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Sample records for biocreative ii gene

  1. Overview of BioCreative II gene normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Morgan (Alexander); Z. Lu (Zhongbing); S.X. Wang; A.M. Cohen (Aaron); J. Fluck (Juliane); P. Ruch (Patrick); A. Divoli (Anna); K. Fundel (Katrin); R. Leaman (Robert); J. Hakenberg (Jörg); C.W. Sun; H.H. Liu (Hong); R. Torres (Rafael); M. Krauthammer (Michael); W.W. Lau (William); C.N. Hsu; M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); L. Hirschman (Lynette)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The goal of the gene normalization task is to link genes or gene products mentioned in the literature to biological databases. This is a key step in an accurate search of the biological literature. It is a challenging task, even for the human expert; genes are often described

  2. Overview of BioCreAtIvE task 1B: normalized gene lists

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschman, Lynette; Colosimo, Marc; Morgan, Alexander; Yeh, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Background Our goal in BioCreAtIve has been to assess the state of the art in text mining, with emphasis on applications that reflect real biological applications, e.g., the curation process for model organism databases. This paper summarizes the BioCreAtIvE task 1B, the "Normalized Gene List" task, which was inspired by the gene list supplied for each curated paper in a model organism database. The task was to produce the correct list of unique gene identifiers for the genes and gene product...

  3. Overview of BioCreAtIvE: critical assessment of information extraction for biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirschman Lynette

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of the first BioCreAtIvE challenge (Critical Assessment of Information Extraction in Biology was to provide a set of common evaluation tasks to assess the state of the art for text mining applied to biological problems. The results were presented in a workshop held in Granada, Spain March 28–31, 2004. The articles collected in this BMC Bioinformatics supplement entitled "A critical assessment of text mining methods in molecular biology" describe the BioCreAtIvE tasks, systems, results and their independent evaluation. Results BioCreAtIvE focused on two tasks. The first dealt with extraction of gene or protein names from text, and their mapping into standardized gene identifiers for three model organism databases (fly, mouse, yeast. The second task addressed issues of functional annotation, requiring systems to identify specific text passages that supported Gene Ontology annotations for specific proteins, given full text articles. Conclusion The first BioCreAtIvE assessment achieved a high level of international participation (27 groups from 10 countries. The assessment provided state-of-the-art performance results for a basic task (gene name finding and normalization, where the best systems achieved a balanced 80% precision / recall or better, which potentially makes them suitable for real applications in biology. The results for the advanced task (functional annotation from free text were significantly lower, demonstrating the current limitations of text-mining approaches where knowledge extrapolation and interpretation are required. In addition, an important contribution of BioCreAtIvE has been the creation and release of training and test data sets for both tasks. There are 22 articles in this special issue, including six that provide analyses of results or data quality for the data sets, including a novel inter-annotator consistency assessment for the test set used in task 2.

  4. BioCreative V BioC track overview: collaborative biocurator assistant task for BioGRID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Chang, Christie S; Oughtred, Rose; Rust, Jennifer; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Carter, Jacob; Ananiadou, Sophia; Matos, Sérgio; Santos, André; Campos, David; Oliveira, José Luís; Singh, Onkar; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chang, Yung-Chun; Su, Yu-Chen; Chu, Chun-Han; Chen, Chien Chin; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Peng, Yifan; Arighi, Cecilia; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K; Aydın, Ferhat; Hüsünbeyi, Zehra Melce; Özgür, Arzucan; Shin, Soo-Yong; Kwon, Dongseop; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike; Wilbur, W John; Comeau, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    BioC is a simple XML format for text, annotations and relations, and was developed to achieve interoperability for biomedical text processing. Following the success of BioC in BioCreative IV, the BioCreative V BioC track addressed a collaborative task to build an assistant system for BioGRID curation. In this paper, we describe the framework of the collaborative BioC task and discuss our findings based on the user survey. This track consisted of eight subtasks including gene/protein/organism named entity recognition, protein-protein/genetic interaction passage identification and annotation visualization. Using BioC as their data-sharing and communication medium, nine teams, world-wide, participated and contributed either new methods or improvements of existing tools to address different subtasks of the BioC track. Results from different teams were shared in BioC and made available to other teams as they addressed different subtasks of the track. In the end, all submitted runs were merged using a machine learning classifier to produce an optimized output. The biocurator assistant system was evaluated by four BioGRID curators in terms of practical usability. The curators' feedback was overall positive and highlighted the user-friendly design and the convenient gene/protein curation tool based on text mining.Database URL: http://www.biocreative.org/tasks/biocreative-v/track-1-bioc/. PMID:27589962

  5. Overview of the interactive task in BioCreative V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qinghua; S Abdul, Shabbir; Almeida, Lara;

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated text mining (TM) systems promote efficient literature searching, retrieval, and review but are not sufficient to produce ready-to-consume curated documents. These systems are not meant to replace biocurators, but instead to assist them in one or more literature curation steps. To do...... and the TM communities. In BioCreative V, the IAT track followed a format similar to previous interactive tracks, where the utility and usability of TM tools, as well as the generation of use cases, have been the focal points. The proposed curation tasks are user-centric and formally evaluated by biocurators....... In BioCreative V IAT, seven TM systems and 43 biocurators participated. Two levels of user participation were offered to broaden curator involvement and obtain more feedback on usability aspects. The full level participation involved training on the system, curation of a set of documents with and without...

  6. Overview of the interactive task in BioCreative V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; S Abdul, Shabbir; Almeida, Lara; Ananiadou, Sophia; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Campos, David; Chilton, Lucy; Chou, Hui-Jou; Contreras, Gabriela; Cooper, Laurel; Dai, Hong-Jie; Ferrell, Barbra; Fluck, Juliane; Gama-Castro, Socorro; George, Nancy; Gkoutos, Georgios; Irin, Afroza K; Jensen, Lars J; Jimenez, Silvia; Jue, Toni R; Keseler, Ingrid; Madan, Sumit; Matos, Sérgio; McQuilton, Peter; Milacic, Marija; Mort, Matthew; Natarajan, Jeyakumar; Pafilis, Evangelos; Pereira, Emiliano; Rao, Shruti; Rinaldi, Fabio; Rothfels, Karen; Salgado, David; Silva, Raquel M; Singh, Onkar; Stefancsik, Raymund; Su, Chu-Hsien; Subramani, Suresh; Tadepally, Hamsa D; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Wang, Xiaodong; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; McEntyre, Johanna; Orchard, Sandra; Pundir, Sangya; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Van Auken, Kimberly; Lu, Zhiyong; Schaeffer, Mary; Wu, Cathy H; Hirschman, Lynette; Arighi, Cecilia N

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated text mining (TM) systems promote efficient literature searching, retrieval, and review but are not sufficient to produce ready-to-consume curated documents. These systems are not meant to replace biocurators, but instead to assist them in one or more literature curation steps. To do so, the user interface is an important aspect that needs to be considered for tool adoption. The BioCreative Interactive task (IAT) is a track designed for exploring user-system interactions, promoting development of useful TM tools, and providing a communication channel between the biocuration and the TM communities. In BioCreative V, the IAT track followed a format similar to previous interactive tracks, where the utility and usability of TM tools, as well as the generation of use cases, have been the focal points. The proposed curation tasks are user-centric and formally evaluated by biocurators. In BioCreative V IAT, seven TM systems and 43 biocurators participated. Two levels of user participation were offered to broaden curator involvement and obtain more feedback on usability aspects. The full level participation involved training on the system, curation of a set of documents with and without TM assistance, tracking of time-on-task, and completion of a user survey. The partial level participation was designed to focus on usability aspects of the interface and not the performance per se In this case, biocurators navigated the system by performing pre-designed tasks and then were asked whether they were able to achieve the task and the level of difficulty in completing the task. In this manuscript, we describe the development of the interactive task, from planning to execution and discuss major findings for the systems tested.Database URL: http://www.biocreative.org.

  7. Overview of the interactive task in BioCreative V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; S. Abdul, Shabbir; Almeida, Lara; Ananiadou, Sophia; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I.; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Campos, David; Chilton, Lucy; Chou, Hui-Jou; Contreras, Gabriela; Cooper, Laurel; Dai, Hong-Jie; Ferrell, Barbra; Fluck, Juliane; Gama-Castro, Socorro; George, Nancy; Gkoutos, Georgios; Irin, Afroza K.; Jensen, Lars J.; Jimenez, Silvia; Jue, Toni R.; Keseler, Ingrid; Madan, Sumit; Matos, Sérgio; McQuilton, Peter; Milacic, Marija; Mort, Matthew; Natarajan, Jeyakumar; Pafilis, Evangelos; Pereira, Emiliano; Rao, Shruti; Rinaldi, Fabio; Rothfels, Karen; Salgado, David; Silva, Raquel M.; Singh, Onkar; Stefancsik, Raymund; Su, Chu-Hsien; Subramani, Suresh; Tadepally, Hamsa D.; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Wang, Xiaodong; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; McEntyre, Johanna; Orchard, Sandra; Pundir, Sangya; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Van Auken, Kimberly; Lu, Zhiyong; Schaeffer, Mary; Wu, Cathy H.; Hirschman, Lynette; Arighi, Cecilia N.

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated text mining (TM) systems promote efficient literature searching, retrieval, and review but are not sufficient to produce ready-to-consume curated documents. These systems are not meant to replace biocurators, but instead to assist them in one or more literature curation steps. To do so, the user interface is an important aspect that needs to be considered for tool adoption. The BioCreative Interactive task (IAT) is a track designed for exploring user-system interactions, promoting development of useful TM tools, and providing a communication channel between the biocuration and the TM communities. In BioCreative V, the IAT track followed a format similar to previous interactive tracks, where the utility and usability of TM tools, as well as the generation of use cases, have been the focal points. The proposed curation tasks are user-centric and formally evaluated by biocurators. In BioCreative V IAT, seven TM systems and 43 biocurators participated. Two levels of user participation were offered to broaden curator involvement and obtain more feedback on usability aspects. The full level participation involved training on the system, curation of a set of documents with and without TM assistance, tracking of time-on-task, and completion of a user survey. The partial level participation was designed to focus on usability aspects of the interface and not the performance per se. In this case, biocurators navigated the system by performing pre-designed tasks and then were asked whether they were able to achieve the task and the level of difficulty in completing the task. In this manuscript, we describe the development of the interactive task, from planning to execution and discuss major findings for the systems tested. Database URL: http://www.biocreative.org PMID:27589961

  8. Overview of the interactive task in BioCreative V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; S Abdul, Shabbir; Almeida, Lara; Ananiadou, Sophia; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Campos, David; Chilton, Lucy; Chou, Hui-Jou; Contreras, Gabriela; Cooper, Laurel; Dai, Hong-Jie; Ferrell, Barbra; Fluck, Juliane; Gama-Castro, Socorro; George, Nancy; Gkoutos, Georgios; Irin, Afroza K; Jensen, Lars J; Jimenez, Silvia; Jue, Toni R; Keseler, Ingrid; Madan, Sumit; Matos, Sérgio; McQuilton, Peter; Milacic, Marija; Mort, Matthew; Natarajan, Jeyakumar; Pafilis, Evangelos; Pereira, Emiliano; Rao, Shruti; Rinaldi, Fabio; Rothfels, Karen; Salgado, David; Silva, Raquel M; Singh, Onkar; Stefancsik, Raymund; Su, Chu-Hsien; Subramani, Suresh; Tadepally, Hamsa D; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Wang, Xiaodong; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; McEntyre, Johanna; Orchard, Sandra; Pundir, Sangya; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Van Auken, Kimberly; Lu, Zhiyong; Schaeffer, Mary; Wu, Cathy H; Hirschman, Lynette; Arighi, Cecilia N

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated text mining (TM) systems promote efficient literature searching, retrieval, and review but are not sufficient to produce ready-to-consume curated documents. These systems are not meant to replace biocurators, but instead to assist them in one or more literature curation steps. To do so, the user interface is an important aspect that needs to be considered for tool adoption. The BioCreative Interactive task (IAT) is a track designed for exploring user-system interactions, promoting development of useful TM tools, and providing a communication channel between the biocuration and the TM communities. In BioCreative V, the IAT track followed a format similar to previous interactive tracks, where the utility and usability of TM tools, as well as the generation of use cases, have been the focal points. The proposed curation tasks are user-centric and formally evaluated by biocurators. In BioCreative V IAT, seven TM systems and 43 biocurators participated. Two levels of user participation were offered to broaden curator involvement and obtain more feedback on usability aspects. The full level participation involved training on the system, curation of a set of documents with and without TM assistance, tracking of time-on-task, and completion of a user survey. The partial level participation was designed to focus on usability aspects of the interface and not the performance per se In this case, biocurators navigated the system by performing pre-designed tasks and then were asked whether they were able to achieve the task and the level of difficulty in completing the task. In this manuscript, we describe the development of the interactive task, from planning to execution and discuss major findings for the systems tested.Database URL: http://www.biocreative.org. PMID:27589961

  9. PIPE: a protein–protein interaction passage extraction module for BioCreative challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun-Han; Su, Yu-Chen; Chen, Chien Chin; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the interactions between proteins mentioned in biomedical literatures is one of the frequently discussed topics of text mining in the life science field. In this article, we propose PIPE, an interaction pattern generation module used in the Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task at BioCreative V (http://www.biocreative.org/) to capture frequent protein-protein interaction (PPI) patterns within text. We also present an interaction pattern tree (IPT) kernel method that integrates the PPI patterns with convolution tree kernel (CTK) to extract PPIs. Methods were evaluated on LLL, IEPA, HPRD50, AIMed and BioInfer corpora using cross-validation, cross-learning and cross-corpus evaluation. Empirical evaluations demonstrate that our method is effective and outperforms several well-known PPI extraction methods. Database URL: PMID:27524807

  10. PIPE: a protein-protein interaction passage extraction module for BioCreative challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung-Chun; Chu, Chun-Han; Su, Yu-Chen; Chen, Chien Chin; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the interactions between proteins mentioned in biomedical literatures is one of the frequently discussed topics of text mining in the life science field. In this article, we propose PIPE, an interaction pattern generation module used in the Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task at BioCreative V (http://www.biocreative.org/) to capture frequent protein-protein interaction (PPI) patterns within text. We also present an interaction pattern tree (IPT) kernel method that integrates the PPI patterns with convolution tree kernel (CTK) to extract PPIs. Methods were evaluated on LLL, IEPA, HPRD50, AIMed and BioInfer corpora using cross-validation, cross-learning and cross-corpus evaluation. Empirical evaluations demonstrate that our method is effective and outperforms several well-known PPI extraction methods. DATABASE URL. PMID:27524807

  11. Benchmarking of the 2010 BioCreative Challenge III text-mining competition by the BioGRID and MINT interaction databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesareni Gianni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast amount of data published in the primary biomedical literature represents a challenge for the automated extraction and codification of individual data elements. Biological databases that rely solely on manual extraction by expert curators are unable to comprehensively annotate the information dispersed across the entire biomedical literature. The development of efficient tools based on natural language processing (NLP systems is essential for the selection of relevant publications, identification of data attributes and partially automated annotation. One of the tasks of the Biocreative 2010 Challenge III was devoted to the evaluation of NLP systems developed to identify articles for curation and extraction of protein-protein interaction (PPI data. Results The Biocreative 2010 competition addressed three tasks: gene normalization, article classification and interaction method identification. The BioGRID and MINT protein interaction databases both participated in the generation of the test publication set for gene normalization, annotated the development and test sets for article classification, and curated the test set for interaction method classification. These test datasets served as a gold standard for the evaluation of data extraction algorithms. Conclusion The development of efficient tools for extraction of PPI data is a necessary step to achieve full curation of the biomedical literature. NLP systems can in the first instance facilitate expert curation by refining the list of candidate publications that contain PPI data; more ambitiously, NLP approaches may be able to directly extract relevant information from full-text articles for rapid inspection by expert curators. Close collaboration between biological databases and NLP systems developers will continue to facilitate the long-term objectives of both disciplines.

  12. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material ...

  13. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...

  14. Biocuration workflows and text mining: overview of the BioCreative 2012 Workshop Track II

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhiyong; Hirschman, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    Manual curation of data from the biomedical literature is a rate-limiting factor for many expert curated databases. Despite the continuing advances in biomedical text mining and the pressing needs of biocurators for better tools, few existing text-mining tools have been successfully integrated into production literature curation systems such as those used by the expert curated databases. To close this gap and better understand all aspects of literature curation, we invited submissions of writ...

  15. Integrating various resources for gene name normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuncui; Li, Yanpeng; Lin, Hongfei; Yang, Zhihao; Cheng, Liangxi

    2012-01-01

    The recognition and normalization of gene mentions in biomedical literature are crucial steps in biomedical text mining. We present a system for extracting gene names from biomedical literature and normalizing them to gene identifiers in databases. The system consists of four major components: gene name recognition, entity mapping, disambiguation and filtering. The first component is a gene name recognizer based on dictionary matching and semi-supervised learning, which utilizes the co-occurrence information of a large amount of unlabeled MEDLINE abstracts to enhance feature representation of gene named entities. In the stage of entity mapping, we combine the strategies of exact match and approximate match to establish linkage between gene names in the context and the EntrezGene database. For the gene names that map to more than one database identifiers, we develop a disambiguation method based on semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology and MEDLINE abstracts. To remove the noise produced in the previous steps, we design a filtering method based on the confidence scores in the dictionary used for NER. The system is able to adjust the trade-off between precision and recall based on the result of filtering. It achieves an F-measure of 83% (precision: 82.5% recall: 83.5%) on BioCreative II Gene Normalization (GN) dataset, which is comparable to the current state-of-the-art. PMID:22984434

  16. Integrating various resources for gene name normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncui Hu

    Full Text Available The recognition and normalization of gene mentions in biomedical literature are crucial steps in biomedical text mining. We present a system for extracting gene names from biomedical literature and normalizing them to gene identifiers in databases. The system consists of four major components: gene name recognition, entity mapping, disambiguation and filtering. The first component is a gene name recognizer based on dictionary matching and semi-supervised learning, which utilizes the co-occurrence information of a large amount of unlabeled MEDLINE abstracts to enhance feature representation of gene named entities. In the stage of entity mapping, we combine the strategies of exact match and approximate match to establish linkage between gene names in the context and the EntrezGene database. For the gene names that map to more than one database identifiers, we develop a disambiguation method based on semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology and MEDLINE abstracts. To remove the noise produced in the previous steps, we design a filtering method based on the confidence scores in the dictionary used for NER. The system is able to adjust the trade-off between precision and recall based on the result of filtering. It achieves an F-measure of 83% (precision: 82.5% recall: 83.5% on BioCreative II Gene Normalization (GN dataset, which is comparable to the current state-of-the-art.

  17. HLA class II genes: typing by DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, J L; Bidwell, E A; Bradley, B A

    1990-04-01

    A detailed understanding of the structure and function of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has ensued from studies by molecular biologist during the last decade. Virtually all of the HLA genes have now been cloned, and the nucleotide sequences of their different allelic forms have been determined. Typing for these HLA alleles is a fundamental prerequisite for tissue matching in allogeneic organ transplantation. Until very recently, typing procedures have been dominated by serological and cellular methods. The availability of cloned DNA from HLA genes has now permitted the technique of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to be applied, with remarkable success and advantage, to phenotyping of both HLA Class I and Class II determinants. For the HLA Class II genes DR and DQ, a simple two-stage RFLP analysis permits the accurate identification of all specificities defined by serology, and of many which are defined by cellular typing. At the present time, however, RFLP typing of HLA Class I genes is not as practicable or as informative as that for HLA Class II genes. The present clinical applications of HLA-DR and DQ RFLP typing are predominantly in phenotyping of living donors, including selection of HLA-matched volunteer bone marrow donors, in allograft survival studies, and in studies of HLA Class II-associated diseases. However, the time taken to perform RFLP analysis precludes its use for the typing of cadaveric kidney donors. Nucleotide sequence data for the alleles of HLA Class II genes have now permitted the development of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) typing, a second category of DNA analysis. This has been greatly facilitated by the ability to amplify specific HLA Class II DNA 'target' sequences using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The accuracy of DNA typing techniques should ensure that this methodology will eventually replace conventional HLA phenotyping.

  18. Group II intron-based gene targeting reactions in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Mastroianni

    Full Text Available Mobile group II introns insert site-specifically into DNA target sites by a mechanism termed retrohoming in which the excised intron RNA reverse splices into a DNA strand and is reverse transcribed by the intron-encoded protein. Retrohoming is mediated by a ribonucleoprotein particle that contains the intron-encoded protein and excised intron RNA, with target specificity determined largely by base pairing of the intron RNA to the DNA target sequence. This feature enabled the development of mobile group II introns into bacterial gene targeting vectors ("targetrons" with programmable target specificity. Thus far, however, efficient group II intron-based gene targeting reactions have not been demonstrated in eukaryotes.By using a plasmid-based Xenopus laevis oocyte microinjection assay, we show that group II intron RNPs can integrate efficiently into target DNAs in a eukaryotic nucleus, but the reaction is limited by low Mg(2+ concentrations. By supplying additional Mg(2+, site-specific integration occurs in up to 38% of plasmid target sites. The integration products isolated from X. laevis nuclei are sensitive to restriction enzymes specific for double-stranded DNA, indicating second-strand synthesis via host enzymes. We also show that group II intron RNPs containing either lariat or linear intron RNA can introduce a double-strand break into a plasmid target site, thereby stimulating homologous recombination with a co-transformed DNA fragment at frequencies up to 4.8% of target sites. Chromatinization of the target DNA inhibits both types of targeting reactions, presumably by impeding RNP access. However, by using similar RNP microinjection methods, we show efficient Mg(2+-dependent group II intron integration into plasmid target sites in zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos and into plasmid and chromosomal target sites in Drosophila melanogster embryos, indicating that DNA replication can mitigate effects of chromatinization.Our results provide an

  19. How to link ontologies and protein-protein interactions to literature: text-mining approaches and the BioCreative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krallinger, Martin; Leitner, Florian; Vazquez, Miguel; Salgado, David; Marcelle, Christophe; Tyers, Mike; Valencia, Alfonso; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing ontologies and controlled vocabularies to improve the efficiency and consistency of manual literature curation, to enable more formal biocuration workflow results and ultimately to improve analysis of biological data. Two ontologies that have been successfully used for this purpose are the Gene Ontology (GO) for annotating aspects of gene products and the Molecular Interaction ontology (PSI-MI) used by databases that archive protein-protein interactions. The examination of protein interactions has proven to be extremely promising for the understanding of cellular processes. Manual mapping of information from the biomedical literature to bio-ontology terms is one of the most challenging components in the curation pipeline. It requires that expert curators interpret the natural language descriptions contained in articles and infer their semantic equivalents in the ontology (controlled vocabulary). Since manual curation is a time-consuming process, there is strong motivation to implement text-mining techniques to automatically extract annotations from free text. A range of text mining strategies has been devised to assist in the automated extraction of biological data. These strategies either recognize technical terms used recurrently in the literature and propose them as candidates for inclusion in ontologies, or retrieve passages that serve as evidential support for annotating an ontology term, e.g. from the PSI-MI or GO controlled vocabularies. Here, we provide a general overview of current text-mining methods to automatically extract annotations of GO and PSI-MI ontology terms in the context of the BioCreative (Critical Assessment of Information Extraction Systems in Biology) challenge. Special emphasis is given to protein-protein interaction data and PSI-MI terms referring to interaction detection methods.

  20. Exclusion of the alpha 1(II) collagen structural gene as the mutant locus in type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, P; Ogilvie, D.; Smith, R.; Sykes, B

    1985-01-01

    We have used a high frequency site polymorphism within the human pro-alpha 1(II) collagen gene (COL2A1) in order to examine the segregation of this gene within a large pedigree with type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The EDS gene and the collagen gene segregate independently within the pedigree and therefore COL2A1 can be excluded as the mutant locus.

  1. An overview of the BioCreative 2012 Workshop Track III: interactive text mining task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arighi, Cecilia N; Carterette, Ben; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Krallinger, Martin; Wilbur, W John; Fey, Petra; Dodson, Robert; Cooper, Laurel; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Dahdul, Wasila; Mabee, Paula; Li, Donghui; Harris, Bethany; Gillespie, Marc; Jimenez, Silvia; Roberts, Phoebe; Matthews, Lisa; Becker, Kevin; Drabkin, Harold; Bello, Susan; Licata, Luana; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Schaeffer, Mary L; Park, Julie; Haendel, Melissa; Van Auken, Kimberly; Li, Yuling; Chan, Juancarlos; Muller, Hans-Michael; Cui, Hong; Balhoff, James P; Chi-Yang Wu, Johnny; Lu, Zhiyong; Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Tudor, Catalina O; Raja, Kalpana; Subramani, Suresh; Natarajan, Jeyakumar; Cejuela, Juan Miguel; Dubey, Pratibha; Wu, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    usability. In addition, strategies to refine the annotation guidelines and systems documentation, to adapt the tools to the needs and query types the end user might have and to evaluate performance in terms of efficiency, user interface, result export and traditional evaluation metrics have been analyzed during this task. This analysis will help to plan for a more intense study in BioCreative IV. PMID:23327936

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the Pseudomonas fluorescens signal peptidase II gene (lsp) and flanking genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaki, L; Beers, R; Wu, H.C.

    1990-01-01

    The lsp gene encoding prolipoprotein signal peptidase (signal peptidase II) is organized into an operon consisting of ileS and three open reading frames, designated genes x, orf149, and orf316 in both Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes. A plasmid, pBROC128, containing a 5.8-kb fragment of Pseudomonas fluorescens DNA was found to confer pseudomonic acid resistance on E. coli host cells and to contain the structural gene of ileS from P. fluorescens. In addition, E. coli strains carryin...

  3. The BEL information extraction workflow (BELIEF): evaluation in the BioCreative V BEL and IAT track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Sumit; Hodapp, Sven; Senger, Philipp; Ansari, Sam; Szostak, Justyna; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel; Fluck, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Network-based approaches have become extremely important in systems biology to achieve a better understanding of biological mechanisms. For network representation, the Biological Expression Language (BEL) is well designed to collate findings from the scientific literature into biological network models. To facilitate encoding and biocuration of such findings in BEL, a BEL Information Extraction Workflow (BELIEF) was developed. BELIEF provides a web-based curation interface, the BELIEF Dashboard, that incorporates text mining techniques to support the biocurator in the generation of BEL networks. The underlying UIMA-based text mining pipeline (BELIEF Pipeline) uses several named entity recognition processes and relationship extraction methods to detect concepts and BEL relationships in literature. The BELIEF Dashboard allows easy curation of the automatically generated BEL statements and their context annotations. Resulting BEL statements and their context annotations can be syntactically and semantically verified to ensure consistency in the BEL network. In summary, the workflow supports experts in different stages of systems biology network building. Based on the BioCreative V BEL track evaluation, we show that the BELIEF Pipeline automatically extracts relationships with an F-score of 36.4% and fully correct statements can be obtained with an F-score of 30.8%. Participation in the BioCreative V Interactive task (IAT) track with BELIEF revealed a systems usability scale (SUS) of 67. Considering the complexity of the task for new users—learning BEL, working with a completely new interface, and performing complex curation—a score so close to the overall SUS average highlights the usability of BELIEF. Database URL: BELIEF is available at http://www.scaiview.com/belief/

  4. The BEL information extraction workflow (BELIEF): evaluation in the BioCreative V BEL and IAT track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Sumit; Hodapp, Sven; Senger, Philipp; Ansari, Sam; Szostak, Justyna; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel; Fluck, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Network-based approaches have become extremely important in systems biology to achieve a better understanding of biological mechanisms. For network representation, the Biological Expression Language (BEL) is well designed to collate findings from the scientific literature into biological network models. To facilitate encoding and biocuration of such findings in BEL, a BEL Information Extraction Workflow (BELIEF) was developed. BELIEF provides a web-based curation interface, the BELIEF Dashboard, that incorporates text mining techniques to support the biocurator in the generation of BEL networks. The underlying UIMA-based text mining pipeline (BELIEF Pipeline) uses several named entity recognition processes and relationship extraction methods to detect concepts and BEL relationships in literature. The BELIEF Dashboard allows easy curation of the automatically generated BEL statements and their context annotations. Resulting BEL statements and their context annotations can be syntactically and semantically verified to ensure consistency in the BEL network. In summary, the workflow supports experts in different stages of systems biology network building. Based on the BioCreative V BEL track evaluation, we show that the BELIEF Pipeline automatically extracts relationships with an F-score of 36.4% and fully correct statements can be obtained with an F-score of 30.8%. Participation in the BioCreative V Interactive task (IAT) track with BELIEF revealed a systems usability scale (SUS) of 67. Considering the complexity of the task for new users—learning BEL, working with a completely new interface, and performing complex curation—a score so close to the overall SUS average highlights the usability of BELIEF. Database URL: BELIEF is available at http://www.scaiview.com/belief/ PMID:27694210

  5. The Protein-Protein Interaction tasks of BioCreative III: classification/ranking of articles and linking bio-ontology concepts to full text

    OpenAIRE

    Krallinger, Martin; Vazquez, Miguel; Leitner, Florian; Salgado, David; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Winter, Andrew; Perfetto, Livia; Briganti, Leonardo; Licata, Luana; Iannuccelli, Marta; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni; Tyers, Mike; Schneider, Gerold; Rinaldi, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Background Determining usefulness of biomedical text mining systems requires realistic task definition and data selection criteria without artificial constraints, measuring performance aspects that go beyond traditional metrics. The BioCreative III Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) tasks were motivated by such considerations, trying to address aspects including how the end user would oversee the generated output, for instance by providing ranked results, textual evidence for human interpretat...

  6. Benchmarking of the 2010 BioCreative Challenge III text-mining competition by the BioGRID and MINT interaction databases

    OpenAIRE

    Krallinger, Martin; Vazquez, Miguel; Leitner, Florian; Salgado, David; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Winter, Andrew; Perfetto, Livia; Briganti, Leonardo; Licata, Luana; Iannuccelli, Marta; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni; Tyers, Mike; Schneider, Gerold; Rinaldi, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Determining usefulness of biomedical text mining systems requires realistic task definition and data selection criteria without artificial constraints, measuring performance aspects that go beyond traditional metrics. The BioCreative III Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) tasks were motivated by such considerations, trying to address aspects including how the end user would oversee the generated output, for instance by providing ranked results, textual evidence fo...

  7. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses.

  8. A cII-dependent promoter is located within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, B C; McClure, W R

    1985-01-01

    We have found a cII-dependent promoter, PaQ, within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda. Transcription experiments and abortive initiation assays performed in vitro showed that the promoter strength and the cII affinity of PaQ were comparable to the other cII-dependent lambda promoters, PE and PI. The location and leftward direction of PaQ suggests a possible role in the delay of lambda late-gene expression by cII protein, a phenomenon that has been called cII-dependent inhibition. We have con...

  9. A multistage gene normalization system integrating multiple effective methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishuang Li

    Full Text Available Gene/protein recognition and normalization is an important preliminary step for many biological text mining tasks. In this paper, we present a multistage gene normalization system which consists of four major subtasks: pre-processing, dictionary matching, ambiguity resolution and filtering. For the first subtask, we apply the gene mention tagger developed in our earlier work, which achieves an F-score of 88.42% on the BioCreative II GM testing set. In the stage of dictionary matching, the exact matching and approximate matching between gene names and the EntrezGene lexicon have been combined. For the ambiguity resolution subtask, we propose a semantic similarity disambiguation method based on Munkres' Assignment Algorithm. At the last step, a filter based on Wikipedia has been built to remove the false positives. Experimental results show that the presented system can achieve an F-score of 90.1%, outperforming most of the state-of-the-art systems.

  10. Identification and characterization of the human type II collagen gene (COL2A1).

    OpenAIRE

    Cheah, Kathryn; Stoker, N G; Griffin, J.R.; Grosveld, Frank; Solomon, E

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe gene contained in the human cosmid clone CosHcol1, previously designated an alpha 1(I) collagen-like gene, has now been identified. CosHcol1 hybridizes strongly to a single 5.9-kilobase mRNA species present only in tissue in which type II collagen is expressed. DNA sequence analysis shows that this clone is highly homologous to the chicken alpha 1(II) collagen gene. These data together suggest that CosHcol1 contains the human alpha 1(II) collagen gene COL2A1. The clone appears...

  11. ProMiner: rule-based protein and gene entity recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hanisch, D.; Fundel, K.; Mevissen, H. T.; Zimmer, R; Fluck, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Identification of gene and protein names in biomedical text is a challenging task as the corresponding nomenclature has evolved over time. This has led to multiple synonyms for individual genes and proteins, as well as names that may be ambiguous with other gene names or with general English words. The Gene List Task of the BioCreAtIvE challenge evaluation enables comparison of systems addressing the problem of protein and gene name identification on common benchmark data. Methods...

  12. Chromosomal assignments of the genes coding for human types II, III, and IV collagen: a dispersed gene family.

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, E; Hiorns, L R; Spurr, N; Kurkinen, M.; Barlow, D; Hogan, B L; Dalgleish, R.

    1985-01-01

    The human type II collagen gene, COL2A1, has been assigned to chromosome 12, the type III gene, COL3A1, to chromosome 2, and one of the type IV genes, COL4A1, to chromosome 13. These assignments were made by using cloned genes as probes on Southern blots of DNA from a panel of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids. The two genes of type I collagen, COL1A1 and COL2A1, have been mapped previously to chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively. This family of conserved genes seems therefore to be dispersed th...

  13. Expression of endogenous and transfected apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin II genes in an estrogen responsive chicken liver cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, R; MacDonald, C C; Burch, J B; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1990-02-01

    A recently described chicken liver cell line, LMH, was characterized to evaluate responsiveness to estrogen. Expression of the endogenous apolipoprotein (apo) II gene was induced by 17 beta-estradiol when LMH cells were cultured with chicken serum. The response was low and yielded apoll mRNA at only 0.3% of the level seen in estrogenized rooster liver. Higher levels of apoll mRNA were achieved when LMH cells were transiently transfected with an expression plasmid for estrogen receptor. A transfected apoll gene was strongly expressed only when cotransfected with receptor. Expression of the endogenous vitellogenin (VTG) II gene was not detected. However, when cotransfected with a receptor expression plasmid, VTG II reporter plasmids were expressed in LMH cells in response to 17 beta-estradiol. These results suggest that estrogen responsiveness of LMH cells is limited by the availability of functional receptor. Low levels of estrogen receptor mRNA were detected in LMH cells, and receptor binding sites and mRNA were greatly increased following transient transfection with a receptor expression plasmid. Using this transient transfection protocol, several VTG II reporter plasmids were compared in LMH cells and chick embryo fibroblasts. A plasmid containing VTG II estrogen response elements linked to a heterologous promoter was regulated by estrogen in both cell types. In contrast, reporter plasmids containing the VTG II promoter were regulated by estrogen in LMH cells but were not expressed at all in chick embryo fibroblasts. These results suggest that regulation of the VTG II gene involves cell type-specific elements in addition to estrogen response elements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2330000

  14. Cloning and characterization of the gene product of the form II ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase gene of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, E D; Chory, J; Kaplan, S

    1985-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of the gene product of the gene for the form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. We present evidence that the form II enzyme is encoded by a single gene in R. sphaeroides; however, this gene does hybridize to a second chromosomal locus.

  15. The human insulin-like growth factor II gene contains two development-specific promoters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagter-Holthuizen, P. de; Jansen, M.; Schaik, F.M.A.; Kammen, R. van der; Oosterwijk, C.; Brande, J.L. van den; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF) play an important role in fetal and postnatal development. Recently, the nucleotide sequences of the cDNAs encoding IGF-I and IGF-II and part of the human IGF genes were reported. In this communication we describe two distinct IGF-II cDNAs isolated from a human

  16. A cII-dependent promoter is located within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, B C; McClure, W R

    1985-05-01

    We have found a cII-dependent promoter, PaQ, within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda. Transcription experiments and abortive initiation assays performed in vitro showed that the promoter strength and the cII affinity of PaQ were comparable to the other cII-dependent lambda promoters, PE and PI. The location and leftward direction of PaQ suggests a possible role in the delay of lambda late-gene expression by cII protein, a phenomenon that has been called cII-dependent inhibition. We have constructed a promoter down mutation, paq-1, by changing a single base pair in the putative cII binding site of the promoter by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis. The paq-1 mutant promoter required about 4-fold higher cII concentrations for maximal activation compared to the wild-type PaQ. We tested the hypothesis that PaQ is responsible in part for the delay of lambda late-gene expression by recombining the paq-1 mutation into a phage showing severe cII-dependent inhibition. We found that the paq-1 mutation relieved the cII-dependent growth defect of this phage. The paq-1 mutation (in combination with lambda cI857) resulted in a clear-plaque phenotype at the permissive temperature of 32 degrees C. The role of the PaQ-initiated antisense transcript in the control of lambda development is discussed.

  17. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meng-Jun Li; Ai-Qin Li; Han Xia; Chuan-Zhi Zhao; Chang-Sheng Li; Shu-Bo Wan; Yu-Ping Bi; Xing-Jun Wang

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, -ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), -ketoacyl-ACP reductase, -hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  19. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Ambite

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes. Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an

  20. Isolation of the human insulin-like growth factor genes: insulin-like growth factor II and insulin genes are contiguous.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, G I; Gerhard, D S; Fong, N. M.; Sanchez-Pescador, R; Rall, L B

    1985-01-01

    Overlapping recombinant clones that encompass the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and II genes have been isolated from a human genomic DNA library. Each gene is present once per haploid genome; the IGF-I gene spans greater than 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) and the IGF-II gene is at least 15 kbp. The exon-intron organization of these genes is similar, each having four exons, which is one more than the related insulin gene. Comparison of the restriction endonuclease cleavage maps of the IGF-II an...

  1. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  2. Rapid duplication and loss of nbs-encoding genes in eurosids II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurosids basically evolved from the core Eudicots Rosids. The Rosids consist of two large assemblages, Eurosids I (Fabids) and Eurosids II (Malvids), which belong to the largest group of Angiosperms, comprising of >40,000 and ∼ 15,000 species, respectively. Although the evolutionary patterns of the largest class of disease resistance genes consisting of a nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) have been studied in many species, systemic research of NBS-encoding genes has not been performed in different orders of Eurosids II. Here, five Eurosids II species, Gossypium raimondii, Theobroma cacao, Carica papaya, Citrus clementina, and Arabidopsis thaliana, distributing in three orders, were used to gain insights into the evolutionary patterns of the NBS-encoding genes. Our data showed that frequent copy number variations of NBS-encoding genes were found among these species. Phylogenetic tree analysis and the numbers of the NBS-encoding genes in the common ancestor of these species showed that species-specific NBS clades, including multi-copy and single copy numbers are dominant among these genes. However, not a single clade was found with only five copies, which come from all of the five species, respectively, suggesting rapid turn-over with birth and death of the NBS-encoding genes among Eurosids II species. In addition, a strong positive correlation was observed between the Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR)) type NBS-encoding genes and species-specific genes, indicating rapid gene loss and duplication. Whereas, non- TIR type NBS-encoding genes in these five species showed two distinct evolutionary patterns. (author)

  3. Synthetic gene transfer vectors II: back to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Jean-Paul

    2012-07-17

    The discovery of RNA interference has given a new lease on life to both the chemistry of oligonucleotides and chemical approaches for the intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. In particular, delivery of siRNA, whether in vitro for screening and target validation purposes or in humans as a new class of drugs, may revolutionize our approach to therapy. Their impact could equal that of the bioproduction and various uses of monoclonal antibodies today. Unfortunately, global pharmaceutical companies again seem to be waiting to buy the next Genentech or Genzyme of gene silencing rather than investing research and development into this promising area of research. Gene silencing encounters barriers similar to gene addition and hence may benefit from the extra decade of experience brought by gene therapy. "Chemical" transfection of cells in culture has become routine, and this Account discusses some of the reasons this success has not extended to nonviral gene therapy trials, most of which do not progress beyond the phase 2 stage. The author also discusses a (much debated) mechanism of nucleic acid cell entry and subsequent release of the polycationic particles into the cytoplasm. Both topics should be useful to those interested in delivery of siRNA. The move from gene therapy toward siRNA as an oligonucleotide-based therapy strategy provides a much wider range of druggable targets. Even though these molecules are a hundredfold smaller than a gene, they are delivered via similar cellular mechanisms. Their complexes with cationic polymers are less stable than those with a higher number of phosphate groups, which may be compensated by siRNA concatemerization or by chemical conjugation with the cationic carrier. Thus chemistry is again desperately needed. PMID:22311735

  4. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  5. DNA sequence of the Peromyscus leucopus MHC class II gene Aa (MhcPeleAa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crew, M.D.; Bates, L.M. [Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The genus Peromyscus has been extensively studied by populations biologists and ecologists for over eighty years, with P. leucopus (the white-footed mouse) being one of the most intensively investigated species. Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes have proven useful in population genetic studies and might be helpful in understanding the population dynamics of Peromyscus species which are ubiquitously distributed over North and Central America. Polymorphism of P. leucopus MHC (MhcPele) class II genes was evident by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses using human and mouse probes and Pele class II loci exhibited degrees of polymorphism similar to H2 class II genes (A-like>E-like). 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Base J represses genes at the end of polycistronic gene clusters in Leishmania major by promoting RNAP II termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, David L; Hofmeister, Brigitte T; Cliffe, Laura; Siegel, T Nicolai; Anderson, Britta A; Beverley, Stephen M; Schmitz, Robert J; Sabatini, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of kinetoplastids are organized into polycistronic gene clusters that are flanked by the modified DNA base J. Previous work has established a role of base J in promoting RNA polymerase II termination in Leishmania spp. where the loss of J leads to termination defects and transcription into adjacent gene clusters. It remains unclear whether these termination defects affect gene expression and whether read through transcription is detrimental to cell growth, thus explaining the essential nature of J. We now demonstrate that reduction of base J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters in L. major leads to read through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes in the cluster. Interestingly, subsequent transcription into the opposing polycistronic gene cluster does not lead to downregulation of sense mRNAs. These findings indicate a conserved role for J regulating transcription termination and expression of genes within polycistronic gene clusters in trypanosomatids. In contrast to the expectations often attributed to opposing transcription, the essential nature of J in Leishmania spp. is related to its role in gene repression rather than preventing transcriptional interference resulting from read through and dual strand transcription.

  7. Slow freezing and vitrification differentially modify the gene expression profile of human metaphase II oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Monzo, Cécile; Haouzi, Delphine; Roman, K.; Assou, Said; Dechaud, Hervé; Hamamah, Samir

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryopreservation is now considered as an efficient way to store human oocytes to preserve fertility. However, little is known about the effects of this technology on oocyte gene expression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the two cryopreservation procedures, slow freezing and vitrification, on the gene expression profile of human metaphase II (MII) oocytes. METHODS: Unfertilized MII oocytes following ICSI failure were cryopreserved either by slow freezing or by ...

  8. KRAS and MAPK1 Gene Amplification in Type II Ovarian Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Ishikawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the clinical significance of KRAS and MAPK1 amplification and assessed whether these amplified genes were potential therapeutic targets in type II ovarian carcinoma. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and retrospectively collected clinical data, KRAS and MAPK1 amplifications were identified in 9 (13.2% and 5 (7.4% of 68 type II ovarian carcinoma tissue samples, respectively. Interestingly, co-amplification of KRAS and MAPK1 seemed to be absent in the type II ovarian carcinomas tested, except one case. Active phospho-ERK1/2 was identified in 26 (38.2% out of 68 type II ovarian carcinomas and did not correlate with KRAS or MAPK1 amplification. There was no significant relationship between KRAS amplification and overall or progression-free survival in patients with type II ovarian carcinoma. However, patients with MAPK1 amplification had significantly poorer progression-free survival than patients without MAPK1 amplification. Moreover, type II ovarian carcinoma cells with concomitant KRAS amplification and mutation exhibited dramatic growth reduction following treatment with the MEK inhibitor PD0325901. These findings indicate that KRAS/MAPK1 amplification is critical for the growth of a subset of type II ovarian carcinomas. Additionally, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway-targeted therapy may benefit selected patients with type II ovarian carcinoma harboring KRAS/MAPK1 amplifications.

  9. Normal HLA class I, II, and MICA gene distribution in uveal melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metzelaar-Blok, J.A.; Hurks, H.M.; Naipal, A.; Lange, P. de; Keunen, J.E.E.; Claas, F.; Doxiadis, I.I.; Jager, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The molecules of the HLA class I and II molecules as well as the MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a polymorphic and stress-induced cell surface molecule, are involved in T-cell and natural killer-cell (NK-cell) mediated immune responses. In this study we looked for any genetic susce

  10. Studies of variability in the PTEN gene among Danish caucasian patients with Type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Jensen, J N; Ekstrøm, C T;

    2001-01-01

    regulates the insulin-dependent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling cassette and accordingly might function as a regulator of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. In this study we tested PTEN as a candidate gene for insulin resistance and late-onset Type II (non...

  11. Evolution of Type II Antifreeze Protein Genes in Teleost Fish: A Complex Scenario Involving Lateral Gene Transfers and Episodic Directional Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Sorhannus

    2012-01-01

    I examined hypotheses about lateral transfer of type II antifreeze protein (AFP) genes among “distantly” related teleost fish. The effects of episodic directional selection on amino acid evolution were also investigated. The strict consensus results showed that the type II AFP and type II antifreeze-like protein genes were transferred from Osmerus mordax to Clupea harengus, from the ancestral lineage of the Brachyopsis rostratus—Hemitripterus americanus clade to the ancestor of the Hypomesus ...

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, H.; Targan, S. [Roche Molecular Systems, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  13. Expression regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and class II encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J van den Elsen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available MHC-I and MHC-II molecules play an essential role in the immune response to pathogens by virtue of their ability to present peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively. Given this critical role, MHC-I and MHC-II genes are regulated in a tight fashion at the transcriptional level by a variety of transcription factors that interact with conserved cis-acting regulatory promoter elements. In addition to the activities of these regulatory factors, modification of chromatin also plays an essential role in the efficient transcription of these genes to meet with local requirement for an effective immune response. The focus of this review is on the transcription factors that interact with conserved cis-acting promoter elements and the epigenetic mechanisms that modulate induced and constitutive expression of these MHC genes.

  14. RNA polymerase II induced transcription of tRNA genes and processing of the mRNAs in yeast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Only 5'-halves were produced when the terminator sequence for RNA polymerase (pol) 1II transcrip-tion was inserted into the intron of yeast tRNATyr gene. If a promoter and a terminator for pol II transcription flanked it,the tRNA gene could be transcribed by pol II, but the transcripts could not be processed into mature tRNAs. In con-trast, tRNA gene could also be transcribed by pol III and the transcripts could be processed into mature tRNAs even if a promoter and a terminator for pol II transcription flanked it. Pol II transcripts, modified with a self-cleaved hannner-head structure at 3'-end, were processed into mature tRNAs in the medium containing 100 mmol/L Mg2+ , indicating that the 3'-long trailer sequence blocks the maturation of tRNA gene transcripts by pol II.

  15. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  16. Dentin phosphoprotein gene locus is not associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, M.; Zeichner-David, M.; Davis, A.; Slavkin, H. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Murray, J. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Crall, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is an autosomal dominant inherited dental disease which affects dentin production and mineralization. Genetic linkage studies have been performed on several multigeneration informative kindreds. These studies determined linkage between DGI types II and III and group-specific component (vitamin D-binding protein). This gene locus has been localized to the long arm of human chromosome 4 in the region 4q11-q21. Although this disease has been mapped to chromosome 4, the defective gene product is yet to be determined. Biochemical studies have suggested abnormal levels of dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) associated with DGI type II. This highly acidic protein is the major noncollagenous component of dentin, being solely expressed by the ectomesenchymal derived odontoblast cells of the tooth. The purpose of the present study was to establish whether DPP is associated with DGI types II and III, by using molecular biology techniques. The results indicated that DPP is not localized to any region of human chromosome 4, thus suggesting that the DPP gene is not directly associated with DGI type II or DGI type III. The data do not exclude the possibility that other proteins associated with DPP posttranslational modifications might be responsible for this genetic disease.

  17. Characterization and expression pattern ofpouII1,a novel class Ⅱ POU gene in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    POU domain transcription factors that share a conserved DNA-binding domain, POU domain, are important regulators for the development of embryos in various animal species. A novel zebrafish POU domain gene, pouII1has been cloned. The pouII1 cDNA is 2080 kb in length and encodes a putative polypeptide of 596 amino acids. It is placed into class Ⅱ POU family since it shares a high degree of homology with the known members of this family.Northern hybridization identifies a major transcript of approximately 2.1 kb that was present in embryos at the single-cell stage throughout 24 h postfertilizafion. The whole mountin situ hybridization shows thatpouII1 transcripts are present in the single-cell embryos, strongly suggesting that these transcripts are of maternal origin. During early development of the embryos, pouII1 mRNA was ubiquitously distributed in all cells and tissues. The transcripts are gradually limited to brains and become completely undetectable by day 3. To our knowledge, pouII1 is the first class Ⅱ POU gene identified in zebrafish.``

  18. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-II regulates bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jin; Sasaki, Yoko; Zhou, Liming; Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) have been found in bone extracts of several different species, and IGF-II is the most abundant growth factor stored in bone. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a noncollagenous extracellular matrix glycoprotein associated with mineralized connective tissues. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of BSP transcription by IGF-II in rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells. IGF-II (50 ng/ml) increased BSP mRNA and protein levels after 6-h stimulation, and enhanced luciferase activities of the constructs pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60), pLUC5 (-801 to +60) and pLUC6 (-938 to +60). Effects of IGF-II were inhibited by tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors, and abrogated by 2-bp mutations in cAMP response element (CRE), FGF2 response element (FRE) and homeodomain protein-binding site (HOX). The results of gel shift assays showed that nuclear proteins binding to CRE, FRE and HOX sites were increased by IGF-II (50 ng/ml) at 3 and 6 h. CREB1, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos and c-Jun antibodies disrupted the formation of the CRE-protein complexes. Dlx5 and Runx2 antibodies disrupted the FRE- and HOX-protein complex formations. These studies therefore demonstrated that IGF-II increased BSP transcription by targeting CRE, FRE and HOX elements in the proximal promoter of the rat BSP gene. Moreover, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos, c-Jun, Dlx5 and Runx2 transcription factors appear to be key regulators of IGF-II effects on BSP transcription.

  20. Physiological Study of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Pvu II Polymorphism in Cases of Obesity in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada El-Kannishy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic predisposition has been implicated in obesity. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL gene, the main lipase of chylomicrons and Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL, has a fundamental role in the transport and metabolism of plasma cholesterol. The present study was undertaken to test for the association of the LPL gene Pvu II polymorphism with obesity with or without hypertension and diabetes and dyslipidemia among affected Egyptian cases. This study has included 120 subjects affected with obesity; 57 of them were affected with metabolic syndrome (with diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension while the other 63 cases were not complicated and were termed simple obesity. These cases were compared to 83 healthy non-obese controls. Body Mass Index (BMI, Waist Hip Ration (WHR and serum lipid levels were measured. The LPL gene polymorphic alleles were determined by PCR-RFLP that includes polymerase chain reaction for gene amplification followed by digestion with Pvu II enzyme and analysis according to the size of digested amplified DNA. Obesity cases had a significantly higher frequency of the homozygous mutated LPL Pvu II (+/+ genotype and also of the (+ allele particularly among metabolic syndrome cases compared to controls. Cases with the (+/+ homozygous genotype showed significantly higher frequency of diabetes, lower frequency of positive family history and lower values for waist hip ratio than those with the (+/- and (-/- genotypes. These cases have showed also higher levels of total cholesterol and LDL-C, yet not reaching statistical significance. This study showed a significant association between the LPL Pvu II gene polymorphism and obesity among Egyptian cases particularly when complicated with the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

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    Kuduk Katarzyna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  2. Characterisation of a plancitoxin-1-like DNase II gene in Trichinella spiralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengshui Liao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Deoxyribonuclease II (DNase II is a well-known acidic endonuclease that catalyses the degradation of DNA into oligonucleotides. Only one or a few genes encoding DNase II have been observed in the genomes of many species. 125 DNase II-like protein family genes were predicted in the Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis genome; however, none have been confirmed. DNase II is a monomeric nuclease that contains two copies of a variant HKD motif in the N- and C-termini. Of these 125 genes, only plancitoxin-1 (1095 bp, GenBank accession no. XM_003370715.1 contains the HKD motif in its C-terminus domain.In this study, we cloned and characterised the plancitoxin-1 gene. However, the sequences of plancitoxin-1 cloned from T. spiralis were shorter than the predicted sequences in GenBank. Intriguingly, there were two HKD motifs in the N- and C-termini in the cloned sequences. Therefore, the gene with shorter sequences was named after plancitoxin-1-like (Ts-Pt, 885 bp and has been deposited in GenBank under accession number KF984291. The recombinant protein (rTs-Pt was expressed in a prokaryotic expression system and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis showed that rTs-Pt was recognised by serum from T. spiralis-infected mice; the anti-rTs-Pt serum recognised crude antigens but not ES antigens. The Ts-Pt gene was examined at all T. spiralis developmental stages by real-time quantitative PCR. Immunolocalisation analysis showed that Ts-Pt was distributed throughout newborn larvae (NBL, the tegument of adults (Ad and muscle larvae (ML. As demonstrated by DNase zymography, the expressed proteins displayed cation-independent DNase activity. rTs-Pt had a narrow optimum pH range in slightly acidic conditions (pH 4 and pH 5, and its optimum temperature was 25°C, 30°C, and 37°C.This study indicated that Ts-Pt was classified as a somatic protein in different T. spiralis developmental stages, and demonstrated for the first time that an

  3. Mutational hot spot in the DSPP gene causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Hu, Jan C-C; Lee, Jae-Il; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Young-Jae; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Chong-Chul; Hahn, Se-Hyun; Simmer, James P

    2005-02-01

    The current system for the classification of hereditary defects of tooth dentin is based upon clinical and radiographic findings and consists of two types of dentin dysplasia (DD) and three types of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI). However, whether DGI type III should be considered a distinct phenotype or a variation of DGI type II is debatable. In the 30 years since the classification system was first proposed, significant advances have been made regarding the genetic etiologies of inherited dentin defects. DGI type II is recognized as an autosomal dominant disorder with almost complete penetrance and a low frequency of de novo mutations. We have identified a mutation (c.52G-->T, p.V18F) at the first nucleotide of exon 3 of the DSPP (dentin sialophosphoprotein) gene in a Korean family (de novo) and a Caucasian family. This mutation has previously been reported as causing DGI type II in a Chinese family. These findings suggest that this mutation site represents a mutational "hot spot" in the DSPP gene. The clinical and radiographic features of these two families include the classic phenotypes associated with both DGI type II and type III. Finding that a single mutation causes both phenotypic patterns strongly supports the conclusion that DGI type II and DGI type III are not separate diseases but rather the phenotypic variation of a single disease. We propose a modification of the current classification system such that the designation "hereditary opalescent dentin" or "DGI type II" should be used to describe both the DGI type II and type III phenotypes.

