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Sample records for biocompatible targeted probes

  1. Biocompatible and target specific hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei; Li, Weiyi; Rubenstein, David A; Meng, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Atherosclerosis is a major cause for cardiovascular diseases. Drugs that treat atherosclerosis usually act nonspecifically. To enhance drug delivery specificity, the authors developed a hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan (HGC) nanoparticle that can specifically target activated endothelial cells. The biocompatibility of these nanoparticles toward red blood cells and platelets was evaluated through hemolysis, platelet activation, platelet thrombogenicity, and platelet aggregation assays. The biocompatibility of these nanoparticles toward vascular endothelial cells was evaluated by their effects on endothelial cell growth, metabolic activity, and activation. The results demonstrated that HGC nanoparticles did not cause hemolysis, or affect platelet activation, thrombogenicity, and aggregation capability in vitro. The nanoparticles did not impair vascular endothelial cell growth or metabolic activities in vitro, and did not cause cell activation either. When conjugated with intercellular adhesion molecular 1 antibodies, HGC nanoparticles showed a significantly increased targeting specificity toward activated endothelial cells. These results suggested that HGC nanoparticles are likely compatible toward red blood cells, platelets, and endothelial cells, and they can be potentially used to identify activated endothelial cells at atherosclerotic lesion areas within the vasculature, and deliver therapeutic drugs. PMID:27126597

  2. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijin; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Shaojie; Zhang, Na; Ma, Chunhong; Lu, Zaijun

    2009-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid-polyethylene glycol/gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA) nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA-PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd-DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was -12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed ( r = 0.987). The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd-DTPA. PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular targeted imaging contrast agent.

  3. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Dexin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid–polyethylene glycol/gadolinium–diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. The PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA–PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd–DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was −12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed (r = 0.987. The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd–DTPA. PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular

  4. Boronate Affinity-Molecularly Imprinted Biocompatible Probe: An Alternative for Specific Glucose Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guosheng; Qiu, Junlang; Fang, Xu'an; Xu, Jianqiao; Cai, Siying; Chen, Qing; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-08-19

    A biocompatible probe for specific glucose recognition is based on photoinitiated boronate affinity-molecular imprinted polymers (BA-MIPs). The unique pre-self-assembly between glucose and boronic acids creates glucose-specific memory cavities in the BA-MIPs coating. As a result, the binding constant toward glucose was enhanced by three orders of magnitude. The BA-MIPs probe was applied to glucose determination in serum and urine and implanted into plant tissues for low-destructive and long-term in vivo continuous glucose monitoring. PMID:27411946

  5. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  6. Ultramild protein-mediated click chemistry creates efficient oligonucleotide probes for targeting and detecting nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized synthetic oligonucleotides are finding growing applications in research, clinical studies, and therapy. However, it is not easy to prepare them in a biocompatible and highly efficient manner. We report a new strategy to synthesize oligonucleotides with promising nucleic acid...... targeting and detection properties. We focus in particular on the pH sensitivity of these new probes and their high target specificity. For the first time, human copper(I)-binding chaperon Cox17 was applied to effectively catalyze click labeling of oligonucleotides. This was performed under ultramild...... conditions with fluorophore, peptide, and carbohydrate azide derivatives. In thermal denaturation studies, the modified probes showed specific binding to complementary DNA and RNA targets. Finally, we demonstrated the pH sensitivity of the new rhodamine-based fluorescent probes in vitro and rationalize our...

  7. Surface Complexation-Based Biocompatible Magnetofluorescent Nanoprobe for Targeted Cellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Satyapriya; Khandelia, Rumi; Pan, Uday Narayan; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-08-19

    We report the synthesis of a magnetofluorescent biocompatible nanoprobe-following room temperature complexation reaction between Fe3O4-ZnS nanocomposite and 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ). The composite nanoprobe exhibited high luminescence quantum yield, low rate of photobleaching, reasonable excited-state lifetime, luminescence stability especially in human blood serum, superparamagnetism and no apparent cytotoxicity. Moreover, the nanoprobe could be used for spatio-controlled cell labeling in the presence of an external magnetic field. The ease of synthesis and cell labeling in vitro make it a suitable candidate for targeted bioimaging applications. PMID:26226317

  8. In Vivo Detection of Oxidation-Specific Epitopes in Atherosclerotic Lesions Using Bio-Compatible Mn(II) Molecular Magnetic Imaging Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Hoang, Tuyen; Saeboe, Alexander M.; Cho, Young Seok; Ryu, Sung Kee; Volkava, Eugenia; Dickson, Stephen; Leibundgut, Gregor; Weisner, Philipp; Green, Simone; Casanada, Florence; Miller, Yury I.; Shaw, Walter; Witztum, Joseph L; Fayad, Zahi A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging efficacy of manganese (Mn(II)) molecular imaging probes targeted to oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE). Background OSE are critical in the initiation, progression and de-stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Gadolinium (Gd(III)) based MR imaging agents can be associated with systemic toxicity. Mn is an endogenous, bio-compatible, paramagnetic metal ion that has poor MR efficacy when chelated, but strong efficacy when released within cells. Methods Multimodal Mn-micelles were generated to contain rhodamine for confocal microscopy and conjugated with either the murine monoclonal IgG antibody MDA2 targeted to malondialdehyde (MDA)-lysine epitopes or the human single-chain Fv antibody fragment IK17 targeted to MDA-like epitopes (‘targeted micelles”). Micelle formulations were characterized in vitro and in vivo and their MR efficacy (9.4 Tesla) evaluated in apoE−/− and LDLR−/− mice (0.05 mmol Mn/Kg dose) (total of 120 mice for all experiments). In vivo competitive inhibition studies were performed to evaluate target specificity. Untargeted, MDA2-Gd and IK17-Gd micelles (0.075 mmol Gd/Kg) were included as controls. Results In vitro studies demonstrated that targeted Mn-micelles accumulate in macrophages when pre-exposed to MDA-LDL with ~10X increase in longitudinal relativity. Following intravenous injection, strong MR signal enhancement was observed 48–72 hours after administration of targeted Mn-micelles, with co-localization within intraplaque macrophages. Co-injection of free MDA2 with the MDA2-Mn micelles resulted in full suppression of MR signal in the arterial wall confirming target specificity. Similar MR efficacy was noted in apoE−/− and LDLR−/− mice with aortic atherosclerosis. No significant differences in MR efficacy were noted between targeted Mn and Gd micelles. Conclusions This study demonstrates that bio-compatible multimodal Mn-based molecular imaging probes

  9. TEM studies of biocompatible nanodiamond probes for in vivo multimodal bioimaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Jiří; Hrubý, Martin; Filippov, Sergey K.; Macková, Hana; Kučka, Jan; Proks, Vladimír; Turner, S.; Bals, S.; Řehoř, Ivan; Cígler, Petr

    Pisa : European Polymer Federation, 2013. P6-78. [European Polymer Congress - EPF 2013. 16.06.2013-21.06.2013, Pisa] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0640 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : nanodiamond * biocompatibility Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X)

  10. Non-Cytotoxic Quantum Dot–Chitosan Nanogel Biosensing Probe for Potential Cancer Targeting Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Maxwell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (Qdot biosensors have consistently provided valuable information to researchers about cellular activity due to their unique fluorescent properties. Many of the most popularly used Qdots contain cadmium, posing the risk of toxicity that could negate their attractive optical properties. The design of a non-cytotoxic probe usually involves multiple components and a complex synthesis process. In this paper, the design and synthesis of a non-cytotoxic Qdot-chitosan nanogel composite using straight-forward cyanogen bromide (CNBr coupling is reported. The probe was characterized by spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, microscopy (Fluorescence, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Dynamic Light Scattering. This activatable (“OFF”/“ON” probe contains a core–shell Qdot (CdS:Mn/ZnS capped with dopamine, which acts as a fluorescence quencher and a model drug. Dopamine capped “OFF” Qdots can undergo ligand exchange with intercellular glutathione, which turns the Qdots “ON” to restore fluorescence. These Qdots were then coated with chitosan (natural biocompatible polymer functionalized with folic acid (targeting motif and Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC; fluorescent dye. To demonstrate cancer cell targetability, the interaction of the probe with cells that express different folate receptor levels was analyzed, and the cytotoxicity of the probe was evaluated on these cells and was shown to be nontoxic even at concentrations as high as 100 mg/L.

