol, us...

  10. ANALYZING BIODIESEL: STANDARDS AND OTHER METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel occupies a prominent position among the alternatives to conventional petrodiesel fuel due to various technical and economic factors. It is obtained by reacting the parent vegetable oil or fat with an alcohol (transesterification) in the presence of a catalyst to give the corresponding mon...

  11. Methods to improve oxidative stability of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative degradation is one of the chief technical deficiencies of biodiesel relative to petrodiesel. Traditional methods to mitigate susceptibility to oxidation include employment of synthetic antioxidants, switching to more stable feedstocks, reducing the storage time of the fuel, and improving t...

  12. A New Source of Biodiesel: Field Pennycress

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a result of the current debate about fuel versus food issues, alternative non-food feedstocks for biodiesel production are an important area of current research. Traditionally considered to be an agricultural weed by farmers, field pennycress has many positive agronomic characteristics that make ...

  13. Recent developments in the biodiesel area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, continues to find increasing interest as an alternative to petrodiesel fuel. In this connection, a significant issue affecting more widespread use and commercialization has been that of supply and availability. This has le...

  14. TECHNOLOGY FOR ENHANCED BIODIESEL ECONOMICS - PHASE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall goal of this project is to complete the research and development of an innovative process technology to enhance the economics of biodiesel production, through upgrading the byproduct glycerol to a propane fuel (LPG), which (a) is widely used today, (b) has an exist...

  15. Analyses of extracted biodiesel and petroleum diesel exhaust particle and the effects on endothelial cell toxicity and antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel (BD) is a renewable energy source and is readily substituted in diesel engines. Combustion of biodiesel is cleaner due to the efficiency of the fuel to completely combust. Biodiesel combustion emissions contain less CO, PAHs, aldehydes, and particulate matter (PM) mas...

  16. Effect of first and second generation biodiesel blends on engine performance and emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, A. K.; Rasul, M. G.; Bhuiya, M. M. K.; Islam, Rubayat

    2016-07-01

    The biodiesel is a potential source of alternative fuel which can be used at different proportions with diesel fuel. This study experimentally investigated the effect of blend percentage on diesel engine performance and emission using first generation (soybean) and second generation (waste cooking) biodiesel. The characterization of the biodiesel was done according to ASTM and EN standards and compared with ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. A multi-cylinder test bed engine coupled with electromagnetic dynamometer and 5 gas analyzer were used for engine performance and emission test. The investigation was made using B5, B10 and B15 blends for both biodiesels. The study found that brake power (BP) and brake torque (BT) slightly decreases and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) slightly increases with an increase in biodiesel blends ratio. Besides, a significant reduction in exhaust emissions (except NOx emission) was found for both biodiesels compared to ULSD. Soybean biodiesel showed better engine performance and emissions reduction compared with waste cooking biodiesel. However, NOx emission for B5 waste cooking biodiesel was lower than soybean biodiesel.

  17. Biodiesel: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Angelo C.; Guarieiro, Lilian L.N.; Rezende, Michelle J.C.; Ribeiro, Nubia M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Torres, Ednildo A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Lopes, Wilson A.; Pereira, Pedro A. de P.; Andrade, Jailson B. de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], Email: jailsong@ufba.br

    2005-07-01

    The importance of biodiesel production was analyzed based on scientific articles and patents. A critical analysis was presented on the most used oil sources, the catalysts and the methods to verify the transesterification yields. Also analyzed were the comparative studies on emissions from pure fossil diesel and mixtures with biodiesel in variable proportions. Finally some challenges and considerations focused on technological, agronomic and infrastructure aspects of biodiesel production were indicated. (author)

  18. Market penetration of biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth R. Szulczyk, Bruce A. McCarl

    2010-01-01

    This research examines in detail the technology and economics of substituting biodiesel for diesel #2. This endeavor examines three areas. First, the benefits of biodiesel are examined, and the technical problems of large-scale implementation. Second, the biodiesel production possibilities are examined for soybean oil, corn oil, tallow, and yellow grease, which are the largest sources of feedstocks for the United States. Examining in detail the production possibilities allows to identity the ...

  19. Prospects of biodiesel production from microalgae in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shakeel A.; Hussain, Mir Z.; Prasad, S. [Division of Environmental Sciences, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012 (India); Rashmi; Banerjee, U.C. [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology (Biotechnology), National Institute of Pharmaceutical and Education Research (NIPER), Sector 67, Phase X, S.A.S. Nagar, Mohali 160062, Punjab (India)

    2009-12-15

    Energy is essential and vital for development, and the global economy literally runs on energy. The use of fossil fuels as energy is now widely accepted as unsustainable due to depleting resources and also due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the environment. Renewable and carbon neutral biodiesel are necessary for environmental and economic sustainability. Biodiesel demand is constantly increasing as the reservoir of fossil fuel are depleting. Unfortunately biodiesel produced from oil crop, waste cooking oil and animal fats are not able to replace fossil fuel. The viability of the first generation biofuels production is however questionable because of the conflict with food supply. Production of biodiesel using microalgae biomass appears to be a viable alternative. The oil productivity of many microalgae exceeds the best producing oil crops. Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms which convert sunlight, water and CO{sub 2} to sugars, from which macromolecules, such as lipids and triacylglycerols (TAGs) can be obtained. These TAGs are the promising and sustainable feedstock for biodiesel production. Microalgal biorefinery approach can be used to reduce the cost of making microalgal biodiesel. Microalgal-based carbon sequestration technologies cover the cost of carbon capture and sequestration. The present paper is an attempt to review the potential of microalgal biodiesel in comparison to the agricultural crops and its prospects in India. (author)

  20. Prospects of dedicated biodiesel engine vehicles in Malaysia and Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petro diplomacy has played its role in last few decades and that makes energy security a major concern worldwide. Rapid climate change and environmental protection is another vital issue to be addressed in recent energy policies. So an alternative carbon neutral transport fuel is a must in new sustainable energy mix. Biodiesel has immense potentiality to be a part of a sustainable energy mix. In this energy scenario, Brazil's success is a role model in utilizing its agro-industry for reducing poverty, greenhouse gas emission and petro-dependency simultaneously. Brazil commercialized bioethanol in mass scale by introducing flexible fuel vehicles in market. This dedicated engine idea moralizes a new concept of dedicated biodiesel engine vehicles for Malaysia and Indonesia. Southeast Asian countries, i.e. Malaysia and Indonesia is the largest producer as well as exporter of palm oil. Growing at highest yield rate among other biodiesel feedstock, palm based biodiesel is a top exported product for this region. This paper will quantify the prospects of a dedicated biodiesel engine vehicle for Malaysia and Indonesia that will initiate palm based biodiesel in fuel supply chain by leapfrogging the barriers of biodiesel utilization by boosting local automobile industry simultaneously. This article will also review on energy scenario of Malaysia and Indonesia and their renewable energy policies and challenges for coming decades. (author)

  1. Methanolysis of Carica papaya Seed Oil for Production of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foluso O. Agunbiade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The future of fossil fuel sources of energy has necessitated the need to search for renewable alternatives. Thus, Carica papaya seed oil (CPSO was employed as feedstock for the production of biodiesel by methanolysis. The seed was obtained locally, dried, and extracted with n-hexane. The CPSO was analyzed for specific gravity, viscosity, iodine value, and saponification value, among others using standard methods. The oil was transesterified by two-stage catalysis with oil to methanol mole ratio of 1 : 9. The biodiesel produced was subjected to standard fuel tests. The seed has an oil yield of 31.2% which is commercially viable. The kinematic viscosity of the oil at 313 K was 27.4 mm2s−1 while that of Carica papaya oil methylester (CPOME was reduced to 3.57 mm2s−1 and the specific gravity was 0.84 comparable with other seed-oil biodiesels and number 2 diesel. Other oil properties were compared favourably with seed oils already documented for biodiesel synthesis. CPOME’s cloud and pour points were 275 K and 274 K, respectively, and relatively higher than other biodiesels and number 2 diesel. CPOME exhibits moderate corrosion of copper strip. The methanolysis improved the fuel properties of the CPOME similar to other biodiesels. CPSO therefore exhibits a potential for biodiesel production.