  4. Molecular analysis of iduronate -2- sulfatase gene in Tunisian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chkioua Latifa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome is X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the defective activity of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS. Hunter disease can vary from mild to severe, depending on the level of enzyme deficiency. We report the IDS mutation and polymorphisms causing the Hunter syndrome in patients from one family in Tunisia Patients and methods A preliminary diagnosis was made by qualitative detection of urinary glycosaminoglycans of the suspected MPS II probands. The IDS mutation and polymorphisms were determined on these probands and their family members by amplifying and sequencing each of the exons and intron-exon junctions of IDS gene. Results The studied probands were homoallelic for p.R88P mutation. In addition, three known polymorphisms/sequence variants: IVS3-16 (c.419-16 delT, T214M (c.641C > T, T146T (c.438 C > T, IVS5-87(c.709-87G > A and one previously unknown: IVS7+38(c.1006+38T > C were identified in the MPS II patients. These are the first Tunisian MPS II patients to be genotyped. Conclusion The identification of these mutation and polymorphisms and their genotype-phenotype correlation should facilitate prenatal diagnosis and counseling for MPS II in Tunisia, where a very high rate of consanguinity exists.

  5. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class-II negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids

  6. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-γ-inducible MHC-II gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-γ. IFN-γ activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-γ-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, C...

  7. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    OpenAIRE

    S.N. Takeshima; T. Miyasaka; Polat, M.; M. Kikuya; Matsumoto, Y.; C.N. Mingala; M.A. Villanueva; A.J. Salces; Onuma, M.; Aida, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-D...

  8. MspI/HpaII polymorphism in the human multidrug resistance gene I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, D.A.; Housman, D.E. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambrige (USA))

    1989-12-11

    A 2.1kb partial cDNA clone encoding the human multidrug resistance gene 1 (mdr 1) was isolated from drug-resistant cells. The probe used is a 850bp Bg1 II-Hind III fragment (nucleotides 1600-2450). Msp I/HpaII digestion identifies a three allele polymorphis with bands of 21kb (a), 17kb (b), and 1.5 kb (c). In addition, an invariant band at 4kb is noted. The mdr 1 gene has been mapped to human chromosome 7. Band localization has been reported as either 7q21 or 7q36. Co-dominant segregation was documented in one informative family.

  9. Phylogenetic Positions of Insectivora in Eutheria Inferred from Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit II Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Onuma, Michiko; Kusakabe, Tadashi; Kusakabe, Shinichi

    1998-01-01

    For the elucidation of the phylogenetic position of insectivora in eutheria, we have sequenced the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene of mitochondria for three insectivoran species [musk shrew (Suncus murinus), shrew mole (Urotrichus talpoides), Japanese mole (Mogera wogura)] and analyzed these amino acid sequences with neighbor-joining (NJ) method and maximum likelihood (ML) method. NJ analysis shows polyphyly of Insectivora and Chiroptera. Assuming that each of Primates, Ferungulat...

  10. Genetic linkage analysis of hereditary arthro-ophthalmopathy (Stickler syndrome) and the type II procollagen gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Knowlton, R G; Weaver, E. J.; Struyk, A F; Knobloch, W H; King, R A; Norris, K; Shamban, A; Uitto, J; Jimenez, S A; Prockop, D J

    1989-01-01

    Hereditary arthro-ophthalmopathy (AO), or Stickler syndrome, is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by vitreo-retinal degeneration and frequently accompanied by epiphyseal dysplasia and premature degenerative joint disease. Three large families with AO were analyzed for clinical manifestations of the disease and for coinheritance of the genetic defect with RFLPs in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1). Genetic linkage between AO and COL2A1 was demonstrated in the largest family, wi...

  11. Differential allelic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in osteoarthritic cartilage.

    OpenAIRE

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C; Athanasou, N; Carr, A; Sykes, B

    1995-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from ...

  12. Inhibition of T lymphocyte activation in mice heterozygous for loss of the IMPDH II gene

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Jing Jin; Stegmann, Sander; Gathy, Karen; Murray, Robert; Laliberte, Josee; Ayscue, Lanier; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2000-01-01

    Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides, which are also synthesized from guanine by a salvage reaction catalyzed by the X chromosome–linked enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). Since inhibitors of IMPDH are in clinical use as immunosuppressive agents, we have examined the consequences of knocking out the IMPDH type II enzyme by gene targeting in a mouse model. Loss of both alleles of th...

  13. Polymorphisms in the genes for coagulation factor II,V,VII in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐耕; 金国栋; 傅国胜; 马骥; 单江; 王建安

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether polymorphisms in the genes for coagulation factor II,V, VII could predispose an individual to increase risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or myocardial infarction (MI) in Chinese. Methods: We screened coagulation factor II(G20210A),V(G1691A),VII (R353Q and HVR4) genotype in 374 patients undergoing coronary angiography by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results: The R353Q and HVR4 genotype of the factor VII distribution was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The frequencies of FVII genotype or allele did not show statistically significant differences between CAD group and controls or between male and female. The frequencies of the Q allele and (RQ+QQ) genotype were significantly higher among the CAD patients without myocardial infarction (MI) history than among those with MI history (P<0.05). However, HVR4 polymorphism was not significantly different within groups. We only find one normal control of factorII(G20210A) mutation. No coagulation factor V(G1691A) mutation was found in the CAD patients and controls. Conclusion: The factor II(G20210A),V(G1691A) mutation is absent and may not be a major genetic factor for CAD and/or MI; the Q allele of the R353Q polymorphism of the factor VII gene may be a protective genetic factor against myocardial infarction in Chinese.

  14. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Friis, J; Fugger, L;

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, and -DPB in 54 patients with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) and in healthy Danes. The frequencies of DNA fragments...... associated with the following HLA class II genes were increased in PJRA when compared to normal controls: DRB1*08 (DRw8) (35.2% vs 10.3%, RR = 4.6, p less than 10(-3), DRB3*01/02/03 (DRw52) (76.3% vs 48.1%, RR 3.5, p less than 10(-3)), DQA1*0401 (41.0% vs 7.4%, RR = 7.9, p less than 10(-3)), DQA1*0501 (55...... of DNA fragments associated with the following HLA class II genes were decreased in PJRA although not statistically significantly so after 'correction' of p values: DRB1*04 (14.8% vs 40.2%, RR = 0.27; p less than 10(-3)), DRB1*07 (0% vs 25.9%, RR = 0.04, p less than 10(-3)), DRB4*0101 (DRw53) (25.9% vs...

  15. Role of type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in the regulation of Circadian Per1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungtae Na

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that regulate rhythmic physiological and behavioral changes to correspond to daily light-dark cycles. Molecular dissections have revealed that transcriptional feedback loops of the circadian clock genes drive the molecular oscillation, in which PER/CRY complexes inhibit the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer to constitute a negative feedback loop. In this study, we identified the type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 as an interacting molecule of CRY1. Although the Prmt5 gene was constitutively expressed, increased interaction of PRMT5 with CRY1 was observed when the Per1 gene was repressed both in synchronized mouse liver and NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, rhythmic recruitment of PRMT5 and CRY1 to the Per1 gene promoter was found to be associated with an increased level of histone H4R3 dimethylation and Per1 gene repression. Consistently, decreased histone H4R3 dimethylation and altered rhythmic Per1 gene expression were observed in Prmt5-depleted cells. Taken together, these findings provide an insight into the link between histone arginine methylation by PRMT5 and transcriptional regulation of the circadian Per1 gene.

  16. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah A. Al-Temaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO, which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  17. Genetic variation in V gene of class II Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huafang; Chen, Shengli; Liu, Peng; Ren, Shanhui; Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Xinglong; Zhang, Shuxia; Yang, Zengqi

    2016-01-01

    The genetic variation and molecular evolution of the V gene of the class II Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates with genotypes I-XVIII were determined using bioinformatics. Results indicated that low homology existed in different genotype viruses, whereas high homology often for the same genotypes, exception may be existed within genotypes I, V, VI, and XII. Sequence analysis showed that the genetic variation of V protein was consistent with virus genotype, and specific signatures on the V protein for nine genotypes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the phylogenetic trees were highly consistent between the V and F genes, with slight discrepancies in the sub-genotypes. Evolutionary rate analyses based on V and F genes revealed the evolution rates varied in genotypes. These data indicate that the genetic variation of V protein is genotype-related and will help in elucidating the molecular evolution of NDV.

  18. Stem cell-like gene expression in ovarian cancer predicts type II subtype and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Schwede

    Full Text Available Although ovarian cancer is often initially chemotherapy-sensitive, the vast majority of tumors eventually relapse and patients die of increasingly aggressive disease. Cancer stem cells are believed to have properties that allow them to survive therapy and may drive recurrent tumor growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells are a rare cell population and difficult to isolate experimentally. Genes that are expressed by stem cells may characterize a subset of less differentiated tumors and aid in prognostic classification of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was the genomic identification and characterization of a subtype of ovarian cancer that has stem cell-like gene expression. Using human and mouse gene signatures of embryonic, adult, or cancer stem cells, we performed an unsupervised bipartition class discovery on expression profiles from 145 serous ovarian tumors to identify a stem-like and more differentiated subgroup. Subtypes were reproducible and were further characterized in four independent, heterogeneous ovarian cancer datasets. We identified a stem-like subtype characterized by a 51-gene signature, which is significantly enriched in tumors with properties of Type II ovarian cancer; high grade, serous tumors, and poor survival. Conversely, the differentiated tumors share properties with Type I, including lower grade and mixed histological subtypes. The stem cell-like signature was prognostic within high-stage serous ovarian cancer, classifying a small subset of high-stage tumors with better prognosis, in the differentiated subtype. In multivariate models that adjusted for common clinical factors (including grade, stage, age, the subtype classification was still a significant predictor of relapse. The prognostic stem-like gene signature yields new insights into prognostic differences in ovarian cancer, provides a genomic context for defining Type I/II subtypes, and potential gene targets which following further

  19. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2016-06-21

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4 This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants. PMID:27274062

  20. Linkage of the gene that encodes the alpha 1 chain of type V collagen (COL5A1) to type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, J; Irven, C; Hardwick, L J; Butcher, S; Walsh, S; Wordsworth, P; Sykes, B

    1995-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders of connective tissue with skin, ligaments and blood vessels being the main sites affected. The commonest variant (EDS II) exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and is characterized by joint hypermobility, cigarette paper scars, lax skin and excessive bruising. As yet no gene has been linked to EDS II, nor has linkage been established to a specific region of the genome. However, several candidate genes encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix have been excluded. Using an intragenic simple sequence repeat polymorphism, we report linkage of the COL5A1 gene, which encodes the alpha 1(V) chain of type V collagen, to EDS II. A maximum LOD score (Zmax) for linkage of 8.3 at theta = 0.00 was generated for a single large pedigree.

  1. BioCreative V track 4: a shared task for the extraction of causal network information using the Biological Expression Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Ellendorff, Tilia Renate; Madan, Sumit; Clematide, Simon; van der Lek, Adrian; Mevissen, Theo; Fluck, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Automatic extraction of biological network information is one of the most desired and most complex tasks in biological and medical text mining. Track 4 at BioCreative V attempts to approach this complexity using fragments of large-scale manually curated biological networks, represented in Biological Expression Language (BEL), as training and test data. BEL is an advanced knowledge representation format which has been designed to be both human readable and machine processable. The specific goal of track 4 was to evaluate text mining systems capable of automatically constructing BEL statements from given evidence text, and of retrieving evidence text for given BEL statements. Given the complexity of the task, we designed an evaluation methodology which gives credit to partially correct statements. We identified various levels of information expressed by BEL statements, such as entities, functions, relations, and introduced an evaluation framework which rewards systems capable of delivering useful BEL fragments at each of these levels. The aim of this evaluation method is to help identify the characteristics of the systems which, if combined, would be most useful for achieving the overall goal of automatically constructing causal biological networks from text. PMID:27402677

  2. BioCreative V track 4: a shared task for the extraction of causal network information using the Biological Expression Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Ellendorff, Tilia Renate; Madan, Sumit; Clematide, Simon; van der Lek, Adrian; Mevissen, Theo; Fluck, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Automatic extraction of biological network information is one of the most desired and most complex tasks in biological and medical text mining. Track 4 at BioCreative V attempts to approach this complexity using fragments of large-scale manually curated biological networks, represented in Biological Expression Language (BEL), as training and test data. BEL is an advanced knowledge representation format which has been designed to be both human readable and machine processable. The specific goal of track 4 was to evaluate text mining systems capable of automatically constructing BEL statements from given evidence text, and of retrieving evidence text for given BEL statements. Given the complexity of the task, we designed an evaluation methodology which gives credit to partially correct statements. We identified various levels of information expressed by BEL statements, such as entities, functions, relations, and introduced an evaluation framework which rewards systems capable of delivering useful BEL fragments at each of these levels. The aim of this evaluation method is to help identify the characteristics of the systems which, if combined, would be most useful for achieving the overall goal of automatically constructing causal biological networks from text. PMID:27402677

  3. Persistent Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection occurs in the absence of functional major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganta, Roman Reddy; Wilkerson, Melinda J.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rokey, Aaron M.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We investigated the impact of two genes that control macrophage and T-cell function on murine resistance to E. chaffeensis. Congenic pairs of wild-type and toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4)- or major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-deficient mice were used for these studies. Wild-type mice cleared the infection within 2 weeks, and the response included macrophage activation and the synthesis of E. chaffeensis-specific Th1-type immunoglobulin G response. The absence of a functional tlr4 gene depressed nitric oxide and interleukin 6 secretion by macrophages and resulted in short-term persistent infections for > or =30 days. In the absence of MHC-II alleles, E. chaffeensis infections persisted throughout the entire 3-month evaluation period. Together, these data suggest that macrophage activation and cell-mediated immunity, orchestrated by CD4(+) T cells, are critical for conferring resistance to E. chaffeensis.

  4. Myocardial overexpression of Mecr, a gene of mitochondrial FAS II leads to cardiac dysfunction in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Chen

    Full Text Available It has been recently recognized that mammalian mitochondria contain most, if not all, of the components of fatty acid synthesis type II (FAS II. Among the components identified is 2-enoyl thioester reductase/mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase (Etr1/Mecr, which catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of trans-2-enoyl thioesters, generating saturated acyl-groups. Although the FAS type II pathway is highly conserved, its physiological role in fatty acid synthesis, which apparently occurs simultaneously with breakdown of fatty acids in the same subcellular compartment in mammals, has remained an enigma. To study the in vivo function of the mitochondrial FAS in mammals, with special reference to Mecr, we generated mice overexpressing Mecr under control of the mouse metallothionein-1 promoter. These Mecr transgenic mice developed cardiac abnormalities as demonstrated by echocardiography in vivo, heart perfusion ex vivo, and electron microscopy in situ. Moreover, the Mecr transgenic mice showed decreased performance in endurance exercise testing. Our results showed a ventricular dilatation behind impaired heart function upon Mecr overexpression, concurrent with appearance of dysmorphic mitochondria. Furthermore, the data suggested that inappropriate expression of genes of FAS II can result in the development of hereditary cardiomyopathy.

  5. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene disruption causes increased adrenal angiotensin II and aldosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Di; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Somanna, Naveen K; Pandey, Kailash N

    2007-07-01

    Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene leads to elevated arterial blood pressure and congestive heart failure in mice lacking NPRA. This study was aimed at determining whether Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene copy number affects adrenal ANG II and aldosterone (Aldo) levels in a gene-dose-dependent manner in Npr1 gene-targeted mice. Adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels increased in 1-copy mice compared with 2-copy mice, but decreased in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. In contrast, renal ANG II levels decreased in 1-copy (25%), 3-copy (38%), and 4-copy (39%) mice compared with 2-copy mice. The low-salt diet stimulated adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (20 and 2,441%), 2-copy (15 and 2,339%), 3-copy (20 and 424%), and 4-copy (31 and 486%) mice, respectively. The high-salt diet suppressed adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (46 and 29%) and 2-copy (38 and 17%) mice. On the other hand, the low-salt diet stimulated renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (45%), 2-copy (45%), 3-copy (59%), and 4-copy (48%) mice. However, the high-salt diet suppressed renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (28%) and 2-copy (27%) mice. In conclusion, NPRA signaling antagonizes adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in a gene-dose dependent manner. Increased adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels may play an important role in elevated arterial blood pressure and progressive hypertension, leading to renal and vascular injury in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice.

  6. Characterisation of four major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Quintin; Jobbins, Sarah E; Belov, Katherine; Higgins, Damien P

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules have an integral role in the adaptive immune response, as they bind and present antigenic peptides to T helper lymphocytes. In this study of koalas, species-specific primers were designed to amplify exon 2 of the MHC class II DA and DB genes, which contain much of the peptide-binding regions of the α and β chains. A total of two DA α1 domain variants and eight DA β1 (DAB), three DB α1 and five DB β1 variants were amplified from 20 koalas from two free-living populations from South East Queensland and the Port Macquarie region in northern New South Wales. We detected greater variation in the β1 than in the α1 domains as well as evidence of positive selection in DAB. The present study provides a springboard to future investigation of the role of MHC in disease susceptibility in koalas.

  7. A comparison of 12-gene colon cancer assay gene expression in African American and Caucasian patients with stage II colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Posey, James; Chao, Calvin Y.; Lu, Ruixiao; Jadhav, Trafina; Javed, Ahmed Y.; Javed, Awais; Mahmoud, Fade A.; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.; Manne, Upender

    2016-01-01

    Background African American (AA) colon cancer patients have a worse prognosis than Caucasian (CA) colon cancer patients, however, reasons for this disparity are not well understood. To determine if tumor biology might contribute to differential prognosis, we measured recurrence risk and gene expression using the Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay (12-gene assay) and compared the Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles between AA patients and CA patients with stage II colon cancer. ...

  8. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (Pcatalase transfection significantly attenuated AngII‑induced ROS generation, macrophage infiltration, collagen deposition and adventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  9. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  10. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, A. R.; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G.; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes...

  11. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Dalhoff, K; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, -DPB, the serologically defined HLA-A, B, C, DR antigens, and the primed lymphocyte typing defined HLA-DP antigens in 23 Danish patients with primary...... and B8, DR3, DQA1*0501, and DQB1*0201, which are frequently found together on the same haplotype, are at variance with recent reports on associations between PBC and Drw8. The discrepancy suggests that PBC is genetically heterogenous....

  12. MHC class II genes in the European badger (Meles meles) : characterization, patterns of variation, and transcription analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Burke, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) comprises many genes, some of which are polymorphic with numerous alleles. Sequence variation among alleles is most pronounced in exon 2 of the class II genes, which encodes the alpha 1 and beta 1 domains that form the antigen-binding site (ABS) for the pre

  13. Expressed MHC class II genes in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from geographically disparate populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, L.; Aldridge, B.M.; Miles, A.K.; Stott, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central to maintaining the immunologic vigor of individuals and populations. Classical MHC class II genes were targeted for partial sequencing in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from populations in California, Washington, and Alaska. Sequences derived from sea otter peripheral blood leukocyte mRNAs were similar to those classified as DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB in other species. Comparisons of the derived amino acid compositions supported the classification of these as functional molecules from at least one DQA, DQB, and DRA locus and at least two DRB loci. While limited in scope, phylogenetic analysis of the DRB peptide-binding region suggested the possible existence of distinct clades demarcated by geographic region. These preliminary findings support the need for additional MHC gene sequencing and expansion to a comprehensive study targeting additional otters. ?? 2006 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  14. Molecular evolution of the capsid gene in human norovirus genogroup II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Miho; Matsushima, Yuki; Motoya, Takumi; Sakon, Naomi; Shigemoto, Naoki; Okamoto-Nakagawa, Reiko; Nishimura, Koichi; Yamashita, Yasutaka; Kuroda, Makoto; Saruki, Nobuhiro; Ryo, Akihide; Saraya, Takeshi; Morita, Yukio; Shirabe, Komei; Ishikawa, Mariko; Takahashi, Tomoko; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Nagasawa, Koo; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Capsid protein of norovirus genogroup II (GII) plays crucial roles in host infection. Although studies on capsid gene evolution have been conducted for a few genotypes of norovirus, the molecular evolution of norovirus GII is not well understood. Here we report the molecular evolution of all GII genotypes, using various bioinformatics techniques. The time-scaled phylogenetic tree showed that the present GII strains diverged from GIV around 1630CE at a high evolutionary rate (around 10−3 substitutions/site/year), resulting in three lineages. The GII capsid gene had large pairwise distances (maximum > 0.39). The effective population sizes of the present GII strains were large (>102) for about 400 years. Positive (20) and negative (over 450) selection sites were estimated. Moreover, some linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were found in the deduced GII capsid protein. These results suggested that norovirus GII strains rapidly evolved with high divergence and adaptation to humans. PMID:27384324

  15. Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome): a new mutation in the TAT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culic, Vida; Betz, Regina C; Refke, Melanie; Fumic, Ksenija; Pavelic, Jasminka

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we report the clinical features and the molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in a young girl from Croatia with Richner-Hanhart syndrome, mainly suffering from photophobia, hyperkeratosis of the palmes and soles and slight neurological abnormalities. Sequencing analysis of the TAT gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation c.1250G>A (p.R417Q) in exon 12, and herewith confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Showing the first symptoms in babyhood, at the age of 8 years it was for the first time clinically diagnosed that the patient suffers from tyrosinemia type II and a therapy with tyrosine and phenylalanine reduced diet has been started successfully. All symptoms disappeared within 2-4 weeks. Since that time, we have been following the girl until today for more than ten years. She is in a good condition, and attends the normal high school program.

  16. Evolutionary trails of plant group II Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase (HDC genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species.

  17. A novel splice acceptor mutation in the DSPP gene causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; Nam, S H; Jang, K T; Lee, S H; Kim, C C; Hahn, S H; Hu, J C C; Simmer, J P

    2004-08-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (4q21.3) encodes two major noncollagenous dentin matrix proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Defects in the human gene encoding DSPP cause inherited dentin defects, and these defects can be associated with bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Clinically, five different patterns of inherited dentin defects are distinguished and are classified as dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) types I, II, and III, and dentin dysplasia types I and II. The genetic basis for this clinical heterogeneity is unknown. Among the 11 members recruited from the studied kindred, five were affected with autosomal dominant DGI type II. The mutation (g.1188C-->G, IVS2-3C-->G) lay in the third from the last nucleotide of intron 2 and changed its sequence from CAG to GAG. The mutation was correlated with the affection status and was absent in 104 unaffected individuals (208 alleles) with the same ethnic and geological background. The proband was in the primary dentition stage and presented with multiple pulp exposures. The occlusal surface of his dental enamel was generally abraded, and the dentin was heavily worn and uniformly shaded brown. The dental pulp chambers appeared originally to be within normal limits without any sign of obliteration, but over time (by age 4), the pulp chambers became partially or completely obliterated. The oldest affected member (age 59) showed mild hearing loss at high-frequency (8 kHz). Permanent dentition was severely affected in the adults, who had advanced dental attrition, premature loss of teeth, and extensive dental reconstruction.

  18. Distribution and origin of bovine major histocompatibility complex class II DQA1 genes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S; Chen, S; Miki, M; Kado, M; Aida, Y

    2008-09-01

    We sequenced the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQA1 gene in 352 Japanese cattle (95 Japanese Black, 91 Holstein, 102 Japanese Shorthorn and 64 Jersey cattle) using a new sequence-based typing method. In total, 19 bovine MHC (BoLA)-DQA1 alleles, of which two were novel alleles, were detected. The Holstein, Jersey, Japanese Shorthorn and Japanese Black breeds had 13, 12, 10 and 15 alleles, respectively. The dendrogram that was constructed by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of the DQA1 gene allele frequencies of the four Japanese cattle breeds showed that the Holstein and Japanese Black breeds were closest to each other, with Jersey being farther from these two breeds than Japanese Shorthorn. In addition, Wu-Kabat analysis showed that the DQA1 alleles of the Holstein and Japanese Black were the most and least polymorphic, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the DQA1 gene of Bovidae such as cattle, sheep, bison and goat were more similar to pig SLA-DQA genes than to human HLA-DQA1 and dog DLA-DQA genes. The cattle, goat, bison, sheep, human and pig DQA1 molecules had similar rates of amino acid sequence polymorphism, but the distribution of their polymorphic residues differed from that in the dog DQA1 protein. However, the Bovidae DQA1 molecule had more polymorphic residues than the human, pig and dog DQA molecules at two regions, namely positions 52-53 and 65-66. This indicates that the Bovidae DQA1 locus is more polymorphic than the DQA loci of other species.

  19. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II regulates renin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2012-07-13

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression.

  20. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Glucose 6P binds and activates HlyIIR to repress Bacillus cereus haemolysin hlyII gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Guillemet

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium causing food poisoning and serious opportunistic infections. These infections are characterized by bacterial accumulation despite the recruitment of phagocytic cells. We have previously shown that B. cereus Haemolysin II (HlyII induces macrophage cell death by apoptosis. In this work, we investigated the regulation of the hlyII gene. We show that HlyIIR, the negative regulator of hlyII expression in B. cereus, is especially active during the early bacterial growth phase. We demonstrate that glucose 6P directly binds to HlyIIR and enhances its activity at a post-transcriptional level. Glucose 6P activates HlyIIR, increasing its capacity to bind to its DNA-box located upstream of the hlyII gene, inhibiting its expression. Thus, hlyII expression is modulated by the availability of glucose. As HlyII induces haemocyte and macrophage death, two cell types that play a role in the sequestration of nutrients upon infection, HlyII may induce host cell death to allow the bacteria to gain access to carbon sources that are essential components for bacterial growth.

  2. Interactions between DNA and gemini surfactant: impact on gene therapy: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Taksim; Kamel, Amany O; Wettig, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery, provides distinct treatment modalities for the inherited and acquired diseases, relies upon the encapsulation of a gene of interest, which is then ideally delivered to the target cells. Variations in the chemical structure of gemini surfactants and subsequent physicochemical characteristics of the gemini-based lipoplexes and their impact on efficient gene transfection were assessed in part I, which was published in first March 2016 issue of Nanomedicine (1103). In order to design an efficient vector using gemini surfactants, the interaction of the surfactant with DNA and other components of the delivery system must be characterized, and more critically, well understood. Such studies will help to understand how nonviral transfection complexes, in general, overcome various cellular barriers. The Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer studies, atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, are extensively used to evaluate the interaction behavior of gemini surfactants with DNA and other vector components. Part II of this review focuses on the use of these unique techniques to understand their interaction with DNA. PMID:26784450

  3. Depletion of REF/Aly alters gene expression and reduces RNA polymerase II occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Sarah H; Conrad, Nicholas K

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA processing is mechanistically linked to transcription with RNA pol II serving as a platform to recruit RNA processing factors to nascent transcripts. The TREX complex member, REF/Aly, has been suggested to play roles in transcription and nuclear RNA stability in addition to its more broadly characterized role in mRNA export. We employed RNA-seq to identify a subset of transcripts with decreased expression in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions upon REF/Aly knockdown, which implies that REF/Aly affects their expression upstream of its role in mRNA export. Transcription inhibition experiments and metabolic labeling assays argue that REF/Aly does not affect stability of selected candidate transcripts. Instead, ChIP assays and nuclear run-on analysis reveal that REF/Aly depletion diminishes the transcription of these candidate genes. Furthermore, we determined that REF/Aly binds directly to candidate transcripts, supporting a direct effect of REF/Aly on candidate gene transcription. Taken together, our data suggest that the importance of REF/Aly is not limited to RNA export, but that REF/Aly is also critical for gene expression at the level of transcription. Our data are consistent with the model that REF/Aly is involved in linking splicing with transcription efficiency.

  4. Exogenous Camp upregulates the expression of glnII and glnK-amtB genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhexian; MAO Xianjun; SU Wei; LI Jian; BECKER Anke; WANG Yiping

    2006-01-01

    The existence of multiple adenylate cyclase encoding genes implies the importance of Camp in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. In this study, as a pioneer step of understanding Camp roles, microarray analysis on S. Meliloti was carried out for the function of exogenous Camp. To our surprise, the result showed that the transcriptions of glnII and glnK genes were significantly upshifted in the presence of exogenous Camp in S. Meliloti. This phenomenon is further confirmed in S. Meliloti that the expression of either glnII or glnK promoter-lacZ translational fusion is higher in the presence of exogenous Camp.Therefore, for the first time, we have identified genes from S. Meliloti whose expression is activated by Camp. The potential physiological role of upregulation of glnII and glnK by Camp is discussed.

  5. Diversification of porcine MHC class II genes: evidence for selective advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeier, Erin S; Malhi, Ripan S; Beever, Jonathan E; Schook, Lawrence B

    2009-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an immunological gene-dense region of high diversity in mammalian species. Sus scrofa was domesticated by at least six independent events over Eurasia during the Holocene period. It has been hypothesized that the level and distribution of MHC variation in pig populations reflect genetic selection and environmental influences. In an effort to define the complexity of MHC polymorphisms and the role of selection in the generation of class II gene diversity (DQB, DRB1, and pseudogene PsiDRB3), DNA from globally distributed unrelated domestic pigs of European and Asian origins and a Suidae out-group was analyzed. The number of pseudogene alleles identified (PsiDRB3 33) was greater than those found in the expressed genes (DQB 20 and DRB1 23) but the level of observed heterozygosity (PsiDRB3 0.452, DQB 0.732, and DRB1 0.767) and sequence diversity (PsiDRB3 0.029, DQB 0.062, and DRB1 0.074) were significantly lower in the pseudogene, respectively. The substitution ratios reflected an excess of d (N) (DQB 1.476, DRB1 1.724, and PsiDRB3 0.508) and the persistence of expressed gene alleles suggesting the influence of balancing selection, while the pseudogene was undergoing purifying selection. The lack of a clear MHC phylogeographic tree, coupled with close genetic distances observed between the European and Asian populations (DQB 0.047 and DRB1 0.063) suggested that unlike observations using mtDNA, the MHC diversity lacks phylogeographic structure and appears to be globally uniform. Taken together, these results suggest that, despite regional differences in selective breeding and environments, no skewing of MHC diversity has occurred.

  6. Diversification of porcine MHC class II genes: evidence for selective advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeier, Erin S; Malhi, Ripan S; Beever, Jonathan E; Schook, Lawrence B

    2009-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an immunological gene-dense region of high diversity in mammalian species. Sus scrofa was domesticated by at least six independent events over Eurasia during the Holocene period. It has been hypothesized that the level and distribution of MHC variation in pig populations reflect genetic selection and environmental influences. In an effort to define the complexity of MHC polymorphisms and the role of selection in the generation of class II gene diversity (DQB, DRB1, and pseudogene PsiDRB3), DNA from globally distributed unrelated domestic pigs of European and Asian origins and a Suidae out-group was analyzed. The number of pseudogene alleles identified (PsiDRB3 33) was greater than those found in the expressed genes (DQB 20 and DRB1 23) but the level of observed heterozygosity (PsiDRB3 0.452, DQB 0.732, and DRB1 0.767) and sequence diversity (PsiDRB3 0.029, DQB 0.062, and DRB1 0.074) were significantly lower in the pseudogene, respectively. The substitution ratios reflected an excess of d (N) (DQB 1.476, DRB1 1.724, and PsiDRB3 0.508) and the persistence of expressed gene alleles suggesting the influence of balancing selection, while the pseudogene was undergoing purifying selection. The lack of a clear MHC phylogeographic tree, coupled with close genetic distances observed between the European and Asian populations (DQB 0.047 and DRB1 0.063) suggested that unlike observations using mtDNA, the MHC diversity lacks phylogeographic structure and appears to be globally uniform. Taken together, these results suggest that, despite regional differences in selective breeding and environments, no skewing of MHC diversity has occurred. PMID:19142631

  7. Novel roles for metallothionein-I + II (MT-I + II) in defense responses, neurogenesis, and tissue restoration after traumatic brain injury: insights from global gene expression profiling in wild-type and MT-I + II knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Cáceres, Mario; Borup, Rehannah;

    2006-01-01

    . A genomic approach, such as the use of microarrays, provides much insight in this regard, especially if combined with the use of gene-targeted animals. We report here the results of one of these studies comparing wild-type and metallothionein-I + II knockout mice subjected to a cryolesion...... of the somatosensorial cortex and killed at 0, 1, 4, 8, and 16 days postlesion (dpl) using Affymetrix genechips/oligonucleotide arrays interrogating approximately 10,000 different murine genes (MG_U74Av2). Hierarchical clustering analysis of these genes readily shows an orderly pattern of gene responses at specific...... and opened new avenues that were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Data in KO, MT-I-overexpressing, and MT-II-injected mice strongly suggest a role of these proteins in postlesional activation of neural stem cells....

  8. Development of genome-specific primers for homoeologous genes in allopolyploid species: the waxy and starch synthase II genes in allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L. as examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brûlé-Babel Anita

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In allopolypoid crops, homoeologous genes in different genomes exhibit a very high sequence similarity, especially in the coding regions of genes. This makes it difficult to design genome-specific primers to amplify individual genes from different genomes. Development of genome-specific primers for agronomically important genes in allopolypoid crops is very important and useful not only for the study of sequence diversity and association mapping of genes in natural populations, but also for the development of gene-based functional markers for marker-assisted breeding. Here we report on a useful approach for the development of genome-specific primers in allohexaploid wheat. Findings In the present study, three genome-specific primer sets for the waxy (Wx genes and four genome-specific primer sets for the starch synthase II (SSII genes were developed mainly from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and/or insertions or deletions (Indels in introns and intron-exon junctions. The size of a single PCR product ranged from 750 bp to 1657 bp. The total length of amplified PCR products by these genome-specific primer sets accounted for 72.6%-87.0% of the Wx genes and 59.5%-61.6% of the SSII genes. Five genome-specific primer sets for the Wx genes (one for Wx-7A, three for Wx-4A and one for Wx-7D could distinguish the wild type wheat and partial waxy wheat lines. These genome-specific primer sets for the Wx and SSII genes produced amplifications in hexaploid wheat, cultivated durum wheat, and Aegilops tauschii accessions, but failed to generate amplification in the majority of wild diploid and tetraploid accessions. Conclusions For the first time, we report on the development of genome-specific primers from three homoeologous Wx and SSII genes covering the majority of the genes in allohexaploid wheat. These genome-specific primers are being used for the study of sequence diversity and association mapping of the three homoeologous Wx

  9. HLA-class II genes in Mexican Amerindian Mayas: relatedness with Guatemalan Mayans and other populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Areces, Cristina; Gómez-Prieto, Pablo; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the HLA class II allele frequencies in 50 healthy unrelated Mayan individuals. The relationship with other worldwide populations was studied by using HLA data from 71 different populations. The most frequent alleles were HLA-DRB1*04, HLA-DRB1*01, HLA-DQB1*0302 and HLA-DQB1*0501. When comparisons with other Mexican Amerindian groups were made, some differences were observed. Mayans showed an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*01 when compared to Nahuas, Mayos, Teenek and Mazatecans (p Mayas showing that languages do not correlate with genes, particularly in Amerindians. The data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and the high frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DQB1*0302 in Mayans from Mexico.

  10. Transgenic tobacco plants harboring tomato proteinase inhibitor II gene and their insect resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The plant expression vectors pBCT2 and pBT2 were constructed with the cDNA sequence (tin2) and genomic DNA sequence (tin2i) of tomato proteinase inhibitor II gene respectively. Then the two expression vectors were transferred into tobacco via the Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404, and transgenic tobacco plants were generated. Molecular analysis and trypsin activity assay showed that both cDNA and genomic DNA were expressed properly in the transgenic plants. Insecticidal activities in these transgenic plants indicated that transgenic tobacco plants carrying tin2i sequence were more resistant to 2-instar larvae of Heliothis armigera Hubner than those carrying tin2 sequence. Therefore the intron of tin2i sequence might be a contributor to insecticidal activity of the transgenic tobacco.

  11. Construction and analysis of deletions in the structural gene (uvrD) for DNA helicase II of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Washburn, B K; Kushner, S R

    1991-01-01

    DNA helicase II, the product of the uvrD gene, has been implicated in DNA repair, replication, and recombination. Because the phenotypes of individual uvrD alleles vary significantly, we constructed deletion-insertion mutations in the uvrD gene to determine the phenotype of cells lacking DNA helicase II. Deletion mutants completely lacking the protein, as well as one which contains a truncated protein retaining the ATP-binding site, remained viable. However, they were sensitive to UV light an...

  12. Novel and recurrent tyrosine aminotransferase gene mutations in tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hühn, R; Stoermer, H; Klingele, B; Bausch, E; Fois, A; Farnetani, M; Di Rocco, M; Boué, J; Kirk, J M; Coleman, R; Scherer, G

    1998-03-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). We have previously described one deletion and six different point mutations in four RHS patients. We have now analyzed the TAT genes in a further seven unrelated RHS families from Italy, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We have established PCR conditions for the amplification of all twelve TAT exons and have screened the products for mutations by direct sequence analysis or by first performing single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. We have thus identified the presumably pathological mutations in eight RHS alleles, including two nonsense mutations (R57X, E411X) and four amino acid substitutions (R119W, L201R, R433Q, R433W). Only the R57X mutation, which was found in one Scottish and two Italian families, has been previously reported in another Italian family. Haplotype analysis indicates that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, has a common origin in the three Italian families but arose independently in the Scottish family. Two polymorphisms have also been detected, viz., a protein polymorphism, P15S, and a silent substitution S103S (TCG-->TCA). Expression of R433Q and R433W demonstrate reduced activity of the mutant proteins. In all, twelve different TAT gene mutations have now been identified in tyrosinemia type II.

  13. Cloning and molecular analysis of L-asparaginase II gene (ansB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZEINAT K. MOHAMED

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The deamination of L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and ammonia is catalyzed by L-asparaginases (L-asparagine amino hydrolase. The enzyme L-asparaginase is widely distributed in nature from different living organisms, starting from bacteria till mammals and plants. It has been recently thought to be a therapeutic agent in treatment of various lymphoblastic leukemia diseases. There have been many attempts to isolate microorganisms that produce L-asparaginase. L-ASNase producing bacteria, Escherichia coli MG27, was previously isolated from the River Nile and identified. In this study, ansB gene, encoding L-ASNase II from E. coli MG27, was amplified by PCR, cloned and characterized by DNA sequencing. The DNA sequence was then analyzed using bioinformatics analysis and translated into amino acid sequence. Identification of highly conserved amino acid sequence motifs was conducted by comparison against the InterPro database. Analysis revealed that the protein sequence had a catalytic domain of L-asparaginase type II (IPR004550 that belong to asparaginase/glutaminase family (IPR006034 and has asparaginase/glutaminase conserved site (IPR020827. According to results predicted using PSIpred tool, ansB consists of eight α-helices and 13 β-strands.

  14. Cellulosic Ethanol Production by Recombinant Cellulolytic Bacteria Harbouring pdc and adh II Genes of Zymomonas mobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriya, P Sobana; Vasan, P Thirumalai; Padma, V S; Vidhyadevi, U; Archana, K; Vennison, S John

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol fermenting genes such as pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh II) were cloned from Zymomonas mobilis and transformed into three different cellulolytic bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae JV, Proteus mirabilis JV and Erwinia chrysanthemi and their cellulosic ethanol production capability was studied. Recombinant E. cloacae JV was found to produce 4.5% and 3.5% (v/v) ethanol, respectively, when CMC and 4% NaOH pretreated bagasse were used as substrates, whereas recombinant P. mirabilis and E. chrysanthemi with the same substrates could only produce 4%, 3.5%, 1%, and 1.5 % of ethanol, respectively. The recombinant E. cloacae strain produced twofold higher percentage of ethanol than the wild type. The recombinant E. cloacae strain could be improved further by increasing its ethanol tolerance capability through media optimization and also by combining multigene cellulase expression for enhancing ethanol production from various types of lignocellulosic biomass so that it can be used for industrial level ethanol production.

  15. Btn2a2, a T cell immunomodulatory molecule coregulated with MHC class II genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarter, Kerstin; Leimgruber, Elisa; Gobet, Florian; Agrawal, Vishal; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Barras, Emmanuèle; Mastelic-Gavillet, Béatris; Kamath, Arun; Fontannaz, Paola; Guéry, Leslie; Duraes, Fernanda do Valle; Lippens, Carla; Ravn, Ulla; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hugues, Stéphanie; Reith, Walter

    2016-02-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that butyrophilins, which are members of the extended B7 family of co-stimulatory molecules, have diverse functions in the immune system. We found that the human and mouse genes encoding butyrophilin-2A2 (BTN2A2) are regulated by the class II trans-activator and regulatory factor X, two transcription factors dedicated to major histocompatibility complex class II expression, suggesting a role in T cell immunity. To address this, we generated Btn2a2-deficient mice. Btn2a2(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses, impaired CD4(+) regulatory T cell induction, potentiated antitumor responses, and exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Altered immune responses were attributed to Btn2a2 deficiency in antigen-presenting cells rather than T cells or nonhematopoietic cells. These results provide the first genetic evidence that BTN2A2 is a co-inhibitory molecule that modulates T cell-mediated immunity.

  16. Cellulosic Ethanol Production by Recombinant Cellulolytic Bacteria Harbouring pdc and adh II Genes of Zymomonas mobilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sobana Piriya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol fermenting genes such as pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh II were cloned from Zymomonas mobilis and transformed into three different cellulolytic bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae JV, Proteus mirabilis JV and Erwinia chrysanthemi and their cellulosic ethanol production capability was studied. Recombinant E. cloacae JV was found to produce 4.5% and 3.5% (v/v ethanol, respectively, when CMC and 4% NaOH pretreated bagasse were used as substrates, whereas recombinant P. mirabilis and E. chrysanthemi with the same substrates could only produce 4%, 3.5%, 1%, and 1.5 % of ethanol, respectively. The recombinant E. cloacae strain produced twofold higher percentage of ethanol than the wild type. The recombinant E. cloacae strain could be improved further by increasing its ethanol tolerance capability through media optimization and also by combining multigene cellulase expression for enhancing ethanol production from various types of lignocellulosic biomass so that it can be used for industrial level ethanol production.

  17. Targeted and random bacterial gene disruption using a group II intron (targetron) vector containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jin; Karberg, Michael; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2003-01-01

    Mobile group II introns have been used to develop a novel class of gene targeting vectors, targetrons, which employ base pairing for DNA target recognition and can thus be programmed to insert into any desired target DNA. Here, we have developed a targetron containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker (RAM), which enables one-step bacterial gene disruption at near 100% efficiency after selection. The targetron can be generated via PCR without cloning, and after intron integrati...

  18. Differentially expressed genes in autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II osteoclasts reveal known and novel pathways for osteoclast biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, Amélie E; Del Fattore, Andrea; Baulard, Céline; Olaso, Robert; Schiltz, Corinne; Collet, Corinne; Teti, Anna; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO II) is a rare, heritable bone disorder characterized by a high bone mass and insufficient osteoclast activity. Mutations in the CLCN7 gene have been reported to cause ADO II. To gain novel insights into the pathways dysregulated in ADOII osteoclasts, we identified changes in gene expression in osteoclasts from patients with a heterozygous mutation of CLCN7. To do this, we carried out a transcriptomic study comparing gene expression in the osteoclasts of patients with ADO II and healthy donors. Our data show that, according to our selection criteria, 182 genes were differentially expressed in osteoclasts from patients and controls. From the 18 displaying the highest change in microarray, we confirmed differential expression for seven by qPCR. Although two of them have previously been found to be expressed in osteoclasts (ITGB5 and SERPINE2), the other five (CES1 (carboxyl esterase 1), UCHL1 (ubiquitin carboxy-terminal esterase L1, also known as ubiquitin thiolesterase), WARS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase), GBP4 (guanylate-binding protein 4), and PRF1) are not yet known to have a role in this cell type. At the protein level, we confirmed elevated expression of ITGB5 and reduced expression of WARS, PRF1, and SERPINE2. Transfection of ClC-7 harboring the G215R mutation into osteoclasts resulted in an increased ITGB5 and reduced PRF1 expression of borderline significance. Finally, we observed that the ADO II patients presented a normal or increased serum level of bone formation markers, demonstrating a coupling between dysfunctional osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Sphingosine kinase 1 mRNA was expressed at the same level in ADO II and control osteoclasts. In conclusion, these data suggest that in addition to an acidification dysfunction caused by the CLCN7 mutation, a change in ITGB5, PRF1, WARS, and SERPINE2 expression could be part of the osteoclastic phenotype of ADO II.

  19. Type II cytokeratin gene expression is indicative of early cell differentiation in the chick embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlebois, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    Embryonic development in vertebrates appears to involve a series of inductive tissue interactions that lead to regional specializations, which eventually become elaborated in the basic body plan of the embryo. The inductive interactions leading to early regionalization of the embryo are often particularly difficult to evaluate because of the absence of available morphological or biochemical evidence that such events have occurred. In the 36 hour chick embryo, the regional subdivision of the early ectoderm is evidence by a marked lens-forming bias in the head ectoderm, which is absent in the presumptive dorsal epidermis of the trunk region. As a strategy for isolating genes whose differential expression might reflect this regional subdivision, a cDNA library from 36 hour embryos was prepared and screened for differential hybridization to ({sup 32}P)cDNA probes synthesized using template RNA isolated from 36 hour head ectoderm and trunk ectoderm. A cDNA clone (T4) was isolated which hybridizes to transcripts present at much higher levels in trunk ectoderm than in head ectoderm. Partial nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of this clone indicate that it represents a gene encoding a type II cytokeratin. The distribution of transcripts complementary to the T4 probe was evaluated in early embryos using RNA gel blot analysis and in situ hybridization to tissue sections.

  20. Point mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene in tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, E; Kida, K; Odievre, M; Di Rocco, M; Scherer, G

    1992-10-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disease of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT; L-tyrosine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.5), a 454-amino acid protein encoded by a gene with 12 exons. To identify the causative mutations in five TAT alleles cloned from three RHS patients, chimeric genes constructed from normal and mutant TAT alleles were tested in directing TAT activity in a transient expression assay. DNA sequence analysis of the regions identified as nonfunctional revealed six different point mutations. Three RHS alleles have nonsense mutations at codons 57, 223, and 417, respectively. One "complex" RHS allele carries a GT----GG splice donor mutation in intron 8 together with a Gly----Val substitution at amino acid 362. A new splice acceptor site in intron 2 of the fifth RHS allele leads to a shift in reading frame.

  1. Trans-species polymorphism and selection in the MHC class II DRA genes of domestic sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith T Ballingall

    Full Text Available Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries. We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201 differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901, which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T

  2. HIGH FREQUENCY GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF CICHORIUM INTYBUS L. USING nptII GENE AS A SELECTIVE MARKER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvieieva, N; Shakhovsky, A; Kvasko, O; Kuchuk, N

    2015-01-01

    Cichorium intybus L. is an important vegetable crop used as salad (leaf form) and for the production of coffee substitutes (root form). At the same time these plants can also be used in biotechnologies for synthesis of pharmaceutical proteins. Here we report the possibility of high frequency Agrobacterium rhizogenes- or A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation of C. intybus L. for construction of transgenic "hairy" roots and plants. The used plasmids contained target human interferonifn-α2b gene, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6:Ag85B antigene esxA::fbpB(ΔTMD) fused gene and human telomerase reverse transcriptase h Tert gene. Using of nptII gene as a selective one was preferable to the bar gene for chicory. In this case the frequency of transgenic plants or "hairy" roots formation was significantly higher. Cultivation of explants on the medium with Basta in concentration 1-2 mg/l have led to plants death or to significant reduction of number of shoots formed. Frequency of "hairy" roots formation varied from 5.9 to 42.3% after A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Frequency of regeneration of transgenic plants varied from 10 to 86% after A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Both A. rhizogenes- and A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation frequency depended on the type of explants, roots or cotyledons, and vector used. Usage of A. tumefaciens carrying pCB064 plasmid (target esxA:fbpB(ΔTMD) fused gene and nptII selective gene) resulted in the most effective regeneration of transgenic plants with regeneration frequency up to 86%. In the case of chicory A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation the highest regeneration frequency up to 42.3% was demonstrated using p CB161 vector with ifn-α2b target gene and nptII selective gene. PMID:26419064

  3. Genetic and expression studies of SMN2 gene in Russian patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiöth Helgi B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type I, II and III is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1. SMN2 is a centromeric copy gene that has been characterized as a major modifier of SMA severity. SMA type I patients have one or two SMN2 copies while most SMA type II patients carry three SMN2 copies and SMA III patients have three or four SMN2 copies. The SMN1 gene produces a full-length transcript (FL-SMN while SMN2 is only able to produce a small portion of the FL-SMN because of a splice mutation which results in the production of abnormal SMNΔ7 mRNA. Methods In this study we performed quantification of the SMN2 gene copy number in Russian patients affected by SMA type II and III (42 and 19 patients, respectively by means of real-time PCR. Moreover, we present two families consisting of asymptomatic carriers of a homozygous absence of the SMN1 gene. We also developed a novel RT-qPCR-based assay to determine the FL-SMN/SMNΔ7 mRNA ratio as SMA biomarker. Results Comparison of the SMN2 copy number and clinical features revealed a significant correlation between mild clinical phenotype (SMA type III and presence of four copies of the SMN2 gene. In both asymptomatic cases we found an increased number of SMN2 copies in the healthy carriers and a biallelic SMN1 absence. Furthermore, the novel assay revealed a difference between SMA patients and healthy controls. Conclusions We suggest that the SMN2 gene copy quantification in SMA patients could be used as a prognostic tool for discrimination between the SMA type II and SMA type III diagnoses, whereas the FL-SMN/SMNΔ7 mRNA ratio could be a useful biomarker for detecting changes during SMA pharmacotherapy.

  4. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: The DAMAGE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; van 't Riet, Esther;

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes...

  5. 9-CIS-RETINOIC ACID REPRESSES ESTROGEN-INDUCED EXPRESSION OF THE VERY-LOW-DENSITY APOLIPOPROTEIN-II GENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIPPERS, IJ; KLOPPENBURG, M; SNIPPE, L; AB, G

    1994-01-01

    The chicken very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) gene is estrogen-inducible and specifically expressed in liver. We examined the possible involvement of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its ligand 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) in the activation of the apoVLDLII promoter. We first concent

  6. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus : the DAMAGE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; van't Riet, Esther; van Haeften, Timon W.; Arp, Pascal A.; Hansen, Torben; Kremer, Dennis; Groenewoud, Marlous J.; van Hove, Els C.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Jan W. A.; Nijpels, Giel; Heine, Robert J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Pedersen, Oluf; Slagboom, P. Eline; Maassen, Johannes A.; Hofker, Marten H.; 't Hart, Leen M.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes me

  7. Investigation of Neuronal Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mima Kazuko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The promoter activity of the rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gene was analyzed using the luciferase reporter gene in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. Neuronal cell type-specific promoter activity was found in the 5'-flanking region of &agr; and &bgr; isoform genes of the kinase. Silencer elements were also found further upstream of promoter regions. A brain-specific protein bound to the DNA sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the gene was found by gel mobility shift analysis in the nuclear extract of the rat brain, including the cerebellum, forebrain, and brainstem, but not in that of non-neuronal tissues, including liver, kidney and spleen. The luciferase expression system and gel shift analysis can be used as an additional and better index by which to monitor gene expression in most cell types.