  11. Modification of polylactic acid surface using RF plasma discharge with sputter deposition of a hydroxyapatite target for increased biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverdokhlebov, S.I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bolbasov, E.N.; Shesterikov, E.V. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Antonova, L.V.; Golovkin, A.S.; Matveeva, V.G. [Federal State Budgetary Institution Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease, 6 Sosnovy Blvd, Kemerovo 650002 (Russian Federation); Petlin, D.G.; Anissimov, Y.G. [Griffith University, School of Natural Sciences, Engineering Dr., Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • The treatment by plasma of radio-frequency magnetron discharge with hydroxyapatite target sputtering improves the biocompatibility of PLLA surface. • The treatment significantly increases the roughness of PLLA surface. • The formation of rough highly porous surface is due to the etching and crystallization processes on PLLA surface during treatment. • Maximum concentration of the ions from the sputtered target is achieved at 60 s of the plasma treatment. - Abstract: Surface modification of polylactic acid (PLLA) by plasma of radio-frequency magnetron discharge with hydroxyapatite target sputtering was investigated. Increased biocompatibility was demonstrated using studies with bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. Atomic force microscopy demonstrates that the plasma treatment modifies the surface morphology of PLLA to produce rougher surface. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that changes in the surface morphology are caused by the processes of PLLA crystallization. Fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy showed that the plasma treatment also changes the chemical composition of PLLA, enriching it with ions of the sputtered target: calcium, phosphorus and oxygen. It is hypothesized that these surface modifications increase biocompatibility of PLLA without increasing toxicity.

  12. Modification of polylactic acid surface using RF plasma discharge with sputter deposition of a hydroxyapatite target for increased biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The treatment by plasma of radio-frequency magnetron discharge with hydroxyapatite target sputtering improves the biocompatibility of PLLA surface. • The treatment significantly increases the roughness of PLLA surface. • The formation of rough highly porous surface is due to the etching and crystallization processes on PLLA surface during treatment. • Maximum concentration of the ions from the sputtered target is achieved at 60 s of the plasma treatment. - Abstract: Surface modification of polylactic acid (PLLA) by plasma of radio-frequency magnetron discharge with hydroxyapatite target sputtering was investigated. Increased biocompatibility was demonstrated using studies with bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. Atomic force microscopy demonstrates that the plasma treatment modifies the surface morphology of PLLA to produce rougher surface. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that changes in the surface morphology are caused by the processes of PLLA crystallization. Fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy showed that the plasma treatment also changes the chemical composition of PLLA, enriching it with ions of the sputtered target: calcium, phosphorus and oxygen. It is hypothesized that these surface modifications increase biocompatibility of PLLA without increasing toxicity

  13. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A; Irwin, John J; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L; Shoichet, Brian K

    2012-07-10

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to "de-orphanize" drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with unknown targets; the number of drugs without molecular targets likely is far fewer than reported. The number of worldwide drugs without reasonable molecular targets similarly dropped, from 352 (25%) to 44 (4%). Nevertheless, there remained at least seven drugs for which reasonable mechanism-of-action targets were unknown but could be predicted, including the antitussives clemastine, cloperastine, and nepinalone; the antiemetic benzquinamide; the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine; the analgesic nefopam; and the immunomodulator lobenzarit. For each, predicted targets were confirmed experimentally, with affinities within their physiological concentration ranges. Turning this question on its head, we next asked which drugs were specific enough to act as chemical probes. Over 100 drugs met the standard criteria for probes, and 40 did so by more stringent criteria. A chemical information approach to drug-target association can guide therapeutic development and reveal applications to probe biology, a focus of much current interest. PMID:22711801

  14. Amplification of target-specific, ligation-dependent circular probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D Y; Brandwein, M; Hsuih, T C; Li, H

    1998-05-12

    We describe a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based gene amplification method utilizing a circularizable oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe (C-probe). The C-probe contains two target complementary regions located at each terminus and an interposed generic PCR primer binding region. The hybridization of C-probe to a target brings two termini in direct apposition as the complementary regions of C-probe wind around the target to form a double helix. Subsequent ligation of the two termini results in a covalently linked C-probe that becomes 'locked on to' the target. The circular nature of the C-probe allows for the generation of a multimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) via extension of the antisense primer by Taq DNA polymerase along the C-probe and displacement of downstream strand, analogous to 'rolling circle' replication of bacteriophage in vivo. This multimeric ssDNA then serves as a template for multiple sense primers to hybridize, extend, and displace downstream DNA, generating a large ramified (branching) DNA complex. Subsequent thermocycling denatures the dsDNA and initiates the next round of primer extension and ramification. This model results in significantly improved amplification kinetics (super-exponential) as compared to conventional PCR. Our results show that the C-probe was 1000 times more sensitive than the corresponding linear hemiprobes for detecting Epstein-Barr virus early RNA. The C-probe not only increases the power of amplification but also offers a means for decontaminating carryover amplicons. As the ligated C-probes possess no free termini, they are resistant to exonuclease digestion, whereas contaminated linear amplicons are susceptible to digestion. Treatment of the ligation reaction mixture with exonuclease prior to amplification eliminated the amplicon contaminant, which could also have been co-amplified with the same PCR primers; only the ligated C-probes were amplified. The combined advantages of the C-probe and thermocycling have a

  15. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes

    OpenAIRE

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A.; Irwin, John J.; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L.; Brian K Shoichet

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to “de-orphanize” drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Adm...

  16. Lipid-Targeting Peptide Probes for Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Aaron D; Yin, Hang

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells are under intense investigation for their roles in cell-cell communication and cancer progression. However, individual vesicles have been difficult to probe as their small size renders them invisible by conventional light microscopy. However, as a consequence of their small size these vesicles possess highly curved lipid membranes that offer an unconventional target for curvature-sensing probes. In this article, we present a strategy for using peptide-based biosensors to detect highly curved membranes and the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine, we delineate several assays used to validate curvature- and lipid-targeting mechanisms, and we explore potential applications in probing extracellular vesicles released from sources such as apoptotic cells, cancer cells, or activated platelets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2327-2332, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26909741

  17. Biocompatibility of ferritin-based nanoparticles as targeted MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Jennifer R; Pearl, Valeria M; Denotti, Anna R; Lee, Jonathan B; Swaminathan, Sundararaman; Scindia, Yogesh M; Charlton, Nathan P; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Beeman, Scott C; Bennett, Kevin M

    2016-08-01

    Ferritin is a naturally occurring iron storage protein, proposed as a clinically relevant nanoparticle with applications as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent. Cationic ferritin is a targeted, injectable contrast agent to measure kidney microstructure with MRI. Here, the toxicity of horse spleen ferritin is assessed as a step to clinical translation. Adult male mice received cationic, native and high dose cationic ferritin (CF, NF, or HDCF) or saline and were monitored for 3weeks. Transient weight loss occurred in the ferritin groups with no difference in renal function parameters. Ferritin-injected mice demonstrated a lower serum iron 3weeks after administration. In ferritin-injected animals pre-treated with hydrocortisone, there were no structural or weight differences in the kidneys, liver, lung, heart, or spleen. This study demonstrates a lack of significant detrimental effects of horse-derived ferritin-based nanoparticles at MRI-detectable doses, allowing further exploration of these agents in basic research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27071333

  18. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hong; Goodwin, Peter M; Keller, Richard A.; Nolan, Rhiannon L.

