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Sample records for biodiesel alternative liquid

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center : Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    , and transport. Maps & Data U.S. Biodiesel Production, Exports, and Consumption U.S. Biodiesel Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equipment Options to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center : Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel

  5. Alternative fuels in fire debris analysis: biodiesel basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Eric; Byron, Doug

    2007-03-01

    Alternative fuels are becoming more prominent on the market today and, soon, fire debris analysts will start seeing them in liquid samples or in fire debris samples. Biodiesel fuel is one of the most common alternative fuels and is now readily available in many parts of the United States and around the world. This article introduces biodiesel to fire debris analysts. Biodiesel fuel is manufactured from vegetable oils and/or animal oils/fats. It is composed of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and is sold pure or as a blend with diesel fuel. When present in fire debris samples, it is recommended to extract the debris using passive headspace concentration on activated charcoal, possibly followed by a solvent extraction. The gas chromatographic analysis of the extract is first carried out with the same program as for regular ignitable liquid residues, and second with a program adapted to the analysis of FAMEs.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Twitter Bookmark Alternative

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehicles in Vermont Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a location or along a route. Infrastructure Development Learn about biodiesel fueling infrastructure codes Case Studies California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in Upstate

  11. Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a renewable alternative to petrodiesel that is prepared from plant oils or animal fats. Biodiesel is prepared via transesterification and the resulting fuel properties must be compliant with international fuel standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Numerous catalysts, methods, and l...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    SmartWay Transport Partnership is a market-based public-private collaboration between the U.S operate vehicle fleets, the public, and other interested entities about the benefits of biodiesel use Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center

  13. Waste Cooking Oil as an Alternate Feedstock for Biodiesel Production

    OpenAIRE

    Arjun B. Chhetri; K. Chris Watts; M. Rafiqul Islam

    2008-01-01

    As crude oil price reach a new high, the need for developing alternate fuels has become acute. Alternate fuels should be economically attractive in order to compete with currently used fossil fuels. In this work, biodiesel (ethyl ester) was prepared from waste cooking oil collected from a local restaurant in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Ethyl alcohol with sodium hydroxide as a catalyst was used for the transesterification process. The fatty acid composition of the final biodiesel esters was ...

  14. Thermophysical properties of biodiesel and related systems: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for soybean biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazutti, Marcio A.; Voll, Fernando A.P.; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Corazza, Marcos L.; Lanza, Marcelo; Priamo, Wagner L.; Oliveira, J. Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for the systems of biodiesel production. ► LLE data for multicomponent FAME and FAEE from (303.15 to 333.15) K. ► Experimental data correlated using the UNIQUAC model. -- Abstract: This work reports (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the systems of interest in soybean biodiesel production. Numerical data for LLE were obtained for binary, ternary and quaternary systems comprising fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) from soybean oil, water, glycerol, methanol, and ethanol at temperatures of (303.15, 318.15, and 333.15) K. Quantification of compounds in equilibrium in both phases was determined by analytical methods whereas solubility curves (binodal) were obtained by the cloud-point method. For all systems investigated, good alignments were obtained between phase compositions and the initial as well as overall compositions hence indicating low deviations from the mass balance. Experimental results were correlated using the UNIQUAC model with satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Diesel Vehicles Work Using Biodiesel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel Vehicles Work Using Biodiesel? to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Diesel Vehicles Work Using Biodiesel? on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Diesel Vehicles Work Using Biodiesel? on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do

  16. Castor oil biodiesel and its blends as alternative fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Paula; Nizri, Shahar; Wiesman, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    Intensive production and commercialization of biodiesel from edible-grade sources have raised some critical environmental concerns. In order to mitigate these environmental consequences, alternative oilseeds are being investigated as biodiesel feedstocks. Castor (Ricinus communis L.) is one of the most promising non-edible oil crops, due to its high annual seed production and yield, and since it can be grown on marginal land and in semi-arid climate. Still, few studies are available regarding its fuel-related properties in its pure form or as a blend with petrodiesel, many of which are due to its extremely high content of ricinoleic acid. In this study, the specifications in ASTM D6751 and D7467 which are related to the fatty acid composition of pure castor methyl esters (B100) and its blend with petrodiesel in a 10% vol ratio (B10) were investigated. Kinematic viscosity and distillation temperature of B100 (15.17 mm 2 s -1 and 398.7 o C respectively) were the only two properties which did not meet the appropriate standard limits. In contrast, B10 met all the specifications. Still, ASTM D7467 requires that the pure biodiesel meets the requirements of ASTM D6751. This can limit the use of a wide range of feedstocks, including castor, as alternative fuel, especially due to the fact that in practice vehicles normally use low level blends of biodiesel and petrodiesel. These issues are discussed in depth in the present study. -- Highlights: → CaME can be used as a biodiesel alternative feedstock when blended in petrodiesel. → Due to the high levels of ricinoleic acid maximum blending level is limited to 10%. → Today, CaME blends are not a viable alternative feedstock. → ASTM D7467 requires that pure biodiesel must meet all the appropriate limits.

  17. Biodiesel from non-food alternative feed-stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a potential feedstock for biodiesel (BD) production, Jojoba oil was extracted from Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis L.) plant seeds that contained around 50-60 wt.%, which were explored as non-food alternative feedstocks. Interestingly, Jojoba oil has long-chain wax esters and is not a typical trigly...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: America's Largest Home Runs on Biodiesel in

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina America's Largest Home Runs on Biodiesel in North Carolina to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: America's Largest Home Runs on Biodiesel in North Carolina on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: America's Largest Home Runs on Biodiesel in North

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural Gas Vehicles St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and

  20. Waste Cooking Oil as an Alternate Feedstock for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafiqul Islam

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available As crude oil price reach a new high, the need for developing alternate fuels has become acute. Alternate fuels should be economically attractive in order to compete with currently used fossil fuels. In this work, biodiesel (ethyl ester was prepared from waste cooking oil collected from a local restaurant in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Ethyl alcohol with sodium hydroxide as a catalyst was used for the transesterification process. The fatty acid composition of the final biodiesel esters was determined by gas chromatography. The biodiesel was characterized by its physical and fuel properties including density, viscosity, acid value, flash point, cloud point, pour point, cetane index, water and sediment content, total and free glycerin content, diglycerides and monoglycerides, phosphorus content and sulfur content according to ASTM standards. The viscosity of the biodiesel ethyl ester was found to be 5.03 mm2/sec at 40oC. The viscosity of waste cooking oil measured in room temperature (at 21° C was 72 mm2/sec. From the tests, the flash point was found to be 164oC, the phosphorous content was 2 ppm, those of calcium and magnesium were 1 ppm combined, water and sediment was 0 %, sulfur content was 2 ppm, total acid number was 0.29 mgKOH/g, cetane index was 61, cloud point was -1oC and pour point was -16oC. Production of biodiesel from waste cooking oils for diesel substitute is particularly important because of the decreasing trend of economical oil reserves, environmental problems caused due to fossil fuel use and the high price of petroleum products in the international market.

  1. Waste cooking oil as an alternate feedstock for biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhetri, A. B.; Rafiqul Islam, M. [Civil and Resources Engineering Dalhousie University, Room D510, 1360 Barrington St., Box 1000, Halifax, N.S. B3J 2X4 (Canada); Watts, K. Ch. [Process Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Box 1000, Halifax, N.S. B3J 2X4 (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    As crude oil price reach a new high, the need for developing alternate fuels has become acute. Alternate fuels should be economically attractive in order to compete with currently used fossil fuels. In this work, biodiesel (ethyl ester) was prepared from waste cooking oil collected from a local restaurant in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Ethyl alcohol with sodium hydroxide as a catalyst was used for the transesterification process. The fatty acid composition of the final biodiesel esters was determined by gas chromatography. The biodiesel was characterized by its physical and fuel properties including density, viscosity, acid value, flash point, cloud point, pour point, cetane index, water and sediment content, total and free glycerin content, diglycerides and monoglycerides, phosphorus content and sulfur content according to ASTM standards. The viscosity of the biodiesel ethyl ester was found to be 5.03 mm{sup 2}/sec at 40 {sup o}C. The viscosity of waste cooking oil measured in room temperature (at 21 {sup o}C) was 72 mm{sup 2}/sec. From the tests, the flash point was found to be 164 {sup o}C, the phosphorous content was 2 ppm, those of calcium and magnesium were 1 ppm combined, water and sediment was 0 %, sulfur content was 2 ppm, total acid number was 0.29 mg KOH/g, cetane index was 61, cloud point was -1 {sup o}C and pour point was -16 {sup o}C. Production of biodiesel from waste cooking oils for diesel substitute is particularly important because of the decreasing trend of economical oil reserves, environmental problems caused due to fossil fuel use and the high price of petroleum products in the international market. (author)

  2. Biodiesel from plant seed oils as an alternate fuel for compression ignition engines-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, C; Ramesh, M; Murugesan, A; Panneerselvam, N; Subramaniam, D; Bharathiraja, M

    2016-12-01

    The modern scenario reveals that the world is facing energy crisis due to the dwindling sources of fossil fuels. Environment protection agencies are more concerned about the atmospheric pollution due to the burning of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel research is getting augmented because of the above reasons. Plant seed oils (vegetable oils) are cleaner, sustainable, and renewable. So, it can be the most suitable alternative fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the availability of different types of plant seed oils, several methods for production of biodiesel from vegetable oils, and its properties. The different types of oils considered in this review are cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) oil, ginger oil, eucalyptus oil, rice bran oil, Calophyllum inophyllum, hazelnut oil, sesame oil, clove stem oil, sardine oil, honge oil, polanga oil, mahua oil, rubber seed oil, cotton seed oil, neem oil, jatropha oil, egunsi melon oil, shea butter, linseed oil, Mohr oil, sea lemon oil, pumpkin oil, tobacco seed oil, jojoba oil, and mustard oil. Several methods for production of biodiesel are transesterification, pre-treatment, pyrolysis, and water emulsion are discussed. The various fuel properties considered for review such as specific gravity, viscosity, calorific value, flash point, and fire point are presented. The review also portrays advantages, limitations, performance, and emission characteristics of engine using plant seed oil biodiesel are discussed. Finally, the modeling and optimization of engine for various biofuels with different input and output parameters using artificial neural network, response surface methodology, and Taguchi are included.

  3. Techno-economic study of different alternatives for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, J.M.; Miguel, V.U.; Errazu, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel has become an attractive diesel fuel substitute due to its environmental benefits since it can be made from renewable resource. However, the high costs surrounding biodiesel production remains the main problem in making it competitive in the fuel market either as a blend or as a neat fuel. More than 80% of the production cost is associated with the feedstock itself and consequently, efforts are focused on developing technologies capable of using lower-cost feedstocks, such as recycled cooking oils and wastes from animal or vegetable oil processing operations. The main issue with spent oils is the high level of free fatty acids found in the recycled materials. The conventional technology employs sodium methoxide as a homogeneous base catalyst for the transesterification reaction and illustrates the drawbacks in working with feedstocks that contain high levels of free fatty acids. On the other hand, homogeneous acidic catalysts are being used for exactly such feedstocks. Both acid and basic homogeneous catalyzed processes require downstream purification equipment to neutralize the catalyst and to purify the biodiesel as well as the glycerol. Recent studies have been conducted to employ heterogeneous catalysts, such acidic or basic solid resins, or immobilized lipases. These catalysts will allow the use of different feedstocks that will permit operation at lower investment costs and will require less downstream process equipment. A conceptual design of these alternative production plants has been done with a techno-economic analysis in order to compare these alternatives. A process simulator was employed to carry out the conceptual design and simulation of each technology. Using these models it was possible to analyze different scenarios and to evaluate productivity, raw material consumption, economic competitiveness, and environmental impacts of each process. (author)

  4. Chemical alternative to the energetic use of biodiesel; Chemische Alternativen zur energetischen Nutzung von Biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwel, S; Ruesch genannt Klaas, M.; Harperscheid, M. [Bundesanstalt fuer Getreide-, Kartoffel- und Fettforschung, Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemie und Technologie der Fette - H.P. Kaufmann-Inst.

    1996-12-31

    Biodiesel is environment-friendly, but much more costly to produce than `normal` diesel fuel. Higher economic efficiency can be achieved by using biodiesel as a chemical feedstock instead. Tenside and polymers offer a wide range of applications. (orig) [Deutsch] Biodiesel ist ein umweltfreundlicher Kraftstoff, jedoch in der Herstellung deutlich teurer als Mineraloel-Dieselkraftstoff. Eine signifikant hoehere Wertschoepfung koennte errreicht werden, wenn Biodiesel nicht im Kraftstoffsektor, sondern als chemischer Rohstoff verwendet wird. Tenside und Polymere sind hierbei grossvolumige Einsatzbereiche. (orig)

  5. Chemical alternative to the energetic use of biodiesel; Chemische Alternativen zur energetischen Nutzung von Biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwel, S; Ruesch genannt Klaas, M; Harperscheid, M [Bundesanstalt fuer Getreide-, Kartoffel- und Fettforschung, Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemie und Technologie der Fette - H.P. Kaufmann-Inst.

    1997-12-31

    Biodiesel is environment-friendly, but much more costly to produce than `normal` diesel fuel. Higher economic efficiency can be achieved by using biodiesel as a chemical feedstock instead. Tenside and polymers offer a wide range of applications. (orig) [Deutsch] Biodiesel ist ein umweltfreundlicher Kraftstoff, jedoch in der Herstellung deutlich teurer als Mineraloel-Dieselkraftstoff. Eine signifikant hoehere Wertschoepfung koennte errreicht werden, wenn Biodiesel nicht im Kraftstoffsektor, sondern als chemischer Rohstoff verwendet wird. Tenside und Polymere sind hierbei grossvolumige Einsatzbereiche. (orig)

  6. Liquid–liquid microextraction in a multicommuted flow system for direct spectrophotometric determination of iodine value in biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Andréia C.; Rocha, Fábio R.P., E-mail: frprocha@cena.usp.br

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • First flow-based procedure for iodine value determination in biodiesel. • Simple, fast and reliable procedure. • Detection without sample pretreatment or phase separation. • Liquid–liquid microextraction with low sample and reagent volumes. • Avoid toxic reagents and organic solvent used in the reference procedure. Abstract: A flow-based procedure was developed for the direct spectrophotometric determination of the iodine value (IV) in biodiesel. The procedure was based on the microextraction/reaction of unsaturated compounds with triiodide ions in an aqueous medium by inserting the reagent solution between the aliquots of biodiesel without any pretreatment. The interaction occurred through the biodiesel film formed on the inner walls of the hydrophobic tube used as the reactor and at the aqueous/biodiesel interfaces. The spectrophotometric detection was based on the discoloration of the I₃⁻ reagent in the aqueous phase by using a glass tube coupled to a fiber-optic spectrophotometer as the detection cell. Reference solutions were prepared by dilution of biodiesel samples with previously determined IV in hexane. The analytical response was linear for IV from 13 to 135 g I₂/100 g with a detection limit of 5 g I₂/100 g. A coefficient of variation of 1.7% (n = 10) and a sampling rate of 108 determinations per hour were achieved by consuming 224 μL of the sample and 200 μg of I₂ per determination. The slopes of analytical curves obtained with three different biodiesel samples were in agreement (variations in slopes lower than 3.1%), thus indicating an absence of any matrix effects. Results for biodiesel samples from different sources agreed with the volumetric official procedure at the 95% confidence level. The proposed procedure is therefore a simple, fast, and reliable alternative for estimating the iodine value of biodiesel.

  7. Liquid–liquid microextraction in a multicommuted flow system for direct spectrophotometric determination of iodine value in biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Andréia C.; Rocha, Fábio R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First flow-based procedure for iodine value determination in biodiesel. • Simple, fast and reliable procedure. • Detection without sample pretreatment or phase separation. • Liquid–liquid microextraction with low sample and reagent volumes. • Avoid toxic reagents and organic solvent used in the reference procedure. - Abstract: A flow-based procedure was developed for the direct spectrophotometric determination of the iodine value (IV) in biodiesel. The procedure was based on the microextraction/reaction of unsaturated compounds with triiodide ions in an aqueous medium by inserting the reagent solution between the aliquots of biodiesel without any pretreatment. The interaction occurred through the biodiesel film formed on the inner walls of the hydrophobic tube used as the reactor and at the aqueous/biodiesel interfaces. The spectrophotometric detection was based on the discoloration of the I 3 − reagent in the aqueous phase by using a glass tube coupled to a fiber-optic spectrophotometer as the detection cell. Reference solutions were prepared by dilution of biodiesel samples with previously determined IV in hexane. The analytical response was linear for IV from 13 to 135 g I 2 /100 g with a detection limit of 5 g I 2 /100 g. A coefficient of variation of 1.7% (n = 10) and a sampling rate of 108 determinations per hour were achieved by consuming 224 μL of the sample and 200 μg of I 2 per determination. The slopes of analytical curves obtained with three different biodiesel samples were in agreement (variations in slopes lower than 3.1%), thus indicating an absence of any matrix effects. Results for biodiesel samples from different sources agreed with the volumetric official procedure at the 95% confidence level. The proposed procedure is therefore a simple, fast, and reliable alternative for estimating the iodine value of biodiesel

  8. Highly effective ionic liquids for biodiesel production from waste vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathy A. Yassin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As conventional energy sources deplete, the need for developing alternative energy resources which are environment friendly becomes more imperative. Vegetable oils are attracting increased interest in this purpose. The methanolysis of vegetable oil to produce a fatty acid methyl ester (FAME, i.e., biodiesel fuel was catalyzed by commercial ionic liquid and its chloride modification. The imidazolium chloride ionic liquid was frequently chosen for the synthesis of biodiesel. The dual-functionalized’ ionic liquid is prepared by a direct combination reaction between imidazolium cation and various metal chlorides such as CoCl2, CuCl2, NiCl2, FeCl3 and AlCl3. Imidazolium tetrachloroferrate was proved to be a selective catalyst for the methanolysis reaction at a yield of 97% when used at 1:10, catalyst: oil ratio for 8 h at 55 °C. Operational simplicity, reusability of the used catalyst for 8 times at least, high yields and no saponification are the key features of this methodology. The dynamic viscosity and density of the upgraded vegetable oil decreased from 32.1 cP and 0.9227 g/cm3 to 10.2 cP and 0.9044 g/cm3 respectively, compared to those of the base vegetable oil. The objective of this study was the synthesis and characterization of biodiesel using commercial ionic liquid and its chloride modification. The ionic liquid catalysts were characterized using FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, DSC, TG and UV.

  9. Process intensification of biodiesel production by using microwave and ionic liquids as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handayani, Prima Astuti; Abdullah; Hadiyanto, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The energy crisis pushes the development and intensification of biodiesel production process. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats and conventionally produced by using acid/base catalyst. However, the conventional method requires longer processing time and obtains lower yield of biodiesel. The microwave has been intensively used to accelerate production process and ionic liquids has been introduced as source of catalyst. This paper discusses the overview of the development of biodiesel production through innovation using microwave irradiation and ionic liquids catalyst to increase the yield of biodiesel. The potential microwave to reduce the processing time will be discussed and compared with other energy power, while the ionic liquids as a new generation of catalysts in the chemical industry will be also discussed for its use. The ionic liquids has potential to enhance the economic and environmental aspects because it has a low corrosion effect, can be recycled, and low waste form

  10. Process intensification of biodiesel production by using microwave and ionic liquids as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayani, Prima Astuti [Department of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, Semarang State University (Indonesia); Abdullah; Hadiyanto, Dan, E-mail: hadiyanto@live.undip.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    The energy crisis pushes the development and intensification of biodiesel production process. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats and conventionally produced by using acid/base catalyst. However, the conventional method requires longer processing time and obtains lower yield of biodiesel. The microwave has been intensively used to accelerate production process and ionic liquids has been introduced as source of catalyst. This paper discusses the overview of the development of biodiesel production through innovation using microwave irradiation and ionic liquids catalyst to increase the yield of biodiesel. The potential microwave to reduce the processing time will be discussed and compared with other energy power, while the ionic liquids as a new generation of catalysts in the chemical industry will be also discussed for its use. The ionic liquids has potential to enhance the economic and environmental aspects because it has a low corrosion effect, can be recycled, and low waste form.

  11. Biotechnological processes for biodiesel production using alternative oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azocar, Laura; Ciudad, Gustavo [La Frontera Univ., Temuco (Chile). Nucleo Cietifico Tecnologico en Biorrecursos; Heipieper, Hermann J. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology; Navia, Rodrigo [La Frontera Univ., Temuco (Chile). Nucleo Cietifico Tecnologico en Biorrecursos; La Frontera Univ., Temuco (Chile). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    2010-10-15

    As biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester (FAME)) is mainly produced from edible vegetable oils, crop soils are used for its production, increasing deforestation and producing a fuel more expensive than diesel. The use of waste lipids such as waste frying oils, waste fats, and soapstock has been proposed as low-cost alternative feedstocks. Non-edible oils such as jatropha, pongamia, and rubber seed oil are also economically attractive. In addition, microalgae, bacteria, yeast, and fungi with 20% or higher lipid content are oleaginous microorganisms known as single cell oil and have been proposed as feedstocks for FAME production. Alternative feedstocks are characterized by their elevated acid value due to the high level of free fatty acid (FFA) content, causing undesirable saponification reactions when an alkaline catalyst is used in the transesterification reaction. The production of soap consumes the conventional catalyst, diminishing FAME production yield and simultaneously preventing the effective separation of the produced FAME from the glycerin phase. These problems could be solved using biological catalysts, such as lipases or whole-cell catalysts, avoiding soap production as the FFAs are esterified to FAME. In addition, by-product glycerol can be easily recovered, and the purification of FAME is simplified using biological catalysts. (orig.)

  12. Biodiesel: An eco-friendly alternate fuel for the future: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singaram Lakshmanan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In today's society, researchers around the world are searching for ways to develop alternate forms of fuel. With the ever-rising fuel costs, developing alternate energy is a top priority. Biodiesel was developed to combat the high gas and oil prices. It is especially made for use in diesel cars and trucks. Biodiesel can be made from all natural foods that can produce oil. Oils such as vegetable, canola, peanut, rapeseed, palm, and olive oil can be used as bio diesel fuel. Virtually all oils that are used in the kitchens everyday can fuel automobiles. Biodiesel fuel is better for the environment because it burns cleaner and does not pollute the atmosphere. It is non-toxic and biodegradable, making it the perfect fuel. Many car manufacturers are realizing that the bio diesel automobile is becoming more popular, and are jumping on the bandwagon, by developing their own version of a biodiesel vehicle. They realize that the need for these vehicles will increase, and predict that they will be ready for the onslaught. Diesel engines have superior fuel efficiencies, and hence they are predominantly used in commercial transportation and agricultural machinery. Due to the shortage of diesel fuel and its increasing costs, a need for an alternate source of fuel for diesel engines is imminent. This paper investigates the suitability of biodiesels as such an alternative with particular reference to automobiles. It reviews techniques used to produce biodiesel and provides a comprehensive analysis of the benefits of using biodiesel over other fuels.

  13. Using of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Ali [Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33500 Mersin (Turkey); Guerue, Metin [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Gazi University, 06570 Maltepe, Ankara (Turkey); Altiparmak, Duran [Technical Education Faculty, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Aydin, Kadir [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2008-04-15

    In this study, usability of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative fuel for diesel engines were studied. Biodiesel was produced by reacting cotton oil soapstock with methyl alcohol at determined optimum condition. The cotton oil biodiesel-diesel fuel blends were tested in a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Engine performances and smoke value were measured at full load condition. Torque and power output of the engine with cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends decreased by 5.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Specific fuel consumption of engine with cotton oil soapstock-diesel fuel blends increased up to 10.5%. At maximum torque speeds, smoke level of engine with blend fuels decreased up to 46.6%, depending on the amount of biodiesel. These results were compared with diesel fuel values. (author)

  14. Using of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Ali; Guerue, Metin; Altiparmak, Duran; Aydin, Kadir

    2008-01-01

    In this study, usability of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative fuel for diesel engines were studied. Biodiesel was produced by reacting cotton oil soapstock with methyl alcohol at determined optimum condition. The cotton oil biodiesel-diesel fuel blends were tested in a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Engine performances and smoke value were measured at full load condition. Torque and power output of the engine with cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends decreased by 5.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Specific fuel consumption of engine with cotton oil soapstock-diesel fuel blends increased up to 10.5%. At maximum torque speeds, smoke level of engine with blend fuels decreased up to 46.6%, depending on the amount of biodiesel. These results were compared with diesel fuel values. (author)

  15. Thermophysical properties of biodiesel and related systems: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for castor oil biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazutti, Marcio A.; Voll, Fernando A.P.; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Corazza, Marcos L.; Lanza, Marcelo; Priamo, Wagner L.; Oliveira, J. Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for multicomponent castor oil FAME and FAEE castor oil. ► Tie-lines and solubility curves (binodal) by cloud-point method for FAME and FAEE systems. ► Experimental data correlated using the UNIQUAC model. -- Abstract: This work reports new liquid–liquid solubility values (binodal curves) as well as (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for, ternary and quaternary systems containing fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) from castor oil, water, glycerol, methanol and anhydrous ethanol at T = (303.15, 318.15, and 333.15) K. Solubility curves (binodal) were also obtained by the cloud-point method for binary systems containing FAME, FAEE, water, or glycerol. All results obtained can be considered of good quality. The experimental values were correlated using the UNIQUAC model, whose results presented good performance and satisfactory fitting of equilibrium values

  16. Evaluation of ionic liquid treated sisal (agave sisalana) fiber as sorbent in biodiesel spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, E.; Silva, A.; Mattedi, S.

    2018-04-01

    The global economic development continually demands the use of energy resources, among which various types of oils are widely used. Despite their undeniable economic importance, environmental accidents with these occur frequently. Thus, the search for efficient and low-cost mitigating measures is recurrent. In this context, techniques that use natural adsorbents, such as vegetable fibers, have been studied, since they combine efficiency, selectivity, low cost and sustainability. Studies have been carried out using various types of fibers, natural or chemically treated. The interest in treating the fiber lies in the fact that, changing the chemical structure of the fiber, its oil sorption capacity is increased. Due to the offered advantages, an alternative and promising type of surface treatment using ionic liquids was performed, to the detriment of traditional treatments. Thus, the technical feasibility of the use of sisal fiber treated with ionic liquid for adsorption of biodiesel was studied.

  17. Thermophysical properties of biodiesel and related systems: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for Jatropha curcas biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Juliana R.F.; Mazutti, Marcio A.; Voll, Fernando A.P.; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Corazza, Marcos L.; Lanza, Marcelo; Priamo, Wagner L.; Vladimir Oliveira, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for multicomponent Jatropha curcas FAME and FAEE. ► Tie-lines, solubility curves (binodal curves) with low deviations from mass balance. ► Experimental data correlated with the UNIQUAC model. -- Abstract: Reported in this study are (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for binary, ternary, and quaternary systems formed by fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) of Jatropha curcas oil, water, glycerol, methanol, and ethanol at temperatures of (303.15, 318.15, and 333.15) K. In general, all the systems investigated resulted in good agreement between phase compositions of crunodes of tie-lines, solubility curves (binodal curves) and overall compositions, hence indicating low deviations from mass balance. Experimental results were correlated with the UNIQUAC model, showing low deviations among experimental and calculated values

  18. Retro-analysis of liquid bio-ethanol and bio-diesel in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumdieck, S.; Page, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses a new approach of retro-analysis. Typically policy is informed by forward-looking analysis of potential for alternative energy technologies. But historical knowledge of energy and processing requirements and greenhouse effects is more reliable for engineering evaluation of biofuel production systems. This study calculates energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions for the most efficient biomass feedstocks in New Zealand if the policy had been implemented to maximize liquid biofuel production in the year 2004/2005. The study uses existing processing technologies and agricultural statistics. Bioethanol production is calculated from putrescible wastes and starch crops, and biodiesel production from rapeseed, tallow, wood and waste paper. Each production system is further evaluated using measures of land use, energy input, crop production related to the energy product, plus relative measures of efficiency and renewability. The research findings are that maximum biofuel production in 2004/2005 would have provided only a few per cent of demand, and would not have reduced dependence on foreign imported oil or exposure to fuel price rise. Finally, we conclude that demand management and efficiency are more effective means of meeting policy objectives. -- Graphical abstract: Input-output energy flows for liquid biofuels with retro-analysis reference to 2004. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We conducted a Retro-analysis of biofuel production for New Zealand in 2004. •EROI analysis shows biodiesel from oil crops is the only viable biofuel. •Renewability analysis shows biofuels do not reduce exposure to peak oil issues. •GHG analysis shows 89% CO 2 emission reductions for the best biodiesel. •Total biofuel from food crops and wastes could provide less than 10% of demand

  19. Biodiesel as an Alternative Fuel for Diesel Engines

    OpenAIRE

    F. Halek; A. Kavousi; M. Banifatemi

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester or FAME) because of the similarity in its properties when compared to those of diesel fuels. Diesel engines operated on biodiesel have lower emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, particulate matter, and air toxics than when operated on petroleum-based diesel fuel. Production of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from rapeseed (nonedible oil) fatty acid distillate having high free fatty acids (FFA) ...

  20. Castor oil biodiesel as an alternative fuel for diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, Alirio; Benjumea, Pedro; Pashova, Veselina

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a study related to the production and use of castor oil biodiesel is presented. The maximum methyl esters yield of the castor oil transesterification reaction is obtained under the following conditions: ambient temperature, a molar ratio of methanol to vegetable oil equal to 9 and a catalyst percentage equal to 0.8%. The castor oil biodiesel can be blended with petroleum diesel as far as 15% in such way that the resulting blend complies with national and international technical standards for diesel fuels. Its high viscosity becomes the main difficulty for using castor oil biodiesel in engines. However this biofuel exhibits excellent cold flow properties (low values of cloud and pour points). The motor tests using castor oil biodiesel petroleum diesel blends, for the biodiesel proportion tested; show that a biodiesel percentage increase leads to an increase in the specific fuel consumption, a decrease in the fuel air ratio, a slight decrease in smoke opacity, while the fuel conversion efficiency and the CO and CO 2 emissions practically remain constants

  1. Characterization of methyl ester compound of biodiesel from industrial liquid waste of crude palm oil processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulidiyah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The second generation of Bioenergy: a study of CPO liquid waste-based biodiesel production technology has been conducted. The aims of this study were to obtain biodiesel from Industrial liquid waste of CPO processing and to identify the kind of methyl-ester compound of the biodiesel. The production of biodiesel was applied in two steps of reactions; esterification reaction using H2SO4 and transesterification using CaO catalyst at 60 °C for 2 h. GC-MS analysis result showed that methyl ester from liquid waste of CPO contains methyl hexadecanoate 12.87%, methyl 9-octadecanoate 19.98%, methyl octadecanoate 5.71%, and methyl 8,11-octadecadienoate 10.22%.

  2. Rhazya stricta Decne seed oil as an alternative, non-conventional feedstock for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehdi, Imededdine Arbi; Sbihi, Hassen Mohamed; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First report of Rhazia stricta seed oil as feedstock for biodiesel production. • Biodiesel is prepared by alkaline transesterification. • Biodiesel from R. stricta oil meets specifications in biodiesel standards. - Abstract: Rhazya stricta Decne (R. stricta) is a hardy, drought-resistant, and arid land plant that is widely distributed from the Middle East to South Asia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of R. stricta seed oil as an alternative source of triacylglycerols that may be suitable for the synthesis of biodiesel. The oil content of the seeds was approximately 14% and was mainly composed of the fatty acids linoleic (60.95%) and oleic (25.48%) acid. R. stricta methyl esters (RSME) were prepared by a base-catalyzed transesterification reaction. The conversion rate of the triacylglycerols to the corresponding methyl esters was determined by 1 H-NMR to be approximately 97%. This study showed that the fuel properties of the RSMEs are comparable to other vegetable oil methyl esters that are commonly used as biodiesels. R. stricta plantations will therefore be suitable for promoting sustainable agriculture and for producing biodiesel with viable prices in arid and semi-arid regions throughout the world

  3. Experimental investigations on mixing of two biodiesels blended with diesel as alternative fuel for diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Srithar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The world faces the crises of energy demand, rising petroleum prices and depletion of fossil fuel resources. Biodiesel has obtained from vegetable oils that have been considered as a promising alternate fuel. The researches regarding blend of diesel and single biodiesel have been done already. Very few works have been done with the combination of two different biodiesel blends with diesel and left a lot of scope in this area. The present study brings out an experiment of two biodiesels from pongamia pinnata oil and mustard oil and they are blended with diesel at various mixing ratios. The effects of dual biodiesel works in engine and exhaust emissions were examined in a single cylinder, direct injection, air cooled and high speed diesel engine at various engine loads with constant engine speed of 3000 rpm. The influences of blends on CO, CO2, HC, NOx and smoke opacity were investigated by emission tests. The brake thermal efficiency of blend A was found higher than diesel. The emissions of smoke, hydro carbon and nitrogen oxides of dual biodiesel blends were higher than that of diesel. But the exhaust gas temperature for dual biodiesel blends was lower than diesel.

  4. Does Biodiesel from Jatropha Curcas Represent a Sustainable Alternative Energy Source?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Ovando-Medina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Various government agencies around the world have proposed vegetable oils and their conversion to biodiesel as a renewable alternative to fossil fuels. Due to its adaptability to marginal soils and environments, the cultivation of Jatropha curcas is frequently mentioned as the best option for producing biodiesel. In the present work the current situation of proven and potential reserves of fossil fuel, and the production and consumption model for the same are analyzed, in order to later review the sustainability of the production process which begins with the cultivation of J. curcas, and culminates with the consumption of biodiesel. A review of the following topics is proposed in order to improve the sustainability of the process: areas destined for cultivation, use of external (chemical inputs in cultivation, processes for converting the vegetable oil to biodiesel, and, above all, the location for ultimate consumption of the biofuel.

  5. Greenhouse gas emissions and energy balances of jatropha biodiesel as an alternative fuel in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshton, Bilha; Katima, Jamidu H.Y.; Kituyi, Evans

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates GHG emissions and energy balances (i.e. net energy value (NEV), net renewable energy value (NREV) and net energy ratio (NER)) of jatropha biodiesel as an alternative fuel in Tanzania by using life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. The functional unit (FU) was defined as 1 tonne (t) of combusted jatropha biodiesel. The findings of the study prove wrong the notion that biofuels are carbon neutral, thus can mitigate climate change. A net GHG equivalent emission of about 848 kg t −1 was observed. The processes which account significantly to GHG emissions are the end use of biodiesel (about 82%) followed by farming of jatropha for about 13%. Sensitivity analysis indicates that replacing diesel with biodiesel in irrigation of jatropha farms decreases the net GHG emissions by 7.7% while avoiding irrigation may reduce net GHG emissions by 12%. About 22.0 GJ of energy is consumed to produce 1 t of biodiesel. Biodiesel conversion found to be a major energy consuming process (about 64.7%) followed by jatropha farming for about 30.4% of total energy. The NEV is 19.2 GJ t −1 , indicating significant energy gain of jatropha biodiesel. The NREV is 23.1 GJ t −1 while NER is 2.3; the two values indicate that large amount of fossil energy is used to produce biodiesel. The results of the study are meant to inform stakeholders and policy makers in the bioenergy sector. -- Highlights: • Production and use of jatropha biodiesel in Tanzania result into positive net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. • The net GHG emission is highly influenced by end use of biodiesel in a diesel engine followed by soil N 2 O emissions during farming of Jatropha. • Jatropha biodiesel results into significant net energy gain; however its production requires large quantity of fossil energy input. • Biodiesel conversion found to be a major energy consuming process followed by jatropha farming. • The results of the study are meant to inform stakeholders and policy makers in the

  6. Transesterification of waste oil to biodiesel using Brønsted acid ionic liquid as catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brønsted acid ionic liquids were employed for the preparation of biodiesel using waste oil as the feedstock. It was found that IL 1–(3–sulfonic acidpropyl–3–methylimidazole hydrosulfate–[HO3S-pmim]HSO4 was an efficient catalyst for the reaction under the optimum conditions: n(oil:n(methanol 1:12, waste oil 15.0 g, ionic liquid 2.0 g, reaction temperature 120 oC and reaction time 8 h, the yield of biodiesel was more than 96%. The reusability of the ionic liquid was also investigated. When the ionic liquid was repeatedly used for five times, the yield of product was still more than 93%. Therefore, an efficient and environmentally friendly catalyst was provided for the synthesis of biodiesel from waste oils.

  7. Fatty acid profile of alternative feedstocks for biodiesel production and implications for fuel properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feedstock accounts for approximately 80% of biodiesel production expenses when commodity lipids such as soybean oil are utilized. Furthermore, commodity lipids have competing food-related applications. Consequently, low-cost alternatives that do not displace existing food production are of interest ...

  8. Biodiesel from Mandarin Seed Oil: A Surprising Source of Alternative Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Azad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mandarin (Citrus reticulata is one of the most popular fruits in tropical and sub-tropical countries around the world. It contains about 22–34 seeds per fruit. This study investigated the potential of non-edible mandarin seed oil as an alternative fuel in Australia. The seeds were prepared after drying in the oven for 20 h to attain an optimum moisture content of around 13.22%. The crude oil was extracted from the crushed seed using 98% n-hexane solution. The biodiesel conversion reaction (transesterification was designed according to the acid value (mg KOH/g of the crude oil. The study also critically examined the effect of various reaction parameters (such as effect of methanol: oil molar ratio, % of catalyst concentration, etc. on the biodiesel conversion yield. After successful conversion of the bio-oil into biodiesel, the physio-chemical fuel properties of the virgin biodiesel were measured according to relevant ASTM standards and compared with ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD and standard biodiesel ASTM D6751. The fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs were analysed by gas chromatography (GC using the EN 14103 standard. The behaviour of the biodiesel (variation of density and kinematic viscosity at various temperatures (10–40 °C was obtained and compared with that of diesel fuel. Finally, mass and energy balances were conducted for both the oil extraction and biodiesel conversion processes to analyse the total process losses of the system. The study found 49.23 wt % oil yield from mandarin seed and 96.82% conversion efficiency for converting oil to biodiesel using the designated transesterification reaction. The GC test identified eleven FAMEs. The biodiesel mainly contains palmitic acid (C16:0 26.80 vol %, stearic acid (C18:0 4.93 vol %, oleic acid (C18:1 21.43 vol % (including cis. and trans., linoleic acid (C18:2 4.07 vol %, and less than one percent each of other fatty acids. It is an important source of energy because it has a higher

  9. Mechanistic Modelling of Biodiesel Production using a Liquid Lipase Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony; Hofmann, Björn; Silva, Vanessa T. L.

    2014-01-01

    , with respect to the industrial production of biodiesel. The developed kinetic model, coupled with a mass balance of the system, was fitted to and validated on experimental results for the fed-batch transesterification of rapeseed oil. The confidence intervals of the parameter estimates, along...... that constrains the amount of methanol in the reactor was computed and the predictions experimentally validated. Monte-Carlo simulations were then used to characterize the effect of the parameter uncertainty on the model outputs, giving a biodiesel yield, based on the mass of oil, of 90.8 ± 0.55 mass %. © 2014...

  10. Preparation of Biodiesel from Soybean Catalyzed by Basic Ionic Liquids [Hnmm]OH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinggong Ren

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A morpholine alkaline basic ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methyl morpholine hydroxide ([Hnmm]OH was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and FT-IR. [Hnmm]OH is highly active in catalyzing the synthesis of biodiesel from the reaction of methanol with soybean oil. The influence of the reaction conditions, including the [Hnmm]OH catalyst amount, the molar ratio of methanol to soybean oil, reaction temperature and time, was investigated. Moreover, the pH and thermal stability of the catalyst was studied. The catalytic activity was affected by its alkalinity. The optimum reaction conditions were found as [Hnmm]OH amount of 4% (mass fraction, the methanol to soybean oil molar ratio of 8, temperature 70 °C and reaction time 1.5 h, the yield of Biodiesel reached 97.0%, and exhibits high stability upon recycling, the yield of Biodiesel is still more than 90% even after being reused for five times. A great advantage of using ILs is that it is very easy to separate the final products. After the reaction, a biphasic system was obtained. The top phase contains biodiesel and a little bit of methanol. Pure biodiesel can be isolated by vacuum evacuating the methanol. The bottom phase contains methanol, glycerol and ILs. Pure glycerol can be obtained simply by distillation. After distillation, pure ILs was obtained, which can be used directly for another reaction. The as prepared biodiesel shows very appealing properties.

  11. Liquid-liquid microextraction in a multicommuted flow system for direct spectrophotometric determination of iodine value in biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Andréia C; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2014-06-04

    A flow-based procedure was developed for the direct spectrophotometric determination of the iodine value (IV) in biodiesel. The procedure was based on the microextraction/reaction of unsaturated compounds with triiodide ions in an aqueous medium by inserting the reagent solution between the aliquots of biodiesel without any pretreatment. The interaction occurred through the biodiesel film formed on the inner walls of the hydrophobic tube used as the reactor and at the aqueous/biodiesel interfaces. The spectrophotometric detection was based on the discoloration of the I3(-) reagent in the aqueous phase by using a glass tube coupled to a fiber-optic spectrophotometer as the detection cell. Reference solutions were prepared by dilution of biodiesel samples with previously determined IV in hexane. The analytical response was linear for IV from 13 to 135 g I2/100 g with a detection limit of 5 g I2/100 g. A coefficient of variation of 1.7% (n=10) and a sampling rate of 108 determinations per hour were achieved by consuming 224 μL of the sample and 200 μg of I2 per determination. The slopes of analytical curves obtained with three different biodiesel samples were in agreement (variations in slopes lower than 3.1%), thus indicating an absence of any matrix effects. Results for biodiesel samples from different sources agreed with the volumetric official procedure at the 95% confidence level. The proposed procedure is therefore a simple, fast, and reliable alternative for estimating the iodine value of biodiesel. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Recent developments in microbial oils production: a possible alternative to vegetable oils for biodiesel without competition with human food?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendoline Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Since centuries vegetable oils are consumed as human food but it also finds applications in biodiesel production which is attracting more attention. But due to being in competition with food it could not be sustainable and leads the need to search for alternative. Nowdays microbes-derived oils (single cell oils seem to be alternatives for biodiesel production due to their similar composition to that of vegetable oils. However, the cold flow properties of the biodiesel produced from microbial oils are unacceptable and have to be modified by an efficient transesterification. Glycerol which is by product of transesterification can be valorised into some more useful products so that it can also be utilised along with biodiesel to simplify the downstream processing. The review paper discusses about various potent microorganisms for biodiesel production, enzymes involved in the lipid accumulation, lipid quantification methods, catalysts used in transesterification (including enzymatic catalyst and valorisation of glycerol.

  13. Preparation of Biodiesel with Liquid Synergetic Lipases from Rapeseed Oil Deodorizer Distillate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Leping; He, Yaojia; Jiao, Liangcheng; Li, Kai; Yan, Yunjun

    2017-11-01

    To reduce industrial production cost, cheap and easily available rapeseed oil deodorizer distillates were used as feedstock to prepare biodiesel in this study. As a result, liquid forms of Candida rugosa lipase and Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) were functioned as new and effective catalysts with biodiesel yield of 92.63% for 30 h and 94.36% for 9 h, respectively. Furthermore, the synergetic effect between the two lipases was employed to enhance biodiesel yield with a result of 98.16% in 6 h under optimized conditions via response surface methodology. The obtained conversion rate surpassed both yields of the individual two lipases and markedly shortened the reaction time. The resultant optimal conditions were ROL ratio 0.84, water content 46 wt% (w/w), reaction temperature 34 °C, and reaction time 6 h.

  14. Production of liquid biofuels (biodiesel and bioethanol) from brown marine macroalgae Padina tetrastromatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashokkumar, Veeramuthu; Salim, Mohd Razman; Salam, Zainal; Sivakumar, Pandian; Chong, Cheng Tung; Elumalai, Sanniyasi; Suresh, Veeraperumal; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated concept of biofuels production from brown macroalgae P. tetrastromatica. • The activation energy was determined as Ea = 34.314 kJ mol"−"1. • Brown marine alga produced 7.8% of biodiesel by acid and alkali transesterification. • The fuel properties of Padina biodiesel meet the ASTM specifications. • Spent biomass of Padina yields 16.1% of bioethanol after fermentation process. - Abstract: In this study, an integrated biomass conversion concept of producing liquid biofuels from brown marine macroalga Padina tetrastromatica was investigated. The algal biomass was collected from the Mandapam coastal region and processed under laboratory. Various parameters were studied to extract crude lipids from the biomass. A kinetic study was conducted for extracting the lipids from the biomass, which follows the first order kinetics and the lipid yield was 8.15 wt.%. The activation energy; Ea = 34.314 kJ mol"−"1 and their thermodynamic parameters were determined. Since the crude algal lipids contain high amount of free fatty acids, a sequential transesterification technique was examined and 7.8% of biodiesel (78 mg/g algal biomass) yield was obtained. The biodiesel was analyzed by "1H and "1"3C–NMR spectroscopy and the conversion yield was estimated. Further, the biodiesel fuel properties were investigated and found that all the features fit the required ASTM D6751 specification limits. The residual biomass after lipid extraction was further explored for bioethanol production through the anaerobic fermentation process. The ethanol yield obtained after saccharification and fermentation were estimated and 161 mg/g residue biomass was reported. The theoretical yield of conversion of hydrolysate to bioethanol was estimated and found to be 83.4%. Therefore, this study demonstrates that macroalga P. tetrastromatica biomass has great potential to produce liquid biofuels such as biodiesel and bioethanol.

  15. Batch production of FAEE-biodiesel using a liquid lipase formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Nordblad, Mathias; Nielsen, Per Munk

    2014-01-01

    % was achieved by combining a 50% stoichiometric excess of ethanol (1.5 equivalents) with 20% (w/w) water relative to the oil. The rate of reaction was directly proportional to the amount of lipase added in this system (500-2000 LU per gram oil). Addition of glycerol to the initial reaction mixture reduced...... the initial reaction rate, but also improved the final yield of biodiesel by suppressing hydrolysis. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V....... competitive option for the conversion of oils and fats to biodiesel. This study investigates the impact of several process parameters on the production of fatty acid ethyl esters from rapeseed oil in a pure batch process on the liquid lipase formulation Callera™ Trans L. Oil conversion in excess of 98...

  16. Conversion of crude Jatropha curcas seed oil into biodiesel using liquid recombinant Candida rugosa lipase isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ting-Chun; Shaw, Jei-Fu; Lee, Guan-Chiun

    2015-09-01

    The versatile Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) has been widely used in biotechnological applications. However, there have not been feasibility reports on the transesterification of non-edible oils to produce biodiesel using the commercial CRL preparations, mixtures of isozymes. In the present study, four liquid recombinant CRL isozymes (CRL1-CRL4) were investigated to convert various non-edible oils into biodiesel. The results showed that recombinant CRL2 and CRL4 exhibited superior catalytic efficiencies for producing fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from Jatropha curcas seed oil. A maximum 95.3% FAME yield was achieved using CRL2 under the optimal conditions (50 wt% water, an initial 1 equivalent of methanol feeding, and an additional 0.5 equivalents of methanol feeding at 24h for a total reaction time of 48 h at 37 °C). We concluded that specific recombinant CRL isozymes could be excellent biocatalysts for the biodiesel production from low-cost crude Jatropha oil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Scale-up of industrial biodiesel production to 40 m3using a liquid lipase formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason; Nordblad, Mathias; Martel, Hannah H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the scale-up from an 80 L fed-batch scale to 40 m3 along with the design of a 4 m3continuous process for enzymatic biodiesel production catalysed by NS-40116 (a liquid formulation of a modified Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase). Based on the analysis of actual pilot plant...... the fed-batch and CSTR cases. Given similar operating conditions, the CSTR operation on average, has a reaction time which is 1.3 times greater than the fed-batch operation. We also showed how the process metrics can be used to quickly estimate the selling price of the enzyme. Assuming a biodiesel selling...... price of 0.6 USD/kg and a one-time use of the enzyme (0.1% (w/woil) enzyme dosage); the enzyme can then be sold for 30 USD/kg which ensures that that the enzyme cost is not more than 5% of the biodiesel revenue. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved...

  18. Process intensification of catalytic liquid-liquid solid processes : Continuous biodiesel production using an immobilized lipase in a centrifugal contactor separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilmi, M.; Kloekhorst, A.; Winkelman, J. G. M.; Euverink, G. J. W.; Hidayat, C.; Heeres, H. J.

    Biodiesel or fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) synthesis from sunflower oil and methanol using an immobilized lipase, an example of a liquid-liquid solid reaction, was studied in batch and various continuous reactor set-ups including the use of a centrifugal contactor separator (CCCS). The latter is an

  19. Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) seed oil as an alternative feedstock for the production of biodiesel in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinas, P.; Karavalakis, G.; Davaris, C.; Anastopoulos, G.; Karonis, D.; Zannikos, F.; Stournas, S.; Lois, E. [Laboratory of Fuels and Lubricants Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Zografou Campus, 157 80 Athens (Greece)

    2009-01-15

    In recent years, the acceptance of fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) as a substitute to petroleum diesel has rapidly grown in Greece. The raw materials for biodiesel production in this country mainly include traditional seed oils (cotton seed oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil and rapeseed oil) and used frying oils. In the search for new low-cost alternative feedstocks for biodiesel production, this study emphasizes the evaluation of pumpkin seed oil. The experimental results showed that the oil content of pumpkin seeds was remarkably high (45%). The fatty acid profile of the oil showed that is composed primarily of linoleic, oleic, palmitic and stearic acids. The oil was chemically converted via an alkaline transesterification reaction with methanol to methyl esters, with a yield nearly 97.5 wt%. All of the measured properties of the produced biodiesel met the current quality requirements according to EN 14214. Although this study showed that pumpkin oil could be a promising feedstock for biodiesel production within the EU, it is rather difficult for this production to be achieved on a large scale. (author)

  20. Biodiesel as an alternative motor fuel: Production and policies in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozbas, Kahraman

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate fuel characteristics of biodiesel and its production in European Union. Biodiesel fuel can be made from new or used vegetable oils and animal fats, which are non-toxic, biodegradable, renewable resources. The vegetable oil fuels were not acceptable because they were more expensive than petroleum fuels. Biodiesel has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. With recent increases in petroleum prices and uncertainties concerning petroleum availability, there is renewed interest in vegetable oil fuels for diesel engines. In Europe the most important biofuel is biodiesel. In the European Union biodiesel is the by far biggest biofuel and represents 82% of the biofuel production. Biodiesel production for 2003 in EU-25 was 1,504,000 tons. (author)

  1. Biodiesel and bioethanol production: A sustainable alternative for the energy crisis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Castro Martínez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution intends to give an overview of the current -status of the energy crisis and suggest some sustainable alternatives for energy production. In first place, a brief summary of the history about resources for energy production is presented. The high dependency of fossil combustibles it is well known and has been estimated that more than 90% of the used energy comes from non-renewable resources such as oil, gas and carbon. In the same way, here, it is described that oil is, by far, the main source of energy used to date and as a consequence, this resource is, unavoidably,coming to an end and at the same time is causing and increasing environmental pollution problems. Later in this work, it is suggested that in order to achieve the energetic sustainability, the development of alternative sources that will allow the reduction of toxic greenhouse gas (GHG emissions as well as a decrease of water usage along with a decrease in the energy production costs are needed. One of the alternatives that have been proposed is the production of biofuels, such as biodiesel and bioethanol. Here, some of the main properties at the level of the employed raw materials and production systems are cited. Finally, this work suggests some solutions that are under development worldwide in order to face thiscurrent energy situation.

  2. Potential utilization of biodiesel as alternative fuel for compression ignition engine in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M. A.; Ma'arof, M. I. N.; Ahmad, I. N.; Husain, H.

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesel is a type of fuel which is derived from various sources of vegetable plants and waste fuels. Today, numerous biodiesels have been engineered to be at par or even better in term of performance in comparison to pure diesel. Therefore, biodiesel has shown a promising sign as one of the best candidate in overcoming total dependency on pure diesel. This paper gives review on various tests and experiments conducted on biodiesel in order to highlight the potentials given by this particular fuel. In addition, providing the supporting evidences to further endorse for a mass usage of biodiesel in Malaysia - simultaneously, driving the country to become a potential global biodiesel producer in the near future. The reviewed studies were obtained mainly via indexed journals and online libraries. Conclusively, every test and study for every blend of biodiesel had shown consistent positive results in regards to performance and in overcoming emission related issues. Thus, providing the evidence that biodiesel is highly reliable. Malaysia as a semi-agricultural nation could take the advantage in becoming one of the leading global biodiesel producers. Nevertheless, this will requires total cooperation of every concerned government bodies and authorities.

  3. Biodiesel from vegetable oil as alternate fuel for C.I engine and feasibility study of thermal cracking: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramkumar, S.; Kirubakaran, V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The C.V of biodiesel is less than diesel of about 10% on volume and 15% on mass basis. • Most forms of biodiesel and its blends with diesel have higher viscosity than diesel. • Biodiesel’s cost and by-product reduce its feasibility as a substitute fuel. • TGA & DCS of Pungamia Oil shows that Thermal cracking is an alternate to Biodiesel. - Abstract: The awareness about using eco friendly fuels like biodiesel is increasing every day. The Increase in global warming and energy crises due to fossil fuel has accelerated the search of bio fuels. Biodiesel is a promising fuel; it is available in a wide range in every part of the world. Most of the studies reveal that the performance of biodiesel is better than that of diesel. Except NOx, the major emissions are high in the case of fossil fuels. This paper reviews the performance and emission characteristics of biodiesel in C.I engines. The paper also reviews the influence of engine modifications, various additives, and various proportions of blends of biodiesel with diesel. The physical and thermal characteristics of biodiesel have a great influence in the performance and emission, and they are tabulated in this paper. This paper also attempts feasibility of admitting vegetable oil in IC engine through Thermal Cracking. Preliminary investigation shows encouraging results and reported in this paper.

  4. Potential alternatives to edible oils for biodiesel production - A review of current work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balat, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel production is a very modern and technological area for researchers due to the relevance that it is winning everyday because of the increase in the petroleum price and the environmental advantages. Currently, biodiesel is mainly prepared from conventionally grown edible oils such as rapeseed, soybean, sunflower and palm thus leading to alleviate food versus fuel issue. About 7% of global vegetable oil supplies were used for biodiesel production in 2007. Extensive use of edible oils may cause other significant problems such as starvation in developing countries. The use of non-edible plant oils when compared with edible oils is very significant in developing countries because of the tremendous demand for edible oils as food, and they are far too expensive to be used as fuel at present. The production of biodiesel from different non-edible oilseed crops has been extensively investigated over the last few years. (author)

  5. New ether-functionalized ionic liquids for lipase-catalyzed synthesis of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Song, Zhiyan; Olubajo, Olarongbe; Cowins, Janet V

    2010-09-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are being explored as solvents for the enzymatic methanolysis of triglycerides. However, most available ILs (especially hydrophobic ones) have poor capability in dissolving lipids, while hydrophilic ILs tend to cause enzyme inactivation. Recently, we synthesized a new type of ether-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) carrying anions of acetate or formate; they are capable of dissolving a variety of substrates and are also lipase-compatible (Green Chem., 2008, 10, 696-705). In the present study, we carried out the lipase-catalyzed transesterifications of Miglyol oil 812 and soybean oil in these novel ILs. These ILs are capable of dissolving oils at the reaction temperature (50 degrees C); meanwhile, lipases maintained high catalytic activities in these media even in high concentrations of methanol (up to 50% v/v). High conversions of Miglyol oil were observed in mixtures of IL and methanol (70/30, v/v) when the reaction was catalyzed by a variety of lipases and different enzyme preparations (free and immobilized), especially with the use of two alkylammonium ILs 2 and 3. The preliminary study on the transesterification of soybean oil in IL/methanol mixtures further confirms the potential of using oil-dissolving and lipase-stabilizing ILs in the efficient production of biodiesels.

  6. Thermophysical properties of biodiesel and related systems: Low-pressure vapor + liquid equilibrium of methyl/ethyl soybean biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veneral, Josamaique G.; Junior, Dirceu L.R.; Mazutti, Marcio A.; Voll, Fernando A.P.; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Corazza, Marcos L.; Silva, Edson A.; Oliveira, J. Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Boiling point temperatures for soybean FAME and FAEE measured in the pressure range of (6.7 to 66.7) kPa. • Investigated systems presented a non-ideal behavior, with positive deviations from Raoult’s law. • Experimental data satisfactorily represented by the UNIQUAC model. -- Abstract: In this work, experimental boiling point temperatures for pseudo-binaries (methyl/ethyl biodiesel + methanol/ethanol) and pseudo-ternaries (methyl/ethyl biodiesel + methanol/ethanol + glycerol/water) systems were measured at several pressures ranging from (6.7 to 66.7) kPa using an Othmer-type ebulliometer. The systems investigated show a non-ideal behavior, with positive deviations from Raoult’s law. It was observed that the addition of up to 10 wt% of alcohol (methanol or ethanol) led to a significant decrease in the boiling point temperature of the systems. The UNIQUAC model was successfully used to represent the experimental results, with an overall average deviation between experimental and calculated boiling temperature values of 0.004%

  7. Eucalyptus biodiesel as an alternative to diesel fuel: preparation and tests on DI diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabet, Lyes; Loubar, Khaled; Lounici, Mohand Said; Hanchi, Samir; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the increasing oil consumption throughout the world induces crucial economical, security, and environmental problems. As a result, intensive researches are undertaken to find appropriate substitution to fossil fuels. In view of the large amount of eucalyptus trees present in arid areas, we focus in this study on the investigation of using eucalyptus biodiesel as fuel in diesel engine. Eucalyptus oil is converted by transesterification into biodiesel. Eucalyptus biodiesel characterization shows that the physicochemical properties are comparable to those of diesel fuel. In the second phase, a single cylinder air-cooled, DI diesel engine was used to test neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel in various ratios (75, 50, and 25 by v%) at several engine loads. The engine combustion parameters such as peak pressure, rate of pressure rise, and heat release rate are determined. Performances and exhaust emissions are also evaluated at all operating conditions. Results show that neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends present significant improvements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon, and particulates emissions especially at high loads with equivalent performances to those of diesel fuel. However, the NOx emissions are slightly increased when the biodiesel content is increased in the blend.

  8. Business management for biodiesel producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerpen, Jon Van [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The material in this book is intended to provide the reader with information about the biodiesel and liquid fuels industry, biodiesel start-up issues, legal and regulatory issues, and operational concerns.

  9. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Proposed kinetic mechanism of biodiesel production through lipase catalysed interesterification with a methyl acetate acyl acceptor and ionic liquid BMIM PF6 co-solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzich, Nicholas Ivan; Bassi, A.S.