  8. From gene trees to species trees II: Species tree inference in the deep coalescence model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Louxin

    2010-01-01

    When gene copies are sampled from various species, the resulting gene tree might disagree with the containing species tree. The primary causes of gene tree and species tree discord include lineage sorting, horizontal gene transfer, and gene duplication and loss. Each of these events yields a different parsimony criterion for inferring the (containing) species tree from gene trees. With lineage sorting, species tree inference is to find the tree minimizing extra gene lineages that had to coexi...

  9. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Meijde Jolanda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1 and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1. Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2, formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1, or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8. Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b increased cholesterol secretion, c increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance

  10. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  11. Phase I/II Clinical Trials Using Gene-Modified Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells for HIV: Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald T. Mitsuyasu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for individuals infected with HIV has the potential to provide a once-only treatment that will act to reduce viral load, preserve the immune system, and mitigate cumulative toxicities associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The authors have been involved in two clinical trials (phase I and phase II using gene-modified adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, and these are discussed as prototypic trials within the general field of HSC gene therapy trials for HIV. Taken as a group these trials have shown (i the safety of both the procedure and the anti-HIV agents themselves and (ii the feasibility of the approach. They point to the requirement for (i the ability to transduce and infuse as many as possible gene-containing HSC and/or (ii high engraftment and in vivo expansion of these cells, (iii potentially increased efficacy of the anti-HIV agent(s and (iv automation of the cell processing procedure.

  12. Structural and segregation analysis of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in some heritable chondrodysplasias.

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, P; Ogilvie, D.; Priestley, L; Smith, R.; Wynne-Davies, R; Sykes, B

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-seven persons with a variety of heritable chondrodysplasias were screened for gross rearrangements of the structural gene encoding the major cartilage collagen, collagen II. None was found. Segregation of the locus (COL2A1) was studied in 19 pedigrees using three restriction site dimorphisms (shown by PvuII, HindIII, and BamHI) and a length polymorphism as linkage markers. Discordant segregation between COL2A1 and the mutant locus was seen in pedigrees with multiple epiphyseal dysplas...

  13. Functional analysis of the class II hydrophobin gene HFB2-6 from the biocontrol agent Trichoderma asperellum ACCC30536.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Mijiti, Gulijimila; Wang, Zhiying; Yu, Wenjing; Fan, Haijuan; Zhang, Rongshu; Liu, Zhihua

    2015-02-01

    A class II hydrophobin gene, HFB2-6, was cloned from Trichoderma asperellum ACCC30536 and its biocontrol function was studied. According to our previous transcriptome data, six of the eight class II hydrophobin genes were obviously differential expression in four inducing conditions, especially the gene HFB2-6. Moreover, HFB2-6 proven to be differentially transcribed under eight different treatments. HFB2-6 transcripts were up-regulated under 1% Alternaria alternata cell wall and 5% A. alternata fermentation liquid treatments, and by nutritional stress conditions, suggesting that HFB2-6 plays roles in interactions with both biotic and abiotic environmental conditions. HFB2-6 expression was down-regulated under 1% poplar leaf powder culture conditions, but its expression was up-regulated under 1% poplar root powder, indicating that HFB2-6 has a function in root colonization. Furthermore, the recombinant hydrophobin rHFB2-6 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-HFB2-6 and purified from the recombinant strain. Genes related to both the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signal transduction pathways were up-regulated by interaction with renatured rHFB2-6. The ORCA3 (octadecanoid-derivative responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain) gene of the poplar jasmonic acid signal transduction pathway showed a peak expression of 4.48 times at 2 h, and the peak expression of PR1 (pathogenesis-related protein gene) in the salicylic acid signal transduction pathway was 4.58 times at 72 h. Two genes, MP (monopteros) and GH3.17 (auxin original response gene), in the auxin signal transduction pathway were also up-regulated after induction with rHFB2-6, indicating that rHFB2-6 can promote poplar growth and confer broad-spectrum resistance to pathogens.

  14. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2).

    OpenAIRE

    Spritz, R A; Fukai, K; Holmes, S A; Luande, J

    1995-01-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of approximately 1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. On...

  15. Immunogenetics of rheumatoid arthritis and primary Sjögren's syndrome: DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Andersen, V; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatability Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, and -DFB in 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in 19 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (primary SS), and healthy Danes....... The frequencies of DNA fragments associated with the following HLA class II genes were increased in RA when compared to normal controls: DRB1*04 (DR4) (relative risk, RR = 7.4, P less than 10(-3), DRB4*0101 (DRw53) (RR = 9.6, P less than 10(-3), DQA1*0301 (RR = 9.6, P less than 10(-3), DQB1*0301 (DQw7) (RR = 2...

  16. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockout strains enable functional analysis of genes required for cyst development and latent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M; Bzik, David J

    2011-09-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8(+) T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission. PMID:21531875

  17. Interaction of DRD2TaqI, COMT, and ALDH2 genes associated with bipolar II disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders in Han Chinese in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming-Chuan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Chen-Lin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-06-01

    It is hypothesized that dopaminergic genes-dopamine type-2 receptor (DRD2), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-are associated with bipolar disorder (BP) and anxiety disorder (AD). Bipolar II (BP-II) is reported to be highly comorbid with AD. We examined whether interactions among these three genes are susceptibility factors in BP-II with AD (BP-II(+AD)) and without AD (BP-II(-AD)). In this study, we hypothesize that the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different. We recruited 1260 participants: 495 with BP-II(-AD), 170 with BP-II(+AD), and 595 healthy controls without BP-II or AD. Genotyping was done using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Genotypic frequencies of the DRD2TaqIA, COMT, and ALDH2 polymorphisms between the two BP-II groups were nonsignificant. In logistic regression, the ALDH2 and DRD2TaqIA genes showed a main effect that was protective against BP-II(-AD) (odds ratio [OR] = 0.497, p = 0.010, and OR = 0.415, p = 0.017, respectively). The interaction of DRD2TaqIA A1/A1 and ALDH2*1/*1 had a significant risk effect on the BP-II(-AD) group (OR = 7.177, p II(-AD) (OR = 0.205, p = 0.047). All of the significant results described above are found only in BP-II(-AD). This study supports the hypothesis the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different,, and provides additional evidence that the DRD2TaqIA A1/A1, ALDH2*1/*1 and COMT genes interact in BP-II(-AD) but not in BP-II(+AD). PMID:25430946

  18. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A R; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. Only 1 of the DR4, DQw8 haplotypes was [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] and 2 were HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8; most were the presumed fragments (SC31, DR4, DQw8) or (SC21, DR4, DQw8) or DR4, DQw8 with some other complotype. Of the patients with DRw6, DQw5, all were DRw14, DQw5, and 6 had a rare Caucasian haplotype, HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5. Four of 6 of these were found in patients of Italian extraction, as was the 1 normal example. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 and has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8- or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes. Images PMID:1675792

  19. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Takeshima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-sequence-based typing (SBT. Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle. A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle.

  20. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  1. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, HaoYang; Hou, YanNing; Cui, YingXia; Huang, YuFeng; Shi, YiChao; Xia, XinYi; Lu, HongYong; Wang, YunHua; Li, XiaoJun

    2009-03-01

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM #125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C-->A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II.

  2. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Haoyang [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Hou Yanning [Department of Stomatology, Third Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Traditional Chinese Medicine University, Nanjing 210001 (China); Cui Yingxia [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)], E-mail: cuiyx55@yahoo.com.cn; Huang Yufeng [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)], E-mail: huangyf@androl.cn; Shi Yichao; Xia Xinyi; Lu Hongyong; Wang Yunhua; Li Xiaojun [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)

    2009-03-09

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM 125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C{yields}A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II.

  3. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM 125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C→A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II

  4. Assignment of genes encoding metallothioneins I and II to Chinese hamster chromosomes 3. Evidence for the role of chromosome rearrangement in gene amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallings, R.L.; Munk, A.C.; Longmire, J.L.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.

    1984-12-01

    Cadmium resistant (Cd/sup r/) variants with coordinately amplified metallothionein I and II (MTI and MTII) genes have been derived from both Chinese hamster ovary and near-euploid Chinese hamster cell lines. Cytogenetic analyses of Cd/sup r/ variants consistently revealed breakage and rearrangement involving chromosome 3p. In situ hybridization with Chinese hamster MT-encoding cDNA probe localized amplified MT gene sequences near the translocation breakpoint involving chromosome 3p. These observations suggested that both functionally related, isometallothionein loci are linked on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. Southern blot analyses of DNAs isolated from a panel of Chinese hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids which segregate hamster chromosomes confirmed that both MTI and MTII are located on chromosome 3. The authors speculate that rearrangement of chromosome 3p could be causally involved with the amplification of MT genes in Cd/sup r/ hamster cell lines. 34 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. Polymorphism and Balancing Selection of MHC Class II DAB Gene in 7 Selective Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Du

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the genetic variation of the MHC class IIB exon2 allele in the offspring, 700 fry from seven families of Japanese flounder challenged with V. anguillarum were studied, and different mortality rates were found in those families. Five to ten surviving and dead fry from each of the seven families were selected to study the MHC class II B exon2 gene with PCR and a direct sequencing method. One hundred and sixteen different exon2 sequences were found and 116 different alleles were identified, while a minimum of four loci were revealed in the MHC class II B exon2 gene. The ratio (dN/dS of nonsynonymous substitution (dN to synonymous substitutions (dS in the peptide-binding region (PBR of the MHC class IIB gene was 6.234, which indicated that balancing selection is acting on the MHC class IIB genes. The MHC IIB alleles were thus being passed on to their progeny. Some alleles were significantly more frequent in surviving than dead individuals. All together our data suggested that the alleles Paol-DAB*4301, Paol-DAB*4601, Paol-DAB*4302, Paol-DAB*3803, and Paol-DAB*4101 were associated with resistance to V. anguillarum in flounder.

  6. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, K.; Beall, D S; Mejia, J P; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L O

    1991-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high level of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selec...

  7. The properties of the single chicken MHC classical class II alpha chain ( B-LA) gene indicate an ancient origin for the DR/E-like isotype of class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Jan; Marston, Denise; Avila, David;

    2003-01-01

    significantly in the peptide-binding alpha(1) domain. The cDNA and genomic DNA sequences from chickens of diverse origins show few alleles, which differ in only four nucleotides and one amino acid. In contrast, significant restriction fragment length polymorphism is detected by Southern blot analysis of genomic...... DNA, suggesting considerable diversity around the gene. Analysis of a large back-cross family indicates that the class II alpha chain locus ( B-LA) is located roughly 5.6 cM from the MHC locus, which encodes the classical class II beta chains. Thus the chicken class II alpha chain gene is like the...

  8. Transcriptome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of Putative Chrysanthemum HD-Zip I and II Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip transcription factor family is a key transcription factor family and unique to the plant kingdom. It consists of a homeodomain and a leucine zipper that serve in combination as a dimerization motif. The family can be classified into four subfamilies, and these subfamilies participate in the development of hormones and mediation of hormone action and are involved in plant responses to environmental conditions. However, limited information on this gene family is available for the important chrysanthemum ornamental species (Chrysanthemum morifolium. Here, we characterized 17 chrysanthemum HD-Zip genes based on transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 17 CmHB genes were distributed in the HD-Zip subfamilies I and II and identified two pairs of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and four pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. The software MEME was used to identify 7 putative motifs with E values less than 1e-3 in the chrysanthemum HD-Zip factors, and they can be clearly classified into two groups based on the composition of the motifs. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that 8 CmHB genes could be targeted by 10 miRNA families, and the expression of these 17 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized. The results presented here will promote research on the various functions of the HD-Zip gene family members in plant hormones and stress responses.

  9. Transcriptome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of Putative Chrysanthemum HD-Zip I and II Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Xin, Jingjing; Chen, Sumei; Zhao, Kunkun; Wu, Dan; Fan, Qingqing; Gao, Tianwei; Chen, Fadi; Guan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor family is a key transcription factor family and unique to the plant kingdom. It consists of a homeodomain and a leucine zipper that serve in combination as a dimerization motif. The family can be classified into four subfamilies, and these subfamilies participate in the development of hormones and mediation of hormone action and are involved in plant responses to environmental conditions. However, limited information on this gene family is available for the important chrysanthemum ornamental species (Chrysanthemum morifolium). Here, we characterized 17 chrysanthemum HD-Zip genes based on transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 17 CmHB genes were distributed in the HD-Zip subfamilies I and II and identified two pairs of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and four pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. The software MEME was used to identify 7 putative motifs with E values less than 1e-3 in the chrysanthemum HD-Zip factors, and they can be clearly classified into two groups based on the composition of the motifs. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that 8 CmHB genes could be targeted by 10 miRNA families, and the expression of these 17 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized. The results presented here will promote research on the various functions of the HD-Zip gene family members in plant hormones and stress responses. PMID:27196930

  10. Helping Students Understand Gene Regulation with Online Tools: A Review of MEME and Melina II, Motif Discovery Tools for Active Learning in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Treves

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Review of: MEME and Melina II, which are two free and easy-to-use online motif discovery tools that can be employed to actively engage students in learning about gene regulatory elements.

  11. Mutations in the COL5A1 gene are causal in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Paepe, A.; Nuytinck, L.; Naeyaert, J.M. [Universitaets-Hautklinik Heidelberg (Germany)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous connective-tissue disorder of which at least nine subtypes are recognized. Considerable clinical overlap exists between the EDS I and II subtypes, suggesting that both are allelic disorders. Recent evidence based on linkage and transgenic mice studies suggest that collagen V is causally involved in human EDS. Collagen V forms heterotypic fibrils with collagen I in many tissues and plays an important role in collagen I fibrillogenesis. We have identified a mutation in COL5A1, the gene encoding the pro{alpha}1(V) collagen chain, segregating with EDS I in a four-generation family. The mutation causes the substitution of the most 5{prime} cysteine residue by a serine within a highly conserved sequence of the pro{alpha}1(V) C-propeptide domain and causes reduction of collagen V by preventing incorporation of the mutant pro{alpha}1 (V) chains in the collagen V trimers. In addition, we have detected splicing defects in the COL5A1 gene in a patient with EDS I and in a family with EDS II. These findings confirm the causal role of collagen V in at least a subgroup of EDS I, prove that EDS I and II are allelic conditions, and represent a, so far, unique example of a human collagen disorder caused by substitution of a highly conserved cysteine residue in the C-propeptide domain of a fibrillar collagen. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Association of high CD4-positive T cell infiltration with mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Eva-Maria; Voigt, Anita Y; Michel, Sara; Bauer, Kathrin; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Ferrone, Soldano; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Besides being expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells, HLA class II antigens are expressed on various tumors of non-lymphoid origin, including a subset of colorectal cancers (CRC). Information about the regulation of HLA class II antigen expression is important for a better understanding of their role in the interactions between tumor and immune cells. Whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in tumors reflects the selective immune destruction of HLA class II antigen-expressing tumor cells is unknown. To address this question, we tested whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in CRC was associated with immune cell infiltration. We selected microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) CRC, because they show pronounced tumor antigen-specific immune responses and, in a subset of tumors, lack of HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations inactivating HLA class II-regulatory genes. We examined HLA class II antigen expression, mutations in regulatory genes, and CD4-positive T cell infiltration in 69 MSI-H CRC lesions. Mutations in RFX5, CIITA, and RFXAP were found in 13 (28.9%), 3 (6.7%), and 1 (2.2%) out of 45 HLA class II antigen-negative tumors. CD4-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in HLA class II antigen-negative tumors harboring mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes (107.4 T cells per 0.25 mm(2)) compared to tumors without mutations (55.5 T cells per 0.25 mm(2), p = 0.008). Our results suggest that the outgrowth of tumor cells lacking HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations of regulatory genes is favored in an environment of dense CD4-positive T cell infiltration.

  13. Isolation and functional characterization of Sporothrix schenckii ROT2, the encoding gene for the endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Ortiz, Claudia I; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Hernández-Cervantes, Arturo; Álvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Lee, Keunsook K; Díaz-Jiménez, Diana F; Munro, Carol A; Cano-Canchola, Carmen; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2012-08-01

    The N-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification in eukaryotic cells. During the N-linked glycan synthesis, the precursor Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2) is processed by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glucosidases I, II and α1,2-mannosidase, before transporting to the Golgi complex for further structure modifications. In fungi of medical relevance, as Candida albicans and Aspergillus, it is well known that ER glycosidases are important for cell fitness, cell wall organization, virulence, and interaction with the immune system. Despite this, little is known about these enzymes in Sporothrix schenckii, the causative agent of human sporotrichosis. This limited knowledge is due in part to the lack of a genome sequence of this organism. In this work we used degenerate primers and inverse PCR approaches to isolate the open reading frame of S. schenckii ROT2, the encoding gene for α subunit of ER glucosidase II. This S. schenckii gene complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae rot2Δ mutant; however, when expressed in a C. albicans rot2Δ mutant, S. schenckii Rot2 partially increased the levels of α-glucosidase activity, but failed to restore the N-linked glycosylation defect associated to the mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first report where a gene involved in protein N-linked glycosylation is isolated from S. schenckii.

  14. Multiple Sites of Type II Site Ligand (Luteolin and BMHPC) Regulation of Gene Expression in PC-3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaverich, Barry M; Vijjeswarapu, Mary

    2012-12-01

    Type II [(3)H]estradiol binding site ligands including luteolin (a naturally occurring bioflavonoid) and synthetic compounds such as 2,6-bis((3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)methylene)cyclohexanone (BMHPC) inhibit normal and malignant prostate cell (PC-3, LNCaP, DU-145) proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Type II sites represent a binding domain on histone H4 possibly involved in an epigenetic mechanism for controlling gene transcription. Treatment of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells with luteolin or BMHPC modulated the expression of a number of genes in the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway (EGFRSP) and cell cycle pathway (CCP). Pronounced stimulation (400-2000% of control) of c-FOS and p21 RNA expression was observed, suggesting that these were primary sites of action. Both compounds also caused irreversible G2/M arrest (pinhibition of PC-3 cell proliferation. Thus, although c-FOS and p21 are known to modulate the expression of genes in the ESGRSP (EGFR, SOS, GRB2, JNK1, MKK4, RasGAP) and CCP (CCNA2, CCNE2, CDC25A, CDKN1A, CDKN1B, p27, PLK1) involved in the regulation of cell proliferation by luteolin and BMHPC, the c-FOS and p21 siRNA knockdown studies reported here suggest that c-FOS and p21 may be secondary bystanders in the overall response to these ligands in the regulation of PC-3 cell proliferation. PMID:23675277

  15. The yeast TFB1 and SSL1 genes, which encode subunits of transcription factor IIH, are required for nucleotide excision repair and RNA polymerase II transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Wang; Buratowski, S; Svejstrup, J Q; Feaver, W J; Wu, X; Kornberg, R D; Donahue, T F; Friedberg, E C

    1995-01-01

    The essential TFB1 and SSL1 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode two subunits of the RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIIH (factor b). Here we show that extracts of temperature-sensitive mutants carrying mutations in both genes (tfb1-101 and ssl1-1) are defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RNA polymerase II transcription but are proficient for base excision repair. RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription at the CYC1 promoter was normal at permissive tempera...

  16. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 Knockout Strains Enable Functional Analysis of Genes Required for Cyst Development and Latent Infection ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Barbara A.; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M.; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P.; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Louis M Weiss; Bzik, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we t...

  17. The Type II Pullulanase of Thermococcus hydrothermalis: Molecular Characterization of the Gene and Expression of the Catalytic Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Erra-Pujada, Marta; Debeire, Philippe; Duchiron, Francis; O’Donohue, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding a hyperthermostable type II pullulanase produced by Thermococcus hydrothermalis (Th-Apu) has been isolated. Analysis of a total of 5.2 kb of genomic DNA has revealed the presence of three open reading frames, one of which (apuA) encodes the pullulanase. This enzyme is composed of 1,339 amino acid residues and exhibits a multidomain structure. In addition to a typical N-terminal signal peptide, Th-Apu possesses a catalytic domain, a domain bearing S-layer homology-like motifs...

  18. Autosomal recessive hypophosphataemic rickets with hypercalciuria is not caused by mutations in the type II renal sodium/phosphate cotransporter gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Koul, K. Op de; Knots, E.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present the genetic defect for autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant hypophosphataemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH) is unknown. Type II sodium/phosphate cotransporter (NPT2) gene is a serious candidate for being the causative gene in either or both autosomal recessive and a

  19. Sequence Analysis of the Capsid Gene during a Genotype II.4 Dominated Norovirus Season in One University Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft;

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of gastroenteritis and genotype II.4 (GII.4) is responsible for the majority of nosocomial NoV infections. Our objective was to examine whether sequencing of the capsid gene might be a useful tool for the hospital outbreak investigation to define possible....... Sequences of the capsid gene (1412 nucleotides) were obtained from the first available sample from 55 patients. From six immunocompromised patients with persistent infections a second sample was also included. As a control for a point-source outbreak, five samples from a foodborne outbreak caused...... by the same GII.4 variant were analyzed. Forty-seven of the inpatients (85%) were infected with the GII.4 variant Den Haag 2006b. Phylogenetic analysis of the Den Haag 2006b sequences identified four distinct outbreaks in different departments and a fifth outbreak with possible inter-department spread...

  20. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  1. The roles and acting mechanism of Caenorhabditis elegans DNase II genes in apoptotic dna degradation and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Jen Lai

    Full Text Available DNase II enzymes are acidic endonucleases that have been implicated in mediating apoptotic DNA degradation, a critical cell death execution event. C. elegans genome contains three DNase II homologues, NUC-1, CRN-6, and CRN-7, but their expression patterns, acting sites, and roles in apoptotic DNA degradation and development are unclear. We have conducted a comprehensive analysis of three C. elegans DNase II genes and found that nuc-1 plays a major role, crn-6 plays an auxiliary role, and crn-7 plays a negligible role in resolving 3' OH DNA breaks generated in apoptotic cells. Promoter swapping experiments suggest that crn-6 but not crn-7 can partially substitute for nuc-1 in mediating apoptotic DNA degradation and both fail to replace nuc-1 in degrading bacterial DNA in intestine. Despite of their restricted and largely non-overlapping expression patterns, both CRN-6 and NUC-1 can mediate apoptotic DNA degradation in many cells, suggesting that they are likely secreted nucleases that are retaken up by other cells to exert DNA degradation functions. Removal or disruption of NUC-1 secretion signal eliminates NUC-1's ability to mediate DNA degradation across its expression border. Furthermore, blocking cell corpse engulfment does not affect apoptotic DNA degradation mediated by nuc-1, suggesting that NUC-1 acts in apoptotic cells rather than in phagocytes to resolve 3' OH DNA breaks. Our study illustrates how multiple DNase II nucleases play differential roles in apoptotic DNA degradation and development and reveals an unexpected mode of DNase II action in mediating DNA degradation.

  2. Trans-species polymorphism of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene in banded penguins (genus Spheniscus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Eri F; Tsuda, Tomi T; Sumiyama, Daisuke; Naruse, Taeko K; Fukuda, Michio; Kurita, Masanori; Wilson, Rory P; LeMaho, Yvon; Miller, Gary D; Tsuda, Michio; Murata, Koichi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2009-05-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc) class II DRB locus of vertebrates is highly polymorphic and some alleles may be shared between closely related species as a result of balancing selection in association with resistance to parasites. In this study, we developed a new set of PCR primers to amplify, clone, and sequence overlapping portions of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene from the 5'UTR end to intron 3, including exons 1, 2, and 3 and introns 1 and 2 in four species (20 Humboldt, six African, five Magellanic, and three Galapagos penguins) of penguin from the genus Spheniscus (Sphe). Analysis of gene sequence variation by the neighbor-joining method of 21 Sphe sequences and 20 previously published sequences from four other penguin species revealed overlapping clades within the Sphe species, but species-specific clades for the other penguin species. The overlap of the DRB-like gene sequence variants between the four Sphe species suggests that, despite their allopatric distribution, the Sphe species are closely related and that some shared DRB1 alleles may have undergone a trans-species inheritance because of balancing selection and/or recent rapid speciation. The new primers and PCR assays that we have developed for the identification of the DRB1 DNA and protein sequence variations appear to be useful for the characterization of the molecular evolution of the gene in closely related Penguin species and might be helpful for the assessment of the genetic health and the management of the conservation and captivity of these endangered species. PMID:19319519

  3. Short communication. An association between the G/A single nucleotide polymorphism within intron II of VIP gene and milk performance traits in dairy cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Marek W. Kmiec; Wioleta Grzelak; Anna M. Majewska

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are present in the encoding part of the genes responsible for important breeding functions, exert an influence on the cattle’s phenotype since their function is to regulate the genes expression. In this study a G/A single nucleotide polymorphism within intron II of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) gene was detected. The study covered a herd of 185 Jersey dairy cows from the Wielkopolska Province in Poland. All possible VIP/DraI genotypes de...

  4. Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection is associated with lower MHC class II gene expression in Apodemus flavicollis: indication for immune suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2011-12-01

    Due to their key role in recognizing foreign antigens and triggering the subsequent immune response the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide a potential target for parasites to attack in order to evade detection and expulsion from the host. A diminished MHC gene expression results in less activated T cells and might serve as a gateway for pathogens and parasites. Some parasites are suspected to be immune suppressors and promote co-infections of other parasites even in other parts of the body. In our study we found indications that the gut dwelling nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus might exert a systemic immunosuppressive effect in yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). The amount of hepatic MHC class II DRB gene RNA transcripts in infected mice was negatively associated with infection intensity with H. polygyrus. The hepatic expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10 was not associated with H. polygyrus infection. We did not find direct positive associations of H. polygyrus with other helminth species. But the prevalence and infection intensity of the nematodes Syphacia stroma and Trichuris muris were higher in multiple infected individuals. Furthermore, our data indicated antagonistic effects in the helminth community of A. flavicollis as cestode infection correlated negatively with H. polygyrus and helminth species richness. Our study shows that expression analyses of immune relevant genes can also be performed in wildlife, opening new aspects and possibilities for future ecological and evolutionary research. PMID:21983561

  5. Characterization of class II β chain major histocompatibility complex genes in a family of Hawaiian honeycreepers: 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, Susan I; Bianchi, Kiara R; Farias, Margaret Em; Txakeeyang, Ann; McFarland, Thomas; Belcaid, Mahdi; Asano, Ashley

    2016-07-01

    Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) have evolved in the absence of mosquitoes for over five million years. Through human activity, mosquitoes were introduced to the Hawaiian archipelago less than 200 years ago. Mosquito-vectored diseases such as avian malaria caused by Plasmodium relictum and Avipoxviruses have greatly impacted these vulnerable species. Susceptibility to these diseases is variable among and within species. Due to their function in adaptive immunity, the role of major histocompatibility complex genes (Mhc) in disease susceptibility is under investigation. In this study, we evaluate gene organization and levels of diversity of Mhc class II β chain genes (exon 2) in a captive-reared family of Hawaii 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens). A total of 233 sequences (173 bp) were obtained by PCR+1 amplification and cloning, and 5720 sequences were generated by Roche 454 pyrosequencing. We report a total of 17 alleles originating from a minimum of 14 distinct loci. We detected three linkage groups that appear to represent three distinct haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed one variable cluster resembling classical Mhc sequences (DAB) and one highly conserved, low variability cluster resembling non-classical Mhc sequences (DBB). High net evolutionary divergence values between DAB and DBB resemble that seen between chicken BLB system and YLB system genes. High amino acid identity among non-classical alleles from 12 species of passerines (DBB) and four species of Galliformes (YLB) was found, suggesting that these non-classical passerine sequences may be related to the Galliforme YLB sequences. PMID:26971289

  6. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weicai Chen

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae, which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation.

  7. Lipophilic tetranuclear ruthenium(II) complexes as two-photon luminescent tracking non-viral gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bole; Ouyang, Cheng; Qiu, Kangqiang; Zhao, Jing; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-02-23

    Fluorescence detection is the most effective tool for tracking gene delivery in living cells. To reduce photodamage and autofluorescence and to increase deep penetration into cells, choosing appropriate fluorophores that are capable of two-photon activation under irradiation in the NIR or IR regions is an effective approach. In this work, we have developed six tetranuclear ruthenium(II) complexes, GV1-6, and have studied their one- and two-photon luminescence properties. DNA interaction studies have demonstrated that GV2-6, bearing hydrophobic alkyl ether chains, show more efficient DNA condensing ability but lower DNA binding constants than GV1. However, the hydrophobic alkyl ether chains also enhance the DNA delivery ability of GV2-6 compared with that of GV1. More importantly, we have applied GV1-6 as non-viral gene vectors for tracking DNA delivery in living cells by one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopies. In two-photon microscopy, a high signal-to-noise contrast was achieved by irradiation with an 830 nm laser. This is the first example of the use of transition-metal complexes for two-photon luminescent tracking of the cellular pathways of gene delivery and as DNA carriers. Our work provides new insights into improving real-time tracking during gene delivery and transfection as well as important information for the design of multifunctional non-viral vectors. PMID:25597394

  8. Protein signaling and regulation of gene transcription in leukemia: role of the Casein Kinase II-Ikaros axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Chandrika S; Song, Chunhua; Ding, Yali; Kapadia, Malika; Dovat, Sinisa

    2016-03-01

    Protein signaling and regulation of gene expression are the two major mechanisms that regulate cellular proliferation in leukemia. Discerning the function of these processes is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of leukemia and for developing the targeted therapies. Here, we provide an overview of one of the mechanisms that regulates gene transcription in leukemia. This mechanism involves the direct interaction between Casein Kinase II (CK2) and the Ikaros transcription factor. Ikaros (IKZF1) functions as a master regulator of hematopoiesis and a tumor suppressor in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Impaired Ikaros function results in the development of high-risk leukemia. Ikaros binds to the upstream regulatory elements of its target genes and regulates their transcription via chromatin remodeling. In vivo, Ikaros is a target for CK2, a pro-oncogenic kinase. CK2 directly phosphorylates Ikaros at multiple amino acids. Functional experiments showed that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Ikaros, regulates Ikaros' DNA binding affinity, subcellular localization and protein stability. Recent studies revealed that phosphorylation of Ikaros by CK2 regulates Ikaros binding and repression of the terminal deoxytransferase (TdT) gene in normal thymocytes and in T-cell ALL. Available data suggest that the oncogenic activity of CK2 in leukemia involves functional inactivation of Ikaros and provide a rationale for CK2 inhibitors as a potential treatment for ALL. PMID:26912004

  9. TALE-PvuII fusion proteins--novel tools for gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Mert; Alzubi, Jamal; Lahaye, Thomas; Cathomen, Toni; Pingoud, Alfred; Wende, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) consist of zinc fingers as DNA-binding module and the non-specific DNA-cleavage domain of the restriction endonuclease FokI as DNA-cleavage module. This architecture is also used by TALE nucleases (TALENs), in which the DNA-binding modules of the ZFNs have been replaced by DNA-binding domains based on transcription activator like effector (TALE) proteins. Both TALENs and ZFNs are programmable nucleases which rely on the dimerization of FokI to induce double-strand DNA cleavage at the target site after recognition of the target DNA by the respective DNA-binding module. TALENs seem to have an advantage over ZFNs, as the assembly of TALE proteins is easier than that of ZFNs. Here, we present evidence that variant TALENs can be produced by replacing the catalytic domain of FokI with the restriction endonuclease PvuII. These fusion proteins recognize only the composite recognition site consisting of the target site of the TALE protein and the PvuII recognition sequence (addressed site), but not isolated TALE or PvuII recognition sites (unaddressed sites), even at high excess of protein over DNA and long incubation times. In vitro, their preference for an addressed over an unaddressed site is > 34,000-fold. Moreover, TALE-PvuII fusion proteins are active in cellula with minimal cytotoxicity.

  10. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J.; Cissé, Ibrahim I.

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging. PMID:27782203

  11. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-gamma-inducible MHC-II gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-11-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, CARM1, and the acetyltransferase cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during this process. CARM1 synergizes with CIITA in activating MHC-II transcription and synergy is abrogated when an arginine methyltransferase-defective CARM1 mutant is used. Protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 has much less effect on MHC-II transcription. Specific RNA interference reduced CARM1 expression as well as MHC-II expression. The recruitment of CARM1 to the promoter requires endogenous CIITA and results in methylation of histone H3-R17; hence, CIITA is an upstream regulator of histone methylation. Previous work has shown that CARM1 can methylate CBP at three arginine residues. Using wild-type CBP and a mutant of CBP lacking the CARM1-targeted arginine residues (R3A), we show that arginine methylation of CBP is required for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. A kinetic analysis shows that CIITA, CARM1, and H3-R17 methylation all precede CBP loading on the MHC-II promoter during IFN-gamma treatment. These results suggest functional and temporal relationships among CIITA, CARM1, and CBP for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II.

  12. Genetic analysis of ryanodine receptor 1 gene and carnitine palmitoyltransferase II gene: an autopsy case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome related to vegetamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusue, Aya; Hara, Kenji; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Lu, Wang; Ishigami, Akiko; Gotohda, Takako; Tokunaga, Itsuo; Nisimura, Akiyoshi; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-04-01

    We report an autopsy case of a man in his forties who died 2 days after taking an overdose of vegetamin. The autopsy findings were as follows: externally, the upper epidermis of some parts of the body had become loosened. The epidermis was easily detached from the dermis using the fingers. Viscous fluid adhered around the nose and mouth. The brain was edematous and weighed 1520 g. Skeletal muscle was discolored. The urine was a slightly red-tinged yellow. The organs showed congestion. Urine tests: urea nitrogen: 1.95 g/day; creatinine: 0.66 g/day; urine myoglobin: 1100 ng/mL. Blood level of drugs: phenobarbital: 38.2 microg/ml; promethazine: 2.22 microg/ml; chlorpromazine: 0.96 microg/ml. Immunohistochemistry identified myoglobin in the kidney. From these findings, his cause of death was considered to be vegetamin-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. Mutation of the ryanodine receptor 1 gene is associated with malignant hyperthermia. However, there was no mutation which causes amino acid substitution in the three hot-spot regions of the ryanodine receptor 1 gene. Partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II is the commonest cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in adults. The subject was found to be heterozygous for an amino acid exchange in exon 4, (1203)G-->A causing a (368)Val-->Ile amino acid substitution. It is necessary to examine other candidate gene mutations. PMID:19269221

  13. Overexpression of the IGF-II/M6P receptor in mouse fibroblast cell lines differentially alters expression profiles of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease-related pathology.

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    Yanlin Wang

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common type of senile dementia affecting elderly people. The processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP leading to the generation of β-amyloid (Aβ peptide contributes to neurodegeneration and development of AD pathology. The endocytic trafficking pathway, which comprises of the endosomes and lysosomes, acts as an important site for Aβ generation, and endocytic dysfunction has been linked to increased Aβ production and loss of neurons in AD brains. Since insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II receptor plays a critical role in the transport of lysosomal enzymes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomes, it is likely that the receptor may have a role in regulating Aβ metabolism in AD pathology. However, very little is known on how altered levels of the IGF-II receptor can influence the expression/function of various molecules involved in AD pathology. To address this issue, we evaluated the expression profiles of 87 selected genes related to AD pathology in mouse fibroblast MS cells that are deficient in murine IGF-II receptor and corresponding MS9II cells overexpressing ∼ 500 times the human IGF-II receptors. Our results reveal that an elevation in IGF-II receptor levels alters the expression profiles of a number of genes including APP as well as enzymes regulating Aβ production, degradation and clearance mechanisms. Additionally, it influences the expression of various lysosomal enzymes and protein kinases that are involved in Aβ toxicity. IGF-II receptor overexpression also alters expression of several genes involved in intracellular signalling as well as cholesterol metabolism, which play a critical role in AD pathology. The altered gene profiles observed in this study closely match with the corresponding protein levels, with a few exceptions. These results, taken together, suggest that an elevation in IGF-II receptor levels can influence the expression profiles of transcripts as well as proteins

  14. Loss of DNase II function in the gonad is associated with a higher expression of antimicrobial genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsiang; Lai, Huey-Jen; Lin, Tai-Wei; Chen, Chang-Shi; Lo, Szecheng J

    2015-08-15

    Three waves of apoptosis shape the development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Although the exact roles of the three DNase II genes (nuc-1, crn-6 and crn-7), which are known to mediate degradation of apoptotic DNA, in the embryonic and larval phases of apoptosis have been characterized, the DNase II acting in the third wave of germ cell apoptosis remains undetermined. In the present study, we performed in vitro and in vivo assays on various mutant nematodes to demonstrate that NUC-1 and CRN-7, but not CRN-6, function in germ cell apoptosis. In addition, in situ DNA-break detection and anti-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) staining illustrated the sequential and spatially regulated actions of NUC-1 and CRN-7, at the pachytene zone of the gonad and at the loop respectively. In line with the notion that UV-induced DNA fragment accumulation in the gonad activates innate immunity responses, we also found that loss of NUC-1 and CRN-7 lead to up-regulation of antimicrobial genes (abf-2, spp-1, nlp-29, cnc-2, and lys-7). Our observations suggest that an incomplete digestion of DNA fragments resulting from the absence of NUC-1 or CRN-7 in the gonad could induce the ERK signalling, consequently activating antimicrobial gene expression. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that nuc-1 and crn-7 play a role in degrading apoptotic DNA in distinct sites of the gonad, and act as negative regulators of innate immunity in C. elegans.

  15. Targeted gene knockdown in zebrafish reveals distinct intraembryonic functions for insulin-like growth factor II signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Yvonne A R; Kyle, Joshua T; Wood, Antony W

    2009-09-01

    IGF-II is the predominant IGF ligand regulating prenatal growth in all vertebrates, including humans, but its central role in placental development has confounded efforts to fully elucidate its functions within the embryo. Here we use a nonplacental model vertebrate (zebrafish) to interrogate the intraembryonic functions of IGF-II signaling. The zebrafish genome contains two coorthologs of mammalian IGF2 (igf2a, igf2b), which exhibit distinct patterns of expression during embryogenesis. Expression of igf2a mRNA is restricted to the notochord, primarily during segmentation/neurulation. By contrast, igf2b mRNA is expressed in midline tissues adjacent to the notochord, with additional sites of expression in the ventral forebrain, and the pronephros. To identify their intraembryonic functions, we suppressed the expression of each gene with morpholino oligonucleotides. Knockdown of igf2a led to defects in dorsal midline development, characterized by delayed segmentation, notochord undulations, and ventral curvature. Similarly, suppression of igf2b led to defects in dorsal midline development but also induced ectopic fusion of the nephron primordia, and defects in ventral forebrain development. Subsequent onset of severe body edema in igf2b, but not igf2a morphants, further suggested a distinct role for igf2b in development of the embryonic kidney. Simultaneous knockdown of both genes increased the severity of dorsal midline defects, confirming a conserved role for both genes in dorsal midline development. Collectively, these data provide evidence that the zebrafish orthologs of IGF2 function in dorsal midline development during segmentation/neurulation, whereas one paralog, igf2b, has evolved additional, distinct functions during subsequent organogenesis.

  16. Enhanced antiproliferative effects of combination hexokinase II shRNA and NIS gene therapy on vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This study was designed to determine the antiproliferative effects of combination gene therapy using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)-based radioiodine and lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against hexokinase II (HKII) on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: A7r5 rat VSMCs were stably transfected with a dual-expression vector of NIS and Fluc (A7r5-NL cells). Functional assessment was performed by radioiodine uptake assay, luciferase assay and confocal microscopy. After exposure to lentivirus-HKII-shRNA, the 18F-FDG uptake test and HK activity assay were performed. The effects of combination therapy with 131I and lentivirus-HKII-shRNA on VSMCs were assessed with an in vitro clonogenic assay. In vivo bioluminescence and nuclear imaging were undertaken using a xenografted mouse model. Results: In vitro functional assessment confirmed expression of NIS and Fluc genes in A7r5-NL, but not in parent A7r5 cells. Transfection of lentivirus-HKII-shRNA resulted in a significant decrease in messenger RNA expression of the HKII gene, 18F-FDG uptake and HK activity. The cell survival rate of A7r5-NL decreased to 61.9% and 90.5% by single therapy with 7.4 MBq of 131I or lentivirus-HKII-shRNA, respectively, and further decreased to 42.9% by combined therapy (P99mTc pertechnetate uptake at the site of A7r5-NL cell inoculation in nude mice. Conclusion: The enhanced antiproliferative effect on VSMCs was achieved by a combination of NIS-based radioiodine and lentivirus-mediated HKII shRNA gene therapy. Successful demonstration of in vivo dual reporter gene imaging assures the potential for further application in an animal model.

  17. [Influence of mutant genes on crystallin synthesis in the forming mouse lens. II. Fidget and ocular retardation genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, M I; Platonov, E S; Koniukhov, B V

    1977-01-01

    The beginning of synthesis and the localization of alpha- and gamma-crystallins in the developing lenses of the 10-13 and 15 days old mouse embryos of the genotypes fi/fi +/+, +/+ or/or, fi/fi or/or and +/+ +/+ were studied by means of indirect immunofluorescence. The synthesis of crystallins in the mutant embryos with the exception of the embryo +/+ or/or was shown to begin somewhat later than in the normal ones but to proceed in all defective lenses, irrespective of the degree of defect. Hence, the activation of the genes controlling the synthesis of alpha-crystallins begins at the early stages of lens development and the synthesis of these proteins proceeds even during the abnormal with the slowing down of the formation of primary lens fibers. In the cases of strong defects of morphogenesis in the fi/fi +/+ and, especially, fi/fi or/or, embryos gamma-crystallins were not detected. The synthesis of gamma-crystallins appears to begin at the final stages of lens fiber differentiation.

  18. B-cell-specific enhancer activity of conserved upstream elements of the class II major histocompatibility complex DQB gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, M.; Strominger, J.L.

    1988-09-01

    A 95-base-pair immediate upstream sequence of the human class II major histocompatibility complex DQB gene containing the conserved X and Y elements showed enhancer activity in a transient expression assay. An enhancer test plasmid harboring the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene under the control of a truncated simian virus 40 enhancerless early promoter was employed. The DQB sequence inserted into this plasmid was active as an enhancer in Raji cells (human Burkitt lymphoma cells) but not active in Jurkat cells (human T-cell leukemia cells) or in HeLa cells (human cervical carcinoma cells). This cell-type specificity suggests that this enhancer activity may be involved in the tissue specificity of the DQB gene that is normally expressed only in mature B cells, macrophages, and thymic epithelial cells. Deletion analysis showed that both X and Y box sequences are essential for the full activity of the enhancer sequence and that these two sequences may function in a cooperative manner as cis-acting elements. Further deletions were used to define the 5' border of the X element. These results suggest that previously characterized protein factors that bind to X and Y include transcription factors involved in the cell-type specificity of this enhancer activity.

  19. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, J B; Andersen, V; Halberg, P;

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, -DPB in 24 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in 102 healthy Danes. A highly significant increase of the frequency of the DR3...

  20. The tetracycline resistance determinant Tet 39 and the sulphonamide resistance gene sulII are common among resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolated from integrated fish farms in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Petersen, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    sulfamethoxazole-resistant contained sulII (96%; 129/134) and/or sulI (14%; 19/134) (as part of class I integrons). sulII and tet(39) were located on plasmids differing in size in the isolates tested. Conclusions: The study shows tet(39) and sulII to be common resistance genes among clonally distinct Acinetobacter...... spp. from integrated fish farms and these bacteria may constitute reservoirs of resistance genes that may increase owing to a selective pressure caused by the use of antimicrobials in the overlaying animal production.......Objectives: To determine the genetic basis for tetracycline and sulphonamide resistance and the prevalence of class I and II integrons in oxytetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from integrated fish farms in Thailand. Methods: A total of 222 isolates were screened for tetracycline resistance...

  1. A novel mutation in the DSPP gene associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S-K; Lee, K-E; Jeon, D; Lee, G; Lee, H; Shin, C-U; Jung, Y-J; Lee, S-H; Hahn, S-H; Kim, J-W

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary dentin defects are divided into dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia. We identified a family segregating severe dentinogenesis imperfecta. The kindred spanned four generations and showed an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance. The proband was a child presenting with a severely affected primary dentition, with wide-open pulp chambers and multiple pulp exposures, resembling a DGI type III (DGI-III) pattern. We hypothesized that a mutation in the DSPP gene is responsible for this severe phenotype. Mutational analyses revealed a novel mutation (c.53T>A, p.V18D) near the intron-exon boundary in the third exon of the DSPP gene. We analyzed the effect of the mutation by means of an in vitro splicing assay, which revealed that the mutation did not affect pre-mRNA splicing. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the nature of the disease and the development of an appropriate treatment strategy.

  2. Coptotermes gestroi (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in Brazil: possible origins inferred by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C; Fontes, L R; Bueno, O C; Martins, V G

    2010-09-01

    The Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi, originally from northeast India through Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Indonesian archipelago, is a major termite pest introduced in several countries around the world, including Brazil. We sequenced the mitochondrial COII gene from individuals representing 23 populations. Phylogenetic analysis of COII gene sequences from this and other studies resulted in two main groups: (1) populations of Cleveland (USA) and four populations of Malaysia and (2) populations of Brazil, four populations of Malaysia, and one population from each of Thailand, Puerto Rico, and Key West (USA). Three new localities are reported here, considerably enlarging the distribution of C. gestroi in Brazil: Campo Grande (state of Mato Grosso do Sul), Itajaí (state of Santa Catarina), and Porto Alegre (state of Rio Grande do Sul).

  3. Coptotermes gestroi (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in Brazil: possible origins inferred by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C; Fontes, L R; Bueno, O C; Martins, V G

    2010-09-01

    The Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi, originally from northeast India through Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Indonesian archipelago, is a major termite pest introduced in several countries around the world, including Brazil. We sequenced the mitochondrial COII gene from individuals representing 23 populations. Phylogenetic analysis of COII gene sequences from this and other studies resulted in two main groups: (1) populations of Cleveland (USA) and four populations of Malaysia and (2) populations of Brazil, four populations of Malaysia, and one population from each of Thailand, Puerto Rico, and Key West (USA). Three new localities are reported here, considerably enlarging the distribution of C. gestroi in Brazil: Campo Grande (state of Mato Grosso do Sul), Itajaí (state of Santa Catarina), and Porto Alegre (state of Rio Grande do Sul). PMID:20924414

  4. Optimization of Streptomyces bacteriophage phi C31 integrase system to prevent post integrative gene silencing in pulmonary type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Manish Kumar; Geiger, Johannes; Imker, Rabea; Uzgun, Senta; Kormann, Michael; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Maucksch, Christof; Rudolph, Carsten

    2009-12-31

    phi C31 integrase has emerged as a potent tool for achieving long-term gene expression in different tissues. The present study aimed at optimizing elements of phi C31 integrase system for alveolar type II cells. Luciferase and beta-galactosidase activities were measured at different time points post transfection. 5-Aza-2'deoxycytidine (AZA) and trichostatin A (TSA) were used to inhibit DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) respectively. In A549 cells, expression of the integrase using a CMV promoter resulted in highest integrase activity, whereas in MLE12 cells, both CAG and CMV promoter were equally effective. Effect of polyA site was observed only in A549 cells, where replacement of SV40 polyA by bovine growth hormone (BGH) polyA site resulted in an enhancement of integrase activity. Addition of a C-terminal SV40 nuclear localization signal (NLS) did not result in any significant increase in integrase activity. Long-term expression studies with AZA and TSA, provided evidence for post-integrative gene silencing. In MLE12 cells, both DNA methylases and HDACs played a significant role in silencing, whereas in A549 cells, it could be attributed majorly to HDAC activity. Donor plasmids comprising cellular promoters ubiquitin B (UBB), ubiquitin C (UCC) and elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) in an improved backbone prevented post-integrative gene silencing. In contrast to A549 and MLE12 cells, no silencing could be observed in human bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B. Donor plasmid coding for murine erythropoietin under the EF1 alpha promoter when combined with phi C31 integrase resulted in higher long-term erythropoietin expression and subsequently higher hematocrit levels in mice after intravenous delivery to the lungs. These results provide evidence for cell specific post integrative gene silencing with C31 integrase and demonstrate the pivotal role of donor plasmid in long-term expression attained with this system.

  5. Association of Variants in Genes Related to the Immune Response and Obesity with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in CLUE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, David S.; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Isaacs, William B.; Smith, Michael W.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic inflammation and obesity may contribute to the genesis or progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and BPH-associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The influence of variants in genes related to these states on BPH has not been studied extensively. Thus, we evaluated the association of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes (IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL10, TNF, CRP, TLR4, RNASEL) and genes involved in obesity, including insulin regulation (LEP, ADIPOQ, PPARG, TCF7L2), with BPH. METHODS BPH cases (N=568) and age-frequency matched controls (N=568) were selected from among adult male CLUE II cohort participants who responded in 2000 to a mailed questionnaire. BPH was defined as BPH surgery, use of BPH medications, or symptomatic BPH (American Urological Association Symptom Index Score ≥15). Controls were men who had not had BPH surgery, did not use BPH medications, and whose symptom score was ≤7. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS None of the candidate SNPs was statistically significantly associated with BPH. However, we could not rule out possible weak associations for CRP rs1205 (1082C>T), ADIPOQ rs1501299 (276C>A), PPARG rs1801282 (-49C>G), and TCF7L2 rs7903146 (47833T>C). After summing risk alleles, men with ≥4 had an increased BPH risk compared with those with ≤1 (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.10-2.89; Ptrend=0.006). CONCLUSION SNPs in genes related to immune response and obesity, especially in combination, may be associated with BPH. PMID:25224558

  6. Maturation in Larch : II. Effects of Age on Photosynthesis and Gene Expression in Developing Foliage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, K W; Sherman, C D; Weber, J; Smith, S S; Singer, P B; Greenwood, M S

    1990-11-01

    The effect of maturation on the morphological and photosynthetic characteristics, as well as the expression of two genes involved in photosynthesis in the developing, current year foliage of Eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi]) is described. These effects were observed on foliage during the third growing season after grafting of scions from trees of different ages onto 2 year old rootstock. Specific leaf weight (gram dry weight per square meter), leaf cross-sectional area (per square millimeter), and chlorophyll content (milligram per gram dry weight) all increase with increasing age in long shoot foliage from both indoor- and outdoor-grown trees. Net photosynthesis (NPS) (mole of CO(2) per square millimeter per second) increases with age on indoor- but not outdoor-grown trees. NPS also increases with increased chlorophyll content, but outdoor-grown scions of all ages had higher chlorophyll content, and chlorophyll does not appear to be limiting for NPS outdoors. To extend these studies of maturation-related differences in foliar morphology and physiology to the molecular genetic level, sequences were cloned from the cab and rbsS gene families of larch. Both cab and rbcS gene families are expressed in foliage but not in roots, and they are expressed in light-grown seedlings of larch but only at very low levels in dark-grown seedlings (~2% of light-grown seedlings). Steady-state cab mRNA levels are relatively higher (~40%) in newly expanding short shoot foliage from juvenile plants compared to mature plants. Unlike cab, the expression of the rbcS gene family did not seem to vary with age. These data show that the maturation-related changes in morphological and physiological phenotypes are associated with changes in gene expression. No causal relationship has been established, however. Indeed, we conclude that the faster growth of juvenile scions reported previously (MS Greenwood, CA Hopper, KW Hutchison [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 406-412) is not due to increased

  7. Transgenic Indian Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum Harboring Rice Chitinase Gene (Chi II Confers Resistance to Two Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganesan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The present investigation described a simple and reproducible protocol for transgenic cotton regeneration and characterization of chitinase (Chi II gene expression against two different fungal pathogens in cotton. Approach: Transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. SVPR2 plants were produced by pCambia-bar-Chi II (13.8 kb under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, harbored in the strain LBA 4404 Agrobacterium tumefaciens by using shoot tip explants. Results: Finally, from the 10 experiments, 21.8% of transformation frequency was recorded. Segregation ratio of 3:1 was recorded in the T0 plant seeds. Polymerase chain reaction and southern blotting analysis were used to confirm the integration of Chi II transgene in the T0 plants genome of putative transgenics. Quantitiave and qualitative (SDS-PAGE analyses were also carried out to confirm the expression of chitinase enzyme in T0 plants. Further, randomly selected transgenic plants (T0 were analyzed for disease tolerance by evaluating them with spores of Fusarium oxysporum and Alternaria macrospora. All the selected PCR positive plants showed enhanced disease resistance against Fusarium wilt. The plants selected randomly showed an enhanced survival rate compared with the control when they were grown in earthen pots inoculated with 1×105 spores 100-1 g of soil mixture. Another four randomly selected plantlets were sprayed with spores of Alternaria macrospora in order to test their tolerance to Alternaria leaf spot disease. After 20 days of culture, the number of lesions per leaf and the lesion length per leaf spot in non-transferred leaves increased. In the case of transgenic plantlets, lesion formation was completely absent. Conclusion: The disease resistance against Fusarium wilt and Alternaria leaf spot in cotton strains would serve as good breeding materials for producing fungal disease resistant cotton varieties.