  2. Prospects of dedicated biodiesel engine vehicles in Malaysia and Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayed, M.H.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Liaquat, A.M. [Centre for Energy Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Husnawan, M. [Centre for Energy Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Syiah Kuala, Jl. S. Abd. Rauf No. 7, Darussalam - Banda Aceh (Indonesia)

    2011-01-15

    Petro diplomacy has played its role in last few decades and that makes energy security a major concern worldwide. Rapid climate change and environmental protection is another vital issue to be addressed in recent energy policies. So an alternative carbon neutral transport fuel is a must in new sustainable energy mix. Biodiesel has immense potentiality to be a part of a sustainable energy mix. In this energy scenario, Brazil's success is a role model in utilizing its agro-industry for reducing poverty, greenhouse gas emission and petro-dependency simultaneously. Brazil commercialized bioethanol in mass scale by introducing flexible fuel vehicles in market. This dedicated engine idea moralizes a new concept of dedicated biodiesel engine vehicles for Malaysia and Indonesia. Southeast Asian countries, i.e. Malaysia and Indonesia is the largest producer as well as exporter of palm oil. Growing at highest yield rate among other biodiesel feedstock, palm based biodiesel is a top exported product for this region. This paper will quantify the prospects of a dedicated biodiesel engine vehicle for Malaysia and Indonesia that will initiate palm based biodiesel in fuel supply chain by leapfrogging the barriers of biodiesel utilization by boosting local automobile industry simultaneously. This article will also review on energy scenario of Malaysia and Indonesia and their renewable energy policies and challenges for coming decades. (author)

  3. Cold Flow Properties of Biodiesel by Automatic and Manual Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel from most common feedstocks has inferior cold flow properties compared to conventional diesel fuel. Blends with as little as 10 vol% biodiesel content typically have significantly higher cloud point (CP), pour point (PP) and cold filter plugging point (CFPP) than No. 2 grade diesel fuel (...

  4. Thermodynamic Study on the Effects of Minor Constituents on Cold Weather Performance of Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils, animal fats and other lipid feedstocks. Fuel properties and performance of biodiesel during cold weather are influenced by factors related to its feedstock, namely fatty acid composition and trace concentrations of monoacylglycerols,...

  5. Biodiesel from Citrus reticulata (Mandarin orange) seed oil, a potential non-food feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oil extracted from Citrus reticulata (Mandarin orange) seeds was investigated as a potential feedstock for the production of biodiesel. The biodiesel fuel was prepared by sodium methoxide-catalyzed transesterification of the oil with methanol. Fuel properties that were determined include cetane numb...

  6. Impact of fatty ester composition on low temperature properties of biodiesel-petroleum diesel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several biodiesel fuels along with neat fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) commonly encountered in biodiesel were blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel at low blend levels permitted by ASTM D975 (B1-B5) and cold flow properties such as cloud point (CP), cold filter plugging point (CFPP), an...

  7. The effects of minor constituents on biodiesel cold flow properties: Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils, animal fats and other lipid feedstocks. Fuel properties and performance of biodiesel during cold weather are influenced by factors related to lipid feedstock as well as small concentrations of monoacylglycerols and other minor constit...

  8. Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.; Jarvis, E.; Dunahay, T.; Roessler, P.; Zeiler, K. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-05-01

    The primary goal of the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology for growing microalgae as a renewable biomass feedstock for the production of a diesel fuel substitute (biodiesel), thereby reducing the need for imported petroleum. Microalgae are of interest as a feedstock because of their high growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions, and because the oils (lipids) they produce can be extracted and converted to substitute petroleum fuels such as biodiesel. Microalgae can be grown in arid and semi-arid regions with poor soil quality, and saline water from aquifers or the ocean can be used for growing microalgae. Biodiesel is an extremely attractive candidate to fulfill the need for a diesel fuel substitute. Biodiesel is a cleaner fuel than petroleum diesel; it is virtually free of sulfur, and emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulates during combustion are significantly reduced in comparison to emissions from petroleum diesel. Biodiesel provides essentially the same energy content and power output as petroleum-based diesel fuel.

  9. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and Their Genotoxicity in Exhaust Emissions from a Diesel Engine during Extended Low-Load Operation on Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtisek-Lom, M.; Pechout, M.; Dittrich, L.; Beránek, V.; Kotek, M.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Vodička, Petr; Milcová, Alena; Rössnerová, Andrea; Ambrož, Antonín; Topinka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, MAY 2015 (2015), s. 9-18. ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-01438S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : biodiesel * diesel particulate matter * DNA adducts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality (UEM-P) Impact factor: 3.281, year: 2014

  10. Effects of low concentration biodiesel blend application on modern passenger cars. Part 1: Feedstock impact on regulated pollutants, fuel consumption and particle emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaras, Georgios; Kousoulidou, Marina [Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, P.O. Box 458, GR 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karavalakis, Georgios [Laboratory of Fuels Technology and Lubricants, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou str., Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens (Greece); Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Pistikopoulos, Panayotis; Ntziachristos, Leonidas [Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, P.O. Box 458, GR 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Bakeas, Evangelos [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Chemistry Department, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greece); Stournas, Stamoulis [Laboratory of Fuels Technology and Lubricants, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou str., Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens (Greece); Samaras, Zissis, E-mail: zisis@auth.g [Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, P.O. Box 458, GR 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-05-15

    Five biodiesels from different feedstocks (rapeseed, soy, sunflower, palm, and used fried oils) blended with diesel at 10% vol. ratio (B10), were tested on a Euro 3 common-rail passenger car. Limited effects (-2% to +4%) were observed on CO{sub 2} emissions. CO and HC emissions increased between 10% and 25% on average, except at high speed - high power where emissions were too low to draw conclusions. NOx emissions increased by up to 20% for two out of the five blends, decreased by up to 15% for two other blends, and remained unchanged for one blend. Particulate matter (PM) was reduced for all blends by up to 25% and the reductions were positively correlated with the extent of biodiesel saturation. PM reductions are associated with consistent reductions in non-volatile particle number. A variable behaviour in particle number is observed when volatile particles are also accounted. - Fleet-wide biodiesel application on passenger cars may affect pollutant emissions and the impact can vary depending on biodiesel feedstock.

  11. Effects of low concentration biodiesel blend application on modern passenger cars. Part 1: Feedstock impact on regulated pollutants, fuel consumption and particle emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five biodiesels from different feedstocks (rapeseed, soy, sunflower, palm, and used fried oils) blended with diesel at 10% vol. ratio (B10), were tested on a Euro 3 common-rail passenger car. Limited effects (-2% to +4%) were observed on CO2 emissions. CO and HC emissions increased between 10% and 25% on average, except at high speed - high power where emissions were too low to draw conclusions. NOx emissions increased by up to 20% for two out of the five blends, decreased by up to 15% for two other blends, and remained unchanged for one blend. Particulate matter (PM) was reduced for all blends by up to 25% and the reductions were positively correlated with the extent of biodiesel saturation. PM reductions are associated with consistent reductions in non-volatile particle number. A variable behaviour in particle number is observed when volatile particles are also accounted. - Fleet-wide biodiesel application on passenger cars may affect pollutant emissions and the impact can vary depending on biodiesel feedstock.

  12. Analyse de la demande et des mesures de promotion françaises du biodiesel à l'horizon 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Frédérick

    2008-01-01

    The researches presented aim at assessing biodiesel promoting measures under consideration in France by 2010. This assessment is based on a deep study of French biodiesel demand. The use of a linear model for optimizing the whole French refining industry costs allow us to take into account the physicochemical characteristics of biodiesel useful for gas oil blending operation. This researches show that biodiesel can be incorporated up to 27% blend in volume to diesel fuel without major technic...

  13. The engine tests of biodiesel from used frying oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly and a renewable alternative diesel fuel that can be used in diesel engines with little or no modification. Used frying oil is one of the raw materials which can be used for biodiesel production. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of used frying oil originated from biodiesel on engine performance and emissions in a Fiat Doblo 1.9 DS, four-cylinder, four-stroke, 46 kW power capacity diesel engine. Comparative measurements with no. 2 diesel fuel were conducted on both engine power and emission characteristics of each of the fuel used. Biodiesel, when compared to no. 2 diesel fuel, showed reduction in wheel force over 3.35% and it also reduced the wheel power by over 2.03%. In the acceleration tests, 40-100 km/h and 60-100 km/h acceleration periods were measured and a reduction of 7.32% and 8.78% were observed, respectively. According to emission tests, as a result of biodiesel consumption, a reduction of 8.59% in CO emission and an increase of 2.62% were observed in CO2 emission. Also, NOx emissions increased by 5.03% as a result of biodiesel consumption. HC emissions and particulate emissions have a significant effect on air pollution. As a result of biodiesel usage, HC and particulate emissions decreased by 30.66% and 63.33%, respectively. When the fuel consumption amounts are compared, it was observed that biodiesel consumption was 2.43% less than that of no. 2 diesel fuel. (Author)

  14. Use of Reactive Distillation for Biodiesel Production: A Literature Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dani Supardan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel has been shown to be the best substitute for fossil-based fuels to its environmental advantages and renewable resource availability. There is a great demand for the commercialization of biodiesel production, which in turn calls for a technically and economically reactor technology. The production of biodiesel in existing batch and continuous-flow processes requires excess alcohol, typically 100%, over the stoichiometric molar requirement in order to drive the chemical reaction to completion. In this study, a novel reactor system using a reactive distillation (RD technique was discussed for biodiesel production. RD is a chemical unit operation in which chemical reactions and separations occur simultaneously in one unit. It is an effective alternative to the classical combination of reactor and separation units especially when involving reversible or consecutive chemical reactions such as transesterication process in biodiesel production.