    2011-02-15

    As the depletion of fossil resources continues, the demand for environmentally friendly sources of energy as biodiesel is increasing. Biodiesel is the resulting fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from an esterification reaction. To enhance this reaction lipase catalysts and ionic liquids can also used. The aim of this study was to develop a kinetic model of this reaction and to determine the effect of ionic liquids. The esterification reaction was conducted in a jacketed reactor under constant temperature in presence of ionic liquid and with the use of lipase to start the reaction; samples were analyzed with a high-performance liquid chromatography. A kinetic model was developed and results indicated that ionic liquids tend to limit mass transfer and thus reduce initial reaction rates; the authors proposed to increase the flow rate of the reaction mixture to overcome this issue. This study successfully investigated the reaction of lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production and developed its kinetic model.

  11. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the

  12. Gas-liquid countercurrent integration process for continuous biodiesel production using a microporous solid base KF/CaO as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shengyang; Wen, Libai; Wang, Yun; Zheng, Xinsheng; Han, Heyou

    2012-11-01

    A continuous-flow integration process was developed for biodiesel production using rapeseed oil as feedstock, based on the countercurrent contact reaction between gas and liquid, separation of glycerol on-line and cyclic utilization of methanol. Orthogonal experimental design and response surface methodology were adopted to optimize technological parameters. A second-order polynomial model for the biodiesel yield was established and validated experimentally. The high determination coefficient (R(2)=98.98%) and the low probability value (Prcontinuous-flow process has good potential in the manufacture of biodiesel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biodiesel fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mono-alkyl esters, most commonly the methyl esters, of vegetable oils, animal fats or other materials consisting mainly of triacylglycerols, often referred to as biodiesel, are an alternative to conventional petrodiesel for use in compression-ignition engines. The fatty acid esters that thus com...

  14. The role of renewable liquid transportation fuels in Canada's climate action plan: Pros and cons, and stages of development of ethanol, biodiesel, and thermal depolymerization oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coxworth, E.

    2003-04-01

    The feasibility of using ethanol from grain as a partial replacement for gasoline is examined. Although ethanol is widely seen as a desirable renewable transportation fuel, there are concerns about the amount of fossil fuel energy used in its production, both at the farm and the factory level. Indeed, some people claim that there is, in fact, a net energy loss when ethanol is produced from grain, not to mention the concerns about the use of grain for fuel instead of food in a world where millions of people go hungry every day of their life. The emission from ethanol plants and the cost of producing ethanol from grain are related issues that cause concern. The report urges examination of alternatives to fermentation of plant materials such as gasification, and materials other than corn, such as woody material or hay which, although more complex and not yet commercially developed, are showing promise, and deserve further attention. Other renewable liquid transportation fuels such as biodiesel from canola oil, and thermal depolymerization oils that can be derived from a wide variety of waste renewable organic materials, are also suggested as potential fuel sources. Both of these appear promising and require testing to determine implications of further developing these technologies as replacement transportation fuels. The report contains a bibliography of 37 items for ethanol, 12 items for biodiesel, and two items for thermal depolymerization oil

  15. The Utilization of Chicken Fat as Alternative Raw Material for Biodiesel Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gugule

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A study of biodiesel production of chicken fat through estrification-transesterification reactions has been conducted. The separation of the chicken fat was conducted using heating technique, while the esterification-transesterification was conducted using ethanol reagent with chloride acid and hydroxide kalium catalyses. The identification results were identified chromatographically and spectroscopically and the chemical properties (peroxide number, acid number and saponification number were determined. The results of the study showed that the ethyl ester resulting from the chicken fat was dominated by ethyl miristic component (1.25%, ethyl palmitic (22.38%, ethyl palmitoleic (3.35%, ethyl stearic (7.56%, ethyl oleic (45.83%, and ethyl linoleic (17.54%. Moreover, the percentage yield of ethyl ester from es-trans reaction of chicken fat was 66-70 %. The ethyl ester had the same characteristic as biodiesel quality standard. Key Words: chicken fat, esterification, transesterification, biodiesel

  16. Biodiesel Fuel Quality and the ASTM Biodiesel Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is usually produced from vegetable oils, animal fats and used cooking oils with alternative feedstocks such as algae receiving increasing interest. The transesterification reaction which produces biodiesel also produces glycerol and proceeds stepwise via mono- and diacylglycerol intermedi...

  17. Study of thermodynamic and transport properties of binary liquid mixture of diesel with biodiesel at 298.15K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Shyam Sunder; Purohit, Suresh

    2018-05-01

    Properties of diesel and biodiesel (produced from corn oil) are used. Densities and viscosities of binary mixture of diesel with biodiesel (produced from corn oil) have been computed by using liquid binary mixture law over the entire range of compositions at T=298.15K and atmospheric pressure. From the computed values of density and viscosities, viscosity deviation (Δη), the excess molar volume (VE) and excess Gibbs energy of activation of viscous flow (ΔG#E) have been calculated. The results of excess volume, excess Gibbs energy of activation of viscous flow and viscosity deviation have been fitted to Redlich -Kister models to estimate the binary coefficients. The results are communicated in terms of the molecular interactions and the best suited composition has been found.

  18. Alternative technique for biodiesel quality control using an optical fiber long-period grating sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falate, Rosane; Nike, Karen; Costa Neto, Pedro Ramos da; Cacao Junior, Eduardo; Muller, Marcia; Kalinowski, Hypolito Jose; Fabris, Jose Luis

    2007-01-01

    We report the use of an optical fiber sensor to measure the soybean oil concentration in samples obtained from the mixture of pure biodiesel and commercial soybean oil. The operation of the device is based on the long-period grating sensitivity to the surrounding medium refractive index, which leads to measurable modifications in the grating transmission spectrum. The proposed analysis method results in errors in the oil concentration of 0.4% and 2.6% for pure biodiesel and commercial soybean oil, respectively. Techniques of total glycerol, dynamic viscosity, density, and hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were also employed to validate the proposed method. (author)

  19. Alternative technique for biodiesel quality control using an optical fiber long-period grating sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falate, Rosane [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Informatica; Nike, Karen; Costa Neto, Pedro Ramos da [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Cacao Junior, Eduardo; Muller, Marcia; Kalinowski, Hypolito Jose; Fabris, Jose Luis [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: fabris@utfpr.edu.br

    2007-07-01

    We report the use of an optical fiber sensor to measure the soybean oil concentration in samples obtained from the mixture of pure biodiesel and commercial soybean oil. The operation of the device is based on the long-period grating sensitivity to the surrounding medium refractive index, which leads to measurable modifications in the grating transmission spectrum. The proposed analysis method results in errors in the oil concentration of 0.4% and 2.6% for pure biodiesel and commercial soybean oil, respectively. Techniques of total glycerol, dynamic viscosity, density, and hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were also employed to validate the proposed method. (author)

  20. Simple TLC-screening of acylglycerol levels in biodiesel as an alternative to GC determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, J D; Zagonel, G; Vechiatto, W W; Costa, B J; Laurindo, J C; Fontana, R; Pelisson, L; Jorge, B H; Lanças, F M

    2009-10-01

    Thin layer chromatography (TLC) stained with hot acidic p-anisaldehyde, is an interesting, fast, and low-cost technique to monitor main lipid contaminants such as triacylglycerols, diacylglycerols, and monoacylglycerols in biodiesel. These acylglycerols are detectable by the proposed planar chromatographic method, provided the content of the contaminants exceeds the limits recommended by the international norms applicable to biodiesel quality/specification, namely 0.25% in mass for total combined glycerin. The TLC data are confirmed by gas chromatography of the methyl esters of soy oil.

  1. Technical aspects of biodiesel production from vegetable oils

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnakumar Janahiraman; Venkatachalapathy Karuppannan V.S.; Elancheliyan Sellappan

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel, a promising substitute as an alternative fuel has gained significant attention due to the finite nature of fossil energy sources and does not produce sulfur oxides and minimize the soot particulate in comparison with the existing one from petroleum diesel. The utilization of liquid fuels such as biodiesel produced from vegetable oil by transesterification process represents one of the most promising options for the use of conventional fossil fuels. In the first step of this experim...

  2. Overview on the current trends in biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, N.N.A.N.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Yaakub, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Various method for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil were reviewed. → Such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. → The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. → Finally, the economics of biodiesel production was discussed using Malaysia as a case study. -- Abstract: The finite nature of fossil fuels necessitates consideration of alternative fuels from renewable sources. The term biofuel refers to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include bioethanol, biomethanol, biodiesel and biohydrogen. Biodiesel, defined as the monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is an attractive alternative fuel because it is environmentally friendly and can be synthesized from edible and non-edible oils. Here, we review the various methods for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil, such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. Finally, we analyze the economics of biodiesel production using Malaysia as a case study.

  3. Overview on the current trends in biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusuf, N.N.A.N. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Kamarudin, S.K., E-mail: ctie@eng.ukm.m [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yaakub, Z. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Various method for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil were reviewed. {yields} Such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. {yields} The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. {yields} Finally, the economics of biodiesel production was discussed using Malaysia as a case study. -- Abstract: The finite nature of fossil fuels necessitates consideration of alternative fuels from renewable sources. The term biofuel refers to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include bioethanol, biomethanol, biodiesel and biohydrogen. Biodiesel, defined as the monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is an attractive alternative fuel because it is environmentally friendly and can be synthesized from edible and non-edible oils. Here, we review the various methods for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil, such as direct use and blending, microemulsion, pyrolysis and transesterification. The advantages and disadvantages of the different biodiesel-production methods are also discussed. Finally, we analyze the economics of biodiesel production using Malaysia as a case study.

  4. Evaluation of Indian milkweed (Calotropis gigantea) seed oil as alternative feedstock for biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calotropis gigantea (Indian milkweed) is a common plant in Asia that grows as a weed on open waste ground. Flowering and fruiting take place throughout the year. In this study, Indian milkweed oil was evaluated as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. The oil was extracted from Indian milk...

  5. The potential of biodiesel with improved properties to an alternative energy mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuels derived from renewable biological sources (biomass) are prominent among the sustainable energy sources. Biodiesel, the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, is one of the significant biomass-derived fuels. It is obtained from vegetable oils or other triacylglycerol feedstocks b...

  6. Biodegradation of gas-to-liquids synthetic diesel, biodiesel and their blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal M.C. Albertus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Volhoubare en hernubare alternatiewe vir petroleumbrandstowwe word ondersoek vanweë die toenemende aanvraag na brandstof in die vervoerbedryf. Sintetiese brandstowwe soos diesel word van natuurlike gas en steenkool geproduseer, via die Fischer-Tropschsinteseproses. Biodiesel kan ’n aantreklike alternatief vir petroleumgebaseerde diesel wees omdat die fisiese eienskappe daarvan soortgelyk is aan dié van petrodiesel en dit vervoer en gestoor kan word deur van bestaande infrastruktuur gebruik te maak. Die biodegradeerbaarheid van sintetiese diesel en biodieselmengsels is ondersoek deur van respirometrie gebruik te maak. Die doel was om vas te stel of biodiesel die biodegradeerbaarheid van die mengsels kan bevorder in vergelyking met sintetiese petrodiesel. Bykomend is ’n model ontwikkel om die biodegradeerbaarheid van die diesel en diesel-/biodieselmengsels te voorspel deur benutting van die molekulȇre samestelling van die brandstowwe en die BIOWIN V.4.10, EPISuite-voorspellingsagteware. Die byvoeging van biodiesel tot sintetiese diesel het die biodegradeerbaarheid van die mengsels bevorder. Die byvoeging van minder as 1% biodiesel het die biodegraderingsklassifikasie vanaf inherent biodegradeerbaar tot geredelik biodegradeerbaar verbeter. Die byvoeging van biodiesel tot petroleumgebaseerde diesel kan gebruik word om die ontwikkeling van hernubare alternatiewe aan te moedig, aangesien die mengsels beter biodegradeer as petroleumdiesel. Die voordele van biodiesel om die remediëring van koolwaterstofkontaminasie te bevorder, is ook bevestig.

  7. Carbonyl emission and toxicity profile of diesel blends with an animal-fat biodiesel and a tire pyrolysis liquid fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, R; Guillén-Flores, J; Martínez, J D

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, two diesel fuels, an animal-fat biodiesel and two diesel blends with the animal-fat biodiesel (50vol.%) and with a tire pyrolysis liquid (TPL) fuel (5vol.%) have been tested in a 4-cylinder, 4-stroke, turbocharged, intercooled, 2.0L Nissan diesel automotive engine (model M1D) with common-rail injection system and diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). Carbonyl emissions have been analyzed both before and after DOC and specific reactivity of carbonyl profile has been calculated. Carbonyl sampling was carried out by means of a heated line, trapping the gas in 2,4-DNPH cartridges. The eluted content was then analyzed in an HPLC system, with UV-VIS detection. Results showed, on the one hand, an increase in carbonyl emissions with the biodiesel fraction in the fuel. On the other hand, the addition of TPL to diesel also increased carbonyl emissions. These trends were occasionally different if the emissions were studied after the DOC, as it seems to be selectivity during the oxidation process. The specific reactivity was also studied, finding a decrease with the oxygen content within the fuel molecule, although the equivalent ozone emissions slightly increased with the oxygen content. Finally, the emissions toxicity was also studied, comparing them to different parameters defined by different organizations. Depending on the point of study, emissions were above or below the established limits, although acrolein exceeded them as it has the least permissive values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Life cycle energy, environment and economic assessment of soybean-based biodiesel as an alternative automotive fuel in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhiyuan; Tan, Piqiang; Lou, Diming; Yan, Xiaoyu

    2008-01-01

    Life cycle energy, environment and economic assessment for conventional diesel (CD) and soybean-based biodiesel (SB) in China was carried out in this paper. The results of the assessment have shown that compared with CD, SB has similar source-to-tank (StT) total energy consumption, 76% lower StT fossil energy consumption, 79% higher source-to-wheel (StW) nitrogen oxides (NO X ) emissions, 31%, 44%, 36%, 29%, and 67% lower StW hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM), sulfur oxides (SO X ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, respectively. SB is thus considered to be much more renewable and cleaner than CD. However, the retail price of SB at gas stations would be about 86% higher than that of CD without government subsidy according to the cost assessment and China had to import large amount of soybean to meet the demand in recent years. Therefore, although SB is one of the most promising clean and alternative fuels, currently it is not a good choice for China. It is strategically important for China to diversify the feedstock for biodiesel and to consider other kinds of alternative fuels to substitute CD. (author)

  9. Use of sloops distilleries for oils production: an alternative source for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faife, Evelyn; Otero, Miguel A.; Alvarez, Amaury; Penna, Miguel A.; Mtnez, Aidin; Melfi, Mariel; Matos, Maria L.; Kozlowski, Alejandro M.

    2011-01-01

    This study report an evaluation of different yeast strains screened from molasses and soils, on media based mainly in distilleries sloops to produces oils which could be further transformed into biodiesel. Among 9 screened yeast strains 6 was selected and identified previously as oleaginous by other authors. The lipid content of this yeast strains was determinate by Bligh y Dyer modified method. The strain identified as Yarrovia lipolytic a reached 24,8 g/L of biomass concentration in a sloop distillery/crude glycerol mix adjusted to 75 g/L of total DQO and 70:30 ratio and produce lipids around 20 % in fed-batch mode. Different results was obtained with the supplement of others nutrients and elements and from the use of different sloop distillery/glycerol DQO ratio. Chemical characterization of biodiesel obtained by transesterification of Y. lipolytic a lipids when cells were grown on sloops/molasses and sloops/glycerol mixture are mainly C14-C18 and indicated that possessed similar composition to that from vegetable oils, one of the widely used feedstock for biodiesel, although it is not similar on both media. The sum of fatty acids range C14-C18 obtained in slops/glycerol medium was superior about 10 % respect to the value obtained in sloops/molasses. (author)

  10. Biodiesel Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putzig, Mollie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-04

    This fact sheet (updated for 2017) provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, the difference between biodiesel and renewable diesel, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  11. Biodiesel Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-01

    This fact sheet (updated for 2017) provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, the difference between biodiesel and renewable diesel, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  12. Technological research on alternative energy sources in Brazil: the case of biodiesel; Pesquisas tecnologicas sobre fontes alternativas de energia no Brasil: o caso do biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Marcia Franca; Souza, Cristina Gomes de; Peixoto, Jose Antonio Assuncao [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This article aims to map the main characteristics of research projects promoted in Brazil on biodiesel, as part of the National Program for Production and Use of Biodiesel (PNPB), aiming to identify issues, such as: what are the types of plants studied, which is being searched and what the different partners involved. The survey was made on the basis of data available on the web site of the government www.biodiesel.gov.br, and showed the existence of 118 searches registered on the subject. The contents of the study addresses initially some relevant information on biodiesel and its peculiarities in Brazil. In the following sections are identified actions taken by the Brazilian government to create an environment to encourage technological development related to biodiesel, with emphasis on the PNPB and its lines of research. Finally, the results obtained from the database found are presented and discussed. Among other information, the study reveals that: the plants most studied are castor bean, soybeans and cotton, and the research on the biodiesel has focused on improvements in its characterization and quality control as well as in the production of the fuel itself. (author)

  13. Supercritical Synthesis of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Vaultier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of biodiesel fuel from lipids (vegetable oils and animal fats has gained in importance as a possible source of renewable non-fossil energy in an attempt to reduce our dependence on petroleum-based fuels. The catalytic processes commonly used for the production of biodiesel fuel present a series of limitations and drawbacks, among them the high energy consumption required for complex purification operations and undesirable side reactions. Supercritical fluid (SCF technologies offer an interesting alternative to conventional processes for preparing biodiesel. This review highlights the advances, advantages, drawbacks and new tendencies involved in the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs for biodiesel synthesis.

  14. Biodiesel Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-07-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends and specifications. It also covers how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance (including in cold weather) and whether there are adverse effects on engines or other systems. Finally, it discusses biodiesel fuel quality and standards, and compares biodiesel emissions to those of diesel fuel.

  15. Developing New Alternative Energy in Virginia: Bio-Diesel from Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatcher, Patrick [Old Dominion University

    2012-03-29

    The overall objective of this study was to select chemical processing equipment, install and operate that equipment to directly convert algae to biodiesel via a reaction patented by Old Dominion University (Pat. No. US 8,080,679B2). This reaction is a high temperature (250- 330{degrees}C) methylation reaction utilizing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to produce biodiesel. As originally envisioned, algal biomass could be treated with TMAH in methanol without the need to separately extract triacylglycerides (TAG). The reactor temperature allows volatilization and condensation of the methyl esters whereas the spent algae solids can be utilized as a high-value fertilizer because they are minimally charred. During the course of this work and immediately prior to commencing, we discovered that glycerol, a major by-product of the conventional transesterification reaction for biofuels, is not formed but rather three methoxylated glycerol derivatives are produced. These derivatives are high-value specialty green chemicals that strongly upgrade the economics of the process, rendering this approach as one that now values the biofuel only as a by-product, the main value products being the methoxylated glycerols. A horizontal agitated thin-film evaporator (one square foot heat transfer area) proved effective as the primary reactor facilitating the reaction and vaporization of the products, and subsequent discharge of the spent algae solids that are suitable for supplementing petrochemicalbased fertilizers for agriculture. Because of the size chosen for the reactor, we encountered problems with delivery of the algal feed to the reaction zone, but envision that this problem could easily disappear upon scale-up or can be replaced economically by incorporating an extraction process. The objective for production of biodiesel from algae in quantities that could be tested could not be met, but we implemented use of soybean oil as a surrogate TAG feed to overcome this limitation

  16. Transesterification of palm oil to biodiesel using Br(φ)nsted acidic ionic liquid as high-efficient and eco-friendly catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaoyao Feng; Ting Qiu; Jinbei Yang; Ling Li; Xiaoda Wang; Hongxing Wang

    2017-01-01

    The transesterification of palm oil and methanol catalyzed by Br(φ)nsted acidic ionic liquids was investigated.Four eco-friendly Br(φ)nsted acidic ionic liquids were prepared and their structures were characterized by NMR,FT-IR and TG-DTG.The results demonstrated that [CyN1,1PrSO3H][p-TSA] was more efficient than the other ionic liquids and chosen as catalyst for further research.The influences of various reaction parameters on the conversion of palm oil to biodiesel were performed,and the orthogonal test was investigated to seek the optimum reaction conditions,which were illustrated as follows:methanol to oil mole ratio of 24∶1,catalyst dosage of 3.0 wt% of oil,reaction temperature of 120 ℃,reaction time of 150 min,and the biodiesel yield achieved 98.4%.In addition,kinetic study was established for the conversion process,with activation energy and preexponential factor of 122.93 kJ·mol-1 and 1.83 × 1015,respectively.Meanwhile,seven-time recycling runs of ionic liquid were completed with ignorable loss of its catalyst activity.The refined biodiesel met the biodiesel standard EN 14214.

  17. Phase behaviour measurements for the system (carbon dioxide + biodiesel + ethanol) at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, Odilon A.S.; Silva, Fabiano R.; Ramos, Luiz P.; Lenzi, Marcelo K.; Ndiaye, Papa M.; Corazza, Marcos L.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Comparison between ethyl and methyl esters in a pressure-composition of {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2)} at 303.15 K (triangles), 323.15 K (squares) and 343.15 K (circles). Open symbols are ethyl biodiesel (this work) and closed symbols are methyl biodiesel data by Pinto et al. Highlights: ► We measured phase behaviour for the system involving {CO 2 + biodiesel + ethanol}. ► The saturation pressures were obtained using a variable-volume view cell. ► The experimental data were modelled using PR-vdW2 and PR-WS equations of state. - Abstract: This work reports phase equilibrium measurements for binary system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2)} and ternary system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2) + ethanol(3)}. The biodiesel (ethyl esters) used in this work was produced from soybean oil, purified and characterised following the standard specification for subsequent use. Nowadays, great interest in biodiesel production processes at supercritical and/or pressurised solvents is observed, such as, non-catalytic supercritical biodiesel production and enzyme-catalyzed biodiesel production, besides the supercritical CO 2 can be an interesting alternative to glycerol separation in the biodiesel purification step. Towards this, the main goal of this work is to study the phase behaviour at high pressure for the binary and ternary systems involving CO 2 , biodiesel and ethanol. Experiments were carried out in a high pressure variable-volume view cell with operating temperatures ranging from (303.15 to 343.15) K and pressures up to 25 MPa. The CO 2 molar fraction ranged from 0.4213 to 0.9855 for the system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2)}, 0.4263 to 0.9781 for the system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2) + ethanol(3)} with a biodiesel to ethanol molar ratio of (1:3), and 0.4317 to 0.9787 for the system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2) + ethanol(3)} with a biodiesel to ethanol molar ratio of (1:8). For the systems investigated, vapour–liquid (VL), liquid–liquid (LL) and vapour–liquid–liquid (VLL

  18. Alternative route to metal halide free ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Koichiro; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2008-01-01

    An alternative synthetic route to metal halide free ionic liquids using trialkyloxonium salt is proposed. Utility of this synthetic route has been demonstrated by preparing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid through the reaction between 1-methylimidazole and triethyloxonium tetra-fluoroborate in anhydrous ether. (author)

  19. A comprehensive review on biodiesel purification and upgrading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Bateni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Serious environmental concerns regarding the use of fossil-based fuels have raised awareness regarding the necessity of alternative clean fuels and energy carriers. Biodiesel is considered a clean, biodegradable, and non-toxic diesel substitute produced via the transesterification of triglycerides with an alcohol in the presence of a proper catalyst. After initial separation of the by-product (glycerol, the crude biodiesel needs to be purified to meet the standard specifications prior to marketing. The presence of impurities in the biodiesel not only significantly affects its engine performance but also complicates its handling and storage. Therefore, biodiesel purification is an essential step prior to marketing. Biodiesel purification methods can be classified based on the nature of the process into equilibrium-based, affinity-based, membrane-based, reaction-based, and solid-liquid separation processes. The main adverse properties of biodiesel – namely moisture absorption, corrosiveness, and high viscosity – primarily arise from the presence of oxygen. To address these issues, several upgrading techniques have been proposed, among which catalytic (hydrodeoxygenation using conventional hydrotreating catalysts, supported metallic materials, and most recently transition metals in various forms appear promising. Nevertheless, catalyst deactivation (via coking and/or inadequacy of product yields necessitate further research. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the techniques and methods used for biodiesel purification and upgrading.

  20. SINTESIS BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK LIMBAH BIJI KARET SEBAGAI SUMBER ENERGI ALTERNATIF (Synthesis of Biodiesel From Waste of Rubber Seed Oil as Alternative Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasmadi Imam Supardi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Biji karet hanya ditemukan sebagai limbah padat dan belum termanfaatkan sepenuhnya. Minyak limbah biji karet yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini mengandung asam lemak bebas yang tinggi, yaitu 97,77% dan mempunyai bilangan asam yang tinggi pula yaitu setara dengan 6,2 mg KOH g minyak, sehingga perlu dilakukan esterifikasi untuk menurunkan kandungan asam lemak bebasnya menjadi ester. Metanol (20% volume minyak direaksikan dengan minyak limbah biji karet dengan katalis asam sulfat 98% (0,5% volume minyak menjadi ester. Dalam operasi reaksi transesterifikasi, digunakan variasi optimasi katalis yaitu pada 0,5% sampai 1,5% KOH dengan suhu operasi 60 o C dalam perbandingan metanol dengan minyak 1:3 (volume, dan dengan kecepatan pengadukan yang sama, didapatkan konsentrasi metil ester yang baik pada katalis 0,75%. Uji fisis minyak limbah biji karet hasil reaksi transesterifikasi adalah Specific Gravity 0,9000, Density 919,5, Korosi Lempeng Tembaga 1b, CCR 1,361% W, Kadar Air 0,22%, Viscosity 11,53mm 2 /s, dan Flash Point 182,5 o C. Hasil uji fisis menunjukkan belum semua parameter metil ester atau biodiesel memenuhi standar biodiesel. Hasil uji Performance unjuk kerja menunjukkan biodiesel yang dicampur solar dengan perbandingan volume 20:80 memberikan hasil emisi gas buang paling bersih dan waktu pembakaran yang paling lama. ABSTRACT Waste of rubber seeds is found only as a solid waste and has not fully exploited. Waste of rubber seed oil used in the research contains high free fatty acids, about 97.77% and higher acidity number, namely 6.2 mg KOH / g oil, so it needs esterification to reduce the free fatty acid content to be changed into ester. Methanol (20% volume of oil reacted with  waste of rubber seed oil to become methyl ester with sulfuric acid 98% (0,5% volume of oil as a catalyst. In the operations of transesterification variations of the optimization of catalyst 0.5% until 1.5% KOH was used with operating temperature of 60o C in

  1. Biodiesel Fuel Quality and the ASTM Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is usually produced from vegetable oils, animal fats and used cooking oils with alternative feedstocks such as algae receiving increasing interest. The transesterification reaction which produces biodiesel also produces glycerol and proceeds stepwise via mono- and diacylglycerol intermedia...

  2. Cetane Number of Biodiesel from Karaya Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Wasfi, Bayan

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel alternative to petroleum Diesel, biodiesel has similar characteristic but with lesser exhaust emission. In this study, transesterification of Karaya oil is examined experimentally using a batch reactor at 100-140°C

  3. Comparison of alternate fuels for aircraft. [liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene were assessed as alternate fuels for aircraft in terms of cost, capital requirements, and energy resource utilization. Fuel transmission and airport storage and distribution facilities are considered. Environmental emissions and safety aspects of fuel selection are discussed and detailed descriptions of various fuel production and liquefaction processes are given. Technological deficiencies are identified.

  4. Two-Stage Conversion of High Free Fatty Acid Jatropha curcas Oil to Biodiesel Using Brønsted Acidic Ionic Liquid and KOH as Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel was produced from high free fatty acid (FFA Jatropha curcas oil (JCO by two-stage process in which esterification was performed by Brønsted acidic ionic liquid 1-(1-butylsulfonic-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BSMIM]Cl followed by KOH catalyzed transesterification. Maximum FFA conversion of 93.9% was achieved and it reduced from 8.15 wt% to 0.49 wt% under the optimum reaction conditions of methanol oil molar ratio 12 : 1 and 10 wt% of ionic liquid catalyst at 70°C in 6 h. The ionic liquid catalyst was reusable up to four times of consecutive runs under the optimum reaction conditions. At the second stage, the esterified JCO was transesterified by using 1.3 wt% KOH and methanol oil molar ratio of 6 : 1 in 20 min at 64°C. The yield of the final biodiesel was found to be 98.6% as analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical composition of the final biodiesel was also determined by GC-MS analysis.

  5. Biodiesel production from inedible animal tallow and an experimental investigation of its use as alternative fuel in a direct injection diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oener, Cengiz; Altun, Sehmus

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a substitute fuel for diesel engines was produced from inedible animal tallow and its usability was investigated as pure biodiesel and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel in a diesel engine. Tallow methyl ester as biodiesel fuel was prepared by base-catalyzed transesterification of the fat with methanol in the presence of NaOH as catalyst. Fuel properties of methyl ester, diesel fuel and blends of them (5%, 20% and 50% by volume) were determined. Viscosity and density of fatty acid methyl ester have been found to meet ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 specifications. Viscosity and density of tallow methyl esters are found to be very close to that of diesel. The calorific value of biodiesel is found to be slightly lower than that of diesel. An experimental study was carried out in order to investigate of its usability as alternative fuel of tallow methyl ester in a direct injection diesel engine. It was observed that the addition of biodiesel to the diesel fuel decreases the effective efficiency of engine and increases the specific fuel consumption. This is due to the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to diesel fuel. However, the effective engine power was comparable by biodiesel compared with diesel fuel. Emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO x ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and smoke opacity were reduced around 15%, 38.5%, 72.7% and 56.8%, respectively, in case of tallow methyl esters (B100) compared to diesel fuel. Besides, the lowest CO, NO x emissions and the highest exhaust temperature were obtained for B20 among all other fuels. The reductions in exhaust emissions made tallow methyl esters and its blends, especially B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and thus could help in controlling air pollution. Based on this study, animal tallow methyl esters and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel can be used a substitute for diesel in direct injection diesel engines without any engine modification. (author)

  6. Mobile liquid VR system: a cost effective alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, R.; Harkins, R.; HPD, Inc., Naperville, IL)

    1985-01-01

    The need for cost effective alternatives to treat large volumes of liquid radwaste has never been more evident. As part of a continuing effort to introduce such alternatives, HPD, Inc., and Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., have integrated two proven state-of-the-art technologies to offer a mobile liquid volume reduction system that satisfies nuclear industry requirements, with respect to liquid radwaste handling. This system optimizes proven technology by employing a crystallizer unit to concentrate the waste liquids to 50 weight percent solids, thereby reducing the volume to be solidified by factors of 40, while using only 20 percent of the energy required by conventional evaporative systems. In addition, the system employs a field proven cement solidification process which has been accepted in a Topical Report by the US NRC and which offers the highest waste to container volume ratios for stable waste forms in the industry. This volume reduction-solidification system is able to reduce over 7000 gallons of liquid waste per day to less than 30 cubic feet of 10CFR61 certified stable solidified waste for ultimate disposal or on-site storage. This document describes the GEODE System; its applicability; economics; volume reduction; scope of responsibility and experience. Major benefits include higher VR factors; assurance of continual regulatory compliance; and no capital investment

  7. Importance of biodiesel as transportation fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2007-01-01

    The scarcity of known petroleum reserves will make renewable energy resources more attractive. The most feasible way to meet this growing demand is by utilizing alternative fuels. Biodiesel is defined as the monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats. Biodiesel is the best candidate for diesel fuels in diesel engines. The biggest advantage that biodiesel has over gasoline and petroleum diesel is its environmental friendliness. Biodiesel burns similar to petroleum diesel as it concerns regulated pollutants. On the other hand, biodiesel probably has better efficiency than gasoline. One such fuel for compression-ignition engines that exhibit great potential is biodiesel. Diesel fuel can also be replaced by biodiesel made from vegetable oils. Biodiesel is now mainly being produced from soybean, rapeseed and palm oils. The higher heating values (HHVs) of biodiesels are relatively high. The HHVs of biodiesels (39-41 MJ/kg) are slightly lower than that of gasoline (46 MJ/kg), petrodiesel (43 MJ/kg) or petroleum (42 MJ/kg), but higher than coal (32-37 MJ/kg). Biodiesel has over double the price of petrodiesel. The major economic factor to consider for input costs of biodiesel production is the feedstock, which is about 80% of the total operating cost. The high price of biodiesel is in large part due to the high price of the feedstock. Economic benefits of a biodiesel industry would include value added to the feedstock, an increased number of rural manufacturing jobs, an increased income taxes and investments in plant and equipment. The production and utilization of biodiesel is facilitated firstly through the agricultural policy of subsidizing the cultivation of non-food crops. Secondly, biodiesel is exempt from the oil tax. The European Union accounted for nearly 89% of all biodiesel production worldwide in 2005. By 2010, the United States is expected to become the world's largest single biodiesel market, accounting for roughly 18% of world biodiesel consumption

  8. Biodiesel Analytical Methods: August 2002--January 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gerpen, J.; Shanks, B.; Pruszko, R.; Clements, D.; Knothe, G.

    2004-07-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that is receiving great attention worldwide. The material contained in this book is intended to provide the reader with information about biodiesel engines and fuels, analytical methods used to measure fuel properties, and specifications for biodiesel quality control.

  9. LIQUID-LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM FOR TERNARY SYSTEMS CONTAINING ETHYLIC BIODIESEL + ANHYDROUS ETHANOL + REFINED VEGETABLE OIL (SUNFLOWER OIL, CANOLA OIL AND PALM OIL): EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND THERMODYNAMIC MODELING

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, T. P. V. B.; Mielke Neto, P.; Ansolin, M.; Follegatti-Romero, L. A.; Batista, E. A. C.; Meirelles, A. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phase equilibria of the reaction components are essential data for the design and process operations of biodiesel production. Despite their importance for the production of ethylic biodiesel, the reaction mixture, reactant (oil and ethanol) and the product (fatty acid ethyl esters) up to now have received less attention than the corresponding systems formed during the separation and purification phases of biodiesel production using ethanol. In this work, new experimental measurements...

  10. LIQUID-LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM FOR TERNARY SYSTEMS CONTAINING ETHYLIC BIODIESEL + ANHYDROUS ETHANOL + REFINED VEGETABLE OIL (SUNFLOWER OIL, CANOLA OIL AND PALM OIL): EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND THERMODYNAMIC MODELING

    OpenAIRE

    T. P. V. B. Dias; P. Mielke Neto; L. A. Follegatti-Romero; E. A. C. Batista; A. J. A. Meirelles

    2015-01-01

    AbstractPhase equilibria of the reaction components are essential data for the design and process operations of biodiesel production. Despite their importance for the production of ethylic biodiesel, the reaction mixture, reactant (oil and ethanol) and the product (fatty acid ethyl esters) up to now have received less attention than the corresponding systems formed during the separation and purification phases of biodiesel production using ethanol. In this work, new experimental measurements ...

  11. Solid Catalysts and theirs Application in Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Mat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of oil resources and increasing petroleum price has led to the search for alternative fuel from renewable resources such as biodiesel. Currently biodiesel is produced from vegetable oil using liquid catalysts. Replacement of liquid catalysts with solid catalysts would greatly solve the problems associated with expensive separation methods and corrosion problems, yielding to a cleaner product and greatly decreasing the cost of biodiesel production. In this paper, the development of solid catalysts and its catalytic activity are reviewed. Solid catalysts are able to perform trans-esterification and esterification reactions simultaneously and able to convert low quality oils with high amount of Free Fatty Acids. The parameters that effect the production of biodiesel are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th April 2012, Revised: 24th October 2012, Accepted: 24th October 2012[How to Cite: R. Mat, R.A. Samsudin, M. Mohamed, A. Johari, (2012. Solid Catalysts and Their Application in Biodiesel Production. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7(2: 142-149. doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3047.142-149] [How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3047.142-149 ] | View in 

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Transportation Data for Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    alternative fuels Fuel Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 3 0 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 1 2 Electric Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in sold per GGE Biodiesel (B20) $2.79/gallon $2.54/GGE $2.84/gallon $2.58/GGE Biodiesel (B99-B100) $2.47

  13. Systematic sustainable process design and analysis of biodiesel processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Ismail, Muhammad Imran; Babi, Deenesh Kavi

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel is a promising fuel alternative compared to traditional diesel obtained from conventional sources such as fossil fuel. Many flowsheet alternatives exist for the production of biodiesel and therefore it is necessary to evaluate these alternatives using defined criteria and also from...... a biodiesel production case study....

  14. Identification of Critical Parameters in Liquid Enzyme-Catalyzed Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordblad, Mathias; Silva, Vanessa T. L.; Nielsen, Per Munk

    2014-01-01

    CalleraTM Trans L, a liquid formulation of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase, has recently shown great promise as a cost-efficient catalyst for methanolysis of triglyceride substrates, specifically in the BioFAME process. However, identifying the right combination of temperature and concentrations o...

  15. Bronsted imidazolium ionic liquids: Synthesis and comparison of their catalytic activities as pre-catalyst for biodiesel production through two stage process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsheikh, Y.A.; Man, Zakaria; Bustam, M.A.; Yusup, Suzana; Wilfred, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, study was undertaken to prepare biodiesel via a two-step transesterification process. The high free fatty acids (FFA) value contained in the crude palm oil (CPO), which cause several problems with the straight alkaline-catalyzed, were converted to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) before introducing KOH-catalyzed transesterification step. In order to evaluate their catalytic activities, three Bronsted acidic imidazoliums were investigated. These ionic liquids (ILs) appeared to be promising candidates to replace conventional acidic catalyst for biodiesel production due to their unique properties. Among them, a longer side chains 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hydrogensulfate (BMIMHSO 4 ) was found to be more superior to the other two catalysts. Based on the experimental results, a catalyst (BIMHSO 4 ) concentration of 4.5 wt.%, methanol/CPO molar ratio of 12:1, a temperature of 160 o C, and agitation speed of 600 rpm provided a final CPO acid value lower than 1.0 mg KOH/CPO within 120 min. The second alkali-catalyze step was performed at agitation speed of 600 rpm, 60 o C, 1.0% KOH for 50 min. The final biodiesel product in 98.4% yield was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The determined physicochemical important properties of POME were confirmed with American Standards for Testing Material (ASTM).

  16. Business Management for Biodiesel Producers: August 2002--January 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gerpen, J.

    2004-07-01

    The material in this book is intended to provide the reader with information about the biodiesel and liquid fuels industry, biodiesel start-up issues, legal and regulatory issues, and operational concerns.

  17. Analysis of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a biogenic alternative to diesel fuel derived from petroleum. It is produced by a transesterification reaction from materials consisting largely of triacylglycerols such as vegetable and other plant oils, animal fats, used cooking oils, and “alternative” feedstocks such as algal oils. T...

  18. Why Teach about Biodiesel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Proposes that study of biodiesel as a healthier alternative to petroleum diesel be included in the curriculum. Suggests that teachers will play a critical role during the transition away from fossil fuel technologies. Provides background information and web-based resources. (DLH)

  19. Biodiesel from microalgae beats bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisti, Yusuf

    2008-03-01

    Renewable biofuels are needed to displace petroleum-derived transport fuels, which contribute to global warming and are of limited availability. Biodiesel and bioethanol are the two potential renewable fuels that have attracted the most attention. As demonstrated here, biodiesel and bioethanol produced from agricultural crops using existing methods cannot sustainably replace fossil-based transport fuels, but there is an alternative. Biodiesel from microalgae seems to be the only renewable biofuel that has the potential to completely displace petroleum-derived transport fuels without adversely affecting supply of food and other crop products. Most productive oil crops, such as oil palm, do not come close to microalgae in being able to sustainably provide the necessary amounts of biodiesel. Similarly, bioethanol from sugarcane is no match for microalgal biodiesel.

  20. Liquid alternative diesel fuels with high hydrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancsok, Jenoe; Varga, Zoltan; Eller, Zoltan; Poelczmann, Gyoergy [Pannonia Univ., Veszprem (Hungary). MOL Dept. of Hydrocarbon Processing; Kasza, Tamas [MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Plc., Szazhalombatta (Hungary)

    2013-06-01

    Mobility is a keystone of the sustainable development. In the operation of the vehicles as the tools of mobility internal combustion engines, so thus Diesel engines will play a remarkable role in the next decades. Beside fossil fuels - used for power these engines - liquid alternative fuels have higher and higher importance, because of their known advantages. During the presentation the categorization possibilities based on the chronology of their development and application will be presented. The importance of fuels with high hydrogen content will be reviewed. Research and development activity in the field of such kind of fuels will be presented. During this developed catalytic systems and main performance properties of the product will be presented which were obtained in case of biogasoils produced by special hydrocracking of natural triglycerides and in case of necessity followed by isomerization; furthermore in case of synthetic biogasoils obtained by the isomerization hydrocracking of Fischer-Tropsch paraffins produced from biomass based synthesis gas. Excellent combustion properties (cetane number > 65-75), good cold flow properties and reduced harmful material emission due to the high hydrogen content (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}) are highlighted. Finally production possibilities of linear and branched paraffins based on lignocelluloses are briefly reviewed. Summarizing it was concluded that liquid hydrocarbons with high isoparaffin content are the most suitable fuels regarding availability, economical and environmental aspects, namely the sustainable development. (orig.)

  1. Opportunities and challenges for biodiesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lin; Cunshan, Zhou; Vittayapadung, Saritporn; Xiangqian, Shen; Mingdong, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Fossil fuel resources are decreasing daily. As a renewable energy, biodiesel has been receiving increasing attention because of the relevance it gains from the rising petroleum price and its environmental advantages. This review highlights some of the perspectives for the biodiesel industry to thrive as an alternative fuel, while discussing opportunities and challenges of biodiesel. This review is divided in three parts. First overview is given on developments of biodiesel in past and present, especially for the different feedstocks and the conversion technologies of biodiesel industry. More specifically, an overview is given on possible environmental and social impacts associated with biodiesel production, such as food security, land change and water source. Further emphasis is given on the need for government's incentives and public awareness for the use and benefits of biodiesel, while promoting policies that will not only endorse the industry, but also promote effective land management. (author)

  2. Infrared optical constants of liquid palm oil and palm oil biodiesel determined by the combined ellipsometry-transmission method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Tan, J Y; Ma, Y Q; Liu, L H

    2017-06-20

    The optical constants of vegetable oils and biodiesels are the basic input parameters in the study of the thermal radiation transfer and monitoring the productivity of vegetable oils converting to biodiesels. In this work, a combined ellipsometry-transmission method is presented to obtain the optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel between 20°C and 150°C in the spectral range 600-4100  cm -1 and to study the temperature effect on the optical constants. In the combined method, a modified ellipsometry method is used to measure the optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel for the whole researched wave bands. For the weak absorption regions in which the ellipsometry method cannot give precise absorption indices, the transmission method is conducted to get the absorption indices using the refractive indices obtained by the proposed ellipsometry method. Deionized water and methanol are taken as examples to verify the combined ellipsometry-transmission method. It is shown that the combined method can overcome the deficiencies of the traditional ellipsometry and transmission method, which can be used for the measurements of both strong and weak absorption wave bands. The experimental analyses indicate that temperature exerts a noticeable influence on the infrared optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel. With the increase of temperature, the refractive indices at certain wavenumbers decrease nearly linearly, and the amplitudes of dominant absorption peaks show a decreasing trend. The absorption peaks located around 3550  cm -1 show blueshift trends as temperature increases. Comparing these two kinds of oils, palm oil presents larger values in refractive indices and dominant absorption peaks.

  3. Are subsidies for biodiesel economically efficient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassell, Charles S.; Dittmer, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    Biodiesel produces less pollution than petrodiesel; however, it is more expensive and will only be a viable alternative if market prices of the products are comparable. This paper examines whether the external benefits from biodiesel use justify subsidies required for adoption outside of niche alternative fuel markets. The authors establish a range of subsidies required to make biodiesel a viable substitute for petrodiesel. Published estimates of the emissions reductions from biodiesel and the dollar benefits of unit reductions in emissions are used to compute a per-gallon external benefit from use of biodiesel, versus petrodiesel. Under conservative estimates of the benefits from biodiesel use in non-road equipment, the external benefits outweigh the required subsidies.(JEL Q48, Q42, H2)

  4. Biodiesel research progress 1992-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyson, K.S. [ed.

    1998-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fuels Development began evaluating the potential of various alternative fuels, including biodiesel, as replacement fuels for traditional transportation fuels. Biodiesel is derived from a variety of biological materials from waste vegetable grease to soybean oil. This alkyl ester could be used as a replacement, blend, or additive to diesel fuel. This document is a comprehensive summary of relevant biodiesel and biodiesel-related research, development demonstration, and commercialization projects completed and/or started in the US between 1992 and 1997. It was designed for use as a reference tool to the evaluating biodiesel`s potential as a clean-burning alternative motor fuel. It encompasses, federally, academically, and privately funded projects. Research projects are presented under the following topical sections: Production; Fuel characteristics; Engine data; Regulatory and legislative activities; Commercialization activities; Economics and environment; and Outreach and education.

  5. New technologies in biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santacesaria, E.; Di Serio, M.; Tesser, R.

    2009-01-01

    The cost of biodiesel is nowadays affected by the cost of the raw materials, because the currently used method of preparation requires highly refined vegetable oils containing very low amounts of free fatty acids and moisture. Alternatively, less expensive technologies are possible using heterogeneous catalysts. In the present paper examples of these new technologies, based on the use of heterogeneous catalysts, in the production of biodiesel are described and discussed. [it

  6. Biodiesel update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee, K.

    1998-01-01

    Compared to gasoline driven spark ignition engines, diesel engines are more efficient and emit less CO 2 and CO. The use of mono-alkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from renewable lipid feed stocks such as vegetable oils or animal fats for use in compression ignition (diesel) engines was described. Production of this biodiesel product was illustrated. The raw materials for biodiesel include vegetable oil or animal fat, alcohol (methanol or ethanol), and a catalyst such as sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide. As far as uses are concerned, biodiesels can be used as a pure fuel, as a blending stock with petrodiesel, or in low levels with petrodiesel, indeed, anywhere where no. 1 or no. 2 petrodiesel is used. Details of the technical attributes of biodiesel were provided. The superior ability of biodiesel over petrodiesel to reduce particulates, carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons was documented. A case study of using biodiesel fuel in an underground mine was part of the demonstration. 20 refs., 6 tabs

  7. Biodiesel production by lipase-catalyzed transesterification of Ocimum basilicum L. (sweet basil) seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Zeynab; Ong, Hwai Chyuan; Harrison, Mark D.; Kusumo, Fitranto; Mazaheri, Hoora; Ilham, Zul

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Need for alternative energy has led to explore new feedstock. • Ocimum basilicum seeds oil was used as biodiesel feedstock. • Biodiesel was produced via lipase-catalyzed transesterification by Novozym. • Artificial neural network with genetic algorithm modelling was employed. - Abstract: The increasing global demand for fuel, limited fossil fuel resources, and increasing concern about the upturn in gaseous CO_2 emissions are the key drivers of research and development into sources of renewable liquid transport fuels, such as biodiesel. In the present work, we demonstrate biodiesel production from Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) seed oil by lipase-catalyzed transesterification. Sweet basil seeds contain 22% oil on a dry weight basis. Artificial neural network with genetic algorithm modelling was used to optimize reaction. Temperature, catalyst concentration, time, and methanol to oil molar ratio were the input factors in the optimization study, while fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield was the key model output. FAME composition was determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The optimized transesterification process resulted in a 94.58% FAME yield after reaction at 47 °C for 68 h in the presence of 6% w/w catalyst and a methanol to oil ratio of 10:1. The viscosity, density, calorific value, pour point, and cloud point of the biodiesel derived from sweet basil seed oil conformed to the EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 standard specifications. The antioxidant stability of the biodiesel did not meet these specifications but could be improved via the addition of antioxidant.

  8. Predicting specific gravity and viscosity of biodiesel fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfa, Belachew; Mishra, Rakesh; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Biodiesel is a promising non-toxic and biodegradable alternative fuel in transport sector. Of all the biodiesel properties, specific gravity and viscosity are the most significant for the effects they have on the utilization of biodiesel fuels in unmodified engines. This paper presents models, which have been derived from experimental data, for predicting the specific gravity and dynamic viscosity of biodiesel at various temperatures and fractions. In addition a model has also been developed ...

  9. Georges Chavanne and the first biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article discusses the first production and use of a fuel around 1937 now called biodiesel, which is obtained from a vegetable or plant oil through a straightforward chemical reaction called transesterification. Biodiesel has become an alternative or supplement to conventional diesel fuel derive...

  10. Technical aspects of biodiesel production from vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnakumar Janahiraman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel, a promising substitute as an alternative fuel has gained significant attention due to the finite nature of fossil energy sources and does not produce sulfur oxides and minimize the soot particulate in comparison with the existing one from petroleum diesel. The utilization of liquid fuels such as biodiesel produced from vegetable oil by transesterification process represents one of the most promising options for the use of conventional fossil fuels. In the first step of this experimental research, edible rice bran oil used as test material and converted into methyl ester and non-edible jatropha vegetable oil is converted into jatropha oil methyl ester, which are known as biodiesel and they are prepared in the presence of homogeneous acid catalyst and optimized their operating parameters like reaction temperature, quantity of alcohol and the catalyst requirement, stirring rate and time of esterification. In the second step, the physical properties such as density, flash point, kinematic viscosity, cloud point, and pour point were found out for the above vegetable oils and their methyl esters. The same characteristics study was also carried out for the diesel fuel for obtaining the baseline data for analysis. The values obtained from the rice bran oil methyl ester and jatropha oil methyl ester are closely matched with the values of conventional diesel and it can be used in the existing diesel engine without any hardware modification. In the third step the storage characteristics of biodiesel are also studied. .

  11. Liquid Biofuels: We Lose More than We Win

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Hedegaard, Karsten; Thyø, Kathrine

    2013-01-01

    biofuels, including first-generation bio-diesels (plant bio-diesels) as well as first- and second-generation bioethanols produced in Europe and the USA. When we prioritise biomass for these biofuels, we deprive ourselves the better alternative of using the same limited biomass for heat and power...... fuel substitution, and biomass is increasingly used for both the transport and the heat and power sectors, with increasing interest in using it for chemicals production as well. For the transport sector, the conversion of biomass to the liquid biofuels of bio-diesel and bioethanol is at present...

  12. Pinhão-Manso: Uma Alternativa para Produção de Biodiesel na Agricultura Familiar da Amazônia Brasileira. = Jatropha curcas: An alternative for biodiesel production in the Brazilian Amazonian family agriculture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Arcanjo Alves

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available O pinhão-manso (Jatropha curcas L., da família Euforbiaceae, é uma espécie que pode ser cultivada em diferentes condições edafoclimáticas. Apresenta valor medicinal, ornamental e na produção de óleo. Atualmente tem aumentado o interesse no conhecimento agronômico desta cultura, visando à seleção e o aprimoramento de variedades mais produtivas e economicamente viáveis, principalmente devido ao alto potencial na produção de óleo para fabricar o biodiesel. Apesar de ainda não ser cultivada comercialmente no Brasil, mostra-se viável para a agricultura familiar das regiões Norte e Nordeste, pois tem alta resistência à seca e boa adaptação as altas temperaturas e insolação, além de produzir em solos ácidos e de baixa fertilidade como os do cerrado da Amazônia. Estudos estão sendo conduzidos com essa cultura no estado de Roraima visando desenvolver tecnologias viáveis de produção para serem adotadas pela agricultura familiar, como uma alternativa promissora na geração de emprego e renda, promovendo a recuperação e proteção de áreas alteradas ou degradadas e permitindo o consórcio com fruteiras nativas e culturas anuais. = The pinhão-manso (Jatropha curcas L., from the Euforbiaceae famíly, is a species that can be raised in different edafoclimatic conditions. It presents a regular medicinal and ornamental value, and it is also useful for oil production, Nowadays it is increasing the interest in the agronomic knowledge of this culture, mostly related to the selection and improving of more productive and economically feasible varieties, mainly due to its high potencial for biodiesel production. Although this species is not yet cultivated for market use in Brasil, it has shown feasibility for family agriculture in North and Northeast regions, because of its great resistance to draught as well as its good adaptation to high temperatures and insolation. This species can also produce in highly acid and scarcely

  13. Performance and emission characteristics of double biodiesel blends with diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuthalingam Arun Balasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on biodiesel focused on performance of single biodiesel and its blends with diesel. The present work aims to investigate the possibilities of the application of mixtures of two biodiesel and its blends with diesel as a fuel for diesel engines. The combinations of Pongamia pinnata biodiesel, Mustard oil biodiesel along with diesel (PMD and combinations of Cotton seed biodiesel, Pongamia pinnata biodiesel along with diesel (CPD are taken for the experimental analysis. Experiments are conducted using a single cylinder direct-injection diesel engine with different loads at rated 3000 rpm. The engine characteristics of the two sets of double biodiesel blends are compared. For the maximum load, the value of Specific Fuel consumption and thermal efficiency of CPD-1 blend (10:10:80 is close to the diesel values. CPD blends give better engine characteristics than PMD blends. The blends of CPD are suitable alternative fuel for diesel in stationary/agricultural diesel engines.

  14. Biodiesel Mass Transit Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The Biodiesel Mass Transit Demonstration report is intended for mass transit decision makers and fleet managers considering biodiesel use. This is the final report for the demonstration project implemented by the National Biodiesel Board under a gran...

  15. Biodiesel Emissions Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using existing data, the EPA's biodiesel emissions analysis program sought to quantify the air pollution emission effects of biodiesel for diesel engines that have not been specifically modified to operate on biodiesel.

  16. Application of correlation constrained multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares methods for determination of compounds of interest in biodiesel blends using NIR and UV-visible spectroscopic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Rocha; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes; Tauler, Romà; de Juan, Anna

    2014-07-01

    This study describes two applications of a variant of the multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method with a correlation constraint. The first application describes the use of MCR-ALS for the determination of biodiesel concentrations in biodiesel blends using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data. In the second application, the proposed method allowed the determination of the synthetic antioxidant N,N'-Di-sec-butyl-p-phenylenediamine (PDA) present in biodiesel mixtures from different vegetable sources using UV-visible spectroscopy. Well established multivariate regression algorithm, partial least squares (PLS), were calculated for comparison of the quantification performance in the models developed in both applications. The correlation constraint has been adapted to handle the presence of batch-to-batch matrix effects due to ageing effects, which might occur when different groups of samples were used to build a calibration model in the first application. Different data set configurations and diverse modes of application of the correlation constraint are explored and guidelines are given to cope with different type of analytical problems, such as the correction of matrix effects among biodiesel samples, where MCR-ALS outperformed PLS reducing the relative error of prediction RE (%) from 9.82% to 4.85% in the first application, or the determination of minor compound with overlapped weak spectroscopic signals, where MCR-ALS gave higher (RE (%)=3.16%) for prediction of PDA compared to PLS (RE (%)=1.99%), but with the advantage of recovering the related pure spectral profile of analytes and interferences. The obtained results show the potential of the MCR-ALS method with correlation constraint to be adapted to diverse data set configurations and analytical problems related to the determination of biodiesel mixtures and added compounds therein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareg, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for confining molten metal with a horizontal alternating magnetic field. In particular, this invention employs a magnet that can produce a horizontal alternating magnetic field to confine a molten metal at the edges of parallel horizontal rollers as a solid metal sheet is cast by counter-rotation of the rollers.

  18. The biodiesel handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knothe, Gerhard; Krahl, Jurgen; Van Gerpen, Jon Harlan

    2010-01-01

    .... The Biodiesel Handbook delivers solutions to issues associated with biodiesel feedstocks, production issues, quality control, viscosity, stability, applications, emissions, and other environmental...

  19. Western Kentucky University Research Foundation Biodiesel Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [Principal Investigator; Cao, Yan [Co-Principal Investigator

    2013-03-15

    Petroleum-based liquid hydrocarbons is exclusively major energy source in the transportation sector. Thus, it is the major CO{sub 2} source which is the associated with greenhouse effect. In the United States alone, petroleum consumption in the transportation sector approaches 13.8 million barrels per day (Mbbl/d). It is corresponding to a release of 0.53 gigatons of carbon per year (GtC/yr), which accounts for approximate 7.6 % of the current global release of CO{sub 2} from all of the fossil fuel usage (7 GtC/yr). For the long term, the conventional petroleum production is predicted to peak in as little as the next 10 years to as high as the next 50 years. Negative environmental consequences, the frequently roaring petroleum prices, increasing petroleum utilization and concerns about competitive supplies of petroleum have driven dramatic interest in producing alternative transportation fuels, such as electricity-based, hydrogen-based and bio-based transportation alternative fuels. Use of either of electricity-based or hydrogen-based alternative energy in the transportation sector is currently laden with technical and economical challenges. The current energy density of commercial batteries is 175 Wh/kg of battery. At a storage pressure of 680 atm, the lower heating value (LHV) of H{sub 2} is 1.32 kWh/liter. In contrast, the corresponding energy density for gasoline can reach as high as 8.88 kWh/liter. Furthermore, the convenience of using a liquid hydrocarbon fuel through the existing infrastructures is a big deterrent to replacement by both batteries and hydrogen. Biomass-derived ethanol and bio-diesel (biofuels) can be two promising and predominant U.S. alternative transportation fuels. Both their energy densities and physical properties are comparable to their relatives of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel, however, biofuels are significantly environmental-benign. Ethanol can be made from the sugar-based or starch-based biomass materials, which is easily

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Application for School Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propane Buses Jan. 26, 2016 Video thumbnail for Biodiesel Offers an Easy Alternative for Fleets Biodiesel thumbnail for Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama May 1, 2012 Video School Transportation Videos on YouTube Video thumbnail for New Hampshire Cleans up with Biodiesel Buses

  1. Ionic liquids as alternative solvents for aromatics extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansmeier, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was the development of an extraction process for the removal of multiple aromatics from several petrochemical streams by means of an ionic liquid. Due to environmental legislation, the demand of ‘clean’ fuels is increasing and most likely will increase even more towards

  2. Mixotrophic cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production: status and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghan; Yang, Haizhen; Wang, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Biodiesel from microalgae provides a promising alternative for biofuel production. Microalgae can be produced under three major cultivation modes, namely photoautotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic cultivation, and mixotrophic cultivation. Potentials and practices of biodiesel production from microalgae have been demonstrated mostly focusing on photoautotrophic cultivation; mixotrophic cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production has rarely been reviewed. This paper summarizes the mechanisms and virtues of mixotrophic microalgae cultivation through comparison with other major cultivation modes. Influencing factors of microalgal biodiesel production under mixotrophic cultivation are presented, development of combining microalgal biodiesel production with wastewater treatment is especially reviewed, and bottlenecks and strategies for future commercial production are also identified.