  8. De novo mutation in the DSPP gene associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II in a Japanese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Miyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomonori; Shindoh, Masanobu; Ikeda, Hisami; Ariga, Tadashi

    2009-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is one of the most common dominantly inherited dentin defects, in which both the primary and permanent teeth are affected. Here, we report a Japanese family with autosomal-dominant DGI type II, including both molecular genetic defects and pathogenesis with histological analysis. Mutation analysis revealed a mutation (c.53T>A, p.V18D, g.1192T>A) involving the second nucleotide of the first codon within exon 3 of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene. This mutation has previously been reported in a Korean family. Thus far, 24 allelic DSPP mutations have been reported, and this is the seventh mutation involving the DSPP V18 residue. Among those, only one other was shown to be caused by a de novo mutation, and that mutation also affected the V18 amino acid residue. The DSPP V18 residue is highly conserved among other mammalian species. These findings thus suggest that the V18 amino acid might be a sensitive mutational hot spot, playing a critical role in the pathogenesis of DGI.

  9. Germline polymorphisms in genes involved in the Hippo pathway as recurrence biomarkers in stages II/III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebio, A; Matsusaka, S; Zhang, W; Yang, D; Ning, Y; Stremitzer, S; Stintzing, S; Sunakawa, Y; Yamauchi, S; Fujimoto, Y; Ueno, M; Lenz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    The Hippo pathway regulates tissue growth and cell fate. In colon cancer, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes cellular quiescence and resistance to 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu). In this study, 14 polymorphisms in 8 genes involved in the Hippo pathway (MST1, MST2, LATS1, LATS2, YAP, TAZ, FAT4 and RASSF1A) were evaluated as recurrence predictors in 194 patients with stages II/III colon cancer treated with 5-Fu-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a RASSF1A rs2236947 AA genotype had higher 3-year recurrence rate than patients with CA/CC genotypes (56 vs 33%, hazard ratio (HR): 1.87; P=0.017). Patients with TAZ rs3811715 CT or TT genotypes had lower 3-year recurrence rate than patients with a CC genotype (28 vs 40%; HR: 0.66; P=0.07). In left-sided tumors, this association was stronger (HR: 0.29; P=0.011) and a similar trend was found in an independent Japanese cohort. These promising results reveal polymorphisms in the Hippo pathway as biomarkers for stages II and III colon cancer.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 15 September 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.64. PMID:26370619

  10. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus suggest trans-species polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Eimes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP, in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis American crows (C. brachyrhynchos and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis. Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While

  11. Tobacco streak virus (strain dahlia) suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing of flavone synthase II in black dahlia cultivars and causes a drastic flower color change.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, Ayumi; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Doi, Motoaki; Ohno, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco streak virus suppressed post-transcriptional gene silencing and caused a flower color change in black dahlias, which supported the role of cyanidin-based anthocyanins for black flower appearance. Black flower color of dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) has been attributed, in part, to the high accumulation of cyanidin-based anthocyanins that occurs when flavone synthesis is reduced because of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of flavone synthase II (DvFNS). There are also purple-flow...

  12. Analyses of promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene promoter in a Drosophila nuclear extract.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, B.; Weber, J. A.; Chen, Y; Greenleaf, A L; Gilmour, D S

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of Drosophila cells have revealed that RNA polymerase II is paused in a region 20 to 40 nucleotides downstream from the transcription start site of the hsp70 heat shock gene when the gene is not transcriptionally active. We have developed a cell-free system that reconstitutes this promoter-proximal pausing. The paused polymerase has been detected by monitoring the hyperreactivity of thymines in the transcription bubble toward potassium permanganate. The pattern of permanganate reacti...

  13. Studies on Expression of IGF-II Gene in Deciduas Derived from Medical Abortion Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of insulin-like growth factor-Ⅱ (IGF-Ⅱ ) upon the maintenance of decidua in early pregnancy and its relationship with progesterone, as well as its role in medical abortion. Materials & Methods Decidua tissue was obtained from 28 women who undergoing surgical abortion and 39 for medical abortion respectively at 5~7 weeks of gestation. The extracted total RNA was reversely transcripted and amplified by PCR with spe cific primers (IGF-Ⅱ and β-actin). The products were semi-quantitated by MIAS 300 system and qualitatively analyzed by southern blotting. Results The expression of IGF-Ⅱ gene in decidua from surgical abortion was signif icantly higher than that from medical abortion (P<0.05). The average IGF-Ⅱ gene transcription values were 1. 54±0.79 and 0.72±0.39 respectively. The results of southern blotting proved qualitatively that the RT-PCR products were IGF-Ⅱ cDNA. Conclusion IGF-Ⅱ plays a role in the maintenance of decidua in early pregnancy. It may act as a mediator of progestin. It's also involved in the molecular mechanism of mifepristone.

  14. DNA methylation of angiotensin II receptor gene in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related liver fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kiyoshi; Aihara, Yosuke; Takaya, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Ryuichi; Namisaki, Tadashi; Moriya, Kei; Uejima, Masakazu; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Mashitani, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Kosuke; Kawaratani, Hideto; Okura, Yasushi; Kaji, Kosuke; Douhara, Akitoshi; Sawada, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Norihisa; Seki, Kenichiro; Mitoro, Akira; Yamao, Junichi; Yoshiji, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify whether Agtr1a methylation is involved in the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-related liver fibrosis in adult rats. METHODS A choline-deficient amino acid (CDAA) diet model was employed for methylation analysis of NASH-related liver fibrosis. Agtr1a methylation levels were measured in the livers of CDAA- and control choline-sufficient amino acid (CSAA)-fed rats for 8 and 12 wk using quantitative methylation-specific PCR. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated by collagenase digestion of the liver, followed by centrifugation of the crude cell suspension through a density gradient. Agtr1a methylation and its gene expression were also analyzed during the activation of HSCs. RESULTS The mean levels of Agtr1a methylation in the livers of CDAA-fed rats (11.5% and 18.6% at 8 and 12 wk, respectively) tended to be higher (P = 0.06 and 0.09, respectively) than those in the livers of CSAA-fed rats (2.1% and 5.3% at 8 and 12 wk, respectively). Agtr1a was not methylated at all in quiescent HSCs, but was clearly methylated in activated HSCs (13.8%, P renin-angiotensin system-related gene expression during liver fibrosis. PMID:27729955

  15. [Somatic hypermutagenesis in immunoglobulin genes. II. Properties of somatic mutations and clonal selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, I B; Solov'ev, V V

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of the collection of 203 somatic mutations in immunoglobulin genes was carried out. It was shown, that the high frequency of these mutations in CDRs of V-genes may be connected with the high concentration of repeats in these regions. In addition, the observed clusterization of mutations may emerge from simultaneous correction of several pertubations of complementarity in the heteroduplex, formed by the repeat regions. It was revealed, that somatic mutations in FRs are characterized by reliably smaller changes of some important amino acid physical-chemical properties than in CDRs. These data obviously indicate the occurrence of B-lymphocytes clonal selection. Analysis of synonymous substitutions has shown, that stabilizing selection seems to provide the conservatism of FRs (it leads to the conservation of the protein three-dimensional structure) and movement selection may provide the proliferation of B-lymphocytes with considerable changes in CDRs, if these mutations improve antigens binding. Preferential fixation of transitions in comparison with transversions, particularly expressed in FRs, may also be connected with the fact, that transitions lead to smaller changes of amino acid physical-chemical properties and they are rejected by selection to a smaller extent.

  16. p13 from group II baculoviruses is a killing-associated gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Qi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available p13 gene was first described in Leucania separata multinuclearpolyhedrosis virus (Ls-p13 several years ago, but the functionof P13 protein has not been experimentally investigated todate. In this article, we indicated that the expression of p13from Heliothis armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus(Ha-p13 was regulated by both early and late promoter.Luciferase assay demonstrated that the activity of Ha-p13promoter with hr4 enhancer was more than 100 times inheterologous Sf9 cells than that in nature host Hz-AM1 cells.Both Ls-P13 and Ha-P13 are transmembrane proteins. Confocalmicroscopic analysis showed that both mainly located in thecytoplasm membrane at 48 h. Results of RNA interferenceindicated that Ha-p13 was a killing-associated gene for hostinsects H. armigera. The AcMNPV acquired the mentionedkilling activity and markedly accelerate the killing rate whenexpressing Ls-p13. In conclusion, p13 is a killing associatedgene in both homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedrovirus.

  17. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilchung [Ames Laboratory; Ray, Judhajeet [Ames Laboratory; Gupta, Vinayak [Iowa State University; Ilgu, Muslum [Ames Laboratory; Beasley, Jonathan [Iowa State University; Bendickson, Lee [Ames Laboratory; Mehanovic, Samir [Molecular Express; Kraus, George A. [Iowa State University; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit [Ames Laboratory

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  18. Ago1 Interacts with RNA polymerase II and binds to the promoters of actively transcribed genes in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Huang

    Full Text Available Argonaute proteins are often credited for their cytoplasmic activities in which they function as central mediators of the RNAi platform and microRNA (miRNA-mediated processes. They also facilitate heterochromatin formation and establishment of repressive epigenetic marks in the nucleus of fission yeast and plants. However, the nuclear functions of Ago proteins in mammalian cells remain elusive. In the present study, we combine ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with massively parallel sequencing with biochemical assays to show that nuclear Ago1 directly interacts with RNA Polymerase II and is widely associated with chromosomal loci throughout the genome with preferential enrichment in promoters of transcriptionally active genes. Additional analyses show that nuclear Ago1 regulates the expression of Ago1-bound genes that are implicated in oncogenic pathways including cell cycle progression, growth, and survival. Our findings reveal the first landscape of human Ago1-chromosomal interactions, which may play a role in the oncogenic transcriptional program of cancer cells.

  19. Dissection of immune gene networks in primary melanoma tumors critical for antitumor surveillance of patients with stage II-III resectable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Chang, Rui; Pham, Lisa; Phelps, Robert G; Harcharik, Sara T; Hall, Lawrence D; Bernardo, Sebastian G; Moskalenko, Marina M; Sivendran, Meera; Fu, Yichun; de Moll, Ellen H; Pan, Michael; Moon, Jee Young; Arora, Sonali; Cohain, Ariella; DiFeo, Analisa; Ferringer, Tammie C; Tismenetsky, Mikhail; Tsui, Cindy L; Friedlander, Philip A; Parides, Michael K; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Lebwohl, Mark G; Wolchok, Jedd D; Bhardwaj, Nina; Burakoff, Steven J; Oh, William K; Palucka, Karolina; Merad, Miriam; Schadt, Eric E; Saenger, Yvonne M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with resected stage II-III cutaneous melanomas remain at high risk for metastasis and death. Biomarker development has been limited by the challenge of isolating high-quality RNA for transcriptome-wide profiling from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumor specimens. Using NanoString technology, RNA from 40 stage II-III FFPE primary melanomas was analyzed and a 53-immune-gene panel predictive of non-progression (area under the curve (AUC)=0.920) was defined. The signature predicted disease-specific survival (DSS P<0.001) and recurrence-free survival (RFS P<0.001). CD2, the most differentially expressed gene in the training set, also predicted non-progression (P<0.001). Using publicly available microarray data from 46 primary human melanomas (GSE15605), a coexpression module enriched for the 53-gene panel was then identified using unbiased methods. A Bayesian network of signaling pathways based on this data identified driver genes. Finally, the proposed 53-gene panel was confirmed in an independent test population of 48 patients (AUC=0.787). The gene signature was an independent predictor of non-progression (P<0.001), RFS (P<0.001), and DSS (P=0.024) in the test population. The identified driver genes are potential therapeutic targets, and the 53-gene panel should be tested for clinical application using a larger data set annotated on the basis of prospectively gathered data.

  20. Development of a simultaneous high resolution typing method for three SLA class II genes, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 and the analysis of SLA class II haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, MinhThong; Choi, Hojun; Choi, Min-Kyeung; Cho, Hyesun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk; Cha, Se-Yeon; Seo, Kunho; Dadi, Hailu; Park, Chankyu

    2015-06-15

    The characterization of the genetic variations of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is essential to understand the relationship between the genetic diversity of MHC molecules and disease resistance and susceptibility in adaptive immunity. We previously reported the development of high-resolution individual locus typing methods for three of the most polymorphic swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class II loci, namely, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1. In this study, we extensively modified our previous protocols and developed a method for the simultaneous amplification of the three SLA class II genes and subsequent analysis of individual loci using direct sequencing. The unbiased and simultaneous amplification of alleles from the all three hyper-polymorphic and pseudogene containing genes such as MHC genes is extremely challenging. However, using this method, we demonstrated the successful typing of SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 for 31 selected individuals comprising 26 different SLA class II haplotypes which were identified from 700 animals using the single locus typing methods. The results were identical to the known genotypes from the individual locus typing. The new method has significant benefits over the individual locus typing, including lower typing cost, use of less biomaterial, less effort and fewer errors in handling large samples for multiple loci. We also extensively characterized the haplotypes of SLA class II genes and reported three new haplotypes. Our results should serve as a basis to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms of MHC class II and differences in immune responses to exogenous antigens.

  1. Bioavailability of polyglutamyl folic acid relative to that of monoglutamyl folic acid in subjects with different genotypes of the glutamate carboxypeptidase II gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse-Boonstra, A.; Lievers, K.J.; Blom, H.J.; Verhoef, P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Before dietary folate is absorbed, polyglutamate folates are deconjugated to monoglutamates by folylpoly-gamma-glutamyl carboxypeptidase in the small intestine. The 1561T allele of the glutamate carboxypeptidase II gene (GCPII), which codes for folylpoly-gamma-glutamyl carboxypeptidase,

  2. Treatment of lymphoid cells with the topoisomerase II poison etoposide leads to an increased juxtaposition of AML1 and ETO genes on the surface of nucleoli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razin S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available AML1 and ETO genes are known partners in the t(8,21 translocation associated with the treatment-related leukaemias in the patients receiving chemotherapy with DNA-topoisomerase II (topo II poisons. Aim. To determine whether the genes AML1 and ETO are in close proximity either permanently or temporarily in the nucleus. Methods. 3D FISH. Results. We found that in 5 % of untreated cells, alleles of AML1 and ETO are in close proximity. This number increased two-fold in the cells treated with the topo II poison etoposide. Surprisingly, in more than 50 % of the cases observed, co-localization of the genes occurred at the nucleoli surface. We found also that the treatment of cells triggers preferential loading of RAD51 onto bcr of the AML1 and ETO genes. Conclusions. Our results suggest that the repair of DNA lesions introduced by topoisomerase II poisons may be mediated simultaneously by multiple mechanisms, which may be the cause of mistakes resulting in translocations.

  3. Expression of a partially deleted gene of human type II procollagen (COL2A1) in transgenic mice produces a chondrodysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberg, P.; Khillan, J.S.; Prockop, D.J.; Helminen, H.; Kontusaari, S.; Ala-Kokko, L. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1991-09-01

    A minigene version of the human gene for type II procollagen (COL2AI) was prepared that lacked a large central region containing 12 of the 52 exons and therefore 291 of the 1523 codons of the gene. The construct was modeled after sporadic in-frame deletions of collagen genes that cause synthesis of shortened pro{alpha} chains that associate with normal pro{alpha} chains and thereby cause degradation of the shortened and normal pro{alpha} chains through a process called procollagen suicide. The gene construct was used to prepare five lines of transgenic mice expressing the minigene. A large proportion of the mice expressing the minigene developed a phenotype of a chondrodysplasia with dwarfism, short and thick limbs, a short snout, a cranial bulge, a cleft palate, and delayed mineralization of bone. A number of mice died shortly after birth. Microscopic examination of cartilage revealed decreased density and organization of collagen fibrils. In cultured chondrocytes from the transgenic mice, the minigene was expressed as shortened pro{alpha}1(II) chains that were disulfide-linked to normal mouse pro{alpha}1(II) chains. Therefore, the phenotype is probably explained by depletion of the endogenous mouse type II procollagen through the phenomenon of procollagen suicide.

  4. Mutation of a type II keratin gene (K6a) in pachyonychia congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, P E; Haley, J L; Kansky, A; Rothnagel, J A; Jones, D O; Turner, R J

    1995-07-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple ectodermal abnormalities. Patients with Jadassohn-Lewandowsky Syndrome (MIM #167200; PC-1) have nail defects (onchyogryposis), palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, follicular hyperkeratosis and oral leukokeratosis. Those with the rarer Jackson-Lawler Syndrome (MIM #167210; PC-2) lack oral involvement but have natal teeth and cutaneous cysts. Ultra-structural studies have identified abnormal keratin tonofilaments and linkage to the keratin gene cluster on chromosome 17 has been found in PC families. Keratins are the major structural proteins of the epidermis and associated appendages and the nail, hair follicle, palm, sole and tongue are the main sites of constitutive K6, K16 and K17 expression. Furthermore, mutations in K16 and K17 have recently been identified in some PC patients. Although we did not detect K16 or K17 mutations in PC families from Slovenia, we have found a heterozygous deletion in a K6 isoform (K6a) in the affected members of one family. This 3 bp deletion (AAC) in exon 1 of K6a removes a highly conserved asparagine residue (delta N170) from position 8 of the 1A helical domain (delta N8). This is the first K6a mutation to be described and this heterozygous K6a deletion is sufficient to explain the pathology observed in this PC-1 family.

  5. HLA class II genes in Latvian patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I; Denisova, A; Sochnev, A; Nilsson, B; Sanjeevi, C B

    1997-01-01

    PCR-based HLA genotyping was used to analyze the association of HLA-DR and -DQ genes in 127 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients and 111 population-based controls from Latvia. The results show DQA1*03 to be positively associated in overall patients and DRB1*01-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 to be negatively associated with JRA in overall patients and in polyarthritis patients compared to controls. These data indicate the immunogenetic heterogeneity in the JRA patients, in the disease subgroups and in different ethnic groups. Rheumatoid factor (RF) was assayed in patients (n = 119) and controls (n = 98). RF was present in patients (7/119, 6%) compared to controls (5/98, 5%). None of the DQA1, DQB1 alleles, DQ and DR-DQ haplotypes was associated in seropositive patients compared to seropositive controls. DR1-DQ5 (DQA1*0101-B*0501) was decreased in seronegative patients (11/111, 10%) compared to seronegative controls (24/105, 23%), but the difference was not significant after correction of the p value.

  6. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  7. The broken MLL gene is frequently located outside the inherent chromosome territory in human lymphoid cells treated with DNA topoisomerase II poison etoposide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I Glukhov

    Full Text Available The mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL gene is frequently rearranged in secondary leukaemias, in which it could fuse to a variety of different partners. Breakage in the MLL gene preferentially occurs within a ~8 kb region that possesses a strong DNA topoisomerase II cleavage site. It has been proposed that DNA topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage within this and other regions triggers translocations that occur due to incorrect joining of broken DNA ends. To further clarify a possible mechanism for MLL rearrangements, we analysed the frequency of MLL cleavage in cells exposed to etoposide, a DNA topoisomerase II poison commonly used as an anticancer drug, and positioning of the broken 3'-end of the MLL gene in respect to inherent chromosomal territories. It was demonstrated that exposure of human Jurkat cells to etoposide resulted in frequent cleavage of MLL genes. Using MLL-specific break-apart probes we visualised cleaved MLL genes in ~17% of nuclei. Using confocal microscopy and 3D modelling, we demonstrated that in cells treated with etoposide and cultivated for 1 h under normal conditions, ~9% of the broken MLL alleles were present outside the chromosome 11 territory, whereas in both control cells and cells inspected immediately after etoposide treatment, virtually all MLL alleles were present within the chromosomal territory. The data are discussed in the framework of the "breakage first" model of juxtaposing translocation partners. We propose that in the course of repairing DNA topoisomerase II-mediated DNA lesions (removal of stalled DNA topoisomerase II complexes and non-homologous end joining, DNA ends acquire additional mobility, which allows the meeting and incorrect joining of translocation partners.

  8. Construction of expression vector containing glnA gene and detection of NPT II activity in the transgenic rice calli using 32P-labelled compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glnA gene encoding glutamine synthetase (GS) was amplified from Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 by PCR technique. the amplified 1.4 kb DNA fragment was cloned at the EcoRV site of Bluescript-SK. Both sequencing and restriction digestion data showed that the 1.4 kb DNA fragment flanked with BamHI site at each end was really the glnA gene of A. brasilense Sp7. The glnA gene was ligated with Bg1 II site of pCo24. As a result, an expression vector pGSC35 with CaMV35S promoter was obtained. Using colony in situ hybridization with α-32P-dATP labelled probes to screen the positive clones, another glnA gene expression vector pAGNB92 with rice actin 1 promoter was constructed after three rounds of ligation and transformation. Protoplasts isolated from rice cell suspension line cv. T986 were transformed with glnA expression vectors pGSC35 and pAGNB92 containing neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) gene by using PEG fusion and electroporation. Transformed microcalli were selected on media containing G418 disulfate salt. NPT II activity was detected in 37% of G418 resistant calli by using dot blot hybridization with γ-32P-ATP and kanamycin as substrate

  9. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of phase II drug metabolizing/antioxidant enzymes gene response by anticancer agent sulforaphane in rat lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-Yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-10-01

    This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (iv) administration of an anticancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN). SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of each of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted and converted to cDNA, quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed, and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko's indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus and bootstrap method. SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5-fold) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increases (>5-fold) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus and the bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after iv administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD response of lymphocyte mRNA expression is

  11. El socratismo de Diógenes Laercio. Vidas de los filósofos ilustres (libro II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gerena Carrillo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se trata de mostrar que en el libro II de las Vidas de los filósofos ilustres, Diógenes Laercio establece los rasgos que distinguen como tales a los principales socráticos menores (Jenofonte, Esquines Aristipo y Euclides. De acuerdo con esto, se sostiene que para Laercio los socráticos son aquellos que escribieron diálogos socráticos, pero principalmente quienes elaboraron una propuesta de vida buena a partir de su relación con Sócrates y, en este sentido, sustentada en supuestos filosóficos que se pueden considerar socráticos, especialmente el supuesto de que el conocimiento es el bien. Esta lectura de Laercio es importante porque nos permite pensar a los socráticos como un movimiento con rasgos comunes, que desarrolla la ética, la cual, según Laercio, introduce Sócrates como una disciplina distinta de la física y la dialéctica, pero que constituye una nueva forma de filosofía: una cuyo problema es cómo vivir bien, pero que elabora sus propuestas a partir del diálogo y la confrontación, entendiéndose esto por conocimiento.   Palabras clave: Sócrates, socratismo, filosofía socrática   The Socrates of Diogenes Laertius. Lives of Eminent Philosophers (book II This paper aims is to show that in book II of the Lives of Eminent Philosophers, Diogenes Laertius establishes the distinctive traits of the minor Socratics (Xenophon, Aeschines, Aristippus and Euclid. Accordingly for Laertius, the socratics wrote socratic dialogues, and mainly those who made a proposal of a good life from their relation with Socrates and based on philosophical suppositions that can be considered Socratic, specially that the knowledge is good. This interpretation of Laertius is important because we think of the Socratics as a movement with common traits, that developed the ethics, which according to Laertius, Socrates introduced as a distinct discipline of physics and dialectic, but it is a new form of philosophy: one in which the

  12. Immature transformed rat islet beta-cells differentially express C-peptides derived from the genes coding for insulin I and II as well as a transfected human insulin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Petersen, J S; Andersen, L C;

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing unique sequences in rat proinsulin C-peptide I and II were used to generate highly specific antisera, which, when applied on sections of normal rat pancreas, confirm a homogeneous coexpression of the two C-peptides in all islet beta-cells. Insulin gene expression...... of transcription.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  13. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogensen Knud

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, experimentally characterized mammalian genes may be used to annotate fish genomes. However, gene families that escape this principle include the rapidly diverging cytokines that regulate the immune system, and their receptors. A classic example is the class II helical cytokines (HCII including type I, type II and lambda interferons, IL10 related cytokines (IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24 and IL26 and their receptors (HCRII. Despite the report of a near complete pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes genome sequence, these genes remain undescribed in fish. Results We have used an original strategy based both on conserved amino acid sequence and gene structure to identify HCII and HCRII in the genome of another pufferfish, Tetraodon nigroviridis that is amenable to laboratory experiments. The 15 genes that were identified are highly divergent and include a single interferon molecule, three IL10 related cytokines and their potential receptors together with two Tissue Factor (TF. Some of these genes form tandem clusters on the Tetraodon genome. Their expression pattern was determined in different tissues. Most importantly, Tetraodon interferon was identified and we show that the recombinant protein can induce antiviral MX gene expression in Tetraodon primary kidney cells. Similar results were obtained in Zebrafish which has 7 MX genes. Conclusion We propose a scheme for the evolution of HCII and their receptors during the radiation of bony vertebrates and suggest that the diversification that played an important role in the fine-tuning of the ancestral mechanism for host defense against infections probably followed different pathways in amniotes and fish.

  14. Angiotensin II modulates interleukin-1{beta}-induced inflammatory gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells via interfering with ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shanqin [Vascular Biology Unit, Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Zhi, Hui [Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hou, Xiuyun [Vascular Biology Unit, Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jiang, Bingbing, E-mail: bjiang1@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Vascular Biology Unit, Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine how angiotensin II modulates ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk and gene expression. {yields} Angiotensin II suppresses IL-1{beta}-induced prolonged ERK and NF-{kappa}B activation. {yields} ERK-RSK1 signaling is required for IL-1{beta}-induced prolonged NF-{kappa}B activation. {yields} Angiotensin II modulates NF-{kappa}B responsive genes via regulating ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk. {yields} ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk is a novel mechanism regulating inflammatory gene expression. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II is implicated in cardiovascular diseases, which is associated with a role in increasing vascular inflammation. The present study investigated how angiotensin II modulates vascular inflammatory signaling and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. In cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), angiotensin II suppressed interleukin-1{beta}-induced prolonged phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK)-1, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, leading to decreased iNOS but enhanced VCAM-1 expression, associated with an up-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression. Knock-down of RSK1 selectively down regulated interleukin-1{beta}-induced iNOS expression without influencing VCAM-1 expression. In vivo experiments showed that interleukin-1{beta}, iNOS, and VCAM-1 expression were detectable in the aortic arches of both wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice. VCAM-1 and iNOS expression were higher in ApoE{sup -/-} than in wild type mouse aortic arches. Angiotensin II infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day, for 6 days, via subcutaneous osmotic pump) in ApoE{sup -/-} mice enhanced endothelial and adventitial VCAM-1 and iNOS expression, but reduced medial smooth muscle iNOS expression associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK and RSK-1. These results indicate that angiotensin

  15. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants.

  16. The expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiichi; Ashizawa, Koji; Gohma, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Tadahiro; Narumi, Kazunori; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Tatemoto, Hideki; Nakada, Tadashi; Nagai, Kenji

    2006-12-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and an ER antagonist on the expression of Hedgehog genes (Indian hedgehog: Ihh; Desert hedgehog: Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Patched 1: Ptc1; glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1: Gli1; chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II: Coup-TfII) in the rat uterus. Immature female rats were administered once with 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol (EE, an ER agonist), propyl pyrazole triole (PPT, an ERalpha-selective agonist), diarylpropionitrile (DPN, an ERbeta-selective agonist), or ICI 182,780 (an ER antagonist). Expression of mRNA for Ihh, Dhh, and Ptc1 was dose-dependently downregulated by EE in the uterus of immature rats, mediated by ER as confirmed by coadministration of ICI 182,780. The mRNA expression levels of Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII were simultaneously downregulated during the period in which the mRNA expression levels of Ihh and Dhh were downregulated in the uterus after administration of EE. PPT downregulated the transcription of Ihh, Dhh, Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII, indicating that expression of these genes was regulated by the ERalpha-dependent pathway. DPN also downregulated the transcription of Ihh and Dhh, although the effect was weaker than that of PPT, indicating that the regulation of uterine Ihh and Dhh transcription was also affected by the ERbeta-dependent pathway. These results suggest that the expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats. PMID:17109907

  17. Sequence Analysis of Inducible Prophage phIS3501 Integrated into the Haemolysin II Gene of Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis ATCC35646

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouziane Moumen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheic food poisoning by bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group is mostly due to several toxins encoded in the genomes. One of them, cytotoxin K, was recently identified as responsible for severe necrotic syndromes. Cytotoxin K is similar to a class of proteins encoded by genes usually annotated as haemolysin II (hlyII in the majority of genomes of the B. cereus group. The partially sequenced genome of Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis ATCC35646 contains several potentially induced prophages, one of them integrated into the hlyII gene. We determined the complete sequence and established the genomic organization of this prophage-designated phIS3501. During induction of excision of this prophage with mitomycin C, intact hlyII gene is formed, thus providing to cells a genetic ability to synthesize the active toxin. Therefore, this prophage, upon its excision, can be implicated in the regulation of synthesis of the active toxin and thus in the virulence of bacterial host. A generality of selection for such systems in bacterial pathogens is indicated by the similarity of this genetic arrangement to that of Staphylococcus aureus  β-haemolysin.

  18. Swine leukocyte antigen class II genes (SLA-DRA, SLA-DRB1, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1) polymorphism and genotyping in Guizhou minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Z; Xia, J H; Xin, L L; Wang, Z G; Qian, L; Wu, S G; Yang, S L; Li, K

    2015-11-30

    The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex harbors highly polymorphic gene clusters encoding glycoproteins that are involved in responses to vaccines, infectious disease, and production performance. Pigs with well-defined SLA class II genes are useful for the study of disease, immunology, and vaccines. In this study, we analyzed four SLA class II genes (SLA-DRA, SLA-DRB1, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1) in 22 founder Guizhou minipigs using a sequence-based typing method. Twelve alleles were detected, compared with the SLA class II allele sequences in the GenBank, and one of twelve alleles was found to be novel in Guizhou minipigs. There are four SLA II haplotypes, and one of them has been previously reported in Meishan pigs. Furthermore, based on sequence information of these alleles, we developed a simple SLA typing method implemented to SLA-typing for unknown offspring of Guizhou minipigs, relying on designed twelve sequence specific primers that could discriminate between each other. According to the combination of sequence-based typing and PCR-SSP, we were able to rapidly check SLA typing of Guizhou breeding stock and identified four SLA haplotypes in the herd. Therefore, SLA-defined Guizhou minipigs will be useful as animal models for xenotransplantation and immunological research.

  19. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidumrepeat) genes (tprE, tprG and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors, including four catabolite activator protein homologues. In this work, sequences matching the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homologue, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator that influences tpr promoter activity.

  20. CNS-directed gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motas, Sandra; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Roca, Carles; Sánchez, Víctor; Molas, Maria; Bertolin, Joan; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by severe neurologic and somatic disease caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme that catabolizes the glycosaminoglycans heparan and dermatan sulphate. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) currently constitutes the only approved therapeutic option for MPSII. However, the inability of recombinant IDS to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits ERT efficacy in treating neurological symptoms. Here, we report a gene therapy approach for MPSII through direct delivery of vectors to the CNS. Through a minimally invasive procedure, we administered adeno-associated virus vectors encoding IDS (AAV9-Ids) to the cerebrospinal fluid of MPSII mice with already established disease. Treated mice showed a significant increase in IDS activity throughout the encephalon, with full resolution of lysosomal storage lesions, reversal of lysosomal dysfunction, normalization of brain transcriptomic signature, and disappearance of neuroinflammation. Moreover, our vector also transduced the liver, providing a peripheral source of therapeutic protein that corrected storage pathology in visceral organs, with evidence of cross-correction of nontransduced organs by circulating enzyme. Importantly, AAV9-Ids-treated MPSII mice showed normalization of behavioral deficits and considerably prolonged survival. These results provide a strong proof of concept for the clinical translation of our approach for the treatment of Hunter syndrome patients with cognitive impairment.

  1. Refactoring the Six-Gene Photosystem II Core in the Chloroplast of the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Scranton, Melissa A; Li, Daphne; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2016-07-15

    Oxygenic photosynthesis provides the energy to produce all food and most of the fuel on this planet. Photosystem II (PSII) is an essential and rate-limiting component of this process. Understanding and modifying PSII function could provide an opportunity for optimizing photosynthetic biomass production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct. Complementation of the knockout strain with the core PSII synthetic module from three different green algae resulted in reconstitution of photosynthetic activity to 85, 55, and 53% of that of the wild-type, demonstrating that the PSII core can be exchanged between algae species and retain function. The strains, synthetic cassettes, and refactoring strategy developed for this study demonstrate the potential of synthetic biology approaches for tailoring oxygenic photosynthesis and provide a powerful tool for unraveling PSII structure-function relationships. PMID:26214707

  2. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  3. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilkinson, J.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Geisler, J.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Refactoring the Six-Gene Photosystem II Core in the Chloroplast of the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Scranton, Melissa A; Li, Daphne; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2016-07-15

    Oxygenic photosynthesis provides the energy to produce all food and most of the fuel on this planet. Photosystem II (PSII) is an essential and rate-limiting component of this process. Understanding and modifying PSII function could provide an opportunity for optimizing photosynthetic biomass production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct. Complementation of the knockout strain with the core PSII synthetic module from three different green algae resulted in reconstitution of photosynthetic activity to 85, 55, and 53% of that of the wild-type, demonstrating that the PSII core can be exchanged between algae species and retain function. The strains, synthetic cassettes, and refactoring strategy developed for this study demonstrate the potential of synthetic biology approaches for tailoring oxygenic photosynthesis and provide a powerful tool for unraveling PSII structure-function relationships.

  5. UV-B-induced differential transcription of psbA genes encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-B irradiation of intact Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells results in the loss of photosystem II activity, which can be repaired via de novo synthesis of the D1 (and D2) reaction center subunits. In this study, we investigated the effect of UV-B irradiation on the transcription of the psbA2 and psbA3 genes encoding identical D1 proteins. We show that UV-B irradiation increases the level of psbA2 mRNA 2-3-fold and, more dramatically, it induces a 20-30-fold increase in the accumulation of the psbA3 mRNA even at levels of irradiation too low to produce losses of either photosystem II activity or D1 protein. The induction of psbA3 transcript accumulation is specific for UV-B light (290-330 nm). Low intensity UV-A emission (330-390 nm) and white light induce only a small, at most, 2-3-fold enhancement, whereas no effect of blue light was observed. Expression patterns of chimeric genes containing the promoter regions of the psbA2, psbA3 genes fused to the firefly luciferase (luc) reporter gene indicate that (i) transcription of psbA2/luc and psbA3/luc transgenes was elevated, similarly to that of the endogenous psbA genes, by UV-B irradiation, and that (ii) a short, 80-base pair psbA3 promoter fragment is sufficient to maintain UV-B-induced transcription of the luc reporter gene. Furthermore, our findings indicate that UV-B-induced expression of the psbA2 and psbA3 genes is a defense response against UV-B stress, which is regulated, at least, partially at the level of transcription and does not require active electron transport

  6. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen β and α chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both β and α) gene products, respectively, all of which being ˜90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to β2-microglobulin (β2M). The membraneembedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II α chains than to class II β chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a β2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  7. Towards the simplification of MHC typing protocols: targeting classical MHC class II genes in a passerine, the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canal David

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC has drawn the attention of evolutionary biologists due to its importance in crucial biological processes, such as sexual selection and immune response in jawed vertebrates. However, the characterization of classical MHC genes subjected to the effects of natural selection still remains elusive in many vertebrate groups. Here, we have tested the suitability of flanking intron sequences to guide the selective exploration of classical MHC genes driving the co-evolutionary dynamics between pathogens and their passerine (Aves, Order Passeriformes hosts. Findings Intronic sequences flanking the usually polymorphic exon 2 were isolated from different species using primers sitting on conserved coding regions of MHC class II genes (β chain. Taking the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca as an example, we demonstrate that careful primer design can evade non-classical MHC gene and pseudogene amplification. At least four polymorphic and expressed loci were co-replicated using a single pair of primers in five non-related individuals (N = 28 alleles. The cross-amplification and preliminary inspection of similar MHC fragments in eight unrelated songbird taxa suggests that similar approaches can also be applied to other species. Conclusions Intron sequences flanking the usually polymorphic exon 2 may assist the specific investigation of classical MHC class II B genes in species characterized by extensive gene duplication and pseudogenization. Importantly, the evasion of non-classical MHC genes with a more specific function and non-functional pseudogenes may accelerate data collection and diminish lab costs. Comprehensive knowledge of gene structure, polymorphism and expression profiles may be useful not only for the selective examination of evolutionarily relevant genes but also to restrict chimera formation by minimizing the number of co-amplifying loci.

  8. A second mutation in the type II procollagen gene (COL2AI) causing stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy) is also a premature termination codon.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, N N; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Zackai, E H; Knowlton, R G; LaRossa, D; DiMascio, J; Prockop, D J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analyses suggest that mutations in type II collagen may be responsible for Stickler syndrome, or arthro-ophthalmopathy (AO), in many families. In the present study oligonucleotide primers were developed to amplify and directly sequence eight of the first nine exons of the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1). Analysis of the eight exons in 10 unrelated probands with AO revealed that one had a single-base mutation in one allele that changed the codon of -CGA- for arginine at a...

  9. Gene knockout mice establish a primary protective role for major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted responses in Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, R P; Feilzer, K; Tumas, D B

    1995-01-01

    Mice with disrupted beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m-/-), I-A (class II-/-), or CD4 (CD4-/-) genes were examined for their capacity to resolve Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection. C57BL/6 and beta 2m-/- mice resolved infection similarly and were culture negative by 4 to 5 weeks following infection. Conversely, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-/- mice failed to resolve infection, and CD4-/- mice showed a significant delay (2 weeks). Secondary challenge of C57BL/6, beta 2m...

  10. TaqMan Probe-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Discrimination of Class I, II, and III tfdA Genes in Soils Treated with Phenoxy Acid Herbicides▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Bælum, Jacob; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2009-01-01

    Separate quantification of three classes of tfdA genes was performed using TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR for 13 different soils subsequent to mineralization of three phenoxy acids. Class III tfdA genes were found to be involved in mineralization more often than class I and II tfdA genes.

  11. A nonsense nucleotide substitution in the oculocutaneous albinism II gene underlies the original pink-eyed dilution allele (Oca2p ) in mice

    OpenAIRE

    SHOJI, Haruka; Kiniwa, Yukiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yang, Mu; Higuchi, Keiichi; Mori, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The original pink-eyed dilution (p) on chromosome 7 is a very old spontaneous mutation in mice. The oculocutaneous albinism II (Oca2) gene has previously been identified as the p gene. Oca2 transcripts have been shown to be absent in the skin of SJL/J mice with the original p mutant allele (Oca2p ); however, the molecular genetic lesion underlying the original Oca2p allele has never been reported. The NCT mouse (commonly known as Nakano cataract mouse) has a pink-eyed dilution phenotype, whic...

  12. Assignment of Etfdh, Etfb, and Etfa to chromosomes 3, 7, and 13: The mouse homologs of genes respondible for glutaric acidemia type II in human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.A.; Dowler, L.L.; Angeloni, S.V. [UMKC School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Koeller, D.M. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein (composed of {alpha} and {beta} subunits) is an obligatory electron acceptor for several dehydrogenases and is located in the mitochondrial matrix. Electrons accepted by electron transfer flavo-protein (ETF) are transferred to the main mitochondrial respiratory chain by the way of ETF dehydrogenase (ETFDH). In humans, deficiency of ETF or ETFDH leads to glutaric acidemia type II, an inherited metabolic disorder that can be fatal in its neonatal form and is characterized by severe hypoketotic hypoglycemia and acidosis. We used cDNA probes for the Etfdh, Etfb, and Etfa genes to determine localization of these mouse genes to chromosomes 3, 7, and 13. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  13. The human tyrosine aminotransferase gene: characterization of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and haplotype analysis in a family with tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, E M; Natt, E; Grimm, T; Odievre, M; Scherer, G

    1988-07-01

    Deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) causes tyrosinemia type II, an autosomal recessively inherited disorder. Using a TAT cosmid clone, we have identified an MspI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) 5' to the TAT gene, with allele frequencies of 0.63 and 0.37. Analysis of the cloned maternal and paternal TAT alleles from a patient with tyrosinemia type II led to the identification of a HaeIII RFLP at the 3' end of the TAT gene, with allele frequencies of 0.94 and 0.06. The two RFLPs are 27 kb apart and in no allelic association. From haplotype frequencies, a polymorphism information content (PIC) value of 0.44 was obtained. The two RFLPs have allowed the unambiguous identification of the mutant TAT alleles in the patient's pedigree by haplotype analysis.

  14. Sequence polymorphism of two major histocompatibility (MH) class II B genes and their association with Vibrio anguillarum infection in half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Quanqi; Yu, Yan; Li, Shuo; Zhong, Qiwang; Sun, Yeying; Wang, Zhigang; Qi, Jie; Zhai, Jieming; Wang, Xubo

    2011-11-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B molecules play an important role in the adaptive immune response in fish. Previous study has reported that two highly polymorphic class II B genes, Cyse-DAB and Cyse-DBB exist in half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis). In this study, the polymorphism within exon 2 of the class II B genes following bacterial challenge was evaluated. Two hundred C. semilaevis individuals were injected intraperitoneally with Vibrio anguillarum. Muscle tissue from the first 20 dead and 20 of the survivors was collected for genotyping. Sixty alleles from the 40 individuals were isolated, of which 32 belonged to Cyse-DAB and 28 belonged to Cyse-DBB. The rate of d N (non-synonymous substitution) was higher than that of d S (synonymous substitution) in the PBRs (peptide binding residues) of both class II B genes. Conversely, the rate of d S was higher than d N in the non-PBRs and the complete exon 2 sequence. Thus, the results suggest that positive selection has occurred in the PBRs and purifying selection in the non-PBRs and exon 2. Thirteen class II B alleles were used to study the association between alleles and resistance to infection. Though not significant, alleles Cyse-DAB*0601, Cyse-DAB*0706, and Cyse-DBB*0101, Cyse-DBB*1301 were only found in surviving individuals and may represent alleles that have resistance against V. anguillarum infection. Alleles Cyse-DAB*0701 and Cyse-DAB*1301 were significantly more prevalent in dead individuals than in surviving ones and may represent alleles that are associated with increased susceptibility to V. anguillarum infection.

  15. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 Knockout Strains Enable Functional Analysis of Genes Required for Cyst Development and Latent Infection ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A.; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M.; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P.; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M.; Bzik, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8+ T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8+ T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission. PMID:21531875

  16. Identification of two major histocompatibility (MH) class II A genes and their association to Vibrio anguillarum infection in half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Wang, Xubo; Zhang, Quanqi; Wang, Zhigang; Qi, Jie; Yi, Qilin; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Yanan; Yu, Haiyang

    2012-03-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II antigens are important in vertebrate immune system. In the present study, the full cDNA sequence of class II A gene was synthesized by RACE-PCR from half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis), and its open reading frame (ORF) polymorphism was studied. The whole cDNA sequence was 992 bp in length, including the ORF with 717 bp. Twenty-five alleles were identified and clustered into two distinct groups according to the specific nucleotides/ amino acids in specific positions. Eleven alleles belonged to Cyse-DAA while fourteen alleles belonged to Cyse-DBA. Four Cyse-DAA alleles were observed in one individual, and three to five Cyse-DBA alleles were observed in each of the three detected individuals, which indicated that at least two loci existed in each gene. Moreover, in order to study the function of the alleles in resistance to infection, 200 individuals were intraperitoneally injected with Vibrio anguillarum and the first 20 dead individuals and 20 surviving ones were selected for genotype analysis. Fifty-six alleles were identified among the 40 individuals. Twenty-nine alleles belonged to Cyse-DAA and the other 27 alleles belonged to Cyse-DBA. Eighteen alleles were selected for studying their function in resistance to infection. Alleles Cyse-DAA*0201, Cyse-DAA*1101, Cyse-DBA*0401, Cyse-DBA*1102, Cyse-DBA*1801 and Cyse-DBA*2201 were identified only in surviving individuals, while alleles Cyse- DAA*0901, Cyse-DBA*1101 and Cyse-DBA*1401 occurred more frequently in dead individuals. This study confirmed the existence and polymorphism of two class II A genes as well as the relationship between alleles of class II A genes and disease susceptibility/ resistance in half-smooth tongue sole.

  17. Optimization of Streptomyces bacteriophage φC31 integrase system to prevent post integrative gene silencing in pulmonary type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aneja, Manish Kumar; Geiger, Johannes; Imker, Rabea; Üzgün, Senta; Kormann, Michael; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Maucksch, Christof; Rudolph, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    φC31 integrase has emerged as a potent tool for achieving long-term gene expression in different tissues. The present study aimed at optimizing elements of φC31 integrase system for alveolar type II cells. Luciferase and β-galactosidase activities were measured at different time points post transfection. 5-Aza-2'deoxycytidine (AZA) and trichostatin A (TSA) were used to inhibit DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) respectively. In A549 cells, expression of the integrase...

  18. Two Zebrafish Alcohol Dehydrogenases Share Common Ancestry with Mammalian Class I, II, IV, and V Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes but Have Distinct Functional Characteristics*

    OpenAIRE

    Reimers, Mark J.; Hahn, Mark E.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol is teratogenic to many vertebrates. We are utilizing zebrafish as a model system to determine whether there is an association between ethanol metabolism and ethanol-mediated developmental toxicity. Here we report the isolation and characterization of two cDNAs encoding zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). Phylogenetic analysis of these zebrafish ADHs indicates that they share a common ancestor with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V ADHs. The genes encoding these zebrafish ADHs have...

  19. Evolution of the P-type II ATPase gene family in the fungi and presence of structural genomic changes among isolates of Glomus intraradices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Ian R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P-type II ATPase gene family encodes proteins with an important role in adaptation of the cell to variation in external K+, Ca2+ and Na2+ concentrations. The presence of P-type II gene subfamilies that are specific for certain kingdoms has been reported but was sometimes contradicted by discovery of previously unknown homologous sequences in newly sequenced genomes. Members of this gene family have been sampled in all of the fungal phyla except the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; phylum Glomeromycota, which are known to play a key-role in terrestrial ecosystems and to be genetically highly variable within populations. Here we used highly degenerate primers on AMF genomic DNA to increase the sampling of fungal P-Type II ATPases and to test previous predictions about their evolution. In parallel, homologous sequences of the P-type II ATPases have been used to determine the nature and amount of polymorphism that is present at these loci among isolates of Glomus intraradices harvested from the same field. Results In this study, four P-type II ATPase sub-families have been isolated from three AMF species. We show that, contrary to previous predictions, P-type IIC ATPases are present in all basal fungal taxa. Additionally, P-Type IIE ATPases should no longer be considered as exclusive to the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota, since we also demonstrate their presence in the Zygomycota. Finally, a comparison of homologous sequences encoding P-type IID ATPases showed unexpectedly that indel mutations among coding regions, as well as specific gene duplications occur among AMF individuals within the same field. Conclusion On the basis of these results we suggest that the diversification of P-Type IIC and E ATPases followed the diversification of the extant fungal phyla with independent events of gene gains and losses. Consistent with recent findings on the human genome, but at a much smaller geographic scale, we provided evidence

  20. A Case of Transforming Growth Factor-β-Induced Gene-Related Oculorenal Syndrome: Granular Corneal Dystrophy Type II with a Unique Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Oyama, Yuko; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Many types of inherited renal diseases have ocular features that occasionally support a diagnosis. The following study describes an unusual example of a 40-year-old woman with granular corneal dystrophy type II complicated by renal involvement. These two conditions may coincidentally coexist; however, there are some reports that demonstrate an association between renal involvement and granular corneal dystrophy type II. Granular corneal dystrophy type II is caused by a mutation in the transforming growth factor-β-induced (TGFBI) gene. The patient was referred to us because of the presence of mild proteinuria without hematuria that was subsequently suggested to be granular corneal dystrophy type II. A kidney biopsy revealed various glomerular and tubular basement membrane changes and widening of the subendothelial space of the glomerular basement membrane by electron microscopy. However, next-generation sequencing revealed that she had no mutation in a gene that is known to be associated with monogenic kidney diseases. Conversely, real-time polymerase chain reaction, using a simple buccal swab, revealed TGFBI heteromutation (R124H). The TGFBI protein plays an important role in cell-collagen signaling interactions, including extracellular matrix proteins which compose the renal basement membrane. This mutation can present not only as corneal dystrophy but also as renal disease. TGFBI-related oculorenal syndrome may have been unrecognized. It is difficult to diagnose this condition without renal electron microscopic studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of nephropathy associated with a TGFBI mutation.

  1. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Loera-Castañeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12% harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn’t been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  2. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24701363

  3. Molecular cloning of cDNA of mammalian and chicken II gonadotropin-releasing hormones (mGnRHs and cGnRH-II) in the beluga (Huso huso) and the disruptive effect of methylmercury on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaei, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas; Edalat, Rozita; Adeli, Ahmad; Keyvanshokooh, Saeed

    2010-09-01

    Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) isoforms were identified in the beluga (Huso huso) brain by cDNA sequencing: prepro-mammalian GnRH (mGnRH) and prepro-chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II). The nucleotide sequences of the beluga mGnRH and cGnRH-II precursors are 273 and 258 base pairs (bp) long, encoding peptides of 91 and 86 amino acids, respectively. To investigate the effect of methylmercury (MeHg) on GnRH gene expression, animals were fed with four diets containing increasing levels of MeHg (0 mg kg(-1) [control]; 0.76 mg kg(-1) [low]; 7.8 mg kg(-1) [medium]; 16.22 mg kg(-1) [high]) for 32 days. The effects of MeHg on brain GnRH mRNA levels were evaluated by real-time PCR. A significant decrease in brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNA levels were detected in fish receiving high dietary MeHg dose compared to controls on day 11 (P < 0.05). On day 18 and 32, all treatment groups had significantly lower brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNA levels compared to the control group (P < 0.05). These findings demonstrate a disruptive role of MeHg on the level of brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNAs in immature beluga. PMID:19821139

  4. Use of meta-analysis to combine candidate gene association studies: application to study the relationship between the ESR PvuII polymorphism and sow litter size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Leopoldo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article investigates the application of meta-analysis on livestock candidate gene effects. The PvuII polymorphism of the ESR gene is used as an example. The association among ESR PvuII alleles with the number of piglets born alive and total born in the first (NBA1, TNB1 and later parities (NBA, TNB is reviewed by conducting a meta-analysis of 15 published studies including 9329 sows. Under a fixed effects model, litter size values were significantly lower in the "AA" genotype groups when compared with "AB" and "BB" homozygotes. Under the random effects model, the results were similar although differences between "AA" and "AB" genotype groups were not clearly significant for NBA and TNB. Nevertheless, the most noticeable result was the high and significant heterogeneity estimated among studies. This heterogeneity could be assigned to error sampling, genotype by environment interaction, linkage or epistasis, as referred to in the literature, but also to the hypothesis of population admixture/stratification. It is concluded that meta-analysis can be considered as a helpful analytical tool to synthesise and discuss livestock candidate gene effects. The main difficulty found was the insufficient information on the standard errors of the estimated genotype effects in several publications. Consequently, the convenience of publishing the standard errors or the concrete P-values instead of the test significance level should be recommended to guarantee the quality of candidate gene effect meta-analyses.

  5. The prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes (aac (6'-I, aac (6'-II, ant (2"-I, aph (3'-VI in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzam Vaziri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is one of the primary opportunistic pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections. Aminoglycosides are an import ant component of antipseudomonal chemotherapy. The inactivation of drugs by modifying enzymes is the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. OBJECTIVES: The inactivation of aminoglycosides by modifying enzymes is the primary resistance mechanism employed by P. aeruginosa. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of aminoglycoside resistance and the prevalence of four import ant modifying enzyme genes (aac (6'-I, aac (6'-II, ant (2"-I, aph (3'-VI in P. aeruginosa in Iran. METHODS: A total of 250 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from several hospitals in seven cities in Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests (using the disk diffusion method and E-tests were performed for all 250 isolates. In addition, all isolates were screened for the presence of modifying enzyme genes by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The resistance rates, as determined by the disk diffusion method, were as follows: gentamicin 43%, tobramycin 38%, and amikacin 24%. Of the genes examined, aac (6'-II (36% was the most frequently identified gene in phenotypic resist ant isolates, followed by ant (2"-I, aph (3'-VI, and aac (6'-I. CONCLUSIONS: Aminoglycoside resistance in P. aeruginosa remains a signific ant problem in Iran. Therefore, there is considerable local surveillance of aminoglycoside resistance.