  15. Bio-Diesel production and Effect of Catalytic Converter on Emission performance with Bio-Diesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Murali Manohar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bio-Diesel the word itself defines almost all the features of the Bio-Diesel literary. In the Era of this Global Warming where the people are making their living more and more comfortable and they are deteriorating the environment also. The uses of the automobiles with the conventional source of fuel leads to the production of the toxic gaseous substances like carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxide of sulphur, hydro-carbons etc. The limitation comes with the rise in the price of the fuel as well as the produce of the green house gases as the exhaust gas. In the present study, a new method has been employed to produce Bio-Diesel in a homely basis. Theproduction of the Bio-Diesel is done by using Bio-Diesel processor. It requires the used vegetable oil, methanol and the lye with the accurate proportionate. Generally, emissions of regulated compounds changed linearly with the blend level. The objective is to detect any posit ive or negative effects depending on blend levels, because conventional diesel fuel and biodiesel can be blended in every ratio. The known positive and negative effects of biodiesel varied accordingly and investigate the effect of Catalytic Converter on emission performance with Bio- Diesel Blends.

  16. Production and characterization of biodiesel derived from Hodgsonia macrocarpa seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The oil content of HM seed was 71.65 wt%. The HM biodiesel yield was 95.46 wt%. • HM biodiesel satisfied ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 standards, with the exception of OS. • The transportation safety and cold flow properties of HM biodiesel were excellent. • After treatment with 400 ppm TBHQ, the OS of HM biodiesel satisfied EN 14214. - Abstract: Using inexpensive and high-quality oil feedstock is an effective means to produce low-cost biodiesel. This work investigated the production and fuel properties of biodiesel derived from Hodgsonia macrocarpa (HM). The oil content of HM seed was 71.65 wt%, which is much higher than that of many potential oil plants. With traditional base-catalyzed transesterification, biodiesel was readily prepared from HM seed oil. The biodiesel yield was 95.46 wt% from HM seed oil. Biodiesel derived from HM met all ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 specifications, except for oxidative stability (OS). The OS specifications of the two biodiesel standards were met after treatment of HM biodiesel with 400 ppm tertbutyl hydroquinone. The biodiesel exhibited excellent transportation safety and cold flow properties, with flash point of 153 °C, pour point of −9 °C, and cold filter plugging point of −7 °C

  17. French bio-diesel demand and promoting measures analysis by 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The researches presented aim at assessing bio-diesel promoting measures under consideration in France by 2010. This assessment is based on a deep study of French bio-diesel demand. The use of a linear model for optimizing the whole French refining industry costs allow us to take into account the physicochemical characteristics of bio-diesel useful for gas oil blending operation. This researches show that bio-diesel can be incorporated up to 27% blend in volume to diesel fuel without major technical problem. A decomposition of the value allotted to the bio-diesel by French refiners according to its physicochemical characteristics shows that energy content is the most disadvantageous characteristics for bio-diesel incorporation and, up to 17%, density become also constraining. However, the low bio-diesel sulphur content could become interesting from now to 2010. On the basis of this bio-diesel demand analysis, we proceed to an external coupling of an agro-industrial model of bio-diesel supply with the French refining model. Thus, we study the impact of the 2010 French bio-diesel consumption objective on agricultural surface need, the competitiveness of the bio-diesel, the reduction of greenhouse gases emissions and the trade balance of the petroleum products. On this basis, we propose a critical analysis of French bio-diesel promoting measures under consideration by 2010. (author)

  18. The single cell of low temperature solid oxide fuel cell with sodium carbonate-SDC (samarium-doped ceria) as electrolyte and biodiesel as fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, F.; Nuryanto, A.; Nugrahaningtyas, K. D.

    2016-02-01

    In this research NSDC (composite of Na2CO3-SDC) was prepared by the sol-gel method to produce NSDC1 and also by the ceramic method to produce NSDC2. The prepared NSDC then were analyzed by XRD embedded with Le Bail refinement to study the change of characteristic peaks, their crystal structure, and their cell parameters. Meanwhile, the measurement of impedance was conducted to study the electrical conductivity of the prepared materials. A single cell was prepared by coating NSDC-L (a composite of NSDC with Li0.2Ni0.7Cu0.1O2) on both surfaces of NSDC. The NSDC-L was used as anode and cathode. The ionic conductivity of NSDC1 and NSDC2 at 400 oC are 4.1109 x 10-2 S.cm-1 and 1.6231 x 10-2 S.cm-1, respectively. Both electrolytes have ionic conductivity higher than 1 x 10-4 S.cm-1, therefore, can be categorized as good electrolyte [1]. However, the NSDC1 shows electrodeelectrolyte conduction. It indicates the existence of electronic migration from electrolyte- electrode or vice versa. Those may cause a short circuit during fuel cell operation and will reduce the fuel cell performance fastly. The single cell tests were conducted at 300, 400, 500 and 600 °C. The single fuel cell with NSDC1 and NSDC2 as electrolyte show maximum power density at 400 °C with the power density of 3.736 x 10-2 mW.cm-2 and 2.245 x 10-2 mW.cm-2, respectively.

  19. Prospects of biodiesel from Jatropha in India: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing industrialization and modernization of the world has to a steep rise for the demand of petroleum products. Economic development in developing countries has led to huge increase in the energy demand. In India, the energy demand is increasing at a rate of 6.5% per annum. The crude oil demand of the country is met by import of about 80%. Thus the energy security has become a key issue for the nation as a whole. Petroleum-based fuels are limited. The finite reserves are highly concentrated in certain regions of the world. Therefore, those countries not having these reserves are facing foreign exchange crises, mainly due to the import of crude oil. Hence it is necessary to look forward for alternative fuels, which can be produced from feedstocks available within the country. Biodiesel, an ecofriendly and renewable fuel substitute for diesel has been getting the attention of researchers/scientists of all over the world. The R and D has indicated that up to B20, there is no need of modification and little work is available related to suitability and sustainability of biodiesel production from Jatropha as non-edible oil sources. In addition, the use of vegetable oil as fuel is less polluting than petroleum fuels. The basic problem with biodiesel is that it is more prone to oxidation resulting in the increase in viscosity of biodiesel with respect to time which in turn leads to piston sticking, gum formation and fuel atomization problems. The report is an attempt to present the prevailing fossil fuel scenario with respect to petroleum diesel, fuel properties of biodiesel resources for biodiesel production, processes for its production, purification, etc. Lastly, an introduction of stability of biodiesel will also be presented. (author)

  20. Energy aspects of microalgal biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Martinez-Guerra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Algal biodiesel production will play a significant role in sustaining future transportation fuel supplies. A large number of researchers around the world are investigating into making this process sustainable by increasing the energy gains and by optimizing resource-utilization efficiencies. Although, research is being pursued aggressively in all aspects of algal biodiesel production from microalgal cell cultivation, cell harvesting, and extraction and transesterification steps to the final product separation and purification, there is a large disparity in the data presented in recent reports making it difficult to assess the real potential of microalgae as a future energy source. This article discusses some of the key issues in energy consumption in the process of algal biodiesel production and identifies the areas for improvement to make this process energy-positive and sustainable.

  1. Environmental Sustainability Analysis of Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Ivan Tengbjerg; Hauschild, Michael Michael Zwicky; Birkved, Morten

    like these require a life cycle perspective on the biofuel - from the cradle (production of the agricultural feedstock) to the grave (use as fuel). An environmental life cycle assessment is performed on biodiesel to compare different production schemes including chemical and enzymatic esterification...... with the use of methanol or ethanol. The life cycle assessment includes all processes needed for the production, distribution and use of the biodiesel (the product system), and it includes all relevant environmental impacts from the product system, ranging from global impacts like climate change and loss...... of non-renewable resources over regional impacts like acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone to more local impacts like ecotoxicity and physical impacts like land use, to allow judging on the overall environmental sustainability of the biodiesel and to support identification of the main...

  2. Performance and emission study on waste cooking oil biodiesel and distillate blends for microturbine application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee Sann Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is defined as domestic renewable energy resource, which can be derived from natural oils through the transesterification. The implementation of biodiesel is essential due to the energy depletion crisis and the impact on exacerbating environment caused by rapid consumption of conventional diesel. Waste cooking oil (WCO was used as the raw material to produce biodiesel in order to reduce wastes polluting the environment. This paper studies the technical potential of WCO biodiesel to be used as an alternative fuel for microturbine. The ASTM D6751 and ASTM D2881 standards were selected as references to evaluate the compatibility with distillate to be used as a microturbine fuel. The performance and emission tests were conducted employing a 30 kW microturbine, without any modification, using biodiesel and distillate blends up to maximum of 20% biodiesel mixing ratio. It was found that the thermal efficiency peaked at 20% biodiesel blend with distillate, despite the fact that biodiesel had a lower calorific value and a higher fuel consumption. The emission test results showed reduction of CO emission by increasing the WCO biodiesel mixing ratio, while NOx emission was dependent on the exhaust gas temperature. In conclusion, biodiesel derived from WCO has the potential to substitute distillate in the microturbine application.