  3. Review of the Production of Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil using Solid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H. Said

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for fossil fuels and the emissions generated from these fuels are increasing daily. Researchers are concerned with global warming as well as climate change; and energy sustainability and material usages are important issues today. Waste cooking oil (WCO can be processed into biodiesel as an alternative fuel to replace diesel. Production of biodiesel using WCO as the feedstock has been of growing interest for the last two decades. A number of research papers related to the improvements in production, raw materials and catalyst selection have been published. This paper reviews the various types of heterogeneous solid catalyst in the production of biodiesel via the transesterification of WCO. The catalysts used can be classified according to their state presence in the transesterification reaction as homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. Homogeneous catalysts act in the same liquid phase as the reaction mixture, whereas heterogeneous catalysts act in a solid phase with the reaction mixture. Heterogeneous catalysts are non-corrosive, a green process and environmentally friendly. They can be recycled and used several times, thus offering a more economic pathway for biodiesel production. The advantages and drawbacks of these heterogeneous catalysts are presented. Future work focuses on the application of economically and environmentally friendly solid catalysts in the production of biodiesel using WCO as the raw material.

  4. Optimization of factors affecting the production of biodiesel from crude palm kernel oil and ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwornoo, David. K. [Faculty of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Private Mail Bag, Kumasi (Ghana); Ahiekpor, Julius C. [Chemical Engineering Department, Kumasi Polytechnic, P.O. Box 854, Kumasi (Ghana)

    2010-07-01

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from renewable sources such as vegetable oils and animal fats, has been identified by government to play a key role in the socio-economic development of Ghana. The utilization of biodiesel is expected to be about 10% of the total liquid fuel mix of the country by the year 2020. Despite this great potential and the numerous sources from which biodiesel could be developed in Ghana, studies on the sources of biodiesel and their properties as a substitute for fossil diesel have tended to be limited to Jatropha oil. This paper, however, reports the parameters that influences the production of biodiesel from palm kernel oil, one of the vegetable oils obtained from oil palm which is the highest vegetable oil source in Ghana. The parameters studied are; mass ratio of ethanol to oil, reaction temperature, catalyst concentration, and reaction time using completely randomized 24 factorial design. Results indicated that ethanol to oil mass ratio, catalyst concentration and reaction time were the most important factors affecting the ethyl ester yield. There was also an interaction effect between catalyst and time and ethanol- oil ratio and time on the yield. Accordingly, the optimal conditions for the production of ethyl esters from crude palm kernel oil were determined as; 1:5 mass ratio of ethanol to oil, 1% catalyst concentration by weight of oil, 90 minutes reaction time at a temperature of 30 deg C.

  5. Development of a test method for distillation of diesel-biodiesel-alcohols mixtures at reduced pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, R.; Iosub, I.; Clenci, A.; Zaharia, C.; Iorga-Simăn, V.

    2017-10-01

    Increased environmental awareness and depletion of fossil petroleum resources are driving the automotive industry to seek out and use alternative fuels. For instance, the biofuel is a major renewable energy source to supplement declining fossil fuel resources. The addition of alcohols like methanol and ethanol is practical in biodiesel blends due to its miscibility with the pure biodiesel. Alcohols also improve physico-chemical properties of biodiesel blends, which lead to improved combustion efficiency. Proper volatility of fuels is critical to the operation of internal combustion engines with respect to both performance and emissions. Volatility may be characterised by various measurements, the most common of which are vapour pressure, distillation and the vapour/liquid ratio. The presence of ethanol or other oxygenates may affect these properties and, as a result, performance and emissions, as well. However, in the case of diesel-biodiesel-alcohols mixtures, the variance of component volatility makes difficult the analysis of the overall volatility. Thus, the paper presents an experimental method of distilling diesel-biodiesel-alcohols mixtures by adjusting the boiler pressure of an i-Fischer Dist equipment.

  6. Glycerin purification using asymmetric nano-structured ceramic membranes from production of waste fish oil biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghami, M.; Sadrameli, S. M.; Shamloo, M.

    2018-02-01

    Biodiesel is an environmental friendly alternative liquid transportation fuel that can be used in diesel engines without major modifications. The scope of this research work is to produce biodiesel from waste fish oil and its purification from the byproducts using a ceramic membrane. Transesterification of waste fish oil was applied for the biodiesel production using methanol in the presence of KOH as a catalyst. Effect of catalyst weight percent, temperature and methanol to oil molar ratio (MR) on the biodiesel yield have been studied and the results show that highest methyl ester yield of 79.2% has been obtained at 60 °C, MR: 6 and 1% KOH. The produced biodiesel purified by a ceramic membrane. Membrane flux and glycerin removal at different operating conditions such as temperature, trans-membrane pressures and cross flow velocities have been measured. Glycerin purity by membrane method is 99.97% by weight at the optimum condition. The highest membrane flux occurred at 50 °C temperature, 1 bar pressure and 3 m/s velocity.

  7. Biodiesel production from marine cyanobacteria cultured in plate and tubular photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, B Karpanai; Revathi, M; Piriya, P Sobana; Vasan, P Thirumalai; Prabhu, D Immuanual Gilwax; Vennison, S John

    2013-03-01

    Carbon (neutral) based renewable liquid biofuels are alternative to petroleum derived transport fuels that contribute to global warming and are of a limited availability. Microalgae based biofuels are considered as promising source of energy. Lyngbya sp. and Synechococcus sp. were studied for the possibility of biodiesel production in different media such as ASNIII, sea water enrichment medium and BG11. The sea water enrichment medium was found superior in enhancing the growth rate of these microalgae. Nitrogen depletion has less effect in total chlorophyll a content, at the same time the lipid content was increased in both Lyngbya sp. and Synechococcus sp. by 1.4 and 1.2 % respectively. Increase in salinity from 0.5-1.0 M also showed an increase in the lipid content to 2.0 and 0.8 % in these strains; but a salinity of 1.5 M has a total inhibitory effect in the growth. The total biomass yield was comparatively higher in tubular LED photobioreactor than the fluorescent flat plated photobioreactor. Lipid extraction was obtained maximum at 60 degrees C in 1:10 sample: solvent ratio. GC-MS analysis of biodiesel showed high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; 4.86 %) than saturated fatty acid (SFA; 4.10 %). Biodiesel production was found maximum in Synechococcus sp. than Lyngbya sp. The viscosity of the biodiesel was closely related to conventional diesel. The results strongly suggest that marine microalgae could be used as a renewable energy source for biodiesel production.

  8. Social and techno-economical analysis of biodiesel production in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres Quintero, Julian; Ruth Felix, Erika; Eduardo Rincón, Luis; Crisspín, Marianella; Fernandez Baca, Jaime; Khwaja, Yasmeen; Cardona, Carlos Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Peru has introduced a law to promote the use of biofuels with the objective to increase employment, strengthening agriculture development, providing an economic alternative to illegal drug production. In this work, the costs of biodiesel production from oil palm and Jatropha were analyzed under different scenarios. They include the participation of associations of smallholders and commercial producers as raw material provides in biodiesel business in Peru. The scenarios considered have a strong social dimension in which they explicitly consider how productions' costs change when smallholders supply a proportion of the feedstock to the industry. Production cost profiles were generated using the chemical process simulation and economical evaluation software packages provided by Aspen Technology. Total production cost found for oil palm biodiesel production ranged between 0.23 and 0.31 USD/L and Jatropha biodiesel production costs were between 0.84 and 0.87 USD/L. These production costs were analyzed and compared to biodiesel ex-factory prices and diesel fuel production cost factors. The results suggest that including smallholders in the supply chain can be under some conditions competitive with liquid biofuel production systems that are purely large scale. - Highlights: ► We design and simulate biodiesel production schemes based on oil palm and Jatropha. ► Scenarios consider smallholders and commercial producers combinations. ► Inclusion of by-product selling allows a reduction of 30% in total biodiesel production cost. ► Major inclusion of smallholders requires a strong government policy to improve their technical production conditions.

  9. Newly Generated Liquid Waste Processing Alternatives Study, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, William Henry; Bates, Steven Odum; Bonnema, Bruce Edward; Palmer, Stanley Leland; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Walsh, Stephanie

    2002-09-01

    This report identifies and evaluates three options for treating newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The three options are: (a) treat the waste using processing facilities designed for treating sodium-bearing waste, (b) treat the waste using subcontractor-supplied mobile systems, or (c) treat the waste using a special facility designed and constructed for that purpose. In studying these options, engineers concluded that the best approach is to store the newly generated liquid waste until a sodium-bearing waste treatment facility is available and then to co-process the stored inventory of the newly generated waste with the sodium-bearing waste. After the sodium-bearing waste facility completes its mission, two paths are available. The newly generated liquid waste could be treated using the subcontractor-supplied system or the sodium-bearing waste facility or a portion of it. The final decision depends on the design of the sodium-bearing waste treatment facility, which will be completed in coming years.

  10. Biodiesel in British Columbia : feasibility study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, M.; Murray-Hill, A.; Schaddelee, K. [Wise Energy Co-op, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2004-05-05

    This report evaluates the potential for biodiesel as a viable fuel in British Columbia. Biodiesel is a non-toxic, biodegradable, renewable fuel produced from recycled bio-oils that can be used to replace conventional petroleum diesel. The report also examines potential feedstock characteristics, output volumes and environmental impacts. Production of biodiesel is increasing globally due to its economic, human and environmental health benefits. Canada's Climate Change Action Plan target of 500 million litres of biodiesel production per year by 2010 will also contribute to biodiesel growth. The use of pure biodiesel as an alternative fuel results in reduced emissions of carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, methane, unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. British Columbia's biodiesel feedstock volumes yield a total theoretical capacity of 125 million litres per year of biodiesel, or 4.5 per cent of the province's total annual diesel consumption The feedstock is enough to fuel over 3,700 transit buses annually and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This report outlines the activities needed to establish commercial biodiesel companies in the province. It also examines standards and regulatory issues; technology availability; cost and processing analysis; potential markets and distribution channels; and environmental impact comparisons. The 4 critical factors that will determine the success or failure of a commercial biodiesel project include: the ability to balance feedstock supplies, processing technology, and market penetration in an integrated system that is reliable and efficient; the ability to form stable strategic alliances with feedstock suppliers, distributors and end users; the ability to deal effectively with competitive pressures; and, the ability to generate a business plan that will attract financing. It was concluded that community-based biodiesel production at a plant scale

  11. Sustainable Future for Biodiesel in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Maria Amélia de Paula

    This thesis aims to study alternatives to biodiesel industry in Brazil, for 2030, taking in account the sustainability dimensions, namely economic, environmental, ecological, social, national and international politics, territorial, cultural, and technological, through the development of scenarios...... for agriculture and pasture. Thus, a simulation, using linear programming models, was made in order to verify the alternatives of feedstock to produce biodiesel. It was observed that it is possible to decentralize the market, reduce land use, and regionalize production, making better use of the availability...... to identify the driving forces to develop the scenario storylines. This proposition was tested in an in-depth interview with the biodiesel market stakeholders. Based on the findings of the two approaches, the simulations and the interviews, it was possible to obtain future alternatives, where the biodiesel...

  12. Studies Highlight Biodiesel's Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    , Colo., July 6, 1998 — Two new studies highlight the benefits of biodiesel in reducing overall air Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted both studies: An Overview of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Life Cycles and Biodiesel Research Progress, 1992-1997. Biodiesel is a renewable diesel

  13. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareg, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for confining molten metal. It comprises: containment means having an open side; a magnet capable of generating a mainly horizontal alternating magnetic field. The the magnet is located adjacent to the open side of the containment means whereby the field generated by the magnet is capable of inducing eddy currents in a thin layer at the surface of the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field producing a force that can contain the molten metal within the containment means; wherein the magnet includes: magnetic poles located adjacent to the open side of the confinement means; a core connecting the poles; a coil encircling the core, the coil capable of being responsive to a current source; whereby an alternating magnetic field can be generated between the poles and parallel to the open side of the containment means so that a molten metal can be confined within the confinement means

  14. On the potential of absorption and reactive adsorption for desulfurization of ultra low-sulfur commercial diesel in the liquid phase in the presence of fuel additive and bio-diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieterse, J.A.Z.; Van Eijk, S.; Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    Sorption of sulfur components in the liquid phase was used to desulfurize ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) to below 1 ppmw S. Several concepts of sorption were considered by using both physisorption and chemisorption materials and conditions. Adsorption assisted by reaction with Ni sorbent was found to be most successful. Using a pre-commercial diesel representing a mature diesel on all aspects except for the absence of fuel stabilizers and bio-diesel, a sulfur breakthrough capacity of 2 mg S/g could be achieved using a Ni-sorbent at an acceptable LHSV of 0.7 h{sup -1} on average. However, successive experiments indicated that the desulfurization capacity depended strongly on the presence of fuel-additive and bio-diesel in commercial ULSD. The presence of the cetane improver 2-ethylhexylnitrate (2EHN) was shown to decrease the sulfur capacity by roughly 50%. The presence of bio-diesel (fatty acid methyl ester, abbreviated to FAME) was shown to completely disable the desulfurization process. This was confirmed by comparing BP Ultimate diesel with FAME (obtained in 2008) and without FAME (obtained in 2006). From this evaluation it turned out that the targeted breakthrough capacity of 1 mg S/g sorbent was within reach for commercial ULSD until late 2006 when adding bio-diesel to ULSD became common practice in Europe. Several attempts to remove the additives prior to desulfurization by using copper loaded zeolites, active carbon and silica gel proved unsuccessful to bring the sulfur adsorption capacity for current diesel to the level observed for 2EHN and FAME-free diesel. It is concluded that sorption in the liquid phase does not yet represent a viable desulfurization technology for ultra-low sulfur diesel.

  15. Montana BioDiesel Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Brent [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2017-01-29

    This initiative funding helped put Montana State University (MSU) in a position to help lead in the development of biodiesel production strategies. Recent shortages in electrical power and rising gasoline prices have focused much attention on the development of alternative energy sources that will end our dependence on fossil fuels. In addition, as the concern for environmental impact of utilizing fossil fuels increases, effective strategies must be implemented to reduce emissions or the increased regulations imposed on fossil fuel production will cause economic barriers for their use to continue to increase. Biodiesel has been repeatedly promoted as a more environmentally sound and renewable source of fuel and may prove to be a highly viable solution to provide, at the least, a proportion of our energy needs. Currently there are both practical and economic barriers to the implementation of alternative energy however the advent of these technologies is inevitable. Since many of the same strategies for the storage, transport, and utilization of biodiesel are common with that of fossil fuels, the practical barriers for biodiesel are comparatively minimal. Strategies were developed to harness the CO2 as feedstock to support the growth of biodiesel producing algae. The initiative funding led to the successful funding of highly rated projects in competitive national grant programs in the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. This funding put MSU in a key position to develop technologies to utilize the CO2 rich emissions produced in fossil fuel utilization and assembled world experts concerning the growth characteristics of photosynthetic microorganisms capable of producing biodiesel.

  16. Prediction of cold flow properties of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Saxena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel being environmentally friendly is fast gaining acceptance in the market as an alternate diesel fuel. But compared to petroleum diesel it has certain limitations and thus it requires further development on economic viability and improvement in its properties to use it as a commercial fuel. The cold flow properties play a major role in the usage of biodiesel commercially as it freezes at cold climatic conditions. In the present study, cold flow properties of various types of biodiesel were estimated by using correlations available in literature. The correlations were evaluated based on the deviation between the predicted value and experimental values of cold flow properties.

  17. Innovative Canadian Process Technology For Biodiesel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johar, Sangat; Norton, Kevin

    2010-09-15

    The need for increasing renewable and alternative energy in the global energy mix has been well recognized by Governments and major scientific forums to reduce climate change impact for this living planet. Biodiesel has very high potential for GHG emission reduction. An innovative process developed in Canada provides solution to mitigate the feedstock, yield and quality issues impacting the industry. The Biox process uses a continuous process which reduces reaction times, provides > 99% yield of high quality biodiesel product. The process is feedstock flexible and can use cheaper higher FFA feedstock providing a sustainable approach for biodiesel production.

  18. Liquid clay emulsion--alternate daily cover and erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martell, L. [L/M Chemical Service, Ancona, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Formula 480 Biodegradable Clay Based Product, developed in 1985, is a non-toxic liquid bentonite clay product that comes in concentrate form for dilution with water and/or leachate. The concentrate allows this product y to be used for erosion and dust control, grass seeding, as well as a daily or intermediate cover for landfills. It inhibits the activities of birds and vectors, while controlling dust, erosion, odor, and blowing debris. By varying the dilution of Formula 480, the product can be set up from porous and flexible, to durable and waterproof. Having a clay base, high cation exchange capacity offers nutrient stabilization for grass seeding. When using leachate for product dilution, it will percolate, waterproof, and be recycled back into the surface as a solid. The product is economical at $.03 to $.08/sq.ft., depending on thickness of application, smoothness of surface or compaction ratio. Application is done with a self-contained sprayer developed specifically for Formula 480. It can be sprayed with a high volume handgun or an economical and efficient spray boom. This product is cleared for use in over 15 states and is currently being used on hazardous and non-hazardous fills throughout the U.S. and Germany. Ease of application, economy, and effectiveness warrants people to look at this product for many uses.

  19. 76 FR 67287 - Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; Alternative Fueled Vehicle Credit Program (Subpart F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... additional credits for the use of biodiesel in blends of 20 percent biodiesel or greater and have provided an... discussion in Part II.A), the original program based upon AFV acquisitions and biodiesel use became known as... example, B20 (a 20 percent blend of biodiesel with 80 percent petroleum diesel) is not an alternative fuel...

  20. Price Comovement Between Biodiesel and Natural Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Janda, Karel; Kourilek, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    We study relationship between biodiesel, as a most important biofuel in the EU, relevant feedstock commodities and fossil fuels. Our main interest is to capture relationship between biodiesel and natural gas. They are both used either directly as a fuel or indirectly in form of additives in transport. Therefore, our purpose is to �nd price linkage between biofuel and natural gas to support or reject the claim that they compete as alternative fuels and potential substitutes. The estimated p...

  1. Isothermal calorimetry on enzymatic biodiesel production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk, Lene

    2008-01-01

    information about effects taking place when using lipases immobilized on an inert carrier for transesterification of a triglyceride and an alcohol as for biodiesel production. The biodiesel is produced by rapeseed oil and methanol as well as ethanol and a commercial biocatalyst Novozym 435 from Novozymes...... containing a Candida Antarctica B lipase immobilized on an acrylic resin. The reaction investigated is characterized by immiscible liquids (oil, methanol, glycerol and biodiesel) and enzymes imm. on an inert carrier during reaction, which allows several effects to take place that during normal reaction...... conditions can not be elucidated. These effects have been observed with isothermal calorimetry bringing forth new information about the reaction of enzymes catalyzing transesterification. Enzymatic biodiesel production has until now not been investigated with isothermal microcalorimetry, but the results...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Transportation Data for Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    /2018 Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions updated 4/9/2018 Data Download Fueling Stations 706 stations in Virginia with alternative fuels Fuel Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 1 9 Compressed unit sold per GGE per unit sold per GGE Biodiesel (B20) $2.47/gallon $2.25/GGE $2.84/gallon $2.58/GGE

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Transportation Data for Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    stations in Missouri with alternative fuels Fuel Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 1 2 Compressed Students Get Hands-On Training With Biodiesel Missouri High School Students Get Hands-On Training With Biodiesel Feb. 5, 2016 https://youtube.com/embed/p4pVRgoWyZw Video thumbnail for AT&T Fleet Reaches

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Transportation Data for Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel-Blended Diesel Documentation Requirement Data Download Fueling Stations 149 stations in Maine with alternative fuels Fuel Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 2 1 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 0 2 Electric ://www.youtube.com/embed/jHftlruFR40 Video thumbnail for Maine's Only Biodiesel Manufacturer Powers Fleets in the

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: James Madison University Teaches Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative Fuels Sept. 16, 2017 Photo of a truck Phoenix Utility Fleet Drives Smarter with Biodiesel Aug. 26 Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Rhode Island July 14, 2017 Photo of a truck Idaho Transports Mail Home Runs on Biodiesel in North Carolina June 9, 2017 Photo of a bus New Hampshire Cleans up with

  6. Progress and recent trends in biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    Fossil fuel resources are decreasing daily. Biodiesel fuels are attracting increasing attention worldwide as blending components or direct replacements for diesel fuel in vehicle engines. Biodiesel fuel typically comprises lower alkyl fatty acid (chain length C 14 -C 22 ), esters of short-chain alcohols, primarily, methanol or ethanol. Various methods have been reported for the production of biodiesel from vegetable oil, such as direct use and blending, microemulsification, pyrolysis, and transesterification. Among these, transesterification is an attractive and widely accepted technique. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. The most important variables affecting methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil and the reaction temperature. Methanol is the commonly used alcohol in this process, due in part to its low cost. Methyl esters of vegetable oils have several outstanding advantages over other new-renewable and clean engine fuel alternatives. Biodiesel fuel is a renewable substitute fuel for petroleum diesel or petrodiesel fuel made from vegetable or animal fats; it can be used in any mixture with petrodiesel fuel, as it has very similar characteristics, but it has lower exhaust emissions. Biodiesel fuel has better properties than petrodiesel fuel; it is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future; it has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly fuel that can be used in any diesel engine without modification

  7. Biodiesel production by transesterification using immobilized lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Reena

    2013-04-01

    Biodiesel can be produced by transesterification of vegetable or waste oil catalysed by lipases. Biodiesel is an alternative energy source to conventional fuel. It combines environmental friendliness with biodegradability, low toxicity and renewability. Biodiesel transesterification reactions can be broadly classified into two categories: chemical and enzymatic. The production of biodiesel using the enzymatic route eliminates the reactions catalysed under acid or alkali conditions by yielding product of very high purity. The modification of lipases can improve their stability, activity and tolerance to alcohol. The cost of lipases and the relatively slower reaction rate remain the major obstacles for enzymatic production of biodiesel. However, this problem can be solved by immobilizing the enzyme on a suitable matrix or support, which increases the chances of re-usability. The main factors affecting biodiesel production are composition of fatty acids, catalyst, solvents, molar ratio of alcohol and oil, temperature, water content, type of alcohol and reactor configuration. Optimization of these parameters is necessary to reduce the cost of biodiesel production.

  8. 16 CFR 309.15 - Posting of non-liquid alternative vehicle fuel rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... rating. (a) If you are a retailer who offers for sale or sells non-liquid alternative vehicle fuel (other... fuel. If you are a retailer who offers for sale or sells electricity to consumers through an electric... vehicle fuel dispensing system, either by letter or on the delivery ticket or other paper, or by a...

  9. Study of alternative methods for the management of liquid scintillation counting wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche-Farmer, L.

    1980-02-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Waste Disposal Site in Richland, Washington, is the only radioactive waste disposal facility that will accept liquid scintillation counting wastes (LSCW) for disposal. That site is scheduled to discontinue receiving LSCW by the end of 1982. This document explores alternatives presently available for management of LSCW: evaporation, distillation, solidification, conversion, and combustion

  10. Experimental study on methanol recovery through flashing vaporation in continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cunwen; Chen Wen; Wang Weiguo; Wu Yuanxin; Chi Ruan; Tang Zhengjiao

    2011-01-01

    To improve the oil conversion, high methanol/oil molar ratio is required in the continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol transesterification in tubular reactor. And thus the subsequent excess methanol recovery needs high energy consumption. Based on the feature of high temperature and high pressure in supercritical methanol transesterification, excess methanol recovery in reaction system by flashing vaporation is conducted and the effect of reaction temperature, reaction pressure and flashing pressure on methanol recovery and methanol concentration in gas phase is discussed in detail in this article. Results show that at the reaction pressure of 9-15 MPa and the reaction temperature of 240-300 o C, flashing pressure has significant influence on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase, which can be effectively improved by reducing flashing pressure. At the same time, reaction temperature and reaction pressure also have an important effect on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase. At volume flow of biodiesel and methanol 1:2, tubular reactor pressure 15 MPa, tubular reactor temperature 300 o C and the flashing pressure 0.4 MPa, methanol recovery is more than 85% and methanol concentration of gas phase (mass fraction) is close to 99% after adiabatic braising; therefore, the condensate liquid of gas phase can be injected directly into methanol feedstock tank to be recycled. Research abstracts: Biodiesel is an important alternative energy, and supercritical methanol transesterification is a new and green technology to prepare biodiesel with some obvious advantages. But it also exists some problems: high reaction temperature, high reaction pressure and large molar ratio of methanol/oil will cause large energy consumption which restricts supercritical methanol for the industrial application of biodiesel. So a set of tubular reactor-coupled flashing apparatus is established for continuous preparing biodiesel in supercritical

  11. History and policy of biodiesel in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pousa, Gabriella P.A.G.; Santos, Andre L.F.; Suarez, Paulo A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, during petroleum shortage, vegetable oils and their derivatives have been proposed as alternatives to petroleum diesel fuel. Since 1930, different approaches have been proposed by Brazilian's universities and research institutes, including the use of neat vegetable oils (pure or in blends) or their derivatives, such as hydrocarbons obtained by thermal-catalytic cracking and fatty acids' methyl or ethyl esters (nowadays known as 'biodiesel') produced by alcoholysis. Recently, the external dependence on imported diesel fuel and the present petroleum crisis have increased the discussion in Brazil in the sense of starting to use alternatives to diesel fuel, biodiesel being the main alternative for a large petroleum diesel substitution program

  12. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of extracts of diesel and biodiesel exhaust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractContext: Biodiesel and biodiesel-blend fuels offer a renewable alternative to petroleum diesel, but few data are available concerning the carcinogenic potential of biodiesel exhausts. Objectives: We compared the formation of covalent DNA adducts by the in vitro metabol...

  13. Biodiesel From waste cooking oil for heating, lighting, or running diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico O. Cruz

    2009-01-01

    Biodiesel and its byproducts and blends can be used as alternative fuel in diesel engines and for heating, cooking, and lighting. A simple process of biodiesel production can utilize waste cooking oil as the main feedstock to the transesterification and cruzesterification processes. I currently make my own biodiesel for applications related to my nursery and greenhouse...

  14. Fischer–tropsch diesel production and evaluation as alternative automotive fuel in pilot-scale integrated biomass-to-liquid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Doo; Yang, Chang-Won; Kim, Beom-Jong; Moon, Ji-Hong; Jeong, Jae-Yong; Jeong, Soo-Hwa; Lee, See-Hoon; Kim, Jae-Ho; Seo, Myung-Won; Lee, Sang-Bong; Kim, Jae-Kon; Lee, Uen-Do

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A pilot scale biomass-to-liquid (BTL) process was investigated for Fischer-Tropsch diesel production. • 200 kW_t_h dual fluidized bed gasifier was integrated with 1 bbl/day F-T synthesis reactor. • Purified syngas satisfies minimum requirements of F-T synthesis. • F-T diesel produced successfully (1 L/h) and satisfies the automotive fuel standard. • Fully integrated BTL system was operated successfully more than 500 h. - Abstract: Fischer–Tropsch (F-T) diesel produced from biomass through gasification is a promising alternative fuel. In this study, a biomass-to-liquid (BTL) system involving a dual fluidized bed gasifier (DFBG), a methanol absorption tower, and an F-T synthesis process was investigated for producing clean biodiesel as an automotive fuel. A DFBG, which is an efficient indirect gasifier, can produce syngas with high caloric value while minimizing the amount of nitrogen in the product gas. In order to meet the strict requirements of syngas for F-T synthesis, any contaminants in the syngas must be minimized and its composition must be carefully controlled. In this work, the syngas mainly comprised 35 vol% of H_2 and 21.3 vol% of CO. The concentrations of H_2S and COS in the syngas were less than 1 ppmV owing to the use of chilled methanol cleaning process. Furthermore, long-term operation of a fully integrated BTL system was successfully conducted for over 500 h. The results showed that the BTL diesel can be used as an alternative automotive diesel fuel.

  15. Blending Biodiesel in Fishing Boat Fuels for Improved Fuel Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel is a renewable, clean, alternative energy source with advantages, such as excellent lubricity, superior biodegradability, and high combustion efficiency. Biodiesel is considered for mixing with fishing boat fuels to adjust their fuel characteristics so that toxic pollutants and greenhouse-effect gas emissions from such shipping might be reduced. The effects of blending fishing boat fuels A and B with various weight proportions of biodiesel are experimentally investigated in this study. The results show that biodiesel blending can significantly improve the inferior fuel properties of both fishing boat fuels and particularly fuel B. The flash points of both of these fuels increases significantly with the addition of biodiesel and thus enhances the safety of transporting and storing these blended fuels. The flash point of fishing boat fuel B even increases by 16% if 25 wt.% biodiesel is blended. The blending of biodiesel with no sulfur content is found to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the high sulfur content of fishing boat fuel, resulting in a reduction in the emission of sulfur oxides. The addition of only 25 wt.% biodiesel decreased the sulfur content of the fishing boat fuel by 37%. The high kinematic viscosity of fishing boat fuel B was also observed to be reduced by 63% with the blending of just 25 wt.% biodiesel. However, biodiesel blending caused a slight decrease in heating value around 1–4.5%.

  16. Blending Biodiesel in Fishing Boat Fuels for Improved Fuel Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan, E-mail: lin7108@ntou.edu.tw [Department of Marine Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24

    Biodiesel is a renewable, clean, alternative energy source with advantages, such as excellent lubricity, superior biodegradability, and high combustion efficiency. Biodiesel is considered for mixing with fishing boat fuels to adjust their fuel characteristics so that toxic pollutants and greenhouse-effect gas emissions from such shipping might be reduced. The effects of blending fishing boat fuels A and B with various weight proportions of biodiesel are experimentally investigated in this study. The results show that biodiesel blending can significantly improve the inferior fuel properties of both fishing boat fuels and particularly fuel B. The flash points of both of these fuels increases significantly with the addition of biodiesel and thus enhances the safety of transporting and storing these blended fuels. The flash point of fishing boat fuel B even increases by 16% if 25 wt.% biodiesel is blended. The blending of biodiesel with no sulfur content is found to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the high sulfur content of fishing boat fuel, resulting in a reduction in the emission of sulfur oxides. The addition of only 25 wt.% biodiesel decreased the sulfur content of the fishing boat fuel by 37%. The high kinematic viscosity of fishing boat fuel B was also observed to be reduced by 63% with the blending of just 25 wt.% biodiesel. However, biodiesel blending caused a slight decrease in heating value around 1–4.5%.

  17. Accelerated oxidation processes is biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canakci, M.; Monyem, A.; Van Gerpen, J.

    1999-12-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that can be produced from renewable feedstocks such as vegetable oil and animal fats. These feedstocks are reacted with an alcohol to produce alkyl monoesters that can be used in conventional diesel engines with little or no modification. Biodiesel, especially if produced from highly unsaturated oils, oxidizes more rapidly than diesel fuel. This article reports the results of experiments to track the chemical and physical changes that occur in biodiesel as it oxidizes. These results show the impact of time, oxygen flow rate, temperature, metals, and feedstock type on the rate of oxidation. Blending with diesel fuel and the addition of antioxidants are explored also. The data indicate that without antioxidants, biodiesel will oxidize very quickly at temperatures typical of diesel engines. This oxidation results in increases in peroxide value, acid value, and viscosity. While the peroxide value generally reaches a plateau of about 350 meq/kg ester, the acid value and viscosity increase monotonically as oxidation proceeds.

  18. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lumley, T.C.; Landriault, M.; Doe, K.; Jackman, P.

    2007-01-01

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  19. Degradation of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and fluoroelastomers in rapeseed biodiesel and hydrogenated vegetable oil

    OpenAIRE

    Akhlaghi, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) are currently viewed by the transportation sector as the most viable alternative fuels to replace petroleum-based fuels. The use of biodiesel has, however, been limited by the deteriorative effect of biodiesel on rubber parts in automobile fuel systems. This work therefore aimed at investigating the degradation of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and fluoroelastomers (FKM) on exposure to biodiesel and HVO at different temperatures and oxygen ...

  20. Environmental impacts the of production and use of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Snežana; Veljković, Milan

    2018-01-01

    Biodiesel as renewable, environmental friendly, less toxic, and biodegradable is an attractive alternative to fossil fuels and is produced mainly from vegetable oils and animal fats. It is expected, globally, that the use of renewable biofuels, in general, will increase rapidly in the near future. The growing biodiesel production and usage have encouraged assessment of its impact on the environment. The present paper reviews various aspects of biodiesel production using commercial processing technology and biodiesel use through evaluation and analysis of the studies concerning environmental impacts of biodiesel. As a general conclusion, it can be said that biodiesel has the potential to offer a series of perceived benefits such as political, economical, and agricultural, as well as environmental (due to its biodegradability, less toxicity, renewability) and health (greenhouse gas-saving, less harmful exhaust emissions).

  1. Properties of various plants and animals feedstocks for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Aninidita; Karmakar, Subrata; Mukherjee, Souti

    2010-10-01

    As an alternative fuel biodiesel is becoming increasingly important due to diminishing petroleum reserves and adverse environmental consequences of exhaust gases from petroleum-fuelled engines. Biodiesel, the non-toxic fuel, is mono alkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from renewable feedstock like vegetable oils, animal fats and residual oils. Choice of feedstocks depends on process chemistry, physical and chemical characteristics of virgin or used oils and economy of the process. Extensive research information is available on transesterification, the production technology and process optimization for various biomaterials. Consistent supply of feedstocks is being faced as a major challenge by the biodiesel production industry. This paper reviews physico-chemical properties of the plant and animal resources that are being used as feedstocks for biodiesel production. Efforts have also been made to review the potential resources that can be transformed into biodiesel successfully for meeting the ever increasing demand of biodiesel production. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biodiesel production with special emphasis on lipase-catalyzed transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisen, Prakash S; Sanodiya, Bhagwan S; Thakur, Gulab S; Baghel, Rakesh K; Prasad, G B K S

    2010-08-01

    The production of biodiesel by transesterification employing acid or base catalyst has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. Downstream processing costs and environmental problems associated with biodiesel production and byproducts recovery have led to the search for alternative production methods. Recently, enzymatic transesterification involving lipases has attracted attention for biodiesel production as it produces high purity product and enables easy separation from the byproduct, glycerol. The use of immobilized lipases and immobilized whole cells may lower the overall cost, while presenting less downstream processing problems, to biodiesel production. The present review gives an overview on biodiesel production technology and analyzes the factors/methods of enzymatic approach reported in the literature and also suggests suitable method on the basis of evidence for industrial production of biodiesel.

  3. Water Consumption Estimates of the Biodiesel Process in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a renewable alternative to petroleum diesel, biodiesel has been widely used in the US and around the world. Along with the rapid development of the biodiesel industry, its potential impact on water resources should also be evaluated. This study investigates water consumption f...

  4. Biodiesel: A fuel, a lubricant, and a solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is well-known as a biogenic alternative to conventional diesel fuel derived from petroleum. It is produced from feedstocks such as plant oils consisting largely of triacylglycerols through transesterification with an alcohol such as methanol. The properties of biodiesel are largely compet...

  5. Thermophysical properties of biodiesel and related systems. Part I. Vapour–liquid equilibrium at low pressures of binary and ternary systems involving methanol, ethanol, glycerol, water and NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veneral, Josamaique G.; Benazzi, Tassio; Mazutti, Marcio A.; Voll, Fernando A.P.; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Corazza, Marcos L.; Guirardello, Reginaldo; Vladimir Oliveira, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Experimental vapour–liquid equilibrium data of multicomponent mixtures of biodiesel-related systems. ► Othmer-type ebulliometer in the pressure range of 6.7 to 66.7 kPa. ► Experimental data satisfactorily represented by the UNIQUAC model. -- Abstract: Experimental vapour–liquid equilibrium data of several binary mixtures (methanol + glycerol), (ethanol + glycerol) and (glycerol + water) and ternary (methanol + glycerol + water), (ethanol + glycerol + water) and (water + glycerol + NaCl) were obtained over the pressure range of 6.7 kPa to 66.7 kPa through an Othmer-type ebulliometer, allowing the construction of temperature – mass fraction and pressure – temperature diagrams. It is shown that the systems without NaCl were satisfactorily represented by the UNIQUAC model with good agreement between theory and experimental results. It was observed that alcohol concentrations lower than 10 wt% increase the phase transition temperature. The systems investigated show positive deviations in relation to Raoult’s law. Results presented in this work may be relevant in process design towards efficient recovering of components in the biodiesel down-stream processes

  6. Biodiesel production from waste frying oils and its quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabudak, T; Yildiz, M

    2010-05-01

    The use of biodiesel as fuel from alternative sources has increased considerably over recent years, affording numerous environmental benefits. Biodiesel an alternative fuel for diesel engines is produced from renewable sources such as vegetable oils or animal fats. However, the high costs implicated in marketing biodiesel constitute a major obstacle. To this regard therefore, the use of waste frying oils (WFO) should produce a marked reduction in the cost of biodiesel due to the ready availability of WFO at a relatively low price. In the present study waste frying oils collected from several McDonald's restaurants in Istanbul, were used to produce biodiesel. Biodiesel from WFO was prepared by means of three different transesterification processes: a one-step base-catalyzed, a two-step base-catalyzed and a two-step acid-catalyzed transesterification followed by base transesterification. No detailed previous studies providing information for a two-step acid-catalyzed transesterification followed by a base (CH(3)ONa) transesterification are present in literature. Each reaction was allowed to take place with and without tetrahydrofuran added as a co-solvent. Following production, three different procedures; washing with distilled water, dry wash with magnesol and using ion-exchange resin were applied to purify biodiesel and the best outcome determined. The biodiesel obtained to verify compliance with the European Standard 14214 (EN 14214), which also corresponds to Turkish Biodiesel Standards. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Current Status of Biodiesel Production Technology: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal Alamsyah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is addressed to the name of fuel which consist of mono-alkyl ester that made from renewable and biodegradable resources, such as oils from plants (vegetable oils, waste or used cooking oil, and animal fats. Such oils or fats are chemically reacted with alcohols or methanol In producing chernical compounds called fatty acid methyl ester (FAME and these reactions are called transesterification and esterification. Glycerol, used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry is produced from biodiesel production as a by-product. Researches on biodiesel as an alternative petroleum diesel have been done for more than 20 years. Transesterification reaction can be acid-catalyzed, alkali-catatyzed, or enzyme-catalyzed. Commercially biodiesel is processed by transesterification with alkali catalyst. This process, however, requires refining of products and recovery of catalysts, Such biodiesel production accelerates researches on biodiesel to obtain simpler methods, better quality. and minimum production cost. Besides the catalytic production for biodiesel, there is a method for biodiesel production namely non-catalytic production. Non-catalytic transesterification method was developed since catalytic tranestertfification still has two main problems assoclated With long reaction time and complicated purification. The first problem occurres because of the two phase nature of vegetable oil/methanol mixture, and the last problem is due to purification of catalyst and glycerol. The application of catalytic tranestertfication method leads to condition of high biodiesel production cost and high energy consumption. This paper provides information of biodiesel production progress namely catalytic tranestertfification (acid, alkali, and enzymatic tranesterfification, and non-catalytic tranesterification (at sub-critical­-supercritical temperature under pressurized conditions. It was found that every method of biodiesel production still has advantages and

  8. Production and application of biodiesel from waste cooking oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuly, S. S.; Saha, M.; Mustafi, N. N.; Sarker, M. R. I.

    2017-06-01

    Biodiesel has been identified as an alternative and promising fuel source to reduce the dependency on conventional fossil fuel in particular diesel. In this work, waste cooking oil (WCO) of restaurants is considered to produce biodiesel. A well-established transesterification reaction by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) catalytic and supercritical methanol (CH3OH) methods are applied to obtain biodiesel. In the catalytic transesterification process, biodiesel and glycerine are simultaneously produced. The impact of temperature, methanol/WCO molar ratio and sodium hydroxide concentration on the biodiesel formation were analysed and presented. It was found that the optimum 95% of biodiesel was obtained when methanol/WCO molar ratio was 1:6 under 873 K temperature with the presence of 0.2% NaOH as a catalyst. The waste cooking oil blend proportions were 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% and named as bio-diesel blends B-10, B-15, B-20, and B-25, respectively. Quality of biodiesel was examined according to ASTM 6751: biodiesel standards and testing methods. Important fuel properties of biodiesel, such as heating value, cetane index, viscosity, and others were also investigated. A four-stroke single cylinder naturally aspirated DI diesel engine was operated using in both pure form and as a diesel blend to evaluate the combustion and emission characteristics of biodiesel. Engine performance is examined by measuring brake specific fuel consumption and fuel conversion efficiency. The emission of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and others were measured. It was measured that the amount of CO2 increases and CO decreases both for pure diesel and biodiesel blends with increasing engine load. However, for same load, a higher emission of CO2 from biodiesel blends was recorded than pure diesel.

  9. Two novel approaches used to produce biodiesel from low-cost feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, X.; Chen, F. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition; Wang, X. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Biochemistry

    2010-07-01

    The cost of feedstock has a significant effect of the economic viability of biodiesel production. The paper discussed a preliminary study looking at 2 approaches used to economically produce biodiesel, one from waste cooking oil (WCO) and the other from flaked cottonseed. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis was used to produce biodiesel from WCO, and in situ transesterification was used to produce biodiesel from the flaked cottonseed. The use of WCO solves the problem of waste disposal and also generates an environmentally benign fuel while at the same time lowering the costs involved in producing biodiesel. Ultrasonification has proven to be an efficient, low-cost, energy saving means of producing biodiesel. In situ transesterification makes solvent extraction and oil cleanup prior to biodiesel synthesis unnecessary, thereby simplifying the reaction steps. Based on the results of gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography tests, both approaches are feasible for the production of biodiesel from low-cost feedstock. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Microalgae as feedstock for biodiesel production under ultrasound treatment - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Ramachandran; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2018-02-01

    The application of ultrasound in biodiesel production has recently emerged as a novel technology. Ultrasound treatment enhances the mass transfer characteristics leading to the increased reaction rate with short reaction time and potentially reduces the production cost. In this review, application of ultrasound-assisted biodiesel production using acid, base and enzyme catalysts is presented. A critical assessment of the current status of ultrasound in biodiesel production was discussed with the emphasis on using ultrasound for efficient microalgae biodiesel production. The ultrasound in the biodiesel production enhances the emulsification of immiscible liquid reactant by microturbulence generated by cavitation bubbles. The major benefit of the ultrasound-assisted biodiesel production is a reduction in reaction time. Several different methods have been discussed to improve the biodiesel production. Overall, this review focuses on the current understanding of the application of ultrasound in biodiesel production from microalgae and to provide insights into future developments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Transportation Data for

    Science.gov (United States)

    to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles Recent Additions and Updates Biodiesel Blend Mandate Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 1 4 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 8 3 Electric 59 4 Ethanol (E85 GGE Biodiesel (B20) $2.60/gallon $2.37/GGE $2.84/gallon $2.58/GGE Biodiesel (B99-B100) $2.49/gallon

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Transportation Data for

    Science.gov (United States)

    stations in Washington with alternative fuels Fuel Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 8 33 Compressed Partnerships Spark Biodiesel Success for Essential Baking Company Partnerships Spark Biodiesel Success for Videos on YouTube Video thumbnail for Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks Seattle Bakery

  13. Comparison of chromatographic methods for the determination of bound glycerol in biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foglia, T.A.; Jones, K.C.; Nunez, A.; Phillips, J.G. [U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmoor, PA (United States); Mittelbach, M. [Inst. for Chemistry, Univ. of Graz, Graz (Austria)

    2004-09-01

    An important fuel criterion for biodiesel is bound glycerol, which is a function of the residual amount of triglycerides and partial glycerides in the biodiesel. Either high-temperature gas chromatography or high performance liquid chromatography can be used for determining these minor but important components in biodiesel. In this paper we have conducted a statistical study on the accuracy of the two methods for ascertaining the bound glycerol in biodiesel fuels obtained from different feedstocks. Analysis of variance showed that with one exception, namely diacylglycerols in some soy oil based biodiesel, there was no statistical difference in bound glycerol for the biodiesel samples analyzed or a difference between methods. Operationally, the high performance liquid chromatographic method is superior to the high temperature gas chromatographic method in that it requires no sample derivatization, has shorter analysis times, and is directly applicable to most biodiesel fuels. (orig.)

  14. Physico-chemical characterization of biodiesel from pests attacked corn oil; Caracterizacao fisico-quimica do biodiesel de oleo de milho danificado por pragas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fabia M.; Correa, Paulo C.; Martins, Marcio A.; Santos, Silmara B.; Damian, Amanda D. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil)], Emails: copace@ufv.br, aredes@ufv.br, syllmara@vicosa.ufv.br

    2009-07-01

    The biodiesel is a renewable energy source alternative to fossil fuels. The biodiesel synthesis can be made by many types of triglycerides transesterification, it is possible to use this biofuel in vehicles if it has the quality required from Agencia Nacional de Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP). Searching an application for pests attacked corn, there is feasibility technical for the biodiesel production from this corn oil. The biodiesel synthesis was made through ethyl transesterification process with alkaline catalyst using ethanol. The biodiesel physical-chemical characterization was performed using ANP methods. (author)

  15. Calophyllum inophyllum L. as a future feedstock for bio-diesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atabania, A.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Khartoum (Sudan)], email: a_atabani2@msn.com, email: ardinsu@yahoo.co.id; Silitonga, A.S.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Masjukia, H.H.; Badruddin, I.A. [University of Malaya (Malaysia)

    2011-07-01

    Due to the energy crisis and the concerns about climate change, the possibility of using biodiesel as an alternative energy resource has been examined. It has been found that biodiesel could be a solution for the future but the first generation of biodiesel, prepared from edible vegetable oils, has raised important concerns about food and environmental problems. The aim of this study is to assess if Calophyllum inophyllum, a non-edible oil, could be used for biodiesel production. Density, kinematic viscosity, cetane number, flashpoint and iodine value were determined on Calophyllum inophyllum trees from Cilacap, Indonesia and compared in light of ASTM D6751 biodiesel standards. It was found that Calophyllum inophyllum would be a satisfactory feedstock to produce biodiesel in the future. This study demonstrated that Calophyllum inophyllum has the potential to be a biodiesel feedstock and further research should be carried out on engine performance, combustion and emission performance of biodiesel produced from Calophyllum inophyllum.

  16. Corrosion mechanism of copper in palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, M.A.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of copper in biodiesel increases with the increase of immersion time. ► The corrosion patina is found to be composed of CuO, Cu 2 O, CuCO 3 and Cu(OH) 2 . ► Green CuCO 3 was found as the major corrosion product. ► The mechanisms governing corrosion of copper in palm biodiesel are discussed. - Abstract: Biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel. However, it causes enhanced corrosion of automotive materials, especially of copper based components. In the present study, corrosion mechanism of copper was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Compositional change of biodiesel due to the exposure of copper was also investigated. Corrosion patina on copper is found to be composed of Cu 2 O, CuO, Cu(OH) 2 and CuCO 3. Dissolved O 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 and RCOO − radical in biodiesel seem to be the leading factors in enhancing the corrosiveness of biodiesel.

  17. BiodieselFAO: An Integrated Decision Support System for Investment Analysis in the Biodiesel Production Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Galvão da Silva Júnior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the short and medium terms, biofuels are the most viable alternative to reduce the environmental impact of fossil fuels. The recent controversy over the competition between biofuels and food production increases the complexity of investment decisions in the biodiesel production chain. In this context, decision support tools are highly relevant. The purpose of this article is to describe the BiodieselFAO using the Unified Modeling Language (UML. An integrated analysis considering both agricultural and industrial sectors was identified as a key requirement to the system. Therefore, farmers and industry are the main actors in the use case diagram. As the raw material represents around 70% of the industrial cost of biodiesel production, the price negotiation of raw material (oilseeds is the central use case. Configuration, agriculture, industry, results and scenarios are the modules, which encompass the functionalities derived from the UML diagrams. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO has made the BiodieselFAO available, free of charge, to around 180 professionals from 17 Latin American countries. Additionally, the developing team has supported the usage of the BiodieselFAO in several biodiesel investment analyses throughout Latin America. The system was also useful in the design and analysis of policy related to biodiesel industry in Brazil.

  18. Calorific value for compositions with biodiesel of fat chicken and diesel oil; Valor calorifico para composicoes com biodiesel da gordura de frango e oleo diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcelo Jose da [Universidade de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola], email: marcelo.jose@feagri.unicamp.br; Souza, Samuel N.M. de; Souza, Abel A. de; Martins, Gislaine I. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (CCET/UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas], emails: ssouza@unioeste.br, abel.sza@hotmail.com, iastiaque@yahoo.com.br

    2011-07-01

    The biodiesel fuel is a renewable source of alternative fuel used in diesel cycle engines. The production of biodiesel involves the reaction of methanol with fatty acids of animal or vegetable. The production of biodiesel from chicken fat can be very attractive for some regions from Brazil with high poultry production, as in the Parana West and Santa Catarina West. In this study , the goal was the lower calorific value of the compositions between biodiesel and diesel oil: 100% Diesel oil (B0), 20% biodiesel (B20), 40% biodiesel (B40), 60% biodiesel (B60), 80% biodiesel (B80 ), 100% biodiesel (B100). The biodiesel used was acquired in the Centre for Development and Diffusion of technologies on the Assis Gurgacz College, in Cascavel city. The nominal production capacity of the unit is 900 liters on period of 8 hours. The model of the calorimeter used, was the E2K. The lower calorific value of B100 composition was 35.388 MJ kg-1 and the diesel oil was 41.299 MJ kg-1. With the measuring of the caloric value of six samples mix of diesel oil and biodiesel, was obtained a linear function decrease of the calorific value when increased it the proportion of biodiesel from chicken fat into fuel. (author)

  19. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the

  20. Impact of ternary blends of biodiesel on diesel engine performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Pongamia and waste cooking oils are the main non edible oils for biodiesel production in India. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the fuel properties and investigate the impact on engine performance using Pongamia and waste cooking biodiesel and their ternary blend with diesel. The investigation of the fuel properties shows that Pongamia biodiesel and waste cooking biodiesel have poor cold flow property. This will lead to starting problem in the engine operation. To overcome this problem the ternary blends of diesel, waste cooking biodiesel and Pongamia biodiesel are prepared. The cloud and pour point for ternary blend, (WCB20:PB20:D60 were found to be 7 °C and 6.5 °C which are comparable to cloud and pour point of diesel 6 °C and 5 °C, respectively. The result of the test showed that brake specific fuel consumption for Pongamia biodiesel and waste cooking biodiesel is higher than ternary blend, (WCB20:PB20:D60 due to their lower energy content. The brake thermal efficiency of ternary blend and diesel is comparable while the Pongamia and waste cooking biodiesel have low efficiency. The result of investigation showed that ternary blend can be developed as alternate fuel.

  1. The economics of producing biodiesel from algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Brian J. [Ecotonics Environmental Scientists, 1801 Century Park East, Suite 2400, Los Angeles, CA 90067 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for conventional diesel that is made from natural plant oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils. This paper discusses the economics of producing biodiesel fuel from algae grown in open ponds. There is potential for large-scale production of biodiesel from algal farms on non-arable land; however, previous studies have failed to demonstrate an economically viable process that could be scalable to a commercialized industry. The problems include inconsistent and insufficient algal productivities, uncertain capital and operating costs, volatile market prices and unknown levels of government support. Although intensive work is being done on many technological issues, the economic studies and data are incomplete and out of date. This paper presents an updated financial analysis of the production and economic conditions that could have a profound effect on the success of this important alternative fuel production process. (author)

  2. The economics of producing biodiesel from algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for conventional diesel that is made from natural plant oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils. This paper discusses the economics of producing biodiesel fuel from algae grown in open ponds. There is potential for large-scale production of biodiesel from algal farms on non-arable land; however, previous studies have failed to demonstrate an economically viable process that could be scalable to a commercialized industry. The problems include inconsistent and insufficient algal productivities, uncertain capital and operating costs, volatile market prices and unknown levels of government support. Although intensive work is being done on many technological issues, the economic studies and data are incomplete and out of date. This paper presents an updated financial analysis of the production and economic conditions that could have a profound effect on the success of this important alternative fuel production process. (author)

  3. Particulate emissions from biodiesel fuelled CI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Avinash Kumar; Gupta, Tarun; Shukla, Pravesh C.; Dhar, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Physical and chemical characterization of biodiesel particulates. • Toxicity of biodiesel particulate due to EC/OC, PAHs and BTEX. • Trace metals and unregulated emissions from biodiesel fuelled diesel engines. • Influence of aftertreatment devices and injection strategy on biodiesel particulates. • Characterization of biodiesel particulate size-number distribution. - Abstract: Compression ignition (CI) engines are the most popular prime-movers for transportation sector as well as for stationary applications. Petroleum reserves are rapidly and continuously depleting at an alarming pace and there is an urgent need to find alternative energy resources to control both, the global warming and the air pollution, which is primarily attributed to combustion of fossil fuels. In last couple of decades, biodiesel has emerged as the most important alternative fuel candidate to mineral diesel. Numerous experimental investigations have confirmed that biodiesel results in improved engine performance, lower emissions, particularly lower particulate mass emissions vis-à-vis mineral diesel and is therefore relatively more environment friendly fuel, being renewable in nature. Environmental and health effects of particulates are not simply dependent on the particulate mass emissions but these change depending upon varying physical and chemical characteristics of particulates. Particulate characteristics are dependent on largely unpredictable interactions between engine technology, after-treatment technology, engine operating conditions as well as fuel and lubricating oil properties. This review paper presents an exhaustive summary of literature on the effect of biodiesel and its blends on exhaust particulate’s physical characteristics (such as particulate mass, particle number-size distribution, particle surface area-size distribution, surface morphology) and chemical characteristics (such as elemental and organic carbon content, speciation of polyaromatic

  4. A Comprehensive Review of Effect of Biodiesel Additives on Properties, Performance, and Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiwale, S.; Karthikeyan, A.; Bhojwani, V.

    2017-05-01

    Objectives:- To presents the literature review on effect of biodiesel additives on properties, performance and on emission. Method:-In the current paper reviews are taken from previous years paper which necessitates the need of addition of additives in the blends of biodiesel and studied the its effect on properties, performance and emissions. Emissions from the diesel powered vehicles mostly damaged the earth’s environment and also increased the overall earth’s temperature. This attracts the need of alternative fuels in the field of transportation sector. Past inventions and research showed that Biodiesel can be used as an alternative fuel for the diesel engine. Biodiesel have good combustion characteristics because of their long chain hydrocarbon structure. However biodiesel possesses few disadvantages such as lower heating value, higher flow ability, much high density and not able to flow at low temperature. Higher rate of fuel consumption is identified and higher level of NOx emissions when biodiesel used in an engine as an alternative fuels. Findings:-Different additives such as antioxidants, improvers for cetane number, cold flow properties improver, etc were investigated by the many researcher and scientists and added in the different feedstock of biodiesel or blends of biodiesel with diesel in different proportions. Directly or indirectly fuel additives can improve the reduction in the emissions, improve the fuel economy, and reduce the dependency of the one’s nation on other. Performances of biodiesel vehicles were drastically improved because of additioninthe blends of biodiesel with diesel fuel in specific percentages to meet the international emission standards. Addition of additives in the biodiesel or in the blends of biodiesel basically changes the high temperature and low temperature flow properties of blends of biodiesel. Current paper finds and compares properties of different additives and its effect on blends of biodiesel properties

  5. Cottonseed oil for biodiesel production; Oleo de algodao para a producao de biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pighinelli, Anna L.M.T.; Park, Kil J. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)], E-mail: annalets@feagri.unicamp.br; Ferrari, Roseli A; Miguel, Ana M.R.O. [Instituto de Tecnologia de Alimentos (ITAL), Campinas, SP (Brazil)], Emails: roseliferrari@ital.sp.gov.br, anarauen@ital.sp.gov.br, kil@feagri.unicamp.br

    2009-07-01

    Crude cottonseed oil is an alternative for biodiesel production, mostly in Mato Grosso State, where its production is the biggest of Brazil. Even being an acid oil, esterification reaction, followed by transesterification, could make possible the biodiesel production. In this study, crude cottonseed oil obtained from expelled process was reacted to evaluate molar ration and catalyst concentration effects in biodiesel yield. Molar ratio varied from 3 to 15 moles of ethanol to 1 mol of oil, and catalyst, from 1 to 5% by oil mass. Statistic analysis showed that none of studied variables was significant, for the values range. Biodiesel yield had a maximum of 88%, for molar ratio of 4.7 and 4.42% of catalyst concentration. A combination of oil with high free fatty acid content and ethanol as alcohol, affected the separation between esters and glycerol. (author)

  6. The effect of economic variables over a biodiesel production plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, J.M., E-mail: jmarchetti@plapiqui.edu.ar [Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica (UNS-CONICET), Camino La Carrindanga km 7, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Influence of the mayor economic parameters for biodiesel production. {yields} Variations of profitability of a biodiesel plant due to changes in the market scenarios. {yields} Comparison of economic indicators of a biodiesel production facility when market variables are modified. - Abstract: Biodiesel appears as one of the possible alternative renewable fuels to substitute diesel fuel derived from petroleum. Several researches have been done on the technical aspects of biodiesel production in an attempt to develop a better and cleaner alternative to the conventional process. Economic studies have been carried out to have a better understanding of the high costs and benefits of different technologies in the biodiesel industry. In this work it is studied the effect of the most important economic variables of a biodiesel production process over the general economy of a conventional plant which employs sodium methoxide as catalyst. It has been analyzed the effect of the oil price, the amount of free fatty acid, the biodiesel price, the cost of the glycerin, the effect due to the modification on the methanol price, the washing water price, and several others. Small variations on some of the major market variables would produce significant effects over the global economy of the plant, making it non profitable in some cases.

  7. The effect of economic variables over a biodiesel production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Influence of the mayor economic parameters for biodiesel production. → Variations of profitability of a biodiesel plant due to changes in the market scenarios. → Comparison of economic indicators of a biodiesel production facility when market variables are modified. - Abstract: Biodiesel appears as one of the possible alternative renewable fuels to substitute diesel fuel derived from petroleum. Several researches have been done on the technical aspects of biodiesel production in an attempt to develop a better and cleaner alternative to the conventional process. Economic studies have been carried out to have a better understanding of the high costs and benefits of different technologies in the biodiesel industry. In this work it is studied the effect of the most important economic variables of a biodiesel production process over the general economy of a conventional plant which employs sodium methoxide as catalyst. It has been analyzed the effect of the oil price, the amount of free fatty acid, the biodiesel price, the cost of the glycerin, the effect due to the modification on the methanol price, the washing water price, and several others. Small variations on some of the major market variables would produce significant effects over the global economy of the plant, making it non profitable in some cases.