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  19. Hairpin DNA probes based on target-induced in situ generation of luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Wu, Zhengjun; Wong, Kwok-Yin; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-05-14

    Novel hairpin DNA probes are designed and constructed based on target-induced in situ generation of luminescent silver nanoclusters. This design allows specific and versatile detection of diverse targets with easy operation and low cost. PMID:24686790

  20. CLAVATA3 dodecapeptide modified CdTe nanoparticles: a biocompatible quantum dot probe for in vivo labeling of plant stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui Yu

    Full Text Available CLAVATA3 (CLV3 dodecapeptides function in plant stem cell maintenance, but CLV3 function in cell-cell communication remains less clear. Here, we coupled CLV3 dodecapeptides to synthesized CdTe nanoparticles to track their bioactivity on stem cells in the root apical meristem. To achieve this, we first synthesized CdTe quantum dots (QDs using a one-pot method, and then evaluated the cytotoxicity of the QDs in BY-2 cells. The results showed that QDs in plant cells must be used at low concentrations and for short treatment time. To make biocompatible probes to track stem cell fate, we conjugated CLV3 dodecapeptides to the QDs by the zero-coupling method; this modification greatly reduced the cytotoxicity of the QDs. Furthermore, we detected CLV3-QDs localized on the cell membrane, consistent with the known localization of CLV3. Our results indicate that using surface-modified QDs at low concentrations and for short time treatment can improve their utility for plant cell imaging.

  1. Target momentum measurement in laser plasma propulsion using two probe beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method to measure the target velocity in laser plasma propulsion is proposed. By this method, the target velocity can be directly measured. The target thickness and the probe beam have no effects on measurement results. Compared with theoretical result, the error of experimental result is less than 2%. Furthermore, using this method, target momentum generation in laser-ablation water under different ambient temperatures is measured. Results show that the target momentum increases as the temperature decreases. (authors)

  2. Highly Sensitive Detection of Target Biomolecules on Cell Surface Using Gold Nanoparticle Conjugated with Aptamer Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Terazono, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Masahito; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    A method of gold nanoparticle (Au NP) labeling with backscattered electron (BE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was applied for specific detection of target biomolecules on a cell surface. A single-stranded DNA aptamer, which specifically binds to the target molecule on a human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell, was conjugated with a 20 nm Au NP and used as a probe to label its target molecule on the cell. The Au NP probe was incubated with the cell, and the interaction was confirmed using BE imaging of FE-SEM through direct counting of the number of Au NPs attached on the target cell surface. Specific Au NP-aptamer probes were observed on a single cell surface and their spatial distributions including submicron-order localizations were also clearly visualized, whereas the nonspecific aptamer probes were not observed on it. The aptamer probe can be potentially dislodged from the cell surface with treatment of nucleases, indicating that Au NP-conjugated aptamer probes can be used as sensitive and reversible probes to label target biomolecules on cells.

  3. Target-protecting dumbbell molecular probe against exonucleases digestion for sensitive detection of ATP and streptavidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyang; Liu, Yucheng; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a versatile dumbbell molecular (DM) probe was designed and employed in the sensitively homogeneous bioassay. In the presence of target molecule, the DM probe was protected from the digestion of exonucleases. Subsequently, the protected DM probe specifically bound to the intercalation dye and resulted in obvious fluorescence signal which was used to determine the target molecule in return. This design allows specific and versatile detection of diverse targets with easy operation and no sophisticated fluorescence labeling. Integrating the idea of target-protecting DM probe with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) involved ligation reaction, the DM probe with 5'-end phosphorylation was successfully constructed for ATP detection, and the limitation of detection was found to be 4.8 pM. Thanks to its excellent selectivity and sensitivity, this sensing strategy was used to detect ATP spiked in human serum as well as cellular ATP. Moreover, the proposed strategy was also applied in the visual detection of ATP in droplet-based microfluidic platform with satisfactory results. Similarly, combining the principle of target-protecting DM probe with streptavidin (SA)-biotin interaction, the DM probe with 3'-end biotinylation was developed for selective and sensitive SA determination, which demonstrated the robustness and versatility of this design. PMID:27131994

  4. A Targeted DNAzyme-Nanocomposite Probe Equipped with Built-in Zn2+ Arsenal for Combined Treatment of Gene Regulation and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi-Mei; Zhang, Peng-Hui; Li, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    As catalytic nucleic acids, DNAzymes have been extensively used in the design of sensing platforms. However, their potentials as intelligent drug carriers for responsive drug release in gene therapy and chemotherapy were rarely explored. Herein, we report a dual-functional probe composed of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), catalytic Zn2+-dependent DNAzyme, anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox), targeted AS1411 aptamer and acid-decomposable ZnO quantum dots (ZnO QDs) to achieve intracellular gene regulation and drug delivery in a controlled manner. By means of aptamer-guided targeting and receptor-mediated endocytosis, the probes were specifically internalized into the HeLa cells and trapped in the acidic endo-/lysosomes, where the ZnO QDs as the built-in Zn2+ arsenal were promptly dissolved to offer Zn2+, leading to the activation of DNAzyme to cleave the substrate strands, and subsequent drug release. Meanwhile, as designed, one part of the cleaved substrate, hybridized with the overexpressed miR-21 in the target cells, thereby declining its intracellular level. Taken together, the down-regulation of miR-21 has a synergistic effect with Dox to efficiently eradicate the cancer cells. Thus, the favorable biocompatibility, cancer cell specificity and combined treatment make the probe promising for therapy of multidrug-resistant cancer and in vivo application. PMID:26956167

  5. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26507179

  6. Biocompatible ELR-Based Polyplexes Coated with MUC1 Specific Aptamers and Targeted for Breast Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, Maria J; Girotti, Alessandra; Santos, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Cabello, J Carlos; Arias, F Javier

    2016-03-01

    The search for new and biocompatible materials with high potential for improvement is a challenge in gene delivery applications. A cell type specific vector made of elastin-like recombinamer (ELR) and aptamers has been specifically designed for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic material for breast cancer therapy. A lysine-enriched ELR was constructed and complexed with plasmid DNA to give positively charged and stable polyplexes. Physical characterization of these polyplexes showed a particle size of around 140 nm and a zeta potential of approximately +40 mV. The incorporation of MUC1-specific aptamers into the polyplexes resulted in a slight decrease in zeta potential but increased cell transfection specificity for MCF-7 breast cancer cells with respect to a MUC1-negative tumor line. After showing the transfection ability of this aptamer-ELR vector which is facilitated mainly by macropinocytosis uptake, we demonstrated its application for suicide gene therapy using a plasmid containing the gene of the toxin PAP-S. The strategy developed in this work about using ELR as polymeric vector and aptamers as supplier of specificity to deliver therapeutic material into MUC1-positive breast cancer cells shows promising potential and continues paving the way for ELRs in the biomedical field. PMID:26815223

  7. A targeted molecular probe for colorectal cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Indrevoll, B.; Moestue, S.; Rogstad, A.; Bendiksen, R.; Healey, A.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. Morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs can be reduced if the disease can be detected at an early stage. Screening is a viable approach as there is a clear link to risk factors such as age. We have developed a fluorescent contrast agent for use during colonoscopy. The agent is administered intravenously and is targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent consists of a targeting section comprising a peptide, and a fluorescent reporter molecule. Clinical imaging of the agent is to be performed with a far red fluorescence imaging channel (635 nm excitation/660-700 nm emission) as an adjunct to white light colonoscopy. Preclinical proof of mechanism results are presented. The compound has a K d of ~3nM. Two human xenograft tumour models were used. Tumour cells were implanted and grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Imaging using a fluorescence reflectance imaging system and quantitative biodistribution studies were performed. Substances tested include the targeted agent, and a scrambled sequence of the peptide (no binding) used as a negative control. Competition studies were also performed by co-administration of 180 times excess unlabelled peptide. Positive imaging contrast was shown in the tumours, with a clear relationship to expression levels (confirmed with quantitative biodistribution data). There was a significant difference between the positive and negative control substances, and a significant reduction in contrast in the competition experiment.