  6. Multidrug resistance-associated protein gene overexpression and reduced drug sensitivity of topoisomerase II in a human breast carcinoma MCF7 cell line selected for etoposide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E; Horton, J K; Yang, C H; Nakagawa, M; Cowan, K H

    1994-01-01

    A human breast cancer cell line (MCF7/WT) was selected for resistance to etoposide (VP-16) by stepwise exposure to 2-fold increasing concentrations of this agent. The resulting cell line (MCF7/VP) was 28-, 21-, and 9-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and doxorubicin, respectively. MCF7/VP cells also exhibited low-level cross-resistance to 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide, mitoxantrone, and vincristine and no cross-resistance to genistein and camptothecin. Furthermore, these cells were collaterally sensitive to the alkylating agents melphalan and chlorambucil. DNA topoisomerase II levels were similar in both wild-type MCF7/WT and drug-resistant MCF7/VP cells. In contrast, topoisomerase II from MCF7/VP cells appeared to be 7-fold less sensitive to drug-induced cleavable complex formation in whole cells and 3-fold less sensitive in nuclear extracts than topoisomerase II from MCF7/WT cells. Although this suggested that the resistant cells may contain a qualitatively altered topoisomerase II, no mutations were detected in either the ATP-binding nor the putative breakage/resealing regions of either DNA topoisomerase II alpha or II beta. In addition, the steady-state intracellular VP-16 concentration was reduced by 2-fold in the resistant cells, in the absence of detectable mdr1/P-gp expression and without any change in drug efflux. In contrast, expression of the gene encoding the MRP was increased at least 10-fold in resistant MCF7/VP cells as compared to sensitive MCF7/WT cells. These results suggest that resistance to epipodophyllotoxins in MCF7/VP cells is multifactorial, involving a reduction in intracellular drug concentration, possibly as a consequence of MRP overexpression, and an altered DNA topoisomerase II drug sensitivity. PMID:7903202

  7. Global gene expression analysis of fission yeast mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation of the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Saberianfar

    Full Text Available In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the nuclear-localized Lsk1p-Lsc1p cyclin dependent kinase complex promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the heptad repeats found within the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain (CTD. Here, we first provide evidence supporting the existence of a third previously uncharacterized Ser-2 CTD kinase subunit, Lsg1p. As expected for a component of the complex, Lsg1p localizes to the nucleus, promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the CTD, and physically interacts with both Lsk1p and Lsc1p in vivo. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that lsg1Δ mutants--just like lsk1Δ and lsc1Δ strains--are compromised in their ability to faithfully and reliably complete cytokinesis. Next, to address whether kinase mediated alterations in CTD phosphorylation might selectively alter the expression of genes with roles in cytokinesis and/or the cytoskeleton, global gene expression profiles were analyzed. Mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation display little change with respect to the level of transcription of most genes. However, genes affecting cytokinesis--including the actin interacting protein gene, aip1--as well as genes with roles in meiosis, are included in a small subset that are differentially regulated. Significantly, genetic analysis of lsk1Δ aip1Δ double mutants is consistent with Lsk1p and Aip1p acting in a linear pathway with respect to the regulation of cytokinesis.

  8. Estrogen-dependent activation of the avian very low density apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin genes. Transient alterations in mRNA polyadenylation and stability early during induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, A W; Deeley, R G

    1988-10-01

    Administration of estrogen to egg-laying vertebrates activates unscheduled, hepatic expression of major, egg-yolk protein genes in immature animals and mature males. Two avian yolk protein genes, encoding very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) and vitellogenin II, are dormant prior to stimulation with estrogen, but within three days their cognate mRNAs accumulate to become two of the most abundant species in the liver. Accumulation of these mRNAs has been attributed to both induction of transcription and selective, estrogen-dependent mRNA stabilization. We have detected alterations in the size of apoVLDLII mRNA that occur during the first 24 hours that are attributable to a shift in the extent of polyadenylation as steady-state is approached. In vitro transcription assays indicate that primary activation of both genes takes place relatively slowly and that maximal rates of mRNA accumulation occur when the apoVLDLII and vitellogenin II genes are expressed at only 30% and 10% of their fully induced levels, respectively. Transcription data combined with the structural alteration of apoVLDLII mRNA suggest that stability of the two mRNAs may change as steady-state is approached. We have assessed the compatibility of this suggestion with earlier estimates of the kinetics of accumulation of both mRNAs by developing a generally useful algorithm that predicts approach to steady-state kinetics under conditions where both the rate of synthesis and mRNA stability change throughout the accumulation phase of the response. The results predict that the stability of both mRNAs decreases by at least two- to threefold during the approach to steady-state and that, although an additional destabilization of apoVLDLII mRNA may occur following withdrawal of estrogen, the steady-state stability of vitellogenin mRNA is not significantly decreased upon removal of hormone. PMID:3210227

  9. Distribution of genes associated with yield potential and water-saving in Chinese Zone II wheat detected by developed functional markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhenxian Gao; Zhanliang Shi; Aimin Zhang; Jinkao Guo

    2015-03-01

    Functional markers (FMs) developed from sequence polymorphisms are present in allelic variants of a functional gene at a locus and are directly associated with phenotypic variations. In this study, FM linked to Rht-B1, Rht-D1, TaCwi-A1, TaSus2-2B, TaGW2-6A and Dreb-B1 genes conferring to yield potential and water-saving were selected to analyse the distribution in 102 wheat varieties, most of which were authorized in the past decade and adapted to grow in Zone II of China. First, the semi-dwarfing genes Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b (mutant alleles) conferring to grain yield were analysed. The frequencies of favourable alleles Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b were 32.4 and 58.8%, respectively. Comparing with the previous report, the frequency of Rht-B1b among cultivars in this study is similar to the frequency among cultivars released in the 1990s, while the frequency of Rht-D1b is slightly lower than the previous report 63.9%. Twelve (11.8%) cultivars neither contained Rht-B1b nor Rht-D1b, while only Yumai 66 contained both semidwarfing genes. Linyuan8 and Xinong 928 are heterozygous at RhtB1 locus and Zhengmai 9023 is heterozygous at both RhtB1 and Rht-D1 loci. Second, the TaCwi-A1, TaSus2-2B and TaGW2-6A genes considered as candidate genes related to grain weight were detected. We found that the frequencies of the favourable alleles were 76.5, 56.9 and 69.6%, respectively. Among the 102 wheat varieties, 30 contained all the three favourable genes, 45 contained two of the three favourable genes and 27 contained only one. There are eight wheat varieties (7.8%) in hybrid state at the TaCWI-A1 locus. Third, the designed FM linked to water-saving gene Dreb-B1 were validated on 102 wheat varieties. The results showed that the haplotypes of 47 wheat varieties at the Dreb-B1 locus were same as that of Opata 85, and 55 wheat varieties showed the signal expected for W7984 (Opata 85 and W7984 are parents of the ITMI mapping population). This information will be useful for the wheat breeding

  10. Distribution of genes associated with yield potential and water-saving in Chinese Zone II wheat detected by developed functional markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenxian; Shi, Zhanliang; Zhang, Aimin; Guo, Jinkao

    2015-03-01

    Functional markers (FMs) developed from sequence polymorphisms are present in allelic variants of a functional gene at a locus and are directly associated with phenotypic variations. In this study, FM linked to Rht-B1, Rht-D1, TaCwi-A1, TaSus2-2B, TaGW2-6A and Dreb-B1 genes conferring to yield potential and water-saving were selected to analyse the distribution in 102 wheat varieties, most of which were authorized in the past decade and adapted to grow in Zone II of China. First, the semidwarfing genes Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b (mutant alleles) conferring to grain yield were analysed. The frequencies of favourable alleles Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b were 32.4 and 58.8%, respectively. Comparing with the previous report, the frequency of Rht-B1b among cultivars in this study is similar to the frequency among cultivars released in the 1990s, while the frequency of Rht-D1b is slightly lower than the previous report 63.9%. Twelve (11.8%) cultivars neither contained Rht-B1b nor Rht-D1b, while only Yumai 66 contained both semidwarfing genes. Linyuan8 and Xinong 928 are heterozygous at RhtB1 locus and Zhengmai 9023 is heterozygous at both RhtB1 and Rht-D1 loci. Second, the TaCwi-A1, TaSus2-2B and TaGW2-6A genes considered as candidate genes related to grain weight were detected. We found that the frequencies of the favourable alleles were 76.5, 56.9 and 69.6%, respectively. Among the 102 wheat varieties, 30 contained all the three favourable genes, 45 contained two of the three favourable genes and 27 contained only one. There are eight wheat varieties (7.8%) in hybrid state at the TaCWI-A1 locus. Third, the designed FM linked to water-saving gene Dreb-B1 were validated on 102 wheat varieties. The results showed that the haplotypes of 47 wheat varieties at the Dreb-B1 locus were same as that of Opata 85, and 55 wheat varieties showed the signal expected for W7984 (Opata 85 and W7984 are parents of the ITMI mapping population). This information will be useful for the wheat breeding

  11. Effects of alien and intraspecies cytoplasms on manifestation of nuclear genes for wheat resistance to brown rust: II. Specificity of cytoplasm influence on different Lr genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voluevich, E.A.; Buloichik, A.A.; Palilova, A.N. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Minsk (Belarus)

    1995-04-01

    Specificity of expression of the major nuclear genes Lr to two brown rust clones in hybrids with the same maternal cytoplasm was analyzed. It was evaluated by a resistant: susceptible ratio in the F{sub 2}. Reciprocal hybrids were obtained from the cross between the progeny of homozygous susceptible plants of the cultivar Penjamo 62 and its alloplasmatic lines carrying cytoplasms of Triticum dicoccoides var. fulvovillosum, Aegilops squarrosa var. typical, Agropyron trichophorum, and isogenic lines of the cultivar Thatcher (Th) with the Lr1, Lr9, Lr15, and Lr19 genes. It was shown that the effect of the Lr1 gene in the cytoplasm of cultivar Thatcher and in eu-, and alloplasmatic forms of Penjamo 62 was less expressed than that of other Lr genes. Cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (dicoccoides)-Penjamo 62 was the only exception: in the F{sub 2}, hybrids with Th (Lr1) had a higher yield of resistant forms than those with Th (Lr15). In the hybrid combinations studied, expression and/or transmission of the Lr19 gene was more significant than that of other genes. This gene had no advantages over Lr15 and Lr19 only in cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (squarrosa)-Penjamo 62. In certain hybrid cytoplasms, the display of the Lr1, Lr15, and Lr19 genes, in contrast to Lr9, varied with the virulence of the pathogen clones. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. A nonsense nucleotide substitution in the oculocutaneous albinism II gene underlies the original pink-eyed dilution allele (Oca2(p)) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Haruka; Kiniwa, Yukiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yang, Mu; Higuchi, Keiichi; Mori, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The original pink-eyed dilution (p) on chromosome 7 is a very old spontaneous mutation in mice. The oculocutaneous albinism II (Oca2) gene has previously been identified as the p gene. Oca2 transcripts have been shown to be absent in the skin of SJL/J mice with the original p mutant allele (Oca2(p)); however, the molecular genetic lesion underlying the original Oca2(p) allele has never been reported. The NCT mouse (commonly known as Nakano cataract mouse) has a pink-eyed dilution phenotype, which prompted us to undertake a molecular genetic analysis of the Oca2 gene of this strain. Our genetic linkage analysis suggests that the locus for the pink-eyed dilution phenotype of NCT is tightly linked to the Oca2 locus. PCR cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that the NCT mouse has a nonsense nucleotide substitution at exon 7 of the Oca2 gene. Examination of three mouse strains (NZW/NSlc, SJL/J, and 129X1/SvJJmsSlc) with the original Oca2(p) allele revealed the presence of a nonsense nucleotide substitution identical to that in the NCT strain. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Oca2 transcripts were absent in the skin of NCT mice, suggesting intervention of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Collectively, the data in this study indicate that the nonsense nucleotide substitution in the Oca2 gene underlies the Oca2(p) allele. Our data also indicate that the NCT mouse can be used not only as a cataract model, but also as a model for human type II oculocutaneous albinism.

  13. Ultraviolet-B responses of nuclear genes encoding light-harvesting complex II proteins in pea (Pisum sativum) are altered by norflurazon- and photobleaching-induced chloroplast changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of functional and intact chloroplasts in mediating the ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 290–320 nm) regulation of two nuclear genes encoding light-harvesting complex II proteins in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Extra Early Alaska) was studied. Plants with chloroplasts lacking or containing carotenoids and functional photosystem II were obtained by growth under dim red light (0.2 µmol m−2 s−1) in the presence or absence of norflurazon (NF), an inhibitor of carotenoid biosynthesis. The NF-treatment resulted in an increase in AB80 (lhcb1*2) mRNA but no substantial change in Cab-8 (lhcb1*4) mRNA, indicating that the mRNA accumulations for AB80 and Cab-8 were differently correlated with the presence and absence of carotenoids. The mRNA levels for both Cab-8 and AB80 in the NF-treated plants were reduced to the same extent by partially photobleaching the chloroplasts with 3 h of higher intensity white light (W, 110 µmol m−2 s−1), suggesting that chloroplast integrity was equally important for transcript accumulation of both genes. The mRNAs of both Cab-8 and AB80 in non-NF-treated control plants were decreased by UV-B irradiation, with the level of AB80 mRNA reduced to a greater extent. The UV-B-induced mRNA reduction of both genes was inhibited by NF. The difference between the UV-B responses of the two genes was unaffected by NF, but was abolished by photobleaching the NF-treated plants prior to the UV-B irradiation. Therefore, the presence of carotenoids enhanced rather than prevented the UV-B down-regulation, and the difference in UV-B responses of the two genes may be dependent on chloroplast integrity. (author)

  14. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology.

  15. TAT gene mutation analysis in three Palestinian kindreds with oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II; characterization of a silent exonic transversion that causes complete missplicing by exon 11 skipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maydan, G; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Madsen, Pia Pinholt;

    2006-01-01

    Deficiency of the hepatic cytosolic enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) causes marked hypertyrosinaemia leading to painful palmoplantar hyperkeratoses, pseudodendritic keratitis and variable mental retardation (oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II or Richner-Hanhart syndrome). Parents may......, we sought TAT gene mutations in 9 tyrosinaemia II patients from three consanguineous Palestinian kindreds. In two kindreds (7 patients), the only potential abnormality identified after sequencing all 12 exons and exon-intron boundaries was homozygosity for a silent, single-nucleotide transversion c...... the effect of c.1224G > T on exon 11 splicing. Transfection experiments with wild-type and c.1224G > T mutant minigene constructs demonstrated that c.1224G > T results in complete exon 11 skipping, illustrating the utility of this approach for confirming a putative splicing defect when cDNA is unavailable...

  16. Insulin-like growth factor I gene promoter polymorphism, collagen type II alpha1 (COL2A1) gene, and the prevalence of radiographic osteoarthritis: the Rotterdam Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Guangju; Duijn, Cock; Rivadeneira Ramirez, Fernando; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Bijkerk, Casper; Meurs, Joyce; Uitterlinden, André; Pols, Huib; Slagboom, Eline; Hofman, Albert

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To examine the role of an IGF-I gene promoter polymorphism in the prevalence of radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA), and study its interaction with the COL2A1 gene. METHODS: Individuals genotyped for IGF-I (n = 1546) and COL2A1 gene polymorphisms (n = 808) were selected from a random sample (n = 1583) derived from the Rotterdam study. The presence of ROA was defined as a Kellgren score of 2 or more in at least one of four joints (knee, hip, hand, and spine). Genotype spec...

  17. Interaction analysis between HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles and MHC class II transactivator CIITA gene with regard to risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ronninger

    Full Text Available HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE alleles are the strongest genetic determinants for autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the key regulators in expression of HLA class II receptors is MHC class II transactivator (CIITA. A variant of the CIITA gene has been found to associate with inflammatory diseases.We wanted to explore whether the risk variant rs3087456 in the CIITA gene interacts with the HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of developing RA. We tested this hypothesis in a case-control study with 11767 individuals from four European Caucasian populations (6649 RA cases and 5118 controls.We found no significant additive interaction for risk alleles among Swedish Caucasians with RA (n = 3869, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP = 0.2, 95%CI: -0.2-0.5 or when stratifying for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA presence (ACPA positive disease: n = 2945, AP = 0.3, 95%CI: -0.05-0.6, ACPA negative: n = 2268, AP = -0.2, 95%CI: -1.0-0.6. We further found no significant interaction between the main subgroups of SE alleles (DRB1*01, DRB1*04 or DRB1*10 and CIITA. Similar analysis of three independent RA cohorts from British, Dutch and Norwegian populations also indicated an absence of significant interaction between genetic variants in CIITA and SE alleles with regard to RA risk.Our data suggest that risk from the CIITA locus is independent of the major risk for RA from HLA-DRB1 SE alleles, given that no significant interaction between rs3087456 and SE alleles was observed. Since a biological link between products of these genes is evident, the genetic contribution from CIITA and class II antigens in the autoimmune process may involve additional unidentified factors.

  18. Expression and imprinting of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) and H19 genes in uterine leiomyomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainho, C A; Pontes, A; Rogatto, S R

    1999-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is defined as a gamete of origin-specific epigenetic modification of DNA leading to differential gene expression in the zygote. Several imprinted genes have been identified and some of them are associated with tumor development. We investigated the expression and the imprinting...

  19. Genetics and biology of human ovarian teratomas. II. Molecular analysis of origin of nondisjunction and gene-centromere mapping of chromosome I markers.

    OpenAIRE

    Deka, R; Chakravarti, A; Surti, U; Hauselman, E; Reefer, J; Majumder, P P; Ferrell, R E

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal heteromorphisms and DNA polymorphisms have been utilized to identify the mechanisms that lead to formation of human ovarian teratomas and to construct a gene-centromere map of chromosome 1 by using those teratomas that arise by meiotic nondisjunction. Of 61 genetically informative ovarian teratomas, 21.3% arose by nondisjunction at meiosis I, and 39.3% arose by meiosis II nondisjunction. Eight polymorphic marker loci on chromosome 1p and one marker on 1q were used to estimate a ge...

  20. DNA Topoisomerase I Gene Copy Number and mRNA Expression Assessed as Predictive Biomarkers for Adjuvant Irinotecan in Stage II/III Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Vainer, Ben; Nielsen, Signe L;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Prospective-retrospective assessment of the TOP1 gene copy number and TOP1 mRNA expression as predictive biomarkers for adjuvant irinotecan in stage II/III colon cancer (CC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays were obtained from an adjuvant CC trial......RNA data were available from 580 patients with stage III disease. Benefit of irinotecan was restricted to patients characterized by TOP1 mRNA expression ≥ 3rd quartile (RFS: HRadjusted, 0.59; P = .09; OS: HRadjusted, 0.44; P = 0.03). The treatment by TOP1 mRNA interaction was not statistically significant...

  1. The rnb gene of Synechocystis PCC6803 encodes a RNA hydrolase displaying RNase II and not RNase R enzymatic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute G Matos

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotic organisms that share characteristics with bacteria and chloroplasts regarding mRNA degradation. Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is a model organism for cyanobacteria, but not much is known about the mechanism of RNA degradation. Only one member of the RNase II-family is present in the genome of Synechocystis sp PCC6803. This protein was shown to be essential for its viability, which indicates that it may have a crucial role in the metabolism of Synechocystis RNA. The aim of this work was to characterize the activity of the RNase II/R homologue present in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The results showed that as expected, it displayed hydrolytic activity and released nucleoside monophosphates. When compared to two E. coli counterparts, the activity assays showed that the Synechocystis protein displays RNase II, and not RNase R characteristics. This is the first reported case where when only one member of the RNase II/R family exists it displays RNase II and not RNase R characteristics.

  2. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  3. Genomic organization of the human osteopontin gene: Exclusion of the locus from a causative role in the pathogenesis of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, A.H.; Edwards, S.J.; Murray, J.C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is the principal phosphorylated glycoprotein of bone that is also expressed in a limited number of other tissues including dentine. In the current investigation the authors report the genomic organization of the SPP1 gene, which comprises seven exons, six of which contain coding sequence. The splice sites for exon donor and acceptor positions are in close agreement with previously published consensus sequences. Comparison of the human gene with its murine and bovine counterparts revealed a highly homologous organization. A highly informative short tandem repeat polymorphism isolated at the SPP1 locus showed no recombination with the autosomal dominant disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta type II. Nevertheless, sequencing of each exon in individuals affected by this disorder failed to reveal any disease-specific mutations. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Activation of the retinoid X receptor modulates angiotensin II-induced smooth muscle gene expression and inflammation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Allison M B; Montford, John R; Horita, Henrick; Ostriker, Allison C; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Furgeson, Seth B

    2014-11-01

    The retinoid X receptor (RXR) partners with numerous nuclear receptors, such as the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) family, liver X receptors (LXRs), and farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Although each heterodimer can be activated by specific ligands, a subset of these receptors, defined as permissive nuclear receptors, can also be activated by RXR agonists known as rexinoids. Many individual RXR heterodimers have beneficial effects in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Because rexinoids can potently activate multiple RXR pathways, we hypothesized that treating SMCs with rexinoids would more effectively reverse the pathophysiologic effects of angiotensin II than an individual heterodimer agonist. Cultured rat aortic SMCs were pretreated with either an RXR agonist (bexarotene or 9-cis retinoic acid) or vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide) for 24 hours before stimulation with angiotensin II. Compared with dimethylsulfoxide, bexarotene blocked angiotensin II-induced SM contractile gene induction (calponin and smooth muscle-α-actin) and protein synthesis ([(3)H]leucine incorporation). Bexarotene also decreased angiotensin II-mediated inflammation, as measured by decreased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase but not extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) or protein kinase B (Akt) was also blunted by bexarotene. We compared bexarotene to five agonists of nuclear receptors (PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR, and FXR). Bexarotene had a greater effect on calponin reduction, MCP-1 inhibition, and p38 MAP kinase inhibition than any individual agonist. PPARγ knockout cells demonstrated blunted responses to bexarotene, indicating that PPARγ is necessary for the effects of bexarotene. These data demonstrate that RXR is a potent modulator of angiotensin II-mediated responses in the vasculature, partially through inhibition of p38. PMID:25169989

  5. Genotyping of major histocompatibility complex Class II DRB gene in Rohilkhandi goats by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kush Shrivastava

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class II DRB1 gene polymorphism in Rohilkhandi goat using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequencing techniques. Materials and Methods: DNA was isolated from 127 Rohilkhandi goats maintained at sheep and goat farm, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly. A 284 bp fragment of exon 2 of DRB1 gene was amplified and digested using BsaI and TaqI restriction enzymes. Population genetic parameters were calculated using Popgene v 1.32 and SAS 9.0. The genotypes were then sequenced using Sanger dideoxy chain termination method and were compared with related breeds/species using MEGA 6.0 and Megalign (DNASTAR software. Results: TaqI locus showed three and BsaI locus showed two genotypes. Both the loci were found to be in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE, however, population genetic parameters suggest that heterozygosity is still maintained in the population at both loci. Percent diversity and divergence matrix, as well as phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MHC Class II DRB1 gene of Rohilkhandi goats was found to be in close cluster with Garole and Scottish blackface sheep breeds as compared to other goat breeds included in the sequence comparison. Conclusion: The PCR-RFLP patterns showed population to be in HWE and absence of one genotype at one locus (BsaI, both the loci showed excess of one or the other homozygote genotype, however, effective number of alleles showed that allelic diversity is present in the population. Sequence comparison of DRB1 gene of Rohilkhandi goat with other sheep and goat breed assigned Rohilkhandi goat in divergence with Jamanupari and Angora goats.

  6. The pcz1 Gene, which Encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 Protein, Is Involved in the Control of Growth, Conidiation, and Conidial Germination in the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium roqueforti

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Gil-Durán; Juan F Rojas-Aedo; Exequiel Medina; Inmaculada Vaca; Ramón O García-Rico; Sebastián Villagrán; Gloria Levicán; Renato Chávez

    2015-01-01

    Proteins containing Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) domains are exclusively found in fungi and yeasts. Genes encoding this class of proteins are broadly distributed in fungi, but few of them have been functionally characterized. In this work, we have characterized a gene from the filamentous fungus Penicillium roqueforti that encodes a Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) protein, whose function to date remains unknown. We have named this gene pcz1. We showed that the expression of pcz1 is negatively regulated in a P. roqueforti...

  7. Genomic and proteomic profiling II: Comparative assessment of gene expression profiles in leiomyomas, keloids, and surgically-induced scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Li

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leiomyoma have often been compared to keloids because of their fibrotic characteristic and higher rate of occurrence among African Americans as compared to other ethnic groups. To evaluate such a correlation at molecular level this study comparatively analyzed leiomyomas with keloids, surgical scars and peritoneal adhesions to identify genes that are either commonly and/or individually distinguish these fibrotic disorders despite differences in the nature of their development and growth. Methods Microarray gene expression profiling and realtime PCR. Results The analysis identified 3 to 12% of the genes on the arrays as differentially expressed among these tissues based on P ranking at greater than or equal to 0.005 followed by 2-fold cutoff change selection. Of these genes about 400 genes were identified as differentially expressed in leiomyomas as compared to keloids/incisional scars, and 85 genes as compared to peritoneal adhesions (greater than or equal to 0.01. Functional analysis indicated that the majority of these genes serve as regulators of cell growth (cell cycle/apoptosis, tissue turnover, transcription factors and signal transduction. Of these genes the expression of E2F1, RUNX3, EGR3, TBPIP, ECM-2, ESM1, THBS1, GAS1, ADAM17, CST6, FBLN5, and COL18A was confirmed in these tissues using quantitative realtime PCR based on low-density arrays. Conclusion the results indicated that the molecular feature of leiomyomas is comparable but may be under different tissue-specific regulatory control to those of keloids and differ at the levels rather than tissue-specific expression of selected number of genes functionally regulating cell growth and apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue turnover.

  8. Short communication. An association between the G/A single nucleotide polymorphism within intron II of VIP gene and milk performance traits in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek W. Kmiec

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, which are present in the encoding part of the genes responsible for important breeding functions, exert an influence on the cattle’s phenotype since their function is to regulate the genes expression. In this study a G/A single nucleotide polymorphism within intron II of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP gene was detected. The study covered a herd of 185 Jersey dairy cows from the Wielkopolska Province in Poland. All possible VIP/DraI genotypes determined by using two alleles (AA, AG, GG were examined in the herd of cows under study. The AA genotype frequency was 0.48; AG 0.22, and GG 0.30. Allele A frequency was 0.592, whereas allele G was 0.408. Analyzed VIP/DraI gene polymorphism with respect to milk utility traits showed slight statistical differences in the percentage of fat and protein content in milk of the animals with different VIP/DraI genotypes. This study could have a significant influence on dairy cattle breeding programs in the future as improvements in genetic selection methods will continue to be important in milking management.

  9. Genetic variation of the MHC class II DRB genes in the Japanese weasel, Mustela itatsi, endemic to Japan, compared with the Siberian weasel, Mustela sibirica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Y; Abramov, A V; Kosintsev, P A; Lin, L-K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a critical role in vertebrate immune system and are highly polymorphic. To further understand the molecular evolution of the MHC genes, we compared MHC class II DRB genes between the Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi), a species endemic to Japan, and the Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), a closely related species on the continent. We sequenced a 242-bp region of DRB exon 2, which encodes antigen-binding sites (ABS), and found 24 alleles from 31 M. itatsi individuals and 17 alleles from 21 M. sibirica individuals, including broadly distributed, species-specific and/or geographically restricted alleles. Our results suggest that pathogen-driven balancing selection have acted to maintain the diversity in the DRB genes. For predicted ABS, nonsynonymous substitutions exceeded synonymous substitutions, also indicating positive selection, which was not seen at non-ABS. In a Bayesian phylogenetic tree, two M. sibirica DRB alleles were basal to the rest of the sequences from mustelid species and may represent ancestral alleles. Trans-species polymorphism was evident between many mustelid DRB alleles, especially between M. itatsi and M. sibirica. These two Mustela species divided about 1.7 million years ago, but still share many MHC alleles, indicative of their close phylogenetic relationship. PMID:26593752

  10. Refactoring the six-gene photosystem II core in the chloroplast of the green algae chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Scranton, Melissa A;

    2016-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis provides the energy to produce all food and most of the fuel on this planet. Photosystem II (PSII) is an essential and rate-limiting component of this process. Understanding and modifying PSII function could provide an opportunity for optimizing photosynthetic biomass prod...

  11. RNA polymerase II transcription inhibits DNA repair by photolyase in the transcribed strand of active yeast genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone-Zatchej, M; Meier, A; Suter, B.; Thoma, F

    1997-01-01

    Yeast uses nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase (photoreactivation) to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) generated by ultraviolet light. In active genes, NER preferentially repairs the transcribed strand (TS). In contrast, we recently showed that photolyase preferentially repairs the non-transcribed strands (NTS) of the URA3 and HIS3 genes in minichromosomes. To test whether photoreactivation depends on transcription, repair of CPDs was investigated in the transcriptional...

  12. Epistasis between catechol-O-methyltransferase and type II metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 genes on working memory brain function

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Hao-Yang; Chen, Qiang; Sust, Steven; Joshua W Buckholtz; Meyers, John D.; Egan, Michael F.; Mattay, Venkata S.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Callicott, Joseph H.

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems are critical components responsible for prefrontal signal-to-noise tuning in working memory. Recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies of genetic variation in these systems in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and in metabotropic glutamate receptor mgluR3 (GRM3), respectively, suggest that these genes influence prefrontal physiological signal-to-noise in humans. Here, using fMRI, we extend these individual gene findings to examine the combined effects of CO...

  13. Splitting Hares and Tortoises: A Classification of Neuronal Immediate Early Gene Transcription Based on Poised RNA Polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Ramendra N; Dudek, Serena M.

    2013-01-01

    Immediate early transcription is an integral part of the neuronal response to environmental stimulation and serves many brain processes including development, learning, triggers of programmed cell death, and reaction to injury and drugs. Following a stimulus, neurons express a select few genes within a short period of time without undergoing de novo protein translation. Referred to as the ‘gateway to genetic response’, these immediate early genes (IEGs) are either expressed within a few minut...

  14. Inherited and de novo deletion of the tyrosine aminotransferase gene locus at 16q22.1----q22.3 in a patient with tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, E; Westphal, E M; Toth-Fejel, S E; Magenis, R E; Buist, N R; Rettenmeier, R; Scherer, G

    1987-12-01

    Tyrosinemia II is an autosomal-recessively inherited condition caused by deficiency in the liver-specific enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT; EC 2.6.1.5). We have restudied a patient with typical symptoms of tyrosinemia II who in addition suffers from multiple congenital anomalies including severe mental retardation. Southern blot analysis using a human TAT cDNA probe revealed a complete deletion of both TAT alleles in the patient. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of the patient and his family showed one deletion to be maternally inherited, extending over at least 27 kb and including the complete TAT structural gene, whereas loss of the second TAT allele results from a small de novo interstitial deletion, del 16 (pter----q22.1::q22.3----qter), in the paternally inherited chromosome 16. Three additional loci previously assigned to 16q22 were studied in our patient: haptoglobin (HP), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and the metallothionein gene cluster MT1,MT2. Of these three markers, only the HP locus was found to be codeleted with the TAT locus on the del(16) chromosome.

  15. No role for estrogen receptor 1 gene intron 1 Pvu II and exon 4 C325G polymorphisms in migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinlan Sharon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported an association between the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 gene exon 8 G594A polymorphism and migraine susceptibility in two independent Australian cohorts. In this paper we report results of analysis of two further single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the ESR1 gene in the same study group, the T/C Pvu II SNP in intron 1 and the C325G SNP in exon 4, as well as results of linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis on these markers. Methods We investigated these variants by case-control association analysis in a cohort of 240 migraineurs and 240 matched controls. The SNPs were genotyped using specific restriction enzyme assays. Results were analysed using contingency table methods incorporating the chi-squared statistic. LD results are presented as D' statistics with associated P values. Results We found no evidence for association of the Pvu II T/C polymorphism and the C325G polymorphism and migraine susceptibility and no evidence for LD between these two SNPs and the previously implicated exon 8 G594A marker. Conclusion We have found no role for the polymorphisms in intron 1 and exon 4 with migraine susceptibility. To further investigate our previously implicated exon 8 marker, we suggest the need for studies with a high density of polymorphisms be undertaken, with particular focus on markers in LD with the exon 8 marker.

  16. Coordinate amplification of metallothionein I and II genes in cadmium-resistant Chinese hamster cells: implications for mechanisms regulating metallothionein gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, B.D.; Enger, M.D.; Griffith, B.B.; Griffith, J.K.; Hanners, J.L.; Longmire, J.L.; Munk, A.C.; Stallings, R.L.; Tesmer, J.G.; Walters, R.A.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The authors describe here the derivation, characterization, and use of clonal cadmium-resistance (Cd/sup r) strains of the Chinese hamster cell line CHO which differ in their metallothionein (MT) induction capacity. By nondenaturing polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis, the authors showed that the stable Cd/sup r/ phenotype is correlated with the augmented expression of both isometallothioneins (MTI and MTII). In cells resistant to concentrations of CdCl2 exceeding 20 M, coordinate amplifications of genes encoding both isometallothioneins was demonstrated by using cDNA MT-coding sequence probes and probes specific for 3'-noncoding regions of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes. Molecular and in situ hybridization analyses supported close linkage of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes, which the authors have mapped previously to Chinese hamster chromosome 3. This suggests the existence of a functionally related MT gene cluster in this species. Amplified Cd/sup r/ variants expressing abundant MT and their corresponding Cd/sup s/ parental CHO cells should be useful for future studies directed toward elucidating the mechanisms that regulate expressions of the isometallothioneins. 59 references, 8 figures.

  17. A unique restriction site in the flaA gene allows rapid differentiation of group I and group II Clostridium botulinum strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J; Tran, Shulin; Tam, Kevin J; Austin, John W

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of botulism. Based on distinctive physiological traits, strains of C. botulinum can be divided into four groups: however, only groups I and II are associated with human illness. Alignment of the flaA gene sequences from 40 group I and 40 group II strains identified a single BsrG1 restriction cut site that was present at base pair 283 in all group II flaA sequences and was not found in any group I sequence. The flaA gene was amplified by rapid colony PCR from 22 group I strains and 18 group II strains and digested with BsrGI restriction enzyme. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining showed two fragments, following restriction digestion of group II flaA gene amplicons with BsrGI, but only a single band of uncut flaA from group I strains. Combining rapid colony PCR with BsrGI restriction digest of the flaA gene at 60 degrees C is a significant improvement over current methods, such as meat digestion or amplified fragment length polymorphism, as a strain can be identified as either group I or group II in under 5 h when starting with a visible plated C. botulinum colony.

  18. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  19. Exceptional hyperthyroidism and a role for both major histocompatibility class I and class II genes in a murine model of Graves' disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M McLachlan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease, can be induced by immunizing susceptible strains of mice with adenovirus encoding the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR or its A-subunit. Studies in two small families of recombinant inbred strains showed that susceptibility to developing TSHR antibodies (measured by TSH binding inhibition, TBI was linked to the MHC region whereas genes on different chromosomes contributed to hyperthyroidism. We have now investigated TSHR antibody production and hyperthyroidism induced by TSHR A-subunit adenovirus immunization of a larger family of strains (26 of the AXB and BXA strains. Analysis of the combined AXB and BXA families provided unexpected insight into several aspects of Graves' disease. First, extreme thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism in one remarkable strain, BXA13, reflected an inability to generate non-functional TSHR antibodies measured by ELISA. Although neutral TSHR antibodies have been detected in Graves' sera, pathogenic, functional TSHR antibodies in Graves' patients are undetectable by ELISA. Therefore, this strain immunized with A-subunit-adenovirus that generates only functional TSHR antibodies may provide an improved model for studies of induced Graves' disease. Second, our combined analysis of linkage data from this and previous work strengthens the evidence that gene variants in the immunoglobulin heavy chain V region contribute to generating thyroid stimulating antibodies. Third, a broad region that encompasses the MHC region on mouse chromosome 17 is linked to the development of TSHR antibodies (measured by TBI. Most importantly, unlike other strains, TBI linkage in the AXB and BXA families to MHC class I and class II genes provides an explanation for the unresolved class I/class II difference in humans.

  20. Expression of ABCA3, a causative gene for fatal surfactant deficiency, is up-regulated by glucocorticoids in lung alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have shown previously that the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA3 is expressed predominantly at the limiting membrane of the lamellar bodies in lung alveolar type II cells. Very recently, an ABCA3 gene mutation was reported in human newborns with fatal surfactant deficiency. In the present study, we have shown in rat lung that expression of the ABCA3 protein is dramatically increased after embryonic day (E) 20.5 just before birth. Expression was also markedly induced even at E18.5 when dexamethasone (Dex), which is known to accelerate surfactant formation, was administered to pregnant female rats for 3 days from E15.5. Since Dex increased the ABCA3 mRNA expression level in human alveolar type II cell line A549 cells 4-fold, we cloned and characterized the promoter region of the human ABCA3 gene. Promoter activity of the 5'-flanking region of the ABCA3 gene, which contains a potential glucocorticoid-responsive element (GRE), was up-regulated about 2-fold. Up-regulation by Dex was not observed when the GRE-containing region was deleted or when a point mutation was introduced into the GRE, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay using Dex-treated A549 nuclear extracts demonstrated specific binding of the glucocorticoid receptor to the GRE. These findings demonstrate that glucocorticoid-induced up-regulation of ABCA3 expression in vivo is mediated by transcriptional activation through the GRE in the promoter, and suggest that ABCA3 plays an important role in the formation of pulmonary surfactant, probably by transporting lipids such as cholesterol

  1. A susceptibility gene for kidney disease in an obese mouse model of type II diabetes maps to chromosome 8

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Streamson; Li, Yifu; Liu, Shun Mei; Liu, Ruijie; Chan, Ka Tak; Martino, Jeremiah; Zheng, Zongyu; Susztak, Katalin; D'Agati, Vivette D.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2010-01-01

    Most mouse models of diabetes do not fully reproduce features of human diabetic nephropathy, limiting their utility in inferring mechanisms of human disease. Here we performed detailed phenotypic and genetic characterization of leptin-receptor (Lepr) deficient mice on the FVB/NJ background (FVBdb/db), an obese model of type II diabetes, to determine their suitability to model human diabetic nephropathy. These mice have sustained hyperglycemia, significant albuminuria and characteristic diabet...

  2. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part II. Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy have become a major field in modern biotechnology, especially in the area of human health and fascinating developments achieved in the past decades are impressive examples of an interdisciplinary interplay between medicine, biology and engineering. Among the classical products from cells one can find viral vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and interferons, as well as recombinant therapeutic proteins. Gene therapy opens up challenging new areas. In this review, a definitions of these processes are given and fields of application and products, as well as the future prospects, are discussed.

  3. Demand theory of gene regulation. II. Quantitative application to the lactose and maltose operons of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savageau, M A

    1998-08-01

    Induction of gene expression can be accomplished either by removing a restraining element (negative mode of control) or by providing a stimulatory element (positive mode of control). According to the demand theory of gene regulation, which was first presented in qualitative form in the 1970s, the negative mode will be selected for the control of a gene whose function is in low demand in the organism's natural environment, whereas the positive mode will be selected for the control of a gene whose function is in high demand. This theory has now been further developed in a quantitative form that reveals the importance of two key parameters: cycle time C, which is the average time for a gene to complete an ON/OFF cycle, and demand D, which is the fraction of the cycle time that the gene is ON. Here we estimate nominal values for the relevant mutation rates and growth rates and apply the quantitative demand theory to the lactose and maltose operons of Escherichia coli. The results define regions of the C vs. D plot within which selection for the wild-type regulatory mechanisms is realizable, and these in turn provide the first estimates for the minimum and maximum values of demand that are required for selection of the positive and negative modes of gene control found in these systems. The ratio of mutation rate to selection coefficient is the most relevant determinant of the realizable region for selection, and the most influential parameter is the selection coefficient that reflects the reduction in growth rate when there is superfluous expression of a gene. The quantitative theory predicts the rate and extent of selection for each mode of control. It also predicts three critical values for the cycle time. The predicted maximum value for the cycle time C is consistent with the lifetime of the host. The predicted minimum value for C is consistent with the time for transit through the intestinal tract without colonization. Finally, the theory predicts an optimum value

  4. Association of the estrogen receptor gene Pvu II restriction polymorphism with expected progeny differences for reproductive and performance traits in swine herds in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Amélia Aparecida Santana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen has an important function in swine reproduction and growth. A Pvu II restriction enzyme polymorphism has been proven to be an important genetic variation in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR and may be considered as a candidate gene for use in pig production but there is no data regarding the prevalence of this polymorphism in the Brazilian pig population. We used DNA samples from the following three purebred pig breeds: Large White (336 females and 26 males, Landrace (304 females and 27 males and Pietrain (125 females and 11 males. The ESR genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP. For each breed, genotypes for the ESR gene were compared independently for expected progeny differences (EPD in litter size (LS, average daily weight gain (DWG (g/day and back fat thickness (BT as measured in mm by ultrasound. In the Large White breed, but not the other breeds, the ESR genotype was significantly (p < 0.05 associated to LS, DWG and BT. Large Whites genotyped as AA or AB had higher EPD values for the LS and BT traits compared to BB Large Whites, while AA Large Whites had higher DWG EPD values than BB Large Whites. Our results for the Large White population showed that the A allele has a beneficial effect on LS, DWG and BT expected progeny differences.

  5. The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II as a new marker gene to study assemblages of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Stockinger

    Full Text Available Due to the potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota to improve plant growth and soil quality, the influence of agricultural practice on their diversity continues to be an important research question. Up to now studies of community diversity in AMF have exclusively been based on nuclear ribosomal gene regions, which in AMF show high intra-organism polymorphism, seriously complicating interpretation of these data. We designed specific PCR primers for 454 sequencing of a region of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II gene, and established a new reference dataset comprising all major AMF lineages. This gene is known to be monomorphic within fungal isolates but shows an excellent barcode gap between species. We designed a primer set to amplify all known lineages of AMF and demonstrated its applicability in combination with high-throughput sequencing in a long-term tillage experiment. The PCR primers showed a specificity of 99.94% for glomeromycotan sequences. We found evidence of significant shifts of the AMF communities caused by soil management and showed that tillage effects on different AMF taxa are clearly more complex than previously thought. The high resolving power of high-throughput sequencing highlights the need for quantitative measurements to efficiently detect these effects.

  6. Study of correlation between polymorphism of angiotensin II-1 receptor gene A1166 genotype and complications in atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of genetic polymorphism on atrial fibrillation. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction-restrictive fragment length polymorphism(PCR-RFLP) was used to identify and compare the genotype of the location of AT1R gene 1166, and color echo-ultrasound was performed with logistic regression used to analyse the independent risk of various genotypes for atrial fibrillation in 121 patients with atrial fibrillation and 100 controls. Results: (1) Frequency of genotype AC + CC, iso-gene C in atrial fibrillation group was higher than that in control group (P=0.017, 0.013), the risk ratio in patients with genotype AC + CC to develop atrial fibrillation was 3.657 compared with genotype AA (95% CI:1.181∼11.322), and genotype difference as well as systolic pressure were involved in occurrence of overall atrial fibrillation. The OR to develop atrial fibrillation in patients with genotype AC + CC was 4.132 compared with genotype AA (95% CI:1.263∼13.513). (2) There were no significant differences of clinical manifestation (heart failure, cerebral embolism) or ultrasonic parameters among patients with different genotypes (AA vs AC + CC)(P>0.05). Conclusion: People carrying iso-gene C in AT1R gene 1166 were more liable to develop atrial fibrillation, but there were no correlationship with development of complications. (authors)

  7. Heroin self-administration: II. CNS gene expression following withdrawal and cue-induced drug-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kara L; Patel, Kruti M; Grigson, Patricia S; Freeman, Willard M; Vrana, Kent E

    2008-09-01

    In the accompanying paper, we described incubation of heroin-seeking behavior in rats following 14 days of abstinence. To gain an understanding of genomic changes that accompany this behavioral observation, we measured the expression of genes previously reported to respond to drugs of abuse. Specifically, after 1 or 14 days of abstinence, mRNA expression was measured for 11 genes in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) immediately following a single 90 min extinction session. Additionally, the role of contingency was examined in control rats that received yoked, response-independent heroin administration. Gene expression was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Expression of five genes (Arc, EGR1, EGR2, Fos, and Homer1b/c) was changed in the mPFC. EGR1 and EGR2 expression was increased following the 90 min extinction session in a contingency-specific manner and this increase persisted through the 14 days of abstinence. Fos expression was also increased after 1 and 14 days of abstinence, but at 14 days this increase was response-independent (i.e., it occurred in both the rats with a history of heroin self-administration and in the yoked controls). Arc expression increased following the extinction session only in rats with a history of heroin self-administration and only when tested following 1, but not 14, days of abstinence. Homer 1 b/c decreased after 14 days of enforced abstinence in rats that received non-contingent heroin. Expression of only a single gene (EGR2) was increased in the NAc. These data demonstrate that behavioral incubation is coincident with altered levels of specific transcripts and that this response is contingently-specific. Moreover, EGR1 and EGR2 are specifically upregulated in self-administering rats following extinction and this finding persists through 14 days of abstinence, suggesting that these genes are particularly associated with the incubation phenomenon. These latter observations of persistent changes

  8. Functional Consequences of Genome Evolution in Listeria monocytogenes: the lmo0423 and lmo0422 Genes Encode σC and LstR, a Lineage II-Specific Heat Shock System†

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chaomei; Nietfeldt, Joe; Zhang, Min; Benson, Andrew K.

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes strains belonging to phylogenetic lineage II (serotypes 1/2a, 1/2c, and 3a) carry a lineage-specific genome segment encoding a putative sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (lmo0423, herein referred to as sigC), a gene of unknown function (lmo0422) similar to the padR family of regulators, and a gene that is similar to the rodA-ftsW family of cell wall morphology genes (lmo0421). To understand the function of this set of genes, their expression patterns and the effects of nu...

  9. Genetic variants within obesity-related genes are associated with tumor recurrence in patients with stages II/III colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebio, Ana; Gerger, Armin; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Yang, Dongyun; Zhang, Wu; Stremitzer, Stefan; Stintizing, Sebastian; Sunakawa, Yu; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Ning, Yan; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Ueno, Masashi; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and it is also linked to CRC recurrence and survival. Polymorphisms located in obesity-related genes are associated with increased risk of developing several cancer types including colorectal cancer. We evaluated whether SNPs in obesity-related genes may predict tumor recurrence in colon cancer patients. Methods Genotypes were obtained from germline DNA from 207 patients with stage II or III colon cancer at the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Nine polymorphisms in eight obesity-related genes (PPAR, LEP, NFKB, CD36, DRG1, NGAL, REGIA and DSCR1) were evaluated. The primary endpoint of the study was 3-year recurrence rate. Positive associations were also tested in an independent Japanese cohort of 350 stage III CRC patients. Results In univariate analysis, for PPAR rs1801282, patients with a CC genotype had significantly lower recurrence probability (29± 4% standard error, SE) compared to patients with a CG genotype (48% ± 8% SE), HR: 1.77; 95%CI, 1.01-3.10; p=0.040. For DSCR1 rs6517239, patients with an AA genotype had higher recurrence probability than patients carrying at least one allele G (37% ± 4% SE vs 15% ± 6% SE), HR: 0.51, 95% CI, 0.27-0.94; p=0.027. This association was stronger in the patients bearing a left-sided tumor (HR: 0.34; 95%CI, 0.13-0.88; p=0.018). In the Japanese cohort no associations were found. Conclusion This hypothesis generating study suggests a potential influence of polymorphisms within obesity-related genes in the recurrence probability of colon cancer. These interesting results should be further evaluated. PMID:25379721

  10. Evidence against the structural gene encoding type II collagen (COL2A1) as the mutant locus in achondroplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, D.; Wordsworth, P; Thompson, E.; Sykes, B

    1986-01-01

    The structure of the locus encoding the major cartilage collagen gene (COL2A1) was studied in a total of 19 cases of achondroplasia. No gross rearrangements were seen. The segregation of COL2A1 was examined in three affected kindreds using restriction site and length variants as genetic markers. In two kindreds discordant segregation between the achondroplasia and COL2A1 loci was demonstrated. Paternity/maternity was confirmed using a 'minisatellite' core sequence probe which reveals cross hy...

  11. Delineating the structural, functional and evolutionary relationships of sucrose phosphate synthase gene family II in wheat and related grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Zaynali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS is an important component of the plant sucrose biosynthesis pathway. In the monocotyledonous Poaceae, five SPS genes have been identified. Here we present a detailed analysis of the wheat SPSII family in wheat. A set of homoeologue-specific primers was developed in order to permit both the detection of sequence variation, and the dissection of the individual contribution of each homoeologue to the global expression of SPSII. Results The expression in bread wheat over the course of development of various sucrose biosynthesis genes monitored on an Affymetrix array showed that the SPS genes were regulated over time and space. SPSII homoeologue-specific assays were used to show that the three homoeologues contributed differentially to the global expression of SPSII. Genetic mapping placed the set of homoeoloci on the short arms of the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes. A resequencing of the A and B genome copies allowed the detection of four haplotypes at each locus. The 3B copy includes an unspliced intron. A comparison of the sequences of the wheat SPSII orthologues present in the diploid progenitors einkorn, goatgrass and Triticum speltoides, as well as in the more distantly related species barley, rice, sorghum and purple false brome demonstrated that intronic sequence was less well conserved than exonic. Comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SPSII gene showed that false purple brome was more similar to Triticeae than to rice. Wheat - rice synteny was found to be perturbed at the SPS region. Conclusion The homoeologue-specific assays will be suitable to derive associations between SPS functionality and key phenotypic traits. The amplicon sequences derived from the homoeologue-specific primers are informative regarding the evolution of SPSII in a polyploid context.

  12. Selective pressures on MHC class II genes in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) as inferred by hierarchical analysis of population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdegen, M; Babik, W; Radwan, J

    2014-11-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex, which are the most polymorphic of all vertebrate genes, are a pre-eminent system for the study of selective pressures that arise from host-pathogen interactions. Balancing selection capable of maintaining high polymorphism should lead to the homogenization of MHC allele frequencies among populations, but there is some evidence to suggest that diversifying selection also operates on the MHC. However, the pattern of population structure observed at MHC loci is likely to depend on the spatial and/or temporal scale examined. Here, we investigated selection acting on MHC genes at different geographic scales using Venezuelan guppy populations inhabiting four regions. We found a significant correlation between MHC and microsatellite allelic richness across populations, which suggests the role of genetic drift in shaping MHC diversity. However, compared to microsatellites, more MHC variation was explained by differences between populations within larger geographic regions and less by the differences between the regions. Furthermore, among proximate populations, variation in MHC allele frequencies was significantly higher compared to microsatellites, indicating that selection acting on MHC may increase population structure at small spatial scales. However, in populations that have significantly diverged at neutral markers, the population-genetic signature of diversifying selection may be eradicated in the long term by that of balancing selection, which acts to preserve rare alleles and thus maintain a common pool of MHC alleles.

  13. HCV Proteins and Immunoglobulin Variable Gene (IgV Subfamilies in HCV-Induced Type II Mixed Cryoglobulinemia: A Concurrent Pathogenetic Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sautto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII is well established, but the role played by distinct HCV proteins and by specific components of the anti-HCV humoral immune response remains to be clearly defined. It is widely accepted that HCV drives the expansion of few B-cell clones expressing a restricted pool of selected immunoglobulin variable (IgV gene subfamilies frequently endowed with rheumatoid factor (RF activity. Moreover, the same IgV subfamilies are frequently observed in HCV-transformed malignant B-cell clones occasionally complicating MCII. In this paper, we analyze both the humoral and viral counterparts at the basis of cryoglobulins production in HCV-induced MCII, with particular attention reserved to the single IgV subfamilies most frequently involved.