  8. Biodiesel Test Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Biodiesel Test Plan Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release; distribution is unlimited. July 2014 Report No. CG-D-07-14...Appendix C) Biodiesel Test Plan ii UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 R&DC | G. W. Johnson, et al. Public | July 2014 N O T I C E This...Development Center 1 Chelsea Street New London, CT 06320 Biodiesel Test Plan iii UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 R&DC | G. W. Johnson, et al

  9. Green engineering: Green composite material, biodiesel from waste coffee grounds, and polyurethane bio-foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang-Fu

    In this thesis we developed several ways of producing green materials and energy resources. First, we developed a method to fabricate natural fibers composites, with the purpose to develop green textile/woven composites that could potentially serve as an alternative to materials derived from non-renewable sources. Flax and hemp fabrics were chosen because of their lightweight and exceptional mechanical properties. To make these textile/woven composites withstand moist environments, a commercially available marine resin was utilized as a matrix. The tensile, three-point bending, and edgewise compression strengths of these green textile/woven composites were measured using ASTM protocols. Secondly, we developed a chemical procedure to obtain oil from waste coffee grounds; we did leaching and liquid extractions to get liquid oil from the solid coffee. This coffee oil was used to produce bio-diesel that could be used as a substitute for petroleum-based diesel. Finally, polyurethane Bio-foam formation utilized glycerol that is the by-product from the biodiesel synthesis. A chemical synthesis procedure from the literature was used as the reference system: a triol and isocynate are mixed to produce polyurethane foam. Moreover, we use a similar triol, a by-product from bio-diesel synthesis, to reproduce polyurethane foam.

  10. Biodiesel at TRANSPETRO; Biodiesel na TRANSPETRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Antonio Carlos C. da; Machado, Tupinamba da Conceicao S. [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    TRANSPETRO took the challenge, in early 2007, to design and install in less than one year, the systems of injection of Biodiesel in its Distribution Bases with loading truck. The basics premises, adopted for the development of the project, were based on the criteria of safety, operational reliability and to complying with legal deadline. These points guided the actions of Coordinating with two goals: Ensure the injection of Biodiesel according to time by law and the future flexibility of the system. Two to three sets were installed in each Distribution Base, respecting the characteristics of the market and the distance from centers producers of Biodiesel. TRANSPETRO was one of the first companies in Brazil using cutting-edge technology in injection of this product through the use of digital valves in the control of flow of the product. Sum up the storage capacity of Biodiesel the first and second phase of the project, TRANSPETRO will provide 8 to 10 days' stock of Biodiesel to its customers based on the injection of 5% to Diesel Oil. The Project Biodiesel at TRANSPETRO was differentiated by working in teams, the strategy for deployment and the modular aspect with focus on future demand. (author)

  11. Greening Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography Methods Using Alternative Solvents for Pharmaceutical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Yabré

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The greening of analytical methods has gained increasing interest in the field of pharmaceutical analysis to reduce environmental impacts and improve the health safety of analysts. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC is the most widely used analytical technique involved in pharmaceutical drug development and manufacturing, such as the quality control of bulk drugs and pharmaceutical formulations, as well as the analysis of drugs in biological samples. However, RP-HPLC methods commonly use large amounts of organic solvents and generate high quantities of waste to be disposed, leading to some issues in terms of ecological impact and operator safety. In this context, greening HPLC methods is becoming highly desirable. One strategy to reduce the impact of hazardous solvents is to replace classically used organic solvents (i.e., acetonitrile and methanol with greener ones. So far, ethanol has been the most often used alternative organic solvent. Others strategies have followed, such as the use of totally aqueous mobile phases, micellar liquid chromatography, and ionic liquids. These approaches have been well developed, as they do not require equipment investments and are rather economical. This review describes and critically discusses the recent advances in greening RP-HPLC methods dedicated to pharmaceutical analysis based on the use of alternative solvents.

  12. Biodiesel production via non-catalytic SCF method and biodiesel fuel characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    Vegetable oil (m)ethyl esters, commonly referred to as 'biodiesel,' are prominent candidates as alternative Diesel fuels. Biodiesel is technically competitive with or offers technical advantages compared to conventional petroleum Diesel fuel. The vegetable oils, as alternative engine fuels, are all extremely viscous with viscosities ranging from 10 to 20 times greater than that of petroleum Diesel fuel. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. Transesterifications of vegetable oils in supercritical methanol are performed without using any catalyst. The most important variables affecting the methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil and the reaction temperature. Biodiesel has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. The cost of biodiesel, however, is the main obstacle to commercialization of the product. With cooking oils used as raw material, the viability of a continuous transesterification process and recovery of high quality glycerol as a biodiesel by product are primary options to be considered to lower the cost of biodiesel. Supercritical methanol has a high potential for both transesterification of triglycerides and methyl esterification of free fatty acids to methyl esters for a Diesel fuel substitute. In the supercritical methanol transesterification method, the yield of conversion increases to 95% in 10 min. The viscosity values of vegetable oils are between 27.2 and 53.6 mm 2 /s, whereas those of vegetable oil methyl esters are between 3.59 and 4.63 mm 2 /s. The flash point values of vegetable oil methyl esters are much lower than those of vegetable oils. An increase in density from 860 to 885 kg/m 3 for vegetable oil methyl esters or biodiesels increases the viscosity from 3.59 to 4.63 mm 2 /s. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly fuel that can be used in any Diesel engine without modification

  13. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Technologies for monitoring interstitial liquids in single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Jenkins, C.E.

    1996-02-01

    A global search of mature, emerging, and conceptual tank liquid monitoring technologies, along with a historical review of Hanford tank farm waste monitoring instrumentation, was conducted to identify methods for gauging the quantity of interstitial waste liquids contained in Hanford SSTs. Upon completion of the search, an initial screening of alternatives was conducted to identify candidates which might be capable of monitoring interstitial tank liquids. The nine candidate technologies that were selected, evaluated, and ranked are summarized. Hydrostatic tank gauging (HTG) is the technology generally recommended for gauging the quantity of process materials contained in Hanford SSTs. HTG is a mass-based technique that has the capability for continuous remote monitoring. HTG has the advantages of no moving parts, intrinsic safety, and potentially gauging a one-million gal tank with a precision of approximately ±500 pounds (i.e., ±62 gal of water or ±0.02 in. of level in a 75 ft diameter tank). HTG is relatively inexpensive and probe design, construction, testing, installation, and operation should be straightforward. HTG should be configured as part of a hybrid tank gauging system. A hybrid system employs two or more independent measurement systems which function in concert to provide redundancy, improved accuracy, and maximum information at minimum cost. An excellent hybrid system choice for monitoring interstitial liquids in SSTs might be the combination of HTG with thermal differential technology

  14. Liquid metals as alternative solution for the power exhaust of future fusion devices: status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, J W; Philipps, V; Sergienko, G; Terra, A; Unterberg, B; Wegener, T; De Temmerman, G; Van den Bekerom, D C M; Federici, G; Strohmayer, G

    2014-01-01

    Applying liquid metals as plasma facing components for fusion power-exhaust can potentially ameliorate lifetime issues as well as limitations to the maximum allowed surface heat loads by allowing for a more direct contact with the coolant. The material choice has so far been focused on lithium (Li), as it showed beneficial impact on plasma operation. Here materials such as tin (Sn), gallium (Ga) and aluminum (Al) are discussed as alternatives potentially allowing higher operating temperatures without strong evaporation. Power loads of up to 25 MW m −2 for a Sn/W component can be envisioned based on calculations and modeling. Reaching a higher operating temperature due to material re-deposition will be discussed. Liquids typically face stability issues due to j × B forces, potential pressure and magnetohydrodynamic driven instabilities. The capillary porous system is used for stabilization by a mesh (W and Mo) substrate and replenishment by means of capillary action. (paper)

  15. Adsorptive removal of dye using biochar derived from residual algae after in-situ transesterification: Alternate use of waste of biodiesel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Piyushi; Subramanian, K A; Dastidar, M G

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this present study was to utilize the residual biomass (DB) of Spirulina platensis algae, left after in-situ transesterification, for biochar preparation. This is a solid waste residue of biodiesel industry. The biochar (BC) prepared was examined for its capacity to adsorb congo red dye from the aqueous solution. The results were compared with other adsorbents used in the study such as commercial activated carbon (AC), original algae biomass (AB) and DB. The results of proximate analysis of BC showed the decrease in the percentage of volatile matter and an increase in fixed carbon content compared to DB. The physico-chemical properties of BC were studied using elemental analysis, SEM, FTIR and XRD techniques. The AC and BC adsorbents showed better performance in removing 85.4% and 82.6% of dye respectively from solution compared to AB (76.6%) and DB (78.1%). The effect of initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage and pH of solution on the adsorption phenomena was studied by conducting the batch adsorption experiments. The highest specific uptake for biochar was observed at acidic pH of 2 with 0.2 g/100 ml of adsorbent dosage and 90 mg/l of initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to three isotherms, namely Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin. Freundlich model proved to show the best suited results with value of correlation coefficient of 99.12%. Thus, the application of DB for production of biochar as potential adsorbent supports sustainability of algae biodiesel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodiesel Production Technology: August 2002--January 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gerpen, J.; Shanks,B.; Pruszko,R.; Clements, D.; Knothe, G.

    2004-07-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that is gaining attention in the United States after reaching a considerable level of success in Europe. The purpose of this book is to describe and explain the process and issues involved in producing this fuel.

  17. [FTIR detection of unregulated emissions from a diesel engine with biodiesel fuel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pi-qiang; Hu, Zhi-yuan; Lou, Di-ming

    2012-02-01

    Biodiesel, as one of the most promising alternative fuels, has received more attention because of limited fossil fuels. A comparison of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel is discussed as regards engine unregulated exhaust emissions. A diesel fuel, a pure biodiesel fuel, and fuel with 20% V/V biodiesel blend ratio were tested without engine modification The present study examines six typical unregulated emissions by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method: formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (C2 H4 O), acetone (C3 H6 O), toluene (C7 H8), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). The results show addition of biodiesel fuel increases the formaldehyde emission, and B20 fuel has little change, but the formaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel shows a clear trend of addition. Compared with the pure diesel fuel, the acetaldehyde of B20 fuel has a distinct decrease, and the acetaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel is lower than that of the pure diesel fuel at low and middle engine loads, but higher at high engine load. The acetone emission is very low, and increases for B20 and pure biodiesel fuels as compared to diesel fuel. Compared with the diesel fuel, the toluene and sulfur dioxide values of the engine show a distinct decrease with biodiesel blend ratio increasing. It is clear that the biodiesel could reduce aromatic compounds and emissions of diesel engines. The carbon dioxide emission of pure biodiesel has a little lower value than diesel, showing that the biodiesel benefits control of greenhouse gas.

  18. Combustion of biodiesel in a large-scale laboratory furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Caio; Wang, Gongliang; Costa, Mário

    2014-01-01

    Combustion tests in a large-scale laboratory furnace were carried out to assess the feasibility of using biodiesel as a fuel in industrial furnaces. For comparison purposes, petroleum-based diesel was also used as a fuel. Initially, the performance of the commercial air-assisted atomizer used in the combustion tests was scrutinized under non-reacting conditions. Subsequently, flue gas data, including PM (particulate matter), were obtained for various flame conditions to quantify the effects of the atomization quality and excess air on combustion performance. The combustion data was complemented with in-flame temperature measurements for two representative furnace operating conditions. The results reveal that (i) CO emissions from biodiesel and diesel combustion are rather similar and not affected by the atomization quality; (ii) NO x emissions increase slightly as spray quality improves for both liquid fuels, but NO x emissions from biodiesel combustion are always lower than those from diesel combustion; (iii) CO emissions decrease rapidly for both liquid fuels as the excess air level increases up to an O 2 concentration in the flue gas of 2%, beyond which they remain unchanged; (iv) NO x emissions increase with an increase in the excess air level for both liquid fuels; (v) the quality of the atomization has a significant impact on PM emissions, with the diesel combustion yielding significantly higher PM emissions than biodiesel combustion; and (vi) diesel combustion originates PM with elements such as Cr, Na, Ni and Pb, while biodiesel combustion produces PM with elements such as Ca, Mg and Fe. - Highlights: • CO emissions from biodiesel and diesel tested are similar. • NO x emissions from biodiesel tested are lower than those from diesel tested. • Diesel tested yields significantly higher PM (particulate matter) emissions than biodiesel tested. • Diesel tested originates PM with Cr, Na, Ni and Pb, while biodiesel tested produces PM with Ca, Mg and Fe

  19. Comparison between conventional and ultrasonic preparation of beef tallow biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Leonardo S.G. [Instituto de Quimica - Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario de Ondina, 40.170-280 - Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Assis, Julio C.R.; Santos, Iran T.V.; Guimaraes, Paulo R.B.; Pontes, Luiz A.M. [Universidade Salvador - UNIFACS - Departamento de Engenharia e Arquitetura, - Av. Cardeal da Silva 132, 40.220-141 - Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Mendonca, Daniel R. [Escola Politecnica - Universidade Federal da Bahia, Av. Aristides Novis 2, 40.210-630, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Teixeira, Josanaide S.R. [Instituto Federal de Educacao Ciencia e Tecnologica da Bahia - IFBAHIA - Rua Emidio de Morais S/N, 40.625-650, Salvador - BA (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    Tallow is biodiesel feedstock that, due to its highly centralized generation in slaughter/processing facilities and historically low prices, may have energetic, environmental, and economic advantages that could be exploited. Transesterification of fatty acids by means of ultrasonic energy has been used for biodiesel production from different vegetable oils. However, application of ultrasonic irradiation for biodiesel production from beef tallow has received little attention. In this work, the transesterification of beef tallow with methanol was performed in the presence of potassium hydroxide as a catalyst using ultrasound irradiation (400 W, 24 kHz). The reaction time, conversion and biodiesel quality were compared with that seen in conventional transesterification. The results indicated that the reaction conversion and biodiesel quality were similar; however, the use of ultrasonic irradiation decreased the reaction time, showing that this method may be a promising alternative to the conventional method. (author)

  20. Biodiesel production through hydrodynamic cavitation and performance testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Amit; Verma, Ashish; Kachhwaha, S.S.; Maji, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Delhi College of Engineering, Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents the details of development of a biodiesel production test rig based on hydrodynamic cavitation followed by results of experimental investigation carried out on a four cylinder, direct injection water cooled diesel engine operating on diesel and biodiesel blend of Citrullus colocyntis (Thumba) oil. The experiment covers a wide range of engine rpm. Results show that biodiesel of Thumba oil produced through hydrodynamic cavitation technique can be used as an alternative fuel with better performance and lower emissions compared to diesel. The most significant conclusions are that (1) Biodiesel production through hydrodynamic cavitation technique seems to be a simple, efficient, time saving, eco-friendly and industrially viable process. (2) 30% biodiesel blend of Thumba oil shows relatively higher brake power, brake thermal efficiency, reduced bsfc and smoke opacity with favourable p-{theta} diagram as compared to diesel. (author)

  1. Studies of Terminalia catappa L. oil: characterization and biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, I C F; de Carvalho, S H V; Solleti, J I; Ferreira de La Salles, W; Teixeira da Silva de La Salles, K; Meneghetti, S M P

    2008-09-01

    Since the biodiesel program has been started in Brazil, the investigation of alternative sources of triacylglycerides from species adapted at semi-arid lands became a very important task for Brazilian researchers. Thus we initiated studies with the fruits of the Terminalia catappa L (TC), popularly known in Brazil as "castanhola", evaluating selected properties and chemical composition of the oil, as well any potential application in biodiesel production. The oil was obtained from the kernels of the fruit, with yields around 49% (% mass). Also, its fatty acid composition was quite similar to that of conventional oils. The crude oil of the TC was transesterified, using a conventional catalyst and methanol to form biodiesel. The studied physicochemical properties of the TC biodiesel are in acceptable range for use as biodiesel in diesel engines.

  2. Use of Reactive Distillation for Biodiesel Production: A Literature Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dani Supardan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel has been shown to be the best substitute for fossil-based fuels to its environmental advantages and renewable resource availability. There is a great demand for the commercialization of biodiesel production, which in turn calls for a technically and economically reactor technology. The production of biodiesel in existing batch and continuous-flow processes requires excess alcohol, typically 100%, over the stoichiometric molar requirement in order to drive the chemical reaction to completion. In this study, a novel reactor system using a reactive distillation (RD technique was discussed for biodiesel production. RD is a chemical unit operation in which chemical reactions and separations occur simultaneously in one unit. It is an effective alternative to the classical combination of reactor and separation units especially when involving reversible or consecutive chemical reactions such as transesterication process in biodiesel production.

  3. Comparison between conventional and ultrasonic preparation of beef tallow biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Leonardo S.G.; Assis, Julio C.R.; Santos, Iran T.V.; Guimaraes, Paulo R.B.; Pontes, Luiz A.M.; Mendonca, Daniel R.; Teixeira, Josanaide S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Tallow is biodiesel feedstock that, due to its highly centralized generation in slaughter/processing facilities and historically low prices, may have energetic, environmental, and economic advantages that could be exploited. Transesterification of fatty acids by means of ultrasonic energy has been used for biodiesel production from different vegetable oils. However, application of ultrasonic irradiation for biodiesel production from beef tallow has received little attention. In this work, the transesterification of beef tallow with methanol was performed in the presence of potassium hydroxide as a catalyst using ultrasound irradiation (400 W, 24 kHz). The reaction time, conversion and biodiesel quality were compared with that seen in conventional transesterification. The results indicated that the reaction conversion and biodiesel quality were similar; however, the use of ultrasonic irradiation decreased the reaction time, showing that this method may be a promising alternative to the conventional method. (author)

  4. Production of Biodiesel from Vegetable Oil Using Microware Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kapilan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The petroleum oil supply crisis, the increase in demand and the price eruption have led to a search for an alternative fuel of bio-origin in India. Among the alternative fuels, biodiesel is considered as a sustainable renewable alternative fuel to fossil diesel. Non-edible jatropha oil has considerable potential for the production of biodiesel in India. The production of biodiesel from jatropha oil using a conventional heating method takes more than 1h. In this work, microwave irradiation has been used as a source of heat for the transesterification reaction. A domestic microwave oven was modified and used for microwave heating of the reactants. The time taken for biodiesel production using microwave irradiation was 1 min. The fuel property analysis shows that the properties of jatropha oil biodiesel satisfy the biodiesel standards, and are close to the fossil diesel standards. From this work, it is concluded that biodiesel can be produced from vegetable oil using microwave irradiation, with a significant reduction in production time.

  5. Technoeconomic analysis of an integrated microalgae photobioreactor, biodiesel and biogas production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harun, Razif; Davidson, Michael; Doyle, Mark; Gopiraj, Rajprathab; Danquah, Michael; Forde, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    As fossil fuel prices increase and environmental concerns gain prominence, the development of alternative fuels from biomass has become more important. Biodiesel produced from microalgae is becoming an attractive alternative to share the role of petroleum. Currently it appears that the production of microalgal biodiesel is not economically viable in current environment because it costs more than conventional fuels. Therefore, a new concept is introduced in this article as an option to reduce the total production cost of microalgal biodiesel. The integration of biodiesel production system with methane production via anaerobic digestion is proved in improving the economics and sustainability of overall biodiesel stages. Anaerobic digestion of microalgae produces methane and further be converted to generate electricity. The generated electricity can surrogate the consumption of energy that require in microalgal cultivation, dewatering, extraction and transesterification process. From theoretical calculations, the electricity generated from methane is able to power all of the biodiesel production stages and will substantially reduce the cost of biodiesel production (33% reduction). The carbon emissions of biodiesel production systems are also reduced by approximately 75% when utilizing biogas electricity compared to when the electricity is otherwise purchased from the Victorian grid. The overall findings from this study indicate that the approach of digesting microalgal waste to produce biogas will make the production of biodiesel from algae more viable by reducing the overall cost of production per unit of biodiesel and hence enable biodiesel to be more competitive with existing fuels. (author)

  6. Determinants of stakeholders' attitudes towards biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Hashim, Hasrizul; Mahadi, Zurina; Ibrahim, Maznah; Ismail, Khaidzir

    2017-01-01

    Concern about the inevitable depletion of global energy resources is rising and many countries are shifting their focus to renewable energy. Biodiesel is one promising energy source that has garnered much public attention in recent years. Many believe that this alternative source of energy will be able to sustain the need for increased energy security while at the same time being friendly to the environment. Public opinion, as well as proactive measures by key players in industry, may play a decisive role in steering the direction of biodiesel development throughout the world. Past studies have suggested that public acceptance of biofuels could be shaped by critical consideration of the risk-benefit perceptions of the product, in addition to the impact on the economy and environment. The purpose of this study was to identify the relevant factors influencing stakeholders' attitudes towards biodiesel derived from crops such as palm oil for vehicle use, as well as to analyse the interrelationships of these factors in an attitude model. A survey of 509 respondents, consisting of various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia, was undertaken. The results of the study have substantiated the premise that the most important direct predictor of attitude to biodiesel is the perceived benefits ( β  = 0.80, p  < 0.001). Attitude towards biodiesel also involves the interplay between other factors, such as engagement to biotechnology, trust of key players, attitude to technology, and perceived risk. Although perceived benefit has emerged as the main predictor of public support of biodiesel, the existence of other significant interactions among variables leads to the conclusion that public attitude towards biodiesel should be seen as a multi-faceted process and should be strongly considered prior to its commercialisation.

  7. Modelling and operation of reactors for enzymatic biodiesel production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony

    to the production of high fructose corn syrup, upgrading of fats and oils and biodiesel production to name a few. Despite these examples of industrial enzymatic applications, it is still not “clear cut” how to implement biocatalyst in industry and how best to optimize the processes. This is because the processing...... aspects of the enzyme with reaction/reactor engineering is performed. This strategy is applied to a case study of biodiesel production catalysed by a liquid enzyme formulation. The use of enzymes for biodiesel production is still in its infancy with non-optimized process designs. Furthermore is it unclear...

  8. Generation and characterization of diesel engine combustion emissions from petroleum diesel and soybean biodiesel fuels and application for inhalation exposure studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel made from the transesterification of plant- and anmal-derived oils is an important alternative fuel source for diesel engines. Although numerous studies have reported health effects associated with petroleum diesel emissions, information on biodiesel emissions are more ...

  9. Rapid biodiesel production using wet microalgae via microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahidin, Suzana; Idris, Ani; Shaleh, Sitti Raehanah Muhamad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Lipid was directly extracted from wet microalgae using microwave irradiation. • The microwave irradiation and water bath-assisted solvent extraction are applied. • Cell walls are significantly disrupted under microwave irradiation. • Highly disrupted cell walls led to higher biodiesel yield in microwave irradiation. • Microwave irradiation is a promising direct technique with high biodiesel yields. - Abstract: The major challenges for industrial commercialized biodiesel production from microalgae are the high cost of downstream processing such as dewatering and drying, utilization of large volumes of solvent and laborious extraction processes. In order to address these issues the microwave irradiation method was used to produce biodiesel directly from wet microalgae biomass. This alternative method of biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass is compared with the conventional water bath-assisted solvent extraction. The microwave irradiation extracted more lipids and high biodiesel conversion was obtained compared to the water bath-assisted extraction method due to the high cell disruption achieved and rapid transesterification. The total content of lipid extracted from microwave irradiation and water bath-assisted extraction were 38.31% and 23.01% respectively. The biodiesel produced using microwave irradiation was higher (86.41%) compared to the conventional method. Thus microwave irradiation is an attractive and promising technology to be used in the extraction and transesterification process for efficient biodiesel production

  10. Replacement of the cross-site transfer system liquid waste transport alternatives evaluation, Project W-058

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, D.V.; Epperson, E.M.

    1995-05-01

    This document examines high-/low-level radioactive liquid waste transport alternatives. Radioactive liquid waste will be transported from the 200 West Area to the 200 East Area and within the 200 East Areas for safe storage and disposal. The radioactive waste transport alternatives are the Aboveground Transport System (French LR-56 Cask System [3,800 L (1,000 gal)]), 19,000-L (5,000-gal) trailer tanker system, 75,700-L (20,000-gal) rail tanker system and Underground Transport System (buried pipe [unlimited transfer volume capability]). The evaluation focused on the following areas: initial project cost, operational cost, secondary waste generation, radiation exposure, and final decommissioning. The evaluation was based on the near term (1995 to 2005) estimated volume of 49.509 million L (13.063 million gal) and long term (1995 to 2028) estimated volume of 757.1 million L (200 million gal). The conclusion showed that the buried pipe (Underground Transport System) resulted in the lowest overall total cost for near and long term, the trailer container resulted in the highest total cost for near and long term, and the French truck was operationally impractical and cost prohibitive

  11. Valorization of crude glycerol from biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinović Sandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased production of biodiesel as an alternative fuel involves the simultaneous growth in production of crude glycerol as its main by-product. Therefore, the feasibility and sustainability of biodiesel production requires the effective utilization of crude glycerol. This review describes various uses of crude glycerol as a potential green solvent for chemical reactions, a starting raw material for chemical and biochemical conversions into value-added chemicals, a substrate or co-substrate in microbial fermentations for synthesis of valuable chemicals and production of biogas and biohydrogen as well as a feedstuff for animal feed. A special attention is paid to various uses of crude glycerol in biodiesel production. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45001

  12. Compatibility of elastomers in palm biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.; Siang, C.T.; Fazal, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-10-15

    In recent time, environmental awareness and concern over the rapid exhaustion of fossil fuels have led to an increased popularity of biodiesel as an alternative fuel for automobiles. However, there are concerns over enhanced degradation of automotive materials in biodiesel. The present study aims to investigate the impact of palm biodiesel on the degradation behavior of elastomers such as nitrile rubber (NBR), polychloroprene, and fluoro-viton A. Static immersion tests in B0 (diesel), B10 (10% biodiesel in diesel), B100 (biodiesel) were carried out at room temperature (25 C) and at 50 C for 500 h. At the end of immersion test, degradation behavior was investigated by measuring mass, volume, hardness as well as tensile strength and elongation. The exposed elastomer surface was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out to identify the chemical and structural changes. Results showed that the extent of degradation was higher for both polychloroprene and NBR while fluoro-viton exhibited good resistance to degradation and was least attacked. (author)

  13. Biodiesel production from various feedstocks and their effects on the fuel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canakci, M; Sanli, H

    2008-05-01

    Biodiesel, which is a new, renewable and biological origin alternative diesel fuel, has been receiving more attention all over the world due to the energy needs and environmental consciousness. Biodiesel is usually produced from food-grade vegetable oils using transesterification process. Using food-grade vegetable oils is not economically feasible since they are more expensive than diesel fuel. Therefore, it is said that the main obstacle for commercialization of biodiesel is its high cost. Waste cooking oils, restaurant greases, soapstocks and animal fats are potential feedstocks for biodiesel production to lower the cost of biodiesel. However, to produce fuel-grade biodiesel, the characteristics of feedstock are very important during the initial research and production stage since the fuel properties mainly depend on the feedstock properties. This review paper presents both biodiesel productions from various feedstocks and their effects on the fuel properties.

  14. Study on Emission and Performance of Diesel Engine Using Castor Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2014-01-01

    performance of diesel engine using the castor biodiesel and its blend with diesel from 0% to 40% by volume. The acid-based catalyzed transesterification system was used to produce castor biodiesel and the highest yield of 82.5% was obtained under the optimized condition. The FTIR spectrum of castor biodiesel indicates the presence of C=O and C–O functional groups, which is due to the ester compound in biodiesel. The smoke emission test revealed that B40 (biodiesel blend with 40% biodiesel and 60% diesel had the least black smoke compared to the conventional diesel. Diesel engine performance test indicated that the specific fuel consumption of biodiesel blend was increased sufficiently when the blending ratio was optimized. Thus, the reduction in exhaust emissions and reduction in brake-specific fuel consumption made the blends of caster seed oil (B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and could help in controlling air pollution.

  15. MODEL FOR THE CORRECTION OF THE SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF BIODIESEL FROM RESIDUAL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Aparecida Rosa da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a important fuel with economic benefits, social and environmental. The production cost of the biodiesel can be significantly lowered if the raw material is replaced by a alternative material as residual oil. In this study, the variation of specific gravity with temperature increase for diesel and biodiesel from residual oil obtained by homogeneous basic catalysis. All properties analyzed for biodiesel are within specification Brazil. The determination of the correction algorithm for the specific gravity function of temperature is also presented, and the slope of the line to diesel fuel, methylic biodiesel (BMR and ethylic biodiesel (BER from residual oil were respectively the values -0.7089, -0.7290 and -0.7277. This demonstrates the existence of difference of the model when compared chemically different fuels, like diesel and biodiesel from different sources, indicating the importance of determining the specific algorithm for the operations of conversion of volume to the reference temperature.

  16. Combustion, emission and engine performance characteristics of used cooking oil biodiesel - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enweremadu, C.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa); Rutto, H.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    As the environment degrades at an alarming rate, there have been steady calls by most governments following international energy policies for the use of biofuels. One of the biofuels whose use is rapidly expanding is biodiesel. One of the economical sources for biodiesel production which doubles in the reduction of liquid waste and the subsequent burden of sewage treatment is used cooking oil (UCO). However, the products formed during frying, such as free fatty acid and some polymerized triglycerides, can affect the transesterification reaction and the biodiesel properties. This paper attempts to collect and analyze published works mainly in scientific journals about the engine performance, combustion and emissions characteristics of UCO biodiesel on diesel engine. Overall, the engine performance of the UCO biodiesel and its blends was only marginally poorer compared to diesel. From the standpoint of emissions, NOx emissions were slightly higher while un-burnt hydrocarbon (UBHC) emissions were lower for UCO biodiesel when compares to diesel fuel. There were no noticeable differences between UCO biodiesel and fresh oil biodiesel as their engine performances, combustion and emissions characteristics bear a close resemblance. This is probably more closely related to the oxygenated nature of biodiesel which is almost constant for every biodiesel (biodiesel has some level of oxygen bound to its chemical structure) and also to its higher viscosity and lower calorific value, which have a major bearing on spray formation and initial combustion. (author)

  17. Alternative Fuel Fleet Vehicle Evaluations | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    delivery, transit, and freight vehicles. Although biodiesel is the most commonly used alternative fuel in Diesel and Biodiesel Renewable diesel is a conventional petroleum diesel substitute produced from alternative to conventional diesel and does not require any vehicle modifications. Biodiesel is an oxygenated

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Transportation Data for

    Science.gov (United States)

    Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 7 108 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 26 16 Electric 500 121 Ethanol (E85 CNG Installation a Boost Aug. 19, 2015 Video thumbnail for Biodiesel Offers an Easy Alternative for Fleets Biodiesel Offers an Easy Alternative for Fleets Aug. 18, 2015 Video thumbnail for Blue Skies

  19. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ∼34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry

  20. Study about the particularities of biodiesel in Brazil; Estudo sobre as particularidades do biodiesel no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcia Franca Ribeiro Fernandes dos [Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica (IBGE), Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Peixoto, Jose Antonio Assuncao; Souza, Cristina Gomes de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The environmental concern associated with the impending shortage of oil, which is pressing to raise the price of the barrel, has forced governments and society to seek alternatives that will replace the use of fossil fuels. The biodiesel, in particular, has been set up as an alternative energy by it of fuel come from renewable sources, and less polluting the environment. In this context, the objective of this article is to present some features of the production of biodiesel in Brazil, identifying the characteristics of the main oil used, as well as regional motivations for the use of biodiesel in Brazil. The methodology adopted in this study was exploratory in nature based on a literature search and documentary from a survey of information available in literature. The main results, the article points out that: unlike alcohol, which is in sugar cane their ideal raw material, biodiesel is still in a stage of intensive research and development in order to identify the most appropriate its oil production - with emphasis on soybean and castor bean, and the motivations for regional use of biodiesel are different for the Brazilian regions. The study aims to contribute to the discussion on the subject, emphasizing that technological research should be directed taking into consideration the conditions and needs of Brazil. (author)

  1. Biodiesel in Belgium. From rapeseed oil to used vegetable oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelkmans, L.

    1997-01-01

    There are two motives for the search for alternative motor fuels: reducing the growing pressure of traffic on environment, and looking for a replacement for petrol and diesel oil that are bound to be worn-out in a few decades. A promising alternative motor fuel is biodiesel. The author's institute is involved in its second biodiesel demonstration project. In the first project RME (rapeseed methyl ester) was used undiluted in five passenger cars for two years. There were no technical problems and a clear environmental advantage was noticed. However, the price remains a problem. The use of waste vegetable oils for the production of biodiesel could help to overcome this problem. Therefore, a second biodiesel demonstration project was started in which UVOME (used vegetable oil methyl ester) is used. The preliminary results show a great similarity with the RME results and no technical problems in real life use. 1 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  2. Sustainable and Intensified Design of a Biodiesel Production Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Ismail, Muhammad I.; Babi, Deenesh Kavi

    impact and maximum profitability is needed. In this work a computer-aided framework for process synthesis and process intensification is applied for sustainable production of biodiesel from pure/waste palm oil as the feedstock. This approach examines several biodiesel processing routes that were...... collected through available data and current technologies reported in the literature. Using this information, a generic superstructure of processing routes was created that described a network of configurations representing multiple designs for the production of biodiesel. Therefore, based on the currently...... of economic and environmental sustainability was identified. For the case of biodiesel production, the intensified process alternative turned out to be the most economical and more sustainable than other alternatives. The computer-aided methods and tools used in this work are: SustainPro (method and tool...

  3. Model study on transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel with methanol using solid base catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejun; Piao, Xianglan; Wang, Yujun; Zhu, Shenlin

    2010-03-25

    Modeling of the transesterification of vegetable oils to biodiesel using a solid base as a catalyst is very important because the mutual solubilities of oil and methanol will increase with the increasing biodiesel yield. The heterogeneous liquid-liquid-solid reaction system would become a liquid-solid system when the biodiesel reaches a certain content. In this work, we adopted a two-film theory and a steady state approximation assumption, then established a heterogeneous liquid-liquid-solid model in the first stage. After the diffusion coefficients on the liquid-liquid interface and the liquid-solid interface were calculated on the basis of the properties of the system, the theoretical value of biodiesel productivity changing with time was obtained. The predicted values were very near the experimental data, which indicated that the proposed models were suitable for the transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel when solid bases were used as catalysts. Meanwhile, the model indicated that the transesterification reaction was controlled by both mass transfer and reaction. The total resistance will decrease with the increase in biodiesel yield in the liquid-liquid-solid stage. The solid base catalyst exhibited an activation energy range of 9-20 kcal/mol, which was consistent with the reported activation energy range of homogeneous catalysts.

  4. Nanostructured liquid crystalline particles as an alternative delivery vehicle for plant agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiminti, Pavani P; Dong, Yao D; Sayer, Chad; Hay, Phillip; Rookes, James E; Boyd, Ben J; Cahill, David M

    2013-03-13

    Agrochemical spray formulations applied to plants are often mixed with surfactants that facilitate delivery of the active ingredient. However, surfactants cause phytotoxicity and off-target effects in the environment. We propose the use of nanostructured liquid crystalline particles (NLCP) as an alternative to surfactant-based agrochemical delivery. For this, we have compared the application of commercial surfactants, di (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate and alkyl dimethyl betaine, with NLCP made from phytantriol, at concentrations of 0.1%, 1% and 5% on the adaxial surface of leaves of four plant species Ttriticum aestivum (wheat), Zea mays (maize), Lupinus angustifolius (lupin), and Arabidopsis thaliana. In comparison with the application of surfactants there was less phytotoxicity on leaves of each species following treatment with NLCP. Following treatment of leaves with NLCP analysis of cuticular wax micromorphology revealed less wax solubilization in the monocot species. The results clearly show that there are advantages in the use of NLCP rather than surfactants for agrochemical delivery.

  5. Analysis of liquid medication dose errors made by patients and caregivers using alternative measuring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gyeong Suk; Lee, Yu Jeung

    2012-01-01

    Patients use several types of devices to measure liquid medication. Using a criterion ranging from a 10% to 40% variation from a target 5 mL for a teaspoon dose, previous studies have found that a considerable proportion of patients or caregivers make errors when dosing liquid medication with measuring devices. To determine the rate and magnitude of liquid medication dose errors that occur with patient/caregiver use of various measuring devices in a community pharmacy. Liquid medication measurements by patients or caregivers were observed in a convenience sample of community pharmacy patrons in Korea during a 2-week period in March 2011. Participants included all patients or caregivers (N = 300) who came to the pharmacy to buy over-the-counter liquid medication or to have a liquid medication prescription filled during the study period. The participants were instructed by an investigator who was also a pharmacist to select their preferred measuring devices from 6 alternatives (etched-calibration dosing cup, printed-calibration dosing cup, dosing spoon, syringe, dispensing bottle, or spoon with a bottle adapter) and measure a 5 mL dose of Coben (chlorpheniramine maleate/phenylephrine HCl, Daewoo Pharm. Co., Ltd) syrup using the device of their choice. The investigator used an ISOLAB graduated cylinder (Germany, blue grad, 10 mL) to measure the amount of syrup dispensed by the study participants. Participant characteristics were recorded including gender, age, education level, and relationship to the person for whom the medication was intended. Of the 300 participants, 257 (85.7%) were female; 286 (95.3%) had at least a high school education; and 282 (94.0%) were caregivers (parent or grandparent) for the patient. The mean (SD) measured dose was 4.949 (0.378) mL for the 300 participants. In analysis of variance of the 6 measuring devices, the greatest difference from the 5 mL target was a mean 5.552 mL for 17 subjects who used the regular (etched) dosing cup and 4

  6. Oil extraction from plant seeds for biodiesel production

    OpenAIRE

    Keneni, Yadessa Gonfa; Marchetti, Jorge Mario

    2017-01-01

    Energy is basic for development and its demand increases due to rapid population growth, urbanization and improved living standards. Fossil fuels will continue to dominate other sources of energy although it is non-renewable and harm global climate. Problems associated with fossil fuels have driven the search for alternative energy sources of which biodiesel is one option. Biodiesel is renewable, non-toxic, environmental-friendly and an economically feasible options to tackle the depleting fo...

  7. Process Simulation of enzymatic biodiesel production -at what cost can biodiesel be made with enzymes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Christensen, Knud Villy; Rong, Benguang

    as well as environmental impacts of the alternative process must be evaluated towards the conventional process. With process simulation tools, an evaluation will be carried out looking at what it will cost to produce biodiesel with enzymes. Different scenarios will be taken into account with variations...... in raw material prices, process designs and enzyme cost and performance....

  8. Sustainable Biocatalytic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güzel, Günduz

    As part of his PhD studies, Gündüz Güzel examined the thermodynamics of reactions involved in biocatalytic biodiesel production processes, with a specific focus on phase equilibria of reactive systems. He carried out the thermodynamic analyses of biocatalytic processes in terms of phase and chemi......As part of his PhD studies, Gündüz Güzel examined the thermodynamics of reactions involved in biocatalytic biodiesel production processes, with a specific focus on phase equilibria of reactive systems. He carried out the thermodynamic analyses of biocatalytic processes in terms of phase...... and chemical equilibria as part of his main sustainable biodiesel project. The transesterification reaction of vegetable oils or fats with an aliphatic alcohol – in most cases methanol or ethanol – yields biodiesel (long-chain fatty acid alkyl esters – FAAE) as the main product in the presence of alkaline...

  9. Microbial degradation of palm (Elaeis guineensis biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Lutz

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of biodegradation of palm-derived fatty methyl and ethyl esters (Elaeis guineensis biodiesel by a wild-type aerobic bacterial population was measured at 20 °C, as the rate of oxygen uptake by a manometric technique. The methyl and ethyl biodiesels were obtained by potassium-hydroxide catalysed transesterification of palm oil, respectively. The bacterial flora included the genera Bacillus, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Citrobacter and Enterobacter. The rate of oxygen uptake for palm biodiesel is similar to the quantity observed in the biodegradation of 1.0 mM solutions of simple substrates such as carbohydrates or amino acids.Palm methyl or ethyl biodiesel is subjected to facile aerobic biodegradation by wild-type bacteria commonly present in natural open environments. This result should lessen any environmental concern for its use as alternative fuel, solvent or lubricant. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(1: 59-63.Epub 2006 Mar 31.La cinética de la biodegradación de los ésteres metílicos y etílicos derivados de palma (biodiesel por una población silvestre de bacterias aeróbicas fue medida a 20 °C, como medición manométrica del consumo de oxígeno. Los ésteres metílicos y etílicos se obtuvieron por transesterificación del aceite de palma con metanol y etanol,respectivamente. La flora bacteriana incluyó a los géneros Bacillus, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Citrobacter y Enterobacter. Las velocidades de consumo de oxígeno para las muestras de biodiesel fueron similares a lo observado en la biodegradación de disoluciones 1.0 mM de sustratos sencillos solubles en agua, tales como carbohidratos, aminoácidos y albúmina de huevo.

  10. Impact of residual glycerides on viscosity of biodiesel (waste and rapeseed oil blends)

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Jurac; L. Pomenić

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biodiesel, mixture of fatty acid methyl esters is a biodegradable alternative fuel that is obtained from renewable sources as a vegetable oils or animal fats. Use of waste cooking oils reduce the cost of raw materials for biodiesel production and also reduces the environment pollution. Moreover, pure edible vegetable oils for biodiesel production have an ethical significance because food is used to produce fuel. The aim of this work is a presentation of effects that r...

  11. Techno-economics Analysis of Biodiesel Production From Palm, Jatropha Curcas and Calophyllum Inophyllum as Biofuel

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlia, T.M.I; Ong, H.C; Masjuki, H.H

    2012-01-01

    Transportation sector has a dominant role in global fuel consumption andgreenhouse gas emissions consequently. Biodiesel is a renewable energy that has great potential to serve as an alternative fuel to fossil diesel in diesel engine. Besides the technical barriers, there are several nontechnical limiting factors, which impede the development of biodiesel. Therefore, this study is focused on biodiesel production and techno-economic comparison among palm, jatropha curcas and calophyllum inophy...

  12. Beschikbaarheid koolzaad voor biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    Janssens, B.; Prins, H.; Smit, A.B.; Annevelink, E.; Meeusen-van Onna, M.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an insight into the conditions under which the Dutch agricultural industry will cultivate oilseed rape for biodiesel. The Dutch agricultural entrepreneur occupies a central role in this. The possibilities relating to the cultivation of oilseed rape are assessed from the perspective of the Dutch farmer, within the framework of the EU directive regarding the substitution of 2% of transport fuels with bio transport fuels in the Netherlands. Along with bio-ethanol, biodiesel ...

  13. The Quality of Liquid Fermented Products for Alternative Use of Antibiotics for Animal Raising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piadang, Nattaya

    2006-09-01

    The chemical properties of liquid fermented products (LFP) as probiotics substance for alternative uses of antibiotic were studied. The LFP of 235 were sampling from markets and farmers during 2005-2006. The total count of bacteria, fungi, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Actinomyces and coliform bacteria were conducted. Chemical analysis of LFP showed medium nitrogen (0.01- 0.55%), maximum sugar contents (0.02 - 19.40%), high lactic acid contents (0.34 - 13.01%) and low pH (2.9-5.0). LFPs were free from fecal coliform and Escherichia coil (Ec); but in LAB (1.0 - 1.25x10 7 cfu/ml) and high Actinomyces (1.0 - 7.5 x 10 6 cfu/ml). LFPs inhibited Staphylococcus aureus (Sa), Samonella typhimurium (STM), Escherichia coil (Ec) and Ec 0157 at maximum yield by using Minimal Inhibition Concentration (MIC). But Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) could medium inhibited. Therefore LFP samples are suitable as probiotics for alternative use of antibiotic for animal raising.

  14. The Quality of Liquid Fermented Products for Alternative Use of Antibiotics for Animal Raising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piadang, Nattaya [Office of Atoms for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2006-09-15

    The chemical properties of liquid fermented products (LFP) as probiotics substance for alternative uses of antibiotic were studied. The LFP of 235 were sampling from markets and farmers during 2005-2006. The total count of bacteria, fungi, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Actinomyces and coliform bacteria were conducted. Chemical analysis of LFP showed medium nitrogen (0.01- 0.55%), maximum sugar contents (0.02 - 19.40%), high lactic acid contents (0.34 - 13.01%) and low pH (2.9-5.0). LFPs were free from fecal coliform and Escherichia coil (Ec); but in LAB (1.0 - 1.25x10{sup 7} cfu/ml) and high Actinomyces (1.0 - 7.5 x 10{sup 6} cfu/ml). LFPs inhibited Staphylococcus aureus (Sa), Samonella typhimurium (STM), Escherichia coil (Ec) and Ec 0157 at maximum yield by using Minimal Inhibition Concentration (MIC). But Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) could medium inhibited. Therefore LFP samples are suitable as probiotics for alternative use of antibiotic for animal raising.

  15. Prospects of dedicated biodiesel engine vehicles in Malaysia and Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayed, M.H.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Liaquat, A.M.; Husnawan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Petro diplomacy has played its role in last few decades and that makes energy security a major concern worldwide. Rapid climate change and environmental protection is another vital issue to be addressed in recent energy policies. So an alternative carbon neutral transport fuel is a must in new sustainable energy mix. Biodiesel has immense potentiality to be a part of a sustainable energy mix. In this energy scenario, Brazil's success is a role model in utilizing its agro-industry for reducing poverty, greenhouse gas emission and petro-dependency simultaneously. Brazil commercialized bioethanol in mass scale by introducing flexible fuel vehicles in market. This dedicated engine idea moralizes a new concept of dedicated biodiesel engine vehicles for Malaysia and Indonesia. Southeast Asian countries, i.e. Malaysia and Indonesia is the largest producer as well as exporter of palm oil. Growing at highest yield rate among other biodiesel feedstock, palm based biodiesel is a top exported product for this region. This paper will quantify the prospects of a dedicated biodiesel engine vehicle for Malaysia and Indonesia that will initiate palm based biodiesel in fuel supply chain by leapfrogging the barriers of biodiesel utilization by boosting local automobile industry simultaneously. This article will also review on energy scenario of Malaysia and Indonesia and their renewable energy policies and challenges for coming decades. (author)

  16. Prospects of biodiesel production from microalgae in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shakeel A.; Hussain, Mir Z.; Prasad, S. [Division of Environmental Sciences, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012 (India); Rashmi; Banerjee, U.C. [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology (Biotechnology), National Institute of Pharmaceutical and Education Research (NIPER), Sector 67, Phase X, S.A.S. Nagar, Mohali 160062, Punjab (India)

    2009-12-15

    Energy is essential and vital for development, and the global economy literally runs on energy. The use of fossil fuels as energy is now widely accepted as unsustainable due to depleting resources and also due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the environment. Renewable and carbon neutral biodiesel are necessary for environmental and economic sustainability. Biodiesel demand is constantly increasing as the reservoir of fossil fuel are depleting. Unfortunately biodiesel produced from oil crop, waste cooking oil and animal fats are not able to replace fossil fuel. The viability of the first generation biofuels production is however questionable because of the conflict with food supply. Production of biodiesel using microalgae biomass appears to be a viable alternative. The oil productivity of many microalgae exceeds the best producing oil crops. Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms which convert sunlight, water and CO{sub 2} to sugars, from which macromolecules, such as lipids and triacylglycerols (TAGs) can be obtained. These TAGs are the promising and sustainable feedstock for biodiesel production. Microalgal biorefinery approach can be used to reduce the cost of making microalgal biodiesel. Microalgal-based carbon sequestration technologies cover the cost of carbon capture and sequestration. The present paper is an attempt to review the potential of microalgal biodiesel in comparison to the agricultural crops and its prospects in India. (author)

  17. Cetane Number of Biodiesel from Karaya Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Wasfi, Bayan

    2017-04-01

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel alternative to petroleum Diesel, biodiesel has similar characteristic but with lesser exhaust emission. In this study, transesterification of Karaya oil is examined experimentally using a batch reactor at 100-140°C and 5 bar in subcritical methanol conditions, residence time from 10 to 20 minutes, using a mass ratio 6 methanol-to-vegetable oil. Methanol is used for alcoholysis and sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. Experiments varied the temperature and pressure, observing the effect on the yield and reaction time. In addition, biodiesel from corn oil was created and compared to biodiesel from karaya oil. Kinetic model proposed. The model estimates the concentration of triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides and methyl esters during the reaction. The experiments are carried out at temperatures of 100°C and above. The conversion rate and composition of methyl esters produced from vegetable oils are determined by Gas Chromatography Analysis. It was found that the higher the temperature, the higher reaction rate. Highest yield is 97% at T=140°C achieved in 13 minutes, whereas at T=100°C yield is 68% in the same time interval. Ignition Quality Test (IQT) was utilized for determination of the ignition delay time (IDT) inside a combustion chamber. From the IDT cetane number CN inferred. In case of corn oil biodiesel, the IDT = 3.5 mS, leading to a CN = 58. Whereas karaya oil biodiesel showed IDT = 2.4 mS, leading to a CN = 97. The produced methyl esters were also characterized by measurements of viscosity (υ), density (ρ), flash point (FP) and heat of combustion (HC). The following properties observed: For corn biodiesel, υ = 8.8 mPa-s, ρ = 0.863 g/cm3, FP = 168.8 °C, and HC = 38 MJ/kg. For karaya biodiesel, υ = 10 mPa-s, ρ = 0.877 g/cm3, FP = 158.2 °C, and HC = 39 MJ/kg.

  18. Alcohol biodiesel from frying oil residues; Biodiesel etilico a partir de oleo de fritura residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Festa, Brunna Simoes; Marques, Luiz Guilherme da Costa [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IVIG/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Inst. Virtual Internacional de Mudancas Globais], E-mail: lguilherme@ivig.coppe.ufrj.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the reaction optimization and production of biodiesel through the use of frying residual oil made available by the restaurant placed at the PETROBRAS Research Center (CENPES-RJ), using ethanol, so that to permit the production of sustainable bio diesel. The environmental gains obtained by the utilization of residual oil, avoiding that this oil be released in the nature, and the economic gains coming from the generation and utilization of ethanol allowing the production of biodiesel be an viable alternative. The obtained results during laboratory tests shown that biodiesel produced from the transesterification in alkaline medium, of the frying residual oil collected presented a reaction yield of approximately 80% considering in mass.

  19. Comparative Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Soy-biodiesel and Petroleum-Diesel Emissions: Overview of Studies from the U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel use as a fuel is increasing globally as an alternate to petroleum sources. To comprehensively assess the effects of the use of biodiesel as an energy source, end stage uses of biodiesel such as the effects of inhalation of combusted products on human health must be inco...

  20. Biodiesel production technologies: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemelis Nigatu Gebremariam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a fuel with various benefits over the conventional diesel fuel. It is derived from renewable resources, it has less emission to environment, it is biodegradable so has very limited toxicity and above all its production can be decentralized so that it could have a potential in helping rural economies. However, there are also some worth mentioning challenges associated with production of biodiesel. Among them repeatedly mentioned are the cost of feedstock and the choice of convenient technology for efficient production of the fuel from diverse feedstock types. There are four main routes by which raw vegetable oil and/or animal fat can be made suitable for use as substituent fuel in diesel engines without modification. These are direct use or blending of oils, micro-emulsion, thermal cracking or pyrolysis and transesterification reaction. Due to the quality of the fuel produced, the transesterification method is the most preferred way to produce biodiesel from diverse feedstock types. Through this method, oils and fats (triglycerides are converted to their alkyl esters with reduced viscosity to near diesel fuel levels. There are different techniques to carry out transesterification reaction for biodiesel production. Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages as well as its own specifically convenient feedstock character. There are also some very important reaction conditions to be given due attention in each of this techniques for efficient production of biodiesel, such as molar ratio of alcohol to oil, type and amount of catalyst, reaction temperature, reaction time, reaction medium, type and relative amount of solvents, among others. This review is meant to investigate the main transesterification techniques for biodiesel production in terms of their choice of feedstock character as well as their determinately required reaction conditions for efficient biodiesel production, so that to give an overview on their advantages

  1. Biodiesel/Cummins CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dedicated totes). This change provided uncontaminated containers to transport the delivery of biodiesel to the ANT, and better control for dosing as...emissions calculations. Each approach makes assumptions for farming practices, the biodiesel production process, and transportation and distribution... Biodiesel /Cummins CRADA Report Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release; distribution is unlimited. July 2014 Report

  2. Performance and emission study on waste cooking oil biodiesel and distillate blends for microturbine application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee Sann Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is defined as domestic renewable energy resource, which can be derived from natural oils through the transesterification. The implementation of biodiesel is essential due to the energy depletion crisis and the impact on exacerbating environment caused by rapid consumption of conventional diesel. Waste cooking oil (WCO was used as the raw material to produce biodiesel in order to reduce wastes polluting the environment. This paper studies the technical potential of WCO biodiesel to be used as an alternative fuel for microturbine. The ASTM D6751 and ASTM D2881 standards were selected as references to evaluate the compatibility with distillate to be used as a microturbine fuel. The performance and emission tests were conducted employing a 30 kW microturbine, without any modification, using biodiesel and distillate blends up to maximum of 20% biodiesel mixing ratio. It was found that the thermal efficiency peaked at 20% biodiesel blend with distillate, despite the fact that biodiesel had a lower calorific value and a higher fuel consumption. The emission test results showed reduction of CO emission by increasing the WCO biodiesel mixing ratio, while NOx emission was dependent on the exhaust gas temperature. In conclusion, biodiesel derived from WCO has the potential to substitute distillate in the microturbine application.

  3. Non-Edible Plant Oils as New Sources for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafiqul Islam

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the concern on the availability of recoverable fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems caused by the use those fossil fuels, considerable attention has been given to biodiesel production as an alternative to petrodiesel. However, as the biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats, there are concerns that biodiesel feedstock may compete with food supply in the long-term. Hence, the recent focus is to find oil bearing plants that produce non-edible oils as the feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, two plant species, soapnut (Sapindus mukorossi and jatropha (jatropha curcas, L. are discussed as newer sources of oil for biodiesel production. Experimental analysis showed that both oils have great potential to be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME from cold pressed soapnut seed oil was envisaged as biodiesel source for the first time. Soapnut oil was found to have average of 9.1% free FA, 84.43% triglycerides, 4.88% sterol and 1.59% others. Jatropha oil contains approximately 14% free FA, approximately 5% higher than soapnut oil. Soapnut oil biodiesel contains approximately 85% unsaturated FA while jatropha oil biodiesel was found to have approximately 80% unsaturated FA. Oleic acid was found to be the dominant FA in both soapnut and jatropha biodiesel. Over 97% conversion to FAME was achieved for both soapnut and jatropha oil.

  4. Effect of first and second generation biodiesel blends on engine performance and emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, A. K., E-mail: azad.cqu@gmail.com, E-mail: a.k.azad@cqu.edu.au; Rasul, M. G., E-mail: m.rasul@cqu.edu.au; Bhuiya, M. M. K., E-mail: m.bhuiya@cqu.edu.au [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD 4702 (Australia); Islam, Rubayat, E-mail: rubayat12@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    The biodiesel is a potential source of alternative fuel which can be used at different proportions with diesel fuel. This study experimentally investigated the effect of blend percentage on diesel engine performance and emission using first generation (soybean) and second generation (waste cooking) biodiesel. The characterization of the biodiesel was done according to ASTM and EN standards and compared with ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. A multi-cylinder test bed engine coupled with electromagnetic dynamometer and 5 gas analyzer were used for engine performance and emission test. The investigation was made using B5, B10 and B15 blends for both biodiesels. The study found that brake power (BP) and brake torque (BT) slightly decreases and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) slightly increases with an increase in biodiesel blends ratio. Besides, a significant reduction in exhaust emissions (except NO{sub x} emission) was found for both biodiesels compared to ULSD. Soybean biodiesel showed better engine performance and emissions reduction compared with waste cooking biodiesel. However, NO{sub x} emission for B5 waste cooking biodiesel was lower than soybean biodiesel.

  5. Biodiesel's Characteristics Preparation from Palm Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilani Hamid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Using vegetable oils directly as an alternative diesel fuel has presented engine problems. The problems have been attributed to high viscosity of vegetable oil that causes the poor atomization of fuel in the injector system and pruduces uncomplete combustion. Therefore, it is necessary to convert the vegetable oil into ester (metil ester by tranesterification process to decrease its viscosity. In this research has made biodiesel by reaction of palm oil and methanol using lye (NaOH as catalyst with operation conditions: constant temperature at 60 oC in atmosferic pressure, palm oil : methanol volume ratio = 5 : 1, amount of NaOH used as catalyst = 3.5 gr, 4.5 gr, 5 gr and 5.5 gr and it takes about one hour time reaction. The ester (metil ester produced are separated from glycerin and washed until it takes normal pH (6-7 where more amount of catalyst used will decrease the ester (biodiesel produced. The results show that biodiesels' properties made by using 3.5 (M3.5 gr, 4.5 gr (M4.5 and 5 (M5.0 gr catalyst close to industrial diesel oil and the other (M5.5 closes to automotive diesel oil, while blending diesel oil with 20 % biodiesel (B20 is able to improve the diesel engine performances.

  6. Effect of temperature on tribological properties of palm biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Sia, S.Y.; Fazal, M.A.; Masjuki, H.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-03-15

    Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel is steadily gaining attention to replace petroleum diesel partially or completely. The tribological performance of biodiesel is crucial for its application in automobiles. In the present study, effect of temperature on the tribological performance of palm biodiesel was investigated by using four ball wear machine. Tests were conducted at temperatures 30, 45, 60 and 75 C, under a normal load of 40 kg for 1 h at speed 1200 rpm. For each temperature, the tribological properties of petroleum diesel (B0) and three biodiesel blends like B10, B20, B50 were investigated and compared. During the wear test, frictional torque was recorded on line. Wear scars in tested ball were investigated by optical microscopy. Results show that friction and wear increase with increasing temperature. (author)

  7. Biodiesel Production from Rubber Seed Oil via Esterification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Widayat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One promise source of alternative energy is biodiesel from rubber seed oil, because the raw materials available in plentiful quantities and can be renewed. In addition, the rubber seed is still lack of utilization, and Indonesia is one of the largest rubbers producing country in the world. The objective of this research is to studied on biodiesel production by esterification process. Parameters used in this study are the ratio of catalyst and temperature and its influence on the characteristics of the resulting biodiesel product. Characterization of rubber seed include acid content number analysis, saponification numbers, density, viscosity, iodine number, type of free fatty acids and triglyceride oils. The results of analysis showed that rubber seed oil content obtained is 50.5%. The results of the GCMS analysis showed that a free fatty acid level in rubber seed is very high. Conversion into bio-diesel oil is obtained by at most 59.91% and lowest 48.24%.

  8. Production of Biodiesel from Mixed Waste Cooking and Castor Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiyanto Hadiyanto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing population growth, the consumption and needs of energy increase significantly. This leads Indonesia government to search alternative energy to cover the lacks of fossil energy reserves. Biodiesel is one of the prospective alternative energy which are renewable and environmental friendly. A common problem in large-scale biodiesel production is the sustainability of feedstock and the biodiesel stability. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the production of biodiesel from two oil sources i.e. waste cooking oil and castor oil. This study examined the effect of mixed oil ratio on yield, biodiesel characteristics and stability. The physical properties included kinematic viscosity, acid number, saponification number, iodine number and cetane number have been evaluated as function of oil ratio. Yield of biodiesel was obtained at 35.07%, 99.2% and 83.69% for jatropha:castor oil ratio of 1: 0, 1: 2 and 2: 1, respectively. Most of these characteristics showed an increase by increasing the oil ratio. The result concluded that at the ratio of 1:1(v/v was the best characteristic and stability.