  8. Effect of titanium incorporation on the structural, mechanical and biocompatible properties of DLC thin films prepared by reactive-biased target ion beam deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathy, P. Vijai; Nataraj, D.; Chu, Paul K.; Wang, Huaiyu; Yang, Q.; Kiran, M. S. R. N.; Silvestre-Albero, J.; Mangalaraj, D.

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous diamond like carbon (DLC) and titanium incorporated diamond like carbon (Ti-DLC) thin films were deposited by using reactive-biased target ion beam deposition method. The effects of Ti incorporation and target bias voltage on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited films were investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nano-indentation. It was found that the Ti content in Ti-DLC films gets increased with increasing target bias voltage. At about 4.2 at.% of Ti, uniform sized well dispersed nanocrystals were seen in the DLC matrix. Using FFT analysis, a facility available in the TEM, it was found that the nanocrystals are in cubic TiC phase. Though at the core, the incorporated Ti atoms react with carbon to form cubic TiC; most of the surface exposed Ti atoms were found to react with the atmospheric oxygen to form weakly bonded Ti-O. The presence of TiC nanocrystals greatly modified the sp 3/sp 2 hybridized bonding ratio and is reflected in mechanical hardness of Ti-DLC films. These films were then tested for their biocompatibility by an invitro cell culturing test. Morphological observation and the cell proliferation test have demonstrated that the human osteoblast cells well attach and proliferate on the surface of Ti incorporated DLC films, suggesting possible applications in bone related implant coatings.

  9. Effect of titanium incorporation on the structural, mechanical and biocompatible properties of DLC thin films prepared by reactive-biased target ion beam deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous diamond like carbon (DLC) and titanium incorporated diamond like carbon (Ti-DLC) thin films were deposited by using reactive-biased target ion beam deposition method. The effects of Ti incorporation and target bias voltage on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited films were investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nano-indentation. It was found that the Ti content in Ti-DLC films gets increased with increasing target bias voltage. At about 4.2 at.% of Ti, uniform sized well dispersed nanocrystals were seen in the DLC matrix. Using FFT analysis, a facility available in the TEM, it was found that the nanocrystals are in cubic TiC phase. Though at the core, the incorporated Ti atoms react with carbon to form cubic TiC; most of the surface exposed Ti atoms were found to react with the atmospheric oxygen to form weakly bonded Ti-O. The presence of TiC nanocrystals greatly modified the sp3/sp2 hybridized bonding ratio and is reflected in mechanical hardness of Ti-DLC films. These films were then tested for their biocompatibility by an invitro cell culturing test. Morphological observation and the cell proliferation test have demonstrated that the human osteoblast cells well attach and proliferate on the surface of Ti incorporated DLC films, suggesting possible applications in bone related implant coatings.

  10. Aminopeptidase N/CD13 targeting fluorescent probes: synthesis and application to tumor cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhouen; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Hatta, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2005-11-01

    A family of fluorescein-peptide conjugates (CNP1-3) for aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) targeting fluorescent probes were designed and synthesized. Among the three conjugates, CNP1 bearing tumor-homing cyclic peptide CNGRC, could selectively label APN/CD13 over-expressing on the surface of tumor cells of HT-1080, as identified by means of fluorescent microscopic cell imaging. CNP1 was shown to be a promising fluorescent probe applicable to tumor-targeting molecular imaging. PMID:15885853

  11. Methicillin-Resistant Bacteria Inhabiting Surface Waters Monitored by mecA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmonir, Elnaz; Yilmaz, Fadime; Icgen, Bulent

    2016-08-01

    Part of a 20-60 kb staphylococcal chromosome cassette called mecA encodes low-affinity penicillin-binding protein PBP2a and causes methicillin resistance. Among all methicillin-resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen and main concern worldwide. Although the origin of the mecA is not very well-defined, mecA homologues are also ubiquitous in methicillin-resistant non-staphylococcal bacteria. Due to the dissemination of methicillin resistance through the transmission of mecA gene among staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal bacteria inhabiting surface waters, there is a need to monitor mecA gene in these waters for public health safety. Therefore, this study aimed at monitoring mecA harboring bacteria inhabiting surface waters by using fluorescently labelled mecA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. Under the hybridization conditions of 55 % formamide and 0.020 M NaCl at 46°C, the oligonucleotide probe used in the study showed high hybridization stringency to the mecA gene targeted. The strong linear relationships observed between the signal intensity and the target gene were used to assess the population dynamics of mecA harboring isolates over a 2-year-period. The results indicated that mecA-targeted oligonucleotide probes can be effectively used for in situ monitoring of methicillin resistant isolates inhabiting surface waters. PMID:27156085

  12. BaitFisher: A Software Package for Multispecies Target DNA Enrichment Probe Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Christoph; Sann, Manuela; Donath, Alexander; Meixner, Martin; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Peters, Ralph S; Petersen, Malte; Meusemann, Karen; Liere, Karsten; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang; Misof, Bernhard; Bleidorn, Christoph; Ohl, Michael; Niehuis, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Target DNA enrichment combined with high-throughput sequencing technologies is a powerful approach to probing a large number of loci in genomes of interest. However, software algorithms that explicitly consider nucleotide sequence information of target loci in multiple reference species for optimizing design of target enrichment baits to be applicable across a wide range of species have not been developed. Here we present an algorithm that infers target DNA enrichment baits from multiple nucleotide sequence alignments. By applying clustering methods and the combinatorial 1-center sequence optimization to bait design, we are able to minimize the total number of baits required to efficiently probe target loci in multiple species. Consequently, more loci can be probed across species with a given number of baits. Using transcript sequences of 24 apoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae, Sphecidae) from the 1KITE project and the gene models of Nasonia vitripennis, we inferred 57,650, 120-bp-long baits for capturing 378 coding sequence sections of 282 genes in apoid wasps. Illumina reduced-representation library sequencing confirmed successful enrichment of the target DNA when applying these baits to DNA of various apoid wasps. The designed baits furthermore enriched a major fraction of the target DNA in distantly related Hymenoptera, such as Formicidae and Chalcidoidea, highlighting the baits' broad taxonomic applicability. The availability of baits with broad taxonomic applicability is of major interest in numerous disciplines, ranging from phylogenetics to biodiversity monitoring. We implemented our new approach in a software package, called BaitFisher, which is open source and freely available at https://github.com/cmayer/BaitFisher-package.git. PMID:27009209

  13. Development of an Optimized Activatable MMP-14 targeted SPECT Imaging Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, Gregory A.; Jones, Ella Fung; Shell, M. Scott; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Pan, Mei-Hsiu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Feng, Jin Jin; He, Jiang; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Dill, Ken A.; Contag, Christopher H.; Coussens, Lisa M; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix Metalloproteinase-14 (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) is a membrane-associated protease implicated in a variety of tissue remodeling processes and a molecular hallmark of select metastatic cancers. The ability to detect MMP-14 in vivo would be useful in studying its role in pathologic processes and may potentially serve as a guide for the development of targeted molecular therapies. Four MMP-14 specific probes containing a positively charged cell penetrating peptide (CPP) d-arginine octamer (r8) li...

  14. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  15. Detection of target DNA using fluorescent cationic polymer and peptide nucleic acid probes on solid support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclerc Mario

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acids detection using microarrays requires labelling of target nucleic acids with fluorophores or other reporter molecules prior to hybridization. Results Using surface-bound peptide nucleic acids (PNA probes and soluble fluorescent cationic polythiophenes, we show a simple and sensitive electrostatic approach to detect and identify unlabelled target nucleic acid on microarray. Conclusion This simple methodology opens exciting possibilities for applied genetic analysis for the diagnosis of infections, identification of genetic mutations, and forensic inquiries. This electrostatic strategy could also be used with other nucleic acid detection methods such as electrochemistry, silver staining, metallization, quantum dots, or electrochemical dyes.