  3. An investigation of biodiesel production from wastes of seafood restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Nour Sh; Hamdy, A; Abu Amr, Salem S

    2014-01-01

    This work illustrates a comparative study on the applicability of the basic heterogeneous calcium oxide catalyst prepared from waste mollusks and crabs shells (MS and CS, resp.) in the transesterification of waste cooking oil collected from seafood restaurants with methanol for production of biodiesel. Response surface methodology RSM based on D-optimal deign of experiments was employed to study the significance and interactive effect of methanol to oil M : O molar ratio, catalyst concentration, reaction time, and mixing rate on biodiesel yield. Second-order quadratic model equations were obtained describing the interrelationships between dependent and independent variables to maximize the response variable (biodiesel yield) and the validity of the predicted models were confirmed. The activity of the produced green catalysts was better than that of chemical CaO and immobilized enzyme Novozym 435. Fuel properties of the produced biodiesel were measured and compared with those of Egyptian petro-diesel and international biodiesel standards. The biodiesel produced using MS-CaO recorded higher quality than that produced using CS-CaO. The overall biodiesel characteristics were acceptable, encouraging application of CaO prepared from waste MS and CS for production of biodiesel as an efficient, environmentally friendly, sustainable, and low cost heterogeneous catalyst. PMID:25400665

  4. An Investigation of Biodiesel Production from Wastes of Seafood Restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Sh. El-Gendy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates a comparative study on the applicability of the basic heterogeneous calcium oxide catalyst prepared from waste mollusks and crabs shells (MS and CS, resp. in the transesterification of waste cooking oil collected from seafood restaurants with methanol for production of biodiesel. Response surface methodology RSM based on D-optimal deign of experiments was employed to study the significance and interactive effect of methanol to oil M : O molar ratio, catalyst concentration, reaction time, and mixing rate on biodiesel yield. Second-order quadratic model equations were obtained describing the interrelationships between dependent and independent variables to maximize the response variable (biodiesel yield and the validity of the predicted models were confirmed. The activity of the produced green catalysts was better than that of chemical CaO and immobilized enzyme Novozym 435. Fuel properties of the produced biodiesel were measured and compared with those of Egyptian petro-diesel and international biodiesel standards. The biodiesel produced using MS-CaO recorded higher quality than that produced using CS-CaO. The overall biodiesel characteristics were acceptable, encouraging application of CaO prepared from waste MS and CS for production of biodiesel as an efficient, environmentally friendly, sustainable, and low cost heterogeneous catalyst.

  5. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  6. Sustainable Energy Production from Jatropha Bio-Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amit Kumar; Krishna, Vijai

    2012-10-01

    The demand for petroleum has risen rapidly due to increasing industrialization and modernization of the world. This economic development has led to a huge demand for energy, where the major part of that energy is derived from fossil sources such as petroleum, coal and natural gas. Continued use of petroleum sourced fuels is now widely recognized as unsustainable because of depleting supplies. There is a growing interest in using Jatropha curcas L. oil as the feedstock for biodiesel production because it is non-edible and thus does not compromise the edible oils, which are mainly used for food consumption. Further, J. curcas L. seed has a high content of free fatty acids that is converted in to biodiesel by trans esterification with alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. The biodiesel produced has similar properties to that of petroleum-based diesel. Biodiesel fuel has better properties than petro diesel fuel; it is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. Biodiesel has the potential to economically, socially, and environmentally benefit communities as well as countries, and to contribute toward their sustainable development.

  7. Experimental investigation on direct inj. diesel engine fuelled with graphene,silver and multiwalled carbon nanotubes-biodiesel blended fuels / Yakıt Olarak Grafen,Gümüş ve Çoktabakalı Karbon Nano Tüp-Biyodizel Yakıt Karışımlarının DI Mot. Kul. Den. İnc.

    OpenAIRE

    Banapurmath, Nagaraj Ramalingayya; Sankaran, Radhakrishnan; Tumbal, A. V.; N., Narasimhalu T.; Hunshyal, Anand M.; N H Ayachit1

    2014-01-01

    In the present energy scenario of increased energy demand and rapid depletion of high energy non-renewable energy resources like petroleum products the search for new renewable and alternative fuels has gained momentum. Increased pollution due to the excess use of such petroleum and diesel fuels for varied energy requirements is another important issue to be addressed. Due to their low emission characteristics and equivalent energy density biodiesel are becoming more useful in replacement for...

  8. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  9. Performance and Emission Study of 4S CI Engine using Calophyllum Inophyllum Biodiesel with Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash K Hegde; K V Sreenivas Rao

    2012-01-01

    Petroleum sourced fuels is now widely known as non-renewable due to fossil fuel depletion and environmental degradation. Renewable, carbon neutral, transport fuels are necessary for environmental and economic sustainability. Biodiesel derived from oil crops is a potential renewable and carbon neutral alternative to petroleum fuels. Chemically, biodiesel is mono alkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from renewable feed stock like vegetable oils and animal fats. It is produced by trans...

  10. ANALYSIS OF NOME (NEEM OIL METHYL ESTER) FOR BIODIESEL GENERATION

    OpenAIRE

    P Lakshmi Kandan*, R Magendra Varma

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesel derived from the neem oil has been proved as an alternative fuel sources. Since neem is most common edible and medicinal plant could be grown at any places in India, it was selected for the biodiesel purpose. Selected grades of neem seeds are collected and they are dried for some time. Dried seeds are crushed and the oil was extracted in the oil mill. Collected oil was tested to know their various properties. Since it was found to be more suitable for biodiesel then it was trans-est...

  11. Transesterification of Palm Oil for the Production of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalizani Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Palm oil is known as an important source of edible oil with significant values of renewable energy. Depletion of petroleum had captured much attention on producing biodiesel from the palm oil. Approach: The most concerning methods for the production of biodiesel were discussed, namely transesterification (alkali and acid, enzymetic approach and supercritical alcohol. Results: The results showed the vis-a-vis of the methods for possible consideration of research. Conclusion: Concerning the importance of this vegetable oil, the contribution of palm oil towards diminution of fossil fuel, possible methods for the production of biodiesel and the opportunity for the futures is very much important.

  12. Study about the particularities of biodiesel in Brazil; Estudo sobre as particularidades do biodiesel no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcia Franca Ribeiro Fernandes dos [Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica (IBGE), Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Peixoto, Jose Antonio Assuncao; Souza, Cristina Gomes de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The environmental concern associated with the impending shortage of oil, which is pressing to raise the price of the barrel, has forced governments and society to seek alternatives that will replace the use of fossil fuels. The biodiesel, in particular, has been set up as an alternative energy by it of fuel come from renewable sources, and less polluting the environment. In this context, the objective of this article is to present some features of the production of biodiesel in Brazil, identifying the characteristics of the main oil used, as well as regional motivations for the use of biodiesel in Brazil. The methodology adopted in this study was exploratory in nature based on a literature search and documentary from a survey of information available in literature. The main results, the article points out that: unlike alcohol, which is in sugar cane their ideal raw material, biodiesel is still in a stage of intensive research and development in order to identify the most appropriate its oil production - with emphasis on soybean and castor bean, and the motivations for regional use of biodiesel are different for the Brazilian regions. The study aims to contribute to the discussion on the subject, emphasizing that technological research should be directed taking into consideration the conditions and needs of Brazil. (author)

  13. Life cycle assessment of palm biodiesel: Revealing facts and benefits for sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Kian Fei; Tan, Kok Tat; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Lee, Keat Teong [School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2009-11-15

    Similarity between the properties of biodiesel and petroleum-derived diesel has made the former one of the most promising alternatives to a renewable and sustainable fuel for the transportation sector. In Malaysia, palm oil can be a suitable feedstock for the production of biodiesel due to its abundant availability and low production cost. However, not many assessments have been carried out regarding the impacts of palm biodiesel on the environment. Hence, in this study, life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for palm biodiesel in order to investigate and validate the popular belief that palm biodiesel is a green and sustainable fuel. The LCA study was divided into three main stages, namely agricultural activities, oil milling and transesterification process for the production of biodiesel. For each stage, the energy balance and green house gas assessments were presented and discussed. These are important data for the techno-economical and environmental feasibility evaluation of palm biodiesel. The results obtained for palm biodiesel were then compared with rapeseed biodiesel. From this study, it was found that the utilization of palm biodiesel would generate an energy yield ratio of 3.53 (output energy/input energy), indicating a net positive energy generated and ensuring its sustainability. The energy ratio for palm biodiesel was found to be more than double that of rapeseed biodiesel which was estimated to be only 1.44, thereby indicating that palm oil would be a more sustainable feedstock for biodiesel production as compared to rapeseed oil. Moreover, combustion of palm biodiesel was found to be more environment-friendly than petroleum-derived-diesel as a significant 38% reduction of CO{sub 2} emission can be achieved per liter combusted. (author)

  14. Boiler Retrofit for the Utilization of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leily Nurul Komariah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil used in the boiler is able to substitute with biodiesel. In lower blends, there are no engine modification needed, but some researchers recommended some technical adjustments in order to maintain the boiler's performance and equipment durability. This study consists of the comparison between the performance of boiler before and after retrofitting on the use of biodiesel. The diesel oil was introduced in biodiesel blends of 10% (B10, 20% (B20 and 25% (B25. A fire tube boiler was used for the test with pressure of 3 bar and heat input capacity of 60,000 kcal. The boiler retrofit is conducted by fine tuning the fan damper scale (FDS and adding a heating feature on fuel system. It was specifically intended to maintain the quality of combustion and boiler efficiency as well as to avoid an increase in fuel consumption. The combustion behaviour was monitored by exhaust emissions of CO, NOx, and SO2. The fan damper scale (FDS and fuel temperature is adjusted by the increasing portion of biodiesel used. The fuel heating apparatus was set at temperature of 40oC for the use of B10, and 60oC for B20 and B25. The FDS adjustment was successfully resulted a reduction in rate of combustion air by average of 9.2%. The boiler retrofitting for the utilization of B10, B20 and B25 showed an increase in boiler efficiency by 0.64%, 0.42% and 2.6% respectively. The boiler retrofitting is surprisingly reduced the fuel consumption by average of 11.2%.