  9. Evaluation of Biodiesel Production, Engine Performance, and Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürü, Metin; Keskïn, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, to decrease environmental pollution and dependence on fossil-based fuels, research on alternative renewable energy sources has been increasing. One such renewable energy source is biodiesel, which is used as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel is renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly. Biodiesel is domestically produced from vegetable oil (edible or nonedible), animal fat, and used cooking oils. In the biodiesel production process, oil or fat undergoes transesterification reaction through use of simple alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, etc. Use of methanol is most feasible because of its low cost, and physical and chemical advantages. Acid catalysis, alkali catalysis, and enzyme catalysis are usually used to improve the reaction rate and yield. Glycerol is a byproduct of the reaction and can be used as an industrial raw material. In this study, biodiesel production methods (direct use, pyrolysis, microemulsion, transesterification, supercritical processes, ultrasound- assisted, and microwave-assisted) and types of catalyst (homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzyme) have been evaluated and compared. In addition, the effects of biodiesel and its blends on diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions are described and reviewed.

  10. Determinants of stakeholders? attitudes towards biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Latifah; Hashim, Hasrizul; Mahadi, Zurina; Ibrahim, Maznah; Ismail, Khaidzir

    2017-01-01

    Background Concern about the inevitable depletion of global energy resources is rising and many countries are shifting their focus to renewable energy. Biodiesel is one promising energy source that has garnered much public attention in recent years. Many believe that this alternative source of energy will be able to sustain the need for increased energy security while at the same time being friendly to the environment. Public opinion, as well as proactive measures by key players in industry, ...

  11. Multicomponent evaporation model for pure and blended biodiesel droplets in high temperature convective environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, K.; Abu-Ramadan, E.; Li, X. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Renewable energy sources are currently being investigated for their reliability, efficiency, and applicability. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives to conventional diesel fuels in compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reported on a study that compared pure biodiesel, pure diesel and blended fuels using a comprehensive multicomponent droplet vaporization model. The model considers the difference in the gas phase diffusivity of diesel and biodiesel vapors. The paper presented the vaporization characteristics of pure diesel, pure biodiesel fuel droplets as well as the effect of mixing them in different proportions (B20 and B50). The model successfully predicted the vaporization history of a multicomponent droplet. The modeling study revealed that biodiesel droplets evaporate at a slower rate than the diesel droplets because of relatively low vapor pressure. As such, the blending of diesel fuel with small proportions of biodiesel will result in an increase in the evaporation time of diesel fuel to some extent. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Industrial fermentation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides for production of biodiesel and its application in vehicle diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo eXiao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae-derived biodiesel has been regarded as a promising alternative for fossil diesel. However, the commercial production of microalgal biodiesel was halted due to its high cost. Here, we presented a pilot study on the industrial production of algal biodiesel. We began with the heterotrophic cultivation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides in a 60 m3 fermentor that produced biomass at 3.81 g L-1 day-1 with a neutral lipid content at 51%. Next, we developed plate-frame filter, natural drying and ball milling methods to harvest, dry and extract oil from the cells at low cost. Additionally, algal biodiesel was produced for a vehicle engine test, which indicated that the microalgal biodiesel was comparable to fossil diesel but resulted in fewer emissions of particulate matter, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon. Altogether, our data suggested that the heterotrophic fermentation of A. protothecoides could have the potential for the future industrial production of biodiesel.

  13. Industrial Fermentation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides for Production of Biodiesel and Its Application in Vehicle Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yibo; Lu, Yue; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae-derived biodiesel has been regarded as a promising alternative for fossil diesel. However, the commercial production of microalgal biodiesel was halted due to its high cost. Here, we presented a pilot study on the industrial production of algal biodiesel. We began with the heterotrophic cultivation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides in a 60-m3 fermentor that produced biomass at 3.81 g L−1 day−1 with a neutral lipid content at 51%. Next, we developed plate-frame filter, natural drying, and ball milling methods to harvest, dry, and extract oil from the cells at low cost. Additionally, algal biodiesel was produced for a vehicle engine test, which indicated that the microalgal biodiesel was comparable to fossil diesel but resulted in fewer emissions of particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbon. Altogether, our data suggested that the heterotrophic fermentation of A. protothecoides could have the potential for the future industrial production of biodiesel. PMID:26539434

  14. Industrial Fermentation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides for Production of Biodiesel and Its Application in Vehicle Diesel Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yibo; Lu, Yue; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae-derived biodiesel has been regarded as a promising alternative for fossil diesel. However, the commercial production of microalgal biodiesel was halted due to its high cost. Here, we presented a pilot study on the industrial production of algal biodiesel. We began with the heterotrophic cultivation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides in a 60-m(3) fermentor that produced biomass at 3.81 g L(-1) day(-1) with a neutral lipid content at 51%. Next, we developed plate-frame filter, natural drying, and ball milling methods to harvest, dry, and extract oil from the cells at low cost. Additionally, algal biodiesel was produced for a vehicle engine test, which indicated that the microalgal biodiesel was comparable to fossil diesel but resulted in fewer emissions of particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbon. Altogether, our data suggested that the heterotrophic fermentation of A. protothecoides could have the potential for the future industrial production of biodiesel.

  15. Biodiesel production from wet municipal sludge: evaluation of in situ transesterification using xylene as a cosolvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, O K; Song, J S; Cha, D K; Lee, J W

    2014-08-01

    This study proposes a method to produce biodiesel from wet wastewater sludge. Xylene was used as an alternative cosolvent to hexane for transesterification in order to enhance the biodiesel yield from wet wastewater sludge. The water present in the sludge could be separated during transesterification by employing xylene, which has a higher boiling point than water. Xylene enhanced the biodiesel yield up to 8.12%, which was 2.5 times higher than hexane. It was comparable to the maximum biodiesel yield of 9.68% obtained from dried sludge. Xylene could reduce either the reaction time or methanol consumption, when compared to hexane for a similar yield. The fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) content of the biodiesel increased approximately two fold by changing the cosolvent from hexane to xylene. The transesterification method using xylene as a cosolvent can be applied effectively and economically for biodiesel recovery from wet wastewater sludge without drying process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodegradation and environmental behavior of biodiesel mixtures in the sea: An initial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMello, Jared A; Carmichael, Catherine A; Peacock, Emily E; Nelson, Robert K; Samuel Arey, J; Reddy, Christopher M

    2007-07-01

    Biodiesel, a mixture of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) derived from animal fats or vegetable oils, is rapidly moving towards the mainstream as an alternative source of energy. However, the behavior of biodiesel, or blends of biodiesel with fossil diesel, in the marine environment have yet to be fully understood. Hence, we performed a series of initial laboratory experiments and simple calculations to evaluate the microbial and environmental fate of FAMEs. Aerobic seawater microcosms spiked with biodiesel or mixtures of biodiesel and fossil diesel revealed that the FAMEs were degraded at roughly the same rate as n-alkanes, and more rapidly than other hydrocarbon components. The residues extracted from these different microcosms became indistinguishable within weeks. Preliminary results from physical-chemical calculations suggest that FAMEs in biodiesel mixtures will not affect the evaporation rates of spilled petroleum hydrocarbons but may stabilize oil droplets in the water column and thereby facilitate transport.

  17. Thermodynamic Study on the Effects of Minor Constituents on Cold Weather Performance of Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils, animal fats and other lipid feedstocks. Fuel properties and performance of biodiesel during cold weather are influenced by factors related to its feedstock, namely fatty acid composition and trace concentrations of monoacylglycerols,...

  18. Biodiesel production through non-catalytic supercritical transesterification: current state and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, C. da; Oliveira, J. Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The inconveniences of the conventional method for biodiesel production by alkaline catalysis suggests research towards alternative methods, with the non-catalytic transesterification using an alcohol at supercritical conditions proposed as a promising technique for biodiesel production. The so-called supercritical method (SCM) has powerful advantages over conventional techniques, such as fast reaction rates, feedstock flexibility, production efficiency and environmentally friendly benefits. H...

  19. Study of the drivers of competitiveness of the Brazilian biodiesel; Estudo dos direcionadores de competitividade do biodiesel brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesar, Aldara da Silva; Batalha, Mario Otavio [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Producao; Monteiro, Marcos Roberto [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Centro de Caracterizacao e Desenvolvimento de Materiais

    2008-07-01

    In the increasingly important role that the biofuel market takes in the new dynamic global competition, biodiesel emerges as a real alternative of implantation. In Brazil, this interest is not different. However, despite of biodiesel's enormous potential, there is a number of uncertainties that need to be investigated in order to produce a biodiesel which has its unique specifications and international quality recognized. The aim of this article is twofold: first, the information systematization of the Brazilian biodiesel production chain; and second, the analysis of drivers of competitiveness that affect that same production chain. Through the theory of systemic approach, each driver of competitiveness is described and its competitive environment is analyzed. The range of different raw materials and possible technological routes present numerous challenges for the agents of this chain. What increases the relevance of studies such as this is the notion that investigating the drives of competitiveness is the first step in overcoming these challenges. (author)

  20. Study of the drivers of competitiveness of the Brazilian biodiesel; Estudo dos direcionadores de competitividade do biodiesel brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesar, Aldara da Silva; Batalha, Mario Otavio [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Producao; Monteiro, Marcos Roberto [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Centro de Caracterizacao e Desenvolvimento de Materiais

    2008-07-01

    In the increasingly important role that the biofuel market takes in the new dynamic global competition, biodiesel emerges as a real alternative of implantation. In Brazil, this interest is not different. However, despite of biodiesel's enormous potential, there is a number of uncertainties that need to be investigated in order to produce a biodiesel which has its unique specifications and international quality recognized. The aim of this article is twofold: first, the information systematization of the Brazilian biodiesel production chain; and second, the analysis of drivers of competitiveness that affect that same production chain. Through the theory of systemic approach, each driver of competitiveness is described and its competitive environment is analyzed. The range of different raw materials and possible technological routes present numerous challenges for the agents of this chain. What increases the relevance of studies such as this is the notion that investigating the drives of competitiveness is the first step in overcoming these challenges. (author)

  1. Toxicity assessment of ionic liquids with Vibrio fischeri: an alternative fully automated methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Susana P F; Pinto, Paula C A G; Lapa, Rui A S; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2015-03-02

    A fully automated Vibrio fischeri methodology based on sequential injection analysis (SIA) has been developed. The methodology was based on the aspiration of 75 μL of bacteria and 50 μL of inhibitor followed by measurement of the luminescence of bacteria. The assays were conducted for contact times of 5, 15, and 30 min, by means of three mixing chambers that ensured adequate mixing conditions. The optimized methodology provided a precise control of the reaction conditions which is an asset for the analysis of a large number of samples. The developed methodology was applied to the evaluation of the impact of a set of ionic liquids (ILs) on V. fischeri and the results were compared with those provided by a conventional assay kit (Biotox(®)). The collected data evidenced the influence of different cation head groups and anion moieties on the toxicity of ILs. Generally, aromatic cations and fluorine-containing anions displayed higher impact on V. fischeri, evidenced by lower EC50. The proposed methodology was validated through statistical analysis which demonstrated a strong positive correlation (P>0.98) between assays. It is expected that the automated methodology can be tested for more classes of compounds and used as alternative to microplate based V. fischeri assay kits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative studies of liquid metals for an alternative divertor target in a fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarés, F. L.; Oyarzabal, E.; Tafalla, D.; Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Pastor, I.; Ochando, M. A.; Medina, F.; Zurro, B.; McCarthy, K. J.; the TJ-II Team

    2017-12-01

    Two liquid metals (LM), Li and LiSn (20:80 at), presently considered as alternative materials for the divertor target of a fusion reactor, have been exposed to the plasma in a capillary porous system (CPS) arrangement in TJ-II. A negligible perturbation of the plasma has been recorded in both cases, even when stellarator plasmas are particularly sensitive to high Z elements due to the tendency to central impurity accumulation. The surface temperature of the LM CPS samples (made of a tungsten mesh impregnated in SnLi or Li) has been measured during the plasma pulse with ms resolution by pyrometry and the thermal balance during heating and cooling has been used to obtain the thermal parameters of the SnLi and Li CPS arrangements. Temperatures as high as 1150 K during TJ-II plasma exposure were observed for the LiSn solid case. Strong changes in the thermal conductivity of the alloy were recorded in the cooling phase at temperatures close to the nominal melting point. The deduced values for the thermal conductivity of the LiSn alloy/CPS sample were significantly lower than those predicted from their individual components.

  3. Evaluation of process alternatives for solidification of the West Valley high-level liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, L.K.; Larson, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the West Valley Solidification Project (WVSP) in 1980. The project purpose is to demonstrate removal and solidification of the high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) presently stored in tanks at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC), West Valley, New York. As part of this effort, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to evaluate process alternatives for solidifcation of the WNYNSC wastes. Two process approaches for waste handling before solidification, together with solidification processes for four terminal and four interim waste forms, were considered. The first waste-handling approach, designated the salt/sludge separation process, involves separating the bulk of the nonradioactive nuclear waste constituents from the radioactive waste constituents, and the second waste-handling approach, designated the combined-waste process, involves no waste segregation prior to solidification. The processes were evaluated on the bases of their (1) readiness for plant startup by 1987, (2) relative technical merits, and (3) process cost. The study has shown that, based on these criteria, the salt/sludge separation process with a borosilicate glass waste form is preferred when producing a terminal waste form. It was also concluded that if an interim waste form is to be used, the preferred approach would be the combined waste process with a fused-salt waste form

  4. Semi-volatile and particulate emissions from the combustion of alternative diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S; Graham, J; Striebich, R

    2001-01-01

    Motor vehicle emissions are a major anthropogenic source of air pollution and contribute to the deterioration of urban air quality. In this paper, we report results of a laboratory investigation of particle formation from four different alternative diesel fuels, namely, compressed natural gas (CNG), dimethyl ether (DME), biodiesel, and diesel, under fuel-rich conditions in the temperature range of 800-1200 degrees C at pressures of approximately 24 atm. A single pulse shock tube was used to simulate compression ignition (CI) combustion conditions. Gaseous fuels (CNG and DME) were exposed premixed in air while liquid fuels (diesel and biodiesel) were injected using a high-pressure liquid injector. The results of surface analysis using a scanning electron microscope showed that the particles formed from combustion of all four of the above-mentioned fuels had a mean diameter less than 0.1 microm. From results of gravimetric analysis and fuel injection size it was found that under the test conditions described above the relative particulate yields from CNG, DME, biodiesel, and diesel were 0.30%. 0.026%, 0.52%, and 0.51%, respectively. Chemical analysis of particles showed that DME combustion particles had the highest soluble organic fraction (SOF) at 71%, followed by biodiesel (66%), CNG (38%) and diesel (20%). This illustrates that in case of both gaseous and liquid fuels, oxygenated fuels have a higher SOF than non-oxygenated fuels.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Transportation Data for

    Science.gov (United States)

    stations in Rhode Island with alternative fuels Fuel Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 3 3 More Rhode Island Videos on YouTube Video thumbnail for Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Rhode Island Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Rhode Island July 14, 2017 https://www.youtube.com/embed

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative Fuels Sept. 16, 2017 Photo of a truck Phoenix Utility Fleet Drives Smarter with Biodiesel Aug. 26 Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Rhode Island July 14, 2017 Photo of a truck Idaho Transports Mail Home Runs on Biodiesel in North Carolina June 9, 2017 Photo of a bus New Hampshire Cleans up with

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative Fuels Sept. 16, 2017 Photo of a truck Phoenix Utility Fleet Drives Smarter with Biodiesel Aug. 26 Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Rhode Island July 14, 2017 Photo of a truck Idaho Transports Mail Home Runs on Biodiesel in North Carolina June 9, 2017 Photo of a bus New Hampshire Cleans up with

  8. Production of biodiesel using the microwave technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakinaz A. El Sherbiny

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production is worthy of continued study and optimization of production procedures because of its environmentally beneficial attributes and its renewable nature. Non-edible vegetable oils such as Jatropha oil, produced by seed-bearing shrubs, can provide an alternative and do not have competing food uses. However, these oils are characterized by their high free fatty acid contents. Using the conventional transesterification technique for the production of biodiesel is well established. In this study an alternative energy stimulant, “microwave irradiation”, was used for the production of the alternative energy source, biodiesel. The optimum parametric conditions obtained from the conventional technique were applied using microwave irradiation in order to compare the systems. The study showed that the application of radio frequency microwave energy offers a fast, easy route to this valuable biofuel with the advantages of enhancing the reaction rate (2 min instead of 150 min and of improving the separation process. The methodology allows for the use of high free fatty acid content feedstock, including Jatropha oil. However, this emerging technology needs to be further investigated for possible scale-up for industrial application.

  9. Technoeconomic study of supercritical biodiesel production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, J.M.; Errazu, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last years, biodiesel has gained more market due to its benefits and because it appears as the natural substitute for diesel. However, the highest cost of this process is associated with the raw material employed, making it a less competitive and more expensive fuel. Therefore, research is being done in order to use low price raw material, such as acid oils, frying oils or soapstocks. In this work, a biodiesel production plant was developed using supercritical methanol and acid oils as raw materials. This technology was compared with some other alternatives previously described with the aim of making a comparative study, not only on the technical aspects but also on the economic results. A process simulator was employed to produce the conceptual design and simulate each technology. Using these models, it was possible to analyze different scenarios and to evaluate productivity, raw material consumption, economic competitiveness and environmental impacts of each process. Although the supercritical alternative appears as a good technical possibility to produce biodiesel, today, it is not an economic alternative due to its high operating costs

  10. Recent trends, opportunities and challenges of biodiesel in Malaysia: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Steven; Teong, Lee Keat

    2010-01-01

    Energy supply and its security issues have been the topic of interest lately. With growing environmental awareness about the negative implications brought by excessive usage of fossil fuels, the race for finding alternative energy as their substitutions is getting heated up. For now, renewable energy from biodiesel has been touted as one of the most promising substitutions for petroleum-derived diesel. Combustion of biodiesel as fuel is more environment-friendly while retaining most of the positive engine properties of petroleum-derived diesel. Production of biodiesel is also a proven technology with established commercialization activities. The huge potential of biodiesel coupled with the abundance of palm oil which is one of the most cost-effective feedstocks for biodiesel is responsible for the pledging of Malaysia to become the leading producer of high quality biodiesel in the region. Currently, total approved installed capacity of biodiesel production in Malaysia equals to almost 92% of the world biodiesel production output in 2008. While Malaysia does indeed possessed materials, technologies and marketing superiority to vie for that position, many more challenges are still awaiting. The price restriction, provisions controversy, escalating non-tariff trade barriers and negligible public support need to be addressed appropriately. In this review, Malaysia's previous and current position in global biodiesel market, its future potential towards the prominent leading biodiesel status and major disrupting obstacles are being discussed. The feasibility of utilizing algae as the up-and-coming biodiesel feedstock in Malaysia is also under scrutiny. Lastly, several recommendations on the roles played by three major forces in Malaysia's biodiesel industry are presented to tackle the shortcomings in achieving the coveted status by Malaysia. It is hope that Malaysia's progress in biodiesel industry will not only benefit itself but rather as the role model to catalyst the

  11. EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO ON ENERGY AND EMISSION OF VCR DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH DUAL BLENDS OF BIODIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. EKNATH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent 10 years biodiesel fuel was studied extensively as an alternative fuel. Most of researchers reported performance and emission of biodiesel and their blends with constant compression ratio. Also all the research was conducted with use of single biodiesel and its blend. Few reports are observed with the use of variable compression ratio and blends of more than one biodiesel. Main aim of the present study is to analyse the effect of compression ratio on the performance and emission of dual blends of biodiesel. In the present study Blends of Jatropha and Karanja with Diesel fuel was tested on single cylinder VCR DI diesel engine for compression ratio 16 and 18. High density of biodiesel fuel causes longer delay period for Jatropha fuel was observed compare with Karanja fuel. However blending of two biodiesel K20J40D results in to low mean gas temperature which is the main reason for low NOx emission.

  12. Biodiesel Handling and Use Guide (Fifth Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleman, T.L.; McCormick, R.L.; Christensen, E.D.; Fioroni, G.; Moriarty. K.; Yanowitz, J.

    2016-11-08

    This document is a guide for those who blend, distribute, and use biodiesel and biodiesel blends. It provides basic information on the proper and safe use of biodiesel and biodiesel blends in engines and boilers, and is intended to help fleets, individual users, blenders, distributors, and those involved in related activities understand procedures for handling and using biodiesel fuels.

  13. Enhancing Biodiesel from Kemiri Sunan Oil Manufacturing using Ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriyadi, Slamet; Purwanto; Anggoro, Didi Dwi; Hermawan

    2018-02-01

    Kemiri Sunan (Reutalis trisperma (Blanco) Airy Shaw) is a potential plant to be developed as biodiesel feedstock. The advantage of Kemiri Sunan seeds when compared to other biodiesel raw materials is their high oil content. This plant is also very good for land conservation. Due the increasingly demand for biodiesel, research and new methods to increase its biodiesel production continue to be undertaken. The weakness of conventional biodiesel manufacturing process is in the mixing process in which mechanical stirring and heating in the trans-esterification process require more energy and a longer time. A higher and stronger mixing process is required to increase the contact area between the two phases of the mixed substance to produce the emulsion. Ultrasonic is a tool that can be useful for a liquid mixing process that tends to be separated. Ultrasonic waves can cause mixing intensity at the micro level and increase mass transfer, so the reaction can be performed at a much faster rate. This study is to figure out the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the transesterification process of biodiesel from Kemiri Sunan Oil.

  14. Biodiesel production by microalgal biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, GuanHua [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology (China); Chen, Feng [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); College of Light Industry and Food Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Wei, Dong; Zhang, XueWu; Chen, Gu [College of Light Industry and Food Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China)

    2010-01-15

    Biodiesel has received much attention in recent years. Although numerous reports are available on the production of biodiesel from vegetable oils of terraneous oil-plants, such as soybean, sunflower and palm oils, the production of biodiesel from microalgae is a newly emerging field. Microalgal biotechnology appears to possess high potential for biodiesel production because a significant increase in lipid content of microalgae is now possible through heterotrophic cultivation and genetic engineering approaches. This paper provides an overview of the technologies in the production of biodiesel from microalgae, including the various modes of cultivation for the production of oil-rich microalgal biomass, as well as the subsequent downstream processing for biodiesel production. The advances and prospects of using microalgal biotechnology for biodiesel production are discussed. (author)

  15. Preparation of biodiesel with the help of ultrasonic and hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianbing; Wang, Jianli; Li, Yongchao; Yu, Yunliang; Xu, Zhichao

    2006-12-22

    An alkali-catalyzed biodiesel production method with power ultrasonic (19.7 kHz) has been developed that allows a short reaction time and high yield because of emulsification and cavitation of the liquid-liquid immiscible system. Orthogonality experiments were employed to evaluate the effects of synthesis parameters. Furthermore, hydrodynamic cavitation was used for biodiesel production in comparison to ultrasonic method. Both methods were proved to be efficient, and time and energy saving for the preparation of biodiesel by transesterification of soybean oil.

  16. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  17. Phase equilibrium data and thermodynamic modeling of the system (CO2 + biodiesel + methanol) at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Leandro F.; Segalen da Silva, Diogo Italo; Rosa da Silva, Fabiano; Ramos, Luiz P.; Ndiaye, Papa M.; Corazza, Marcos L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → We measured phase behavior for the system involving {CO 2 + biodiesel + methanol}. → The saturation pressures were obtained using a variable-volume view cell. → The experimental data were modeled using PR-vdW2 and PR-WS equations of state. - Abstract: The main objective of this work was to investigate the high pressure phase behavior of the binary systems {CO 2 (1) + methanol(2)} and {CO 2 (1) + soybean methyl esters (biodiesel)(2)} and the ternary system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2) + methanol(3)} were determined. Biodiesel was produced from soybean oil, purified, characterized and used in this work. The static synthetic method, using a variable-volume view cell, was employed to obtain the experimental data in the temperature range of (303.15 to 343.15) K and pressures up to 21 MPa. The mole fractions of carbon dioxide were varied according to the systems as follows: (0.2383 to 0.8666) for the binary system {CO 2 (1) + methanol(2)}; (0.4201 to 0.9931) for the binary system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2)}; (0.4864 to 0.9767) for the ternary system {CO 2 (1) + biodiesel(2) + methanol(3)} with a biodiesel to methanol molar ratio of (1:3); and (0.3732 to 0.9630) for the system {CO 2 + biodiesel + methanol} with a biodiesel to methanol molar ratio of (8:1). For these systems, (vapor + liquid), (liquid + liquid), (vapor + liquid + liquid) transitions were observed. The phase equilibrium data obtained for the systems were modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state with the classical van der Waals (PR-vdW2) and Wong-Sandler (PR-WS) mixing rules. Both thermodynamic models were able to satisfactorily correlate the phase behavior of the systems investigated and the PR-WS presented the best performance.

  18. Characteristics of paddy operations with biodiesel fuelled tractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.; Park, S.H.; Kim, C.K.; Im, D.H.; Kim, H.J.; Chung, S.C. [National Academy of Agricultural Science, Seodundong, Suwon (Korea, Democratic People' s Republic of); Kim, S.S. [Daedong Industrial Co., Chang Nyong-Kun, Kyungnam (Korea, Democratic People' s Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which biofuels were tested for their power and competitiveness in various paddy operations, such as plowing and rotary tilling of paddy fields. The study considered the use of diesel fuel as well as 20 per cent biodiesel (BD20) and 100 per cent biodiesel (BD100) as an alternative fuel for tractors. Ignition problems or abrupt stopping were not monitored during operations of plowing, rotary tilling and travelling on the road. According to tractor power take-off (PTO) test codes, there was no considerable power difference between the 3 fuels. However, fuel consumption rates were quite different between the biodiesels and diesel fuel in the paddy works. Fuel consumption increased when biodiesel content increased. Approximately 35 to 40 per cent more fuel was needed for rotary tilling operations than plowing operations. Within the operations, the maximum difference occurred during the rotary tilling of wet paddy fields. This difference was as high as 20 per cent , between BD100 and diesel fuel. In terms of exhaust gases, more carbon dioxide was discharged from diesel fuel than biodiesels, but more nitrous oxide was discharged with biodiesels. It was difficult to differentiate quantities of carbon monoxide between the 3 different fuels.

  19. Oil extraction from plant seeds for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadessa Gonfa Keneni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy is basic for development and its demand increases due to rapid population growth, urbanization and improved living standards. Fossil fuels will continue to dominate other sources of energy although it is non-renewable and harm global climate. Problems associated with fossil fuels have driven the search for alternative energy sources of which biodiesel is one option. Biodiesel is renewable, non-toxic, environmental-friendly and an economically feasible options to tackle the depleting fossil fuels and its negative environmental impact. It can be produced from vegetable oils, animal fats, waste oils and algae. However, nowadays, the major feedstocks of biodiesel are edible oils and this has created food vs fuel debate. Therefore, the future prospect is to use non-edible oils, animal fats, waste oils and algae as feedstock for biodiesel. Selection of non-expensive feedstock and the extraction and preparation of oil for biodiesel production is a crucial step due to its relevance on the overall technology. There are three main conventional oil extraction methods: mechanical, chemical/solvent and enzymatic extraction methods. There are also some newly developed oil extraction methods that can be used separately or in combination with the conventional ones, to overcome some disadvantages of the conventional oil extraction methods. This review paper presents, compare and discusses different potential biofuel feedstocks, various oil extraction methods, advantages and disadvantages of different oil extraction methods, and propose future prospective for the improvement of oil extraction methods and sustainability of biodiesel production and utilization.

  20. An updated comprehensive techno-economic analysis of algae biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sanjay; Chou, Siaw Kiang; Cao, Shenyan; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Zhi

    2013-10-01

    Algae biodiesel is a promising but expensive alternative fuel to petro-diesel. To overcome cost barriers, detailed cost analyses are needed. A decade-old cost analysis by the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory indicated that the costs of algae biodiesel were in the range of $0.53-0.85/L (2012 USD values). However, the cost of land and transesterification were just roughly estimated. In this study, an updated comprehensive techno-economic analysis was conducted with optimized processes and improved cost estimations. Latest process improvement, quotes from vendors, government databases, and other relevant data sources were used to calculate the updated algal biodiesel costs, and the final costs of biodiesel are in the range of $0.42-0.97/L. Additional improvements on cost-effective biodiesel production around the globe to cultivate algae was also recommended. Overall, the calculated costs seem promising, suggesting that a single step biodiesel production process is close to commercial reality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biodiesel Production from Microalgae by Extraction – Transesterification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact of using petroleum fuels has led to a quest to find a suitable alternative fuel source. In this study, microalgae were explored as a highly potential feedstock to produce biodiesel fuel. Firstly, algal oil is extracted from algal biomass by using organic solvents (n–hexan.  Lipid is contained in microalgae up to 60% of their weight. Then, Biodiesel is created through a chemical reaction known as transesterification between algal oil and alcohol (methanol with strong acid (such as H2SO4 as the catalyst. The extraction – transesterification method resulted in a high biodiesel yield (10 % of algal biomass and high FAMEs content (5.2 % of algal biomass. Biodiesel production from microalgae was studied through experimental investigation of transesterification conditions such as reaction time, methanol to oil ration and catalyst dosage which are deemed to have main impact on reaction conversion efficiency. All the parameters which were characterized for purified biodiesel such as free glycerin, total glycerin, flash point, sulfur content were analyzed according to ASTM standardDoi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.6-9Citation:  Thao, N.T.P., Tin, N.T., and Thanh, B.X. 2013. Biodiesel Production from Microalgae by Extraction – Transesterification Method. Waste Technology 1(1:6-9. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.6-9

  2. Optimization of emergy sustainability index for biodiesel supply network design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Tan, Shiyu; Yang, Le; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Pang, Chengfang; Dong, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A MINLP model for designing sustainable biodiesel supply network is developed. • Emergy sustainability index is used as the objective to be maximized. • Multiple alternatives in each stage of biodiesel supply network are considered. • Life cycle perspective is incorporated in the design of biodiesel supply network. - Abstract: Sustainability is an important and difficult consideration for the stakeholders/decision-makers when planning a biofuel supply network. In this paper, a Mixed-Integer Non-linear Programming (MINLP) model was developed with the aim to help the stakeholders/decision-maker to select the most sustainable design. In the proposed model, the emergy sustainability index of the whole biodiesel supply networks in a life cycle perspective is employed as the measure of the sustainability, and multiple feedstocks, multiple transport modes, multiple regions for biodiesel production and multiple distribution centers can be considered. After describing the process and mathematic framework of the model, an illustrative case was studied and demonstrated that the proposed methodology is feasible for finding the most sustainable design and planning of biodiesel supply chains

  3. Oxidative stability of biodiesel blends derived from waste frying oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Feroldi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The high cost of biodiesel production is mainly linked to the price of raw material.This factor has favored the use of alternative fats and oils such as those used in frying. Since biodiesel can be obtained from several vegetable and animal raw materials, the physicochemical characteristics of the fuel may vary considerably. One of these characteristics is the fatty acid composition. It directly affects the oxidative stability of biodiesel, which can be impaired when the fuel undergoes exposure to sunlight, metals, oxygen and high temperatures. In order to improve the oxidative stability of biodiesels produced from waste frying oil some studies involving blends of different raw materials have been carried out. In this sense, this work aimed to assess the characteristics resulting from the blending of soybean waste frying oil with other waste biodiesels in what concerns to oxidation. The blends of fatty materials were obtained by means of a 2² factorial design. The induction periods of biodiesel blends were enough to meet the ASTM D6751 standard. Swine fat was responsible for the increase in the induction period values.

  4. Beschikbaarheid koolzaad voor biodiesel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, B.; Prins, H.; Smit, A.B.; Annevelink, E.; Meeusen-van Onna, M.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an insight into the conditions under which the Dutch agricultural industry will cultivate oilseed rape for biodiesel. The Dutch agricultural entrepreneur occupies a central role in this. The possibilities relating to the cultivation of oilseed rape are assessed from the

  5. Equilibrium study for ternary mixtures of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doungsri, S.; Sookkumnerd, T.; Wongkoblap, A.; Nuchitprasittichai, A.

    2017-11-01

    The liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary mixtures of methanol + fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) + palm oil and FAME + palm oil + glycerol at various temperatures from 35 to 55°C, the tie lines and binodial curves were also investigated and plotted in the equilibrium curve. The experimental results showed that the binodial curves of methanol + FAME + palm oil depended significantly with temperature while the binodial curves of FAME + palm oil + glycerol illustrated insignificant change with temperatures. The interaction parameters between liquid pair obtained for NRTL (Nonrandom Two-Liquid) and UNIQUAC (Universal Quasi-Chemical Theory) models from the experimental data were also investigated. It was found that the correlated parameters of UNIQUAC model for system of FAME + palm oil + glycerol, denoted as a13 and a31, were 580.42K and -123.69K, respectively, while those for system of methanol + FAME + palm oil, denoted as a42 and a24, were 71.48 K and 965.57K, respectively. The ternary LLE data reported here would be beneficial for engineers and scientists to use for prediction of yield and purity of biodiesel for the production. The UNIQUAC model agreed well with the experimental data of ternary mixtures of biodiesel.

  6. Study on the Tribological Characteristics of Australian Native First Generation and Second Generation Biodiesel Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mofijur Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesels are a renewable energy source, and they have the potential to be used as alternatives to diesel fuel. The aim of this study is to investigate the wear and friction characteristics of Australian native first generation and second generation biodiesels using a four-ball tribo tester. The biodiesel was produced through a two-step transesterification process and characterized according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards. The tribological experiment was carried out at a constant 1800 rpm and different loads and temperatures. In addition, the surface morphology of the ball was tested by scanning electron microscope (SEM/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX analysis. The test results indicated that biodiesel fuels have a lower coefficient of frictions (COF and lower wear scar diameter (WSD up to 83.50% and 41.28%, respectively, compared to conventional diesel fuel. The worn surface area results showed that biodiesel fuel has a minimum percentage of C and O, except Fe, compared to diesel. In addition, the worn surface area for diesel was found (2.20%–27.92% to be higher than biodiesel. The findings of this study indicated that both first and second generation biodiesel fuels have better tribological performance than diesel fuel, and between the biodiesel fuels, macadamia biodiesel showed better lubrication performance.

  7. Effects of Biodiesel Blend on Marine Fuel Characteristics for Marine Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherng-Yuan Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel produced from vegetable oils, animal fats and algae oil is a renewable, environmentally friendly and clean alternative fuel that reduces pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions in marine applications. This study investigates the influence of biodiesel blend on the characteristics of residual and distillate marine fuels. Adequate correlation equations are applied to calculate the fuel properties of the blended marine fuels with biodiesel. Residual marine fuel RMA has inferior fuel characteristics compared with distillate marine fuel DMA and biodiesel. The flash point of marine fuel RMA could be increased by 20% if blended with 20 vol% biodiesel. The sulfur content of residual marine fuel could meet the requirement of the 2008 MARPOL Annex VI Amendment by blending it with 23.0 vol% biodiesel. In addition, the kinematic viscosity of residual marine fuel could be reduced by 12.9% and the carbon residue by 23.6% if 20 vol% and 25 vol% biodiesel are used, respectively. Residual marine fuel blended with 20 vol% biodiesel decreases its lower heating value by 1.9%. Moreover, the fuel properties of residual marine fuel are found to improve more significantly with biodiesel blending than those of distillate marine fuel.

  8. Variability in sunflower oil quality for biodiesel production: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereyra-Irujo, Gustavo A.; Izquierdo, Natalia G.; Covi, Mauro; Nolasco, Susana M.; Quiroz, Facundo; Aguirrezabal, Luis A.N.

    2009-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oils or animal fats. The fatty acid composition of the feedstock, which varies among and within species, is the main determinant of biodiesel quality. In this work we analyze the variability in biodiesel quality (density, kinematic viscosity, heating value, cetane number and iodine value) obtained from sunflower oil, by means of a validated crop model that predicts the fatty acid composition of one high-oleic, and three traditional (high-linoleic) sunflower hybrids. The model was run with a 10-year average weather data from 56 weather stations in Argentina, and simulation results were compared to the biodiesel standards of Argentina, USA and Europe. We show that biodiesel produced from sunflower oil does not have one fixed quality, but different qualities depending on weather conditions and agricultural practices, and that intraspecific variation in biodiesel quality can be larger than interspecific differences. Our results suggest that (a) sunflower oil from high-oleic hybrids is suitable for biodiesel production (within limits of all analyzed standards), regardless of growing conditions and (b) sunflower oil from traditional hybrids is suitable for biodiesel production under the standards of Argentina and USA, while only certain hybrids grown in warm regions (e.g., Northern Argentina, Southern USA, China, India, Pakistan) are suitable for biodiesel production according to the European standard

  9. Biodiesel scenario in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taj, S. [Bangalore Univ., Al-Ameen College, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Prasad, H. [Bangalore Univ., Central College, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Ramesh, N. [Reva College, Bangladore (India); Papavinasam, S. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Lab

    2009-08-15

    This article presented an overview of biodiesel production in India. Biodiesel has gained widespread acceptance in the United States and the European Union as a substitute for diesel. In early 2003, the Indian National Planning Commission launched a program to also foster development of vegetable oil based biofuels in order to address the energy challenges facing India. Approximately 57 per cent of rural Indian households are still not connected to the power grid, and India imports 75 per cent of its total petroleum. The National Planning Commission advocated widespread planting of an inedible, but high-yielding tree-born oilseed known as jatropha curcas that would serve as the primary feedstock for the production of vegetable oil based biofuels. Jatropha and pongamia are widely recognized as the most economically viable and environmentally neutral feedstock options. Both of these tree-borne oilseeds are adaptable to reasonably harsh climatic and growing conditions, enabling them to be cultivated on wastelands that are not currently used in agricultural production. The Commission recommended that 11.2 million hectares of jatropha be cultivated on marginal waste lands which would, over time, replace 20 per cent of total national diesel consumption with biodiesel. Both public and private sector players have begun to act on the Commission's plan. More than a hundred thousand hectares of jatropha have been planted and private firms have begun to build biodiesel processing plants. State-owned petroleum product marketing firms have committed to distributing biodiesel through some existing distribution channels. 8 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Direct Utilization of Liquid Fuels in SOFC for Portable Applications: Challenges for the Selection of Alternative Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Cimenti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC have the advantage of being able to operate with fuels other than hydrogen. In particular, liquid fuels are especially attractive for powering portable applications such as small power generators or auxiliary power units, in which case the direct utilization of the fuel would be convenient. Although liquid fuels are easier to handle and transport than hydrogen, their direct use in SOFC can lead to anode deactivation due to carbon formation, especially on traditional nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni/YSZ anodes. Significant advances have been made in anodic materials that are resistant to carbon formation but often these materials are less electrochemically active than Ni/YSZ. In this review the challenges of using liquid fuels directly in SOFC, in terms of gas-phase and catalytic reactions within the anode chamber, will be discussed and the alternative anode materials so far investigated will be compared.

  11. New options for conversion of vegetable oils to alternative fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A.; Kara, H. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-15

    Biodiesel from transesterification of vegetable oils is an excellent alternative fuel. There is, however, a need to develop a direct process for conversion of vegetable oils into gasoline-competitive biodiesel and other petroleum products. Methyl esters of vegetable oils have several outstanding advantages among other new-renewable and clean engine fuel alternatives. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of vegetable oil. Compared to No. 2 diesel fuel, all of the vegetable oils are much more viscous, whereas methyl esters of vegetable oils are slightly more viscous. The methyl esters are more volatile than those of the vegetable oils. Conversion of vegetable oils to useful fuels involves the pyrolysis and catalytic cracking of the oils into lower molecular products. Pyrolysis produces more biogasoline than biodiesel fuel. Soap pyrolysis products of vegetable oils can be used as alternative diesel engine fuel. The soaps obtained from the vegetable oils can be pyrolyzed into hydrocarbon-rich products. Zinc chloride catalyst contributed greatly to high amounts of hydrocarbons in the liquid product. The yield of ZnCl2 catalytic conversion of the soybean oil reached the maximum 79.9% at 660 K. (author)

  12. Biodiesel Fuel Technology for Military Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frame, Edwin

    1997-01-01

    This program addressed the effects of biodiesel (methyl soyate) and blends of biodiesel with petrofuels on fuel system component and material compatibility, fuel storage stability, and fuel lubricity...

  13. Performance characteristics of mix oil biodiesel blends with smoke emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mohite

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fuel resources are being depleted day by day and its use affects the environment adversely. Renewable energy is one of the alternate for sustainable development and biodiesel is one of the suitable alternate which can replace the diesel. The major hurdles in the successful commercialization of biodiesel are high feedstock cost and conversion technology to reduce viscosity. The choice of raw material and biodiesel production method must depend upon techno-economical view. There are some specific regions for different types of oil availability. It is therefore required to produce biodiesel from the mixture of oils to fulfill the requirements of energy demand in a particular country according to its suitability and availability of feedstock. Karanja and Linseed crops  are abundantly available in India. Biodiesel was produced from a mixture of Karanja and Linseed oils by alkaline transesterification. In this experimental study, biodiesel blends of 10%, 20% and 30% were used with diesel in a diesel engine at a constant speed of 1500 rpm with varying brake powers (loads from 0.5 kW to 3.5kW to evaluate brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption,  brake specific energy consumption, exhaust gas temperature, mechanical efficiency, volumetric efficiency, air fuel ratio and smoke opacity. They were compared with diesel and found satisfactory. BTE was found to be  28.76% for B10 at 3.5kW load.  Smoke opacity was also found to be reduced with all blends. Smoke opacity was found to be reduced up to 10.23% for B10 biodiesel blend as compared to that of diesel at 3.5kW. Experimental investigation  has revealed that  biodiesel produced from a mixture of Karanja and Linseed oils can be successfully used in diesel engines without any engine modification  and B10 was found to be an optimum biodiesel blend in terms of brake thermal efficiency. Article History: Received April 14th 2016; Received in revised form June 25th 2016; Accepted

  14. Potential use of eucalyptus biodiesel in compressed ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Verma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The increased population has resulted in extra use of conventional sources of fuels due to which there is risk of extinction of fossil fuels’ resources especially petroleum diesel. Biodiesel is emerging as an excellent alternative choice across the world as a direct replacement for diesel fuel in vehicle engines. Biodiesel offers a great choice. It is mainly derived from vegetable oils, animal fats and algae. Hence in this paper effort has been made to find out feasibility of biodiesel obtained from eucalyptus oil and its impact on diesel engine. Higher viscosity is a major issue while using vegetable oil directly in engine which can be removed by converting it into biodiesel by the process of transesterification. Various fuel properties like calorific value, flash point and cetane value of biodiesel and biodiesel–diesel blends of different proportions were evaluated and found to be comparable with petroleum diesel. The result of investigation shows that Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC for two different samples of B10 blend of eucalyptus biodiesel is 2.34% and 2.93% lower than that for diesel. Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE for B10 blends was found to be 0.52% and 0.94% lower than that for diesel. Emission characteristics show that Smoke Opacity improves for both samples, smoke is found to be 64.5% and 62.5% cleaner than that of diesel. Out of all blends B10 was found to be a suitable alternative to conventional diesel fuel to control air pollution without much significant effect on engine performance. On comparing both samples, biodiesel prepared from sample A of eucalyptus oil was found to be superior in all aspects of performance and emission.

  15. Synthesis of Acrolein From Glycerol Using FePO4 Catalyst in Liquid Phase Dehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin, Akhmad Zainal; Afandi, Rani Guslianti; Graha, Hafis Pratama Rendra

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein is currently produced using propylene from crude oil while its price and scarcity are increasing. A renewable material such as glycerol is an attractive alternative for acrolein production. It can be obtained from crude palm oil (CPO) and is a byproduct of biodiesel production. Besides being able to compete economically, glycerol is an environmentally friendly material. The purpose of this study is to synthesize acrolein from glycerol using FePO4 catalyst in liquid phase dehydration....

  16. Advanced Technology and Alternative Fuel Vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, J.

    2001-01-01

    This fact sheet provides a basic overview of today's alternative fuel choices--including biofuels, biodiesel, electricity, and hydrogen--alternative fuel vehicles, and advanced vehicle technology, such as hybrid electric vehicles, fuel cells and advanced drive trains

  17. Combustion chemistry of biodiesel for use in urban transport buses : experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Biofuels, such as biodiesel, offer benefits as a possible alternative to conventional fuels due to their fuel source sustainability : and reduced environmental impact. Before they can be used, however, it is essential to understand their physical pro...

  18. An analytical and experimental study of performance on jatropha biodiesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Thirunavukkarasu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel plays a major role as one of the alternative fuel options in direct injection diesel engines for more than a decade. Though many feed stocks are employed for making biodiesel worldwide, biodiesel derived from domestically available non-edible feed stocks such as Jatropha curcas L. is the most promising alternative engine fuel option especially in developing countries. Since experimental analysis of the engine is pricey as well as more time consuming and laborious, a theoretical thermodynamic model is necessary to analyze the performance characteristics of jatropha biodiesel fueled diesel engine. There were many experimental studies of jatropha biodiesel fueled diesel engine reported in the literature, yet theoretical study of this biodiesel run diesel engine is scarce. This work presents a theoretical thermodynamic study of single cylinder four stroke direct injection diesel engine fueled with biodiesel derived from jatropha oil. The two zone thermodynamic model developed in the present study computes the in-cylinder pressure and temperature histories in addition to various performance parameters. The results of the model are validated with experimental values for a reasonable agreement. The variation of cylinder pressure with crank angle for various models are also compared and presented. The effects of injection timing, relative air fuel ratio and compression ratio on the engine performance characteristics for diesel and jatropha biodiesel fuels are then investigated and presented in the paper.

  19. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Results Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Conclusions Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution. PMID:23590829

  20. Conversion of lipid from food waste to biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmee, Sanjib Kumar; Linardi, Darwin; Lee, Jisoo; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2015-07-01

    Depletion of fossil fuels and environmental problems are encouraging research on alternative fuels of renewable sources. Biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel to be used as a substitute to the petroleum based diesel fuels. However, the cost of biodiesel production is high and is attributed mainly to the feedstock used which leads to the investigation of low cost feedstocks that are economically feasible. In this paper, we report on the utilization of lipid obtained from food waste as a low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production. Lipid from food waste was transesterified with methanol using base and lipase as catalysts. The maximum biodiesel yield was 100% for the base (KOH) catalyzed transesterification at 1:10M ratio of lipid to methanol in 2h at 60°C. Novozyme-435 yielded a 90% FAME conversion at 40°C and 1:5 lipid to methanol molar ratio in 24h. Lipid obtained from fungal hydrolysis of food waste is found to be a suitable feedstock for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proceedings of the 2008 marine biodiesel symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In addition to producing lower hydrocarbon emissions, marine biodiesel is biodegradable and does not harm fish. This symposium was held to discuss current marine biodiesel applications and examine methods of increasing the use of biodiesel in marine environments in British Columbia (BC). Biofuel policies and mandates in the province were reviewed, and methods of expanding the biodiesel market were explored. Updates on the use of biodiesel in ferries, tugboats, and smaller marine diesel engine applications were provided. Biodiesel projects in the United States were discussed. The environmental impacts of marine biodiesel were evaluated, and federal policies and standards for biodiesel were also outlined. The symposium was divided into the following 5 main sessions: (1) policy, (2) overviews, (3) using biodiesel in marine engines, (4) biodiesel in larger marine vessels, and (5) biodiesel quality and environmental considerations. The conference featured 13 presentations, of which 4 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  2. Energy Analysis of a Diesel Engine Using Diesel and Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil

    OpenAIRE

    S Abbasi; H Bahrami; B Ghobadian; M Kiani Deh Kiani

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The extensive use of diesel engines in agricultural activities and transportation, led to the emergence of serious challenges in providing and evaluating alternative fuels from different sources in addition to the chemical properties close to diesel fuel, including properties such as renewable, inexpensive and have fewer emissions. Biodiesel is one of the alternative fuels. Many studies have been carried out on the use of biodiesel in pure form or blended with diesel fuel a...

  3. Effects of NOx-inhibitor agent on fuel properties of three-phase biodiesel emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan; Lin, Hsiu-An

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel is one of the more promising alternative clean fuels to fossil fuel, which can reduce the emissions of fossil fuel burning, and possibly resolve the energy crisis caused by the exhaustion of petroleum resources in the near future. The burning of biodiesel emits much less gaseous emissions and particulate matter primarily because of its dominant combustion efficiency. However, the high oxygen content in biodiesel not only promotes the burning process but also enhances NO x formation when biodiesel is used as fuel. Biodiesel emulsion and the additive of NO x -inhibitor agent are considered to reduce levels of NO x emissions in this experimental study. The biodiesel was produced by transesterification reaction accompanied with peroxidation process. A three-phase biodiesel emulsion of oil-in water drops-in oil (O/W/O) and an O/W/O biodiesel emulsion containing aqueous ammonia were prepared afterwards. The effect of the existence of NO x -inhibitor agent on the fuel properties and the emulsion characteristics of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsions were investigated. The experimental results show that the burning of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion and the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion containing aqueous ammonia had larger fraction of fuel burnt and thus larger heat release than the neat biodiesel if water content is not considered for the calculation of heating value. The addition of aqueous ammonia within the dispersed phase of the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion appeared to deteriorate the emulsification characteristics. A smaller quantity of emulsion and greater kinematic viscosity were formed while a larger carbon residue and actual reaction-heat release also appeared for this O/W/O biodiesel emulsion. Aqueous ammonia in the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion produces a higher pH value as well. In addition, the number as well as the volumetric fraction of the dispersed water droplets is reduced for the O/W/O biodiesel emulsion that contains aqueous ammonia. (author)

  4. Engine performance, combustion, and emissions study of biomass to liquid fuel in a compression-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunkoya, Dolanimi; Fang, Tiegang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Renewable biomass to liquid (BTL) fuel was tested in a direct injection diesel engine. • Engine performance, in-cylinder pressure, and exhaust emissions were measured. • BTL fuel reduces pollutant emission for most conditions compared with diesel and biodiesel. • BTL fuel leads to high thermal efficiency and lower fuel consumption compared with diesel and biodiesel. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of diesel, biodiesel and biomass to liquid (BTL) fuels are investigated in a single-cylinder diesel engine at a fixed speed (2000 rpm) and three engine loads corresponding to 0 bar, 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The engine performance, in-cylinder combustion, and exhaust emissions were measured. Results show an increase in indicated work for BTL and biodiesel at 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP when compared to diesel but a decrease at 0 bar. Lower mechanical efficiency was observed for BTL and biodiesel at 1.26 bar BMEP but all three fuels had roughly the same mechanical efficiency at 3.77 bar BMEP. BTL was found to have the lowest brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and the highest brake thermal efficiency (BTE) among the three fuels tested. Combustion profiles for the three fuels were observed to vary depending on the engine load. Biodiesel was seen to have the shortest ignition delay among the three fuels regardless of engine loads. Diesel had the longest ignition delay at 0 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP but had the same ignition delay as BTL at 1.26 bar BMEP. At 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP, BTL had the lowest HC emissions but highest HC emissions at no load conditions when compared to biodiesel and diesel. When compared to diesel and biodiesel BTL had lower CO and CO 2 emissions. At 0 bar and 1.26 bar BMEP, BTL had higher NOx emissions than diesel fuel but lower NOx than biodiesel at no load conditions. At the highest engine load tested, NOx emissions were observed to be highest for diesel fuel but lowest for BTL. At 1

  5. Catalyst systems in the production of biodiesel from residual oil; Sistemas cataliticos na producao de biodiesel por meio de oleo residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Carlos Alexandre de [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The vegetable oils and fat animals appear like an alternative for substitution the diesel oil in ignition engines for compression. Submitting the oil on transesterification reaction, we obtain a fuel with same characteristics as diesel, called biodiesel. Generally, 85 per cent of biodiesel cost is from the oil production. Through transesterification vegetable oil can be transformed in a mixture of esters of fatty acids. The residual oil from frying has been used as a possibility of raw materials of biodiesel, due to its easy acquisition and the viability of not being discarded as waste. (author)

  6. Production of biodiesel from microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Bojana R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more attention has been paid to the use of third generation feedstocs for the production of biodiesel. One of the most promising sources of oil for biodiesel production are microalgae. They are unicellular or colonial photosynthetic organisms, with permanently increasing industrial application in the production of not only chemicals and nutritional supplements but also biodiesel. Biodiesel productivity per hectare of cultivation area can be up to 100 times higher for microalgae than for oil crops. Also, microalgae can grow in a variety of environments that are often unsuitable for agricultural purposes. Microalgae oil content varies in different species and can reach up to 77% of dry biomass, while the oil productivity by the phototrophic cultivation of microalgae is up to 122 mg/l/d. Variations of the growth conditions and the implementation of the genetic engineering can induce the changes in the composition and productivity of microalgal oil. Biodiesel from microalgae can be produced in two ways: by transesterification of oil extracted from biomass or by direct transesterification of algal biomass (so called in situ transesterification. This paper reviews the curent status of microalgae used for the production of biodiesel including their isolation, cultivation, harvesting and conversion to biodiesel. Because of high oil productivity, microalgae will play a significant role in future biodiesel production. The advantages of using microalgae as a source for biofuel production are increased efficiency and reduced cost of production. Also, microalgae do not require a lot of space for growing and do not have a negative impact on the global food and water supplies. Disadvantages of using microalgae are more difficult separation of biomass and the need for further research to develop standardized methods for microalgae cultivation and biodiesel production. Currently, microalgae are not yet sustainable option for the commercial

  7. Energetic assessment of soybean biodiesel obtainment in West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work presents the result of a research that aimed to assess soybean-based biodiesel production in the West region of Paraná State, showing that the growing usage of these fuels happens due to the need for alternatives to the use of fossil fuels, once biomass-based fuels have been an environmentally-friendly ...

  8. Preparation of Jojoba Oil Ester Derivatives for Biodiesel Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a result of the increase in commodity vegetable oil prices, it is imperative that non-food oils should be considered as alternative feedstocks for biodiesel production. Jojoba oil is unusual in that it is comprised of wax esters as opposed to the triglycerides found in typical vegetable oils. A...

  9. Superstructure-based optimization of biorefinery networks: Production of biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Orsi, Albert; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    through a practical case study for the production biodiesel from a variety of feedstock. The different biorefinery processing alternatives are represented in a superstructure and the associated data is collected and stored in a database. Once a specific biorefinery synthesis problem is formulated...

  10. BIODIESEL EXHAUST: THE NEED FOR HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a diesel fuel alternative that has shown potential of becoming a commercially accepted part of the United States energy infrastructure. In November of 2004, the signing of the Jobs Creation Bill HR4520 marked an important turning point for the future production of bi...

  11. Soybean Oil: Powering a High School Investigation of Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rosa, Paul; Azurin, Katherine A.; Page, Michael F. Z.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory investigation challenges students to synthesize, analyze, and compare viable alternative fuels to Diesel No. 2 using a renewable resource, as well as readily available reagents and supplies. During the experiment, students synthesized biodiesel from soybean oil in an average percent yield of 83.8 ± 6.3%. They then prepared fuel…

  12. Alternatives to disposal of Hanford Site liquid effluents to the soil column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhardt, C.C.; Flyckt, D.L.; Wirsing, R.M.; Winterhalder, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    Alternative systems were selected for 28 effluent streams, based on the use of available technology and ability to eliminate the contaminated effluent or reduce contaminant levels to meet specified effluent disposal criteria and standards derived from DOE Orders and environmental statutes. This study determined that technically feasible alternative waste disposal systems are available. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P. [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India)

    2010-12-15

    In view of the fast depletion of fossil fuel, the search for alternative fuels has become inevitable, looking at huge demand of diesel for transportation sector, captive power generation and agricultural sector, the biodiesel is being viewed a substitute of diesel. The vegetable oils, fats, grease are the source of feedstocks for the production of biodiesel. Significant work has been reported on the kinetics of transesterification of edible vegetable oils but little work is reported on non-edible oils. Out of various non-edible oil resources, Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) is considered as future feedstocks for biodiesel production in India and limited work is reported on the kinetics of transesterification of high FFA containing oil. The present study reports a review of kinetics of biodiesel production. The paper also reveals the results of kinetics study of two-step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried out at pre-determined optimum temperature of 65 and 50 C for esterification and transesterification process, respectively, under the optimum condition of methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1% (w/w) for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH and 400 rpm of stirring. The yield of methyl ester (ME) has been used to study the effect of different parameters. The maximum yield of 21.2% of ME during esterification and 90.1% from transesterification of pretreated JCO has been obtained. This is the first study of its kind dealing with simplified kinetics of two-step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried at optimum temperature of both the steps which took about 6 h for complete conversion of TG to ME. (author)

  14. Techno-economic evaluation of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil--a case study of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmee, Sanjib Kumar; Patria, Raffel Dharma; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2015-02-18

    Fossil fuel shortage is a major challenge worldwide. Therefore, research is currently underway to investigate potential renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the major renewable energy sources that can be obtained from oils and fats by transesterification. However, biodiesel obtained from vegetable oils as feedstock is expensive. Thus, an alternative and inexpensive feedstock such as waste cooking oil (WCO) can be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. In this project, techno-economic analyses were performed on the biodiesel production in Hong Kong using WCO as a feedstock. Three different catalysts such as acid, base, and lipase were evaluated for the biodiesel production from WCO. These economic analyses were then compared to determine the most cost-effective method for the biodiesel production. The internal rate of return (IRR) sensitivity analyses on the WCO price and biodiesel price variation are performed. Acid was found to be the most cost-effective catalyst for the biodiesel production; whereas, lipase was the most expensive catalyst for biodiesel production. In the IRR sensitivity analyses, the acid catalyst can also acquire acceptable IRR despite the variation of the WCO and biodiesel prices.

  15. Techno-Economic Evaluation of Biodiesel Production from Waste Cooking Oil—A Case Study of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmee, Sanjib Kumar; Patria, Raffel Dharma; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2015-01-01

    Fossil fuel shortage is a major challenge worldwide. Therefore, research is currently underway to investigate potential renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the major renewable energy sources that can be obtained from oils and fats by transesterification. However, biodiesel obtained from vegetable oils as feedstock is expensive. Thus, an alternative and inexpensive feedstock such as waste cooking oil (WCO) can be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. In this project, techno-economic analyses were performed on the biodiesel production in Hong Kong using WCO as a feedstock. Three different catalysts such as acid, base, and lipase were evaluated for the biodiesel production from WCO. These economic analyses were then compared to determine the most cost-effective method for the biodiesel production. The internal rate of return (IRR) sensitivity analyses on the WCO price and biodiesel price variation are performed. Acid was found to be the most cost-effective catalyst for the biodiesel production; whereas, lipase was the most expensive catalyst for biodiesel production. In the IRR sensitivity analyses, the acid catalyst can also acquire acceptable IRR despite the variation of the WCO and biodiesel prices. PMID:25809602

  16. Techno-Economic Evaluation of Biodiesel Production from Waste Cooking Oil—A Case Study of Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Kumar Karmee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fuel shortage is a major challenge worldwide. Therefore, research is currently underway to investigate potential renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the major renewable energy sources that can be obtained from oils and fats by transesterification. However, biodiesel obtained from vegetable oils as feedstock is expensive. Thus, an alternative and inexpensive feedstock such as waste cooking oil (WCO can be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. In this project, techno-economic analyses were performed on the biodiesel production in Hong Kong using WCO as a feedstock. Three different catalysts such as acid, base, and lipase were evaluated for the biodiesel production from WCO. These economic analyses were then compared to determine the most cost-effective method for the biodiesel production. The internal rate of return (IRR sensitivity analyses on the WCO price and biodiesel price variation are performed. Acid was found to be the most cost-effective catalyst for the biodiesel production; whereas, lipase was the most expensive catalyst for biodiesel production. In the IRR sensitivity analyses, the acid catalyst can also acquire acceptable IRR despite the variation of the WCO and biodiesel prices.