  16. Lysosomal Targeting with Stable and Sensitive Fluorescent Probes (Superior LysoProbes): Applications for Lysosome Labeling and Tracking during Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Chen; Yue Bi; Tianyang Wang; Pengfei Li; Xin Yan; Shanshan Hou; Catherine E. Bammert; Jingfang Ju; K. Michael Gibson; Pavan, William J.; Lanrong Bi

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pH plays an important role in the response to cancer invasion. We have designed and synthesized a series of new fluorescent probes (Superior LysoProbes) with the capacity to label acidic organelles and monitor lysosomal pH. Unlike commercially available fluorescent dyes, Superior LysoProbes are lysosome-specific and are highly stable. The use of Superior LysoProbes facilitates the direct visualization of the lysosomal response to lobaplatin elicited in human chloangiocarcinoma (...

  17. Free-standing kinked nanowire transistor probes for targeted intracellular recording in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Quan; Jiang, Zhe; Xu, Lin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mai, Liqiang; Lieber, Charles M.

    2014-02-01

    Recording intracellular (IC) bioelectrical signals is central to understanding the fundamental behaviour of cells and cell networks in, for example, neural and cardiac systems. The standard tool for IC recording, the patch-clamp micropipette is applied widely, yet remains limited in terms of reducing the tip size, the ability to reuse the pipette and ion exchange with the cytoplasm. Recent efforts have been directed towards developing new chip-based tools, including micro-to-nanoscale metal pillars, transistor-based kinked nanowires and nanotube devices. These nanoscale tools are interesting with respect to chip-based multiplexing, but, so far, preclude targeted recording from specific cell regions and/or subcellular structures. Here we overcome this limitation in a general manner by fabricating free-standing probes in which a kinked silicon nanowire with an encoded field-effect transistor detector serves as the tip end. These probes can be manipulated in three dimensions within a standard microscope to target specific cells or cell regions, and record stable full-amplitude IC action potentials from different targeted cells without the need to clean or change the tip. Simultaneous measurements from the same cell made with free-standing nanowire and patch-clamp probes show that the same action potential amplitude and temporal properties are recorded without corrections to the raw nanowire signal. In addition, we demonstrate real-time monitoring of changes in the action potential as different ion-channel blockers are applied to cells, and multiplexed recording from cells by independent manipulation of two free-standing nanowire probes.

  18. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Bishnu P. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, BSRB 1722, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wang, Thomas D., E-mail: thomaswa@umich.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, BSRB 1722, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research.

  19. Transforming a Targeted Porphyrin Theranostic Agent into a PET Imaging Probe for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyun Shi, Tracy W.B. Liu, Juan Chen, David Green, David Jaffray, Brian C. Wilson, Fan Wang, Gang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrin based photosensitizers are useful agents for photodynamic therapy (PDT and fluorescence imaging of cancer. Porphyrins are also excellent metal chelators forming highly stable metallo-complexes making them efficient delivery vehicles for radioisotopes. Here we investigated the possibility of incorporating 64Cu into a porphyrin-peptide-folate (PPF probe developed previously as folate receptor (FR targeted fluorescent/PDT agent, and evaluated the potential of turning the resulting 64Cu-PPF into a positron emission tomography (PET probe for cancer imaging. Noninvasive PET imaging followed by radioassay evaluated the tumor accumulation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of 64Cu-PPF. 64Cu-PPF uptake in FR-positive tumors was visible on small-animal PET images with high tumor-to-muscle ratio (8.88 ± 3.60 observed after 24 h. Competitive blocking studies confirmed the FR-mediated tracer uptake by the tumor. The ease of efficient 64Cu-radiolabeling of PPF while retaining its favorable biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and selective tumor uptake, provides a robust strategy to transform tumor-targeted porphyrin-based photosensitizers into PET imaging probes.

  20. Processing technique of target capsule's micro inflation hole with a scanning probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Tao; YAN Yongda; GAO Dangzhong; TANG Yongjian; FU Yibei; DONG Shen

    2004-01-01

    To resolve inflation of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target and encapsulation of micro inflation hole with adhesive, a scanning probe microscope (SPM) diamond microprobe was used as the cutting tool with SPM in contact mode. Some parameters influencing the quality of micro inflation hole, such as the scanning direction of the diamond tip, the scanning rate and the contact force are discussed. Accurate taper hole was achieved whose dimension and precision could meet the requirements of inflation and encapsulation technique of micro hole. The experimental results show that using SPM diamond microprobe as the cutting tool and with special processing technique, the precision machining of target capsule's taper inflation hole can be realized. A novel operative technology for filling high Z gas to target is provided.

  1. Functional probe for annulus fibrosus-targeted intervertebral disc degeneration imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Mcclincy, Michael; Vo, Nam V; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-10-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is closely associated with low back pain. Typically nonsurgical treatment of IDD is the most effective when detected early. As such, establishing reliable imaging methods for the early diagnosis of disc degeneration is critical. The cellular and tissue localization of a facile functional fluorescent probe, HYK52, that labels disc annulus fibrosus is reported. HYK52 was synthesized with high yield and purity via a two-step chemical reaction. Rabbit disc cell studies and ex vivo tissue staining images indicated intracellular localization and intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue binding of HYK52 with negligible cytotoxicity. Moreover, HYK52 is purposefully designed with a functional terminal carboxyl group to allow for coupling with various signaling molecules for multimodal imaging applications. These results suggest that this IVD-targeted probe may have great potential in early diagnosis of IDD. PMID:23839314

  2. Group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to identify thermophilic bacteria in marine hydrothermal vents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, HJM; Prieur, D; Jeanthon, C

    1997-01-01

    Four 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the detection of thermophilic members of the domain Bacteria known to thrive in marine hydrothermal systems, We developed and characterized probes encompassing most of the thermophilic members of the genus Bacillus, most species of the

  3. Human biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of novel PET probes targeting the deoxyribonucleoside salvage pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenberg, Johannes [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Division, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pediatrics, Vienna (Austria); Radu, Caius G.; Tran, Andrew Q.; Phelps, Michael E.; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Benz, Matthias; Fueger, Barbara; Czernin, Johannes; Schiepers, Christiaan [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Division, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Witte, Owen N. [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a rate-limiting enzyme in deoxyribonucleoside salvage, a metabolic pathway involved in the production and maintenance of a balanced pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) for DNA synthesis. dCK phosphorylates and therefore activates nucleoside analogs such as cytarabine, gemcitabine, decitabine, cladribine, and clofarabine that are used routinely in cancer therapy. Imaging probes that target dCK might allow stratifying patients into likely responders and nonresponders with dCK-dependent prodrugs. Here we present the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of three fluorinated dCK substrates, {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC, developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of dCK activity in vivo. PET studies were performed in nine healthy human volunteers, three for each probe. After a transmission scan, the radiopharmaceutical was injected intravenously and three sequential emission scans acquired from the base of the skull to mid-thigh. Regions of interest encompassing visible organs were drawn on the first PET scan and copied to the subsequent scans. Activity in target organs was determined and absorbed dose estimated with OLINDA/EXM. The standardized uptake value was calculated for various organs at different times. Renal excretion was common to all three probes. Bone marrow had higher uptake for L-{sup 18}F-FAC and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC than {sup 18}F-FAC. Prominent liver uptake was seen in L-{sup 18}F-FMAC and L-{sup 18}F-FAC, whereas splenic activity was highest for {sup 18}F-FAC. Muscle uptake was also highest for {sup 18}F-FAC. The critical organ was the bladder wall for all three probes. The effective dose was 0.00524, 0.00755, and 0.00910 mSv/MBq for {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC, respectively. The biodistribution of {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC in humans reveals similarities and differences. Differences may be explained by different probe