  14. A standardised challenge model with an enterotoxigenic F4+ Escherichia coli strain in piglets assessing clinical traits and faecal shedding of fae and est-II toxin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Franz; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Martinez-Vallespin, Beatriz; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five feed additives on post weaning diarrhoea (PWD) in piglets challenged 3 d after weaning with an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (ETEC). In three experimental runs, a total of 84 piglets was weaned at 21 days of age and randomly assigned to seven treatments. As dietary treatment, piglets were fed a basal diet or diets with addition of bovine colostrum (0.2%), pineapple stem extract containing bromelain (0.2%), an autolysed yeast preparation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (0.1%), a combination of organic acids (0.7%) and a phytogenic product with thyme essential oil (0.015%). A porcine ETEC, serotype O149:K91:K88ac was given twice via oral infection on day 3 after weaning at 10(10) colony forming units/animal. One group of piglets was fed the basal diet without ETEC challenge. Traits included clinical sores, body temperature, faecal scoring and determination of faecal dry matter and the shedding of fae and est-II ETEC toxin genes. After weaning, non-challenged control piglets did not show signs of diarrhoea or impaired health, while the majority of infected piglets had a drop in body temperature, signs of diarrhoea and impaired general health. Mortality, the decrease of faecal dry matter and shedding of the toxin genes fae and est-II were not affected by the different additives. In conclusion, the ETEC challenge model induced distinct clinical signs of PWD in piglets, but the tested feed additives had no preventive effect under these conditions. PMID:25313936

  15. A standardised challenge model with an enterotoxigenic F4+ Escherichia coli strain in piglets assessing clinical traits and faecal shedding of fae and est-II toxin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Franz; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Martinez-Vallespin, Beatriz; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five feed additives on post weaning diarrhoea (PWD) in piglets challenged 3 d after weaning with an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (ETEC). In three experimental runs, a total of 84 piglets was weaned at 21 days of age and randomly assigned to seven treatments. As dietary treatment, piglets were fed a basal diet or diets with addition of bovine colostrum (0.2%), pineapple stem extract containing bromelain (0.2%), an autolysed yeast preparation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (0.1%), a combination of organic acids (0.7%) and a phytogenic product with thyme essential oil (0.015%). A porcine ETEC, serotype O149:K91:K88ac was given twice via oral infection on day 3 after weaning at 10(10) colony forming units/animal. One group of piglets was fed the basal diet without ETEC challenge. Traits included clinical sores, body temperature, faecal scoring and determination of faecal dry matter and the shedding of fae and est-II ETEC toxin genes. After weaning, non-challenged control piglets did not show signs of diarrhoea or impaired health, while the majority of infected piglets had a drop in body temperature, signs of diarrhoea and impaired general health. Mortality, the decrease of faecal dry matter and shedding of the toxin genes fae and est-II were not affected by the different additives. In conclusion, the ETEC challenge model induced distinct clinical signs of PWD in piglets, but the tested feed additives had no preventive effect under these conditions.

  16. Genetic transformation of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) using cotyledonary node as explant and a promoterless gus::nptII fusion gene based vector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Swathi Anuradha; S K Jami; R S Datla; P B Kirti

    2006-06-01

    We have generated putative promoter tagged transgenic lines in Arachis hypogaea cv JL-24 using cotyledonary node (CN) as an explant and a promoterless gus::nptII bifunctional fusion gene mediated by Agrobacterium transformation. MS medium fortified with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) at 4 mg/l in combination with 0.1 mg/l -napthaleneacetic acid (NAA) was the most effective out of the various BAP and NAA combinations tested in multiple shoot bud formation. Parameters enhancing genetic transformation viz. seedling age, Agrobacterium genetic background and co-cultivation periods were studied by using the binary vector p35SGUSINT. Genetic transformation with CN explants from 6-dayold seedlings co-cultivated with Agrobacterium GV2260 strain for 3 days resulted in high kanamycin resistant shoot induction percentage (45%); approximately 31% transformation frequency was achieved with p35S GUSINT in -glucuronidase (GUS) assays. Among the in vivo GUS fusions studied with promoterless gus::nptII construct, GUS-positive sectors occupied 38% of the total transient GUS percentage. We have generated over 141 putative T0 plants by using the promoterless construct and transferred them to the field. Among these, 82 plants survived well in the green house and 5 plants corresponding to 3.54% showed stable integration of the fusion gene as evidenced by GUS, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses. Twenty-four plants were positive for GUS showing either tissue-specific expression or blue spots in at least one plant part. The progeny of 15 T0 plants indicated Mendelian inheritance pattern of segregation for single-copy integration. The tissue-specific GUS expression patterns were more or less similar in both T0 and corresponding T1 progeny plants. We present the differential patterns of GUS expression identified in the putative promoter-tagged transgenic lines in the present communication.

  17. La imagen periodística no fotográfica (II. El dibujo: definiciones y orígenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Carlos Abreu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available En este segundo trabajo de la serie sobre la imagen periodística no fotográfica, el doctor Abreu nos ofrece una reseña crítica de las definiciones acerca del dibujo para luego hacer una cronología acerca del mismo, desde sus orígenes hasta su incursión en el periodismo impreso. De esta manera, el autor nos ilustra sobre su uso, bien como adorno o con fines representativos, propio de sus primeras manifestaciones, para posteriormente hacer referencia al dibujo en medios impresos, desde las primeras hojas sueltas hasta las publicaciones periodísticas pioneras.

  18. Molecular evolution of glutamine synthetase II: Phylogenetic evidence of a non-endosymbiotic gene transfer event early in plant evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartar Aurélien

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS is essential for ammonium assimilation and the biosynthesis of glutamine. The three GS gene families (GSI, GSII, and GSIII are represented in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we examined the evolutionary relationship of GSII from eubacterial and eukaryotic lineages and present robust phylogenetic evidence that GSII was transferred from γ-Proteobacteria (Eubacteria to the Chloroplastida. Results GSII sequences were isolated from four species of green algae (Trebouxiophyceae, and additional green algal (Chlorophyceae and Prasinophytae and streptophyte (Charales, Desmidiales, Bryophyta, Marchantiophyta, Lycopodiophyta and Tracheophyta sequences were obtained from public databases. In Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses, eubacterial (GSIIB and eukaryotic (GSIIE GSII sequences formed distinct clades. Both GSIIB and GSIIE were found in chlorophytes and early-diverging streptophytes. The GSIIB enzymes from these groups formed a well-supported sister clade with the γ-Proteobacteria, providing evidence that GSIIB in the Chloroplastida arose by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses suggest that GSIIB and GSIIE coexisted for an extended period of time but it is unclear whether the proposed HGT happened prior to or after the divergence of the primary endosymbiotic lineages (the Archaeplastida. However, GSIIB genes have not been identified in glaucophytes or red algae, favoring the hypothesis that GSIIB was gained after the divergence of the primary endosymbiotic lineages. Duplicate copies of the GSIIB gene were present in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, and Physcomitrella patens. Both GSIIB proteins in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri f. nagariensis had N-terminal transit sequences, indicating they are targeted to the chloroplast or mitochondrion. In contrast, GSIIB proteins of P. patens lacked transit sequences, suggesting

  19. Col2-Cre recombinase is co-expressed with endogenous type II collagen in embryonic renal epithelium and drives development of polycystic kidney disease following inactivation of ciliary genes

    OpenAIRE

    Kolpakova-Hart, Elona; Nicolae, Claudia; Zhou, Jing; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2008-01-01

    Here we report on the severe defects in renal epithelium induced by the transgenic Col2-Cre line used previously for skeletal tissue-specific gene targeting. We demonstrate that conditional ablation of the Kif3a or Pkd1 genes encoding primary cilium/intraflagellar transport-associated proteins using type II collagen-specific Cre transgenic strain results in a severe form of polycystic kidney disease in mice. We detect Col2-Cre recombinase expression in kidney epithelium, which reflects expres...

  20. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Analysis of Gln223Agr polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in type II diabetic mellitus subjects among Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05). PMID:24051404

  2. Analysis of Gln223Agr Polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in Type II Diabetic Mellitus Subjects among Malaysians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Pei Pei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The Leptin Receptor (LEPR gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05.

  3. An H3K9/S10 methyl-phospho switch modulates Polycomb and Pol II binding at repressed genes during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbattini, Pierangela; Sjoberg, Marcela; Nikic, Svetlana; Frangini, Alberto; Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Kunowska, Natalia; Carroll, Tom; Brookes, Emily; Arthur, Simon J; Pombo, Ana; Dillon, Niall

    2014-03-01

    Methylated histones H3K9 and H3K27 are canonical epigenetic silencing modifications in metazoan organisms, but the relationship between the two modifications has not been well characterized. H3K9me3 coexists with H3K27me3 in pluripotent and differentiated cells. However, we find that the functioning of H3K9me3 is altered by H3S10 phosphorylation in differentiated postmitotic osteoblasts and cycling B cells. Deposition of H3K9me3/S10ph at silent genes is partially mediated by the mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1/2) and the Aurora B kinase. Acquisition of H3K9me3/S10ph during differentiation correlates with loss of paused S5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, which is present on Polycomb-regulated genes in embryonic stem cells. Reduction of the levels of H3K9me3/S10ph by kinase inhibition results in increased binding of RNAPIIS5ph and the H3K27 methyltransferase Ezh1 at silent promoters. Our results provide evidence of a novel developmentally regulated methyl-phospho switch that modulates Polycomb regulation in differentiated cells and stabilizes repressed states.

  4. Updates from the Sixth International Congress 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic', the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, U.K., 1-3 December 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, K; Burden, A D

    2012-10-01

    The 15 years between the First International Congress 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic' and the Sixth Congress held in London from 1 to 3 December 2011 have seen extraordinary progress in the sciences that are relevant to psoriasis and therapeutics that have transformed its treatment. Over this time, 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic' has emerged as the premier conference for clinicians and scientists interested in this field. Its popularity is attested to by the 450 registered delegates from the U.K. and around the world, which necessitated a change of venue to the excellent facilities of the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. Although the content has evolved over the years, the structure of this 3-day conference has remained similar. The first day was given to genetics, comorbidities and outcome measures. Immunology and immunity were covered on the second day and therapeutics on the third. The stature of the three keynote lecturers and eight invited speakers was truly world class and their presentations were interspersed with 23 free communications. Here we review highly selected personal highlights of the meeting that we hope will be of general interest.

  5. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron, P.R.; Kushner, S.R.; Grossman, L.

    1985-08-01

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration.

  6. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration

  7. Chromatin-wide profiling of DYRK1A reveals a role as a gene-specific RNA polymerase II CTD kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vona, Chiara; Bezdan, Daniela; Islam, Abul B M M K; Salichs, Eulàlia; López-Bigas, Nuria; Ossowski, Stephan; de la Luna, Susana

    2015-02-01

    DYRK1A is a dosage-sensitive protein kinase that fulfills key roles during development and in tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation results in human pathologies. DYRK1A is present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of mammalian cells, although its nuclear function remains unclear. Genome-wide analysis of DYRK1A-associated loci reveals that the kinase is recruited preferentially to promoters of genes actively transcribed by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), which are functionally associated with translation, RNA processing, and cell cycle. DYRK1A-bound promoter sequences are highly enriched in a conserved palindromic motif, which is necessary to drive DYRK1A-dependent transcriptional activation. DYRK1A phosphorylates the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII at Ser2 and Ser5. Depletion of DYRK1A results in reduced association of RNAPII at the target promoters as well as hypophosphorylation of the RNAPII CTD along the target gene bodies. These results are consistent with DYRK1A being a transcriptional regulator by acting as a CTD kinase. PMID:25620562

  8. Purifying Selection and Birth-and-Death Evolution in the Class II Hydrophobin Gene Families of the Ascomycete Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    kubicek, Christian P.; Baker, Scott E.; Gamauf, Christian; Kenerley, Chuck; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2008-01-10

    Hydrophobins are proteins containing eight conserved cysteine residues that occur uniquely in mycelial fungi, where their main function is to confer hydrophobicity to fungal surfaces in contact with air and during attachment of hyphae to hydrophobic surfaces of hosts, symbiotic partners or of themselves resulting in morphogenetic signals. Based on their hydropathy patterns and their solubility characteristics, they are classified in class I and class II hydrophobins, the latter being found only in ascomycetes. Here we have investigated the mechanisms driving the evolution of the class II hydrophobins in nine species of the mycoparasitic ascomycetous genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea, using three fully sequenced genomes (H. jecorina=T. reesei, H. atroviridis=T. atroviride; H. virens=T. virens) and a total of 14.000 ESTs of six others (T. asperellum, H. lixii=T. harzianum, T. aggressivum var. europeae, T. longibrachiatum, T. cf. viride). The former three contained six, ten and nine members, which is the highest number found in any other ascomycete so far. They all showed the conserved four beta-strands/one helix structure, which is stabilized by four disulfide bonds. In addition, a small number of these HFBs contained an extended N-terminus rich in either praline and aspartate, or glycine-asparagine. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a mosaic of terminal clades contain duplicated genes and shows only three reasonably supported clades. Calculation of the ratio of differences in synonymous vs. non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions provides evidence for strong purifying selection (KS/Ka >> 1). A genome database search for class II HFBs from other ascomycetes retrieved a much smaller number of hydrophobins (2-4) from each species, and most of them were from Pyrenomycetes. A combined phylogeny of these sequences with those of Trichoderma showed that the Trichoderma HFBs mostly formed their own clades, whereas those of other pyrenomycetes occured in shared clades. Our study shows

  9. The role of HLA class II genes in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: Molecular analysis of 180 Caucasian, multiplex families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, J.A.; Cook, M.; Erlich, H.A. [Roche Molecular Systems, Alameda, CA (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    We report here our analysis of HLA class II alleles in 180 Caucasian nuclear families with at least two children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 genotypes were determined with PCR/sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe typing methods. The data allowed unambiguous determination of four-locus haplotypes in all but three of the families. Consistent with other studies, our data indicate an increase in DR3/DR4, DR3/DR3, and DR4/DR4 genotypes in patients compared to controls. In addition, we found an increase in DR1/DR4, DR1/DR3, and DR4/DR8 genotypes. While the frequency of DQB1*0302 on DR4 haplotypes is dramatically increased in DR3/DR4 patients, DR4 haplotypes in DR1/DR4 patients exhibit frequencies of DQB1*0302 and DQB1*0301 more closely resembling those in control populations. The protective effect of DR2 is evident in this data set and is limited to the common DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype. Most DR2{sup +} patients carry the less common DR2 haplotype DRB1*1601-DQB1*0502, which is not decreased in patients relative to controls. DPB1 also appears to play a role in disease susceptibility. DPB1*0301 is increased in patients (P < .001) and may contribute to the disease risk of a number of different DR-DQ haplotypes. DPB1*0101, found almost exclusively on DR3 haplotypes in patients, is slightly increased, and maternal transmissions of DRB1*0301-DPB1*0101 haplotypes to affected children occur twice as frequently as do paternal transmissions. Transmissions of DR3 haplotypes carrying other DPB1 alleles occur at approximately equal maternal and paternal frequencies. The complex, multigenic nature of HLA class II-associated IDDM susceptibility is evident from these data. 76 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  10. A novel point mutation in the translation initiation codon of the pre-pro-vasopressin-neurophysin II gene: Cosegregation with morphological abnormalities and clinical symptoms in autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutishauser, J.; Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Froesch, E.R.; Wichmann, W.; Huisman, T. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a rare variant of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. Several different mutations in the human vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene have been described. We studied nine family members from three generations of an ADNDI pedigree at the clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. AVP concentrations were measured during diagnostic fluid restriction tests. Coronal and sagittal high resolution T1-weighted images of the pituitary were obtained from affected and healthy family members. PCR was used to amplify the AVP-NP II precursor gene, and PCR products were directly sequenced. Under maximal osmotic stimulation, AVP serum levels were close to or below the detection limit in affected individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed the characteristic hyperintense ({open_quotes}bright spot{close_quotes}) appearance of the posterior pituitary in two healthy family members. This signal was absent in all four ADNDI patients examined. The coding sequences of AVP and its carrier protein, neurophysin II, were normal in all family members examined. Affected individuals showed a novel single base deletion (G 227) in the translation initiation codon of the AVP-NP II signal peptide on one allele. The mutation in the AVP-NP II leader sequence appears to be responsible for the disease in this kindred, possibly by interfering with protein translocation. The absence of the hyperintense posterior pituitary signal in affected individuals could reflect deficient posterior pituitary function. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Development of Insect-Resistant Hybrid Rice by Introgressing the Bt Gene from Bt Rice Huahui 1 into II-32A/B, a Widely Used Cytogenic Male Sterile System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Yun-song; HUANG Hai-qing; XU Meng-yun; WANG Liang-chao; ZHANG Xiao-bo; ZHANG Ji-wen; TU Ju-min

    2014-01-01

    Huahui 1 is an elite transgenic male sterile restorer line of wild rice abortive-type that expresses a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)δ-endotoxin and provides effective and economic control of lepidopteran insects. To exploit Huahui 1 to develop a new Bt rice, the insertion site of the Bt gene was determined by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR). Bt was located in the promoter region of LOC.Os10g10360, approximately 5.35 Mb from the telomere of the short arm of chromosome 10. For the ifrst time, a Bt cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) system was developed by introgressing Bt from Huahui 1. The recipient CMS system used consisted of Indonesia paddy rice-type II-32B (maintainer line) and II-32A (male sterile line). Marker-assisted selection was used to increase selection efifciency in the backcrossing program. In BC5F1, the Bt plant 85015-8 was selected for further analyses, as it had the highest SSR marker homozygosity. In addition, the linkage drag of the foreign Bt gene in 85015-8 was minimized to 8.01-11.46 Mb. The foreign Bt gene was then delivered from 85015-8 into II-32A. The resultant Bt II-32A and Bt II-32B lines were both resistant to lepidopteran in ifeld trials, and agronomic traits were not disturbed. The maintainability of II-32B, and the male sterility and general combining ability of II-32A, were not affected by the Bt introgression. This study demonstrates a simple and fast approach to develop Bt hybrid rice.

  12. MHC class I and class II phenotype, gene, and haplotype frequencies in Greeks using molecular typing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassavas, E C; Spyropoulou-Vlachou, M; Papassavas, A C; Schipper, R F; Doxiadis, I N; Stavropoulos-Giokas, C

    2000-06-01

    In the present study, DNA typing for HLA-A, C, B, DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 was performed for 246 healthy, unrelated Greek volunteers of 20-59 years of age. Phenotype, genotype frequencies, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium fit, and 3-locus haplotype frequencies for HLA-A, C, B, HLA-A, B, DRB1, HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and HLA-DRB1, DQB1, DPB1 were calculated. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium, deltas, relative deltas and p-values for significance of the deltas were defined. The population studied is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and many MHC haplotypes are in linkage disequilibrium. The most frequent specificities were HLA-A*02 (phenotype frequency = 44.3%) followed by HLA-A*24 (27.2%), HLA-B*51 (28.5%), HLA-B*18 (26.8%) and HLA-B*35 (26.4%) and HLA-Cw*04 (30.1%) and HLA-Cw*12 (26.8%). The most frequent MHC class II alleles were HLA-DRB1*1104 (34.1%), HLA-DQB1*0301 (54.5%) and HLA-DPB1*0401 with a phenotype frequency of 59.8%. The most prominent HLA-A, C, B haplotypes were HLA-A*24, Cw*04, B*35, and HLA-A*02, Cw*04, B*35, each of them observed in 21/246 individuals. The most frequent HLA-A, B, DRB1 haplotype was HLA-A*02, B*18, DRB1*1104 seen in 20/246 individuals, while the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1104, DQB1*0301, DPB1*0401 was found in 49/246 individuals. Finally, the haplotype DRB1*1104, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 was observed in 83/246 individuals. These results can be used for the estimation of the probability of finding a suitable haplotypically identical related or unrelated stem cell donor for patients of Greek ancestry. In addition, they can be used for HLA and disease association studies, genetic distance studies in the Balkan and Mediterranean area, paternity cases, and matching probability calculations for the optimal allocation of kidneys in Greece.

  13. A novel nine base deletion mutation in NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase gene in an Indian family with recessive congenital methemoglobinemia-type-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Warang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recessive hereditary methemoglobinemia (RCM associated with severe neurological abnormalities is a very rare disorder caused by NADH- cytochrome b5 reductase (cb5r deficiency (Type II. We report a case of 11 month old male child who had severe mental retardation, microcephaly and gross global developmental delay with methemoglobin level of 61.1%. The diagnosis of NADH-CYB5R3 deficiency was made by the demonstration of significantly reduced NADH-CYB5R3 activity in the patient and intermediate enzyme activity in both the parents. Mutation analysis of the CYB5R gene revealed a novel nine nucleotide deletion in exon 6 leading to the elimination of 3 amino acid residues (Lys173, Ser174 and Val 175. To confirm that this mutation was not an artifact, we performed PCR-RFLP analysis using the restriction enzyme Drd I. As the normal sequence has a restriction recognition site for Drd I which was eliminated by the deletion, a single band of 603-bp was seen in the presence of the homozygous mutation. Molecular modeling analysis showed a significant effect of these 3 amino acids deletion on the protein structure and stability leading to a severe clinical presentation. A novel homozygous 9 nucleotide deletion (p.K173–p.V175del3 is shown to be segregated with the disease in this family. Knowing the profile of mutations would allow us to offer prenatal diagnosis in families with severe neurological disorders associated with RCM — Type II.

  14. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation. PMID:26407519

  15. Molecular diagnosis of 65 families with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) characterized by 16 novel mutations in the IDS gene: Genetic, pathological, and structural studies on iduronate-2-sulfatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuga, Motomichi; Mashima, Ryuichi; Hirakiyama, Asami; Fuji, Naoko; Kumagai, Tadayuki; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Nikaido, Mari; Saito, Seiji; Ohno, Kazuki; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Okuyama, Torayuki

    2016-07-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II: also called as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the accumulation of extracellular glycosaminoglycans due to the deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). Previous observations suggested that MPS II can be classified into two distinct disease subtypes: (1) severe type of MPS II involves a decline in the cognitive ability of a patient and (2) attenuated type of MPS II exhibits no such intellectual phenotype. To determine whether such disease subtypes of MPS II could be explained by genetic diagnosis, we analyzed mutations in the IDS gene of 65 patients suffering from MPS II among the Japanese population who were diagnosed with both the accumulation of urinary glycosaminoglycans and a decrease in their IDS enzyme activity between 2004 and 2014. Among the specimens examined, we identified the following mutations: 33 missense, 8 nonsense, 7 frameshift, 4 intronic changes affecting splicing, 8 recombinations involving IDS-IDS2, and 7 other mutations including 4 large deletions. Consistent with the previous data, the results of our study showed that most of the attenuated phenotype was derived from the missense mutations of the IDS gene, whereas mutations associated with a large structural alteration including recombination, splicing, frameshift, and nonsense mutations were linked to the severe phenotype of MPS II. Furthermore, we conducted a homology modeling study of IDS P120R and N534I mutant as representatives of the causative mutation of the severe and attenuated type of MPS II, respectively. We found that the substitution of P120R of the IDS enzyme was predicted to deform the α-helix generated by I119-F123, leading to the major structural alteration of the wild-type IDS enzyme. In sharp contrast, the effect of the structural alteration of N534I was marginal; thus, this mutation was pathogenically predicted to be associated with the attenuated type of MPS II

  16. Mapping of the human dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene (DMP1) to the dentinogenesis imperfecta type II critical region at chromosome 4q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aplin, H.M.; Hirst, K.L.; Crosby, A.H.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-20

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of dentin formation, which has been mapped to human chromosome 4q12-q21. The region most likely to contain the DGI1 locus is a 3.2-cM region surrounding the osteopontin (SPP1) locus. Recently, a novel dentin-specific acidic phosphoprotein (dmp1) has been cloned in the rat and mapped to mouse chromosome 5q21. In the current investigation, we have isolated a cosmid containing the human DMP1 gene. The isolation of a short tandem repeat polymorphism at this locus has allowed us to map the DMP1 locus to human chromosome 4q21 and demonstrate that it is tightly linked to DGI1 in two families (Z{sub max} = 11.01, {theta} = 0.001). The creation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig around SPP1 has further allowed us to demonstrate that DMP1 is located within 150 kb of the bone sialoprotein and 490 kb of the SPP1 loci, respectively. DMP1 is therefore a strong candidate for the DGI1 locus. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Localization of the gene encoding the putative human HLA class II associated protein (PHAPI) to chromosome 15q22.3-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, T.M.; Lichter, P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Abt. Organisation komplexer Genome, Heidelberg (Germany); Vaesen, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer experimentelle Medizin Abt. Immunchemie, Goettingen (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The putative HLA class II associated proteins PHAPI and PHAPII were purified and cloned on the basis of their ability to bind to the cytoplasmatic domain of the HLA Dr{alpha}-chain. They might be components of the transmembrane signaling pathway that is activated after extracellular binding of ligands during the immune response. Both proteins share extended stretches of highly acidic amino acids in their C-terminal regions that also indicate a nuclear localization. Indeed, PHAPI is likely to be the human homologue of the rat {open_quotes}leucine-rich acidic nuclear protein{close_quotes} (LANP) (83.6% amino acid identity), which was shown to be localized in the nuclei of Purkinje cells. Comparison of the cDNA sequences with entries in the EMBL data library revealed that PHAPII is identical to a protein named SET. The SET gene is located on chromosome 9q34 and was found to be fused to the putative oncogene CAN in one patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL). 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. XbaI and PvuII polymorphisms of estrogen receptor 1 gene in females with idiopathic scoliosis: no association with occurrence or clinical form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Janusz

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: XbaI single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (A/G rs934099 in estrogen receptor 1 gene (ESR1 was described to be associated with curve severity in Japanese idiopathic scoliosis (IS patients and in Chinese patients with both curve severity and predisposition to IS. PvuII SNP (C/T rs2234693 of ESR1 was described to be associated with the occurrence of IS in the Chinese population; however, two replication studies did not confirm the findings. The ESR1 SNPs have never been studied in Caucasian IS patients. METHODS: Case-control study. 287 females with IS underwent clinical, radiological and genetic examinations. The patients were divided into three groups according to curve progression velocity: non-progressive IS, slowly progressive IS (progression <1° per month, and rapidly progressive IS (progression ≥1° per month. The radiological maximum Cobb angle was measured and surgery rate established. A control group consisted of 182 healthy females. RESULTS: All results followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. In the case-control study, genotype frequency in the patients did not differ for the XbaI (AA = 33.5%, AG = 49.1%, GG = 17.4%, nor for the PvuII (TT = 26.8%, TC = 50.2%, CC = 23.0% comparing to controls (AA = 33.5%, AG = 50.5%, GG = 15.9% and (TT = 23.1%, TC = 51.1%, CC = 25.8%, respectively, p = 0.3685, p = 0.6046. The haplotype frequency for the patients (AT = 47.1%, GC = 39.2%, AC = 8.9%, GT = 2.8% did not differ from the controls (AT = 44.8%, GC = 37.4%, AC = 14.0%, GT = 3.8%, p = 0.0645. No difference was found either in XbaI (p = 0.8671 or PvuII (p = 0.3601 allele distribution between the patients and the controls. In the case study, there was no significant difference in genotype frequency for the non-progressive, slowly progressive, and rapidly progressive scoliosis. No difference was found in genotype or haplotype distribution for

  19. No evidence of mutations in the genes for type I and type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}HSD) in nonclassical 3{beta}HSD deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerah, M.; Mani, P.; Schram, P. [New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Nonclassical 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/{Delta}{sup 5}-{Delta}{sup 4}-isomerase deficiency (NC3{beta}HSDD) has been diagnosed in hyperandrogenic women with an increasing frequency during the last 14 yr. Fifteen menarcheal women with androgen excess syndrome, previously diagnosed with NC3{beta}HSDD were studied, in 12 after discontinuation of glucocorticoid treatment, in 2 patients never treated with glucocorticoids, and in 1 both before and after glucocorticoid therapy. Molecular DNA analysis was also performed in 6 of the patients, using the strategy successfully used to detect point mutations in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase (3{beta}HSD) gene, which are responsible for classical 3{beta}HSD deficiency. This strategy consists of the direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA fragments corresponding to the complete coding sequence and all intron-exon junctions and to the 5{prime}- and 3{prime}-noncoding region of this gene. We were unable to demonstrate any mutation of the type II 3{beta}HSD gene in these 6 patients. To gain additional information about potential mutations, direct sequencing of the type I 3{beta}HSD gene was also performed using this same strategy, and no mutations were found. The present study strongly suggests that unlike the salt-losing and nonsalt-losing forms of classical 3{beta}HSD deficiency, NC3{beta}HSDD is not due to a mutant type II 3{beta}HSD enzyme. However, the possibility remains of a mutation(s) in the unsequenced regions of the type II 3{beta}HSD gene or elsewhere, such as in a gene for modulatory protein, playing a specific role in the expression of the type II 3{beta}HSD gene. On the other hand, knowing the multiple hormonal controls to which 3{beta}HSD activity is subject, it cannot be excluded that at least in some cases, NC3{beta}HSDD may be an acquired defect, the result of endogenous or environmental factors. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-10-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC

  1. IIS--Integrated Interactome System: a web-based platform for the annotation, analysis and visualization of protein-metabolite-gene-drug interactions by integrating a variety of data sources and tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Falsarella Carazzolle

    Full Text Available High-throughput screening of physical, genetic and chemical-genetic interactions brings important perspectives in the Systems Biology field, as the analysis of these interactions provides new insights into protein/gene function, cellular metabolic variations and the validation of therapeutic targets and drug design. However, such analysis depends on a pipeline connecting different tools that can automatically integrate data from diverse sources and result in a more comprehensive dataset that can be properly interpreted.We describe here the Integrated Interactome System (IIS, an integrative platform with a web-based interface for the annotation, analysis and visualization of the interaction profiles of proteins/genes, metabolites and drugs of interest. IIS works in four connected modules: (i Submission module, which receives raw data derived from Sanger sequencing (e.g. two-hybrid system; (ii Search module, which enables the user to search for the processed reads to be assembled into contigs/singlets, or for lists of proteins/genes, metabolites and drugs of interest, and add them to the project; (iii Annotation module, which assigns annotations from several databases for the contigs/singlets or lists of proteins/genes, generating tables with automatic annotation that can be manually curated; and (iv Interactome module, which maps the contigs/singlets or the uploaded lists to entries in our integrated database, building networks that gather novel identified interactions, protein and metabolite expression/concentration levels, subcellular localization and computed topological metrics, GO biological processes and KEGG pathways enrichment. This module generates a XGMML file that can be imported into Cytoscape or be visualized directly on the web.We have developed IIS by the integration of diverse databases following the need of appropriate tools for a systematic analysis of physical, genetic and chemical-genetic interactions. IIS was validated with

  2. Two zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases share common ancestry with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V alcohol dehydrogenase genes but have distinct functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Mark J; Hahn, Mark E; Tanguay, Robert L

    2004-09-10

    Ethanol is teratogenic to many vertebrates. We are utilizing zebrafish as a model system to determine whether there is an association between ethanol metabolism and ethanol-mediated developmental toxicity. Here we report the isolation and characterization of two cDNAs encoding zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). Phylogenetic analysis of these zebrafish ADHs indicates that they share a common ancestor with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V ADHs. The genes encoding these zebrafish ADHs have been named Adh8a and Adh8b by the nomenclature committee. Both genes were genetically mapped to chromosome 13. The 1450-bp Adh8a is 82, 73, 72, and 72% similar at the amino acid level to the Baltic cod ADH8 (previously named ADH1), the human ADH1B2, the mouse ADH1, and the rat ADH1, respectively. Also, the 1484-bp Adh8b is 77, 68, 67, and 66% similar at the amino acid level to the Baltic cod ADH8, the human ADH1B2, the mouse ADH1, and the rat ADH1, respectively. ADH8A and ADH8B share 86% amino acid similarity. To characterize the functional properties of ADH8A and ADH8B, recombinant proteins were purified from SF-9 insect cells. Kinetic studies demonstrate that ADH8A metabolizes ethanol, with a V(max) of 13.4 nmol/min/mg protein, whereas ADH8B does not metabolize ethanol. The ADH8A K(m) for ethanol as a substrate is 0.7 mm. 4-Methyl pyrazole, a classical competitive inhibitor of class I ADH, failed to inhibit ADH8A. ADH8B has the capacity to efficiently biotransform longer chain primary alcohols (>/=5 carbons) and S-hydroxymethlyglutathione, whereas ADH8A does not efficiently metabolize these substrates. Finally, mRNA expression studies indicate that both ADH8A and ADH8B mRNA are expressed during early development and in the adult brain, fin, gill, heart, kidney, muscle, and liver. Together these results indicate that class I-like ADH is conserved in zebrafish, albeit with mixed functional properties. PMID:15231826

  3. Genetic variation in candidate obesity genes ADRB2, ADRB3, GHRL, HSD11B1, IRS1, IRS2, and SHC1 and risk for breast cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II

    OpenAIRE

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Teras, Lauren R.; Diver, W Ryan; Tang, Weining; Patel, Alpa V.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Calle, Eugenia E; Michael J Thun; Bouzyk, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Obesity has consistently been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Proteins that are secreted by adipose tissue or are involved in regulating body mass may play a role in breast tumor development. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study among postmenopausal women from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to determine whether genes associated with obesity increase risk for breast cancer. Tagging single nucleotide polymorphi...

  4. Molecular diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis Type II (Hunter syndrome) by automated sequencing and computer-assisted interpretation: Toward mutation mapping of the Iduronate-2-sulfatase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, J.J.; Aronovich, E.L.; Braun, S.E.; Whitley, C.B. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Virtually all mutations causing Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) are expected to be new mutations. Therefore, as a means of molecular diagnosis, we developed a rapid method to sequence the entire iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) coding region. PCR amplicons representing the IDS cDNA were sequenced with an automatic instrument, and output was analyzed by computer-assisted interpretation of tracings, using Staden programs on a Sun computer. Mutations were found in 10 of 11 patients studied. Unique missense mutations were identified in five patients: H229Y (685{r_arrow}T, severe phenotype); P358R (1073C{r_arrow}G, severe); R468W (1402C{r_arrow}T, mild); P469H (1406C{r_arrow}A, mild); and Y523C (1568A{r_arrow}G, mild). Nonsense mutations were identified in two patients: R172X (514C{r_arrow}T, severe) and Q389X (1165C{r_arrow}T, severe). Two other patients with severe disease had insertions of 1 and 14 bp, in exons 3 and 6, respectively. In another patient with severe disease, the predominant (<95%) IDS message resulted from aberrant splicing, which skipped exon 3. In this last case, consensus sequences for splice sites in exon 3 were intact, but a 395C{r_arrow}G mutation was identified 24 bp upstream from the 3` splice of exon 3. This mutation created a cryptic 5` splice site with a better consensus sequence for 5` splice sites than the natural 5` splice site of intron 3. A minor population of the IDS message was processed by using this cryptic splice site; however, no correctly spliced message was detected in leukocytes from this patient. The mutational topology of the IDS gene is presented. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. ß-Spectrin São PauloII, a novel frameshift mutation of the ß-spectrin gene associated with hereditary spherocytosis and instability of the mutant mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Bassères

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a common inherited anemia characterized by the presence of spherocytic red cells. Defects in several membrane protein genes have been involved in the pathogenesis of HS. ß-Spectrin-related HS seems to be common. We report here a new mutation in the ß-spectrin gene coding region in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis. The patient presented acanthocytosis and spectrin deficiency and, at the DNA level, a novel frameshift mutation leading to HS, i.e., a C deletion at codon 1392 (ß-spectrin São PauloII, exon 20. The mRNA encoding ß-spectrin São PauloII was very unstable and the mutant protein was not detected in the membrane or in other cellular compartments. It is interesting to note that frameshift mutations of the ß-spectrin gene at the 3' end allow the insertion of the mutant protein in the red cell membrane, leading to a defect in the auto-association of the spectrin dimers and consequent elliptocytosis. On the other hand, ß-spectrin São PauloII protein was absent in the red cell membrane, leading to spectrin deficiency, HS and the presence of acanthocytes.

  6. Widespread occurrence of the tfd-II genes in soil bacteria revealed by nucleotide sequence analysis of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid degradative plasmids pDB1 and p712.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Min-Sun; Lim, Jong-Sung; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Variovorax sp. strain DB1 and Pseudomonas pickettii strain 712 are 2,4-dicholorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria, which were isolated from agricultural soils in Republic of Korea and USA, respectively. Each strain harbors a 2,4-D degradative plasmid and is able to utilize 2,4-D as the sole source of carbon for its growth. The 2,4-D degradative plasmid pDB1 of strain DB1 consisted of a 65,269-bp circular molecule with a G+C content of 66.23% and had 68 ORFs. The 2,4-D degradative plasmid p712 of strain 712 was composed of a 62,798-bp circular molecule with a 62.11% G+C content and had 62 ORFs. The plasmids pDB1 and p712 share significantly homologous 2,4-D degradative genes with high similarity to the tfdR, tfdB-II, tfdC-II, tfdD-II, tfdE-II, tfdF-II, tfdK and tfdA genes of plasmid pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus isolated from Australia. In a phylogenetic analysis with trfA, traL, and trbA genes, pDB1 belonged to IncP-1β with pJP4, while p712 belonged to IncP-1ε with pKJK5 and pEMT3. The results indicated that, in spite of the differences in their backbone regions, the 2,4-D catabolic genes of the two plasmids were closely related and also related to the well-known 2,4-D degradative plasmid pJP4 even though all were isolated from different geographic regions. Other similarities in the genetic organization and the presence of IS1071 suggested that these catabolic genes may be on a transposable element, leading to widespread occurrence in soil bacteria. PMID:23376020

  7. Rhizobia with 16S rRNA and nifH similar to Mesorhizobium huakuii but Novel recA, glnII, nodA and nodC genes are symbionts of New Zealand Carmichaelinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wee Tan

    Full Text Available New Zealand became geographically isolated about 80 million years ago and this separation gave rise to a unique native flora including four genera of legume, Carmichaelia, Clianthus and Montigena in the Carmichaelinae clade, tribe Galegeae, and Sophora, tribe Sophoreae, sub-family Papilionoideae. Ten bacterial strains isolated from NZ Carmichaelinae growing in natural ecosystems grouped close to the Mesorhizobium huakuii type strain in relation to their 16S rRNA and nifH gene sequences. However, the ten strains separated into four groups on the basis of their recA and glnII sequences: all groups were clearly distinct from all Mesorhizobium type strains. The ten strains separated into two groups on the basis of their nodA sequences but grouped closely together in relation to nodC sequences; all nodA and nodC sequences were novel. Seven strains selected and the M. huakuii type strain (isolated from Astragalus sinicus produced functional nodules on Carmichaelia spp., Clianthus puniceus and A. sinicus but did not nodulate two Sophora species. We conclude that rhizobia closely related to M. huakuii on the basis of 16S rRNA and nifH gene sequences, but with variable recA and glnII genes and novel nodA and nodC genes, are common symbionts of NZ Carmichaelinae.

  8. Whole blood transcriptional profiling reveals significant down-regulation of human leukocyte antigen class I and II genes in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads;

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiling studies in the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms have revealed significant deregulation of several immune and inflammation genes that might be of importance for clonal evolution due to defective tumor immune surveillance. Other mechanisms might b...

  9. Isolation of Escherichia coli rpoB mutants resistant to killing by lambda cII protein and altered in pyrE gene attenuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Poulsen, Peter;

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants simultaneously resistant to rifampin and to the lethal effects of bacteriophage lambda cII protein were isolated. The sck mutant strains carry alterations in rpoB that allow them to survive cII killing (thus the name sck), but that do not impair either the expression of c...

  10. Mutations in the HLA class II genes leading to loss of expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, ES; Philippo, K; Giphart, MJ; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2003-01-01

    Loss of expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules on tumor cells affects the onset and modulation of the immune response through lack of activation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that the frequent loss of expression of HLA class II in diffuse large B-cell lymphom

  11. Mutation in domain II of IAA1 confers diverse auxin-related phenotypes and represses auxin-activated expression of Aux/IAA genes in steroid regulator-inducible system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Hye-Joung; Kim, Jungmook

    2002-12-01

    Most of Aux/IAA genes are rapidly induced by auxin. The Aux/IAA proteins are short-lived nuclear proteins sharing the four conserved domains. Domain II is critical for rapid degradation of Aux/IAA proteins. Among these gene family members, IAA1 is one of the earliest auxin-inducible genes. We used a steroid hormone-inducible system to reveal putative roles and downstream signaling of IAA1 in auxin response. Arabidopsis transgenic plants were generated expressing fusion protein of IAA1 (IAA1-GR) or IAA1 with a mutation in domain II (iaa1-GR) and the glucocorticoid hormone-binding domain (GR). IAA1-GR transgenic plants did not exhibit any discernable phenotypic differences by DEX treatment that allows nuclear translocation of the fusion protein. In contrast, diverse auxin-related physiological processes including gravitropism and phototropism were impaired by DEX treatment in roots, hypocotyls, stems, and leaves in iaa1-GR transgenic plants. Auxin induction of seven Aux/IAA mRNAs including IAA1 itself was repressed by DEX treatment, suggesting that IAA1 functions in the nucleus by mediating auxin response and might act as a negative feedback regulator for the expression of Aux/IAA genes including IAA1 itself. Auxin induction of Aux/IAA genes in the presence of cycloheximide can be repressed by DEX treatment, showing that the repression of transcription of the Aux/IAAs by the iaa1 mutant protein is primary. Wild-type IAA1-GR could not suppress auxin induction of IAA1 and IAA2. These results indicate that inhibition of auxin-activated transcription of Aux/IAA genes by the iaa1 mutant protein might be responsible for alteration of various auxin responses.

  12. Association between estrogen receptor α gene (ESR1 PvuII (C/T and XbaI (A/G polymorphisms and hip fracture risk: evidence from a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Genetic factors are important in the pathogenesis of fractures. Notably, estrogen receptor α (ESR1 has been suggested as a possible candidate gene for hip fractures; however, published studies of ESR1 gene polymorphisms have been hampered by small sample sizes and inconclusive or ambiguous results. The aim of this meta-analysis is to investigate the associations between two novel common ESR1 polymorphisms (intron 1 polymorphisms PvuII-rs2234693: C>T and XbaI-rs9340799: A>G and hip fracture. METHODS: Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to evaluate the strength of the association. RESULTS: Five case-control and three cohort studies were assessed, including a total of 1,838 hip fracture cases and 14,972 healthy controls. This meta-analysis revealed that the PvuII T allele is a highly significant risk factor for hip fracture susceptibility, with an effect magnitude similar in male and pre-menopausal and post-menopausal female patients. In stratified analysis based on ethnicity, the PvuII T allele remained significantly correlated with increased risk of hip fracture in Caucasian populations; this correlation, however, was not found in Asian populations. Unlike the PvuII polymorphism, we did not find significant differences in the XbaI (A>G polymorphism allele or genotype distributions of hip fracture patients and controls. We also found no obvious association between the XbaI polymorphism and hip fracture in any of the racial or gender subgroups. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that the ESR1 PvuII T allele may increase the risk of hip fracture and that the XbaI polymorphism is not associated with hip fracture.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of LmnaH222P/H222P mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in LmnaH222P/H222P mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male LmnaH222P/H222P mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of LmnaH222P/H222P mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left ventricular fractional

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  15. The MHC class II ligand lymphocyte activation gene-3 is co-distributed with CD8 and CD3-TCR molecules after their engagement by mAb or peptide-MHC class I complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannier, S; Triebel, F

    1999-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that signaling through lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), a MHC class II ligand, induced by multivalent anti-receptor antibodies led to unresponsiveness to TCR stimulation. Here, lateral distribution of the LAG-3 molecules and its topological relationship (mutual proximity) to the TCR, CD8, CD4, and MHC class I and II molecules were studied in the plasma membrane of activated human T cells in co-capping experiments and conventional fluorescence microscopy. Following TCR engagement by either TCR-specific mAb or MHC-peptide complex recognition in T-B cell conjugates, LAG-3 was found to be specifically associated with the CD3-TCR complex. Similarly, following CD8 engagement LAG-3 and CD8 were co-distributed on the cell surface while only a low percentage of CD4-capped cells displayed LAG-3 co-caps. In addition, LAG-3 was found to be associated with MHC class II (i.e. DR, DP and DQ) and partially with MHC class I molecules. The supramolecular assemblies described here between LAG-3, CD3, CD8 and MHC class II molecules may result from an organization in raft microdomains, a phenomenon known to regulate early events of T cell activation.

  16. Individual members of the light-harvesting complex II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein gene family in pea (Pisum sativum) show differential responses to ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, UV-B-repressible and UV-B-inducible genes were identified in the pea, Pisum sativum L., by rapid amplification of 3′ cDNA ends through use of the polymerase chain reaction. Of the UV-B-repressible clones, psUVRub and psUVDeh represent genes encoding Rubisco activase and dehydrin, respectively. A third clone, psUVZinc, did not correspond closely in overall nucleotide sequence to any gene registered in GenBank; however, a short deduced peptide shared similarity with the photosystem-II reaction center X protein of the chlorophyll a+c-containing alga, Odontella sinensis. The UV-B-inducible clones, psUVGluc, psUVAux and psUVRib, were related to genes encoding β-1, 3-glucanase, auxin-repressed protein, and a 40S ribosomal protein, respectively. The modulation of these pea genes indicates how UV-B, through its actions as a physical stressor, affects several important physiological processes in plants. (author)

  17. The structure at 2.4 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g21360, a putative FeII/2-oxo­glutarate-dependent enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Allard, Simon T. M.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Aceti, David J.; Wrobel, Russell L.; Frederick, Ronnie O.; Sreenath, Hassan; Vojtik, Frank C.; Jeon, Won Bae; Newman, Craig S.; Primm, John; Sussman, Michael R.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N.

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of the gene product of At3g21360 from Arabidopsis thaliana was determined by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to an R factor of 19.3% (R free = 24.1%) at 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit that differ in the conformation of a flexible domain that spans residues 178–230. The crystal structure confirmed that At3g21360 encodes a protein belonging to the clavaminate synthase-like superfamily of iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes. The metal-binding site was defined and is similar to the iron(II) binding sites found in other members of the superfamily. PMID:16511070

  18. Polymorphisms in the F8 gene and MHC-II variants as risk factors for the development of inhibitory anti-factor VIII antibodies during the treatment of hemophilia a: a computational assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    Full Text Available The development of neutralizing anti-drug-antibodies to the Factor VIII protein-therapeutic is currently the most significant impediment to the effective management of hemophilia A. Common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs in the F8 gene occur as six haplotypes in the human population (denoted H1 to H6 of which H3 and H4 have been associated with an increased risk of developing anti-drug antibodies. There is evidence that CD4+ T-cell response is essential for the development of anti-drug antibodies and such a response requires the presentation of the peptides by the MHC-class-II (MHC-II molecules of the patient. We measured the binding and half-life of peptide-MHC-II complexes using synthetic peptides from regions of the Factor VIII protein where ns-SNPs occur and showed that these wild type peptides form stable complexes with six common MHC-II alleles, representing 46.5% of the North American population. Next, we compared the affinities computed by NetMHCIIpan, a neural network-based algorithm for MHC-II peptide binding prediction, to the experimentally measured values and concluded that these are in good agreement (area under the ROC-curve of 0.778 to 0.972 for the six MHC-II variants. Using a computational binding predictor, we were able to expand our analysis to (a include all wild type peptides spanning each polymorphic position; and (b consider more MHC-II variants, thus allowing for a better estimation of the risk for clinical manifestation of anti-drug antibodies in the entire population (or a specific sub-population. Analysis of these computational data confirmed that peptides which have the wild type sequence at positions where the polymorphisms associated with haplotypes H3, H4 and H5 occur bind MHC-II proteins significantly more than a negative control. Taken together, the experimental and computational results suggest that wild type peptides from polymorphic regions of FVIII constitute potential T-cell epitopes

  19. A phase II study of Epirubicin in oxaliplatin-resistant patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and TOP2A gene amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarpgaard, Line S.; Qvortrup, Camilla; Nygård, Sune Boris;

    2016-01-01

    A gene amplification in their tumor cells. BACKGROUND: Epirubicin is an anthracycline that targets DNA topoisomerase 2-α enzyme encoded by the TOP2A gene. It is used for treatment of several malignancies, but currently not in CRC. TOP2A gene amplifications predict improved efficacy of epirubicin...... normal tissue. The TOP2A gene is located on chromosome 17 and when the TOP2A/CEN-17 ratio was applied to identify tumors with gene loss or amplifications, 10.5 % had a ratio ≥ 1.5 consistent with gene amplification and 2.6 % had a ratio ≤ 0.8 suggesting gene deletions. Based on these observations......, investigating the efficacy of epirubicin in patients with oxaliplatin refractory mCRC and with a cancer cell TOP2A/CEN-17 ratio ≥ 1.5. TOP2A gene amplification measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization. A total of 25 evaluable patients (15 + 10 in two steps) will be included (Simon's two-stage minimax...

  20. A Zinc Finger Transcription Factor, αA-Crystallin Binding Protein 1, Is a Negative Regulator of the Chondrocyte-Specific Enhancer of the α1(II) Collagen Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Nakatani, Fumihiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of the type II collagen gene (Col2a1) is regulated by multiple cis-acting sites. The enhancer element, which is located in the first intron, is necessary for high-level and cartilage-specific expression of Col2a1. A mouse limb bud cDNA expression library was screened by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae one-hybrid screening method to identify protein factors bound to the enhancer. A zinc finger protein, αA-crystallin binding protein 1 (CRYBP1), which had been reported to bind to the ...

  1. A phase II study of weekly irinotecan in patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2- negative breast cancer and increased copy numbers of the topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Balslev, Eva; Stenvang, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    comparable to response rates obtained with drugs commonly used in the metastatic setting. If a predictive biomarker could be identified for irinotecan, response rates might be even higher. METHODS/DESIGN: This multi-centre phase II single arm trial was designed to investigate if patients with metastatic...... breast cancer and increased expression of the topoisomerase 1 gene have a high likelihood of obtaining a clinical benefit from treatment with irinotecan. Trial recruitment is two-staged as 19 patients are planned to participate in the first part. If less than 7 patients have clinical benefit the trial...

  2. Clonal spread of catalase-negative ST5/SCCmec II Staphylococcus aureus carrying the staphylococcal enterotoxin A (sea), staphylococcal enterotoxin b (seb), and toxic shock toxin (tst) virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Kim, Jung-Beom; Kim, Hyunjung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Kim, Yang Ree; Yu, Jin Kyung; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2014-01-01

    17 catalase-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates were recovered from respiratory specimens of patients at a 700-bed hospital in Korea. The goal of this study was to determine the molecular characteristics of catalase-negative MRSA strains in Korea for the first time. Characteristics that we explored included kat A gene mutation sequence, sequence type, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec subtype classification, and toxin gene profiles. All 17 isolates showed similar pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern. Four mutations were identified in the kat A gene of a representative catalase-negative MRSA strain: A602G causing a histidine 201 to arginine change, A695T causing a glutamic acid 232 to valine change, T778A causing a tryptophan 260 to arginine change, and G1438A causing a glycine 480 to serine change. Previous studies suggest that the A695T and T778A mutations may have strong effects on the catalase activity of catalase-negative MRSA. The sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type of this isolate were ST 5 and SCCmec type II, respectively. All 17 isolates harbored toxic shock toxin (tst), staphylococcal enterotoxin A (sea), and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (seb) virulence genes. The mortality rate of the present study was 11.8%, suggesting that the clinical relevance of catalase-negative MRSA requires further study in the future.

  3. Association of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Intron 16 Insertion/Deletion and Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor A1166C Gene Polymorphisms with Preeclampsia in South East of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Salimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Some evidence suggests that a variety of genetic factors contributed in pathogenesis of the preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE I/D and angiotensin II type1 receptor A1166C polymorphisms with preeclampsia. This study was performed in 125 preeclamptic pregnant women and 132 controls. The I/D Polymorphism of the ACE gene was assessed by polymerase chain reaction and the A1166C Polymorphism of the AT1R gene was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The genotype and allele frequencies of I/D polymorphism differed between two groups. The risk of preeclampsia was 3.2-fold in pregnant women with D allele (OR, 3.2 [95% CI, 1.1 to 3.8]; P=0.01. The distribution of the AT1R gene A1166C polymorphism was similar in affected and control groups. Our results supported that presence of the I/D polymorphism of ACE gene is a marker for the increased risk of preeclampsia.

  4. COL5A1: Fine genetic mapping, intron/exon organization, and exclusion as candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis complex 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Papenberg, K.A.; Marchuk, D.A. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type V collagen is the only fibrillar collagen which has yet to be implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic diseases in humans or mice. To begin examining the possible role of type V collagen in genetic disease, we have previously mapped COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, to 9q23.2{r_arrow}q34.3 and described two restriction site polymorphisms which allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for nail-patella syndrome. We have now used these polymorphisms to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II. In addition, we describe a CA repeat, with observed heterozygosity of about 0.5, in a COL5A1 intron, which has allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to place COL5A1 on the CEPH family genetic map between markers D9S66 and D9S67. We have also determined the entire intron/exon organization of COL5A1, which will facilitate characterization of mutations in genetic diseases with which COL5A1 may be linked in future studies.

  5. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M;

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...... genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision....