  17. Side-stream products of edible oil refining as feedstocks in biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Bojan S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel, a diesel fuel alternative, is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats by the transesterification reaction of triacylglycerols and lower aliphatic alcohols. Beside number advantages related to fossil fuels, the main barrier to biodiesel wider commercial use is the high price of edible oils. Recently, the special attention was given to side-stream products of edible oil refining as low-cost triacylglycerol sources for biodiesel production because of their positive economic and ecological effects. In this paper, the different procedures for biodiesel production from side-stream refining products such as soapstock, spent bleaching earth and deodorizer distillate were analyzed. The main goal of this paper is to analyze the possibilities for reusing the by-products of edible oil refinement in the biodiesel production.

  18. A review on novel processes of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebian-Kiakalaieh, Amin; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina; Mazaheri, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Fossil fuel depletion, environmental concerns, and steep hikes in the price of fossil fuels are driving scientists to search for alternative fuels. The characteristics of biodiesel have made the pursuit of high quality biodiesel production attractive. Utilization of waste cooking oil is a key component in reducing biodiesel production costs up to 60–90%. Researchers have used various types of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyzed transesterification reaction for biodiesel production. Meanwhile, the effect of novel processes such as membrane reactor, reactive distillation column, reactive absorption, ultrasonic and microwave irradiation significantly influenced the final conversion, yield and in particular, the quality of product. This article attempts to cover all possible techniques in production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil

  19. Optical characterization of pure vegetable oils and their biodiesels using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdous, S.; Anwar, S.; Waheed, A.; Maraj, M.

    2016-04-01

    Great concern regarding energy resources and environmental polution has increased interest in the study of alternative sources of energy. Biodiesels as an alternative fuel provide a suitable diesel oil substitute for internal combustion engines. The Raman spectra of pure biodiesels of soybean oil, olive oil, coconut oil, animal fats, and petroleum diesel are optically characterized for quality and biofuel as an alternative fuel. The most significant spectral differences are observed in the frequency range around 1457 cm-1 for pure petroleum diesel, 1427 for fats biodiesel, 1670 cm-1 for pure soybean oil, 1461 cm-1 for soybean oil based biodiesel, 1670 cm-1 for pure olive oil, 1666 cm-1 for olive oil based biodiesel, 1461 cm-1 for pure coconut oil, and 1460 cm-1 for coconut oil based biodiesel, which is used for the analysis of the phase composition of oils. A diode pump solid-state laser with a 532 nm wavelength is used as an illuminating light. It is demonstrated that the peak positions and relative intensities of the vibrations of the oils can be used to identify the biodiesel quality for being used as biofuel.

  20. Optical characterization of pure vegetable oils and their biodiesels using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firdous, S; Anwar, S; Waheed, A; Maraj, M

    2016-01-01

    Great concern regarding energy resources and environmental polution has increased interest in the study of alternative sources of energy. Biodiesels as an alternative fuel provide a suitable diesel oil substitute for internal combustion engines. The Raman spectra of pure biodiesels of soybean oil, olive oil, coconut oil, animal fats, and petroleum diesel are optically characterized for quality and biofuel as an alternative fuel. The most significant spectral differences are observed in the frequency range around 1457 cm −1 for pure petroleum diesel, 1427 for fats biodiesel, 1670 cm −1 for pure soybean oil, 1461 cm −1 for soybean oil based biodiesel, 1670 cm −1 for pure olive oil, 1666 cm −1 for olive oil based biodiesel, 1461 cm −1 for pure coconut oil, and 1460 cm −1 for coconut oil based biodiesel, which is used for the analysis of the phase composition of oils. A diode pump solid-state laser with a 532 nm wavelength is used as an illuminating light. It is demonstrated that the peak positions and relative intensities of the vibrations of the oils can be used to identify the biodiesel quality for being used as biofuel. (paper)

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    or other domestic, renewable resources using sustainable agricultural methods and encourages its use Engineering Associates, LLC Process Engineering Associates is an independent process design company providing ) Commodity Operations The Commodity Operations Program seeks to expand industrial consumption of agricultural

  2. The emergence of the biodiesel industry in Brazil: Current figures and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos Padula, Antonio; Silveira Santos, Manoela; Ferreira, Luciano; Borenstein, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to characterize and analyze the emergence of the biodiesel industry in Brazil, and provide an assessment of the extent to which the goals established by the National Biodiesel Production and Usage Program have been reached. In relation to the goal of including biodiesel within the Brazilian energy matrix, the program can be seen to be responding dynamically and ahead of schedule. In 2010, the B5 blend was already part of the diesel consumed in Brazil, with 81% of the biodiesel coming from soybean oil and 14% from beef tallow. By contrast, the plans to diversify the feedstocks used to produce biodiesel and improve production in the poorest regions of Brazil have failed to prosper. Regarding the goal of fostering social inclusion by encouraging the participation of family-based farming, this has been partially achieved. Finally, the goal of cost-efficiently producing biodiesel is far from being achieved. The economic feasibility of the production and use of biodiesel in Brazil can be questioned since it is still strongly supported by tax incentives and production and marketing subsidies. - Highlights: ► This paper examines the emergence of the biodiesel industry in Brazil. ► Biodiesel produced from soybean in large plants represents 80% of total production. ► Soybean-based biodiesel costs 30% more than the most economical alternatives. ► The production and trade of biodiesel in Brazil are highly subsidized. ► Feedstock diversification and family farming integration goals have so far failed.

  3. Prospects of biodiesel from Jatropha in India: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P. [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, Uttarakhand (India)

    2010-02-15

    The increasing industrialization and modernization of the world has to a steep rise for the demand of petroleum products. Economic development in developing countries has led to huge increase in the energy demand. In India, the energy demand is increasing at a rate of 6.5% per annum. The crude oil demand of the country is met by import of about 80%. Thus the energy security has become a key issue for the nation as a whole. Petroleum-based fuels are limited. The finite reserves are highly concentrated in certain regions of the world. Therefore, those countries not having these reserves are facing foreign exchange crises, mainly due to the import of crude oil. Hence it is necessary to look forward for alternative fuels, which can be produced from feedstocks available within the country. Biodiesel, an ecofriendly and renewable fuel substitute for diesel has been getting the attention of researchers/scientists of all over the world. The R and D has indicated that up to B20, there is no need of modification and little work is available related to suitability and sustainability of biodiesel production from Jatropha as non-edible oil sources. In addition, the use of vegetable oil as fuel is less polluting than petroleum fuels. The basic problem with biodiesel is that it is more prone to oxidation resulting in the increase in viscosity of biodiesel with respect to time which in turn leads to piston sticking, gum formation and fuel atomization problems. The report is an attempt to present the prevailing fossil fuel scenario with respect to petroleum diesel, fuel properties of biodiesel resources for biodiesel production, processes for its production, purification, etc. Lastly, an introduction of stability of biodiesel will also be presented. (author)

  4. Prospects of biodiesel from Jatropha in India: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing industrialization and modernization of the world has to a steep rise for the demand of petroleum products. Economic development in developing countries has led to huge increase in the energy demand. In India, the energy demand is increasing at a rate of 6.5% per annum. The crude oil demand of the country is met by import of about 80%. Thus the energy security has become a key issue for the nation as a whole. Petroleum-based fuels are limited. The finite reserves are highly concentrated in certain regions of the world. Therefore, those countries not having these reserves are facing foreign exchange crises, mainly due to the import of crude oil. Hence it is necessary to look forward for alternative fuels, which can be produced from feedstocks available within the country. Biodiesel, an ecofriendly and renewable fuel substitute for diesel has been getting the attention of researchers/scientists of all over the world. The R and D has indicated that up to B20, there is no need of modification and little work is available related to suitability and sustainability of biodiesel production from Jatropha as non-edible oil sources. In addition, the use of vegetable oil as fuel is less polluting than petroleum fuels. The basic problem with biodiesel is that it is more prone to oxidation resulting in the increase in viscosity of biodiesel with respect to time which in turn leads to piston sticking, gum formation and fuel atomization problems. The report is an attempt to present the prevailing fossil fuel scenario with respect to petroleum diesel, fuel properties of biodiesel resources for biodiesel production, processes for its production, purification, etc. Lastly, an introduction of stability of biodiesel will also be presented. (author)

  5. Potency of Microalgae as Biodiesel Source in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hadiyanto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Within 20 years, Indonesia should find another energy alternative to substitutecurrent fossil oil. Current use of renewable energy is only 5% and need to be improved up to 17%of our energy mix program. Even though, most of the area in Indonesia is covered by sea, howeverthe utilization of microalgae as biofuel production is still limited. The biodiesel from currentsources (Jatropha, palm oil, and sorghum is still not able to cover all the needs if the fossil oilcannot be explored anymore. In this paper, the potency of microalgae in Indonesia was analysed asthe new potential of energy (biodiesel sources.

  6. Potency of Microalgae as Biodiesel Source in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hadiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Within 20 years, Indonesia should find another energy alternative to substitute current fossil oil. Current use of renewable energy is only 5% and need to be improved up to 17% of our energy mix program. Even though, most of the area in Indonesia is covered by sea, however the utilization of microalgae as biofuel production is still limited. The biodiesel from current sources (Jatropha, palm oil, and sorghum is still not able to cover all the needs if the fossil oil cannot be explored anymore. In this paper, the potency of microalgae in Indonesia was analysed as the new potential of energy (biodiesel sources.

  7. Enzymatic Production of FAME Biodiesel with Soluble Lipases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Gundersen, Maria; Heltborg, Carsten Kirstejn; Yang, V

    Biodiesel is a viable alternative to fossil fuels, and biocatalysis is gaining interest as a greener process. We focus on converting oils to Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) using soluble lipases, which offer an advantage compared to immobilized enzymes by cost efficiency and ease of implementation...... the defined operating space concerning: temperature, water content, initial methanol concentration and enzyme content. The identified optimum range was experimentally evaluated, and model findings were confirmed. Another barrier in lipase use in biodiesel production is the higher melting point (m...

  8. Model Feed for Hydrotreating of Fat for Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biodiesel production by the transesterification of oils and fats with an alcohol to fatty acid alkyl esters is rapidly increasing worldwide. Plant oils are usually suited for transesterification, but feedstocks from waste products like trap greases and abattoir wastes are difficult to react due...... resulted in lower conversions and a much higher degree of hydrogenation than with the Pt catalyst. This protocol represents a facile method of studying hydrotreating of waste fats and oils for biodiesel production, which may be a viable alternative to current dominating transesterification technology. 1...

  9. The second Workshop on Alternative Sources of Energy of Vegetable Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Giselle; Mata Segreda, Julio F.

    2008-01-01

    Diesel diffuses into neoprene matrices 10% faster than palm ethyl biodiesel at 20 degrees celsius. In contrast, the palm biodiesel soaks highly plasticised PVC five times faster than diesel. Phthalate plasticizer leaks from the PVC matrix 14 times faster when biodiesel is the absorbed liquid, relative to petrodiesel. This biodiesel penetrates polybutadiene-styrene resins at rates that depend on the ratio of phenyl to CH=CH units in the resins. (author) [es

  10. The State High Biodiesel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasley, Paul L.; Van Der Sluys, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Through a collaborative project in Pennsylvania, high school students developed a method for converting batches of their cafeteria's waste fryer oil into biodiesel using a 190 L (50 gal) reactor. While the biodiesel is used to supplement the school district's heating and transportation energy needs, the byproduct--glycerol--is used to make hand…

  11. Determination of antioxidant content in biodiesel by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Keurison F.; Caires, Anderson R.L. [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, MS (Brazil). Grupo de Optica Aplicada; Oliveira, Samuel L. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), MS (Brazil). Grupo de Optica e Fotonica

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Biodiesel is an alternative fuel composed by mono-alkyl esters obtained from vegetable oils or animal fats. Due to its chemical structure, biodiesel is highly susceptible to oxidation which leads to formation of insoluble gums and sediments that can block the filter system of fuel injection. Biodiesel made from vegetable oils typically has a small amount of natural antioxidants so that it is necessary to add synthetic antioxidants to enhance its stability and retain their properties for a longer period. The main antioxidants are synthetic phenolic compounds such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) as well as natural antioxidants as tocopherols. The fluorescence spectroscopy has been applied for determination of phenolic compounds in oils. Here, a method based on fluorescence is proposed to quantify the BHA and TBHQ antioxidant concentration in biodiesel produced from sunflower and soybean oils. Soybean and sunflower biodiesel were obtained by transesterification of fatty alcohol in the presence of NaOH as catalyst. The reactions were carried out in the molar ratio of 6:1 methanol/oil. After the production and purification, biodiesel samples were stored. Biodiesel samples with BHA and TBHQ concentrations from 1000 to 8000 ppm (m/m) were pre- pared. These samples were diluted in ethanol (95%) in order to measure the fluorescence spectra. Fluorescence and excitation spectra of the solutions were recorded at room temperature using a spectrofluorimeter. The emission spectra were obtained under excitation at about 310nm and fluorescence in the 320-800nm range was evaluated. Biodiesel samples without BHA and TBHQ showed fluorescence band at about 420nm, which can be attributed to tocopherols inherent to the vegetable oils used in the biodiesel production. The addition of BHA and/or TBHQ is responsible for the appearance of a fluorescence band around 330nm. It was verified that the fluorescence

  12. Investigation of an Alternative Fuel Form for the Liquid Salt Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casino, William A. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Much of the recent studies investigating the use of liquid salts as reactor coolants have utilized a core configuration of graphite prismatic fuel block assemblies with TRISO particles embedded into cylindrical fuel compacts arranged in a triangular pitch lattice. Although many calculations have been performed for this fuel form in gas cooled reactors, it would be instructive to investigate whether an alternative fuel form may yield improved performance for the liquid salt-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This study investigates how variations in the fuel form will impact the performance of the LS-VHTR during normal and accident conditions and compares the results with a similar analysis that was recently completed for a LS-VHTR core made up of prismatic block fuel. (author)

  13. Economics of biodiesel production in the context of fulfilling 20% blending with petro-diesel in Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parajuli, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    The dependency on imported petro-diesel along with the escalating price are adversely affecting the national economy of Nepal. As an alternative fuel, prospects of biodiesel production for partial substitution of petro-diesel are felt necessary to reduce the dependency on fossil fuel. This article...... outlines the economics of biodiesel production in the country. Three different cases are developed for the economic analysis in the chain of biodiesel production, which are aimed to overview the influences of yield of plant, cost of cultivation, and price of raw oilseeds to the production cost of biodiesel....... The study concludes that the biodiesel production is economically viable with a plant yield greater than 2 kg/plant and with the price of oil seeds lower than 0.22 USD/kg, which has a positive return on investment. With the yield lower than 2 kg/plant, the production cost of biodiesel cannot compete...

  14. Methyl biodiesel from Dipteryx lacunifera: preparation, characterization and effect of antioxidant on the oxidation stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Francisca Diana da Silva; Moura, Carla Veronica Rodarte de; Chaves, Mariana H.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the potentialities of Dipteryx lacunifera Ducke seeds oil for biodiesel production. The yield in oil was of 46.11 ± 0.37%. Methyl biodiesel was prepared by base catalyzed transesterification yielding 88.13% and percentage conversion of triglycerides to corresponding methyl ester of 89.1%. The addition of the tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ, 50 ppm), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, 50 ppm) and cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL, 2000 ppm) antioxidants in the biodiesel contributed to the increase of the induction period of 2.97 h for 8.08; 6.06 and 6.02 h, respectively. (author)

  15. Mahua (Madhuca Indica oil: A potential source for biodiesel production in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkarsh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The economic development of a country is highly dependent on the supply of fossil fuels which are constrained by its limited availability and pollution characteristics. India is among the world’s fourth-largest petroleum consumer due to which the vehicular emissions increased eight times over the last two decades. Due to the environmental awareness and depletion of fossil fuel reserves, attention has been given to find an alternative energy source. Among the alternatives existing, Biodiesel is the one which is less polluting and eco-friendly. So it can be used in industrial, commercial, agricultural and other sectors as a substitute for diesel. Biodiesel can be produced from crude vegetable oil, non-edible oil, frying oils (waste, animal tallow and algae by a process of chemical reaction called Transesterification. Biodiesel is also known as methyl or ethyl esters of the feedstock from which it is produced. It is miscible with diesel oil which allows the use of blends of petro diesel and biodiesel in any percentage. The C.I. engines fuelled with biodiesel perform more or less in the same fashion as that with the conventional fuel. Comparative to diesel, biodiesel has high Cetane number and lower compressibility. Additionally, the heat release rate of biodiesel is slightly lower than diesel owing to low calorific value, low volatility and high viscosity. The problem of high viscosity can be eradicated by transesterification process and by adding additives which help us to store the biodiesel for a longer duration of time without any decay. Exhaust emissions are significantly reduced with the use of biodiesel or its blends. The present paper investigates the potential of Mahua (Madhuca Indica oil for biodiesel production as it can be extracted from seeds of Mahua tree which are indigenous to India. It can grow even in dry regions and are found abundantly in several parts of India

  16. Transesterification catalyzed by Lipozyme TLIM for biodiesel production from low cost feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Siti Fatimah Abdul; Hassan, Hamizura; Amri, Nurulhuda; Bashah, Nur Alwani Ali

    2015-05-01

    The development of new strategies to efficiently synthesize biodiesel is of extreme important. This is because biodiesel has been accepted worldwide as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel as alkyl ester derived from vegetable oil has considerable advantages in terms of environmental protection. The diminishing petroleum reserves are the major driving force for researchers to look for better strategies in producing biodiesel. The main hurdle to commercialization of biodiesel is the cost of the raw material. Biodiesel is usually produced from food-grade vegetable oil that is more expensive than diesel fuel. Therefore, biodiesel produced from food-grade vegetable oil is currently not economically feasible. Use of an inexpensive raw material such as waste cooking palm oil and non edible oil sea mango are an attractive option to lower the cost of biodiesel. This study addresses an alternative method for biodiesel production which is to use an enzymatic approach in producing biodiesel fuel from low cost feedstock waste cooking palm oil and unrefined sea mango oil using immobilized lipase Lipozyme TL IM. tert-butanol was used as the reaction medium, which eliminated both negative effects caused by excessive methanol and glycerol as the byproduct. Two variables which is methanol to oil molar ratio and enzyme loading were examine in a batch system. Transesterification of waste cooking palm oil reach 65% FAME yield (methanol to oil molar ratio 6:1 and 10% Novozyme 435 based on oil weight), while transesterification of sea mango oil can reach 90% FAME yield (methanol to oil molar ratio 6:1 and 10% Lipozyme TLIM based on oil weight).

  17. BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK NYAMPLUNG TEROZONISASI MELALUI ESTERIFIKASI DAN TRANSESTERIFIKASI DENGAN BANTUAN GELOMBANG ULTRASONIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Haryono

    2016-10-01

      Fuel from petroleum is the most dominant source of energy used and is non-renewable. This causes the reduction in fossil fuel reserves. It encourages the development of alternative renewable fuels such as biodiesel. The purpose of this study was to synthesize biodiesel from Calophyllum inophyllum oil through esterification and transesterification process with the help of ozonation and ultrasonic waves. Ozonation is performed for 30 minutes, while the transesterification reaction is aided by ultrasonic wave frequency variation 28 and 35 kHz respectively for 30 minutes. The results showed that the use of ultrasonic waves with frequency of 35 kHz in the transesterification reaction to the ozonized Calophyllum inophyllum oil from esterification reaction produced biodiesel relatively accordance with the standards of biodiesel Indonesia. Biodiesel produced in these conditions have the acid value of 0.70 mgKOH/g biodiesel, iodine number 50.34 g I2/100 g, the flash point of 122.4°C, cetana numbers of 102.5, density of 0.9088 g/cm3, and a viscosity of 9.5 cSt. Biodiesel yield that obtained from the best synthesis condition is 77.0%.   Keywords:   biodiesel, Calophyllum inophyllum oil, ozonation, transesterification, ultrasonic.

  18. Degradation of physical properties of different elastomers upon exposure to palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Jun, T.S.; Fazal, M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel, is gradually receiving more popularity for use in internal combustion engines. However questions continue to arise with regard to its compatibility with elastomeric materials. The present work aims to investigate the comparative degradation of physical properties for different elastomers [e.g. ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM), silicone rubber (SR), polychloroprene (CR), polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) and nitrile rubber (NBR)] upon exposure to diesel and palm biodiesel. Static immersion tests in B0(diesel), B10 (10% biodiesel in diesel), B20, B50 and B100(biodiesel) were carried out at room temperature (25 o C) for 1000 h. Different physical properties like, changes in weight and volume, hardness and tensile strength were measured at every 250 h of immersion time. Compositional changes in biodiesel due to exposure of different elastomers were investigated by Gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS). The overall sequence of compatible elastomers in palm biodiesel is found to be PTFE > SR > NBR > EPDM > CR. -- Research highlights: → Biodiesel and its blends swelled polychloroprene (CR) and nitrile rubber (NBR) to a greater extent than did diesel. → Although PTFE seems to be the most compatible elastomer among those tested, it undergoes a slight reduction of main constituents. →The overall sequence of compatible elastomers in palm biodiesel is PTFE > SR > NBR > EPDM > CR.

  19. Reaction product of pyrogallol with methyl linoleate and its antioxidant potential for biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanto, H.; Ainny, L.; Lukman; Susanto, B. H.; Nasikin, M.

    2018-03-01

    The demand of biodiesel as an alternative fuel is increasing due to fossil fuel depletion. Biodiesel is a renewable diesel fuel in the form of fatty acid methyl ester or FAME as a result of an esterification of plant oils in a presence of catalyst. Compared to the conventional diesel fuel, biodiesel is more biodegradable, has higher lubricity, and lower toxic emissions. However, the high content of unsaturated fatty acid leads to a problem that biodiesel is prone to oxidation during storage period. This oxidation instability causes degradation of fuel quality and will affect engine performance. Pyrogallol and other phenolic derivatives have been used as the antioxidant additives to prevent biodiesel oxidation. As reported in many researches, pyrogallol is one of the best phenolic antioxidant. However, its low solubility in biodiesel needs an attention. Several reports indicate the increasing solubility of pyrogallol using molecule modification with the addition of alkyl groups to its benzene ring via electrophilic substitution. This paper discusses the idea about modification of pyrogallol molecule and methyl linoleate using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical in order to increase its solubility in biodiesel while keeping its antioxidant property. Three responses were analyzed to examine the antioxidant activity: iodine value, viscosity, and color intensity. The result shown that the addition of 0.1% reaction product exhibit antioxidant activity in biodiesel.

  20. Fuel for the Future: Biodiesel - A Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutterbach, Márcia T. S.; Galvão, Mariana M.

    High crude oil prices, concern over depletion of world reserves, and growing apprehension about the environment, encouraged the search for alternative energy sources that use renewable natural resources to reduce or replace traditional fossil fuels such as diesel and gasoline (Hill et al., 2006). Among renewable fuels, biodiesel has been attracting great interest, especially in Europe and the United States. Biodiesel is defined by the World Customs Organization (WCO) as 'a mixture of mono-alkyl esters of long-chain [C16-C18] fatty acids derived from vegetable oils or animal fats, which is a domestic renewable fuel for diesel engines and which meets the US specifications of ASTM D 6751'. Biodiesel is biodegradable and non toxic, produces 93% more energy than the fossil energy required for its production, reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 40% compared to fossil diesel (Peterson and Hustrulid, 1998; Hill et al., 2006) and stimulates agriculture.

  1. Lipase-catalyzed biodiesel synthesis with different acyl acceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ognjanović Nevena D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engine that is environmentally acceptable. Conventionally, biodiesel is produced by transesterification of triglycerides and short alcohols in the presence of an acid or an alkaline catalyst. There are several problems associated with this kind of production that can be resolved by using lipase as the biocatalyst. The aim of the present work was to investigate novel acyl acceptors for biodiesel production. 2-Propanol and n-butanol have a less negative effect on lipase stability, and they also improve low temperature properties of the fuel. However, excess alcohol leads to inactivation of the enzyme, and glycerol, a major byproduct, can block the immobilized enzyme, resulting in low enzymatic activity. This problem was solved by using methyl acetate as acyl acceptor. Triacetylglycerol is produced instead of glycerol, and it has no negative effect on the activity of the lipase.

  2. Brazilian Biodiesel Policy: Social and environmental considerations of sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcez, Catherine Aliana Gucciardi; Vianna, Joao Nildo de Souza

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze the Brazilian Biodiesel Policy (PNPB) and to identify the social and environmental aspects of sustainability that are present or absent within it. Biofuels, namely alcohol and biodiesel, have been increasing in popularity on a global scale due to their potential as alternative and renewable energy sources. Brazil, a vast country blessed with abundant natural resources and agricultural land, has emerged as a global leader in the production of biofuels. This article includes a brief analysis of the concept of sustainable development, which served as a basis to evaluate the Policy documents. Although PNPB's implementation, which began in 2004, is still within its initial stage, it was possible to identify and elaborate on the environmental and social aspects of the Policy, namely: the social inclusion of family farmers; regional development; food security; influencing the carbon and energy balance of biodiesel; promoting sustainable agricultural practices and a diversity of feedstock. (author)

  3. Biodiesel as a lubricity additive for ultra low sulfur diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subongkoj Topaiboul1 and 2,*

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available With the worldwide trend to reduce emission from diesel engines, ultra low sulfur diesel has been introduced with thesulfur concentration of less than 10 ppm. Unfortunately, the desulfurization process inevitably reduces the lubricity of dieselfuel significantly. Alternatively, biodiesel, with almost zero sulfur content, has been added to enhance lubricity in an ultralow sulfur diesel. This work has evaluated the effectiveness of the biodiesel amount, sourced from palm and jatropha oil,and origin in ultra low sulfur diesel locally available in the market. Wear scar from a high-frequency reciprocating rig isbenchmarked to the standard value (460 m of diesel fuel lubricity. It was found that very small amount (less than 1% ofbiodiesel from either source significantly improves the lubricity in ultra low sulfur diesel, and the biodiesel from jatropha oilis a superior lubricity enhancer.

  4. An alternative high breeding radio design concept with liquid breeder for the NET/INTOR blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avanzini, P.G.; Cardella, A.; Raia, G.; Rosatelli, F.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid lithium tubolar breeding blanket concept has been studied which could be applied to NET/INTOR or other next generation Tokamak reactors. A high breeding ratio can be achieved using a moderator medium, without enriching lithium in the Li6 percentage. Preliminary neutron and gamma flux and thermohydraulics calculations have shown the feasibility and efficiency of our concept. (author)

  5. Alternative sample-introduction technique to avoid breakthrough in gradient-elution liquid chromatography of polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reingruber, E.; Bedani, F.; Buchberger, W.; Schoenmakers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradient-elution liquid chromatography (GELC) is a powerful tool for the characterization of synthetic polymers. However, gradient-elution chromatograms often suffer from breakthrough phenomena. Breakthrough can be averted by using a sample solvent as weak as the mobile phase. However, this approach

  6. Alternative design of pipe sleeve for liquid removal mechanism in mortar slab layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazri, W. M. H. Wan; Anting, N.; Lim, A. J. M. S.; Prasetijo, J.; Shahidan, S.; Din, M. F. Md; Anuar, M. A. Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Porosity is one of the mortar’s characteristics that can cause problems, especially in the room space that used high amount of water, such as bathrooms. Waterproofing is one of the technology that normally used to minimize this problem which is preventing deep penetration of liquid water or moisture into underlying concrete layers. However, without the proper mechanism to remove liquid water and moisture from mortar system, waterproofing layer tends to be damaged after a long period of time by the static formation of liquid water and moisture at mortar layer. Thus, a solution has been proposed to drain out water that penetrated into the mortar layer. This paper introduces a new solution using a Modified Pipe Sleeve (MPS) that installed at the mortar layer. The MPS has been designed considering the percentage surface area of the pipe sleeve that having contact with mortar layer (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10%) with angle of holes of 60°. Infiltration test and flow rate test have been conducted to identify the effectiveness of the MPS in order to drain out liquid water or moisture from the mortar layer. In this study shows that, MPS surface area 10%, angled 60°, function effectively as a water removal compared to other design.

  7. Production of Biodiesel from Locally Available Spent Vegetable Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mostafa Al Naggar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of fossil fuels prompted considerable research to find alternative fuels. Due its environmental benefits and renewable nature the production of biodiesel has acquired increasing importance with a view to optimizing the production procedure and the sources of feedstock. Millions of liters of waste frying oil are produced from local restaurants and houses every year, most are discarded into sewage systems causing damage to the networks.  This study is intended to consider aspects related to the feasibility of the production of biodiesel from waste frying oils which will solve the problem of waste frying oil pollution and reduce the cost of biodiesel production.This research studies the conversion of locally available spent vegetable oils of different origins and with different chemical compositions into an environmentally friendly fuel. The biodiesel production requirements by base catalyzed trans-esterification process for the different feed stocks are determined according to the measured physical properties. The quality of the produced biodiesel is compared to petro diesel in terms of established standard specifications.

  8. Production of Biodiesel from Pinus Roxburghii Oil and its Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishfaq, M.; Ahmad, I.; Shakiruliah, M.; Saeed, K.

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel fuel is an alternative and renewable source of energy. It may help to reduce air pollution and our dependence on fossil fuel for energy. In this study the plant oil was extracted from saw dust of pine tree using methanol as a solvent and acid catalyst (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) was used for transesterification. The effect of reaction time, temperature and catalyst ratio was studied, which presented that the high yield of biodiesel is produced by using 9 mL of catalyst for 1 h reaction time. The physicochemical properties such as density, viscosity, heating value, cetane index, flash point, Conradson carbon residue and distillation behavior of the obtained biodiesel were determined. The results showed that the final fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) product meets with the biodiesel quality standards, and ASTM specification D6751-02. The UV-Visible and FT-IR spectroscopic studies was also performed, which revealed that the synthesized biodiesel consists of aliphatic, olifinic and aromatic hydrocarbons along with fatty acids. (author)

  9. Performance and emissions characteristics of biodiesel from soybean oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canakci, M. [Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey). Faculty of Technical Education

    2005-07-15

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel that can be produced from renewable feedstocks such as vegetable oils, waste frying oils, and animal fats. It is an oxygenated, non-toxic, sulphur-free, biodegradable, and renewable fuel. Many engine manufacturers have included this fuel in their warranties since it can be used in diesel engines without significant modification. However, the fuel properties such as cetane number, heat of combustion, specific gravity, and kinematic viscosity affect the combustion, engine performance and emission characteristics. In this study, the engine performance and emissions characteristics of two different petroleum diesel fuels (No. 1 and No. 2 diesel fuels) and biodiesel from soybean oil and its 20 per cent blends with No. 2 diesel fuel were compared. The results showed that the engine performance of the neat biodiesel and its blend was similar to that of No. 2 diesel fuel with nearly the same brake fuel conversion efficiency, and slightly higher fuel consumption. CO{sub 2} emission for the biodiesel was slightly higher than for the No. 2 diesel fuel. Compared with diesel fuels, biodiesel produced lower exhaust emissions, except NO{sub x}. (author)

  10. Emission Characteristics of a CI Engine Running with a Range of Biodiesel Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belachew Tesfa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, alternative fuels are being investigated in detail for application in compression ignition (CI engines resulting in exciting potential opportunities to increase energy security and reduce gas emissions. Biodiesel is one of the alternative fuels which is renewable and environmentally friendly and can be used in diesel engines with little or no modifications. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of biodiesel types and biodiesel fraction on the emission characteristics of a CI engine. The experimental work was carried out on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection (DI and turbocharged diesel engine by using biodiesel made from waste oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil and comparing them to normal diesel. The fuels used in the analyses are B10, B20, B50, B100 and neat diesel. The engine was operated over a range of engine speeds. Based on the measured parameters, detailed analyses were carried out on major regulated emissions such as NOx, CO, CO2, and THC. It has been seen that the biodiesel types (sources do not result in any significant differences in emissions. The results also clearly indicate that the engine running with biodiesel and blends have higher NOx emission by up to 20%. However, the emissions of the CI engine running on neat biodiesel (B100 were reduced by up to 15%, 40% and 30% for CO, CO2 and THC emissions respectively, as compared to diesel fuel at various operating conditions.

  11. Performance and emissions of an engine fuelled with a biodiesel fuel produced from animal fats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymaz Imdat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil reserves which are located around the world are declining day by day, so new alternative energy sources must be invented for engines of internal combustion and compression ignition, so biodiesel that is an alternative fuel source for diesel engines and it is a renewable energy resource. Biodiesel is a fuel made from vegetable oils, animals’ fats and waste oils. In this study, physical and chemical properties of biodiesel were analyzed and matched to the diesel fuel. In the experimental study, biodiesel was made from animal fats and compared to diesel fuel. Its effects on engine performance and emissions are studied. A single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injected diesel engine with air cooling system are used as test equipment in different cycles. After the experimental study, it is concluded that the reduction of the emissions of CO and HC as biodiesel has the advantage of emission output. Environmentalist property of biodiesel is the most important characteristic of it. But the sight of engine performance diesel fuel has more advantage to biodiesel fuel.

  12. Investigation of heterogeneous solid acid catalyst performance on low grade feedstocks for biodiesel production: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansir, Nasar; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Rashid, Umer; Lokman, Ibrahim M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solid acid catalysts are proficient to esterifying high free fatty acid feedstocks to biodiesel. • Heterogeneous catalysts have the advantage of easy separation and reusability. • Heterogeneous basic catalysts have limitations due to high FFA of low cost feedstocks. • Solid catalysts having acid and base sites reveal better catalyst for biodiesel production. - Abstract: The conventional fossil fuel reserves are continually declining worldwide and therefore posing greater challenges to the future of the energy sources. Biofuel alternatives were found promising to replace the diminishing fossil fuels. However, conversion of edible vegetable oils to biodiesel using homogeneous acids and base catalysts is now considered as indefensible for the future particularly due to food versus fuel competition and other environmental problems related to catalyst system and feedstock. This review has discussed the progression in research and growth related to heterogeneous catalysts used for biodiesel production for low grade feedstocks. The heterogeneous base catalysts have revealed effective way to produce biodiesel, but it has the limitation of being sensitive to high free fatty acid (FFA) or low grade feedstocks. Alternatively, solid acid catalysts are capable of converting the low grade feedstocks to biodiesel in the presence of active acid sites. The paper presents a comprehensive review towards the investigation of solid acid catalyst performance on low grade feedstock, their category, properties, advantages, limitations and possible remedy to their drawbacks for biodiesel production.

  13. Experimental investigation on performance and exhaust emissions of castor oil biodiesel from a diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeefard, M H; Etgahni, M M; Meisami, F; Barari, A

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, produced from plant and animal oils, is an important alternative to fossil fuels because, apart from dwindling supply, the latter are a major source of air pollution. In this investigation, effects of castor oil biodiesel blends have been examined on diesel engine performance and emissions. After producing castor methyl ester by the transesterification method and measuring its characteristics, the experiments were performed on a four cylinder, turbocharged, direct injection, diesel engine. Engine performance (power, torque, brake specific fuel consumption and thermal efficiency) and exhaust emissions were analysed at various engine speeds. All the tests were done under 75% full load. Furthermore, the volumetric blending ratios of biodiesel with conventional diesel fuel were set at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30%. The results indicate that lower blends of biodiesel provide acceptable engine performance and even improve it. Meanwhile, exhaust emissions are much decreased. Finally, a 15% blend of castor oil-biodiesel was picked as the optimized blend of biodiesel-diesel. It was found that lower blends of castor biodiesel are an acceptable fuel alternative for the engine.

  14. Experimental assessment of toxic phorbol ester in oil, biodiesel and seed cake of Jatropha curcas and use of biodiesel in diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Lalit; Pradhan, Subhalaxmi; Das, L.M.; Naik, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► In the present study toxic phorbol esters were detected in oil and seed cake of Jatropha curcas but not detected in biodiesel using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ► The quantity of phorbol esters in Jatropha curcas oil and cake were amounted to be 2.12 ± 0.02 mg/g and 0.6 ± 0.01 mg/g respectively. ► As jatropha oil is a potential source for biodiesel preparation, huge amount of oil and cake will be generated and hence need to be handled carefully. ► Upon engine study exhaust pollutant such as hydrocarbon, smoke opacity and carbon monoxide reduced substantially. - Abstract: The present study deals with estimation of toxic phorbol esters in Jatropha curcas oil, cake and biodiesel and performance emission of different blends of biodiesel in diesel engine. The jatropha seed was collected from Chattishgarh, India and oil content of the seed kernel was 56.5%, determined by soxhlet apparatus. The oil was subjected to biodiesel preparation by twin step method of acid esterification followed by alkali transesterification. The total conversion of jatropha oil methyl ester (JOME) after reaction was 96.05% from proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) studies. The phorbol esters content of oil, cake and biodiesel was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, Waters). The phorbol esters content of the oil was more (2.26 ± 0.01 mg/g) than the cake (0.6 ± 0.01 mg/g) but no phorbol esters peak was detected in biodiesel. The performance and emission study of the fuel blends (JB2, JB5 and JB10) with conventional diesel were tested for their use as substitute fuel for a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine at constant speed (1500 rpm). The emissions such as CO, HC and smoke opacity decreased whereas NO x and BSCF increased with biodiesel blends.

  15. Particulate filter behaviour of a Diesel engine fueled with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buono, D.; Senatore, A.; Prati, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative and renewable fuel made from plant and animal fat or cooked oil through a transesterification process to produce a short chain ester (generally methyl ester). Biodiesel fuels have been worldwide studied in Diesel engines and they were found to be compatible in blends with Diesel fuel to well operate in modern Common Rail engines. Also throughout the world the diffusion of biofuels is being promoted in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the environmental impact of transport, and to increase security of supply. To meet the current exhaust emission regulations, after-treatment devices are necessary; in particular Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) are essential to reduce particulate emissions of Diesel engines. A critical requirement for the implementation of DPF on a modern Biodiesel powered engine is the determination of Break-even Temperature (BET) which is defined as the temperature at which particulate deposition on the filter is balanced by particulate oxidation on the filter. To fit within the exhaust temperature range of the exhaust line and to require a minimum of active regeneration during the engine running, the BET needs to occur at sufficiently low temperatures. In this paper, the results of an experimental campaign on a modern, electronic controlled fuel injection Diesel engine are shown. The engine was fuelled either with petroleum ultralow sulphur fuel or with Biodiesel: BET was evaluated for both fuels. Results show that on average, the BET is lower for biodiesel than for diesel fuel. The final goal was to characterize the regeneration process of the DPF device depending on the adopted fuel, taking into account the different combustion process and the different nature of the particulate matter. Overall the results suggest significant benefits for the use of biodiesel in engines equipped with DPFs. - Highlights: ► We compare Diesel Particulate Trap (DPF) performance with Biodiesel and Diesel fuel. ► The Break

  16. Industrial Fermentation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides for Production of Biodiesel and Its Application in Vehicle Diesel Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Yibo; Lu, Yue; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae-derived biodiesel has been regarded as a promising alternative for fossil diesel. However, the commercial production of microalgal biodiesel was halted due to its high cost. Here, we presented a pilot study on the industrial production of algal biodiesel. We began with the heterotrophic cultivation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides in a 60-m3 fermentor that produced biomass at 3.81 g L−1 day−1 with a neutral lipid content at 51%. Next, we developed plate-frame filter, natural dryin...

  17. Combustion Characteristics of CI Diesel Engine Fuelled With Blends of Jatropha Oil Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Yunus Sheikh, Mohd.; Singh, Dharmendra; Nageswara rao, P.

    2018-03-01

    Jatropha Curcas oil is a non-edible oil which is used for Jatropha biodiesel (JBD) production. Jatropha biodiesel is produced using transesterification technique and it is used as an alternative fuel in CI diesel engine without any hardware modification. Jatropha biodiesel is used in CI diesel engine with various volumetric concentrations (blends) such as JBD5, JBD15, JBD25, JBD35 and JBD45. The combustion parameters such as in-cylinder pressure, rate of pressure rise, net heat release, cumulative heat release, mass fraction burned are analyzed and compared for all blends combustion data with mineral diesel fuel (D100).

  18. Optimizing biodiesel production in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Natarajan, Karthikeyan; McCallum, Ian; Obersteiner, Michael; Dotzauer, Erik

    2009-01-01

    India is expected to at least double its fuel consumption in the transportation sector by 2030. To contribute to the fuel supply, renewable energies such as jatropha appear to be an attractive resource for biodiesel production in India as it can be grown on waste land and does not need intensive water supply. In order to produce biodiesel at a competitive cost, the biodiesel supply chain - from biomass harvesting to biodiesel delivery to the consumers - is analyzed. A mixed integer linear programming model is used in order to determine the optimal number and geographic locations of biodiesel plants. The optimization is based on minimization of the costs of the supply chain with respect to the biomass, production and transportation costs. Three biodiesel blends are considered, B2, B5 and B10. For each blend, 13 scenarios are considered where yield, biomass cost, cake price, glycerol price, transport cost and investment costs are studied. A sensitivity analysis is carried out on both those parameters and the resulting locations of the plants. The emissions of the supply chain are also considered. The results state that the biomass cost has most influence on the biodiesel cost (an increase of feedstock cost increases the biodiesel cost by about 40%) and to a lower effect, the investment cost and the glycerol price. Moreover, choosing the right set of production plant locations highly depends on the scenarios that have the highest probability to occur, for which the production plant locations still produce a competitive biodiesel cost and emissions from the transportation are minimum. In this study, one set of plant locations happened to meet these two requirements. (author)

  19. Er biodiesel en god ide?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jannick

    2007-01-01

    Biodiesel opfattes som en grøn miljøvenlig teknologi. Men har dette 'grønne' alternativ til konventionel diesel en skjult bagside af medaljen? Og kan det være, at man i stedet for at få et bedre miljø, medvirker til øgede miljøpåvirkninger i form af emissioner og naturødelæggelse, når man skifter...... til biodiesel? I artiklen belyses nogle af de mest sejlivede myter omkring biodiesel. Udgivelsesdato: Januar...

  20. Enhancing liquid-liquid and solid-liquid phase separation by integrating alternating current electrocoagulators with processing and wastewater control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, P.E.; Stanczyk, T.F.

    1989-01-01

    Coal, pigments, pharmaceutical solids, ceramics, carbon, clays, metallic powders and ores are among the categorical groups of products which are wasted as suspended solids in aqueous-based wash solutions. Phase separation and recovery of these solids by conventional dewatering systems is costly and relatively inefficient. Alternating current can be used to neutralize the electrical charge on fine and ultra-fine particles in aqueous suspensions, and facilitate agglomeration and settling of these particulates without using chemicals while improving recovery efficiencies. This paper provides an overview of the technology and discusses applications and benefits in the areas of in-plant processing, industrial wastewater treatment, site remediation and water purification

  1. Preliminary economic assessment of the use of waste frying oils for biodiesel production in Beirut, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawaz, Elyssa G; Salam, Darine A

    2018-05-15

    In this study, a method for assessing the costs of biodiesel production from waste frying oils in Beirut, Lebanon, was investigated with the aim of developing an economic evaluation of this alternative. A hundred restaurant and hotel enterprises in Beirut were surveyed for promoting them in participating in the biodiesel supply chain, and for data collection on waste frying oils generation, disposal methods and frequency, and acquisition cost. Also, waste frying oils were collected and converted into biodiesel using a one-step base catalyzed transesterification process. Physicochemical characteristics of the produced biodiesel were conforming to international standards. Data produced from laboratory scale conversion of waste frying oils to biodiesel, as well as data collected from the only biodiesel plant in Lebanon was used to determine the production cost of biodiesel. Geographic Information System was used to propose a real-time vehicle routing model to establish the logistics costs associated with waste frying oils collection. Comparing scenarios of the configuration collection network of waste frying oils, and using medium-duty commercial vehicles for collection, a logistics cost of US$/L 0.08 was optimally reached. For the calculation of the total cost of biodiesel production, the minimum, average, and maximum values for the non-fixed cost variables were considered emerging 81 scenarios for possible biodiesel costs. These were compared with information on the commercialization of diesel in Lebanon for the years 2011 through 2017. Although competitive with petroleum diesel for years 2011 to 2014, the total biodiesel cost presented less tolerance to declining diesel prices in the recent years. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the acquisition cost of waste frying oils is the key factor affecting the overall cost of biodiesel production. The results of this study validate the economic feasibility of waste frying oils' biodiesel production in the studied

  2. Effect of biodiesel blends on engine performance and exhaust emission for diesel dual fuel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin, R.; Majid, Z.A.; Shihnan, A.H.; Nasri, N.S.; Sharer, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Engine and emission characteristics of biodiesel DDF engine system were measured. • Biodiesel DDF fuelled system produced high engine performance. • Lower hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide was emitted by biodiesel DDF system. • Biodiesel DDF produced slightly higher carbon monoxide and nitric oxides emission. - Abstract: Biodiesel derived from biomass is a renewable source of fuel. It is renovated to be the possible fuel to replace fossil derived diesel due to its properties and combustion characteristics. The integration of compressed natural gas (CNG) in diesel engine known as diesel dual fuel (DDF) system offered better exhaust emission thus become an attractive option for reducing the pollutants emitted from transportation fleets. In the present study, the engine performance and exhaust emission of HINO H07C DDF engine; fuelled by diesel, biodiesel, diesel–CNG, and biodiesel–CNG, were experimentally studied. Biodiesel and diesel fuelled engine system respectively generated 455 N m and 287 N m of torque. The horse power of biodiesel was found to be 10–20% higher compared to diesel. Biodiesel–CNG at 20% (B20-DDF) produced the highest engine torque compared to other fuel blends Biodiesel significantly increase the carbon monoxide (15–32%) and nitric oxides (6.67–7.03%) but in contrast reduce the unburned hydrocarbons (5.76–6.25%) and carbon dioxide (0.47–0.58%) emissions level. These results indicated that biodiesel could be used without any engine modifications as an alternative and environmentally friendly fuel especially the heavy transportation fleets

  3. Alternative solidification techniques for radioactive ion exchange resins and liquid concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thegerstroem, C.

    1980-01-01

    Methods, that are used or are under development for solidification of radioactive ion exchange resins or liquid concentrates, utilize normally cement, bitumen or some polymere as matrix material. This report contains a review and a description of these solidification processes and their products, especially of relatively new techniques that are under development in different countries. It is possible that solidification in thermosetting resins will be more used in the future, especially when product quality requirements are high (for instance when solidifying medium level resins) or when special waste categories has to be solidified. However it is not probable that thermosetting resins will be extensively used in a broad application as matrix material. In that case the methods are to complicated and expensive compared to, for instance, solidification in concrete. Systems for incorporation in polyesteremulsions (Dow-process) have a potential as they are quite simple and can accept a large variation of liquid wastes. Some methods in an early stage of development (for instance Inert Carrier Radwaste Process) will have to be tested in active application before they can be further evaluated. (author)

  4. Experimental studies on the combustion characteristics and performance of a direct injection engine fueled with biodiesel/diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, D.H.; Chen, H.; Geng, L.M.; Bian, Y. ZH.

    2010-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel that can be produced from different kinds of vegetable oils. It is an oxygenated, non-toxic, sulphur-free, biodegradable, and renewable fuel and can be used in diesel engines without significant modification. However, the performance, emissions and combustion characteristics will be different for the same biodiesel used in different types of engine. In this study, the biodiesel produced from soybean crude oil was prepared by a method of alkaline-catalyzed transesterification. The effects of biodiesel addition to diesel fuel on the performance, emissions and combustion characteristics of a naturally aspirated DI compression ignition engine were examined. Biodiesel has different properties from diesel fuel. A minor increase in brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and decrease in brake thermal efficiency (BTE) for biodiesel and its blends were observed compared with diesel fuel. The significant improvement in reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) and smoke were found for biodiesel and its blends at high engine loads. Hydrocarbon (HC) had no evident variation for all tested fuels. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) were slightly higher for biodiesel and its blends. Biodiesel and its blends exhibited similar combustion stages to diesel fuel. The use of transesterified soybean crude oil can be partially substituted for the diesel fuel at most operating conditions in terms of the performance parameters and emissions without any engine modification.

  5. Preparation of biodiesel from soybean oil by using heterogeneous catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdous, Kaniz; Rakib Uddin, M.; Islam, M.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Khan, Maksudur R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Malaysia Pahang, 26300 Gambang, Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2013-07-01

    The predicted shortage of fossil fuels and related environmental concerns has recently attracted significant attention to search alternative fuel. Biodiesel is one of the alternatives to fossil fuel. Now-a-days, most biodiesel is produced by the transesterification of oils using methanol and a homogeneous base catalyst. The use of homogeneous catalysts is normally limited to batch mode processing followed by a catalyst separation step. The immiscible glycerol phase, which accumulates during the course of the reaction, solubilizes the homogeneous base catalyst and therefore, withdraws from the reaction medium. Moreover, other difficulties of using homogeneous base catalysts relate to their sensitivity to free fatty acid (FFA) and water and resulting saponification phenomenon. High energy consumption and costly separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture have inspired the use of heterogeneous catalyst. The use of heterogeneous catalysts does not lead to the formation of soaps through neutralization of FFA and saponification of oil. In the present paper, biodiesel was prepared from crude (soybean) oil by transesterification reaction using heterogeneous base catalyst name calcium oxide (CaO). Various reaction parameters were optimized and the biodiesel properties were evaluated.

  6. Studi Bahan Bakar Biodiesel Diperoleh Dari Reaksi Trigliserida Minyak Goreng Sawit / Etanol Dalam Katalis Basa

    OpenAIRE

    Br Bangun, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Fossil fuel consumption are increasing rapidly and has increased, while fossil fuel reserves are limited, research is directed towards alternative renewable fuels. A potensial diesel fuel substitute is biodiesel. On this research cooking palm oil and ethanol are converted to biodiesel using base catalyst potassium hydroxide (KOH) with transesterification reaction scheme. Reaction take place during 4 hour at temperature 78oC,with comparison of ethanol : cooking palm oil molar ratio 6 ...

  7. Obtention and characterization of biodiesel; Obtencao e caracterizacao do biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Leonidas B.O. dos; Caitano, Moises; Aranda, Donato A.G.; Mothe, Cheila G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Biodiesel is an ester resulting from the transesterification reaction of an alcohol and an oil obtained from biomass. The products of the transesterification are an ester and the glycerol. The biodiesel and the petroleum commercial diesel have similar properties, and they can be mixed and used in diesel motors. The use of biodiesel will allow a better exploration of the energetic potential of our cultures. The biodiesel has some advantages compared to others combustibles, such as adaptability to usual diesel motors and non-generation of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} compounds. Many experiments with biodiesel have been made in Brazil since the 70's. This work made samples of biodiesel by transesterification batch reactions to many blends of soybean oil and residual fry oil, at room temperature, using mechanical mixture or magnetic agitation by a magnetic stirrer, using as catalysts sodium methoxide and potassium hydroxide. For each obtained sample tests to determine the Acidity Index (ABNT-MB-74), Saponification Index (ABNT-MB-75), Iodine Wijz Index (ABNT-MB- 77), thermal analysis by DTA and TG (TA Instruments SDT 2960, 30 to 800 deg C, 10 deg C/min at nitrogen atmosphere) and rheological test (Haake RS 150 Rheo Stress rheometer) were done. (author)

  8. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  9. Microwave irradiation biodiesel processing of waste cooking oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motasemi, Farough; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2012-06-01

    Major part of the world's total energy output is generated from fossil fuels, consequently its consumption has been continuously increased which accelerates the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and also increases the price of these valuable limited resources. Biodiesel is a renewable, non-toxic and biodegradable diesel fuel which it can be the best environmentally friendly and easily attainable alternative for fossil fuels. The costs of feedstock and production process are two important factors which are particularly against large-scale biodiesel production. This study is intended to optimize three critical reaction parameters including intensity of mixing, microwave exit power and reaction time from the transesterification of waste cooking oil by using microwave irradiation in an attempt to reduce the production cost of biodiesel. To arrest the reaction, similar quantities of methanol/oil molar ratio (6:1) and potassium hydroxide (2% wt) as the catalyst were used. The results showed that the best yield percentage (95%) was obtained using 300W microwave exit power, 300 rpm stirrer speed (intensity of mixing) and 78°C for 5 min. It was observed that increasing the intensity of mixing greatly ameliorates the yield percentage of biodiesel (up to 17%). Moreover, the results demonstrate that increasing the reaction time in the low microwave exit power (100W) improves the yield percentage of biodiesel, while it has a negative effect on the conversion yield in the higher microwave exit power (300W). From the obtained results it was clear that FAME was within the standards of biodiesel fuel.

  10. Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) larvae: A new biodiesel resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhuoxue; Yang, Depo; Huang, Miaoling; Hu, Xinjun; Shen, Jiangang; Zhao, Zhimin; Chen, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ►Chrysomya megacephala larvae oil as a new resource transforming to biodiesel. ► Larvae were grown up on restaurant garbage for five days then oil was extracted. ► Oil content in larvae was 24.40 wt% to 26.29 wt% comparing to soybean of 20 wt%. ► Utilization of garbage reduces pollution and makes economic recycle possible. ► The properties of ultimately FAME reach the ASTM D6751 and EN 14124 standards. -- Abstract: The current energy crisis greatly affects worldwide economic development. Therefore, identifying for new energy resources is critically important. In this study, we introduce a potential biodiesel source: Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) larvae (CML), which are proliferative and can be fed with a variety of low cost materials, such as manure, wheat bran, rotted meat and decayed vegetation. The potential of C. megacephala (Fabricius) larvae oil (CMLO) for biodiesel applications was explored. Oil was extracted from the CML raised by feeding on restaurant garbage for five days. The oil content obtained from the dehydrated CML ranged from 24.40% to 26.29% since restaurant garbage varies in composition day to day. The acid value of the CMLO was tested to be 1.10 mg KOH/g. Four factors were subsequently considered to optimize the transesterification of CMLO to biodiesel. The optimized conditions included a 6:1 methanol to oil molar ratio, 1.6% KOH catalyst, a reaction temperature of 55 °C and a reaction time of 30 min. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from CMLO was 87.71%. Finally, properties of the FAME were within the specifications of ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 biodiesel standards. Therefore, we concluded that C. megacephala (Fabricius) larvae represent a potential alternative feedstock for biodiesel production.

  11. Alternative generation of well-aligned uniform lying helix texture in a cholesteric liquid crystal cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hua Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates a simple approach for obtaining a well-aligned uniform lying helix (ULH texture and a tri-bistable feature at ambient temperature in a typical 90°-twisted cell filled with a short-pitch cholesteric liquid crystal. This ULH texture is obtained at room temperature from initially field-induced helix-free homeotropic state by gradually decreasing the applied voltage. Depending on the way and rate of reducing the voltage, three stable states (i.e., Grandjean planar, focal conic, and ULH are generated and switching between any two of them is realized. Moreover, the electrical operation of the cell in the ULH state enables the tunability in phase retardation via the deformation of the ULH. The observations made in this work may be useful for applications such as tunable phase modulators and energy-efficient photonic devices.

  12. Assessing the Liquidity of Firms: Robust Neural Network Regression as an Alternative to the Current Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Javier; Landajo, Manuel; Lorca, Pedro; Labra, Jose; Ordóñez, Patricia

    Artificial neural networks have proven to be useful tools for solving financial analysis problems such as financial distress prediction and audit risk assessment. In this paper we focus on the performance of robust (least absolute deviation-based) neural networks on measuring liquidity of firms. The problem of learning the bivariate relationship between the components (namely, current liabilities and current assets) of the so-called current ratio is analyzed, and the predictive performance of several modelling paradigms (namely, linear and log-linear regressions, classical ratios and neural networks) is compared. An empirical analysis is conducted on a representative data base from the Spanish economy. Results indicate that classical ratio models are largely inadequate as a realistic description of the studied relationship, especially when used for predictive purposes. In a number of cases, especially when the analyzed firms are microenterprises, the linear specification is improved by considering the flexible non-linear structures provided by neural networks.

  13. Alternative Energy Busing

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFee, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, school districts have converted portions of their bus fleets to cleaner-burning, sometimes cheaper, alternative fossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas or propane. Others have adopted biodiesel, which combines regular diesel with fuel derived from organic sources, usually vegetable oils or animal fats. The number of biodiesel…

  14. Technologies for production of biodiesel focusing on green catalytic techniques: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helwani, Z.; Othman, M.R.; Aziz, N.; Fernando, W.J.N.; Kim, J.

    2009-01-01

    Biodiesel production is undergoing rapid technological reforms in industries and academia. This has become more obvious and relevant since the recent increase in the petroleum prices and the growing awareness relating to the environmental consequences of the fuel overdependency. In this paper, various technological methods to produce biodiesel being used in industries and academia are reviewed. Catalytic transesterification, the most common method in the production of biofuel, is emphasized in the review. The two most common types of catalysts; homogeneous liquids and heterogeneous solids, are discussed at length in the paper. Two types of processes; batch and continuous processes, are also presented. Although batch production of biodiesel is favored over continuous process in many laboratory and larger scale efforts, the latter is expected to gain wider acceptance in the near future, considering its added advantages associated with higher production capacity and lower operating costs to ensure long term supply of biodiesel. (author)

  15. Characterization of ionic liquid‐based biocatalytic two‐phase reaction system for production of biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhavathi Devi, Bethala Lakshmi Anu; Guo, Zheng; Xu, Xuebing

    2011-01-01

    The property of a variety of ionic liquids (ILs) as reaction media was evaluated for the production of biodiesel by enzymatic methanolysis of rapeseed oil. The IL Ammoeng 102, containing tetraaminum cation with C18 acyl and oligoethyleneglycol units, was found to be capable of forming oil....../IL biphasic reaction system by mixing with substrates, which is highly effective for the production of biodiesel with more than 98% biodiesel yield and nearly 100% conversion of oil. Conductor‐like screening model for real solvent (COSMO‐RS) in silico prediction of substrate solubility and simulation...... of partition coefficient change vs. reaction evolution indicated that the amphiphilic property of Ammoeng 102 might be responsible for creating efficient interaction of immiscible substrates; while big difference of partition coefficients of generated biodiesel and glycerol between the two phases suggests...