  4. Human biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of novel PET probes targeting the deoxyribonucleoside salvage pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a rate-limiting enzyme in deoxyribonucleoside salvage, a metabolic pathway involved in the production and maintenance of a balanced pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) for DNA synthesis. dCK phosphorylates and therefore activates nucleoside analogs such as cytarabine, gemcitabine, decitabine, cladribine, and clofarabine that are used routinely in cancer therapy. Imaging probes that target dCK might allow stratifying patients into likely responders and nonresponders with dCK-dependent prodrugs. Here we present the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of three fluorinated dCK substrates, 18F-FAC, L-18F-FAC, and L-18F-FMAC, developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of dCK activity in vivo. PET studies were performed in nine healthy human volunteers, three for each probe. After a transmission scan, the radiopharmaceutical was injected intravenously and three sequential emission scans acquired from the base of the skull to mid-thigh. Regions of interest encompassing visible organs were drawn on the first PET scan and copied to the subsequent scans. Activity in target organs was determined and absorbed dose estimated with OLINDA/EXM. The standardized uptake value was calculated for various organs at different times. Renal excretion was common to all three probes. Bone marrow had higher uptake for L-18F-FAC and L-18F-FMAC than 18F-FAC. Prominent liver uptake was seen in L-18F-FMAC and L-18F-FAC, whereas splenic activity was highest for 18F-FAC. Muscle uptake was also highest for 18F-FAC. The critical organ was the bladder wall for all three probes. The effective dose was 0.00524, 0.00755, and 0.00910 mSv/MBq for 18F-FAC, L-18F-FAC, and L-18F-FMAC, respectively. The biodistribution of 18F-FAC, L-18F-FAC, and L-18F-FMAC in humans reveals similarities and differences. Differences may be explained by different probe affinities for nucleoside transporters, dCK, and catabolic enzymes such as cytidine deaminase (CDA

  5. Fluorescence imaging with multifunctional polyglycerol sulfates: novel polymeric near-IR probes targeting inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licha, Kai; Welker, Pia; Weinhart, Marie; Wegner, Nicole; Kern, Sylvia; Reichert, Stefanie; Gemeinhardt, Ines; Weissbach, Carmen; Ebert, Bernd; Haag, Rainer; Schirner, Michael

    2011-12-21

    We present a highly selective approach for the targeting of inflammation with a multivalent polymeric probe. Dendritic polyglycerol was employed to synthesize a polyanionic macromolecular conjugate with a near-infrared fluorescent dye related to Indocyanine Green (ICG). On the basis of the dense assembly of sulfate groups which were generated from the polyol core, the resulting polyglycerol sulfate (molecular weight 12 kD with ~70 sulfate groups) targets factors of inflammation (IC(50) of 3-6 nM for inhibition of L-selectin binding) and is specifically transported into inflammatory cells. The in vivo accumulation studied by near-IR fluorescence imaging in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrated fast and selective uptake which enabled the differentiation of diseased joints (score 1-3) with a 3.5-fold higher fluorescence level and a signal maximum at 60 min post injection. Localization in tissues using fluorescence histology showed that the conjugates are deposited in the inflammatory infiltrate in the synovial membrane, whereas nonsulfated control was not detected in association with disease. Hence, this type of polymeric imaging probe is an alternative to current bioconjugates and provides future options for targeted imaging and drug delivery. PMID:22092336

  6. Progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin αvβ3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical in the growth, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. The integrins, which express on many types of tumor cells and activated vascular endothelial cells, play an important role in regulation of the tumor angiogenesis. RGD peptide, which contains Arg-Gly-Asp sequence, binds specifically to integrin αvβ3. Therefore, the radiolabeled RGD peptides may have broad application prospects in radionuclide imaging and therapy. Major research interests include the selection of radionuclides, modification and improvement of RGD structures. In this article, we give a review on research progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin αvβ3. (authors)

  7. Measurement of the target current by inductive probe during laser interaction on terawatt laser system PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cikhardt, Jakub; Krása, Josef; De Marco, Massimo; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Velyhan, Andriy; Krouský, Eduard; Cikhardtová, B.; Klír, Daniel; Řezáč, Karel; Ullschmied, Jiří; Skála, Jiří; Kubeš, P.; Kravárik, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 10 (2014), s. 103507-103507. ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029; GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant ostatní: LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser PALS * laser-target interaction * target current * inductive probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.614, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4898016

  8. A biocompatible magnetic film: synthesis and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Jhunu; Haik, Yousef; Chen, Ching Jen

    2004-01-01

    Background Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. Methods A biocompatible magnetic gel film has been synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible magnetic film. Nanosized iron oxide particles (γ-Fe2O3, ~7 nm) have been used to produce the magnetic gel. Results The surface ...

  9. A comparative study of lysosome-targetable pH probes based on phenoxazinium attached with aliphatic and aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Li, Xiao-Jun; Sun, Ru; Xu, Yu-Jie; Ge, Jian-Feng

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, phenoxazinium was used as a fluorophore for the design of pH probes by the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. Phenoxazinium with an aliphatic morpholinyl group (probe ) gave increased emission at 665 nm with pH ranging from 7.4 to 4.4; meanwhile, the other one with an aromatic diethylaminophenyl group (probe ) gave nearly OFF-ON emission at 679 nm with pH ranging from 7.4 to 4.2. They both were reversible pH probes with good selectivity. Their optical properties, especially the PET mechanism, were illustrated by (TD)DFT theory. Fluorescence confocal imaging of probes and a typical phenoxazinium dye (Oxazine 1) was also performed, and the results indicated that probes are lysosome-targetable biomarkers. PMID:27048759

  10. Monitoring Target Engagement of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Using Activity Probes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Jeanine; Jacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes or DUBs are a class of enzymes that selectively remove the polypeptide posttranslational modification ubiquitin from a number of substrates. Approximately 100 DUBs exist in human cells and are involved in key regulatory cellular processes, which drive many disease states, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Several aspects of DUB biology have been studied through genetic knock-out or knock-down, genomic, or proteomic studies. However, investigation of enzyme activation and regulation requires additional tools to monitor cellular and physiological dynamics. A comparison between genetic ablation and dominant-negative target validation with pharmacological inhibition often leads to striking discrepancies. Activity probes have been used to profile classes of enzymes, including DUBs, and allow functional and dynamic properties to be assigned to individual proteins. The ability to directly monitor DUB activity within a native biological system is essential for understanding the physiological and pathological role of individual DUBs. We will discuss the evolution of DUB activity probes, from in vitro assay development to their use in monitoring DUB activity in cells and in animal tissues, as well as recent progress and prospects for assessing DUB inhibition in vivo. PMID:27613052

  11. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca2+ Probe D4ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Greotti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER represents the major intracellular Ca2+ store and the free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+] within its lumen ([Ca2+]ER can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca2+ sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca2+ probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd for Ca2+, low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca2+] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca2+ affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca2+] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca2+]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer’s Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2. The lower Ca2+ affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca2+ content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls.

  12. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a dual imaging probe for targeting hepatocytes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Mi; Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Park, In-Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kim, Jin Woong; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2009-12-01

    Hepatocyte-specific targeting agents are useful for evaluation of the hepatocytic function and the monitoring of disease progress. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) bearing terminal galactose groups exhibit a high affinity for the asialoglycoprotein receptor on the hepatocyte surface. In this study, we synthesized and characterized the dual probe SPION detectable by both nuclear and MR imaging modality for specifically targeting hepatocytes in vivo. SPION with 12-nm diameter were functionalized with dopamine. Surface modification of the SPION was performed to target asialoglycoprotein receptor on hepatocytes, using lactobionic acid. Transmission electron microscope images demonstrated that SPION displayed highly uniform characteristics in terms of both particle size and shape. The X-ray diffraction pattern of SPION revealed a nanocrystal structure of magnetite. To radiolabel the magnetite with (99m)Tc, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was conjugated to unreacted functional groups of dopamine. (99m)Tc-labeled lactobionic acid-SPION showed high accumulation in liver, with 38.43 +/- 6.45% injected dose per gram. In MR imaging, the reduction of the T(2) signal in the liver by lactobionic acid-SPION was approximately 50.8 +/- 7.3%. Competition studies and transmission electron microscope images of liver tissues demonstrated that the lactobionic acid-SPION were localized in hepatocytes. Therefore, the lactobionic acid-SPION may be used as a hepatocyte-targeted dual contrast agent for both nuclear and MR imaging. PMID:19859969