  6. Darwin's legacy II: why biology is not physics, or why it has taken a century to see the dependence of genes on the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rama S

    2015-01-01

    Genes and environment make the organism. Darwin stood firm in his denial of any direct role of environment in the modification of heredity. His theory of evolution heralded two debates: one about the importance and adequacy of natural selection as the main mechanism of evolution, and the other about the role of genes versus environment in the modification of phenotype and evolution. Here, I provide an overview of the second debate and show that the reasons for the gene versus environment battle were twofold: first, there was confusion about the role of environment in modifying the inheritance of a trait versus the evolution of that trait, and second, there was misunderstanding about the meaning of environment and its interaction with genes in the production of phenotypes. It took nearly a century to see that environment does not directly affect the inheritance of a phenotype (i.e., its heredity), but it is nevertheless the primary mover of phenotypic evolution. Effects of genes and environment are not separate but interdependent. One cannot separate the effect of genes from that of environment, or nature from nurture. To answer the question posed in the title, it is partly because the 20th century has been a century of unending progress in genetics. But also because unlike physics, biology is not colorblind; progress in biology has often been delayed beyond the Kuhnian paradigm change due to built-in interest in negating the influence of environment. Those who are against evolution, of course, cannot be expected to understand the role of environment in evolution. Those for it, many biologists included, believing in the supremacy of genes empowers them by giving adaptation a solely gene-directed (self-driven) "teleological" interpretation.

  7. Starch phosphorylation in potato tubers is influenced by allelic variation in the genes encoding glucan water dikinase, starch branching enzymes I and II, and starch synthase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Ann Carpenter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Starch phosphorylation is an important aspect of plant metabolism due to its role in starch degradation. Moreover, the degree of phosphorylation of starch determines its physicochemical properties and is therefore relevant for industrial uses of starch. Currently, starch is chemically phosphorylated to increase viscosity and paste stability. Potato cultivars with elevated starch phosphorylation would make this process unnecessary, thereby bestowing economic and environmental benefits. Starch phosphorylation is a complex trait which has been previously shown by antisense gene repression to be influenced by a number of genes including those involved in starch synthesis and degradation. We have used an association mapping approach to discover genetic markers associated with the degree of starch phosphorylation. A diverse collection of 193 potato lines was grown in replicated field trials, and the levels of starch phosphorylation at the C6 and C3 positions of the glucosyl residues were determined by mass spectrometry of hydrolyzed starch from tubers. In addition, the potato lines were genotyped by amplicon sequencing and microsatellite analysis, focusing on candidate genes known to be involved in starch synthesis. As potato is an autotetraploid, genotyping included determination of allele dosage. Significant associations (p<0.001 were found with SNPs in the glucan water dikinase (GWD, starch branching enzyme I (SBEI and the starch synthase III (SSIII genes, and with a SSR allele in the SBEII gene. SNPs in the GWD gene were associated with C6 phosphorylation, whereas polymorphisms in the SBEI and SBEII genes were associated with both C6 and C3 phosphorylation and the SNP in the SSIII gene was associated with C3 phosphorylation. These allelic variants have potential as genetic markers for starch phosphorylation in potato.

  8. Darwin's legacy II: why biology is not physics, or why it has taken a century to see the dependence of genes on the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rama S

    2015-01-01

    Genes and environment make the organism. Darwin stood firm in his denial of any direct role of environment in the modification of heredity. His theory of evolution heralded two debates: one about the importance and adequacy of natural selection as the main mechanism of evolution, and the other about the role of genes versus environment in the modification of phenotype and evolution. Here, I provide an overview of the second debate and show that the reasons for the gene versus environment battle were twofold: first, there was confusion about the role of environment in modifying the inheritance of a trait versus the evolution of that trait, and second, there was misunderstanding about the meaning of environment and its interaction with genes in the production of phenotypes. It took nearly a century to see that environment does not directly affect the inheritance of a phenotype (i.e., its heredity), but it is nevertheless the primary mover of phenotypic evolution. Effects of genes and environment are not separate but interdependent. One cannot separate the effect of genes from that of environment, or nature from nurture. To answer the question posed in the title, it is partly because the 20th century has been a century of unending progress in genetics. But also because unlike physics, biology is not colorblind; progress in biology has often been delayed beyond the Kuhnian paradigm change due to built-in interest in negating the influence of environment. Those who are against evolution, of course, cannot be expected to understand the role of environment in evolution. Those for it, many biologists included, believing in the supremacy of genes empowers them by giving adaptation a solely gene-directed (self-driven) "teleological" interpretation. PMID:25985891

  9. RNA Interference of Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Gene Expression in THP-1 Cell Line Leads to Toll-Like Receptor-4 Overexpression/Activation As Well As Up-modulation of Annexin-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos I. Maratheftis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1 is a candidate transcription factor for the regulation of the Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4 gene. Using a small interfering RNAbased (siRNA process to silence IRF-1 gene expression in the leukemic monocytic cell line THP-1, we investigated whether such a modulation would alter TLR-4 expression and activation status in these cells. The siIRF-1 cells expressed elevated levels of TLR-4 mRNA and protein compared to controls by 90% and 77%, respectively. ICAM.1 protein expression and apoptosis levels were increased by 8.35- and 4.25-fold, respectively. The siIRF-1 cells overexpressed Bax mRNA compared to controls. Proteomic analysis revealed upmodulation of the Annexin-II protein in siIRF-1 THP-1 cells. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS patients with an absence of full-length IRF-1 mRNA also overexpressed Annexin-II. It is plausible that this overexpression may lead to the activation of TLR-4 contributing to the increased apoptosis characterizing MDS.

  10. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, and double strand break genes as markers for response to radiotherapy in patients with Stage I to II head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can influence response to radiotherapy. We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in nine DNA repair genes in 108 patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNSCC) who had received radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to December 2004, patients with Stage I and II histopathologically confirmed HNSCC underwent radiotherapy. DNA was obtained from paraffin-embedded tissue, and SNP analysis was performed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction allelic discrimination TaqMan assay with minor modifications. Results: Patients were 101 men (93.5%) and 7 (6.5%) women, with a median age of 64 years (range, 40 to 89 years). Of the patients, 76 (70.4%) patients were Stage I and 32 (29.6%) were Stage II. The XPF/ERCC1 SNP at codon 259 and XPG/ERCC5 at codon 46 emerged as significant predictors of progression (p 0.00005 and 0.049, respectively) and survival (p = 0.0089 and 0.0066, respectively). Similarly, when variant alleles of XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5 and XPA were examined in combination, a greater number of variant alleles was associated with shorter time to progression (p = 0.0003) and survival (p 0.0002). Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms in XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5, and XPA may significantly influence response to radiotherapy; large studies are warranted to confirm their role in HNSCC

  11. The structure at 2.4 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g21360, a putative Fe{sup II}/2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Allard, Simon T. M.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Aceti, David J.; Wrobel, Russell L.; Frederick, Ronnie O.; Sreenath, Hassan; Vojtik, Frank C.; Jeon, Won Bae; Newman, Craig S.; Primm, John; Sussman, Michael R.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N. Jr, E-mail: phillips@biochem.wisc.edu [Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2005-05-01

    The crystal structure of the 37.2 kDa At3g21360 gene product from A. thaliana was determined at 2.4 Å resolution. The structure establishes that this protein binds a metal ion and is a member of a clavaminate synthase-like superfamily in A. thaliana. The crystal structure of the gene product of At3g21360 from Arabidopsis thaliana was determined by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to an R factor of 19.3% (R{sub free} = 24.1%) at 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit that differ in the conformation of a flexible domain that spans residues 178–230. The crystal structure confirmed that At3g21360 encodes a protein belonging to the clavaminate synthase-like superfamily of iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes. The metal-binding site was defined and is similar to the iron(II) binding sites found in other members of the superfamily.

  12. Efficacy Improvement of PCR Amplification of CAG Trinucleotide Repeats in the Coding Sequence of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type II Gene%提高SCA2编码区CAG三核苷酸重复的PCR扩增效率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤熙翔; 夏家辉

    2000-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of PCR amplification of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the coding sequence of spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene(69.2% G+C), hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR, and the addition of enhancers(1%~12.5% DMSO , 1%~25% glycerol ,1%~12.5% formamide) were performed and compared with normal PCR . The results showed that hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR and the addition of enhancers(1%~10% DMSO , 5%~20% glycerol , 1%~10% formamide) improved the amplification efficacy of the GC rich region. Gene diagnosis in 70 SCA pedgrees and 60 spontaneous SCA patients were also conducted.%以遗传性脊髓小脑共济失调II型基因(spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene SCA2)编码区内的CAG三核苷酸重复为研究对象(G+C含量为69.2%),比较了热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR、添加增效剂(1%~12.5%二甲亚砜、1%~25%甘油、1%~12.5%甲酰胺)与常规PCR的扩增效率,发现热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR及添加增效剂(1%~10%二甲亚砜、5%~20%甘油、1%~10%甲酰胺)能提高该GC富集区的扩增效率,并对70个SCA家系及60个散发SCA患者进行了SCA2的基因诊断。

  13. PRS1 i>is a key member of the gene family encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Andrew T.; Beiche, Flora; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne;

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the metabolite phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is required for purine, pyrimidine, tryptophan and histidine biosynthesis. Enzymes that can synthesize PRPP can be encoded by at least four genes. We have studied 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetases (PRS......) genetically and biochemically. Each of the four genes, all of which are transcribed, has been disrupted in haploid yeast strains of each mating type and although all disruptants are able to grow on complete medium, differences in growth rate and enzyme activity suggest that disruption of PRS1 or PRS3 has a...... significant effect on cell metabolism, whereas disruption of PRS2 or PRS4 has little measurable effect. Using Western blot analysis with antisera raised against peptides derived from the non-homology region (NHR) and the N-terminal half of the PRS1 gene product it has been shown that the NHR is not removed by...

  14. Balancing selection and genetic drift at major histocompatibility complex class II genes in isolated populations of golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Mao-Fang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small, isolated populations often experience loss of genetic variation due to random genetic drift. Unlike neutral or nearly neutral markers (such as mitochondrial genes or microsatellites, major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in these populations may retain high levels of polymorphism due to balancing selection. The relative roles of balancing selection and genetic drift in either small isolated or bottlenecked populations remain controversial. In this study, we examined the mechanisms maintaining polymorphisms of MHC genes in small isolated populations of the endangered golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana by comparing genetic variation found in MHC and microsatellite loci. There are few studies of this kind conducted on highly endangered primate species. Results Two MHC genes were sequenced and sixteen microsatellite loci were genotyped from samples representing three isolated populations. We isolated nine DQA1 alleles and sixteen DQB1 alleles and validated expression of the alleles. Lowest genetic variation for both MHC and microsatellites was found in the Shennongjia (SNJ population. Historical balancing selection was revealed at both the DQA1 and DQB1 loci, as revealed by excess non-synonymous substitutions at antigen binding sites (ABS and maximum-likelihood-based random-site models. Patterns of microsatellite variation revealed population structure. FST outlier analysis showed that population differentiation at the two MHC loci was similar to the microsatellite loci. Conclusions MHC genes and microsatellite loci showed the same allelic richness pattern with the lowest genetic variation occurring in SNJ, suggesting that genetic drift played a prominent role in these isolated populations. As MHC genes are subject to selective pressures, the maintenance of genetic variation is of particular interest in small, long-isolated populations. The results of this study may contribute to captive breeding and

  15. Fatigue-Related Gene Networks Identified in CD14+ Cells Isolated From HIV-Infected Patients—Part II: Statistical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Joachim G.; Dobra, Adrian; Morse, Caryn; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Raju, Raghavan; Danner, Robert L.; Munson, Peter J.; Logan, Carolea; Rangel, Zoila; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; McLaughlin, Mary; Adams, Larry D.; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In limited samples of valuable biological tissues, univariate ranking methods of microarray analyses often fail to show significant differences among expression profiles. In order to allow for hypothesis generation, novel statistical modeling systems can be greatly beneficial. The authors applied new statistical approaches to solve the issue of limited experimental data to generate new hypotheses in CD14+ cells of patients with HIV-related fatigue (HRF) and healthy controls. Methodology We compared gene expression profiles of CD14+ cells of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-treated HIV patients with low versus high fatigue to healthy controls (n = 5 each). With novel Bayesian modeling procedures, the authors identified 32 genes predictive of low versus high fatigue and 33 genes predictive of healthy versus HIV infection. Sparse association and liquid association networks further elucidated the possible biological pathways in which these genes are involved. Relevance for nursing practice Genetic networks developed in a comprehensive Bayesian framework from small sample sizes allow nursing researchers to design future research approaches to address such issues as HRF. Implication for practice The findings from this pilot study may take us one step closer to the development of useful biomarker targets for fatigue status. Specific and reliable tests are needed to diagnosis, monitor and treat fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22084402

  16. Differential stimulation by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha isoforms of the estrogen-activated promoter of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1997-01-01

    The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins alpha and beta (C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta) are highly expressed in liver and are believed to function in maintaining the differentiated state of the hepatocytes, C/EBP alpha appears to be a critical regulator of genes involved in metabolic p

  17. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis

  18. Expression of the class II tumor suppressor gene RIG1 is directly regulated by p53 tumor suppressor in cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tzu-Hui; Chu, Chin-Chen; Jiang, Shun-Yuan; Hung, May-Whey; Ni, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Huai-En; Chang, Tsu-Chung

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies indicated that the RIG1 (RARRES3/TIG3) plays an important role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of RIG1 gene expression has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we identified a functional p53 response element (p53RE) in the RIG1 gene promoter. Transfection studies revealed that the RIG1 promoter activity was greatly enhanced by wild type but not mutated p53 protein. Sequence specific mutation of the p53RE abolished p53-mediated transactivation. Specific binding of p53 protein to the rig-p53RE was demonstrated using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Further studies confirmed that the expression of RIG1 mRNA and protein is enhanced through increased p53 protein in HepG2 or in H24-H1299 cells. In conclusion, our results indicated that RIG1 gene is a downstream target of p53 in cancer cell lines. PMID:22616991

  19. The mapping of the human 52-kD Ro/SSA autoantigen gene to human chromosome II, and its polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M.B.; Itoh, Kazuko (Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City (United States)); Fujisaku, Atsushi (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)); Pontarotti, P. (Centre de Recherches sur le Polymorphisme Genetique des Populations Humaines, Toulouse (France)); Mattei, M.G. (INSERM U 242, Marseille (France)); Neas, B.R. (Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City (United States) Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the ribonucleoprotein Ro/SSA occur in nearly half of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and are associated with lymphopenia, photosensitive dermatitis, and pulmonary and renal disease, which suggests that they have an immunopathologic role. The majority of Ro/SSA precipitin-positive patients produce serum antibodies that bind to the 60-kD and 52-kD Ro/SSA proteins. The authors previously isolated and determined the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone that encodes the 52-kD form of the human Ro/SSA protein. In the present study, they have determined the chromosomal location of the gene by in situ hybridization to the end of the short arm of chromosome 11. Hybridization of portions of the cDNA probe to restriction enzyme-digested DNA indicated the gene is composed of at least three exons. The exon encoding the putative zinc fingers of this protein was found to be distinct from that which encodes the leucine zipper. An RFLP of this gene was identified and is associated with the presence of lupus, primarily in black Americans. 60 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes.

  1. The ontogeny of scarless healing II: EGF and PDGF-B gene expression in fetal rat skin and fibroblasts as a function of gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Z M; Rhee, S J; Hsu, M; Chang, J; Krummel, T M; Longaker, M T

    2001-10-01

    Twenty years ago, surgeons noted the ability of early-gestation fetal skin to heal in a scarless manner. Since that time, numerous investigators have attempted to elucidate the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. As a result of this effort, it is now well established that many animals undergo a transition late in development from scarless cutaneous healing to a scar-forming, adultlike phenotype. The authors have been interested in the role played by cytokines known to be involved in the adult wound-healing process and how they relate to scarless repair. They therefore asked the following question: Are genes for epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) expressed differentially as a function of gestational age in fetal rat skin and dermal fibroblasts? To answer this question, skin from fetal Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 56) at time points that represented both the scarless and scar-forming periods of rat gestation was harvested. In addition, fibroblasts derived from fetal rat skin were cultured in vitro at similar times. These cells were expanded in culture and, when confluent, total ribonucleic acid from both fibroblasts and whole skin was extracted and subjected to Northern blot analysis with probes for EGF and PDGF-B. Results demonstrated that neither EGF nor PDGF-B gene expression changed markedly as a function of gestational age in fetal fibroblasts alone. In whole skin, however, both EGF and PDGF-B demonstrated a marked decrease in gene expression with increasing gestational age. Furthermore, the most striking decrease in gene expression for both cytokines came between 16 and 18 days of gestation-the transition point between scarless and scar-forming repair in the fetal rat. These data suggest that EGF and PDGF may play a role in the mechanism of scarless cutaneous repair. Moreover, it appears that fetal fibroblasts are not the cell type responsible for this differential gene expression. These results raise questions about the

  2. Clone-based comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes retrieved from biodeteriorating brick buildings of the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the bacterial communities in four samples of historical materials (plaster, brick, and wood) derived from buildings located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Brzezinka, Poland. For this purpose a molecular strategy based on the construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries was used. In total, 138 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (∼600bp) were obtained and compared. The clones belonged to phyla Proteobacteria (classes: Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The plaster samples predominantly contained clones closely related to Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, brick samples contained Gammaproteobacteria, while wood samples had Actinobacteria clones. Interestingly, the historic plaster and brick samples contained the following bacteria with known and described biodeterioration potential: chemoorganotrophic Streptomyces sp. and Pseudonocardia sp., halotolerant or halophilic Rubrobacter sp., Salinisphaera sp. and Halomonas sp. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that amongst the bacterial species detected and identified none occurred on all the tested historical materials. The 16S rRNA clone library construction method was successfully used for the detection and diversity determination of bacterial communities inhabiting brick barracks located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Brzezinka.

  3. NnHSP17.5, a cytosolic class II small heat shock protein gene from Nelumbo nucifera, contributes to seed germination vigor and seedling thermotolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Huhui; Chu, Pu; Li, Yin; Tan, Bin; Ding, Yu; Tsang, Edward W T; Jiang, Liwen; Wu, Keqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2012-02-01

    In plants, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are unusually abundant and diverse proteins involved in various abiotic stresses, but their functions in seed vigor remain to be fully explored. In this study, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a sHSP gene, NnHSP17.5, from sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) in seed germination vigor and seedling thermotolerance. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicate that NnHSP17.5 is a cytosolic class II sHSP, which was further supported by the cytosolic localization of the NnHSP17.5-YFP fusion protein. NnHSP17.5 was specifically expressed in seeds under normal conditions, and was strongly up-regulated in germinating seeds upon heat and oxidative stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis seeds ectopically expressing NnHSP17.5 displayed enhanced seed germination vigor and exhibited increased superoxide dismutase activity after accelerated aging treatment. In addition, improved basal thermotolerance was also observed in the transgenic seedlings. Taken together, this work highlights the importance of a plant cytosolic class II sHSP both in seed germination vigor and seedling thermotolerance.

  4. Wide Distribution of a Novel pmoA-Like Gene Copy among Type II Methanotrophs, and Its Expression in Methylocystis Strain SC2

    OpenAIRE

    Tchawa Yimga, Merlin; Dunfield, Peter F.; Ricke, Peter; Heyer, Jürgen; Liesack, Werner

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if a novel pmoA-like gene (pmoA2) recently discovered in the methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylocystis strain SC2 (P. F. Dunfield, M. Tchawa Yimga, S. D. Dedysh, U. Berger, W. Liesack, and J. Heyer, FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 41:17-26, 2002) is present in other methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and if it is expressed. A newly developed primer combination (pmoA206f-pmoA703b) allowed a differential detection of pmoA1 and pmoA2. By using this primer combination...

  5. Part II: Functional delivery of a neurotherapeutic gene to neural stem cells using minicircle DNA and nanoparticles: Translational advantages for regenerative neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Both neurotrophin-based therapy and neural stem cell (NSC)-based strategies have progressed to clinical trials for treatment of neurological diseases and injuries. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in particular can confer neuroprotective and neuro-regenerative effects in preclinical studies, complementing the cell replacement benefits of NSCs. Therefore, combining both approaches by genetically-engineering NSCs to express BDNF is an attractive approach to achieve combinatorial therapy for complex neural injuries. Current genetic engineering approaches almost exclusively employ viral vectors for gene delivery to NSCs though safety and scalability pose major concerns for clinical translation and applicability. Magnetofection, a non-viral gene transfer approach deploying magnetic nanoparticles and DNA with magnetic fields offers a safe alternative but significant improvements are required to enhance its clinical application for delivery of large sized therapeutic plasmids. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of using minicircles with magnetofection technology to safely engineer NSCs to overexpress BDNF. Primary mouse NSCs overexpressing BDNF generated increased daughter neuronal cell numbers post-differentiation, with accelerated maturation over a four-week period. Based on our findings we highlight the clinical potential of minicircle/magnetofection technology for therapeutic delivery of key neurotrophic agents.

  6. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B. [Aahus Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Incorporating rich background knowledge for gene named entity classification and recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhihao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene named entity classification and recognition are crucial preliminary steps of text mining in biomedical literature. Machine learning based methods have been used in this area with great success. In most state-of-the-art systems, elaborately designed lexical features, such as words, n-grams, and morphology patterns, have played a central part. However, this type of feature tends to cause extreme sparseness in feature space. As a result, out-of-vocabulary (OOV terms in the training data are not modeled well due to lack of information. Results We propose a general framework for gene named entity representation, called feature coupling generalization (FCG. The basic idea is to generate higher level features using term frequency and co-occurrence information of highly indicative features in huge amount of unlabeled data. We examine its performance in a named entity classification task, which is designed to remove non-gene entries in a large dictionary derived from online resources. The results show that new features generated by FCG outperform lexical features by 5.97 F-score and 10.85 for OOV terms. Also in this framework each extension yields significant improvements and the sparse lexical features can be transformed into both a lower dimensional and more informative representation. A forward maximum match method based on the refined dictionary produces an F-score of 86.2 on BioCreative 2 GM test set. Then we combined the dictionary with a conditional random field (CRF based gene mention tagger, achieving an F-score of 89.05, which improves the performance of the CRF-based tagger by 4.46 with little impact on the efficiency of the recognition system. A demo of the NER system is available at http://202.118.75.18:8080/bioner.

  8. Design of image codec based on Bandelet transform using a NIOS II processor Diseño de un codec de imágenes basado en la transformada Bandelet utilizando un procesador NIOSII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime-Andres Arteaga

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a compression system for grayscale images based on the Bandelet transform. The basis functions of the Bandelet transform are constructed as a set of vectors that indicate the directions in which the image has regular variations of gray. The compression system was designed as a SoPC and was composed of a NIOSII processor with a Cyclone IIEP2C70, a touch-panel, and a SD-Card, using 13% of the logic elements and 27% of the memory bits of the FPGA. The Wavelet filters were accelerated in hardware with NIOS II C2H Compiler, obtaining an execution time reduction of 8.8%. Experimental results show that Bandelet compression has an improvement of up to 2 dB over a Wavelet compression when the image has geometric components with high contrast.Este trabajo presenta el diseño e implementación de un codec de imágenes en escalas de gris basado en la transformada Bandelet. Las funciones base para la transformada Bandelet se implementan a partir de vectores de flujo geométrico que indican la dirección en la que una región de la imagen tiene variaciones regulares de los niveles de gris. El codec se diseñó como un sistema SoPC con un procesador NIOS II embebido en el FPGA Cyclone II EP2C70, con una pantalla táctil, y una SD-Card, usando el 13% de elementos lógicos y el 27% de bits de memoria del FPGA. Los filtros Wavelet fueron acelerados en hardware con NIOS II C2H Compiler, logrando una reducción en el tiempo de ejecución del 8,8%. Las pruebas realizadas muestran que la compresión con funciones Bandelet llega a ser hasta 2 dB superior a la compresión realizada con funciones Wavelet 2D cuando la imagen tiene componentes geométricos con alto contraste.

  9. Apoptosis and the BCL-2 gene family - patterns of expression and prognostic value in STAGE I and II follicular center lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The prognostic significance of spontaneous levels of apoptosis and Bcl-2, Bax, and Bcl-x protein expression in follicular center lymphoma (FCL) is unknown. The objectives of this retrospective study were (1) to investigate the relationship between pretreatment apoptosis levels and long-term treatment outcome in patients with Stage I and II FCL; (2) to define the incidence and patterns of Bax and Bcl-x protein expression in human FC; and (3) to determine the relationship of Bcl-2, Bax, and Bcl-x expression with spontaneous apoptosis levels and clinical outcome in localized FCL. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1988, 144 patients with Stage I or II FCL were treated. Hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained tissue sections of pretreatment specimens were retrieved for 96 patients. Treatment consisted of regional radiation therapy (XRT) for 25 patients, combined modality therapy (CMT) consisting of combination chemotherapy and XRT for 57 patients, and other treatments for 14 patients. Median follow-up for living patients was nearly 12 years. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated by dividing the number of apoptotic cells by the total number of cells counted and multiplying by 100. Expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and Bcl-x proteins was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results: The mean and median AI values for the entire group were 0.53 and 0.4, respectively (range: 0-5.2). The AI strongly correlated with cytologic grade, with mean AI values of 0.25 for grade 1, 0.56 for grade 2, and 0.84 for grade 3 (p < 0.0005; Kendall correlation). A positive correlation was present between grouped AI and grouped mitotic index (MI) (p = 0.014). For patients treated with CMT, an AI < 0.4 correlated with improved freedom from relapse (FFR) (p = 0.0145) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0081). An AI < 0.4 did not correlate with clinical outcome for the entire cohort or for patients receiving XRT only. Staining of tumor follicles for the Bcl-2 protein was positive, variable

  10. Construction and Comparison of Four Lentivirus Vector Silencing in Chicken(Gus gallus) Invariant Chain Gene(Ii)%4个沉默鸡恒定链基因(Ii)慢病毒载体的构建及其效果比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    操储云; 张大淦; 余为一; 陈芳芳

    2014-01-01

    恒定链(invariant chain,Ii)是脊椎动物重要的免疫分子,在主要组织相容性复合体(major histocompatibility complex,MHC)Ⅱ类分子递呈抗原中起重要作用.为研究鸡(Gus gallus)Ii与MHCⅡ类分子的关系,本研究构建了4个沉默Ii基因的慢病毒表达载体,并比较了其干扰效果.首先,用自行设计合成的4条鸡Ii基因干扰序列,分别经一步退火法获得双链短发夹RNA(short hairpin RNA,shRNA),并将其用双酶切法插入慢病毒载体pLL3.7.4个构建的慢病毒重组载体经酶切和测序鉴定,分别命名为pLL-Ii-shRNA236、pLL-Ii-shRNA376、pLL-Ii-shRNA527和pLL-Ii-shRNA539.然后把这些重组载体分别转染293T细胞(转染腺病毒E1A基因(lethal infection gene)的人肾上皮细胞系),进行病毒包装,再用包装的慢病毒感染鸡源巨噬细胞HD-11.结果表明,重组载体感染的293T细胞表达绿色荧光蛋白,用包装的慢病毒接种293T细胞,其滴度达2.2× 107~5.1×107 TU/mL;接种HD-11细胞的感染率均达到95%以上.最后用荧光定量PCR方法检测其沉默鸡源巨噬细胞HD-11的鸡Ii mRNA的效率,与对照组相比,4个重组慢病毒干扰效率分别为37%、52%、88%和78%;其中,pLL-Ii-shRNA527的干扰效率最高.综上所述,本研究从4个构建的重组载体中筛选出1个高效沉默鸡巨噬细胞Ii基因重组载体,并提示shRNA序列是决定沉默特定基因的关键.实验结果为研究鸡Ii在递呈抗原中与其他免疫分子的关系提供了基础资料.

  11. Cilengitide with metronomic temozolomide, procarbazine, and standard radiotherapy in patients with glioblastoma and unmethylated MGMT gene promoter in ExCentric, an open-label phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasraw, Mustafa; Lee, Adrian; McCowatt, Sally; Kerestes, Zoltan; Buyse, Marc E; Back, Michael; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Ackland, Stephen; Wheeler, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme with unmethylated MGMT promoter has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of 12 months. This phase II study investigated the efficacy and safety of combining the selective integrin inhibitor cilengitide with a combination of metronomic temozolomide and procarbazine for these patients. Eligible patients (newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed supratentorial glioblastoma with unmethylated MGMT promoter) were entered into this multicentre study. Cilengitide (2000 mg IV twice weekly) was commenced 1 week prior to radiotherapy combined with daily temozolomide (60 mg/m(2)) and procarbazine (50 or 100 mg) and, after 4 weeks' break, followed by six adjuvant cycles of temozolomide (50-60 mg/m(2)) and procarbazine (50 or 100 mg) on days 1-20, every 28 days. Cilengitide was continued for up to 12 months or until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint for efficacy was a 12-month overall survival rate of 65 %. Twenty-nine patients completed study treatment. Sixteen patients survived for 12 months or more, an overall survival rate of 55 %. The median overall survival was 14.5 months (95 % CI 11.1-19.6) and the median progression-free survival was 7.4 months (95 % CI 6.1-8). Cilengitide combined with metronomic temozolomide and procarbazine in MGMT-promoter unmethylated glioblastoma did not improve survival compared with historical data and does not warrant further investigation. PMID:26935578

  12. Assignment of the human angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene (AGTR2) to chromosome Xq22-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassagne, C.; Meloche, S. [Hotel-Dieu de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Beatty, B.G. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-01-20

    Angiotensin II (AII), the biologically active effector of the renin-angiotensin system, is a major regulator of blood pressure and electrolyte balance and a growth factor for diverse cell types. AII exerts its physiological effects by interacting with two pharmacologically distinct subtypes of receptors, designated AT{sub 1}, and AT{sub 2}. Most of the known responses to AII are mediated by the AT{sub 1} subtype, whereas the function of the AT{sub 2} receptor remains largely unknown. AT{sub 2} receptor expression is abundant in particular tissues such as adrenal medulla, specific brain regions, uterine myometrium, and ovarian granuloma cells. This specific localization in adult coupled to the demonstration that some actions of AII such as secretion of luteinizing hormone and prolactine, dilation of brain arterioles, or drinking response in rats can be inhibited in vitro by an AT{sub 2} receptor antagonist suggests that the AT{sub 2} subtype may play a role in neuronal and reproductive function. In addition, a growing amount of evidence indicates that the AT{sub 2} receptor may play a most important role in processes involving cellular growth and differentiation. It is abundantly and widely expressed in the mesenchymal tissues of the developing fetus and in the immature brain and is up-regulated in the heart and in vascular smooth muscle cells in the first days following birth. Moreover, AT{sub 2} receptor expression is enhanced in the adult in wound healing, in the neointima of injured vessels, and in pheochromocytoma. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  14. The Markyt visualisation, prediction and benchmark platform for chemical and gene entity recognition at BioCreative/CHEMDNER challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Martin; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gael; Rabal, Obdulia; Vazquez, Miguel; Oyarzabal, Julen; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Valencia, Alfonso; Krallinger, Martin; Lourenço, Anália

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical text mining methods and technologies have improved significantly in the last decade. Considerable efforts have been invested in understanding the main challenges of biomedical literature retrieval and extraction and proposing solutions to problems of practical interest. Most notably, community-oriented initiatives such as the BioCreative challenge have enabled controlled environments for the comparison of automatic systems while pursuing practical biomedical tasks. Under this scenario, the present work describes the Markyt Web-based document curation platform, which has been implemented to support the visualisation, prediction and benchmark of chemical and gene mention annotations at BioCreative/CHEMDNER challenge. Creating this platform is an important step for the systematic and public evaluation of automatic prediction systems and the reusability of the knowledge compiled for the challenge. Markyt was not only critical to support the manual annotation and annotation revision process but also facilitated the comparative visualisation of automated results against the manually generated Gold Standard annotations and comparative assessment of generated results. We expect that future biomedical text mining challenges and the text mining community may benefit from the Markyt platform to better explore and interpret annotations and improve automatic system predictions.Database URL: http://www.markyt.org, https://github.com/sing-group/Markyt. PMID:27542845

  15. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k+) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k+ gene expression where the H S V-1 t k+ gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([18 F]F H P G; [18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([123/131 I]I V R F U; [124/131I]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [123/131I]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k+ reporter gene will be presented

  16. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  17. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  18. Association of HLA Class I and Class II genes with bcr-abl transcripts in leukemia patients with t(9;22 (q34;q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Pedro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the site of breakpoint in t(9;22 (q34;q11, bcr-abl fusion in leukemia patients is associated with different types of transcript proteins. In this study we have seen the association of HLA genes with different types of bcr-abl transcripts. The association could predict the bcr-abl peptide presentation by particular HLA molecules. Methods The study included a total of 189 patients of mixed ethnicity with chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia who were being considered for bone marrow transplantation. Typing of bcr-abl transcripts was done by reverse transcriptase PCR method. HLA typing was performed by molecular methods. The bcr-abl and HLA association was studied by calculating the relative risks and chi-square test. Results Significant negative associations (p Conclusions The negative associations of a particular bcr-abl transcript with specific HLA alleles suggests that these alleles play a critical role in presenting peptides derived from the chimeric proteins and eliciting a successful T-cell cytotoxic response. Knowledge of differential associations between HLA phenotypes and bcr-abl fusion transcript types would help in developing better strategies for immunization with the bcr-abl peptides against t(9;22 (q34;q11-positive leukemia.

  19. DNA-mediated gene transfer in plant protoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Riu, Key Zung; So, In Sup; Hong, Kyung Ae [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-31

    The neomycin phosphotransferase II gene(NPT-II) was introduced into geranium (Pelargonium zonale hybrids) protoplasts by using PEG or electroporation method. The presence of the introduced DNA in the protoplasts and the expressions of the gene in the transformed cells were examined. The presence of the NPT-II DNA in the protoplasts were detected by polymerase chain reaction. The expressions of NPT-II gene in the transformed cells were confirmed by the NPT-II assay. (author)

  20. Association of HLA Class I and Class II genes with bcr-abl transcripts in leukemia patients with t(9;22) (q34;q11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the site of breakpoint in t(9;22) (q34;q11), bcr-abl fusion in leukemia patients is associated with different types of transcript proteins. In this study we have seen the association of HLA genes with different types of bcr-abl transcripts. The association could predict the bcr-abl peptide presentation by particular HLA molecules. The study included a total of 189 patients of mixed ethnicity with chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia who were being considered for bone marrow transplantation. Typing of bcr-abl transcripts was done by reverse transcriptase PCR method. HLA typing was performed by molecular methods. The bcr-abl and HLA association was studied by calculating the relative risks and chi-square test. Significant negative associations (p < 0.05) were observed with HLA-A*02 (b2a2, e1a2), -A*68 (b2a2, b3a2, e1a2), -B*14 (b2a2, b3a2, e1a2), -B*15 (b2a2, b3a2), -B*40 (b2a2), -DQB1*0303 (b2a2, b3a2), -DQB1*0603 (b2a2), -DRB1*0401 (e1a2), -DRB1*0701 (b3a2), and -DRB1*1101 (b2a2). The negative associations of a particular bcr-abl transcript with specific HLA alleles suggests that these alleles play a critical role in presenting peptides derived from the chimeric proteins and eliciting a successful T-cell cytotoxic response. Knowledge of differential associations between HLA phenotypes and bcr-abl fusion transcript types would help in developing better strategies for immunization with the bcr-abl peptides against t(9;22) (q34;q11)-positive leukemia

  1. AT(1) receptor Gαq protein-independent signalling transcriptionally activates only a few genes directly, but robustly potentiates gene regulation from the β2-adrenergic receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte Lund; Knudsen, Steen; Schneider, Mikael;

    2011-01-01

    of Gαq protein-dependent and -independent regulation of AT(1)R mediated gene expression. We found angiotensin II to regulate 212 genes, whereas Gαq-independent signalling obtained with the biased agonist, SII angiotensin II only regulated few genes. Interestingly, SII angiotensin II, like Ang II vastly...

  2. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke [Teikyo Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  3. PORT II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  4. Gene Analysis of Chinese Barley Dwarf Germplasm Resources II. Location of the Dwarf Genes on Chromosomes%中国大麦矮秆种质资源的基因分析 II. 矮秆基因的染色体定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张京

    2001-01-01

    根据连锁遗传原理,利用全套染色体形态性状标记系,对20份中国大麦矮秆种质资源的矮秆基因,进行了染色体定位。结果表明:15份单基因矮秆中,有1份其矮秆基因与宽护颖基因w连锁,位于2(2H)染色体短臂上;10份的矮秆基因与uz基因等位,由3(3H)长臂携带;4份的矮秆基因与钩芒基因K连锁,位于4(4H)长臂上。5份双基因矮秆中,有3份的矮秆基因分别位于2(2H)短臂和4(4H)长臂上;1份的矮秆基因各由其3(3H)和4(4H)长臂携带;其余1份的两对矮秆基因,1对与uz基因等位,由3(3H)长臂携带,另1对则与宽护颖基因w连锁,位于2(2H)短臂之上。%Twenty dwarf sources of Chinese barley were crossed to a set ofmarker stocks. Based on the linkage tests with the marker traits and genes, the dwarfing genes in Chinese dwarf barley were located on different chromosomes. Fifteen of the 20 dwarf sources were recessive mono杔ocus. Among them, BQK carried a pair of dwarfing genes on its short arms of 2(2H) chromosome, linking to the wide outer glume gene w; HZA 77 etc. 10 dwarf sources held dwarfing genes allelic to semi朾rachytic gene uz on their long arms of 3(3H) chromosomes respectively; 91G318, 91D27, 11012.2 and JJ had dwarfing genes on their long arms of 4(4H) chromosomes, which linked with the hooded awn gene K. The remaining five dwarf sources were two杔ocus. Two recessive loci were found to be on 2HS and 4HL respectively in DQQK, ZLL and ZLLQK. A pair of incomplete dominant genes were located on 2HS, and another pair of recessive ones located on 3HL in 1974E. Two recessive loci of Yan 66 were separately located on its 3HL and 4HL.

  5. Detection of gene amplification in MYCN, C-MYC, MYCL1, ERBB2, EGFR, AKT2, and human papilloma virus in samples from cervical smear normal cytology, intraepithelial cervical neoplasia (CIN I, II, III, and cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabeiba Adriana García

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El cáncer cervical es el segundo cáncer más importante en mujeres a nivel mundial y es la segunda causa de muerte por cáncer en mujeres. Se ha demostrado que el proceso de carcinogénesis cervical presenta componentes tanto genéticos como epigenéticos y medio ambientales. En la actualidad, hay gran interés en la búsqueda de marcadores moleculares asociados con la progresión de esta enfermedad, uno de los posibles mecanismos y que además está poco estudiado en cáncer cervical es la amplificación génica de algunos oncogenes como la familia MYC, EGFR y AKT entre otros. Objetivos: Detectar la amplificación génica de MYCN, C-MYC, MYCL1, ERBB2, EGFR y AKT2 además de la presencia del virus de papiloma humano en cepillados cervicales en mujeres con citología normal o con neoplasia intraepitelial cervical (NIC I, II y III o con cáncer cervical. Métodos: Se genotipificó mediante reverse line blot (RLB el virus de papiloma humano (VPH y se determinó el estado de amplificación génica de los genes mencionados mediante PCR en tiempo real utilizando sondas taqman. Resultados: El VPH se encontró presente en 4% de las pacientes con citología normal, en 48% en NIC I, 63.6% en NIC II, 64% en NIC III y 70.8% en cáncer cervical. Los genes MYCN, MYCL1 y ERBB2 mostraron mayor amplificación en lesiones de alto grado y cáncer con diferencias estadísticamente significativas  a las lesiones de bajo grado y citología normal, en 39.1%, 34.7% y 30.4% respectivamente. Además, se encontraron amplificados los genes C-MYC, EGFR y AKT2, en muestras de pacientes con cáncer cervical, en 12%, 18% y 13% respectivamente. Sin embargo, no se observaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas con respecto a las lesiones de alto y bajo grado y citología normal. Conclusión: En las lesiones de alto grado como en cáncer cervical, se encuentra mayor prevalencia del virus al igual que se detectan mayor cantidad de alteraciones gen

  6. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A;

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested whet...

  7. Single molecule studies of RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Abigail E; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is the first step in gene expression and a key determinant of cellular regulation. Elucidating the mechanism by which RNAP II synthesizes RNA is therefore vital to determining how genes are controlled under diverse biological conditions. Significant advances in understanding RNAP II transcription have been achieved using classical biochemical and structural techniques; however, aspects of the transcription mechanism cannot be assessed using these approaches. The application of single-molecule techniques to study RNAP II transcription has provided new insight only obtainable by studying molecules in this complex system one at a time.

  8. Análise da mutação G20210A no gene da protrombina (fator II em pacientes com suspeita de trombofilia no sul do Brasil Analysis of prothrombin G20210A mutation (factor II in patients with suspected trombophilia in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Edgar Herkenhoff

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A protrombina (fator II é uma proteína sanguínea sintetizada no fígado com a presença de vitamina K. É a precursora da trombina, que induz a formação de fibrina. Foi descrita uma mutação no gene da protrombina G20210A, associada diretamente a altos níveis de protrombina no sangue e, consequentemente, à trombofilia. Essa variante alélica consiste em mutação pontual, também chamada de polimorfismo de nucleotídeo simples (SNP, ocasionando a troca de uma guanina por uma adenina no nucleotídeo 20210, localizado em um sítio de clivagem do precursor do ácido ribonucleico mensageiro (mRNA. Essa troca caracteriza o alelo A e a ausência da mutação do alelo G. OBJETIVO: Quantificar o número de indivíduos homozigotos para alelo G, homozigotos para alelo A e heterozigotos, cujas amostras foram enviadas para o laboratório Genolab Análises Genéticas, abrangendo os estados do Paraná e Santa Catarina, no período de 1º de janeiro de 2009 a 10 de outubro de 2010. MÉTODOS: Análise de mutação pontual por reação em cadeia da polimerase em tempo real (RT-PCR. RESULTADOS: Obtivemos o número de 243 indivíduos e desse total 51,03% eram oriundos do estado do Paraná, enquanto 48,97%, oriundos do estado de Santa Catarina. Do total analisado, 88,89% possuíam o genótipo para homozigoto G, e nenhum indivíduo foi encontrado com mutação para homozigoto A. Apenas 11,11% possuíam genótipo heterozigoto. O estado de Santa Catarina apresentou frequência superior para genótipo heterozigoto em relação ao Paraná. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo mostrou que é recomendável a identificação do genótipo para esse gene em pacientes com suspeita de trombofilia nos dois estados.INTRODUCTION: Prothrombin (factor II is a blood protein synthesized in the liver in the presence of vitamin K. It is a thrombin precursor, which induces fibrin formation. Prothrombin G20210A mutation and high prothrombin levels have been closely associated

  9. Carbonic Anhydrase II Deficiency in a Saudi Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Alhuzaim, Omar N; Almohareb, Ohoud M; Safiya M. Sherbeeni

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Carbonic anhydrase (CA) II deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the CA II gene that leads to osteopetrosis, renal tubular acidosis (RTA), and cerebral calcification. Our aim is to present a patient with the classic triad of CA II deficiency syndrome to enhance the awareness about this rare syndrome. METHODS We describe the clinical and radiological findings of a Saudi woman patient with CA II deficiency syndrome. RESULTS A Saudi woman in her 20s pr...

  10. Highly efficient expression of interleukin-2 under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene enhances protective immune responses of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS DNA vaccine in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Du

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV had caused catastrophic losses in swine industry in China. The current inactivated vaccine provided only limited protection, and the attenuated live vaccine could protect piglets against the HP-PRRSV but there was a possibility that the attenuated virus returned to high virulence. In this study, the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1© was modified under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene and the modified vector pMVAX1© was constructed. Porcine interleukin-2 (IL-2 and GP3-GP5 fusion protein of HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN were highly expressed by pMVAX1©. Mice inoculated with pMVAX1©-GP35 developed significantly higher PRRSV-specific antibody responses and T cell proliferation than those vaccinated with pVAX1©-GP35. pMVAX1©-GP35 was selected as PRRS DNA vaccine candidate and co-administrated with pVAX1©-IL-2 or pMVAX1©-IL-2 in pigs. pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 could provide enhanced PRRSV-specific antibody responses, T cell proliferation, Th1-type and Th2-type cytokine responses and CTL responses than pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35. Following homologous challenge with HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN, similar with attenuated PRRS vaccine group, pigs inoculated with pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 showed no clinical signs, almost no lung lesions and no viremia, as compared to those in pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 groups. It indicated that pMVAX1©-IL-2 effectively increases humoral and cell mediated immune responses of pMVAX1©-GP35. Co-administration of pMVAX1©-IL-2 and pMVAX1©-GP35 might be attractive candidate vaccines for preventing HP-PRRSV infections.

  11. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  12. ProNormz--an integrated approach for human proteins and protein kinases normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Suresh; Raja, Kalpana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2014-02-01

    The task of recognizing and normalizing protein name mentions in biomedical literature is a challenging task and important for text mining applications such as protein-protein interactions, pathway reconstruction and many more. In this paper, we present ProNormz, an integrated approach for human proteins (HPs) tagging and normalization. In Homo sapiens, a greater number of biological processes are regulated by a large human gene family called protein kinases by post translational phosphorylation. Recognition and normalization of human protein kinases (HPKs) is considered to be important for the extraction of the underlying information on its regulatory mechanism from biomedical literature. ProNormz distinguishes HPKs from other HPs besides tagging and normalization. To our knowledge, ProNormz is the first normalization system available to distinguish HPKs from other HPs in addition to gene normalization task. ProNormz incorporates a specialized synonyms dictionary for human proteins and protein kinases, a set of 15 string matching rules and a disambiguation module to achieve the normalization. Experimental results on benchmark BioCreative II training and test datasets show that our integrated approach achieve a fairly good performance and outperforms more sophisticated semantic similarity and disambiguation systems presented in BioCreative II GN task. As a freely available web tool, ProNormz is useful to developers as extensible gene normalization implementation, to researchers as a standard for comparing their innovative techniques, and to biologists for normalization and categorization of HPs and HPKs mentions in biomedical literature. URL: http://www.biominingbu.org/pronormz.

  13. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  14. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  15. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelta dos Santos

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  16. Gene promoters dictate histone occupancy within genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Roberto; Erickson, Benjamin; Zhang, Lian; Kim, Hyunmin; Valiquett, Elan; Bentley, David

    2013-10-01

    Spt6 is a transcriptional elongation factor and histone chaperone that reassembles transcribed chromatin. Genome-wide H3 mapping showed that Spt6 preferentially maintains nucleosomes within the first 500 bases of genes and helps define nucleosome-depleted regions in 5' and 3' flanking sequences. In Spt6-depleted cells, H3 loss at 5' ends correlates with reduced pol II density suggesting enhanced transcription elongation. Consistent with its 'Suppressor of Ty' (Spt) phenotype, Spt6 inactivation caused localized H3 eviction over 1-2 nucleosomes at 5' ends of Ty elements. H3 displacement differed between genes driven by promoters with 'open'/DPN and 'closed'/OPN chromatin conformations with similar pol II densities. More eviction occurred on genes with 'closed' promoters, associated with 'noisy' transcription. Moreover, swapping of 'open' and 'closed' promoters showed that they can specify distinct downstream patterns of histone eviction/deposition. These observations suggest a novel function for promoters in dictating histone dynamics within genes possibly through effects on transcriptional bursting or elongation rate.

  17. Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and dioxouranium(II) complexes of thiophene-2-aldehyde-4-phenyl-thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterisation of thiophene-2-aldehyde-4-phenylthiosemicarbazone (TAPTSC) and its metal complexes with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO(II). (author). 30 refs., 1 table

  18. Mutation in intron 6 of the hamster Mitf gene leads to skipping of the subsequent exon and creates a novel animal model for the human Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    OpenAIRE

    Graw, Jochen; Pretsch, Walter; Löster, Jana

    2003-01-01

    In the course of analysis of ENU-induced mutations in Syrian hamsters, a novel dominant anophthalmic white mutant (Wh(V203)) with hearing loss was recovered. Because of this phenotype and a close linkage to the Tpi gene, the Mitf gene was considered as a candidate gene. In the Mitf cDNA, a deletion of 76 bp covering the entire exon 7 was detected. Further molecular analysis revealed a T --> A exchange 16 bp upstream of the end of intron 6, leading to skipping of exon 7. These 16 bp at the end...

  19. Reevaluating the Serotype II Capsular Locus of Streptococcus agalactiae▿

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, E. R.; Melo-Cristino, J.; Ramirez, M.

    2007-01-01

    We report a novel sequence of the serotype II capsular locus of group B streptococcus that resolves inconsistencies among the results of various groups and the sequence in GenBank. This locus was found in diverse lineages and presents genes consistent with the complete synthesis of the type II polysaccharide.

  20. Degradation of the Bile Salt Export Pump at Endoplasmic Reticulum in Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis Type II (PFIC II)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lin; Dong, Huiping; Soroka, Carol J.; WEI, NING; Boyer, James L.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (Bsep) represents the major bile salt transport system at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. When examined in model cell lines, genetic mutations in the BSEP gene impair its targeting and transport function, contributing to the pathogenesis of PFIC II. PFIC II mutations are known to lead to a deficiency of BSEP in human hepatocytes, suggesting that PFIC II mutants are unstable and degraded in the cell. To investigate this further, we have characterized the impa...

  1. Inner complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Be(II) and dioxouranium(VI) with salicylaldehyde semicarbazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, P.L.; Agarwala, B.V.; Dey, A.K. (Allahabad Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1980-08-01

    Salicylaldehyde semicarbazone (SALSC), yields complexes, ML/sub 2/.2H/sub 2/O (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II)) and ML/sub 2/ (M = Be(II) and UO/sub 2/(VI)). The complexes have been characterized by analytical, spectral, magnetic and thermogravimetric studies. SALSC acts as a singly negatively charged bidentate anion, and two such anions coordinate to the metal ion through the hydroxyl oxygen and nitrogen of the C = N group yielding a neutral chelate. The complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) are paramagnetic with magnetic moment values 4.93, 3.35 and 1.98 BM, respectively. The magnetic and spectral data suggest octahedral geometry of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO/sub 2/(VI) complexes, whereas the Be(II) complex is tetrahedral. TG study reveals the order of thermal stability as : Zn(II) approximately equal to Ni(II) >Be(II) approximately equal to Cd(II) > UO/sub 2/(VI) approximately equal to Co(II) approximately equal to Cu(II).

  2. Immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honjo, T. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Alt, F.W. (Columbia Univ., Dobbs Ferry, NY (USA). Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. (Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK))

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  3. First Spanish case of thalassemia major due to a compound heterozygosity for the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) and codon 39 (C --> T) mutations of the beta-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropero, Paloma; Villegas, Ana; Muñoz, Juan; Briceño, Olga; Mora, Asunción; Salvador, María; Polo, Marta; González, Fernando A

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the first case in Spain of a severe form of beta-thalassemia (thal) due to a compound heterozygosity for the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) and the nonsense codon 39 (C --> T) mutations. Five members of a family from Cadiz (southern Spain) were studied. The proband was an 8-year-old girl diagnosed as anemic at the age of 13 months. Her father had the codon 39 (C --> T) mutation and her mother the C --> A change at nucleotide (nt) 848 of IVS-II. Haplotype analysis showed that the proband was a compound heterozygote for haplotypes I [+ --> + +] and VII [+ --> +]. This is the first description in Spain of the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) mutation. It appears, from restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, that this mutation has a different origin in the various populations, where it was found. This observation shows that in this case the association of a beta(0)- and a beta(+)-thal mutation does not lead to a thalassemia intermedia but to a severe thalassemia with very low hemoglobin (Hb) levels. From a therapeutic point of view, early introduction of a transfusion regimen may improve the clinical picture of these children, allowing for better development and growth. PMID:16540410

  4. Respuesta transcripcional temprana de los genes SCL y COMT y disminución de la eficiencia del fotosistema II en plántulas de Pinus radiata frente a infecciones con Macrophomina phaseolina

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido Bigotes, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    En la interacción planta-patógeno, tras el reconocimiento del patógeno por parte del hospedero, se activa la señalización intracelular y la expresión de factores de transcripción que regulan las respuestas celulares de defensa. Entre estos factores de transcripción se encuentran genes maestros que activan otros genes de expresión tardía. Conocer estos mecanismos moleculares aportará información base a los programas de mejoramiento genético para el desarrollo de estrategias orientadas a obtene...

  5. COL5A1: Genetic mapping and exclusion as candidate gene in families with nail-patella syndrome, tuberous sclerosis 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Northrup, H.; Au, K.S. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-10

    COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, has been considered a candidate gene for certain diseases based on chromosomal location and/or disease phenotype. We have employed 3{prime}-untranslated region RFLPs to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis 1, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type H, and nail-patella syndrome. In addition, we describe a polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) within a COL5A1 intron. This SSR is used to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber disease) and to add COL5A1 to the existing map of {open_quotes}index{close_quotes} markers of chromosome 9 by evaluation of the COL5A1 locus on the CEPH 40-family reference pedigree set. This genetic mapping places COL5A1 between markers D9S66 and D9S67. 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Spectrophotometric study of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes with isatin- β-thiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDRA S. KONSTANTINOVIC

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition and stability of the complexes of isatin-b-thiosemicarba­zone with Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II have been investigated us­ing spectrophotometric method at 30 °C and constant ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm-3 (KNO3 in 70 % ethanol. Experimental results indicate the formation of MeL and MeL2 complexes for Ni(II and Co(II, and MeL for Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes, whose stability constants, bn, have been calculated using a com­puteri­zed iterative method of successive approximation.