  15. TECHNICAL REPORT 1: ANALYZING THE BIODIESEL PRODUCTION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    DE BONI, Luis Alcides Brandini; GOLDANI, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The gradual increase in the productive chain of Biodiesel in Brazil comes requiring professionals enabled to its expansion and improvements. This fact is related to constants and increase demands of the biofuels, to attempt the percentages of mixture to diesel oil which will increase in the next years. In this way, this work compels comments of Tchê Química Group researchers, done in recent years, regarding the commercialized synthetic fuels fluid production like biodiesel. This material look...

  16. Study of oxidation stability of Jatropha curcas biodiesel/ diesel blends

    OpenAIRE

    Siddharth Jain, M.P. Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel production is undergoing rapid technological reforms in industries and academia. This has become more obvious and relevant since the recent increase in the petroleum prices and the growing awareness relating to the environmental consequences of the fuel overdependency. However, the possibilities of production of biodiesel from edible oil resources in India is almost impossible, as primary need is to first meet the demand of edible oil that is already imported therefore it is essenti...

  17. Jatropha bio-diesel production and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in using Jatropha curcas L. (JCL) as a feedstock for the production of bio-diesel is rapidly growing. The properties of the crop and its oil have persuaded investors, policy makers and clean development mechanism (CDM) project developers to consider JCL as a substitute for fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, JCL is still a wild plant of which basic agronomic properties are not thoroughly understood and the environmental effects have not been investigated yet. Gray literature reports are very optimistic on simultaneous wasteland reclamation capability and oil yields, further fueling the Jatropha bio-diesel hype. In this paper, we give an overview of the currently available information on the different process steps of the production process of bio-diesel from JCL, being cultivation and production of seeds, extraction of the oil, conversion to and the use of the bio-diesel and the by-products. Based on this collection of data and information the best available practice, the shortcomings and the potential environmental risks and benefits are discussed for each production step. The review concludes with a call for general precaution and for science to be applied. (author)

  18. Jatropha bio-diesel production and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in using Jatropha curcas L. (JCL) as a feedstock for the production of bio-diesel is rapidly growing. The properties of the crop and its oil have persuaded investors, policy makers and clean development mechanism (CDM) project developers to consider JCL as a substitute for fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, JCL is still a wild plant of which basic agronomic properties are not thoroughly understood and the environmental effects have not been investigated yet. Gray literature reports are very optimistic on simultaneous wasteland reclamation capability and oil yields, further fueling the Jatropha bio-diesel hype. In this paper, we give an overview of the currently available information on the different process steps of the production process of bio-diesel from JCL, being cultivation and production of seeds, extraction of the oil, conversion to and the use of the bio-diesel and the by-products. Based on this collection of data and information the best available practice, the shortcomings and the potential environmental risks and benefits are discussed for each production step. The review concludes with a call for general precaution and for science to be applied

  19. Operational performance of agricultural tractor in function of interior and metropolitano diesel mixture in mamona biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabile, Rubens Andre [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Lopes, Afonso; Toledo, Anderson de; Reis, Gustavo Naves dos; Silva, Rouverson Pereira da [Universidade Estadual Paulista (DER/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Rural

    2008-07-01

    The great demand for energy sources by production systems allied to scarcity of fossil fuels has motivated the development and production of biodiesel, this is a fuel produced from renewable sources. Given that, the objective of this study was to compare the operating performance of an agricultural tractor, operating with interior and metropolitano diesel mixed to mamona biodiesel, in seven proportions. The tests were conducted in the Departamento de Engenharia Rural of UNESP/Jaboticabal - SP. The results showed that the kind of diesel did influence fuel consumption, and diesel metropolitano showed best quality. It was also observed that as biodiesel proportion increased, fuel consumption increased as well. (author)

  20. Combustion, emission and engine performance characteristics of used cooking oil biodiesel - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enweremadu, C.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa); Rutto, H.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    As the environment degrades at an alarming rate, there have been steady calls by most governments following international energy policies for the use of biofuels. One of the biofuels whose use is rapidly expanding is biodiesel. One of the economical sources for biodiesel production which doubles in the reduction of liquid waste and the subsequent burden of sewage treatment is used cooking oil (UCO). However, the products formed during frying, such as free fatty acid and some polymerized triglycerides, can affect the transesterification reaction and the biodiesel properties. This paper attempts to collect and analyze published works mainly in scientific journals about the engine performance, combustion and emissions characteristics of UCO biodiesel on diesel engine. Overall, the engine performance of the UCO biodiesel and its blends was only marginally poorer compared to diesel. From the standpoint of emissions, NOx emissions were slightly higher while un-burnt hydrocarbon (UBHC) emissions were lower for UCO biodiesel when compares to diesel fuel. There were no noticeable differences between UCO biodiesel and fresh oil biodiesel as their engine performances, combustion and emissions characteristics bear a close resemblance. This is probably more closely related to the oxygenated nature of biodiesel which is almost constant for every biodiesel (biodiesel has some level of oxygen bound to its chemical structure) and also to its higher viscosity and lower calorific value, which have a major bearing on spray formation and initial combustion. (author)

  1. Non-Edible Plant Oils as New Sources for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafiqul Islam

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the concern on the availability of recoverable fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems caused by the use those fossil fuels, considerable attention has been given to biodiesel production as an alternative to petrodiesel. However, as the biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats, there are concerns that biodiesel feedstock may compete with food supply in the long-term. Hence, the recent focus is to find oil bearing plants that produce non-edible oils as the feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, two plant species, soapnut (Sapindus mukorossi and jatropha (jatropha curcas, L. are discussed as newer sources of oil for biodiesel production. Experimental analysis showed that both oils have great potential to be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME from cold pressed soapnut seed oil was envisaged as biodiesel source for the first time. Soapnut oil was found to have average of 9.1% free FA, 84.43% triglycerides, 4.88% sterol and 1.59% others. Jatropha oil contains approximately 14% free FA, approximately 5% higher than soapnut oil. Soapnut oil biodiesel contains approximately 85% unsaturated FA while jatropha oil biodiesel was found to have approximately 80% unsaturated FA. Oleic acid was found to be the dominant FA in both soapnut and jatropha biodiesel. Over 97% conversion to FAME was achieved for both soapnut and jatropha oil.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of a single cylinder research engine working with biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldovanu Dan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper is to present the results of the CFD simulation of a DI single cylinder engine using diesel, biodiesel, or different mixture proportions of diesel and biodiesel and compare the results to a test bed measurement in the same functioning point. The engine used for verifying the results of the simulation is a single cylinder research engine from AVL with an open ECU, so that the injection timings and quantities can be controlled and analyzed. In Romania, until the year 2020 all the fuel stations are obliged to have mixtures of at least 10% biodiesel in diesel [14]. The main advantages using mixtures of biofuels in diesel are: the fact that biodiesel is not harmful to the environment; in order to use biodiesel in your engine no modifications are required; the price of biodiesel is smaller than diesel and also if we compare biodiesel production to the classic petroleum based diesel production, it is more energy efficient; biodiesel assures more lubrication to the engine so the life of the engine is increased; biodiesel is a sustainable fuel; using biodiesel helps maintain the environment and it keeps the people more healthy [1-3].