  13. The detection of multiple DNA targets with a single probe using a conformation-sensitive acoustic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Grammoustianou, Aristea; Lymbouridou, Rena; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-07-21

    By using an acoustic wave methodology that allows direct sensing of biomolecular conformations, we achieved the detection of multiple target DNAs using a single probe, exploiting the fact that each bound target results in a hybridized product of a different shape. PMID:26097916

  14. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Christopher P.; Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Minogue, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is an epidemic of increasing magnitude requiring rapid identification and profiling for appropriate and timely therapeutic measures and containment strategies. In this context, ciprofloxacin is part of the first-line of countermeasures against numerous high consequence bacteria. Significant resistance can occur via single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and deletions within ciprofloxacin targeted genes. Ideally, use of ciprofloxacin would be prefaced with AR determination to avoid overuse or misuse of the antibiotic. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant, limits of detection (LOD) for high-throughput pooled sequencing ranged from approximately 300–1800 input genome copies. LODs increased 10-fold in the presence of contaminating human genome DNA. In addition, we show that MIPs can be used as an enrichment step with high resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR which is a sensitive assay with a rapid time-to-answer. Overall, this technology is a multiplexable upfront enrichment applicable with multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. PMID:27174456

  15. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Christopher P; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Minogue, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is an epidemic of increasing magnitude requiring rapid identification and profiling for appropriate and timely therapeutic measures and containment strategies. In this context, ciprofloxacin is part of the first-line of countermeasures against numerous high consequence bacteria. Significant resistance can occur via single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and deletions within ciprofloxacin targeted genes. Ideally, use of ciprofloxacin would be prefaced with AR determination to avoid overuse or misuse of the antibiotic. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant, limits of detection (LOD) for high-throughput pooled sequencing ranged from approximately 300-1800 input genome copies. LODs increased 10-fold in the presence of contaminating human genome DNA. In addition, we show that MIPs can be used as an enrichment step with high resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR which is a sensitive assay with a rapid time-to-answer. Overall, this technology is a multiplexable upfront enrichment applicable with multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. PMID:27174456

  16. Identification of planctomycetes with order-, genus-, and strain-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, D; Schlesner, H; Glöckner, F O; Amann, R; Pfeiffer, S; Thomm, M

    2004-04-01

    A specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe (PIR1223) for the genus Pirellula and a species-specific probe (RB454) for Pirellula sp. strain SH1 have been designed and optimized. Together with the already existing order-specific probe PLA886, the two newly designed probes were used to detect and identify planctomycetes, pirellulae, and close relatives of Pirellula sp. strain SH1 in different habitats. With the help of these probes for detection and identification, bacteria of the genus Pirellula were detected and cultivated from tissue of the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba and from the water column of the Kiel Fjord. An unexpected result was the close phylogenetic relationship of the isolate from the sponge and the brackish water habitat Kiel Fjord as revealed by DNA/DNA hybridization. PMID:14994173

  17. Targeted virus detection in next-generation sequencing data using an automated e-probe based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Marike; Burger, Johan T; Maree, Hans J

    2016-08-01

    The use of next-generation sequencing for plant virus detection is rapidly expanding, necessitating the development of bioinformatic pipelines to support analysis of these large datasets. Pipelines need to be easy implementable to mitigate potential insufficient computational infrastructure and/or skills. In this study user-friendly software was developed for the targeted detection of plant viruses based on e-probes. It can be used for both custom e-probe design, as well as screening preloaded probes against raw NGS data for virus detection. The pipeline was compared to de novo assembly-based virus detection in grapevine and produced comparable results, requiring less time and computational resources. The software, named Truffle, is available for the design and screening of e-probes tailored for user-specific virus species and data, along with preloaded probe-sets for grapevine virus detection. PMID:27209446

  18. A cascading activity-based probe sequentially targets E1-E2-E3 ubiquitin enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Monique P C; Witting, Katharina; Berlin, Ilana; Pruneda, Jonathan N; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Chang, Jer-Gung; Merkx, Remco; Bialas, Johanna; Groettrup, Marcus; Vertegaal, Alfred C O; Schulman, Brenda A; Komander, David; Neefjes, Jacques; El Oualid, Farid; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-07-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins with ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like modifiers (Ubls), orchestrated by a cascade of specialized E1, E2 and E3 enzymes, control a wide range of cellular processes. To monitor catalysis along these complex reaction pathways, we developed a cascading activity-based probe, UbDha. Similarly to the native Ub, upon ATP-dependent activation by the E1, UbDha can travel downstream to the E2 (and subsequently E3) enzymes through sequential trans-thioesterifications. Unlike the native Ub, at each step along the cascade, UbDha has the option to react irreversibly with active site cysteine residues of target enzymes, thus enabling their detection. We show that our cascading probe 'hops' and 'traps' catalytically active Ub-modifying enzymes (but not their substrates) by a mechanism diversifiable to Ubls. Our founder methodology, amenable to structural studies, proteome-wide profiling and monitoring of enzymatic activity in living cells, presents novel and versatile tools to interrogate Ub and Ubl cascades. PMID:27182664

  19. Family- and Genus-Level 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes for Ecological Studies of Methanotrophic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    J. Gulledge; Ahmad, A; Steudler, P. A.; Pomerantz, W. J.; Cavanaugh, Colleen Marie

    2001-01-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria play a major role in the global carbon cycle, degrade xenobiotic pollutants, and have the potential for a variety of biotechnological applications. To facilitate ecological studies of these important organisms, we developed a suite of oligonucleotide probes for quantitative analysis of methanotroph-specific 16S rRNA from environmental samples. Two probes target methanotrophs in the family Methylocystaceae (type II methanotrophs) as a group. No oligonucleotide signature...

  20. Preclinical Study on GRPR-Targeted (68)Ga-Probes for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhe; Sun, Ziyan; Loft, Mathias; Ding, Bingbing; Liu, Changhao; Xu, Liying; Yang, Meng; Jiang, Yuxin; Liu, Jianfeng; Xiao, Yuling; Cheng, Zhen; Hong, Xuechuan

    2016-08-17

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeted positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly promising approach for imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) in small animal models and patients. Developing a GRPR-targeted PET probe with excellent in vivo performance such as high tumor uptake, high contrast, and optimal pharmacokinetics is still very challenging. Herein, a novel bombesin (BBN) analogue (named SCH1) based on JMV594 peptide modified with an 8-amino octanoic acid spacer (AOC) was thus designed and conjugated with the metal chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid-4,7-acetic acid (NODAGA). The resulting NODAGA-SCH1 was then radiolabeled with (68)Ga and evaluated for PET imaging of PCa. Compared with (68)Ga-NODAGA-JMV594 probe, (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 exhibited excellent PET/CT imaging properties on PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice, such as high tumor uptake (5.80 ± 0.42 vs 3.78 ± 0.28%ID/g, 2 h) and high tumor/muscle contrast (16.6 ± 1.50 vs 8.42 ± 0.61%ID/g, 2 h). Importantly, biodistribution data indicated a relatively similar accumulation of (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 was observed in the liver (4.21 ± 0.42%ID/g) and kidney (3.41 ± 0.46%ID/g) suggesting that the clearance is through both the kidney and the liver. Overall, (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 showed promising in vivo properties and is a promising candidate for translation into clinical PET-imaging of PCa patients. PMID:27399868

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of a Promising Novel FFAR1/GPR40 Targeting Fluorescent Probe for β-Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Romain; Wolf, Andrea; Ivashchenko, Yuri; Löhn, Matthias; Schäfer, Matthias; Brönstrup, Mark; Gotthardt, Martin; Derdau, Volker; Plettenburg, Oliver