  7. The P450 gene superfamily: recommended nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebert, D W; Adesnik, M; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F; Kemper, B; Levin, W

    1987-02-01

    A nomenclature for the P450 gene superfamily is proposed based on evolution. Recommendations include Roman numerals for distinct gene families, capital letters for subfamilies, and Arabic numerals for individual genes. An updating of this list, which presently includes 65 entries, will be required every 1-2 years. Assignment of orthologous genes is presently uncertain in some cases--between widely diverged species and especially in the P450II family due to the large number of genes. As more is known, it might become necessary to change some gene assignments that are based on our present knowledge. PMID:3829886

  8. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Kris; Bentley, David L

    2012-01-01

    The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5' ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression. PMID:22567377

  9. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD: a large population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne;

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested whet...

  10. Splicing of Nascent RNA Coincides with Intron Exit from RNA Polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Oesterreich, Fernando; Herzel, Lydia; Straube, Korinna; Hujer, Katja; Howard, Jonathon; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-04-01

    Protein-coding genes in eukaryotes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and introns are removed from pre-mRNA by the spliceosome. Understanding the time lag between Pol II progression and splicing could provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of gene expression. Here, we present two single-molecule nascent RNA sequencing methods that directly determine the progress of splicing catalysis as a function of Pol II position. Endogenous genes were analyzed on a global scale in budding yeast. We show that splicing is 50% complete when Pol II is only 45 nt downstream of introns, with the first spliced products observed as introns emerge from Pol II. Perturbations that slow the rate of spliceosome assembly or speed up the rate of transcription caused splicing delays, showing that regulation of both processes determines in vivo splicing profiles. We propose that matched rates streamline the gene expression pathway, while allowing regulation through kinetic competition.

  11. Molecular characterization by high-resolution isoelectric focusing of the products encoded by the class II region loci of the major histocompatibility complex in humans. I. DR and DQ gene variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez de Cordoba, S; Nunez-Roldan, A; Winchester, R; Marshall, P; Carrier, C; Mollen, N; Walker, M; Ginsberg-Fellner, F; Rubinstein, P

    1987-09-01

    We describe a new approach to the analysis of the structural polymorphism of the DR beta, DQ alpha, and DQ beta polypeptide chains of human histocompatibility class II antigens. In comparison to conventional two-dimensional gel studies, this method provides sharper definition of the protein bands and side-by-side comparisons within the same gel, thereby permitting the detection of minor differences in the isoelectric points of the protein chains. Using this methodology we have analyzed the IEF polymorphism and the variability in the number of the DR beta chains encoded by different DR haplotypes. Twenty DR beta chain variants, which include the products of no less than two separate DR beta loci, have been thus far identified. Alleles at one of these loci are assumed to code for DR beta chains carrying the DR alloespecificities DR1, DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5, DRw6, DR7, and DR8. Alleles at a second DR beta locus encode DR beta chains that may be shared by serologically DR-different haplotypes and carry supertypic serologic specificities (i.e., DRw52 and DRw53). We also demonstrate here that the structural polymorphisms of the DQ alpha and DQ beta chains are more extensive than previously thought, report the characterization of 14 DQ beta variants, and define their relationship to the previously described DQw serologic specificities. In addition, we describe the class II haplotype associations observed for the different DR and DQ variants characterized. PMID:3679903

  12. Aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C and 11- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase G534A gene polymorphisms and essential hypertension in the population of Odisha, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manisha Patnaik; Pallabi Pati; Surendra N. Swain; Manoj K. Mohapatra; Bhagirathi Dwibedi; Shantanu K. Kar; Manoranjan Ranjit

    2015-06-01

    Essential hypertension which accounts 90–95% of the total hypertension cases is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. This study was undertaken to investigate the association of aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type I receptor A1166C and 11- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 G534A polymorphisms with essential hypertension in the population of Odisha, India. A total of 246 hypertensive subjects (males, 159; females, 87) and 274 normal healthy individuals (males, 158; females, 116) were enrolled in this study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Analysis of genetic and biochemical data revealed that in this population the CT and TT genotypes of aldosterone synthase C-344T polymorphism, frequency of alcohol consumption and aldosterone levels were significantly high among the total as well as male hypertensives, while the AC and CC genotypes of angiotensin II type I receptor A1166C polymorphism were significantly high among the total as well as female hypertensives. High density lipoprotein levels were higher in male hypertensives.

  13. Aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C and 11- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase G534A gene polymorphisms and essential hypertension in the population of Odisha, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manisha Patnaik; Pallabi Pati; Surendra N. Swain; Manoj K. Mohapatra; Bhagirathi Dwibedi; Shantanu K. Kar; Manoranjan Ranjit

    2014-12-01

    Essential hypertension which accounts 90–95% of the total hypertension cases is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. This study was undertaken to investigate the association of aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type I receptor A1166C and 11- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 G534A polymorphisms with essential hypertension in the population of Odisha, India. A total of 246 hypertensive subjects (males, 159; females, 87) and 274 normal healthy individuals (males, 158; females, 116) were enrolled in this study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Analysis of genetic and biochemical data revealed that in this population the CT and TT genotypes of aldosterone synthase C-344T polymorphism, frequency of alcohol consumption and aldosterone levels were significantly high among the total as well as male hypertensives, while the AC and CC genotypes of angiotensin II type I receptor A1166C polymorphism were significantly high among the total as well as female hypertensives. High density lipoprotein levels were higher in male hypertensives.

  14. Automated direct sequencing of the iduronate-2 sulfatase gene reveals a vast spectrum of mutations causing Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) and a {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} at R468

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitley, C.B; Jonsson, J.J.; Aronovich, E.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Hunter syndrome is an X-linked recessive, lethal disease resulting from deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) catalytic activity. Because of low reproductive fitness, most affected individuals are expected to have new mutations. Most of such defects are anticipated to be single base pair (bp) changes; however, several previous studies utilizing Southern analysis of RT-PCR have identified numerous large gene deletions in patients having the {open_quotes}severe form{close_quotes} with neurologic disease. To investigate the spectrum of IDS mutations, we have developed a method of automated direct sequencing of RT-PCR products representing the entire IDS coding region. Of 19 patients studied by this approach, only 1 had an IDS coding region which did not contain a mutation; 1 had a single bp insertion; 1 had a 2 bp deletion; and 13 had single-base substitutions. Of the 13 having single base substitutions, 2 resulted in aberrant splicing. Only 1 patient had a complete gene deletion; in view of previous reports, there was a surprising lack of major gene deletions. Notably, a CpG dinucleotide at R468 was identified as a {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} for mutation. Five unrelated individuals had substitutions at this site which thus accounted for 28% of all mutations in this series: R468W (3 patients) and R468Q (2 patients). MspI digestion provided a method of rapid diagnosis and determination of heterozygote status for such R468 mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlations in this R468 group are not yet possible because of confounding information, i.e., there are both {open_quotes}mild{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}severe{close_quotes} patients in this group and some have co-existing neurologic diseases. This approach of gene sequencing appears to be necessary, and sufficient, to characterize the vast spectrum of mutations in Hunter syndrome.

  15. Quininium tetrachloridozinc(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhuang Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound {systematic name: 2-[hydroxy(6-methoxyquinolin-1-ium-4-ylmethyl]-8-vinylquinuclidin-1-ium tetrachloridozinc(II}, (C20H26N2O2[ZnCl4], consists of a double protonated quininium cation and a tetrachloridozinc(II anion. The ZnII ion is in a slightly distorted tetrahedral coordination environment. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular N—H...Cl and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  16. Hydrosol II Project; El Proyecto Hydrosol II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Martinez, A.

    2008-07-01

    At present energy production is based on the combustion of fossil fuels and is the main cause of greenhouse gas emissions, which is to say it is the main cause of the climate change that is affecting the planet. On a worldwide scale, the use of solar concentration systems with systems capable of dissociating water is considered, from both an energy and an economic standpoint, as the most important long-term goal in the production of solar fuels to reduce the costs of hydrogen and to ensure practically zero carbon dioxide emissions. The Hydrosol II project has the largest pilot plant of its kind, and the Hydrosol II reactors will be capable of breaking up the water molecule on the basis of thermochemical cycles at moderate temperatures. The Hydrosol II project pilot plant is now a reality, located in the SSPS heliostats field of the Almeria Solar Platform. (Author)

  17. Paths of lateral gene transfer of lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with a unique evolutionary transition stage of prokaryotes coding for class I and II varieties by the same organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the premise that lateral gene transfer (LGT is a dominant evolutionary force is still in considerable dispute, the case for widespread LGT in the family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS is no longer contentious. aaRSs are ancient enzymes, guarding the fidelity of the genetic code. They are clustered in two structurally unrelated classes. Only lysine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS is found both as a class 1 and a class 2 enzyme (LysRS1-2. Remarkably, in several extant prokaryotes both classes of the enzyme coexist, a unique phenomenon that has yet to receive its due attention. Results We applied a phylogenetic approach for determining the extent and origin of LGT in prokaryotic LysRS. Reconstructing species trees for Archaea and Bacteria, and inferring that their last common ancestors encoded LysRS1 and LysRS2, respectively, we studied the gains and losses of both classes. A complex pattern of LGT events emerged. In specific groups of organisms LysRS1 was replaced by LysRS2 (and vice versa. In one occasion, within the alpha proteobacteria, a LysRS2 to LysRS1 LGT was followed by reversal to LysRS2. After establishing the most likely LGT paths, we studied the possible origins of the laterally transferred genes. To this end, we reconstructed LysRS gene trees and evaluated the likely origins of the laterally transferred genes. While the sources of LysRS1 LGTs were readily identified, those for LysRS2 remain, for now, uncertain. The replacement of one LysRS by another apparently transits through a stage simultaneously coding for both synthetases, probably conferring a selective advantage to the affected organisms. Conclusion The family of LysRSs features complex LGT events. The currently available data were sufficient for identifying unambiguously the origins of LysRS1 but not of LysRS2 gene transfers. A selective advantage is suggested to organisms encoding simultaneously LysRS1-2.

  18. Type II universal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  19. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  20. Genetic association of cyclic AMP signaling genes with bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, M-L; MacMullen, C.; Liu, D. J.; Leal, S M; Davis, R L

    2012-01-01

    The genetic basis for bipolar disorder (BPD) is complex with the involvement of multiple genes. As it is well established that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling regulates behavior, we tested variants in 29 genes that encode components of this signaling pathway for associations with BPD type I (BPD I) and BPD type II (BPD II). A total of 1172 individuals with BPD I, 516 individuals with BPD II and 1728 controls were analyzed. Single SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism), haplotype...

  1. Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) chelates of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Singh, R.

    1985-01-01

    Bis chelates of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) with the enolic form of diethyl ketone and methyl n-propyl thiosemicarbazones were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, i.r. and electronic and electron spin resonance spectral studies. All the complexes were found to have the composition ML 2 [where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(ii) and Pt(II) and L = thiosemicarbazones of diethyl ketone and methyl n-propyl ketone]. Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes are paramagnetic and may have polymeric six-coordinate octahedral and square planar geometries, respectively. The Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes are diamagnetic and may have square planar geometries. Pyridine adducts (ML 2·2Py) of Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes were also prepared and characterized.

  2. World War II Homefront.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  3. Preliminary Study on Silent ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae Alcohol Dehydrogenase II Gene%酿酒酵母ADH2基因沉默菌株构建的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林燕环

    2015-01-01

    本实验通过构建酿酒酵母ADH2基因沉默表达载体,电转化法转化酿酒酵母工程菌Y01,获得酿酒酵母ADH2基因沉默突变株S01。发酵实验结果表明沉默突变株乙醇产量相对较低。说明沉默突变株体内乙醇合成途径受到干扰。%The main purpose of this research is to construct a ADH2 gene silencing strain S01 by the method of constructing ADH2 gene silencing expression vector than transformed intoSaccharomyces cerevisiae Y01. The results showed that the ethanol production of the mutant strain was relatively low. The alcohol metabolic pathway in this transformant si interfered.

  4. Biologically active new Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes of N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. SPÎNU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II, cobalt(II, nickel (II, copper (II, zinc(II and cadmium(II complexes of the type ML2Cl2, where M is a metal and L is the Schiff base N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine (TNAM formed by the condensation of 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde and methylamine, were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis as well as magnetic and spectroscopic measurements. The elemental analyses suggest the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data coupled with electronic, ESR and Mössbauer spectra suggest a distorted octahedral structure for the Fe(II, Co(II and Ni(II complexes, a square-planar geometry for the Cu(II compound and a tetrahedral geometry for the Zn(II and Cd(II complexes. The infrared and NMR spectra of the complexes agree with co-ordination to the central metal atom through nitrogen and sulphur atoms. Conductance measurements suggest the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes, except for the Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes, which are 1:2 electrolytes. The Schiff base and its metal chelates were screened for their biological activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the metal chelates were found to possess better antibacterial activity than that of the uncomplexed Schiff base.

  5. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression studies in peach using real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RT-qPCR is a preferred method for rapid and reliable quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR in such studies requires the use of reference gene(s as an internal control to normalize mRNA levels between different samples for an exact comparison of gene expression level. However, recent studies have shown that no single reference gene is universal for all experiments. Thus, the identification of high quality reference gene(s is of paramount importance for the interpretation of data generated by RT-qPCR. Only a few studies on reference genes have been done in plants and none in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch. Therefore, the present study was conducted to identify suitable reference gene(s for normalization of gene expression in peach. Results In this work, eleven reference genes were investigated in different peach samples using RT-qPCR with SYBR green. These genes are: actin 2/7 (ACT, cyclophilin (CYP2, RNA polymerase II (RP II, phospholipase A2 (PLA2, ribosomal protein L13 (RPL13, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA, tubblin beta (TUB, tubblin alpha (TUA, translation elongation factor 2 (TEF2 and ubiquitin 10 (UBQ10. All eleven reference genes displayed a wide range of Cq values in all samples, indicating that they expressed variably. The stability of these genes except for RPL13 was determined by three different descriptive statistics, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper, which produced highly comparable results. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that expression stability varied greatly between genes studied in peach. Based on the results from geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper analyses, for all the sample pools analyzed, TEF2, UBQ10 and RP II were found to be the most suitable reference genes with a very high statistical reliability, and TEF2 and RP II for the other sample series, while 18S rRNA, RPL13 and PLA2 were unsuitable as internal controls

  6. Regulation of immune responses by I-J gene products. II. Presence of Both I-Jb and I-Jk suppressor factors in (nonsuppressor x nonsuppressor) F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, H Y; Dorf, M E; Waltenbaugh, C

    1982-04-01

    Antigen-specific suppression to poly(Glu50-Tyr50) (GT) is under the control of two complementary immune suppressor (Is) genes located in the major histocompatibility (H-2) complex of the mouse. Suppressor strains of mice produce both suppressor T (Ts) cells and Ts-derived suppressor factors (TsF) that bear antigenic determinants of the I-J subregion of the H-2 complex. Nonsuppressor strains of mice, on the other hand, are not suppressed by GT preimmunization. These nonsuppressor mice, however, can be classified according to those that lack the ability to make GT-specific T cell-derived suppressor factor (GT-TsF) after GT injection (i.e., H-2a, I-Jk mice) and those that lack the ability to be suppressed by the appropriate GT-TsF (i.e., H-2b,g2, I-Jb mice). In the present study, we demonstrate that (H-2a x H-2b,g2)F1 hybrid mice produce distinct GT-specific suppressor factors of both parental I-J haplotypes. Moreover, only the I-Jb-bearing GT-TsF derived from these F1 hybrid mice is able to induce second-order suppressor cells (Ts2). This is consistent with the observation that injection of GT-TsF1 derived from C57BL/6 (I-Jb) mice into A/J (I-Jk) mice leads to the production of an antigen-specific I-Jk GT-TsF2. Our results suggest that Is gene complementation occurs through a different cellular mechanism that was previously observed for Ir gene complementation. Further, we show that complementing (non-suppressor X nonsuppressor)F1 hybrid mice produce an I-Jb (and not an I-Jk) GT-TsF1 and an I-Jk (not an I-Jb) GT-TsF2, thus suggesting a heterogeneity of Ia loci within the I-J subregion. Data presented in the present study suggest that there may be even more heterogeneity within the I-J subregion than has has been heretofore reported with regard to I-J expression on Ts.

  7. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  8. Belle II production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hideki; Grzymkowski, Rafal; Ludacka, Radek; Schram, Malachi

    2015-12-01

    The Belle II experiment will record a similar quantity of data to LHC experiments and will acquire it at similar rates. This requires considerable computing, storage and network resources to handle not only data created by the experiment but also considerable amounts of simulated data. Consequently Belle II employs a distributed computing system to provide the resources coordinated by the the DIRAC interware. DIRAC is a general software framework that provides a unified interface among heterogeneous computing resources. In addition to the well proven DIRAC software stack, Belle II is developing its own extension called BelleDIRAC. BelleDIRAC provides a transparent user experience for the Belle II analysis framework (basf2) on various environments and gives access to file information managed by LFC and AMGA metadata catalog. By unifying DIRAC and BelleDIRAC functionalities, Belle II plans to operate an automated mass data processing framework named a “production system”. The Belle II production system enables large-scale raw data transfer from experimental site to raw data centers, followed by massive data processing, and smart data delivery to each remote site. The production system is also utilized for simulated data production and data analysis. Although development of the production system is still on-going, recently Belle II has prepared prototype version and evaluated it with a large scale simulated data production. In this presentation we will report the evaluation of the prototype system and future development plans.

  9. Recent advances in angiotensin II signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Touyz

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II* is a multifunctional hormone that influences the function of cardiovascular cells through a complex series of intracellular signaling events initiated by the interaction of Ang II with AT1 and AT2 receptors. AT1 receptor activation leads to cell growth, vascular contraction, inflammatory responses and salt and water retention, whereas AT2 receptors induce apoptosis, vasodilation and natriuresis. These effects are mediated via complex, interacting signaling pathways involving stimulation of PLC and Ca2+ mobilization; activation of PLD, PLA2, PKC, MAP kinases and NAD(PH oxidase, and stimulation of gene transcription. In addition, Ang II activates many intracellular tyrosine kinases that play a role in growth signaling and inflammation, such as Src, Pyk2, p130Cas, FAK and JAK/STAT. These events may be direct or indirect via transactivation of tyrosine kinase receptors, including PDGFR, EGFR and IGFR. Ang II induces a multitude of actions in various tissues, and the signaling events following occupancy and activation of Ang receptors are tightly controlled and extremely complex. Alterations of these highly regulated signaling pathways may be pivotal in structural and functional abnormalities that underlie pathological processes in cardiovascular diseases such as cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  10. Modes of salmonid MHC class I and II evolution differ from the primate paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shum, B.P.; Guethlein, L.; Flodin, L.R.; Adkison, M.A.; Hedrick, R.P.; Nehring, R.B.; Stet, R.J.M.; Secombes, C.; Parham, P.

    2001-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) represent two salmonid genera separated for 15-20 million years. cDNA sequences were determined for the classical MHC class I heavy chain gene UBA and the MHC class II β-chain gene DAB from 15 rainbow and 10 brown trout. Both genes a

  11. Gamble II Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Gamble II produces a high-voltage (2 MV), high-current (1 MA), short (100 ns) pulse of energy of either positive or negative polarity. This terawatt power...

  12. Leo II PC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — LEO II is a second-generation software system developed for use on the PC, which is designed to convert location references accurately between legal descriptions...

  13. Role of presynaptic phosphoprotein synapsin II in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Molinaro, Luke; Hui, Patricia; Tan, Mattea; Mishra, Ram K.

    2015-01-01

    Synapsin II is a member of the neuronal phosphoprotein family. These phosphoproteins are evolutionarily conserved across many organisms and are important in a variety of synaptic functions, including synaptogenesis and the regulation of neurotransmitter release. A number of genome-wide scans, meta-analyses, and genetic susceptibility studies have implicated the synapsin II gene (3p25) in the etiology of schizophrenia (SZ) and other psychiatric disorders. Further studies have found a reduction...

  14. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn2+ or Cd2+. We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  15. Ecuaciones Diferenciales II

    OpenAIRE

    Mañas Baena, Manuel; Martínez Alonso, Luis

    2015-01-01

    En este manual se revisan diferentes aspectos sobre las ecuaciones diferenciales en derivadas parciales de utilidad para los físicos. Se elaboraron como notas de clase de la asignatura Ecuaciones II, del plan 1993 de la Licenciatura de Física de la UCM. Actualmente cubre un 75% de la asignatura Métodos Matemáticos II del Grado de Física de la UCM.

  16. Apunts de Cartografia II

    OpenAIRE

    Membrado Tena, Joan Carles

    2013-01-01

    Aquest material docent ha rebut l’ajut del Servei de Política Lingüística de la Universitat de València Guia de l'assignatura Cartografia II per a alumnes de segon de grau de Geografia. Apunts sobre cartografia històrica i temàtica. Exercicis per a l'assignatura. Guide of the course "Cartography II" for second grade students.Notes on historical and thematic mapping. Exercises for the course.

  17. Milord II. Language description.

    OpenAIRE

    Puyol-Gruart, Josep; Sierra, Carles

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe the language Milord II. The description is made in terms of computer language concepts and not in terms of the logical semantics underlying it. In this sense the paper complements others in which the focus of the description has been either the object level multi-valued language description, or the reflective component of the architecture, or even the several applications built using it. All the necessary elements to understand how a system programmed in Milord II ex...

  18. ASTRID II satellit projekt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Primdahl, Fritz

    1997-01-01

    The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan.......The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan....

  19. II Infused Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min. Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-α KO mice compared to WT (161±4 mmHg versus 145±4 mmHg and fenofibrate (145 mg/kg/day reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134±7 mmHg. Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-α KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30±4 versus 8±2 pg/mL and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10±3 pg/mL. Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-α attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2.

  20. Gene expression profiles of some cytokines, growth factors, receptors, and enzymes (GM-CSF, IFNγ, MMP-2, IGF-II, EGF, TGF-β, IGF-IIR) during pregnancy in the cat uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaoglu, Ozgecan Korkmaz; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Guzeloglu, Aydin; Aslan, Selim; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Early pregnancy is one of the most critical periods of pregnancy, and many factors such as cytokines, enzymes, and members of the immune system have to cooperate in a balanced way. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of factors associated with pregnancy such as EGF, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 were analyzed in uterine tissues of female cats. The cats were assigned to five groups: G1 (embryo positive, n = 7; 7th day after mating), G2 (after implantation, n = 7; 20th day after mating), G3 (midgestation, n = 7; 24-25th day after mating), G4 (late gestation, n = 7; 30-45th day after mating), G5 (oocyte group, n = 7; 7th day after estrus). Tissue samples from the uterus and placenta were collected after ovariohysterectomy. Relative messenger RNA levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All the factors examined were detected in all tissue samples. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of EGF and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in G2 than in G1 was observed (P macrophage colony-stimulating factor were constantly expressed in all groups. In conclusion, the expressions of these factors in feline uterine tissue at different stages of pregnancy might indicate that these factors play roles in the development of pregnancy such as trophoblast invasion, vascularization, implantation, and placentation. PMID:26559469

  1. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  2. 雌激素受体α基因PvuII基因多态性与冠心病关系的meta分析%Estrogen receptorαgene PvuII polymorphism and coronary artery disease:a meta-analysis of 21 studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie DING; Hui XU; Xiang YIN; Fu-rong ZHANG; Xiao-ping PAN; Yi-an GU; Jun-zhu CHEN; Xiao-gang GUO

    2014-01-01

    研究目的:系统评价雌激素受体α基因PvuII基因多态性与冠心病的关系。  创新要点:目前关于雌激素受体α基因PvuII基因多态性(c.454-397T>C)与冠心病的关系仍存在争议。因此本研究针对这一问题系统收集国内外符合纳入与排除标准的研究,通过meta分析,系统地评估雌激素受体α基因PvuII基因多态性与冠心病的关系。  研究方法:针对研究问题系统检索国内外相关数据库,根据事先制定的纳入与排除标准及质量评价量表,筛选出符合标准的研究文献。利用STATA11.0和RevMan 5.2软件对纳入的21篇研究(包括9926病例和16710对照)进行定量分析。优势比(OR)值及95%置信区间(CI)用来衡量雌激素受体α基因PvuII基因多态性与冠心病的关系。  重要结论:Meta分析结果提示,雌激素受体α基因ESR1 PvuII基因多态性与冠心病的关系在研究的整体人群中有重要意义。地区亚组分析显示,在亚洲人群中,雌激素受体α基因PvuII基因多态性与冠心病相关,然而这种相关性不存在于西方人群。%The association between the estrogen receptorαgene (ESR1) PvuII polymorphism (c.454-397T>C) and coronary artery disease (CAD) is controversial. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship. Data were col ected from 21 studies encompassing 9926 CAD patients and 16710 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95%confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the relationship between PvuII polymorphism and CAD. The poly-morphism in control populations in all studies fol owed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We found a significant association between ESR1 PvuII polymorphism and CAD risk in all subjects. When the data were stratified by region, a significant association between ESR1 PvuII polymorphism and CAD risk was observed in Asian populations but not in Western populations. The current study suggests that ESR1 PvuII

  3. Gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  4. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  5. Human urotensin II promotes hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Arita, Shigeko; Shiraishi, Yuji; Suguro, Toshiaki; Sakai, Tetsuo; Hongo, Shigeki; Miyazaki, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Human urotensin II (U-II), the most potent vasoconstrictor undecapeptide identified to date, and its receptor (UT) are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of U-II with particular reference to its role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of U-II gene (S89N) are associated with onset of essential hypertension, type II diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance in the Asian population. Plasma U-II levels are elevated in patients with vascular endothelial dysfunction-related diseases such as essential hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. Chronic infusion of U-II enhances atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. In human atherosclerotic plaques from the aorta and coronary and carotid arteries, U-II is expressed at high levels in endothelial cells (ECs) and lymphocytes, whereas UT is expressed at high levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), ECs, monocytes, and macrophages. U-II stimulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in human ECs as chemoattractant for monocytes, and accelerates foam cell formation by up-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages. U-II produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activation in human VSMCs, and stimulates VSMC proliferation with synergistic effects when combined with ROS, oxidized LDL, and serotonin. Clinical studies demonstrated increased plasma U-II levels in accordance with the severity of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension and that of coronary artery lesions in patients with ischemic heart disease. Here, we summarize the key roles of U-II in progression of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

  6. About APPLE II Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180° requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  7. About APPLE II Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented

  8. An overview of the biocreative 2012 workshop track III: Interactive text mining task

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important question is how to make use of text mining to enhance the biocuration workflow. A number of groups have developed tools for text mining from a computer science/linguistics perspective and there are many initiatives to curate some aspect of biology from the literature. In some cases the ...

  9. Information on Asse II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brochure published by BfS describes the actual situation of Asse II with respect to the debate on an interim storage and the status of the realization of a final repository search law. During the visit of the new environment minister Hendricks in the underground facility repository Asse II the issue interim storage site and the retrieval of the corroded casks with radioactive waste were discussed. The challenges for BFS include the acceleration of the retrieval process and the safety of the procedure.

  10. Type-II Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jihn E

    2016-01-01

    I will talk on our new theory on baryogenesis through type-II leptogenesis which is different from the well-known type-I leptogenesis. I will comment on the Jarlskog phases, $\\delta_{\\rm CKM}$ and $\\delta_{\\rm PMNS}$, in the CKM and PMNS matrices. In the type-II leptogenesis, the PMNS phase is used for Sakharov's condition on the global quantum number generation in the Universe. For this to be effective, the SU(2)$\\times$U(1) gauge symmetry must be broken during the leptogenesis epoch.

  11. Galaxy S II

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Preston

    2011-01-01

    Unlock the potential of Samsung's outstanding smartphone with this jargon-free guide from technology guru Preston Gralla. You'll quickly learn how to shoot high-res photos and HD video, keep your schedule, stay in touch, and enjoy your favorite media. Every page is packed with illustrations and valuable advice to help you get the most from the smartest phone in town. The important stuff you need to know: Get dialed in. Learn your way around the Galaxy S II's calling and texting features.Go online. Browse the Web, manage email, and download apps with Galaxy S II's 3G/4G network (or create you

  12. 血管紧张素Ⅱ-1型受体基因多态性与老年原发性高血压水平的关系%Relationship between angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism and blood pressure levels in essential hypertensive elders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怡; 陆惠华; 方宁远; 邬亦贤; 郑迪辉; 易雅萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) gene A/C1166 polymorphism and blood pressure levels in essential hypertensive elders.Methods The A/C1166 polymorphism of AT1R gene was assessed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in a casecontrol study of 87 EH elders and 55 normotensive elders. In EH elders blood pressure was measured by 24 hours noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results (1) The frequency of C1166 allele in EH elders was higher than that in normotensive elders (0.115 vs 0. 036,P<0.05). (2) The mean levels of 24 hours and nighttime SBP and MA, daytime SBP,and nighttime DBP were higher in the group with C allele (AC + CC) than that in AA group (P <0.05). Conclusion The results indicate that A/C1166 polymorphism of AT1-R gene is associated with EH elders.The frequency of C1166 allele is higher in EH elders than that in norrnotensive elders. The C1166 allele may contribute to the higher level of blood pressure in EH elders.%目的研究血管紧张素Ⅱ-1型受体(ATl-R)基因A/C1166多态性与老年原发性高血压(EH)血压水平的关系。方法应用PCR-RFLP技术检测87例老年EH患者和55例正常老年人的AT1-R基因A/C1166多态性,同时对老年EH患者作24小时动态血压监测。结果 (1)老年EH的C1166等位基因频率为0.115,明显高于正常人(0.036)(P<0.05)。(2)AC、CC基因型EH患者24小时及夜间SBP、MAP和白天SBP、夜间DBP水平明显高于基因型AA组(P<0.05)。结论研究提示AT1-R基因的A/C1166多态性与老年EH相关,C1166等位基因频率在EH患者明显升高,并与血压水平升高有关。

  13. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela; Goedegebuur, Frits; Van Solingen, Pieter; Ward, Michael

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  14. Gene therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mota Biosca, Anna

    1992-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases.

  15. Preparation of North American Type II PRRSV Infectious Clone Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Liyue Wang; Kao Zhang; Hongyu Lin; Wenyan Li; Jiexia Wen; Jianlou Zhang; Yonghong Zhang; Xiujin Li; Fei Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is still one of the most important infectious diseases threatening the swine industry. To construct North American type II PRRSV infectious clone containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, we amplify gfp gene, flanked by PRRSV Nsp2 gene fragments upstream and downstream, using overlap PCR method from pcDNA-EF1-GFP plasmid and FL12 plasmid containing PRRSV infectious genome as the templates. The Nsp2 fragment-flanked gfp gene wa...

  16. Medicina por Imágenes: la visión globalizada: Parte II: la visión desde Gestión de Recursos Humanos, Psicología y perspectiva Bioética Image Based Medicine: the global vision: Part II: Human Talent Management, Psychological and Bioethical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carestia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La visión globalizada del diagnóstico por imágenes es una puesta al día, creemos que necesaria, de los caracteres más relevantes de esta bellísima disciplina. Está dirigida a quienes todavía no han decidido su camino y están finalizando sus carreras de grado -médica o técnica-, pero también a aquellos que ya han comenzado la residencia; y quizá también para quienes habiendo recorrido ya un largo trayecto, conservan un espíritu crítico y una mirada joven. A la luz del nuevo milenio, y cuando se han cumplido veinticinco años de su reconocimiento como especialidad por parte de la comunidad médica de nuestro país, los autores examinamos esta visión que no se conforma con la mirada unilateral del radiólogo sino que busca también la proveniente de otros saberes y ciencias. Por ello, se incluye una aproximación desde el derecho -sobre un tema puntual-, se tratan los aspectos educacionales y se incorporan la mirada desde el área técnica, la perspectiva de la filosofía y la bioética y las visiones desde la psicología, desde la gestión de los recursos humanos y los aspectos de ciencia y tecnología, entre otras.The global vision of diagnostic imaging is a necessary update, we think, of the most relevant characters of this beautiful discipline. It is directed to those advanced students of Medicine and Radiology Technique career who have not yet decided their future activity but also to the already graduated who are just beginning their residence training programs; and maybe to those who keep a critical spirit and a young glance, in spite of the chronological age. At daybreak of the millennium and when we are assisting to the twenty five anniversary of its origin and recognition as a new speciality inside the medical community in our country, we the authors, have selected not only the unique vision of the radiologist but also the vision of other fields of knowledge and sciences. So because of this we develop the legal view on

  17. Workshop 96. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of the seminar proceedings contains contributions in various areas of science and technology, among them materials science in mechanical engineering, materials science in electrical, chemical and civil engineering, and electronics, measuring and communication engineering. In those areas, 6 contributions have been selected for INIS. (P.A.)

  18. Presentatie van Woordstudies II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.G. de

    2010-01-01

    SAMENVATTING De bundel Woordstudies II is de voortzetting van een verzameling artikelen over semantische aspecten van het Italiaans, die Minne Gerben de Boer, werkzaam bij de vakgroep Italiaans van de Universiteit Utrecht, in de loop van zijn carrière heeft geschreven. In deze presentatie worden d

  19. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  20. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  1. Structure and expression of the Plasmodium falciparum SERA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Horii, T; Inselburg, J

    1989-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, strain FCR3, genomic DNA that encodes the SERA gene of P. falciparum was isolated and sequenced. The SERA gene coding region was interrupted by 3 introns, the largest number observed, so far, in any Plasmodium gene. Two SERA gene alleles, allele I and allele II, were identified in the FCR3 strain, while only allele I was found in the Honduras-1 strain. Allele I mRNA was abundant in vivo during the late trophozoite and schizont stages. Allele II mRNA was either not expressed, or it was labile. PMID:2651911

  2. Ubiquitylation and degradation of elongating RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Marcus D; Harreman, Michelle; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    During its journey across a gene, RNA polymerase II has to contend with a number of obstacles to its progression, including nucleosomes, DNA-binding proteins, DNA damage, and sequences that are intrinsically difficult to transcribe. Not surprisingly, a large number of elongation factors have...

  3. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Renita E; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L; Sheehy, Sean P; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.

  4. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renita E Horton

    Full Text Available In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF, allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.

  5. Epigenetic control of MHC-II: interplay between CIITA and histone-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-02-01

    Recent advances have shown the crucial role of histone-modifying enzymes in controlling gene activation and repression. This led to the 'histone code' hypothesis, which proposes that combinations of histone modifications work in concert to affect specific gene expression. Mounting evidence suggests that the class II transactivator modulates promoter accessibility by coordinating the recruitment of chromatin modifiers in a time-dependent fashion. MHC-II expression is exquisitely controlled by these highly specific, coordinated and dynamic interactions at the promoter.

  6. Recessive germline SDHA and SDHB mutations causing leukodystrophy and isolated mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Alston, Charlotte L; Davison, James E; Meloni, Francesca; van der Westhuizen, Francois H.; Langping, He

    2012-01-01

    Background Isolated complex II deficiency is a rare form of mitochondrial disease, accounting for approximately 2% of all respiratory chain deficiency diagnoses. The succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) genes (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD) are autosomally-encoded and transcribe the conjugated heterotetramers of complex II via the action of two known assembly factors (SDHAF1 and SDHAF2). Only a handful of reports describe inherited SDH gene defects as a cause of paediatric mitochondrial disease, involvi...

  7. A novel DSPP mutation is associated with type II dentinogenesis Imperfecta in a chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chengqi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary defects of tooth dentin are classified into two main groups: dentin dysplasia (DD (types I and II and dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI (types I, II, and III. Type II DGI is one of the most common tooth defects with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. One disease-causing gene, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene, has been reported for type II DGI. Methods In this study, we characterized a four-generation Chinese family with type II DGI that consists of 18 living family members, including 8 affected individuals. Linkage analysis with polymorphic markers D4S1534 and D4S414 that span the DSPP gene showed that the family is linked to DSPP. All five exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP were sequenced in members of type II DGI family. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel mutation (c.49C→T, p.Pro17Ser in exon 1 of the DSPP gene. The mutation spot, the Pro17 residue, is the second amino acid of the mature DSP protein, and highly conserved during evolution. The mutation was identified in all affected individuals, but not in normal family members and 100 controls. Conclusion These results suggest that mutation p.Pro17Ser causes type II DGI in the Chinese family. This study identifies a novel mutation in the DSPP gene, and expands the spectrum of mutations that cause DGI.

  8. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  9. Opposite effects of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activity on the pressor response to angiotensin II

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Zhonghua; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Langenbach, Robert I.; Breyer, Richard M.; Redha, Reyadh; Morrow, Jason D.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic use of cyclooxygenase-inhibiting (COX-inhibiting) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is often complicated by renal side effects including hypertension and edema. The present studies were undertaken to elucidate the roles of COX1 and COX2 in regulating blood pressure and renal function. COX2 inhibitors or gene knockout dramatically augment the pressor effect of angiotensin II (Ang II). Unexpectedly, after a brief increase, the pressor effect of Ang II was abolished by COX...

  10. Linking splicing to Pol II transcription stabilizes pre-mRNAs and influences splicing patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, Martin J; Chin-Rang Yang; Matthew V Kotlajich; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2006-01-01

    RNA processing is carried out in close proximity to the site of transcription, suggesting a regulatory link between transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. Using an in vitro transcription/splicing assay, we demonstrate that an association of RNA polymerase II ( Pol II) transcription and pre-mRNA splicing is required for efficient gene expression. Pol II-synthesized RNAs containing functional splice sites are protected from nuclear degradation, presumably because the local concentration of the sp...

  11. [Language gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The human capacity for acquiring speech and language must derive, at least in part, from the genome. Recent advance in the field of molecular genetics finally discovered 'Language Gene'. Disruption of FOXP2 gene, the firstly identified 'language gene' causes severe speech and language disorder. To elucidate the anatomical basis of language processing in the brain, we examined the expression pattern of FOXP2/Foxp2 genes in the monkey and rat brains through development. We found the preferential expression of FOXP2/Foxp2 in the striosomal compartment of the developing striatum. Thus, we suggest the striatum, particularly striosomal system may participate in neural information processing for language and speech. Our suggestion is consistent with the declarative/ procedural model of language proposed by Ullman (1997, 2001), which the procedural memory-dependent mental grammar is rooted in the basal ganglia and the frontal cortex, and the declarative memory-dependent mental lexicon is rooted in the temporal lobe. PMID:17432197

  12. RADTRAN II user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, M M; Wilmot, E L; Taylor, J M

    1983-02-01

    RADTRAN II is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN II can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  13. Organisation and sequence determination of glutamine-dependent carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2003-01-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II encodes the first enzymic step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II is essential for Toxoplasma gondii replication and virulence. In this study, we characterised the primary structure of a 28kb gene encoding Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. The carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II gene was interrupted by 36 introns. The predicted protein encoded by the 37 carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II exons was a 1,687 amino acid polypeptide with an N-terminal glutamine amidotransferase domain fused with C-terminal carbamoyl phosphate synthetase domains. This bifunctional organisation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II is unique, so far, to protozoan parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa (Plasmodium, Babesia, Toxoplasma) or zoomastigina (Trypanosoma, Leishmania). Apicomplexan parasites possessed the largest carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II enzymes due to insertions in the glutamine amidotransferase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase domains that were not present in the corresponding gene segments from bacteria, plants, fungi and mammals. The C-terminal allosteric regulatory domain, the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase linker domain and the oligomerisation domain were also distinct from the corresponding domains in other species. The novel C-terminal regulatory domain may explain the lack of activation of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II by the allosteric effector 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. Toxoplasma gondii growth in vitro was markedly inhibited by the glutamine antagonist acivicin, an inhibitor of glutamine amidotransferase activity typically associated with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II, guanosine monophosphate synthetase, or CTP synthetase. PMID:12547350

  14. Transport phenomena II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena II covers forced convention, temperature distribution, free convection, diffusitivity and the mechanism of mass transfer, convective mass transfer, concentration

  15. Sociologia Geral II

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Augusto da

    2012-01-01

    Reedição em e-book dos apontamentos de Sociologia Geral II (“Sebenta”) da autoria do Professor Augusto da Silva (ed. original de 1979). A edição de 2012 inclui um preâmbulo assinado pelo então Director do Departamento de Sociologia e testemunhos dos actuais docentes do Departamento de Sociologia da Universidade de Évora que foram alunos do Professor Augusto da Silva em cursos de Licenciatura em Sociologia.

  16. Algebra & trigonometry II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Algebra & Trigonometry II includes logarithms, sequences and series, permutations, combinations and probability, vectors, matrices, determinants and systems of equations, mathematica

  17. What is LAMPF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The present conception of LAMPF II is a high-intensity 16-GeV synchrotron injected by the LAMPF 800-MeV H/sup -/ beam. The proton beam will be used to make secondary beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons, and hyperons more intense than those of any existing or proposed accelerator. For example, by taking maximum advantage of a thick target, modern beam optics, and the LAMPF II proton beam, it will be possible to make a negative muon beam with nearly 100% duty factor and nearly 100 times the flux of the existing Stopped Muon Channel (SMC). Because the unique features of the proposed machine are most applicable to beams of the same momentum as LAMPF (that is, < 2 GeV/c), it may be possible to use most of the experimental areas and some of the auxiliary equipment, including spectrometers, with the new accelerator. The complete facility will provide improved technology for many areas of physics already available at LAMPF and will allow expansion of medium-energy physics to include kaons, antiprotons, and hyperons. When LAMPF II comes on line in 1990 LAMPF will have been operational for 18 years and a major upgrade such as this proposal will be reasonable and prudent.

  18. Maximizing biomarker discovery by minimizing gene signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of gene signatures can potentially be of considerable value in the field of clinical diagnosis. However, gene signatures defined with different methods can be quite various even when applied the same disease and the same endpoint. Previous studies have shown that the correct selection of subsets of genes from microarray data is key for the accurate classification of disease phenotypes, and a number of methods have been proposed for the purpose. However, these methods refine the subsets by only considering each single feature, and they do not confirm the association between the genes identified in each gene signature and the phenotype of the disease. We proposed an innovative new method termed Minimize Feature's Size (MFS based on multiple level similarity analyses and association between the genes and disease for breast cancer endpoints by comparing classifier models generated from the second phase of MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II, trying to develop effective meta-analysis strategies to transform the MAQC-II signatures into a robust and reliable set of biomarker for clinical applications. Results We analyzed the similarity of the multiple gene signatures in an endpoint and between the two endpoints of breast cancer at probe and gene levels, the results indicate that disease-related genes can be preferably selected as the components of gene signature, and that the gene signatures for the two endpoints could be interchangeable. The minimized signatures were built at probe level by using MFS for each endpoint. By applying the approach, we generated a much smaller set of gene signature with the similar predictive power compared with those gene signatures from MAQC-II. Conclusions Our results indicate that gene signatures of both large and small sizes could perform equally well in clinical applications. Besides, consistency and biological significances can be detected among different gene signatures, reflecting the

  19. The NSL complex regulates housekeeping genes in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chung Lam

    Full Text Available MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16 acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP-seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2 throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5% of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP-seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication-related Element (DRE. Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription.

  20. No severe bottleneck during human evolution: evidence from two apolipoprotein C-II deficiency alleles.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, W J; Li, W. H.; Posner, I; Yamamura, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Gotto, A M; Chan, L

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequences of a Japanese and a Venezuelan apolipoprotein (apo) C-II deficiency allele, of a normal Japanese apo C-II gene, and of a chimpanzee apo C-II gene were amplified by PCR, and their nucleotide sequences were determined on multiple clones of the PCR products. The normal Japanese sequence is identical to--and the chimpanzee sequence differs by only three nucleotides from--a previously published normal Caucasian sequence. In contrast, the two human mutant sequences each differ fro...

  1. Allelic Polymorphism, Gene Duplication and Balancing Selection of MHC Class IIB Genes in the Omei Treefrog (Rhacophorus omeimontis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li HUANG; Mian ZHAO; Zhenhua LUO; Hua WU

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide declines in amphibian populations have largely been caused by infectious fungi and bacteria. Given that vertebrate immunity against these extracellular pathogens is primarily functioned by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, the characterization and the evolution of amphibian MHC class II genes have attracted increasing attention. The polymorphism of MHC class II genes was found to be correlated with susceptibility to fungal pathogens in many amphibian species, suggesting the importance of studies on MHC class II genes for amphibians. However, such studies on MHC class II gene evolution have rarely been conducted on amphibians in China. In this study, we chose Omei treefrog (Rhacophorus omeimontis), which lived moist environments easy for breeding bacteria, to study the polymorphism of its MHC class II genes and the underlying evolutionary mechanisms. We amplified the entire MHC class IIB exon 2 sequence in the R. omeimontis using newly designed primers. We detected 102 putative alleles in 146 individuals. The number of alleles per individual ranged from one to seven, indicating that there are at least four loci containing MHC class IIB genes in R. omeimontis. The allelic polymorphism estimated from the 102 alleles in R. omeimontis was not high compared to that estimated in other anuran species. No significant gene recombination was detected in the 102 MHC class IIB exon 2 sequences. In contrast, both gene duplication and balancing selection greatly contributed to the variability in MHC class IIB exon 2 sequences of R. omeimontis. This study lays the groundwork for the future researches to comprehensively analyze the evolution of amphibian MHC genes and to assess the role of MHC gene polymorphisms in resistance against extracellular pathogens for amphibians in China.

  2. Thermodynamics II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Thermodynamics II includes review of thermodynamic relations, power and refrigeration cycles, mixtures and solutions, chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, and flow through nozzl

  3. Graphics gems II

    CERN Document Server

    Arvo, James

    1991-01-01

    Graphics Gems II is a collection of articles shared by a diverse group of people that reflect ideas and approaches in graphics programming which can benefit other computer graphics programmers.This volume presents techniques for doing well-known graphics operations faster or easier. The book contains chapters devoted to topics on two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry and algorithms, image processing, frame buffer techniques, and ray tracing techniques. The radiosity approach, matrix techniques, and numerical and programming techniques are likewise discussed.Graphics artists and comput

  4. Statistics II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Statistics II discusses sampling theory, statistical inference, independent and dependent variables, correlation theory, experimental design, count data, chi-square test, and time se

  5. Engineering mathematics-II

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesh, A

    2009-01-01

    About the Book: This book Engineering Mathematics-II is designed as a self-contained, comprehensive classroom text for the second semester B.E. Classes of Visveswaraiah Technological University as per the Revised new Syllabus. The topics included are Differential Calculus, Integral Calculus and Vector Integration, Differential Equations and Laplace Transforms. The book is written in a simple way and is accompanied with explanatory figures. All this make the students enjoy the subject while they learn. Inclusion of selected exercises and problems make the book educational in nature. It shou

  6. Complex variables II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables II includes elementary mappings and Mobius transformation, mappings by general functions, conformal mappings and harmonic functions, applying complex functions to a

  7. Physics II for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    A plain-English guide to advanced physics. Does just thinking about the laws of motion make your head spin? Does studying electricity short your circuits? Physics II For Dummies walks you through the essentials and gives you easy-to-understand and digestible guidance on this often intimidating course. Thanks to this book, you don?t have to be Einstein to understand physics. As you learn about mechanical waves and sound, forces and fields, electric potential and electric energy, and much more, you?ll appreciate the For Dummies law: The easier we make it, the faster you'll understand it!

  8. PIVKA-II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    建石良介

    2005-01-01

    @@ PIVKA-II是通过维生素K缺乏或拮抗剂II诱导的蛋白质 (protein induced by vitamine K absence or antagonist-II),又称为右旋-γ-羧基-凝血酶原(des-γ-carboxy prothrombin),它是肝脏合成的无凝血活性的异常凝血酶原.自从Liebman等(1984年)报道以来,PIVKA-II作为肝细胞癌的特异性肿瘤标志物,是临床上不可缺少的检查.

  9. Computer science II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Raus, Randall

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Computer Science II includes organization of a computer, memory and input/output, coding, data structures, and program development. Also included is an overview of the most commonly

  10. Thin film processes II

    CERN Document Server

    Kern, Werner

    1991-01-01

    This sequel to the 1978 classic, Thin Film Processes, gives a clear, practical exposition of important thin film deposition and etching processes that have not yet been adequately reviewed. It discusses selected processes in tutorial overviews with implementation guide lines and an introduction to the literature. Though edited to stand alone, when taken together, Thin Film Processes II and its predecessor present a thorough grounding in modern thin film techniques.Key Features* Provides an all-new sequel to the 1978 classic, Thin Film Processes* Introduces new topics, and sever

  11. Data structures II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Smolarski, Dennis C

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Data Structures II includes sets, trees, advanced sorting, elementary graph theory, hashing, memory management and garbage collection, and appendices on recursion vs. iteration, alge

  12. Electronics II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Electronics II covers operational amplifiers, feedback and frequency compensation of OP amps, multivibrators, logic gates and families, Boolean algebra, registers, counters, arithmet

  13. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions mucopolysaccharidosis type II mucopolysaccharidosis type II Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II), also known as Hunter ...

  14. Genomics of the human carnitine acyltransferase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, FR; Huijkman, NCA; Boomsma, C; Kuipers, JRG; Bartelds, B

    2000-01-01

    Five genes in the human genome are known to encode different active forms of related carnitine acyltransferases: CPT1A for liver-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT1B for muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT2 for carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, CROT for carnitine octanoyltrans

  15. Biogenesis of photosystem II complexes: transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integral membrane proteins of photosystem II (PS II) reaction center complexes are encoded by chloroplast genomes. These proteins are absent from thylakoids of PS II mutants of algae and vascular plants as a result of either chloroplast or nuclear gene mutations. To resolve the molecular basis and the concurrent absence of the PS II polypeptides, protein synthesis rates and mRNA levels were measured in mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack PS II. The analyses show that one nuclear gene product regulates the levels of transcripts from the chloroplast gene encoding the 51-kD chlorophyll α-binding polypeptide (polypeptide 5) but is not involved in the synthesis of other chloroplast mRNAs. The other nuclear product is specifically required for translation of mRNA encoding the 32-34-kD polypeptide, D1. The absence of either D1 or polypeptide 5 does not eliminate the synthesis and thylakoid insertion of two other integral membrane proteins of PS II, the chlorophyll α-binding polypeptide of 46 kD (polypeptide 6) and the 30-kD D1-like protein, D2. However, these two unassembled subunits cannot be properly processed and/or are degraded in the mutants even though they reside in the membrane. In addition, pulse labeling of the nuclear mutants and a chloroplast mutant that does not synthesize D1 mRNA indicates that synthesis of polypeptide 5 and D1 is coordinated at the translational level. A model is presented to explain how absence of one of the two proteins could lead to translational arrest of the other

  16. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  17. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns that e...... in the nucleolus....

  18. Complementary DNA sequences encoding the multimammate rat MHC class II DQ α and β chains and cross-species sequence comparison in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goüy de Bellocq, J; Leirs, H

    2009-01-01

    Sequences of the complete open reading frame (ORF) for rodents major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes are rare. Multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the alpha and beta chains of MHC class II DQ gene was cloned from a rapid amplifications of c...

  19. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  20. Cloning and characterization of the Bg/II restriction-modification system reveals a possible evolutionary footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, B P; Heiter, D F; Benner, J S; Hess, E J; Greenough, L; Moran, L S; Slatko, B E; Brooks, J E

    1997-03-10

    Bg/II, a type II restriction-modification (R-M) system from Bacillus globigii, recognizes the sequence 5'-AGATCT-3'. The system has been cloned into E. coli in multiple steps: first the methyltransferase (MTase) gene, bglIIM, was cloned from B. globigii RUB561, a variant containing an inactivated endonuclease (ENase) gene (bglIIR). Next the ENase protein (R.BglII) was purified to homogeneity from RUB562, a strain expressing the complete R-M system. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 5' end of the gene were then synthesized and used to locate bglIIR, and the gene was isolated and cloned in a subsequent step. The nucleotide sequence of the system has been determined, and several interesting features have been found. The genes are tandemly arranged, with bglIIR preceding bglIIM. The amino acid sequence of M.BglII is compared to those of other known MTases. A third gene encoding a protein with sequence similarity to known C elements of other R-M systems is found upstream of bglIIR. This is the first instance of a C gene being associated with an R-M system where the R and M genes are collinear. In addition, open reading frames (ORFs) resembling genes involved with DNA mobility are found in close association with BglII. These may shed light on the evolution of the R-M system. PMID:9073062