  3. Biodiesel Production from Microalgae by Extraction – Transesterification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact of using petroleum fuels has led to a quest to find a suitable alternative fuel source. In this study, microalgae were explored as a highly potential feedstock to produce biodiesel fuel. Firstly, algal oil is extracted from algal biomass by using organic solvents (n–hexan.  Lipid is contained in microalgae up to 60% of their weight. Then, Biodiesel is created through a chemical reaction known as transesterification between algal oil and alcohol (methanol with strong acid (such as H2SO4 as the catalyst. The extraction – transesterification method resulted in a high biodiesel yield (10 % of algal biomass and high FAMEs content (5.2 % of algal biomass. Biodiesel production from microalgae was studied through experimental investigation of transesterification conditions such as reaction time, methanol to oil ration and catalyst dosage which are deemed to have main impact on reaction conversion efficiency. All the parameters which were characterized for purified biodiesel such as free glycerin, total glycerin, flash point, sulfur content were analyzed according to ASTM standardDoi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.6-9Citation:  Thao, N.T.P., Tin, N.T., and Thanh, B.X. 2013. Biodiesel Production from Microalgae by Extraction – Transesterification Method. Waste Technology 1(1:6-9. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.6-9

  4. Sustaining Biodiesel Production via Value-Added Applications of Glycerol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotola Babajide

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of biofuels worldwide has been significant lately due to the shift from obtaining energy from nonrenewable energy (fossil fuels to renewable sources (biofuels. This energy shift arose as a result of the disturbing crude petroleum price fluctuations, uncertainties about fossil fuel reserves, and greenhouse gas (GHG concerns. With the production of biofuels increasing considerably and the current global biodiesel production from different feedstock, reaching about 6 billion liters per year, biodiesel production costs have been highly dependent on feedstock prices, ranging from 70 to 25; of total production costs, and in comparison with the conventional diesel fuel, the biodiesel is currently noncompetitive. An efficient production process is, therefore, crucial to lowering biodiesel production costs. The question of sustainability, however, arises, taking into account the African diverse conditions and how vital concerns need to be addressed. The major concern about biodiesel production costs can be reduced by finding value-added applications for its glycerol byproduct. This paper, thus, provides an overview of current research trends that could overcome the major hurdles towards profitable commercialization of biodiesel and also proposes areas of opportunity probable to capitalize the surplus glycerol obtained, for numerous applications.

  5. Microbial Conversion of Waste Glycerol from Biodiesel Production into Value-Added Products

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Liu; Cheng Li; Keaton L. Lesnik

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel has gained a significant amount of attention over the past decade as an environmentally friendly fuel that is capable of being utilized by a conventional diesel engine. However, the biodiesel production process generates glycerol-containing waste streams which have become a disposal issue for biodiesel plants and generated a surplus of glycerol. A value-added opportunity is needed in order to compensate for disposal-associated costs. Microbial conversions from glycerol to valuable c...

  6. Production and characterization of biodiesel from Camelus dromedarius (Hachi) fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Transesterification reaction with methanol in the presence of NaOH as a catalyst. • Optimization of key reaction parameters were performed. • Some fuel properties of biodiesel were measured and compared with biodiesel standards. • Ten of the properties that were evaluated for the diesel conform to the ASTM and EN standards values. - Abstract: Recently, biodiesel has been gaining market share against fossil-origin diesel due to its ecological benefits and because it can be directly substituted for traditional diesel oils. However, the high cost of the raw materials required to produce biodiesel make it more expensive than fossil diesel. Therefore, low-priced raw materials, such as waste cooking oil and animal fats, are of interest because they can be used to drive down the cost of biodiesel. We have produced biodiesel from camel fat using a transesterification reaction with methanol in the presence of NaOH. The experimental variables investigated in this study were the temperature (30–75 °C), reaction time (20–160 min), catalyst concentration (0.25–1.5%), and methanol/fat molar ratio (4:1–9:1). A maximum biodiesel yield of 98.6% was obtained. The fuel properties of biodiesel, such as iodine value, saponification value, density, kinematic viscosity, cetane number, flash point, sulfur content, carbon residue, water and sediment, high heating value, refractive index, cloud point, pour point, and distillation characteristics, were measured. The properties were compared with EN 14214 and ASTM 6751 biodiesel standards, and an acceptable level of agreement was obtained

  7. Test run of biodiesel in public transport system in Belgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems related to our strong dependency on fossil fuels, i.e. greenhouse effect, energy dependency, urban pollution, are of growing importance in recent years. European Union (EU) Action plan of 2003, which had originated from Kyoto Agreement, defined a strategy for substitution of 20% of conventional fuel with the alternative one by 2020. Proved advantages of biodiesel usage in the system of public transport of passengers, with regard to exhaust gases emission above all, have been the decisive determinants for the actual promotion of biodiesel as ecologically 'clean' fuel, while its wider usage gives important contribution to sustainable development of cities. This paper presents results of biodiesel-test run in Belgrade, as a part of the project BIO-PEX, which relates to the usage of this alternative fuel in real operating conditions in urban public transport system, with special emphasis on technical, ecological and operational aspects of biofuel usage.

  8. Performance of compression ignition engine with mahua (Madhuca indica) biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Raheman; S.V. Ghadge [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Agricultural and Food Engineering Department

    2007-11-15

    The performance of biodiesel obtained from mahua oil and its blend with high speed diesel in a Ricardo E6 engine has been presented in this paper together with some of its fuel properties. These properties were found to be comparable to diesel and confirming to both the American and European standards. Engine performance (brake specific fuel consumption, brake thermal efficiency and exhaust gas temperature) and emissions (CO, smoke density and NOx) were measured to evaluate and compute the behaviour of the diesel engine running on biodiesel. The reductions in exhaust emissions and brake specific fuel consumption together with increase brake power, brake thermal efficiency made the blend of biodiesel (B20) a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and thus could help in controlling air pollution. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Biodiesel development: New markets for conventional and genetically modified agricultural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, J.; Shapouri, H.; Graboski, M.; McCormick, R.; Wilson, R.

    1998-09-01

    With environmental and energy source concerns on the rise, using agricultural fats and oils as fuel in diesel engines has captured increasing attention. Substituting petroleum diesel with biodiesel may reduce air emissions, increase the domestic supply of fuel, and create new markets for farmers. US agricultural fats and oils could support a large amount of biodiesel, but high production costs and competing uses of biodiesel feedstocks will likely prevent mass adoption of biodiesel fuel. Higher-priced niche markets could develop for biodiesels as a result of environmental regulations. Biodiesel has many environmental advantages relative to petroleum diesel, such as lower CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x}, and particulate matter emissions. Enhancing fuel properties by genetically modifying oil crops could improve NO{sub x} emissions, cold flow, and oxidative stability, which have been identified as potential problems for biodiesel. Research activities need to be directed toward cost reduction, improving fuel properties, and analyzing the economic effects of biodiesel development on US agriculture.

  10. Reactive Extraction of Jatropha Seed for Biodiesel Production: Effect of Moisture Content of Jatropha Seed and Co-solvent Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    M. Dani Supardan; Satriana Satriana; Fahrizal Fahrizal; Ryan Moulana

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel is one among the promising renewable fuels, holding various advantages compared with fossil fuel. In this study, reactive extraction of jatropha seed for biodiesel production was investigated. The effect of moisture content of jatropha seeds and cosolvent concentration was examined to determine the best performance of the biodiesel production yield. The co-solvent used is hexane. Design of experiments (DOE) was used to study the effect of moisture content of jatropha seed and co-sol...

  11. Performance and Emission Analysis of Diesel Engine Using Fish Oil And Biodiesel Blends With Isobutanol As An Additive

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kiran Kumar

    2013-01-01

    - Biodiesel with fuel additives has been gaining increased attention from engine researchers in view of the energy crisis and increasing environmental problems. The present work is aimed at experimental investigation of Isobutanol as an additive to the diesel- biodiesel blends. Experiments were done on a 4-Stroke single cylinder diesel engine by varying percentage by volume of isobutanol in diesel-biodiesel blends. The effect of isobutanol on brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel cons...

  12. A skeletal mechanism for biodiesel blend surrogates combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A skeletal biodiesel reaction mechanism with 112 species was constructed. • The developed mechanism contains the CO, NOx and soot formation kinetics. • It was well validated against detailed reaction mechanism and experimental results. • The mechanism is suitable to simulate biodiesel, diesel and their blend fuels. - Abstract: A tri-component skeletal reaction mechanism consisting of methyl decanoate, methyl-9-decenoate, and n-heptane was developed for biodiesel combustion in diesel engine. It comprises 112 species participating in 498 reactions with the CO, NOx and soot formation mechanisms embedded. In this study, a detailed tri-component biodiesel mechanism was used as the start of mechanism reduction and the reduced mechanism was combined with a previously developed skeletal reaction mechanism for n-heptane to integrate the soot formation kinetics. A combined mechanism reduction strategy including the directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis (DRGEPSA), peak concentration analysis, isomer lumping, unimportant reactions elimination and reaction rate adjustment methods was employed. The reduction process for biodiesel was performed over a range of initial conditions covering the pressures from 1 to 100 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 2.0 and temperatures from 700 to 1800 K, whereas for n-heptane, ignition delay predictions were compared against 17 shock tube experimental conditions. Extensive validations were performed for the developed skeletal reaction mechanism with 0-D ignition delay testing and 3-D engine simulations. The results indicated that the developed mechanism was able to accurately predict the ignition delay timings of n-heptane and biodiesel, and it could be integrated into 3-D engine simulations to predict the combustion characteristics of biodiesel. As such, the developed 112-species skeletal mechanism can accurately mimic the significant reaction pathways of the detailed reaction mechanism