  16. Impact of policy on greenhouse gas emissions and economics of biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivetti, Elsa; Gülşen, Ece; Malça, João; Castanheira, Erica; Freire, Fausto; Dias, Luis; Kirchain, Randolph

    2014-07-01

    As an alternative transportation fuel to petrodiesel, biodiesel has been promoted within national energy portfolio targets across the world. Early estimations of low lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of biodiesel were a driver behind extensive government support in the form of financial incentives for the industry. However, studies consistently report a high degree of uncertainty in these emissions estimates, raising questions concerning the carbon benefits of biodiesel. Furthermore, the implications of feedstock blending on GHG emissions uncertainty have not been explicitly addressed despite broad practice by the industry to meet fuel quality standards and to control costs. This work investigated the impact of feedstock blending on the characteristics of biodiesel by using a chance-constrained (CC) blend optimization method. The objective of the optimization is minimization of feedstock costs subject to fuel standards and emissions constraints. Results indicate that blending can be used to manage GHG emissions uncertainty characteristics of biodiesel, and to achieve cost reductions through feedstock diversification. Simulations suggest that emissions control policies that restrict the use of certain feedstocks based on their GHG estimates overlook blending practices and benefits, increasing the cost of biodiesel. In contrast, emissions control policies which recognize the multifeedstock nature of biodiesel provide producers with feedstock selection flexibility, enabling them to manage their blend portfolios cost effectively, potentially without compromising fuel quality or emissions reductions.

  17. Green biodiesel production: a review on feedstock, catalyst, monolithic reactor, and supercritical fluid technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizo Edwin Gumba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of alternative energy is primarily catalyzed by the negative environmental impacts and energy depletion caused by the excessive usage of fossil fuels. Biodiesel has emerged as a promising substitute to petrodiesel because it is biodegradable, less toxic, and reduces greenhouse gas emission. Apart from that, biodiesel can be used as blending component or direct replacements for diesel fuel in automotive engines. A diverse range of methods have been reported for the conversion of renewable feedstocks (vegetable oil or animal fat into biodiesel with transesterification being the most preferred method. Nevertheless, the cost of producing biodiesel is higher compared to fossil fuel, thus impeding its commercialization potentials. The limited source of reliable feedstock and the underdeveloped biodiesel production route have prevented the full-scale commercialization of biodiesel in many parts of the world. In a recent development, a new technology that incorporates monoliths as support matrices for enzyme immobilization in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 for continuous biodiesel production has been proposed to solve the problem. The potential of SC-CO2 system to be applied in enzymatic reactors is not well documented and hence the purpose of this review is to highlight the previous studies conducted as well as the future direction of this technology.

  18. Penggunaan Katalis NaOH dalam Proses Transesterifikasi Minyak Kemiri menjadi Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Mulana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on biodiesel production from hazelnut oil by transesterification process using NaOH catalyst was one of the efforts for renewable energy research. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of NaOH catalyst and the ratio of hazelnut oil to methanol on the production of biodiesel via transesterification process. The transesterification process was carried out in a stirred reactor equipped by a condenser with speed of 200 rpm, temperature of 60°C and the operating time of 90 minutes. The results indicated that biodiesel could be produced from hazelnut oil through transesterification process with the highest yield of 81.7% that was obtained on the use of 2% wt. of NaOH catalyst and the mole ratio of oil to methanol of 1:9. Viscosity, density, and acid number of biodiesel obtained in this study met the Indonesia National Standard for biodiesel as SNI 04-7182-2006, therefore hazelnut oil produced biodiesel could potentially be an alternative diesel fuel. Keywords: hazelnut oil, biodiesel, transesterification, NaOH catalyst

  19. Quality assessment of biodiesels obtained from pure cooking oils of some feedstocks and their waste oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.; Ansari, T.M.; Manzoor, S.

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel being a renewable energy resource possesses compositional variability based on the type of feedstock. Biodiesel is considered a cleaner burning fuel and can be used as pure B100 or blended with petro-diesel. In this study, biodiesel was prepared from pure cooking oils (soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, corn oil) and their waste frying oils by base-catalyzed transesterification with methanol in presence of sodium hydroxide. The optimized experimental parameters were applied to achieve the maximum yield of biodiesel. Various fuel properties like kinematic viscosity, flash point, pour point, cloud point, total acid number, specific gravity, water and sediments, conradson carbon residue, sulfur contents, phosphorous contents, sulphated ash, cetane and copper corrosion were determined and found comparable to ASTM standards. Pure cooking oils, their waste frying oils and prepared biodiesels were characterized by FT-IR. The study showed that the biodiesel derived from waste frying oils can be a promising alternative of the biodiesel from pure cooking oils. (author)

  20. Screening of biodiesel production from waste tuna oil (Thunnus sp.), seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii and Gracilaria sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamsjah, Mochammad Amin; Abdillah, Annur Ahadi; Mustikawati, Hutami; Atari, Suci Dwi Purnawa

    2017-09-01

    Biodiesel has several advantages over solar. Compared to solar, biodiesel has more eco-friendly characteristic and produces lower greenhouse gas emissions. Biodiesel that is made from animal fats can be produced from fish oil, while other alternative sources from vegetable oils are seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii and Gracilaria sp. Waste tuna oil (Thunnus sp.) in Indonesia is commonly a side product of tuna canning industries known as tuna precook oil; on the other hand, seaweed Gracilaria sp. and Kappaphycus alvarezii are commonly found in Indonesia's seas. Seaweed waste that was used in the present study was 100 kg and in wet condition, and the waste oil was 10 liter. The seaweed was extracted with soxhletation method that used n-hexane as the solvent. To produce biodiesel, trans esterification was performed on the seaweed oil that was obtained from the soxhletation process and waste tuna oil. Biodiesel manufactured from seaweed K. alvarezii obtained the best score in flash point, freezing point, and viscosity test. However, according to level of manufacturing efficiency, biodiesel from waste tuna oil is more efficient and relatively easier compared to biodiesel from waste K. alvarezii and Gracilaria sp.

  1. Theoretical modeling of iodine value and saponification value of biodiesel fuels from their fatty acid composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopinath, A.; Puhan, Sukumar; Nagarajan, G. [Internal Combustion Engineering Division, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai 600 025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2009-07-15

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel consisting of alkyl esters of fatty acids from vegetable oils or animal fats. The properties of biodiesel depend on the type of vegetable oil used for the transesterification process. The objective of the present work is to theoretically predict the iodine value and the saponification value of different biodiesels from their fatty acid methyl ester composition. The fatty acid ester compositions and the above values of different biodiesels were taken from the available published data. A multiple linear regression model was developed to predict the iodine value and saponification value of different biodiesels. The predicted results showed that the prediction errors were less than 3.4% compared to the available published data. The predicted values were also verified by substituting in the available published model which was developed to predict the higher heating values of biodiesel fuels from their iodine value and the saponification value. The resulting heating values of biodiesels were then compared with the published heating values and reported. (author)

  2. Comparison of carbonyl compounds emissions from diesel engine fueled with biodiesel and diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; You, Kewei; Han, Xunkun; Wang, Junfang; You, Qiuwen; Shah, Asad Naeem

    The characteristics of carbonyl compounds emissions were investigated on a direct injection, turbocharged diesel engine fueled with pure biodiesel derived from soybean oil. The gas-phase carbonyls were collected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated silica cartridges from diluted exhaust and analyzed by HPLC with UV detector. A commercial standard mixture including 14 carbonyl compounds was used for quantitative analysis. The experimental results indicate that biodiesel-fueled engine almost has triple carbonyls emissions of diesel-fueled engine. The weighted carbonyls emission of 8-mode test cycle of biodiesel is 90.8 mg (kW h) -1 and that of diesel is 30.7 mg (kW h) -1. The formaldehyde is the most abundant compound of carbonyls for both biodiesel and diesel, taking part for 46.2% and 62.7% respectively. The next most significant compounds are acetaldehyde, acrolein and acetone for both fuels. The engine fueled with biodiesel emits a comparatively high content of propionaldehyde and methacrolein. Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel, has lower specific reactivity (SR) caused by carbonyls compared with diesel. When fueled with biodiesel, carbonyl compounds make more contribution to total hydrocarbon emission.

  3. Biodiesel production via injection of superheated methanol technology at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Gaik Tin; Tan, Kok Tat; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic superheated methanol for biodiesel production is developed. • Crude Jatropha curcas oil with high FFA can be directly used as oil feedstock. • High content of biodiesel can be produced. • Separation of FAME and glycerol from the sample product is easy. - Abstract: In this high demand of renewable energy market, biodiesel was extensively produced via various catalytic and non-catalytic technologies. Conventional catalytic transesterification for biodiesel production has been shown to have limitation in terms of sensitivity to high water and free fatty acid, complicated separation and purification of biodiesel. In this study, an alternative and innovative approach was carried out via non-catalytic superheated methanol technology to produce biodiesel. Similar to supercritical reaction, the solvent need to be heated beyond the critical temperature but the reactor pressure remained at 0.1 MPa (atmospheric pressure). Transesterification reaction with superheated methanol was carried out at different reaction temperature within the limit of 270–300 °C and at different methanol flow rate ranging from 1 ml/min to 3 ml/min for 4 h. Results obtained showed that the highest biodiesel yield at 71.54% w/w was achieved at reaction temperature 290 °C and methanol flow rate at 2 ml/min with 88.81% w/w FAME content, implying the huge potential of superheated technology in producing FAME

  4. In-nozzle flow and spray characteristics for mineral diesel, Karanja, and Jatropha biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Avinash Kumar; Som, Sibendu; Shukla, Pravesh Chandra; Goyal, Harsh; Longman, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In-nozzle flow characterization for biodiesel sprays. • Comparison of experimental spray parameters and nozzle hole simulations. • Effect of Karanja and Jatropha biodiesel on in-nozzle cavitation. • Cavitation formation investigation with diesel and biodiesels. • Nozzle hole outlet fuel velocity profile determination for test fuels. - Abstract: Superior spray behavior of fuels in internal combustion engines lead to improved combustion and emission characteristics therefore it is necessary to investigate fuel spray behavior of new alternative fuels. This study discusses the evolution of the in-nozzle orifice parameters of a numerical simulation and the evolution of spray parameters of fuel spray in a constant-volume spray chamber during an experiment. This study compares mineral diesel, biodiesels (Karanja-and Jatropha-based), and their blends with mineral diesel. The results show that mineral diesel provides superior atomization and evaporation behavior compared to the biodiesel test fuels. Karanja biodiesel provides superior atomization and evaporation characteristics compared to Jatropha biodiesel. The qualitative comparison of simulation and experimental results in tandem shows that nozzle-hole design is a critical parameter for obtaining optimum spray behavior in the engine combustion chamber

  5. Biodiesel from Mustard oil: a Sustainable Engine Fuel Substitute for Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Alam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Various attractive features of mustard oil based biodiesel as a potential substitute for engine fuel are investigated in this paper for use in Bangladesh. Although the use of mustard oil as edible oil has been reduced, Bangladesh still produces 0.22 million metric tons of mustard oil per year. This surplus mustard oil would satisfactorily be used as an alternative to diesel fuel, and thus could contribute in reducing the expenses for importing fuel from foreign countries. Moreover, the rural people of Bangladesh are capable of producing mustard oil themselves using indigenous machines. Fuel properties of biodiesel obtained from mustard oil were determined in the laboratory using standard procedure and an experimental setup was constructed to study the performance of a small diesel engine. It is observed that with biodiesel, the engine is capable of running without difficulty. Initially different lower blends of biodiesel (e.g., B20, B30 etc. have been used to avoid complicated modification of the engine and the fuel supply system. It is also found in some condition that mustard oil based biodiesel have better properties than those made from other vegetable oils. These properties of mustard oil based biodiesel were evaluated to validate its sustainability in Bangladesh. Keywords: biodiesel, indigenous machines, mustard oil, renewable energy policy, sustainability

  6. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 7, No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-11-01

    Quarterly magazine with articles on recent additions to the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Station Locator database, biodiesel buying co-ops, and developing the CNG infrastructure in Bangladesh. Also a memo from CIVITAS 2003.

  7. Transesterification of Nannochloropsis oculata microalga's oil to biodiesel using calcium methoxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, Siow Hwa; Islam, Aminul; Yusaf, Talal; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel is an environmental friendly liquid fuel similar to conventional diesel in combustion properties. It has received international attention in recent times, as that biodiesel is renewable, non-toxic and safe to store. In this study, high grade biodiesel was produced from microalgae (Nannochloropsis oculata) derived lipids via transesterification reaction with methanol in the presence of heterogeneous Ca(OCH 3 ) 2 (calcium methoxide) catalyst. The biodiesel was produced with high yield; (92%) at 60 °C compared to the highest yield reported as 22% with the use of a Mg–Zr catalyst. The product exhibited excellent performances. The catalyst was characterized by TG/DTA (thermogravimetric-differential thermal analyses), XRD (X-ray diffraction), BET (Brunauer – Emmett – Teller), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared), SEM-EDX (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) analysis. The effect of different reaction parameters including reaction time, methanol/oil molar ratio and catalyst dosage on the yield of FAME (fatty acid methyl ester) was studied. Interestingly, the catalyst can be reused five times successively without affecting the biodiesel yield. Biodiesel produced from microalgae oil consists of high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, making it highly suitable as winter grade biodiesel. - Highlights: • Biodiesel synthesis from microalgae derived oil by Ca(OCH 3 ) 2 solid catalyst. • Studied effects of methanol/oil ratio, catalyst concentration and reaction time. • Biodiesel yields >90% in 3 h using 12 wt.% catalyst, 30:1 methanol/oil at 60 °C. • Catalyst could be reused up to five times without significant lost of activity

  8. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF EMISSION AND PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF PONGAMIA BIODIESEL AND HHO GAS ADDITION IN A COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    Allen Jeffrey.J1, Divya Meena.S2, Balaji.P3, Bharathi.K4, Arvind Raj.R5

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays the environmental pollution has been increased incredibly by using conventional fuels. To control this increase in pollution alternate fuels has to be used as supplement for conventional fuels. While using conventional fuels such as petrol and diesel in IC engine there is a chance of increase in emissions. Alternate fuels can control emissions. This work is based on the investigation of emission parameters of pongamia biodiesel and HHO gas addition in a CI engine. Pongamia biodiesel ...

  9. Utilization Of Golden Snail As Alternative Liquid Organic Fertilizer LOF On Paddy Farmers In Dairi Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameilia Zuliyanti Siregar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Golden snail Pomaceae canaliculata is a pest of rice plants and used as a food source to be processed into satay seasoning spices biscuits pastry candy crackers animal feed and fertilizer. In Lae Parira village the golden snail is very diverse. Because of this reason the preliminary study and utilization of golden snail used for of liquid organic fertilizer called LOF or and microorganisms local MOL. The golden snail is obtained from a livestock that is still alive and then washed boiled and removed from its shell. The golden snail meat is cut into small pieces separated from the intestine and other visceral organs. Flesh of golden snail give coconut water dilute brown sugar EM4 and fermentation until 10-14 days. The use of mashed LOF can be sprayed on the surface of the soil or all parts of the plant. For fertilization in rice plants the recommended dose of 250 ml15 liters of water is sprayed on the rice age 10 days after planting and repeated again at interval distance of 15 days. Fertilization on the plant recommended 200ml 15 liters of water sprayed on leaves and soil 7 days after planting and repeated every 7 days. The golden snail is potensial used for fertilizer in paddy plantation environmentally.

  10. Hydropyrolysis of biomass to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Final report. Biomass Alternative-Fuels Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, R K; Bodle, W W; Yuen, P C

    1982-10-01

    The ojective of the study is to provide a process design and cost estimates for a biomass hydropyrolysis plant and to establish its economic viability for commercial applications. A plant site, size, product slate, and the most probable feedstock or combination of feedstocks were determined. A base case design was made by adapting IGT's HYFLEX process to Hawaiian biomass feedstocks. The HYFLEX process was developed by IGT to produce liquid and/or gaseous fuels from carbonaceous materials. The essence of the process is the simultaneous extraction of valuable oil and gaseous products from cellulosic biomass feedstocks without forming a heavy hard-to-handle tar. By controlling rection time and temperature, the product slate can be varied according to feedstock and market demand. An optimum design and a final assessment of the applicability of the HYFLEX process to the conversion of Hawaiian biomass was made. In order to determine what feedstocks could be available in Hawaii to meet the demands of the proposed hydropyrolysis plant, various biomass sources were studied. These included sugarcane and pineapple wastes, indigenous and cultivated trees and indigenous and cultivated shrubs and grasses.

  11. Treatment alternatives of liquid radioactive waste containing uranium in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante Escobedo, Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    The UGDR, receives annually 100 [l] of liquid radioactive waste containing, highly acid (pH=0) uranium in phosphoric acid from the Laboratory of Chemical Analysis. This waste must be chemically and radiologically decontaminated before it can be discharged in accordance with local environmental standards. Chemical precipitation and evaporation test were carried out to define the operating conditions for the radiological decontamination of this radioactive waste and to obtain a solid waste that can be conditioned in a cement matrix. The evaporation process generates excellent rates of volume reduction, over 80%, but generates a pulp that is hard handle when submitted to a drying process. Chemical precipitation generates good results for decontaminating these solutions and reducing volume (above 50%) to obtain a uranium free effluent. The treatment with calcium carbonate generated an effluent with a low concentration of polluting agents. A preliminary test was carried out condition these solids in a cement matrix, using ratios of 0.45 waste/cement and 2 of water/cement. The mix prepared with waste from the sodium hydroxide treatment had low mechanical resistance resulting from the saline incrustations. The waste from the calcium carbonate treatment was very porous due to the water evaporation from the highly exothermic reaction between the waste and the cement. The mix of the calcium carbonate generated waste and the cement matrix needs to be optimized, since it generates favorable conditions for adhering with the cement matrix (au)

  12. Study of the liquid-film-forming apparatus as an alternative aeration system: design criteria and operating condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongprasith, Narapong; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Painmanakul, Pisut

    2017-06-01

    Aeration is an important factor in aquaculture systems because it is a vital condition for all organisms that live in water and respire aerobically. Generally, mechanical surface aerators are widely used in Thailand due to their advantage for increasing dissolved oxygen (DO) and for their horizontal mixing of aquaculture ponds with large surface areas. However, these systems still have some drawbacks, primarily the low oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) and energy. Regarding this issue, alternative aeration systems should be studied and applied. Therefore, this research aims to study the aeration mechanism obtained by the diffused-air aeration combined with a liquid-film-forming apparatus (LFFA). The effect of gas flow rates, types, and patterns of aerator installation were investigated in an aquaculture pond of 10 m × 10 m × 1.5 m. The analytical parameters were volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k L a), OTE, and aeration efficiency (AE). From the results, the '4-D' with partitions was proposed as the suitable pattern for the LFFA installation. The advantage could be obtained from high energy performance with 1.2 kg/kW h of AE. Then, the operation conditions can be applied as a design guideline for this alternative aeration system in the aquaculture ponds.

  13. Exergetic analysis of a biodiesel production process from Jatropha curcas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco-Marigorta, A.M.; Suárez-Medina, J.; Vera-Castellano, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Exergetic analysis of a biodiesel production process from Jatropha curcas. ► A 95% of the inefficiencies are located in the transesterification reactor. ► Exergetic efficiency of the steam generator amounts 37.6%. ► Chemical reactions cause most of the irreversibilities of the process. ► Exergetic efficiency of the overall process is over 63%. -- Abstract: As fossil fuels are depleting day by day, it is necessary to find an alternative fuel to fulfill the energy demand of the world. Biodiesel is considered as an environmentally friendly renewable diesel fuel alternative. The interest in using Jatropha curcas as a feedstock for the production of biodiesel is rapidly growing. On the one hand, J. curcas’ oil does not compete with the food sector due to its toxic nature and to the fact that it must be cultivated in marginal/poor soil. On the other, its price is low and stable. In the last decade, the investigation on biodiesel production was centered on the choice of the suitable raw material and on the optimization of the process operation conditions. Nowadays, research is focused on the improvement of the energetic performance and on diminishing the inefficiencies in the different process components. The method of exergy analysis is well suited for furthering this goal, for it is a powerful tool for developing, evaluating and improving an energy conversion system. In this work, we identify the location, magnitude and sources of thermodynamic inefficiencies in a biodiesel production process from J. curcas by means of an exergy analysis. The thermodynamic properties were calculated from existing databases or estimated when necessary. The higher exergy destruction takes places in the transesterification reactor due to chemical reactions. Almost 95% of the exergy of the fuel is destroyed in this reactor. The exergetic efficiency of the overall process is 63%.

  14. Alternative solvent-based methyl benzoate vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of benzimidazole fungicides in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaladchaiyakit, Yanawath; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2014-11-01

    Vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using methyl benzoate as an alternative extraction solvent for extracting and preconcentrating three benzimidazole fungicides (i.e., carbendazim, thiabendazole, and fluberidazole) in environmental water samples before high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis has been developed. The selected microextraction conditions were 250 μL of methyl benzoate containing 300 μL of ethanol, 1.0% w/v sodium acetate, and vortex agitation speed of 2100 rpm for 30 s. Under optimum conditions, preconcentration factors were 14.5-39.0 for the target fungicides. Limits of detection were obtained in the range of 0.01-0.05 μg/L. The proposed method was then applied to surface water samples and the recovery evaluations at three spiked concentration levels of 5, 30, and 50 μg/L were obtained in the range of 77.4-110.9% with the relative standard deviation water samples. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Performance, combustion and emission analysis of mustard oil biodiesel and octanol blends in diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Yuvarajan; Munuswamy, Dinesh Babu; Nagappan, Beemkumar; Pandian, Amith Kishore

    2018-01-01

    Biodiesels from the mustard oil promise to be an alternative to the conventional diesel fuel due to their similarity in properties. Higher alcohols are added to neat Mustard oil biodiesel (M100) to vary the properties of biodiesel for improving its combustion, emission and performance characteristics. N-Octanol has the ability to act as an oxygen buffer during combustion which contributes to the catalytic effect and accelerates the combustion process. N-Octanol is dispersed to neat Mustard oil biodiesel in the form of emulsions at different dosage levels of 10, 20 and 30% by volume. Three emulsion fuels prepared for engine testing constitutes of 90% of biodiesel and 10% of n-Octanol (M90O10), 80% of biodiesel and 20% of n-Octanol (M80O20) and 70% of biodiesel and 30% of n-Octanol (M70O30) by volume respectively. AVL 5402 diesel engine is made to run on these fuels to study the effect of n-Octanol on combustion, emission and performance characteristics of the mustard oil biodiesel. Experimental results show that addition of n-octanol has a positive effect on performance, combustion and emission characteristics owing to its inbuilt oxygen content. N-octanol was found to be the better oxidizing catalyst as it was more effective in reducing HC and CO emissions. A significant reduction in NOx emission was found when fuelled with emulsion techniques. The blending of n-octanol to neat Mustard oil biodiesel reduces the energy and fuel consumption and a marginal increase in brake thermal efficiency. Further, n-octanol also reduces the ignition delay and aids the combustion.

  16. Performance, combustion and emission analysis of mustard oil biodiesel and octanol blends in diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Yuvarajan; Munuswamy, Dinesh Babu; Nagappan, Beemkumar; Pandian, Amith Kishore

    2018-06-01

    Biodiesels from the mustard oil promise to be an alternative to the conventional diesel fuel due to their similarity in properties. Higher alcohols are added to neat Mustard oil biodiesel (M100) to vary the properties of biodiesel for improving its combustion, emission and performance characteristics. N-Octanol has the ability to act as an oxygen buffer during combustion which contributes to the catalytic effect and accelerates the combustion process. N-Octanol is dispersed to neat Mustard oil biodiesel in the form of emulsions at different dosage levels of 10, 20 and 30% by volume. Three emulsion fuels prepared for engine testing constitutes of 90% of biodiesel and 10% of n-Octanol (M90O10), 80% of biodiesel and 20% of n-Octanol (M80O20) and 70% of biodiesel and 30% of n-Octanol (M70O30) by volume respectively. AVL 5402 diesel engine is made to run on these fuels to study the effect of n-Octanol on combustion, emission and performance characteristics of the mustard oil biodiesel. Experimental results show that addition of n-octanol has a positive effect on performance, combustion and emission characteristics owing to its inbuilt oxygen content. N-octanol was found to be the better oxidizing catalyst as it was more effective in reducing HC and CO emissions. A significant reduction in NOx emission was found when fuelled with emulsion techniques. The blending of n-octanol to neat Mustard oil biodiesel reduces the energy and fuel consumption and a marginal increase in brake thermal efficiency. Further, n-octanol also reduces the ignition delay and aids the combustion.

  17. Control of the dielectric microrods rotation in liquid by alternating current electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yukun; Li, Bin; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2014-05-01

    Microfluidics is a promising system for the manipulation of micro-nano particles and fluids. In this platform, alternating current (AC) electric field is usual an effective tool for the general particles control. However, traditional work paid more attention on the regular spherical particles with no obvious distinction when rotating, resulting in imprecise rotation speed calculation. In essence, non-spherical especially biocompatible particles are not only important for biology application but also significant for obtaining accurate rotating results. Hence, in this paper, SU-8, one of the most biocompatible materials was selected as the manipulation object. AC electric field is employed to rotate SU-8 microrods, in order to obtain a controllable rotation angle for both the accurate experimental results and biosensor applications. Firstly, Clausius-Mossotti(CM) factors frequency spectra with different surface conductance and medium conductivities are presented, thereby the theoretical formula is carried out, including both the torque and rotation velocity expressions of SU-8 microrods. Moreover, simulations for the electric field distribution are developed, indicating the rotating direction. Secondly, the quadrupole electrodes are used to generate rotating electric field, and the electrorotation of SU-8 microrods in different medium is carried out, showing that the particles rotate in the opposite direction of the electric field, meanwhile, the peak frequency increases with the conductivity increases. Finally, the experimental results are discussed and compared with theoretical analysis, and the comparison result shows that they have a good agreement. This work proposes an effective and controllable method to rotate microrods, showing extend application potentials in microelectronics and biosensors.

  18. Social and environmental advantages of palm oil biodiesel in Brazil; Vantagens socioambientais do biodiesel de palma no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Lucas Rueda [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The production of biodiesel has seen a fast growth in Brazil during the last years, making the country one of the top producers in the world. This growth is explained by the mandatory blendings of biodiesel in conventional diesel. This article is about how the biodiesel industry developed having soy oil as the main feedstock and how the big oilseed crushers have taken the main role in the industry, with family farmers, the original beneficiaries of the program, having a marginal role. If the scenario of B10 or B20 in 2020 is verified, then it is going to use so much soy oil that it will interfere in another uses of soy, like exportation. Besides that, the article criticizes the failure of the social aspect of the program, arguing that the objective of integration of family farmers has failed, and that the numbers are not worse only because the action of the government, through PETROBRAS. Then it is presented the palm oil as a alternative to share the role of main feedstock with the soy oil, because palm has a bigger production of vegetal oil per hectare than most oilseeds, is capable of a bigger reduction in green house gas emissions than soy oil, the fact that Brazil has plenty of land available to plant palm, without the necessity of deforestation and that this process can bring development to family farmers in the north of the country. The article ends with the summary of the main projects of palm production for biodiesel, like the ones from PETROBRAS, Vale and Oleoplan, and how these are going to be the main determinants of the success or failure of the palm oil as an alternative to the biodiesel sector. (author)

  19. Corrosion characteristics of copper and leaded bronze in palm biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.; Ann, L.J.; Fazal, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-03-15

    Biodiesel has become more attractive as alternative fuel for automobiles because of its environmental benefits and the fact that it is made from renewable sources. However, corrosion of metals in biodiesel is one of the concerns related to biodiesel compatibility issues. This study aims to characterize the corrosion behavior of commercial pure copper and leaded bronze commonly encountered in the automotive fuel system in diesel engine. Static immersion tests in B0, B50 and B100 fuels were carried out at room temperature for 2640 h. Similar immersion tests in B0, B100 and B100 (oxidized) fuels were also conducted at 60 C for 840 h. At the end of the test, corrosion behavior was investigated by weight loss measurements and changes in surface morphology. Fuels were analyzed by using TAN analyzer, FTIR, MOA (multi-element oil analyzer) to investigate acid concentration, oxidation level with water content and corrosive impurities respectively. Results showed that under the experimental conditions, pure copper was more susceptible to corrosion in biodiesel as compared to leaded bronze. (author)

  20. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wali, W A; Hassan, K H; Cullen, J D; Al-Shamma' a, A I; Shaw, A; Wylie, S R, E-mail: w.wali@2009.ljmu.ac.uk [Built Environment and Sustainable Technologies Institute (BEST), School of the Built Environment, Faculty of Technology and Environment Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-17

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  1. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wali, W A; Hassan, K H; Cullen, J D; Al-Shamma'a, A I; Shaw, A; Wylie, S R

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  2. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON OXIDATIVE STABILITY OF BIODIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ÇANAKÇI

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that can be produced from renewable feed stocks such as vegetable oil and animal fats. These feed stocks are reacted with an alcohol to produce alkyl monoesters. The obtained ester can be used in conventional diesel engines with little or no modification. Biodiesel, especially if produced from highly unsaturated oils, oxidizes more rapidly than diesel fuel. This paper reports the results of accelerated oxidation tests on biodiesel. These tests show the impact of time, oxygen flow rate, temperature, metals, and feedstock type on the rate of oxidation. Blending with diesel fuel and the addition of antioxidants are also explored. The data indicate that without antioxidants, biodiesel will oxidize very quickly at temperatures typical of diesel engines. This oxidation results in increases in peroxide value, acid value, and viscosity. While the peroxide value generally reaches a plateau of about 350 meq O2/kg, the acid value and viscosity increase monotonically as oxidation proceeds.

  3. Dual bioimprinting of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase for synthesis of biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyeeta Mukherjee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of biodiesel as an alternative to non-renewable sources of energy has become an attractive option in recent years. The enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel by transesterification of fats/oils with an alcohol is a much more sustainable route than the chemical method. However, cost effectiveness of the enzymatic route is a major barrier in its commercialization. In this work, a high activity biocatalyst design of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase is made by dually bioimprinting it with substrate and a surfactant (which is believed to open up the lid covering the active site of the lipase during precipitation of the lipase in organic solvent. When the lipase was bioimprinted with only the surfactants, 28 U of the enzyme/g of oil could yield 99% biodiesel from soybean oil in about 4 h. However, when dually bioimprinted even very low enzyme load 1.4 U/g of oil, yielded 99% biodiesel within 48 h.

  4. The Paraense Network of Family Agriculture and Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Corrêa Diniz Peixoto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of biodiesel in agreement with the logic of the small scale family agriculture demands several institutional efforts. It is necessary agronomical and technological researches, and the production needs to be developed by means of associations and co-operatives. Agricultural zoning and credit, besides technical assistance, are also important aspects to the activity, whose proposal is to create a new market alternative, without environmental damage and without hammering the production of food. It means that the production of biodiesel, to attend to the family agriculture, requires the integration of many approaches. That integration can be reached by means of a systemic action, able to articulate several institutional competences to the interests of small farmers and agrarian reform settlers. That is the aim of the Paraense Network of Family Agriculture and Biodiesel. More than simply building a forum to debate the subject, the network look for the articulation of institutional competences around projects, defined according to territorial contexts. In that sense, the network is integrated to the project Araguaiana Biodiesel, whose goal is to develop, with the support of Petrobras, a vigorous action in Southern Pará. To this institutional ensemble has joined in a decisive way the Secretary of Agriculture of the State of Pará.

  5. A review on green trend for oil extraction using subcritical water technology and biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoez, Weal; Ashour, Eman; Naguib, Shahenaz M

    2015-01-01

    It became a global agenda to develop clean alternative fuels which were domestically available, environmentally acceptable and technically feasible. Thus, biodiesel was destined to make a substantial contribution to the future energy demands of the domestic and industrial economies. Utilization of the non edible vegetable oils as raw materials for biodiesel production had been handled frequently for the past few years. The oil content of these seeds could be extracted by different oil extraction methods, such as mechanical extraction, solvent extraction and by subcritical water extraction technology SWT. Among them, SWT represents a new promising green extraction method. Therefore this review covered the current used non edible oil seeds for biodiesel production as well as giving a sharp focus on the efficiency of using the SWT as a promising extraction method. In addition the advantages and the disadvantages of the different biodiesel production techniques would be covered.

  6. Ultrasonication Assisted Production of Biodiesel from Sunflower Oil by Using CuO: Mg Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Rintu; Jose, Sony; Joyprabu, H.; Johnson, I.

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel is a clean, renewable, biodegradable, eco-friendly and alternative fuel used in the diesel engine. The present work was carried out at constant operational conditions such as methanol to oil molar ratio 6:1, catalyst concentration 0.25%, 30 minute reaction time and the reaction temperature at 60°C. Biodiesel was synthesized by transesterification of sunflower oil (SFO) with methanol, using CuO: Mgas nanocatalyst. This nanocatalyst was prepared by quick precipitation method. The biodiesel yield of 71.78% was achieved under reaction condition. The presence of methyl ester groups at the produced biodiesel was confirmed using the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The FAME conversion yield up to 82.83 % could be obtained under the operating conditions.

  7. Ultrasound assisted direct transesterification of algae for biodiesel production : Analysis of emission characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namasivayam Manickam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the algae-for-fuel concept has gained renewed interest with energy prices fluctuating widely. Due to some restrictions over the oil extraction from algae, direct transesterification may be considered as a good alternative. In this study, to improve the performance of direct transesterification, ultrasound induction was carried out. A sonicator probe was used to induce the direct transesterification of Cladophora fracta, a freshwater macro alga, which contains 14% lipid on dry biomass basis. Due to ultrasonication about 25% increased biodiesel yields were obtained and the biodiesel thus prepared was analyzed for emission characteristics. The analysis results showed that Cladophora biodiesel emits 18 mg/L of CO whereas petroleum diesel emits 50 mg/L. Similarly, the emission of NOx and particulate matter also were reduced to a considerable level. The Cladophora is a suitable source of biodiesel by ultrasound assisted direct transesterification in industrial level in the future.

  8. Energy Analysis of a Diesel Engine Using Diesel and Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abbasi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The extensive use of diesel engines in agricultural activities and transportation, led to the emergence of serious challenges in providing and evaluating alternative fuels from different sources in addition to the chemical properties close to diesel fuel, including properties such as renewable, inexpensive and have fewer emissions. Biodiesel is one of the alternative fuels. Many studies have been carried out on the use of biodiesel in pure form or blended with diesel fuel about combustion, performance and emission parameters of engines. One of the parameters that have been less discussed is energy balance. In providing alternative fuels, biodiesel from waste cooking oil due to its low cost compared with biodiesel from plant oils, is the promising option. The properties of biodiesel and diesel fuels, in general, show many similarities, and therefore, biodiesel is rated as a realistic fuel as an alternative to diesel. The conversion of waste cooking oil into methyl esters through the transesterification process approximately reduces the molecular weight to one-third, reduces the viscosity by about one-seventh, reduces the flash point slightly and increases the volatility marginally, and reduces pour point considerably (Demirbas, 2009. In this study, effect of different percentages of biodiesel from waste cooking oil were investigated. Energy distribution study identify the energy losses ways in order to find the reduction solutions of them. Materials and Methods Renewable fuel used in this study consists of biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil by transesterification process (Table 1. Five diesel-biodiesel fuel blends with values of 0, 12, 22, 32 and 42 percent of biodiesel that are signs for B0, B12, B22, B32 and B42, respectively. The test engine was a diesel engine, single-cylinder, four-stroke, compression ignition and air¬cooled, series 3LD510 in the laboratory of renewable energies of agricultural faculty, Tarbiat Modarres

  9. Nano-Immobilized Biocatalysts for Biodiesel Production from Renewable and Sustainable Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keon Hee Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cost of biodiesel production relies on feedstock cost. Edible oil is unfavorable as a biodiesel feedstock because of its expensive price. Thus, non-edible crop oil, waste oil, and microalgae oil have been considered as alternative resources. Non-edible crop oil and waste cooking oil are more suitable for enzymatic transesterification because they include a large amount of free fatty acids. Recently, enzymes have been integrated with nanomaterials as immobilization carriers. Nanomaterials can increase biocatalytic efficiency. The development of a nano-immobilized enzyme is one of the key factors for cost-effective biodiesel production. This paper presents the technology development of nanomaterials, including nanoparticles (magnetic and non-magnetic, carbon nanotubes, and nanofibers, and their application to the nano-immobilization of biocatalysts. The current status of biodiesel production using a variety of nano-immobilized lipase is also discussed.

  10. Biodiesel and renewable diesel: A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knothe, Gerhard [National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1815 N. University St., Peoria, IL 61604 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The search for alternatives to petroleum-based fuels has led to the development of fuels from various sources, including renewable feedstocks such as fats and oils. Several types of fuels can be derived from these triacylglycerol-containing feedstocks. One of them is biodiesel, which is defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats. Biodiesel is produced by transesterifying the oil or fat with an alcohol such as methanol under mild conditions in the presence of a base catalyst. Another kind of product that can be obtained from lipid feedstocks is a fuel whose composition simulates that of petroleum-derived diesel fuel. This kind of fuel, probably best termed ''renewable diesel'', is produced from the fat or oil by a hydrodeoxygenation reaction at elevated temperature and pressure in the presence of a catalyst. This article discusses in a general and comparative fashion aspects such as fuel production and energy balance, fuel properties, environmental effects including exhaust emissions and co-products. Among the questions that are addressed are if these fuels compete with or complement each other and what the effect of production scale may be. (author)

  11. Prediction models for density and viscosity of biodiesel and their effects on fuel supply system in CI engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfa, B.; Mishra, R.; Gu, F. [Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Powles, N. [Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Biodiesel is a promising non-toxic and biodegradable alternative fuel used in the transport sector. Nevertheless, the higher viscosity and density of biodiesel poses some acute problems when it is used it in unmodified engine. Taking this into consideration, this study has been focused towards two objectives. The first objective is to identify the effect of temperature on density and viscosity for a variety of biodiesels and also to develop a correlation between density and viscosity for these biodiesels. The second objective is to investigate and quantify the effects of density and viscosity of the biodiesels and their blends on various components of the engine fuel supply system such as fuel pump, fuel filters and fuel injector. To achieve first objective density and viscosity of rapeseed oil biodiesel, corn oil biodiesel and waste oil biodiesel blends (0B, 5B, 10B, 20B, 50B, 75B, and 100B) were tested at different temperatures using EN ISO 3675:1998 and EN ISO 3104:1996 standards. For both density and viscosity new correlations were developed and compared with published literature. A new correlation between biodiesel density and biodiesel viscosity was also developed. The second objective was achieved by using analytical models showing the effects of density and viscosity on the performance of fuel supply system. These effects were quantified over a wide range of engine operating conditions. It can be seen that the higher density and viscosity of biodiesel have a significant impact on the performance of fuel pumps and fuel filters as well as on air-fuel mixing behaviour of compression ignition (CI) engine. (author)

  12. Business Model Canvas and Strategies to Develop Biodiesel Industry of PT. XYZ in Order to Implement CPO Supporting Fund Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Mustika

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is considered as one of the alternative eco-friendly fuels. Besides, the government also issued policy related to biodiesel that is CPO Supporting Fund (CSF Policy. The aim of the research is to identify Business model canvas (BMC biodiesel industry in PT XYZ and to know the strategies to develop business from biodiesel industry in line with the CPO supporting fund policy. The analysis tool used in this research is BMC, SWOT and Quantitative Strategic Planning Matrix (QSPM. The research results in identifying BMC of PT XYZ is customer segment that the company serves in the form of domestic as well international customers. The value the company offers is biodiesel quality that is in accordance with SNI standard and the distribution is at the company’s cost; the relationship built with the customers is by communities and co-creation; the marketing network through stock exchanges and commodity exchanges; the revenue obtained from selling biodiesel and the price difference between biodiesel and solar from BPDPKS; the company’s resources are human resource, raw material resource, and financial resource; the main activities carried out by the company is CPO process to become biodiesel and sale; the company’s partners are GAPKI, BPDPKS and APROBI; the cost structure is operational cost, workers’ salary, and CPO levy fund. Furthermore, the strategy to develop biodiesel industry in line with the rapid increase of competitiveness is to increase the biodiesel production capacity and communication improvement and CRM to improve customers’ service.Keywords: biodiesel, CPO supporting fund (CSF, levy fund, vegetable oil (BBN, business model canvas (BMC

  13. Experimental study on performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fuelled with Ceiba pentandra biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silitonga, A.S.; Masjuki, H.H.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Ong, Hwai Chyuan; Chong, W.T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Ceiba pentandra biodiesel was prepared by two-step transesterification. • The main FAC of C. pentandra is 18.54% of malvalic acid. • Engine performance and emission are conducted for CPME and its blends. • The CPB10 gives the best engine performance at 1900 rpm. • The CO, HC and smoke opacity were lower for all biodiesel blends. - Abstract: Nowadays, production of biodiesel from non-edible feedstock is gaining more attention than edible oil to replace diesel fuel. Thus, Ceiba pentandra is chosen as a potential biodiesel feedstock for the present investigations based on the availability in Indonesia and Malaysia. C. pentandra methyl ester was prepared by two-step acid esterification (H 2 SO 4 ) and base transesterification (NaOH) process. The purpose of this study is to examine the engine performance and emission characteristic of C. pentandra biodiesel diesel blends in internal combustion. Besides, the detailed properties of C. pentandra biodiesel, biodiesel diesel blends and diesel were measured and evaluated. After that, the biodiesel diesel blends (10%, 20%, 30% and 50%) were used to conduct engine performance and exhaust emission characteristic at different engine speeds. The experimental results showed that CPB10 blend give the best results on engine performance such as engine torque and power at 1900 rpm with full throttle condition. Besides, the brake specific fuel consumption at maximum torque (161 g/kW h) for CPB10 is higher about 22.98% relative to diesel fuel (198 g/kW h). This is shown that the lower biodiesel diesel blends ratio will increase the performance and reduce the fuel consumption. Moreover, the exhaust emissions showed that CO, HC and smoke opacity were reduced for all biodiesel diesel blends. However, NO x and CO 2 were increased compared to petrol diesel. Overall, the results proved that C. pentandra biodiesel is a suitable alternative and substitute fuel to diesel

  14. Coalition Cooperation Defines Roadmap for E85 and Biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-06-01

    This Clean Cities success story relates how Colorado's Colorado Biofuels Coalition was formed and provides guidance on forming other such coalitions. This Colorado's coalition sucessfully increase the number of fueling stations providing biofuels and has goals to the number even more. Plans also include assisting with financing infrastructure, making alternative fuels available to more fleets, and educating about E85 and biodiesel use.

  15. Heterogeneous catalysis for sustainable biodiesel production via esterification and transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adam F; Bennett, James A; Manayil, Jinesh C; Wilson, Karen

    2014-11-21

    Concern over the economics of accessing fossil fuel reserves, and widespread acceptance of the anthropogenic origin of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change from combusting such carbon sources, is driving academic and commercial research into new routes to sustainable fuels to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population. Here we discuss catalytic esterification and transesterification solutions to the clean synthesis of biodiesel, the most readily implemented and low cost, alternative source of transportation fuels to meet future societal demands.

  16. E-Cigarette Users' Attitudes on the Banning of Sales of Nicotine E-Liquid, Its Implication on E-Cigarette Use Behaviours and Alternative Sources of Nicotine E-Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Li Ping; Alias, Haridah; Agha Mohammadi, Nasrin; Ghadimi, Azadeh; Hoe, Victor Chee Wai

    2017-12-01

    The banning of sales of nicotine e-liquid in e-cigarette shops has been implemented in several states in Malaysia. The distribution of nicotine e-liquid can only be allowed by licensed pharmacies or registered medical practitioners. This study aimed to evaluate e-cigarette users' responses to the control policy in a cross-sectional survey of 851 e-cigarette users by utilizing a self-report questionnaire that assessed (1) attitudes on regulation policy of e-cigarette banning; (2) e-cigarette use behaviors; and (3) sources of e-liquid after the regulation policy has been implemented. Participants from the state of Selangor where the banning policy was implemented were surveyed. The majority (95.8%) opposed the banning and believed e-cigarettes should be sold to anyone aged 18 years or above as with tobacco cigarettes, only a minority believed that nicotine e-liquid should only be available for sale over the counter in pharmacy stores (14.6%) and in clinics with a doctor's prescription (11.8%). The majority (44.2%) reported that they would continue their e-cigarette use as before the banning policy, while 20% plan to completely stop e-cigarette usage without replacing it with any alternatives. The vast majority (87.9%) was still able to obtained nicotine e-liquid from e-cigarette shops in spite of the ban and the second most common source was from online purchase (63.1%). The sales of nicotine e-liquid from black-market were evidenced as many reported obtaining zero nicotine e-liquid from the black market (54.4%). Self- or home-made (30.8%) nicotine e-liquid was also reported. Majority of respondents that self-made e-liquid were from the average monthly income group (below MYR3000). Obtaining nicotine from the pharmacy was least preferred (21.4%). Provision of professional advice to nicotine e-liquid users along with the ban may lessen the likelihood of users switching to tobacco cigarettes or other nicotine alternatives. Banning of sales of nicotine e-liquid in e

  17. Analysis of the potential use of palm oil biodiesel for power generation in Amazonian remote systems; Analise do potencial do biodiesel de dende para geracao eletrica em sistemas isolados da Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Anamelia Medeiros

    2008-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze the potential of palm-oil biodiesel production and consumption in remote Amazonian systems (not connected to the national grid), taking into account economic, social and environmental impacts of this biofuel alternative. Through a detailed analysis of remote systems and in particular the examination of the national subside called 'Combustible Consumption Account', the study presents potential scenarios of biodiesel demand for electricity generation in the region, considering also the generation and grid connections projects in forthcoming years. Definition of current and future quantities of biodiesel needed to maintain thermal production in this system defines the Biodiesel investment necessities in remote Amazonian states (Acre, Amapa, Amazonas, Para, Rondonia, Roraima). Possibility of using biodiesel made progress with the launch of the National Program of Production and Use of Biodiesel (PNPB) in 2004. Although African Palm-oil trees adapt very well Amazonian soil, wide adoption of this specie as raw material for biodiesel production shows some barriers, like raise of palm oil price in global market, palm tree long maturation time and attractive price for conventional diesel in the region. Even if using palmoil biodiesel result in obvious significant social and environmental benefits, these benefits tend not to compensate the inefficiency of the market and, thus, expand the biofuel production in the Northern Region. (author)

  18. Analysis of the potential use of palm oil biodiesel for power generation in Amazonian remote systems; Analise do potencial do biodiesel de dende para geracao eletrica em sistemas isolados da Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Anamelia Medeiros

    2008-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze the potential of palm-oil biodiesel production and consumption in remote Amazonian systems (not connected to the national grid), taking into account economic, social and environmental impacts of this biofuel alternative. Through a detailed analysis of remote systems and in particular the examination of the national subside called 'Combustible Consumption Account', the study presents potential scenarios of biodiesel demand for electricity generation in the region, considering also the generation and grid connections projects in forthcoming years. Definition of current and future quantities of biodiesel needed to maintain thermal production in this system defines the Biodiesel investment necessities in remote Amazonian states (Acre, Amapa, Amazonas, Para, Rondonia, Roraima). Possibility of using biodiesel made progress with the launch of the National Program of Production and Use of Biodiesel (PNPB) in 2004. Although African Palm-oil trees adapt very well Amazonian soil, wide adoption of this specie as raw material for biodiesel production shows some barriers, like raise of palm oil price in global market, palm tree long maturation time and attractive price for conventional diesel in the region. Even if using palmoil biodiesel result in obvious significant social and environmental benefits, these benefits tend not to compensate the inefficiency of the market and, thus, expand the biofuel production in the Northern Region. (author)

  19. Ecological Impact of Biodiesel Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulbis, V.; Shmigins, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents a study of biodiesel application and its ecological impacts. Our study is based on the comparison of exhaust emission composition produced by the combustion of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME) and conventional diesel fuel (DD) and its blends in a direct injection diesel engine XD2P (YTT). The engine was tested in biofuels laboratory of LUA Motor Vehicle Institute. Fuelling the engine with biodiesel and biodiesel/diesel blend reduced oxides of nitrogen by 17.5% (100RME) and by 5.6% (35RME) and carbon monoxide by 49.8% (100RME) and by 45.3% (35RME). Fuelling the engine with biodiesel and different biodiesel/diesel blends reduced the absorbtion coefficient by 33.9% (5RME), by 44.3% (20RME) and by 51.2% (100RME) on free acceleration regime. In these tests soot reduced by 28...76.7% at full opened throttle position with 100RME. (Authors)

  20. Generation and characterization of diesel engine combustion emissions from petroleum diesel and soybean biodiesel fuels and application for inhalation exposure studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutlu, E.; Nash, D.G.; King, C.; Krantz, T.Q.; Preston, W.T.; Kooter, I.M.; Higuchi, M.; DeMarini, D.; Linak, W.P.; Ian Gilmour, M.

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel made from the transesterification of plant- and animal-derived oils is an important alternative fuel source for diesel engines. Although numerous studies have reported health effects associated with petroleum diesel emissions, information on biodiesel emissions are more limited. To this

  1. Effect of poultry fat oil biodiesel on tractor engine performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bavafa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depletion of fossil fuels and environmental degradation are two major problems faced by the world. Today fossil fuels take up to 80% of the primary energy consumed in the world, of which 58% is consumed by the transport sector alone (Mard et al., 2012. The combustion products cause global warming, which is caused of emissions like carbon monoxide (CO, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and nitrogen oxides (NOX. Thus it is essential that low emission alternative fuels to be developed for useing in diesel engines. Many researchers have concluded that biodiesel holds promise as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel is oxygenated, biodegradable, non-toxic, and environmentally friendly (Qi et al., 2010. Materials and Methods: In this study transesterification method was used to produce biodiesel, because of its simplicity in biodiesel production process and holding the highest conversion efficiency. Transesterification of poultry fat oil and the properties of the fuels: Fatty acid methyl ester of poultry fat oil was prepared by transesterification of oil with methanol in the presence of KOH as catalyst. The fuel properties of poultry fat oil methyl ester and diesel fuel were determined. These properties are presented in Table 1. Tests of engine performance and emissions: After securing the qualitative characteristics of produced biodiesel, different biodiesel fuels of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% blended with diesel fuel were prepared. A schematic diagram of the engine setup is shown in Fig.1. The MF-399 tractor engine was used in the tests. The basic specifications of the engine are shown in Table 3. The engine was loaded with an electromagnetic dynamometer. The Σ5 model dynamometer manufactured by NJ-FROMENT was used to measure the power and the torque of the tractor engine. The speed range and capacity of this device are shown in Table 2. A FTO Flow Meter, manufactured by American FLOWTECH Company, was used to measure the fuel consumption

  2. An ultrasonic-accelerated oxidation method for determining the oxidative stability of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila Orozco, Francisco D; Sousa, Antonio C; Domini, Claudia E; Ugulino Araujo, Mario Cesar; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2013-05-01

    Biodiesel is considered an alternative energy because it is produced from fats and vegetable oils by means of transesterification. Furthermore, it consists of fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAS) which have a great influence on biodiesel fuel properties and in the storage lifetime of biodiesel itself. The biodiesel storage stability is directly related to the oxidative stability parameter (Induction Time - IT) which is determined by means of the Rancimat® method. This method uses condutimetric monitoring and induces the degradation of FAAS by heating the sample at a constant temperature. The European Committee for Standardization established a standard (EN 14214) to determine the oxidative stability of biodiesel, which requires it to reach a minimum induction period of 6h as tested by Rancimat® method at 110°C. In this research, we aimed at developing a fast and simple alternative method to determine the induction time (IT) based on the FAAS ultrasonic-accelerated oxidation. The sonodegradation of biodiesel samples was induced by means of an ultrasonic homogenizer fitted with an immersible horn at 480Watts of power and 20 duty cycles. The UV-Vis spectrometry was used to monitor the FAAS sonodegradation by measuring the absorbance at 270nm every 2. Biodiesel samples from different feedstock were studied in this work. In all cases, IT was established as the inflection point of the absorbance versus time curve. The induction time values of all biodiesel samples determined using the proposed method was in accordance with those measured through the Rancimat® reference method by showing a R(2)=0.998. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethylic or methylic route to soybean biodiesel? Tracking environmental answers through life cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alejos Altamirano, Carlos Alberto; Yokoyama, Lídia; Medeiros, José Luiz de; Queiroz Fernandes Araújo, Ofélia de

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Life cycle of biodiesel using alternative transesterification routes is analyzed. • Bioethanol can potentially decrease CO_2 emissions of methanol biodiesel. • Contrarily, equivalent CO_2 emissions are retained and renewability is reduced. • Water footprint increases from 37.12 (methanol) to 44.88 m"3/GJ biodiesel (ethanol). • Energy efficiency is reduced from 79.37% (methanol) to 75.19 (ethanol %). - Abstract: Biodiesel is a renewable fuel produced by transesterification of triacylglicerides (TAG) contained in vegetable oils and animal fats, to yield alkyl esters (biodiesel) and glycerin. Methanol is the main transesterification agent employed resulting in FAME (fatty acid methyl esters), which is primarily obtained from natural gas reforming (fossil source). Substitution of methanol by ethanol produces FAEE (fatty acid ethyl esters) and has the potential to render biodiesel a fully renewable fuel. Although renewability is a significant driving force for the proposed alcohol replacement, environmental performance of the alternative transesterification is questioned. The answer is herein sought through a comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the two production chains. The study tracks CO_2 emissions, energy efficiency, water and resources consumption, and environmental impacts (Acidification Potential – AP, Global Warming Potential – GWP, Eutrophication Potential – EP, and Human Toxicity Potential – TP). The boundaries of the biodiesel production chains extend from the extraction of raw-materials to its final use as transportation fuel in buses, applied to the Brazilian scenario. Results show that substitution of the methylic route with the ethylic route does not attribute significant environmental benefits. Furthermore, the ethylic route presents competitive advantages only in the category of GWP, and exhibits inferior performance in the remaining evaluated impact categories. Finally, a greater consumption of water and energy

  4. KARAKTERISASI BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK JELANTAH MENGGUNAKAN PEREAKSI BIOETANOL TETES TEBU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagung Ngurah Mayuni

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK: Biodiesel merupakan bahan bakar alternatif yang dapat disintesis dari minyak jelantah dan alkohol melalui proses esterifikasi. Penelitian ini menggunakan bahan dasar minyak jelantah dengan kadar asam lemak bebas sebesar 9,16 %, dimana alkohol yang digunakan adalah bioetanol tetes tebu. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengkarakterisasi biodiesel hasil esterifikasi dan transesterifikasi minyak jelantah dengan hasil destilasi bioetanol tetes tebu. Metode penelitian yang dilakukan adalah menggunakan perbandingan bervariasi antara minyak jelantah dan etanol yaitu 1 : 1 (B1, 3:1 (B2, 5:1 (B3. Hasil karakterisasi biodiesel diperoleh sesuai dengan SNI berturut-turut untuk densitas B1 = 860,3, B2 = 865,3 , B3 = 866,3 (kg/m3, Viskositas B1 = 19,138 , B2 = 24,881 , B3 = 25,359(mm2/s, Titik NyalaB1 = 138,5, B2 = 93,5, B3 = 212,5 (0C. Titik tuang B1 = 6, B2 = 93,5, B3 = 212,5. Titik Tuang B1 = 6, B2 = 6, dan B3 = 9 (0C. Korosi B1 = 1a, B2 = 1a dan B3 =1a. Untuk kadar air dengan hasil B1 = 0,05, B2 = trace (tidak terdeteksi dan B3 = 0,2 (% v/v.Biodiesel minyak jelantah dan etanol tetes tebu dapat terbentuk, setelah dianalisis dengan kromatografi gas menunjukkan adanya senyawa ester (etil palmitat, etil linoleat, etil laurat dengan waktu retensi masing-masing adalah 17,0, 18,6 , 18,7 menit. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian disimpulkan bioetanol tetes tebu dapat digunakan dalam sintesis biodiesel. Penggunaan bioetanol tetes tebu dalam sintesis biodiesel diperoleh karakteristik sesuai dengan Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI -04-7182-2006 kecuali viskositas. ABSTRACT: Biodiesel is an alternative energy for fossil fuel. It can be synthesized by esterification of waste cooking oil with alcohol. In this research, the used waste cooking oil contains 9.16 % FFA, while the alcohol used was bioethanol fermented from molase. The aim of this research was to characterize biodiesel produced from esterification and transesterification of used cooking oil with

  5. An Improvement in Biodiesel Production from Waste Cooking Oil by Applying Thought Multi-Response Surface Methodology Using Desirability Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Corral Bobadilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The exhaustion of natural resources has increased petroleum prices and the environmental impact of oil has stimulated the search for an alternative source of energy such as biodiesel. Waste cooking oil is a potential replacement for vegetable oils in the production of biodiesel. Biodiesel is synthesized by direct transesterification of vegetable oils, which is controlled by several inputs or process variables, including the dosage of catalyst, process temperature, mixing speed, mixing time, humidity and impurities of waste cooking oil that was studied in this case. Yield, turbidity, density, viscosity and higher heating value are considered as outputs. This paper used multi-response surface methodology (MRS with desirability functions to find the best combination of input variables used in the transesterification reactions to improve the production of biodiesel. In this case, several biodiesel optimization scenarios have been proposed. They are based on a desire to improve the biodiesel yield and the higher heating value, while decreasing the viscosity, density and turbidity. The results demonstrated that, although waste cooking oil was collected from various sources, the dosage of catalyst is one of the most important variables in the yield of biodiesel production, whereas the viscosity obtained was similar in all samples of the biodiesel that was studied.

  6. Sustainable supply chain design for waste cooking oil-based biodiesel in bogor using dynamic system approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahdan, A. D.; Arkeman, Y.; Wijaya, H.

    2017-05-01

    Biodiesel is one of the alternative fuels that are environmentally friendly. Besides palm oil, biodiesel can also be produced from waste cooking oil. Since 2007, the government of Bogor has been utilizing waste cooking oil into biodiesel for use as Transpakuan bus’ fuel. However, in practice, the amount of waste cooking oil supplied is never sufficient the needs of fuel of 30 units Transpakuan bus. The main objective of this research is to analyze the availability of waste cooking oil that will be converted into biodiesel within the next ten years as well as providing policy advice to support the program. The method used is a dynamic system that is followed by simulation of multiple scenarios that have been defined. The system is divided into three subsystems, namely supply subsystem, demand subsystem, and production subsystem. The results showed that the current system is not able to guarantee the sustainability of the supply chain of waste cooking oil as a raw material of biodiesel. From some of the scenarios tested can be concluded that biodiesel needs would increase in line with the trend of the use of environmentally friendly fuels. It takes a new system and a new policy relating to the biodiesel supply chain. Policy suggestions that can be proposed from this research is to increase supplier participation, objectify the program of converting angkot into Transpakuan bus, and support the development of biodiesel industry.