  13. In-nozzle flow and spray characteristics for mineral diesel, Karanja, and Jatropha biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In-nozzle flow characterization for biodiesel sprays. • Comparison of experimental spray parameters and nozzle hole simulations. • Effect of Karanja and Jatropha biodiesel on in-nozzle cavitation. • Cavitation formation investigation with diesel and biodiesels. • Nozzle hole outlet fuel velocity profile determination for test fuels. - Abstract: Superior spray behavior of fuels in internal combustion engines lead to improved combustion and emission characteristics therefore it is necessary to investigate fuel spray behavior of new alternative fuels. This study discusses the evolution of the in-nozzle orifice parameters of a numerical simulation and the evolution of spray parameters of fuel spray in a constant-volume spray chamber during an experiment. This study compares mineral diesel, biodiesels (Karanja-and Jatropha-based), and their blends with mineral diesel. The results show that mineral diesel provides superior atomization and evaporation behavior compared to the biodiesel test fuels. Karanja biodiesel provides superior atomization and evaporation characteristics compared to Jatropha biodiesel. The qualitative comparison of simulation and experimental results in tandem shows that nozzle-hole design is a critical parameter for obtaining optimum spray behavior in the engine combustion chamber

  14. Recent trends, opportunities and challenges of biodiesel in Malaysia: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Steven; Teong, Lee Keat [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2010-04-15

    Energy supply and its security issues have been the topic of interest lately. With growing environmental awareness about the negative implications brought by excessive usage of fossil fuels, the race for finding alternative energy as their substitutions is getting heated up. For now, renewable energy from biodiesel has been touted as one of the most promising substitutions for petroleum-derived diesel. Combustion of biodiesel as fuel is more environment-friendly while retaining most of the positive engine properties of petroleum-derived diesel. Production of biodiesel is also a proven technology with established commercialization activities. The huge potential of biodiesel coupled with the abundance of palm oil which is one of the most cost-effective feedstocks for biodiesel is responsible for the pledging of Malaysia to become the leading producer of high quality biodiesel in the region. Currently, total approved installed capacity of biodiesel production in Malaysia equals to almost 92% of the world biodiesel production output in 2008. While Malaysia does indeed possessed materials, technologies and marketing superiority to vie for that position, many more challenges are still awaiting. The price restriction, provisions controversy, escalating non-tariff trade barriers and negligible public support need to be addressed appropriately. In this review, Malaysia's previous and current position in global biodiesel market, its future potential towards the prominent leading biodiesel status and major disrupting obstacles are being discussed. The feasibility of utilizing algae as the up-and-coming biodiesel feedstock in Malaysia is also under scrutiny. Lastly, several recommendations on the roles played by three major forces in Malaysia's biodiesel industry are presented to tackle the shortcomings in achieving the coveted status by Malaysia. It is hope that Malaysia's progress in biodiesel industry will not only benefit itself but rather as the role model

  15. Recent trends, opportunities and challenges of biodiesel in Malaysia: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy supply and its security issues have been the topic of interest lately. With growing environmental awareness about the negative implications brought by excessive usage of fossil fuels, the race for finding alternative energy as their substitutions is getting heated up. For now, renewable energy from biodiesel has been touted as one of the most promising substitutions for petroleum-derived diesel. Combustion of biodiesel as fuel is more environment-friendly while retaining most of the positive engine properties of petroleum-derived diesel. Production of biodiesel is also a proven technology with established commercialization activities. The huge potential of biodiesel coupled with the abundance of palm oil which is one of the most cost-effective feedstocks for biodiesel is responsible for the pledging of Malaysia to become the leading producer of high quality biodiesel in the region. Currently, total approved installed capacity of biodiesel production in Malaysia equals to almost 92% of the world biodiesel production output in 2008. While Malaysia does indeed possessed materials, technologies and marketing superiority to vie for that position, many more challenges are still awaiting. The price restriction, provisions controversy, escalating non-tariff trade barriers and negligible public support need to be addressed appropriately. In this review, Malaysia's previous and current position in global biodiesel market, its future potential towards the prominent leading biodiesel status and major disrupting obstacles are being discussed. The feasibility of utilizing algae as the up-and-coming biodiesel feedstock in Malaysia is also under scrutiny. Lastly, several recommendations on the roles played by three major forces in Malaysia's biodiesel industry are presented to tackle the shortcomings in achieving the coveted status by Malaysia. It is hope that Malaysia's progress in biodiesel industry will not only benefit itself but rather as the role model to catalyst the

  16. Comparative Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Soy-biodiesel and Petroleum-Diesel Emissions: Overview of Studies from the U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel use as a fuel is increasing globally as an alternate to petroleum sources. To comprehensively assess the effects of the use of biodiesel as an energy source, end stage uses of biodiesel such as the effects of inhalation of combusted products on human health must be inco...

  17. A review on novel processes of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil fuel depletion, environmental concerns, and steep hikes in the price of fossil fuels are driving scientists to search for alternative fuels. The characteristics of biodiesel have made the pursuit of high quality biodiesel production attractive. Utilization of waste cooking oil is a key component in reducing biodiesel production costs up to 60–90%. Researchers have used various types of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyzed transesterification reaction for biodiesel production. Meanwhile, the effect of novel processes such as membrane reactor, reactive distillation column, reactive absorption, ultrasonic and microwave irradiation significantly influenced the final conversion, yield and in particular, the quality of product. This article attempts to cover all possible techniques in production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil

  18. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7115

  19. An experimental investigation of biodiesel steam reforming

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Stefan; Kraaij, Gerard; Ascher, Torsten; Wails, David; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Recently, liquid biofuels have attracted increasing attention as renewable feedstock for hydrogen production in the transport sector. Since the lack of hydrogen infrastructure and distribution poses an obstacle for the introduction of fuel cell vehicles to the market, it is reasonable to consider using liquid biofuels for on-board or on-site hydrogen generation. Biodiesel offers the advantage of being an environmentally friendly resource while also having high gravimetric and volumetric energ...

  20. Biodiesel Projects Helpful to Ease Energy Shortage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Nearly 7,000 hectares of biodiesel forest will take shape in the northern province of Hebei in 2008, part of a national campaign to fuel the fast growing economy in a green way. In no more than five years, the Pistacia chinensis Bunge, whose seeds have an oil content of up to 40 percent, will yield five tons of fruit and contribute about two tons of high-quality biological diesel oil,according to the provincial forestry administration.

  1. Physical Properties of Normal Grade Biodiesel and Winter Grade Biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    Azmi Zakaria; W. Mahmood Mat Yunus; Monir Norozi; Harrison Lau Lik Nang; Mohd Maarof Moksin; Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini

    2011-01-01

    In this study, optical and thermal properties of normal grade and winter grade palm oil biodiesel were investigated. Surface Plasmon Resonance and Photopyroelectric technique were used to evaluate the samples. The dispersion curve and thermal diffusivity were obtained. Consequently, the variation of refractive index, as a function of wavelength in normal grade biodiesel is faster than winter grade palm oil biodiesel, and the thermal diffusivity of winter grade biodiesel is higher than the the...

  2. French bio-diesel demand and promoting measures analysis by 2010; Analyse de la demande et des mesures de promotion francaises du biodiesel a l'horizon 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, F

    2008-02-15

    The researches presented aim at assessing bio-diesel promoting measures under consideration in France by 2010. This assessment is based on a deep study of French bio-diesel demand. The use of a linear model for optimizing the whole French refining industry costs allow us to take into account the physicochemical characteristics of bio-diesel useful for gas oil blending operation. This researches show that bio-diesel can be incorporated up to 27% blend in volume to diesel fuel without major technical problem. A decomposition of the value allotted to the bio-diesel by French refiners according to its physicochemical characteristics shows that energy content is the most disadvantageous characteristics for bio-diesel incorporation and, up to 17%, density become also constraining. However, the low bio-diesel sulphur content could become interesting from now to 2010. On the basis of this bio-diesel demand analysis, we proceed to an external coupling of an agro-industrial model of bio-diesel supply with the French refining model. Thus, we study the impact of the 2010 French bio-diesel consumption objective on agricultural surface need, the competitiveness of the bio-diesel, the reduction of greenhouse gases emissions and the trade balance of the petroleum products. On this basis, we propose a critical analysis of French bio-diesel promoting measures under consideration by 2010. (author)

  3. Kinematic viscosity of biodiesel components (fatty acid alkyl esters) and related compounds at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils and animal fats, has undergone rapid development and acceptance recently. Kinematic viscosity is one of the fuel properties specified in biodiesel standards, with 40 deg C being the temperature at which this property is to be determined ...

  4. Genetic and chemical evaluation of the U.S. castor germplasm collection for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castor has multiple industrial applications including potential as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The oil content and fatty acid composition in castor seed are important factors to determine the price for production and affect the key fuel properties of biodiesel. The entire U.S. castor germp...

  5. Determination of the Heat of Combustion of Biodiesel Using Bomb Calorimetry: A Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Stephen M.; Conkle, Jeremy L.; Thomas, Stephanie N.; Rider, Keith B.

    2006-01-01

    Biodiesel was synthesized by transesterification of waste vegetable oil using common glassware and reagents, and characterized by measuring heat of combustion, cloud point, density and measuring the heat of combustion and density together allows the student the energy density of the fuel. Analyzing the biodiesel can serve as a challenging and…

  6. Instrumental Analysis of Biodiesel Content in Commercial Diesel Blends: An Experiment for Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z. Vivian; Buchman, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of replacing petroleum fuels with renewable biofuels has drawn significant public interest. Many states have imposed biodiesel mandates or incentives to use commercial biodiesel blends. We present an inquiry-driven experiment where students are given the tasks to gather samples, develop analytical methods using various instrumental…

  7. Soy Biodiesel Emissions Have Reduced Inflammatory Effects Compared to Diesel Emissions in Healthy and Allergic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity of exhaust from combustion of petroleum diesel (BO), soy-based biodiesel (B100), or a 20% biodiesel/80% petrodiesel mix (B20) was compared in healthy and house dust mite (HDM)-allergic mice. Fuel emissions were diluted to target fine particulate matter (PM2.5) conrentrat...

  8. Oxidative Stress, Inflammatory and Immune Response after Inhalation Exposure to Biodiesel Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel (BD) is an advanced fuel produced from renewable domestic sources. The broad uses of BD in different industries including mining may lead to potential health effects. We hypothesized that the toxicity of biodiesel exhaust (BDE) is dependent at least on three major mecha...

  9. A Study of Microalgal Symbiotic Communities with the Aim to Increase Biomass and Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Claus

    molecules. A variety of algae can produce large amounts of lipids and these easily be converted to biodiesel for use as transport fuel. Production of algal based biodiesel is however still limited mainly due production costs. Research is needed in order to lower the price of the final product. In this study...

  10. Biodiesel and Integrated STEM: Vertical Alignment of High School Biology/Biochemistry and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Andrea C.; Breiner, Jonathan M.; Keiner, Jennifer; Behm, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the vertical alignment of two high school classes, biology and chemistry, around the core concept of biodiesel fuel production. High school teachers and university faculty members investigated biodiesel as it relates to societal impact through a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Teachers. Using an action…

  11. The Bus Stops Here: The Case for Biodiesel in School Buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that diesel exhaust from most of the nation's school buses may be hazardous to children's health. Documents studies on the nature and potential magnitude of the risk to children and proposes replacing petroleum diesel with biodiesel as the fuel for school buses. Presents the merits and practicality of switching to biodiesel as a healthier…

  12. Synthesis and analysis of an alkenone-free biodiesel from Isochrysis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some marine microalgae, such as Isochrysis sp., produce high-melting (~70 ºC) lipids known as long-chain alkenones that detrimentally affect biodiesel fuel quality. A method has been developed for the production of an alkenone-free Isochrysis biodiesel. This material was prepared on sufficient scale...

  13. Efficacy of fatty acid profile as a tool for screening feedstocks for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel properties are largely dependent on the fatty acid (FA) composition of the feedstock from which biodiesel is prepared. Consequently, FA profile was employed as a screening tool for selection of feedstocks high in monounsaturated FAs for further evaluation as biodiesel. Those feedstocks screened...

  14. Performance and exhaust emissions of a spark ignition engine using G-Series fuel (mixtures of gasoline, bioethanol, biodiesel and diesel) / G Serisi Yakıt (Benzin, Biyoetanol, Biyodizel ve Dizel Karışımı) Kullanan Kıvılcım Ateşlemeli Bir Motorun Performan

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamhassan NAJAFI; Nematizade, Pegah; Ghobadian, Barat; Fathollah OMMI

    2013-01-01

    In this research, performance and exhaust emissions of a spark ignition (S.I) engine (XU7JP/L3) using gasoline-ethanol blend (E20) and G-Series fuels, of GS1 and GS2, comprised of the mixtures of gasoline, ethanol, biodiesel and diesel were investigated. The results confirm that the power and torque of XU7JP/L3 engine decreases (not significantly) 6.5% and 1.2% respectively for the mixtures of fossil fuel and biofuel blends. In these circumstances the rate of fuel consumption increases by 36%...

  15. Classification of biodiesel and fuel blends using gas chromatography - differential mobility spectrometry with cluster analysis and isolation of C18:3 me by dual ion filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Dedeepya; Eiceman, Gary A; Pierce, Karisa M

    2016-08-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAEs) were determined at 10-100mg/L in biodiesel and blends with petrodiesel without sample pre-treatment using gas chromatography with a tandem differential mobility detector. Selectivity was provided through chromatographic separations and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization reactions in the detector with mobility characterization of gas ions. Limits of detection were ~0.5ng with an average of 2.98% RSD for peak area precision, ≤1.3% RSD for retention time precision, and ≤9.2% RSD for compensation voltage precision. Biodiesel blends were classified using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Unsupervised cluster analysis captured 52.72% of variance in a single PC while supervised analysis captured 71.64% of variance using Fisher ratio feature selection. Test set predictions showed successful clustering according to source or feedstock when regressed onto the training set model. Detection of the regulated substance methyl linolenate (C18:3 me) was achieved in 6-10s with a 1m long capillary column using dual ion filtering in the tandem differential mobility detector. PMID:27216685

  16. Evaluation of Biodiesel Production, Engine Performance, and Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürü, Metin; Keskïn, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, to decrease environmental pollution and dependence on fossil-based fuels, research on alternative renewable energy sources has been increasing. One such renewable energy source is biodiesel, which is used as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel is renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly. Biodiesel is domestically produced from vegetable␣oil (edible or nonedible), animal fat, and used cooking oils. In the biodiesel production process, oil or fat undergoes transesterification reaction through use of simple alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, etc. Use of methanol is most feasible because of its low cost, and physical and chemical advantages. Acid catalysis, alkali catalysis, and enzyme catalysis are usually used to improve the reaction rate and yield. Glycerol is a byproduct of the reaction and can be used as an industrial raw material. In this study, biodiesel production methods (direct use, pyrolysis, microemulsion, transesterification, supercritical processes, ultrasound- assisted, and microwave-assisted) and types of catalyst (homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzyme) have been evaluated and compared. In addition, the effects of biodiesel and its blends on diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions are described and reviewed.

  17. Evaluation of Biodiesel Production, Engine Performance, and Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürü, Metin; Keskïn, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, to decrease environmental pollution and dependence on fossil-based fuels, research on alternative renewable energy sources has been increasing. One such renewable energy source is biodiesel, which is used as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel is renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly. Biodiesel is domestically produced from vegetable oil (edible or nonedible), animal fat, and used cooking oils. In the biodiesel production process, oil or fat undergoes transesterification reaction through use of simple alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, etc. Use of methanol is most feasible because of its low cost, and physical and chemical advantages. Acid catalysis, alkali catalysis, and enzyme catalysis are usually used to improve the reaction rate and yield. Glycerol is a byproduct of the reaction and can be used as an industrial raw material. In this study, biodiesel production methods (direct use, pyrolysis, microemulsion, transesterification, supercritical processes, ultrasound- assisted, and microwave-assisted) and types of catalyst (homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzyme) have been evaluated and compared. In addition, the effects of biodiesel and its blends on diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions are described and reviewed.

  18. Preliminary assessment of biodiesel generation from meat industry residues in Baja California, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil derived fuels constituted a main energy source during the last fifty years, although their high price limited their accessibility. Prospective studies indicated that economic and environmental problems promoted biodiesel production using biomass and residues like animal fat, along with meat and bones, among others. The regional inventory of the available fat in meat industry, as well as the estimation of the biodiesel potential production demonstrated that the biodiesel generated from animal fat, combined with diesel from oil in a 2% biodiesel blend could power 25% of the trucks and passenger vehicles registered in 2007 in Baja California, Mexico. (author)

  19. Production of biodiesel from sunflower oil and ethanol by base catalyzed transesterification

    OpenAIRE

    Sales, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel is an attractive alternative fuel for diesel engines.The feedstock for biodiesel production is usually vegetable oil, pure oil or waste cooking oil, or animal fats The most common way today to produce biodiesel is by transesterification of the oils with an alcohol in the presence of an alkaline catalyst. It is a low temperature and low-pressure reaction. It yields high conversion (96%-98%) with minimal side reactions and short reaction time. It is a direct conversion to biodiesel wi...

  20. Effect of temperature on tribological properties of palm biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Sia, S.Y.; Fazal, M.A.; Masjuki, H.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-03-15

    Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel is steadily gaining attention to replace petroleum diesel partially or completely. The tribological performance of biodiesel is crucial for its application in automobiles. In the present study, effect of temperature on the tribological performance of palm biodiesel was investigated by using four ball wear machine. Tests were conducted at temperatures 30, 45, 60 and 75 C, under a normal load of 40 kg for 1 h at speed 1200 rpm. For each temperature, the tribological properties of petroleum diesel (B0) and three biodiesel blends like B10, B20, B50 were investigated and compared. During the wear test, frictional torque was recorded on line. Wear scars in tested ball were investigated by optical microscopy. Results show that friction and wear increase with increasing temperature. (author)