  7. Optimization of biodiesel production and engine performance from high free fatty acid Calophyllum inophyllum oil in CI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Hwai Chyuan; Masjuki, H.H.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Silitonga, A.S.; Chong, W.T.; Leong, K.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Calophyllum inophyllum has been evaluated as a potential feedstock for biodiesel. • Acid and base catalyzed transesterification processes was used to produce biodiesel. • The physiochemical properties of CIME fulfilled specification of ASTM D6751. • Engine performance and emission are conducted for CIME and its blends. - Abstract: In the present study, crude Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CCIO) has been evaluated as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. C.inophyllum oil has high acid value which is 59.30 mg KOH/g. Therefore, the degumming, esterification, neutralization and transesterification process are carried out to reduce the acid value to 0.34 mg KOH/g. The optimum yield was obtained at 9:1 methanol to oil ratio with 1 wt.%. NaOH catalyst at 50 °C for 2 h. On the other hand, the C.inophyllum biodiesel properties fulfilled the specification of ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 biodiesel standards. After that, the C.inophyllum biodiesel diesel blends were tested to evaluate the engine performance and emission characteristic. The performance and emission of 10% C.inophyllum biodiesel blends (CIB10) give a satisfactory result in diesel engines as the brake thermal increase 2.30% and fuel consumption decrease 3.06% compared to diesel. Besides, CIB10 reduces CO and smoke opacity compared to diesel. In short, C.inophyllum biodiesel can become an alternative fuel in the future

  8. Biodiesel Production from Spent Coffee Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinová, Lenka; Bartošová, Alica; Sirotiak, Maroš

    2017-06-01

    The residue after brewing the spent coffee grounds is an oil-containing waste material having a potential of being used as biodiesel feedstock. Biodiesel production from the waste coffee grounds oil involves collection and transportation of coffee residue, drying, oil extraction, and finally production of biodiesel. Different methods of oil extraction with organic solvents under different conditions show significant differences in the extraction yields. In the manufacturing of biodiesel from coffee oil, the level of reaction completion strongly depends on the quality of the feedstock oil. This paper presents an overview of oil extraction and a method of biodiesel production from spent coffee grounds.

  9. Utilization of Biodiesel By-Products for Biogas Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kolesárová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reviews the possibility of using the by-products from biodiesel production as substrates for anaerobic digestion and production of biogas. The process of biodiesel production is predominantly carried out by catalyzed transesterification. Besides desired methylesters, this reaction provides also few other products, including crude glycerol, oil-pressed cakes, and washing water. Crude glycerol or g-phase is heavier separate liquid phase, composed mainly by glycerol. A couple of studies have demonstrated the possibility of biogas production, using g-phase as a single substrate, and it has also shown a great potential as a cosubstrate by anaerobic treatment of different types of organic waste or energy crops. Oil cakes or oil meals are solid residues obtained after oil extraction from the seeds. Another possible by-product is the washing water from raw biodiesel purification, which is an oily and soapy liquid. All of these materials have been suggested as feasible substrates for anaerobic degradation, although some issues and inhibitory factors have to be considered.

  10. Utilization of Biodiesel By-Products for Biogas Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesárová, Nina; Hutňan, Miroslav; Bodík, Igor; Špalková, Viera

    2011-01-01

    This contribution reviews the possibility of using the by-products from biodiesel production as substrates for anaerobic digestion and production of biogas. The process of biodiesel production is predominantly carried out by catalyzed transesterification. Besides desired methylesters, this reaction provides also few other products, including crude glycerol, oil-pressed cakes, and washing water. Crude glycerol or g-phase is heavier separate liquid phase, composed mainly by glycerol. A couple of studies have demonstrated the possibility of biogas production, using g-phase as a single substrate, and it has also shown a great potential as a cosubstrate by anaerobic treatment of different types of organic waste or energy crops. Oil cakes or oil meals are solid residues obtained after oil extraction from the seeds. Another possible by-product is the washing water from raw biodiesel purification, which is an oily and soapy liquid. All of these materials have been suggested as feasible substrates for anaerobic degradation, although some issues and inhibitory factors have to be considered. PMID:21403868

  11. SINTESIS BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK MIKROALGA Chlorella vulgaris DENGAN REAKSI TRANSESTERIFIKASI MENGGUNAKAN KATALIS KOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Rini Widyastuti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel merupakan salah satu energi alternatif yang dianggap mampu menjawab permasalahan kelangkaan bahan bakar minyak. Biodiesel dapat disintesis dari minyak nabati melalui reaksi transesterifikasi. Sumber minyak nabati yang potensial adalah mikroalga yang memiliki produktifitas minyak yang lebih tinggi per satuan luas lahan yang digunakan jika dibandingkan dengan tanaman darat. Mikroalga jenis Chlorella sp diketahui mengandung komponen lipid cukup tinggi yaitu sebesar 14-22%. Langkah-langkah penelitian yang dilakukan meliputi ekstraksi minyak mikroalga dengan n-heksana, reaksi transesterifikasi minyak mikroalga dan metanol dengan katalis KOH, dilanjutkan dengan filtrasi untuk memisahkan produk biodiesel dengan gliserol yang terbentuk. Untuk mengetahui kandungan kimia dalam bahan baku dan produk, minyak hasil ekstraksi mikroalga dan biodiesel yang dihasilkan dianalisis dengan GC-MS. Dari hasil uji GC-MS diketahui dua kandungan asam lemak terbesar dalam minyak mikroalga, yaitu Dodecanoic acid sebesar 59.52% dan n-Decanoic acid sebesar 12.64%. Dari proses transesterifikasi, yield biodiesel yang diperoleh sebesar 59.85% dengan densitas 0.88 g/cm3. Kandungan kimia biodiesel diketahui terdiri dari senyawa Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME sebesar 15.4% dan Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester (FAEE sebesar 21.14%.Biodiesel is one of the alternative energy which expected to provide a solution towards our dependence of fossil fuel. Biodiesel could be synthesized from vegetable oil through transesterification process. One of the most potential sources of vegetable oil is microalgae which is more productive than a land-based plant. One of the species of microalgae which is Chlorella sp is known for containing high lipid content from 14 to 22%. The steps of the research including extraction of microalgae oil using n-hexane, transesterification reaction between microalgae and methanol using KOH as a catalyst, and continued by filtration to separate the biodiesel product

  12. Marine biodiesel use in the Puget Sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, N. [Northwest Biofuels Association, Portland, OR (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation explored the use of marine biodiesel in the Puget Sound region. Marine vessels are now adopting biodiesel fuels as a means of expressing corporate commitments to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the environmental impacts of hydrocarbons released into marine environments. Various biodiesel blends have been designed for use in small commercial, recreational, and research vessels. Biodiesel has also been adopted by charter and whale watching vessels in the Puget Sound. The Guemes Island Ferry has recently been re-configured to use biodiesel fuels, with 2 fuel tanks capable of receiving 2200 gallons at a time. The ferry adopted biodiesel after receiving soot complaints from marinas, and hopes to serve as a model for other vessels in the region. Four fueling docks supply the biodiesel blend to marine vessels. The sale of biodiesel has doubled in some marinas over the last 5 years. Deterrents to biodiesel use include parts incompatibilities and warranty problems. Some marinas have stopped selling biodiesel as a result of low sales and high prices. It was concluded that educational programs are needed to ensure the widespread adoption of biodiesel in the Puget Sound. refs., tabs., figs.

  13. Marine biodiesel use in the Puget Sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, N.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation explored the use of marine biodiesel in the Puget Sound region. Marine vessels are now adopting biodiesel fuels as a means of expressing corporate commitments to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the environmental impacts of hydrocarbons released into marine environments. Various biodiesel blends have been designed for use in small commercial, recreational, and research vessels. Biodiesel has also been adopted by charter and whale watching vessels in the Puget Sound. The Guemes Island Ferry has recently been re-configured to use biodiesel fuels, with 2 fuel tanks capable of receiving 2200 gallons at a time. The ferry adopted biodiesel after receiving soot complaints from marinas, and hopes to serve as a model for other vessels in the region. Four fueling docks supply the biodiesel blend to marine vessels. The sale of biodiesel has doubled in some marinas over the last 5 years. Deterrents to biodiesel use include parts incompatibilities and warranty problems. Some marinas have stopped selling biodiesel as a result of low sales and high prices. It was concluded that educational programs are needed to ensure the widespread adoption of biodiesel in the Puget Sound. refs., tabs., figs

  14. Engineering fatty acid biosynthesis in microalgae for sustainable biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatti, Jillian L; Michaud, Jennifer; Burkart, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biodiesel and other liquid fuels due to their fast growth rate, high lipid yields, and ability to grow in a broad range of environments. However, many microalgae achieve maximal lipid yields only under stress conditions hindering growth and providing compositions not ideal for biofuel applications. Metabolic engineering of algal fatty acid biosynthesis promises to create strains capable of economically producing fungible and sustainable biofuels. The algal fatty acid biosynthetic pathway has been deduced by homology to bacterial and plant systems, and much of our understanding is gleaned from basic studies in these systems. However, successful engineering of lipid metabolism in algae will necessitate a thorough characterization of the algal fatty acid synthase (FAS) including protein-protein interactions and regulation. This review describes recent efforts to engineer fatty acid biosynthesis toward optimizing microalgae as a biodiesel feedstock. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of fuel properties of rubber seed oil based biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Junaid; Yusup, Suzana; Bokhari, Awais; Kamil, Ruzaimah Nik Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • This article presents the comparative studies of the fuel properties of rubber seed oil based biodiesel. • The design expert has been adopted for the optimization of the process variables. • The FTIR, cold flow properties and oxidation stability are the findings of present study. • All the fuel properties met the standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. • Present study reveals that rubber seed oil as a non-edible source potentially contributes for esters production. - Abstract: The scarcity of the fossil fuel, environmental pollution and food crisis are the world’s major issues in current era. Biodiesel is an alternative to diesel fuel, environment friendly and biodegradable and is produced from either edible or non-edible oils. In this study, a non-edible rubber seed oil (RSO) with high free fatty acid (FFA) content of 45% were used for the production of biodiesel. The process comprises of two steps. The first step is the acid esterification to reduce the FFA value and the second step is the base transesterification. The response surface methodology (RSM) was used for parametric optimization of the two stage processes i.e. acid esterification and base transesterification. The yield of biodiesel was analyzed using gas chromatography. The FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red) spectrum was also determined to confirm the conversion of fatty acid to methyl esters. The fuel properties were analyzed according to the ASTM D6751 and EN14214 and were compared with the previous finding of researchers. All analyzed properties fulfilled the biodiesel standard criteria

  16. Review of the stability of biodiesel produced from less common vegetable oils of African origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kivevele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The stability of biodiesel is dependent on storage conditions such as contact with ambient air and metals, exposure to sunlight and high temperature conditions which accelerate oxidation reactions. In addition, biodiesels are more susceptible to degradation when compared to fossil diesel because of the presence of unsaturated fatty acid chains which are prone to oxidation. The stability of biodiesel is categorised according to oxidation stability, storage stability and thermal stability. Oxidation instability can led to the formation of oxidation products such as aldehydes, alcohols, shorter chain carboxylic acids, insolubles, gums and sediments in the biodiesel. Thermal instability is concerned with the increased rate of oxidation at higher temperature, which in turn increases the weight of oil and fat due to the formation of insolubles. Storage stability is the ability of liquid fuel to resist change to its physical and chemical characteristics brought about by its interaction with its storage environment, such as contamination with metals. These fuel instabilities give rise to the formation of undesirable substances in biodiesel beyond acceptable limits as per global biodiesel standards such as those of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM D6751 and European Standards (EN 14214. When such fuel is used in the engine, it impairs engine performance through fuel filter plugging, injector fouling, and deposit formation in the engine combustion chamber and various components of the fuel system. We review the stability of biodiesel made from less common vegetable oils of African origin and synthetic antioxidants used in improving the stability of produced biodiesels.

  17. Biodiesel production from corn oil by transesterification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, N.A.; Dessouky, H.

    2009-01-01

    There is much political demand and economic pressure to convert agricultural surpluses into material, such as motor fuel, in which the world is deficient. Transport industry is primary consumer of crude oil. Due to scarcity of known petroleum reserves, the possible alternative fuel for use in present engine technology is biofuels. Europe, USA and Brazil are successfully using biofuels. Biofuels causes less environmental pollution as compared to normal petro fuels. As a fuel, ethanol (gasohol) is used in internal combustion engine while methyester (Biodiesel) is used in diesel engines with same or better performance as compared to petro fuels. Corn is very valuable crop with numerous industrial applications, and is used in more than 300 modern industries, including the manufacture of textiles, paper, adhesives, insecticides, paints, soaps, explosives and many more. Presently the biggest source of ethanol production is from corn (produced by USA). Edible oil can also be extracted from corn which is normally used for cooking and it can be used for biodiesel production. Many countries are experimenting on fats and oil to get feasible data for production of biodiesel. Presently USA prefer to use soybean oil as raw material for commercial production of biodiesel while in Europe rapeseed oil is preferred, so therefore, it depends upon the availability of raw material in particular area and may change from location to location. In Pakistan we started with corn oil to produce biodiesel by transesterification method. In present study different design parameters such as effect of temperature, catalyst concentration, molar ratio, and Stirrer speed were founded for better conversion of neat and used corn oil into biodiesel. The optimum parameters proposed for neat corn oil are 0.5% of catalyst based on weight of corn oil, temperature between 50 deg. C to 60 deg. C, reaction time 15 minutes, molar ratio of 6:1 and speed of stirrer 155 rpm. In case of used corn oil high catalyst

  18. Biodiesel production with microalgae as feedstock: from strains to biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yangmin; Jiang, Mulan

    2011-07-01

    Due to negative environmental influence and limited availability, petroleum-derived fuels need to be replaced by renewable biofuels. Biodiesel has attracted intensive attention as an important biofuel. Microalgae have numerous advantages for biodiesel production over many terrestrial plants. There are a series of consecutive processes for biodiesel production with microalgae as feedstock, including selection of adequate microalgal strains, mass culture, cell harvesting, oil extraction and transesterification. To reduce the overall production cost, technology development and process optimization are necessary. Genetic engineering also plays an important role in manipulating lipid biosynthesis in microalgae. Many approaches, such as sequestering carbon dioxide from industrial plants for the carbon source, using wastewater for the nutrient supply, and maximizing the values of by-products, have shown a potential for cost reduction. This review provides a brief overview of the process of biodiesel production with microalgae as feedstock. The methods associated with this process (e.g. lipid determination, mass culture, oil extraction) are also compared and discussed.

  19. Optimization of biodiesel production from Chlorella protothecoides oil via ultrasound assisted transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özçimen Didem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in biodiesel as an alternative fuel for diesel engines because of the high oil prices and environmental issues related to massive greenhouse gas emissions. Nowadays, microalgal biomass has become a promising biodiesel feedstock. However, traditional biodiesel production from microalgae consumes a lot of energy and solvents. It is necessary to use an alternative method that can reduce the energy and alcohol consumption and save time. In this study, biodiesel production from Chlorella protothecoides oil by ultrasound assisted transesterification was conducted and effects of reaction parameters such as methanol:oil ratio, catalyst/oil ratio and reaction time on fatty acid methyl ester yields were investigated. The transesterification reactions were carried out by using methanol as alcohol and potassium hydroxide as the catalyst. The highest methyl ester production was obtained under the conditions of 9:1 methanol/oil mole ratio, 1.5% potassium hydroxide catalyst in oil, and for reaction time of 40 min. It was also found that catalyst/oil molar ratio was the most effective parameter on methyl ester yield according to statistical data. The results showed that ultrasound-assisted transesterification may be an alternative and cost effective way to produce biodiesel efficiently.

  20. Biodegradation of biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.; Haws, R.; Wright, B.; Reese, D.; Moeller, G.; Peterson, C.

    1995-01-01

    Biodiesel fuel test substances Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Neat Rape Oil (NR), Say Methyl Ester (SME), Soy Ethyl Ester (SEE), Neat Soy Oil (NS), and proportionate combinations of RME/diesel and REE/diesel were studied to test the biodegradability of the test substances in an aerobic aquatic environment using the EPA 560/6-82-003 Shake Flask Test Method. A concurrent analysis of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel was also performed for comparison with a conventional fuel. The highest rates of percent CO 2 evolution were seen in the esterified fuels, although no significant difference was noted between them. Ranges of percent CO 2 evolution for esterified fuels were from 77% to 91%. The neat rape and neat soy oils exhibited 70% to 78% CO 2 evolution. These rates were all significantly higher than those of the Phillips D-2 reference fuel which evolved from 7% to 26% of the organic carbon to CO 2 . The test substances were examined for BOD 5 and COD values as a relative measure of biodegradability. Water Accommodated Fraction (WAF) was experimentally derived and BOD 5 and COD analyses were carried out with a diluted concentration at or below the WAF. The results of analysis at WAF were then converted to pure substance values. The pure substance BOD 5 and COD values for test substances were then compared to a control substance, Phillips D-2 Reference fuel. No significant difference was noted for COD values between test substances and the control fuel. (p > 0.20). The D-2 control substance was significantly lower than all test substances for BCD, values at p 5 value

  1. Prospects and current status of B5 biodiesel implementation in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff, Mohd.Hizami Mohd.; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Sultana, Shazia; Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses B5 biodiesel programs in Malaysia, global challenges on the production of palm oil. Protective measures for future efficiency as well as continued viability of this renewable energy sector are also discussed. Crude palm oil (CPO) prices are currently suppressed because of high palm oil inventory. Malaysian government has taken a pro-active step in implementing the B5 biodiesel for transportation and industrial sectors through the introduction of B5 biodiesel. The B5 Biodiesel Program which was initially targeted at selected government agencies has been fully implemented for subsidized sectors in the Central Region. The promotion of B5 development is highly attractive due to its potential local feedstock from palm oil industry and the availability of production technologies that offer opportunities for the sustainable development in energy entrepreneurships. Nationally, produced B5 will improve the access to alternative energy services and is expected to help in improving productivity and sustainability. Despite successful local B5 implementation, Malaysia is recently facing global challenges on the biodiesel production which currently remains stagnant due to weak domestic demand and uncompetitive export tax structure. -- Highlights: •Prospects of B5 biodiesel implementation in Malaysia. •National Biofuel Policy thrusts pertinent to B5 program. •Successful application of B5 in government and industrial sectors. •Challenges in CPO production, weak domestic demand and export tax. •Reassessment of national policy according to global issues

  2. Effect of Variant End of Injection Period on Combustion Process of Biodiesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Amir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel as a replacement to the standard diesel fuel in combustion diesel engine. The biodiesel fuel has a significantly influences throughout the combustion process and exhaust emission. The purpose of this research is to investigate the combustion process behavior during the End of Injection (EOI period and operates under variant conditions using Rapid Compression Machine (RCM. Experimental of RCM is used to simulate a combustion process and combustion characteristics of diesel engine combustion. Three types of biodiesel blend which are B5, B10 and B15 were tested at several injection pressures of 80 MPa, 90 MPa and 130 MPa under different ambient temperatures, 750 K to 1100 K. The results of this study showed that the ignition delay slightly reduced with increasing the content of biodiesel blends from B5, B10 and B15 and became more shorten as the injection pressure been enhanced. As the injection pressure increased, the behavior of combustion pressure at end of injection is reduced, radically increased the NOX emission. It is noted that the process of combustion at the end of injection increased as the ambient temperature is rising. In fact, higher initial ambient temperature improved the fuel atomization and mixing process. Under the biodiesel combustion with higher ambient temperature condition, the exhaust emission of CO, O2, and HC became less but increased in NOX emission. Besides, increased in blends of biodiesel ratio are found to enhance the combustion process, resulted a decreased in HC emissions.

  3. Synthesis of biodiesel fuel from safflower oil using various reaction parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Pavan Kumar; Tripathi, Vinay; Singh, R P

    2006-01-01

    Biodiesel fuel is gaining more and more importance because of the depletion and uncontrollable prices of fossil fuel resources. The use of vegetable oil and their derivatives as alternatives for diesel fuel is the best answer and as old as Diesel Engine. Chemically biodiesel fuel is the mono alkyl esters of fatty acids derived from renewable feed stocks like vegetable oils and animal fats. Safflower oil contains 75-80% of linoleic acid; the presence of this unsaturated fatty acid is useful in alleviating low temperature properties like pour point, cloud point and cold filter plugging point. In this paper we studied the effect of various parameters such as temperature, molar ratio (oil to alcohol), and concentration of catalyst on synthesis of biodiesel fuel from safflower oil. The better suitable conditions of 1:6 molar ratio (oil to alcohol), 60 degrees C temperature and catalyst concentration of 2% (by wt. of oil) were determined. The finally obtained biodiesel fuel was analyzed for fatty acid composition by GLC and some other properties such as flash point, specific gravity and acid value were also determined. From the results it was clear that the produced biodiesel fuel was with in the recommended standards of biodiesel fuel with 96.8% yield.

  4. Environmental aspects and challenges of oilseed produced biodiesel in Southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayed, M.H.; Masjuki, H.H.; Saidur, R.; Kalam, M.A.; Jahirul, M.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2009-12-15

    Research on alternative fuel for the vehemently growing number of automotivesis intensified due to environmental reasons rather than turmoil in energy price and supply. From the policy and steps to emphasis the use of biofuel by governments all around the world, this can be comprehended that biofuel have placed itself as a number one substitute for fossil fuels. These phenomena made Southeast Asia a prominent exporter of biodiesel. But thrust in biodiesel production from oilseeds of palm and Jatropha curcas in Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand is seriously threatening environmental harmony. This paper focuses on this critical issue of biodiesels environmental impacts, policy, standardization of this region as well as on the emission of biodiesel in automotive uses. To draw a bottom line on feasibilities of different feedstock of biodiesel, a critical analysis on oilseed yield rate, land use, engine emissions and oxidation stability is reviewed. Palm oil based biodiesel is clearly ahead in all these aspects of feasibility, except in the case of NO{sub x} where it lags from conventional petro diesel. (author)

  5. Improvement of the cold flow characteristics of biodiesel containing dissolved polymer wastes using acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouya Mohammadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fast fossil fuel depletion and at the same time global warming phenomenon anticipated for the next coming years, the necessity of developing alternative fuels e.g. biofuels (i.e. bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas and etc. has turned into an important concern. Recently, the application of the bio-solvency properties of biodiesel for recycling waste polymers has been highlighted. However, the impact of polymer dissolution on cold flow characteristics of biodiesel was never investigated. The present study was set to explore the impact of different solvents in stabilizing biodiesel-polymer solution. Among them, acetone was proved to be the best fuel stabilizer. Subsequently, cold flow characteristic i.e. cloud point, of the biodiesel-polymer-acetone fuel was found to have improved (decreased due to the inclusion of acetone. Finally, flash point analysis of the fuel blends containing acetone was done to ensured high safety of the fuel blend by dramatically increasing the flash point values of biodiesel-polymer fuel blends.

  6. Recent trends in policies, socioeconomy and future directions of the biodiesel industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, J.H.; Ng, Hoon Kiat [University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia); Gan, S. [University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-06-15

    The growing uncertainty of available petroleum reserves and the associated environmental impacts from the usage of fossil fuels has led to a worldwide search for renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is currently placed at the forefront as the most viable alternative fuel for compression ignition engines as it can be produced from renewable sources through simple cost-effective transesterification, while being compatible with existing infrastructures. Despite these, biodiesel is still not economically feasible for large-scale adoption at present day, mainly due to the high cost of conventional feedstocks. Governmental policies, fiscal incentives and emissions laws have all shown to encourage the uptake of biodiesel in the early stages of market development. The rapid growth enjoyed by the biodiesel industry thereafter has raised concerns of various ethical issues, which must be addressed if the industry is to maintain its positive growth. The strategies required for a stable and sustained biodiesel industry will predominantly be based on the principles of a free market with minimal artificial interventions from policy makers, and the appropriate technological advances in production techniques and feedstocks options to stay competitive economically. This paper reviews the recent trends in global policies and legislative measures governing the economy of the biodiesel industry, and how these will impact the future outlook of the industry as a whole. Historical backgrounds and pertinent issues on socioeconomical and ethical aspects of the industry are also addressed here. (orig.)

  7. Biodiesel from “Morelos” Rice: Synthesis, Oxidative Stability, and Corrosivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zuñiga-Díaz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice bran is a by-product of great production worldwide and its use for the synthesis of biodiesel does not affect the food chain and therefore it is an excellent alternative for the production of biofuels with low carbon footprint. In this work, the synthesis of biodiesel was carried out from the raw rice bran oil of a kernel variety called “Morelos rice.” The stability and corrosivity characteristics of biodiesel were determined. Biodiesel stability was determined both under storage conditions and under accelerated oxidation conditions, and its corrosivity was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at 110°C under aerated conditions. The results showed that, due to the high instability of the rice bran, its raw oil had a high content of free fatty acids. The synthesized biodiesel showed excellent stability under storage conditions of up to five months, and its oxidative stability was much higher than that established in international standards. On the other hand, biodiesel showed low corrosivity and this was only significant once oxidative degradation began.

  8. Production characterization and working characteristics in DICI engine of Pongamia biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, M; Anand, R B

    2015-11-01

    Renewable energy plays a predominant role in solving the current energy requirement problems and biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel to tide over the energy crisis and conserve fossil fuels. The present work investigates an eco-friendly substitute for the replacement of fossil fuels and the experiments are designed to determine the effects of a catalyst in the biodiesel production processes. Pongamia pinnata oil was utilized to produce the biodiesel by using catalysts namely KOH and NaOH and the properties of the fuel were found by using Carbon Hydrogen Nitrogen Sulfur (CHNS) elemental analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography & Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), and Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR) Spectroscopy and the thermophysical properties were compared with those of neat diesel. In continuation, the working characteristics of the biodiesel and biodiesel-water emulsions were accomplished in a four stroke compression ignition engine and the results were compared to those of neat diesel. It was found that the exhaust emission characteristics like brake specific carbon monoxide (BSCO), brake specific hydrocarbons (BSHC) and smoke opacity were better for neat biodiesel (except brake specific nitric oxide BSNO) than those of neat diesel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Environmental aspects and challenges of oilseed produced biodiesel in Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayed, M.H.; Masjuki, H.H.; Saidur, R.; Kalam, M.A.; Jahirul, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    Research on alternative fuel for the vehemently growing number of automotivesis intensified due to environmental reasons rather than turmoil in energy price and supply. From the policy and steps to emphasis the use of biofuel by governments all around the world, this can be comprehended that biofuel have placed itself as a number one substitute for fossil fuels. These phenomena made Southeast Asia a prominent exporter of biodiesel. But thrust in biodiesel production from oilseeds of palm and Jatropha curcas in Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand is seriously threatening environmental harmony. This paper focuses on this critical issue of biodiesels environmental impacts, policy, standardization of this region as well as on the emission of biodiesel in automotive uses. To draw a bottom line on feasibilities of different feedstock of biodiesel, a critical analysis on oilseed yield rate, land use, engine emissions and oxidation stability is reviewed. Palm oil based biodiesel is clearly ahead in all these aspects of feasibility, except in the case of NO x where it lags from conventional petro diesel. (author)

  10. Optimization of biodiesel production from refined cotton seed oil and its characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Okechukwu Onukwuli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel was produced through transesterification of refined cotton seed oil with methanol and potassium hydroxide (KOH as a catalyst using batch mode. The physicochemical properties of cotton seed oil and biodiesel as an alternative fuel for diesel engine was characterized through ASTM standards for fuel tests. The functional groups of the biodiesel were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Influence of key parameters like reaction temperature, reaction time, catalyst concentration and methanol/oil molar ratio were determined using batch mode. These process parameters were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM and analysis of variance (ANOVA. The significance of the different process parameters and their combined effects on the transesterification efficiency were established through a full factorial central composite design. The results obtained are in good agreement with published data for other vegetable oil biodiesel as well as various international standards for biodiesel fuel. An optimum yield of 96% was achieved with optimal conditions of methanol/oil molar ratio, 6:1; temperature, 55 °C; time, 60 min; and catalyst concentration, 0.6%. This investigation has shown that cotton seed oil from Nigeria can be used to produce biodiesel.

  11. Emission analysis on the effect of nanoparticles on neat biodiesel in unmodified diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Amith Kishore; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh Bapu Bathey; Devarajan, Yuvarajan

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesels derived from the mahua seeds are established as a promising alternative for the diesel fuel owing to its non-edible nature and improved properties. TiO 2 nanoparticle in powder form is added to neat mahua oil biodiesel (BD100) to examine its effect on emission characteristics. TiO 2 nanoparticle is chosen as an additive owing to its catalytic effect, higher surface energy, and larger surface to volume ratio. TiO 2 nanoparticle with an average size of 60 nm was synthesized by sol-gel route. TiO 2 nanoparticles are added with mahua biodiesel (BD100) at 100 and 200 ppm. Mahua oil biodiesel doped with 100 and 200 ppm of TiO 2 nanoparticles are referred as BD100T100 and BD100T200. A constant speed diesel engine is employed for the experimental trail. Engine is fueled with diesel, BD100, BD100T100, and BD100T200, respectively. Experimental result confirmed that the modified fuels (BD100T200 and BD100T100) showed a significant reduction in all the emissions. Further, the addition of TiO 2 nanoparticle (200 ppm) to mahua biodiesel gave respective reduction of 9.3, 5.8, 6.6, and 2.7% in carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, nitrogen oxide, and smoke emissions when compared to neat mahua biodiesel.

  12. Biodiesel production and marketing in Germany. The situation and perspective; Biodieselproduktion und Vermarktung in Deutschland. Situation und Perspektive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockey, D.

    2002-07-01

    Out of all the renewable raw material products, Biodiesel is by far the most important for German agriculture. Now after 12 years of intensive product assessment by UFOP and its member federations, Biodiesel made from rapeseed oil is beginning to establish itself as a technically developed alternative in the fuel market. For the practical use of alternative fuels practically only pure Biodiesel fulfills the set requirements. While the UFOP essentially financed and carried out public relations and sales promotion measures etc., the vehicle industry and Biodiesel manufacturers developed the technical and normative prerequisites for lasting market entry for rapeseed oil methyl esters. This could not have been done without financial support from the federal state governments, the Federal Government and the European Union.

  13. Biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas: Integrated process optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerga, Ignacio R.; Zanuttini, María Soledad; Gross, Martín S.; Querini, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The oil obtained from Jatropha curcas fruits has high variability in its properties. • A process for biodiesel production has been developed for small scale projects. • Oil neutralization with the glycerine phase has important advantages. • The glycerine phase and the meal are adequate to produce biogas. - Abstract: Energy obtained from renewable sources has increased its participation in the energy matrix worldwide, and it is expected to maintain this tendency. Both in large and small scales, there have been numerous developments and research with the aim of generating fuels and energy using different raw materials such as alternative crops, algae and lignocellulosic residues. In this work, Jatropha curcas plantation from the North West of Argentina was studied, with the objective of developing integrated processes for low and medium sizes farms. In these cases, glycerine purification and meal detoxification processes represent a very high cost, and usually are not included in the project. Consequently, alternative uses for these products are proposed. This study includes the evaluation of the Jatropha curcas crop during two years, evaluating the yields and oil properties. The solids left after the oil extraction were evaluated as solid fuels, the glycerine and the meal were used to generate biogas, and the oil was used to produce biodiesel. The oil pretreatment was carried out with the glycerine obtained in the biodiesel production process, thus neutralizing the free fatty acid, and decreasing the phosphorous and water content

  14. NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board | News | NREL NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board February 16, 2018 Fuel stability research advances innovation and bolsters industry confidence in biodiesel. Scott

  15. Biodiesel separation and purification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atadashi, I.M.; Aroua, M.K.; Aziz, A. Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel as a biodegradable, sustainable and clean energy has worldwide attracted renewed and growing interest in topical years, chiefly due to development in biodiesel fuel and ecological pressures which include climatic changes. In the production of biodiesel from biomass, separation and purification of biodiesel is a critical technology. Conventional technologies used for biodiesel separation such as gravitational settling, decantation, filtration and biodiesel purification such as water washing, acid washing, and washing with ether and absorbents have proven to be inefficient, time and energy consumptive, and less cost effective. The involvement of membrane reactor and separative membrane shows great promise for the separation and purification of biodiesel. Membrane technology needs to be explored and exploited to overcome the difficulties usually encountered in the separation and purification of biodiesel. In this paper both conventional and most recent membrane technologies used in refining biodiesel have been critically reviewed. The effects of catalysts, free fatty acids, water content and oil to methanol ratios on the purity and quality of biodiesel are also examined. (author)

  16. Biodiesel via hydrotreating of fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Ahmed, El Hadi; Christensen, Claus Hviid

    Biodiesel production via transesterification to fatty acid alkyl esters is rising rapidly worldwide due to the limited availability of fossil resources and the problems of global warming. Often, however, the use of 2nd-generation feedstock like animal waste fat and trap greases etc. is made...

  17. Transition towards a more environmentally sustainable biodiesel in South America: The case of Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriarte, Alfredo; Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rapeseed biodiesel accounts for a 40% GHG emissions savings compared to fossil diesel. ► Biodiesel has greater impacts than fossil diesel in 7 of the 13 indicators evaluated. ► Agricultural stage cause the greatest impacts in biodiesel pathway. ► A production strategy involving low-impact or renewable resources should be used. ► Use of livestock manure as organic fertilizer presents the best environmental profile. -- Abstract: This study uses a site-specific life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental profile and energy and water demand of potential production options for rapeseed biodiesel in Chile. The first step is the analysis of the biodiesel supply chain in a standard scenario, associated with the most likely production conditions. The second step is the evaluation of the following alternative scenarios related to a production strategy involving low-impact or renewable resources: (1) Addition of livestock manure as organic fertilizer, (2) Use of degraded grassland, (3) Biodiesel transport by rail, and (4) Use of forest residues for industrial steam. The results show that the biodiesel in the standard scenario has less environmental impacts than fossil diesel in 4 of the 13 indicators evaluated. The rapeseed production is the stage with the highest contribution to impacts. The scenario 1 presents the best environmental profile. The scenario 2 reduces the greenhouse gas emissions of biodiesel. The scenarios 3 and 4 moderately improve the profile of the biofuel. The four situations could be implemented in the short term, but should be backed up by economic and social studies.

  18. A study on production of biodiesel using a novel solid oxide catalyst derived from waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Samrat; Ray, Srimanta

    2016-05-01

    The issues of energy security, dwindling supply and inflating price of fossil fuel have shifted the global focus towards fuel of renewable origin. Biodiesel, having renewable origin, has exhibited great potential as substitute for fossil fuels. The most common route of biodiesel production is through transesterification of vegetable oil in presence of homogeneous acid or base or solid oxide catalyst. But, the economics of biodiesel is not competitive with respect to fossil fuel due to high cost of production. The vegetable oil waste is a potential alternative for biodiesel production, particularly when disposal of used vegetable oil has been restricted in several countries. The present study evaluates the efficacy of a low-cost solid oxide catalyst derived from eggshell (a food waste) in transesterification of vegetable oil and simulated waste vegetable oil (SWVO). The impact of thermal treatment of vegetable oil (to simulate frying operation) on transesterification using eggshell-derived solid oxide catalyst (ESSO catalyst) was also evaluated along with the effect of varying reaction parameters. The study reported that around 90 % biodiesel yield was obtained with vegetable oil at methanol/oil molar ratio of 18:1 in 3 h reaction time using 10 % ESSO catalyst. The biodiesel produced with ESSO catalyst from SWVO, thermally treated at 150 °C for 24 h, was found to conform with the biodiesel standard, but the yield was 5 % lower compared to that of the untreated oil. The utilization of waste vegetable oil along with waste eggshell as catalyst is significant for improving the overall economics of the biodiesel in the current market. The utilization of waste for societal benefit with the essence of sustainable development is the novelty of this work.

  19. Experiment and Simulation Study of Single Cylinder Diesel Engine Performance, Using Soybean Oil Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rizqi Ariefianto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— The most common fuel uses in the world is made from fossil. Fossil fuel is categorized as a non-renewable energy source. For that reason, there should be an alternative fuel to replace fossil fuel by using biodiesel and one of the stock comes from soybean bean. Before using the biodiesel made from soybean bean oil, there should be a research to find out the properties and the effect of biodiesel from soybean bean oil regarding the performance of the engine. The research can be conducted in experiment and simulation. The properties result of soybean oil biodiesel should be tested to confirm whether this biodiesel have meet the standard requirement of biodieselor not. This biodiesel sproperties are Flash Point value is 182 o C , Pour Point value is -7 o C, Density at 15 o C is 890 Kg/m3, Kinematic Viscosity at 40 o C is 5.58 (cSt, and Lower Heating Value is 42.27686 MJ/kg. The result from this research is the highest power from simulation is 9% higher than the experiment. The highest torque from the experiment is 37% lower than the simulation’s torque. Lowest SFOC from experiment is  28% lower than the simulation’s SFOC. Highest BMEP from simulation is 20% higher than the highest BMEP from experiment. The  highest thermal efficiency from experiment is 6% higher than the highest thermal efficiency from simulation. The engine performance result using soybean oil biodiesel is not better than the Pertamina Dex. For that reason, the use of this biodiesel is not suggested to substitute Pertamina Dex.

  20. Physico-chemical screening of accessions of Jatropha curcas for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naresh, B.; Reddy, M. Srikanth; Vijayalakshmi, P.; Reddy, Veena; Devi, Prathibha

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative environmentally friendly fuel made from renewable biological sources such as vegetable oils and animal fats. The present report deals with screening of 14 accessions of Jatropha curcas collected from all over India to find the most suitable ones for production of Biodiesel. From the 14 accessions of J. curcas located in the plantation at Osmania University, 4 accessions were initially selected on the basis of traits like general appearance, pest resistance, seed yield and seed-oil content. Further, the seed-oil of these 4 accessions was characterized by physico-chemical analysis to identify the elite accessions for production of biodiesel. Highest 1000-seed weight (640 g) and highest percentage seed-oil content (50.16) (extracted by Soxhlet method with hexane as the solvent) was recorded in the “KM” accession. The transesterification process is affected by the presence of high free fatty acids (recorded in “MB” accession) and high moisture content (recorded in “KM” accession) of the seed-oil which also interfere with the separation of fatty esters and glycerol during production of Biodiesel. Further, high phosphorus content and iodine number (recorded in “MB” accession) interfere with conversion of seed-oil to Biodiesel. In the above context, in spite of its yield being lower, the seed-oil of the “RSAD” accession was found to be most suitable for Biodiesel production followed by “KM”, “F.W.B” and “MB” accessions, since it contains lower free fatty acids, acid value, viscosity, diglycerides and iodine number. -- Highlights: ► We analyzed Indian Jatropha accessions for yield and quality. ► Elite accessions were selected for physico-chemical analysis of seed-oil. ► Four elite accessions identified as good candidates for Biodiesel production. ► The “RSAD” accession was found to be the best suited for biodiesel.

  1. Advances in solid-catalytic and non-catalytic technologies for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Aminul; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Chan, Eng-Seng; Moniruzzaman, M.; Islam, Saiful; Nabi, Md. Nurun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The recent technologies for promoting biodiesel synthesis were elucidated. • The design of catalyst consideration of biodiesel production was proposed. • The recent advances and remaining difficulties in biodiesel synthesis were outlined. • The future research trend in biodiesel synthesis was highlighted. - Abstract: The insecure supply of fossil fuel coerces the scientific society to keep a vision to boost investments in the renewable energy sector. Among the many renewable fuels currently available around the world, biodiesel offers an immediate impact in our energy. In fact, a huge interest in related research indicates a promising future for the biodiesel technology. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The number of well-defined catalyst complexes that are able to catalyze transesterification reactions efficiently has been significantly expanded in recent years. The activity of catalysts, specifically in application to solid acid/base catalyst in transesterification reaction depends on their structure, strength of basicity/acidity, surface area as well as the stability of catalyst. There are various process intensification technologies based on the use of alternate energy sources such as ultrasound and microwave. The latest advances in research and development related to biodiesel production is represented by non-catalytic supercritical method and focussed exclusively on these processes as forthcoming transesterification processes. The latest developments in this field featuring highly active catalyst complexes are outlined in this review. The knowledge of more extensive research on advances in biofuels will allow a deeper insight into the mechanism of these technologies toward meeting the critical energy challenges in future

  2. Comparison of energy expenditure and closed-loop performance of thermal and reactive distillation sequences coupled for biodiesel production; Comparacion de gasto energetico y desempeno a lazo cerrado de secuencias de destilacion reactiva y termicamente acopladas para produccion de biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo-Jacob, J.L [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Vazquez-Ojeda, M; Segovia-Hernandez, J.G; Hernandez, S [Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico); Maya-Yescas, R. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: rmayay@umich.mx

    2013-03-15

    Biodiesel is the common name for fatty acid methyl esters, obtained by esterification (basic catalysis) or trans-esterification (acid catalysis) of vegetable or animal oils with alcohols, and used as liquid fuel. Production involves the reaction, under mild conditions, between the oil and, typically, excess of methanol. Traditional production of biodiesel exhibits some handicaps, such as the shift of equilibrium to fatty acids by using excess of alcohol that must be separated and recycled. As alternative, it is possible to integrate reaction/separation operations into a single intensified unit, a reactive distillation column, followed by a second separation unit. These configurations exhibit several advantages such as shifting equilibrium in the reactive region and, because of the thermal integration with the second unit, energy savings during products separation. In order to design these production sequences taking advantage of steady state knowledge (energy savings) and considering dynamic performance, this work performs a controllability analysis for six possible configurations; open-loop control properties, evaluated by single value decomposition, are probed by implementing PI controllers to the system. The reactive distillation column coupled to a stripper, without reboilers, shows to be the best option in terms of closed-loop performance and energy savings. [Spanish] Biodiesel es el nombre comun dado a metil esteres de acidos grasos obtenidos por esterificacion (catalisis basica) o trans-esterificacion (catalisis acida) de aceites animales o vegetales con alcoholes, y usados como combustibles liquidos. Su produccion involucra la reaccion entre el aceite y, tipicamente, exceso de metanol a condiciones moderadas. La produccion tradicional de biodiesel exhibe algunas desventajas como el desplazamiento del equilibrio hacia acidos grasos debido al exceso de alcohol, que debe ser separado y reciclado. Alternativamente, es posible integrar las operaciones reaccion

  3. New regulatory landmark for biodiesel use; Novo marco regulatorio para usos de biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Rosangela Moreira de [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Brazilian Biodiesel Production and Use of Biodiesel - PNPB, made possible the insert of Biodiesel in the Brazilian energy matrix. The National Agency of the Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels - ANP was responsible to create the outline regulatory that established the rules for entrance and commercialization of this new fuel in the country. This work seeks to present the effects of the implantation of the new relative rules to the biodiesel use. (author)

  4. The Potential of Biodiesel Production derived from Fish Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzana Samat, Amira; Amirah Safiah Muhamad, Nor; Rasib, Nur Aziera Abd; Hassan, Siti Aminah Mohd; Sohaimi, Khairunissa Syairah Ahmad; Izzati Iberahim, Nur

    2018-03-01

    Petroleum based diesel is one of the largest greenhouse emitters in the worlds based on its contribution to more likely of all carbon, methane and other greenhouse emissions. Besides, the depletion of fossil fuel that indirectly increased its price has force the global oil industry not to be so dependent on the fossil fuel but instead start focusing on alternative sources. Biodiesel is recognized as a clean alternative fuel or as a fuel additive to reduce pollutant from combustion equipment. In this study, the discarded parts of mixed marine fish species were used as the raw material to produce biodiesel. Marine fish oil was extracted from the discarded part of fish and if refined through a series of pretreatment process. The refined marine fish oil undergoes esterification process to reduce the amount of free fatty acid. The oil was then transesterified with methanol and sodium hydroxide as an alkaline catalyst that will speed up the conversion of oil to methyl ester. The three process parameters considered for this study were reaction time, reaction temperature and methanol to oil molar ratio. Biodiesel obtained was then analyzed using gas chromatography (GC). Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software. The data obtained was analyzed by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) repeated measure. The results obtained showed that the conversion of FAME yield is the highest at reaction time 180 minutes, reaction temperature 60°C and methanol to oil molar ratio at 15:1 with FAME yield 80.16%, 80.03% and 80.39%. Thus, it can be concluded that the conversion of biodiesel increased as the reaction time, temperature and

  5. Issues for Storing Plant-Based Alternative Fuels in Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    of aerobic metabolites that exacerbated subsequent corrosion processes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS biodiesel , alternative fuel, seawater, corrosion, carbon...2013 Accepted 17 December 2013 Available online 24 December 2013 Keywords: Biodiesel Alternative fuel Seawater Corrosion Carbon steel...high energy density transportation fuels 13). The feasibility of producing large quantities of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and lipid-based fuels

  6. Effect of biodiesel on the performance and combustion parameters of a turbocharged compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.; Baluch, A.H.; Chao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Direct injection compression ignition engines have proved to be the best option in heavy duty applications like transportation and power generation ,but rapid depleting sources of conventional fossil fuels, their rising prices and ever increasing environmental issues are the major concerns. Alternative fuels, particularly bio fuels are receiving increasing attention during the last few years. Biodiesel has already been commercialized in the transport sector. In the present work, a turbocharged intercooled and DI diesel engine has been alternatively fuelled with biodiesel and its 20% blend with commercial diesel. The experimental results show that BSFC, maximum combustion pressure and start of injection angle increase; on the other hand BSEC, maximum rate of pressure rise, ignition lag and premixed combustion amount decrease however HRR duration remains almost unaffected in the case of biodiesel as compared to commercial diesel. (author)

  7. Optimization of oil extraction from waste “Date pits” for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, Farrukh; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala’a H.; Al-Haj, Lamya; Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Hellier, Paul; Rashid, Umer

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oil extraction from “Date pits” has been optimized first time by using RSM. • Optimized conditions for oil extraction gave oil yield of 16.5%. • “Date pits” oil as non-edible feedstock was transformed to biodiesel. • Biodiesel from “Date pits” oil posses potential fuel properties. - Abstract: Biodiesel produced from non-edible feedstocks is increasingly attractive alternative to both fossil diesels and renewable fuels derived from food crops. Date pits are one such lipid containing feedstock, and are widely available in Oman as a waste stream. This study analyses the effects of soxhlet process parameters (temperature, solvent to seed ratio and time) on the extraction of oils from waste Date pits and the subsequent production of biodiesel from it. The highest yield of oil extracted from the Date pits was 16.5 wt% obtained at a temperature of 70 °C, solvent to seed ratio of 4:1 and extraction duration of 7 h. Gas Chromatography analysis showed that Date pits oil consisted of 54.85% unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). Transesterification of the oil extracted was undertaken at 65 °C, a methanol to oil ratio of 6:1 and a reaction time of 1 h for biodiesel production. Biodiesel produced from the Date pits oil was found to have a cetane number of 58.23, density 870 of kg m"−"3, cloud point of 4 °C, pour point of −1 °C, CFPP of −0.5 °C and kinematic viscosity of 3.97 mm"2 s"−"1 (40 °C). In general, Date pit oil appears to be a potential alternative feedstock for biodiesel production.

  8. Three years operational experience with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.

    2008-01-01

    TSI Terminal Systems Inc. is the largest container terminal operator in Canada, and has an annual payroll exceeding $150 million. The company started a biodiesel test program with the Canadian Bioenergy Corporation in order to assess the emission reduction impacts of using biodiesel. The pilot was tested with 6 different pieces of equipment used at the terminal over an initial period of 3 weeks. Emissions testing was then conducted for different biodiesel blend levels and compared with baseline data in relation to particulate matter, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nitrous oxides (NO x ). Results of the tests confirmed that the biodiesel blends significantly reduced emissions at the terminal and confirmed the operability of biodiesel. Overall emissions were reduced by 30 per cent. The fuel is now being used in all the company's equipment. The use of the biodiesel has not resulted in any engine failures or power losses. tabs., figs

  9. Genetic engineering of microorganisms for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Shen, Qi; Zhan, Jumei; Zhao, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, as one type of renewable energy, is an ideal substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel and is usually made from triacylglycerides by transesterification with alcohols. Biodiesel production based on microbial fermentation aiming to establish more efficient, less-cost and sustainable biodiesel production strategies is under current investigation by various start-up biotechnology companies and research centers. Genetic engineering plays a key role in the transformation of microbes into the desired cell factories with high efficiency of biodiesel production. Here, we present an overview of principal microorganisms used in the microbial biodiesel production and recent advances in metabolic engineering for the modification required. Overexpression or deletion of the related enzymes for de novo synthesis of biodiesel is highlighted with relevant examples. PMID:23222170

  10. Palm biodiesel: performance of a agricultural tractor in function of differents storage periods; Biodiesel de dende: desempenho de trator agricola em funcao de diferentes periodos de armazenamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Afonso; Oliveira, Melina C.J. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], email: fonso@fcav.unesp.br; Lima, Leomar P. [Instituto Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (IFTM), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Camara, Felipe P. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Cariri, CE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The use of biofuel for replacement of oil in internal combustion engines is an alternative to seek the reduction of harmful effects that the use of these fuels question to the environment. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of a tractor in the light of storage time of the biodiesel of palm oil. The experiment was conducted in the Laboratory of machinery and agricultural mechanization of Rural Engineering Department of UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP. In this study, -if a tractor Valtra BM 110 4x2 TDA 74 kW (100 cv) in engine 2.350 rpm. The experimental design was completely randomized, in factorial scheme 5x3, with 3 repetitions. The first factor represents 5 proportions of mixing biodiesel for diesel (B0, B5, B25, B 50 and B100, that the number indicates the percentage of biodiesel for diesel) and three storage times in condition storage environment in a rural property (0, 3 and 6 months). The mixtures were prepared hours before the test. The results showed that the storage time did not influence the performance of the tractor, occurring biodiesel specific increase in consumption from the proportion of 25% (B25) mixture of biodiesel for diesel. (author)

  11. Emission Characteristics of CI Engine by using Palm BioDiesel

    OpenAIRE

    V.S.shai sundaram; S.S.shai monish

    2015-01-01

    Environmental concerns and energy crisis of the world has led to the search of alternate to the fossil fuel. FAME (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester) is environment friendly, alternative, and non-toxic, safe; biodegradable has a high flash point and is also termed as Bio-Diesel. The growing economic risk of relying primarily on fossil fuels with limited reserves and Increasing prices has increased the interest on alternative energy sources. Clean and renewable biofuels have been touted as t...

  12. Costs of biodiesel supply chain in Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birzietis, G.; Kunkule, D.

    2003-01-01

    Biodiesels has already become reality in Latvia, but still not are extensively used due to number of reasons. Cost reduction would be one of the most efficient tools that could encourage wider use of biodiesel. Identifying costs in biodiesel supply chain and evaluating their weight in total cost of final product is the first step to finding most costly elements and potential for cost reduction. General cost breakdown in final price is calculated and analysed in this study (authors)

  13. Analysis of performance and emissions of diesel engine using sunflower biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutunea, Dragos; Dumitru, Ilie

    2017-10-01

    The world consumption of fossil fuels is increasing rapidly and it affects the environment by green house gases causing health hazards. Biodiesel is emerging as an important promising alternative energy resource which can be used to reduce or even replace the usage of petroleum. Since is mainly derived from vegetable oil or animal fats can be produce for large scale by local farmers offering a great choice. However the extensive utilization of the biofuels can lead to shortages in the food chain. This paper analyzed the sunflower methyl ester (SFME) and its blends as an alternate source of fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel was prepared from sunflower oil in laboratory in a small biodiesel installation (30L) by base transesterification. A 4 cylinder Deutz F4L912 diesel engine was used to perform the tests on various blends of sunflower biodiesel. The emissions of CO, HC were lower than diesel fuel for all blends tested. The NOx emissions were higher due to the high volatility and high viscosity of biodiesel.

  14. PM, carbon, and PAH emissions from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2010-01-01

    Biodiesels have received increasing attention as alternative fuels for diesel engines and generators. This study investigates the emissions of particulate matter (PM), total carbon (TC), e.g., organic/elemental carbons, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends. Among the tested diesel blends (B0, B10 (10 vol% soy-biodiesel), B20, and B50), B20 exhibited the lowest PM emission concentration despite the loads (except the 5 kW case), whereas B10 displayed lower PM emission factors when operating at 0 and 10 kW than the other fuel blends. The emission concentrations or factors of EC, OC, and TC were the lowest when B10 or B20 was used regardless of the loading. Under all tested loads, the average concentrations of total-PAHs emitted from the generator using the B10 and B20 were lower (by 38% and 28%, respectively) than those using pure petroleum diesel fuel (B0), while the emission factors of total-PAHs decreased with an increasing ratio of biodiesel to premium diesel. With an increasing loading, although the brake specific fuel consumption decreased, the energy efficiency increased despite the bio/petroleum diesel ratio. Therefore, soy-biodiesel is promising for use as an alternative fuel for diesel generators to increase energy efficiency and reduce the PM, carbon, and PAH emissions.

  15. Effect of Alcohol on Diesel Engine Combustion Operating with Biodiesel-Diesel Blend at Idling Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudul, H. M.; Hagos, Ftwi. Y.; A, M. Mukhtar N.; Mamat, Rizalman; Abdullah, A. Adam

    2018-03-01

    Biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel to run the automotive engine. However, its blends have not been properly investigated during idling as it is the main problem to run the vehicles in a big city. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of alcohol additives such as butanol and ethanol on combustion parameters under idling conditions when a single cylinder diesel engine operates with diesel, diesel-biodiesel blends, and diesel biodiesel-alcohol blends. The engine combustion parameters such as peak pressure, heat release rate and ignition delay were computed. This investigation has revealed that alcohol blends with diesel and biodiesel, BU20 blend yield higher maximum peak cylinder pressure than diesel. B5 blend was found with the lowest energy release among all. B20 was slightly lower than diesel. BU20 blend was seen with the highest peak energy release where E20 blend was found advance than diesel. Among all, the blends alcohol component revealed shorter ignition delay. B5 and B20 blends were influenced by biodiesel interference and the burning fraction were found slightly slower than conventional diesel where BU20 and E20 blends was found slightly faster than diesel So, based on the result, it can be said that among the alcohol blends butanol and ethanol can be promising alternative at idling conditions and can be used without any engine modifications.

  16. OPTIMASI VARIABEL YANG PALING BERPENGARUH PADA PEMBUATAN BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK BIJI RANDU DENGAN PROSES TRANSESTERIFIKASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudzofar Sofyan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available [Title: Biodiesel Production from Kapok Seed Oil with KOH Catalyst Using Two Steps Transesterification Process] Biodiesel is one of diesel fuel alternative made from renewable resources such as vegetable oils and animal fats. One of the natural ingredients that can be used as a material in the production of biodiesel is kapok seed. The existence of relatively abundant raw materials is a great opportunity to be developed into alternative energy options which developed on a commercial scale. Biodiesel from kapok seed oil can be made through a two-stage transesterification reaction which helped by using a base catalyst. This research aims to characterize the kapok seed oil, determine the most influential variables between temperature, the ratio of methanol-oil, and time against yield by the factorial design method, optimization variables that most influence on yield, and characterize the biodiesel. Two-stage transesterification process using KOH as the catalyst with changing variables: temperature, methanol-oil ratio, and time. The result showed that kapok seed oil has FFA content: 17.97% and a saponification number: 172.55 mgKOH/g. Most influential variable is the variable of time. At the variable optimization of time, the result were optimally obtained at the 105th minutes with yield: 77.39%. The characterization results of biodiesel’s product show from seven parameters of testing, four parameters are required in accordance with SNI.

  17. Model Biaya Produksi Biodiesel Berbasis Minyak Sawit

    OpenAIRE

    Meilita Tryana Sembiring; Sukardi Sukardi; Ani Suryani; Muhammad Romli

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel is a renewable energy source in Indonesia of which the use is regulated by the government in the form of mandatory policy of biodiesel and diesel fuel blending. The production of biodiesel in Indonesia is not developed (the need is 3.4 million kiloliters but the total national production is only 1,703 kiloliters). It is because the selling price (referring to Mean of Platts Singapore) is always lower than the production cost. Biodiesel production is influenced by raw materials and p...

  18. Oxidation stability and risk evaluation of biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshino Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes oxidation and thermal stability and hazardous possibility of biodiesel by auto-oxidation. As it can be distributed using today’s infrastructure biodisel production has increased especially in the European Union. Biodiesel has many surpassing properties as an automotive fuel. Biodiesel is considered safer than diesel fuel because of the high flash point, but it has oxygen and double bond(s. Fatty acid methyl esters are more sensitive to oxidative degradation than fossil diesel fuel. The ability of producing peroxides is rather high, therefore we should care of handling of biodiesel.

  19. Properties and use of Moringa oleifera biodiesel and diesel fuel blends in a multi-cylinder diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mofijur, M.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Atabani, A.E.; Arbab, M.I.; Cheng, S.F.; Gouk, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Potential of biodiesel production from crude Moringa oleifera oil. • Characterization of M. oleifera biodiesel and its blend with diesel fuel. • Evaluation of M. oleifera biodiesel blend in a diesel engine. - Abstract: Researchers have recently attempted to discover alternative energy sources that are accessible, technically viable, economically feasible, and environmentally acceptable. This study aims to evaluate the physico-chemical properties of Moringa oleifera biodiesel and its 10% and 20% by-volume blends (B10 and B20) in comparison with diesel fuel (B0). The performance and emission of M. oleifera biodiesel and its blends in a multi-cylinder diesel engine were determined at various speeds and full load conditions. The properties of M. oleifera biodiesel and its blends complied with ASTM D6751 standards. Over the entire range of speeds, B10 and B20 fuels reduced brake power and increased brake specific fuel consumption compared with B0. In engine emissions, B10 and B20 fuels reduced carbon monoxide emission by 10.60% and 22.93% as well as hydrocarbon emission by 9.21% and 23.68%, but slightly increased nitric oxide emission by 8.46% and 18.56%, respectively, compared with B0. Therefore, M. oleifera is a potential feedstock for biodiesel production, and its blends B10 and B20 can be used as diesel fuel substitutes

  20. Exploration of agent of change’s role in biodiesel energy transition process using agent-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayatno, A.; Vicky, L. R.; Destyanto, A. R.

    2017-11-01

    As the world’s largest Crude Palm Oil (CPO) producer, Indonesia uses CPO as raw material for biodiesel. A number of policies have been designed by the Indonesian government to support adoption of biodiesel. However, the role of energy alternatives faced complex problems. Agent-based modeling can be applied to predict the impact of policies on the actors in the business process to acquire a rich discernment of the behavior and decision making by the biodiesel industries. This study evaluates government policy by attending at the adoption of the biodiesel industry in the tender run by a government with the intervention of two policy options biodiesel energy utilization by developing an agent-based model. The simulation result show that the policy of adding the biodiesel plant installed capacity has a good impact in increasing the production capacity and vendor adoption in the tender. Even so, the government should consider the cost to be incurred and the profits for vendors, so the biodiesel production targets can be successfully fulfilled.