    2016-06-17

    Diabetes affects an increasing number of patients worldwide and is responsible for a significant rise in healthcare expenses. Imaging of β-cells bears the potential to contribute to an improved understanding, diagnosis, and development of new treatment options for diabetes. Here, we describe the first small molecule fluorescent probe targeting the free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40). This receptor is highly expressed on β-cells, and was up to now unexplored for imaging purposes. We designed a novel probe by facile modification of the selective and potent FFAR1 agonist TAK-875. Effective and specific binding of the probe was demonstrated using FFAR1 overexpressing cells. We also successfully labeled FFAR1 on MIN6 and INS1E cells, two widely used β-cell models, by applying an effective amplification protocol. Finally, we showed that the probe is capable of inducing insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner, thus demonstrating that functional activity of the probe was maintained. These results suggest that our probe represents a first important step to successful β-cell imaging by targeting FFAR1. The developed probe may prove to be particularly useful for in vitro and ex vivo studies of diabetic cellular and animal models to gain new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:27115176

  2. A nested array of rRNA targeted probes for the detection and identification of enterococci by reverse hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, T; Koob, C; Schedl, M; Mehlen, A; Meier, H; Knopp, D; Frahm, E; Obst, U; Schleifer, K; Niessner, R; Ludwig, W

    2000-12-01

    Complete 23S and almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for the type strains of the validly described Enterococcus species, Melissococcus pluton and Tetragenococcus halophilus. A comprehensive set of rRNA targeted specific oligonucleotide hybridization probes was designed according to the multiple probe concept. In silico probe design and evaluation was performed using the respective tools of the ARB program package in combination with the ARB databases comprising the currently available 16S as well as 23S rRNA primary structures. The probes were optimized with respect to their application for reverse hybridization in microplate format. The target comprising 16S and 23S rDNA was amplified and labeled by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) using general primers targeting a wide spectrum of bacteria. Alternatively, amplification of two adjacent rDNA fragments of enterococci was performed by using specific primers. In vitro evaluation of the probe set was done including all Enterococcus type strains, and a selection of other representatives of the gram-positive bacteria with a low genomic DNA G+C content. The optimized probe set was used to analyze enriched drinking water samples as well as original samples from waste water treatment plants. PMID:11249027

  3. Fluorescence in vivo imaging of live tumor cells with pH-activatable targeted probes via receptor-mediated endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Daisuke; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2009-02-01

    One goal of molecular imaging is to establish a widely applicable technique for specific detection of tumors with minimal background. Here, we achieve specific in vivo tumor visualization with a newly-designed "activatable" targeted fluorescence probe. This agent is activated after cellular internalization by sensing the pH change in the lysosome. Novel acidic pH-activatable probes based on the BODIPY fluorophore were synthesized, and then conjugated to a cancer-targeting monoclonal antibody, Trastuzumab, or galactosyl serum albumin (GSA). As proof of concept, ex and in vivo imaging of two different tumor mouse models was performed: HER2-overexpressed lung metastasis tumor with Trastuzumab-pH probe conjugates and lectin-overexpressed i.p. disseminated tumor with GSA-pH probe conjugates. These pH-activatable targeted probes were highly specific for tumors with minimal background signal. Because the acidic pH in lysosomes is maintained by the energy-consuming proton pump, only viable cancer cells were successfully visualized. Furthermore, this strategy was also applied to fluorescence endoscopy in tumor mouse models, resulting in specific visualization of tumors as small as submillimeter in size that could hardly detected by naked eyes because of their poor contrast against normal tissues. The design concept can be widely adapted to cancer-specific cell-surface-targeting molecules that result in cellular internalization.

  4. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  5. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, H.; Kar, S.; Cantono, G.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Doria, D.; Gwynne, D.; Macchi, A.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a 'self' proton probing arrangement - i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed.

  6. Synthesis and physicochemical characterization of novel phenotypic probes targeting the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Hershberger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and related upstream signal transduction pathways have long been associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory diseases and has recently been implicated in the onset of cancer. This report provides a synthetic and compound-based property summary of five pathway-related small-molecule chemical probes identified and optimized within the National Institutes of Health-Molecular Libraries Probe Center Network (NIH-MLPCN initiative. The chemical probes discussed herein represent first-in-class, non-kinase-based modulators of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which were identified and optimized through either cellular phenotypic or specific protein-target-based screening strategies. Accordingly, the resulting new chemical probes may allow for better fundamental understanding of this highly complex biochemical signaling network and could advance future therapeutic translation toward the clinical setting.

  7. Biocompatible Polymeric Materials Intended for Drug Delivery and Therapeutic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren; Javakhishvili, Irakli; Bednarek, Melania;

    2007-01-01

    elucidating strategies for combination of biocompatible polymers in unique but amphiphilic manners. The targeted, documented biocompatible polymers like polycapro-lactone (PCL), poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate)2 (PMEA) with the highest known blood compatibility, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and the two...

  8. Optimization of substrate-target distance for pulsed laser deposition of tungsten oxide thin films using Langmuir probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper investigates the spatial and temporal variation of laser produced plasma of tungsten oxide using a Langmuir probe. The plasma was produced by laser ablation of tungsten oxide target using an Excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm. Our experimental studies confirmed that oxygen partial pressure (P) of 2× 10−2 mbar is sufficient enough to get stoichiometric tungsten oxide thin films and the plume dynamics was diagnosed for their spatial and temporal behaviour at the above optimised oxygen pressure. Spatial distribution was recorded with the target to substrate distance (D) ranging from the target position to a distance of 75 mm away from the target, whereas the temporal variation was taken in the range of 0–50 μ S with an interval of 0.5 μ S. The average electron densities were found to be maximum at 30 mm from the target position. However, ion density was constant beyond the probe distance of 45 mm from the target. The plasma current was found to be maximum at 28 μ S. The target to substrate distance was optimized for homogenous adherent good quality thin films using plasma parameters such as ion density and average electron density obtained at different oxygen pressure. The target distance and background gas pressure were correlated as PD scaling law and fitted as PD3 in the model

  9. 16S rRNA-targeted probes for specific detection of Thermoanaerobacterium spp., Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, and Caldicellulosiruptor spp. by fluorescent in situ hybridization in biohydrogen producing systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O-Thong, Sompong; Prasertsan, P.; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov;

    2008-01-01

    bacteria in sludge and granules from anaerobic reactors. The designed probes were checked for their specificity and then validated using fluorescence in situ hybridization with target microorganisms and non-target microorganisms. Thermoanaerobacterium spp., T. thermosaccharolyticum and Caldicellulosiruptor...

  10. Biocompatibility of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavar, Fereydoon; Sabirianov, Renat; Marton, Denes; Rubinstein, Alexander; Garvin, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Titanium is the material of choice for orthopaedic applications because of its known biocompatibility. In order to enhance osteogenic properties of the Ti implants, it is necessary to understand the origin of its biocompatibility. We addresses the origin of Ti biocompatibility through (1) theoretical modeling, (2) the precise determination of Ti surface chemistry by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), (3) and the study of fibronectin adsorption as a function of Ti (near) surface chemistry by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We compare the protein adsorption on Ti with the native oxide layer and the one coated by TiO2 in anatase phase using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). We show that the thin native sub-stoichiometric titanium oxide layer is crucial for biocompatibility of Ti surface. This is due to the enhancement of the non-specific adsorption of proteins which mediate cell adhesion. Improving the surface oxide quality, i.e. fabricating stoichiometric TiO2 (using IBAD) as well as nanoengineering the surface topology that matches its dimensions to that of adhesive proteins, is crucial for increased protein adsorption and, as a result, further increases biocompatibility of Ti implant materials.

  11. Assessment of the effect of parallel temperature gradients in the JET SOL on Te measured by divertor target Langmuir probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher than expected electron temperatures (Te) are often measured by divertor Langmuir probes (LP) in high recycling and detached regimes in JET and other tokamaks. As a possible mechanism to explain this discrepancy, we investigate the effect of penetration of fast, almost collisionless electrons connecting the hot upstream scrape-off layer (SOL) region to the divertor targets in JET. We simulate the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) near the divertor targets using a simple 1D kinetic model using parallel SOL profiles from EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations. The resulting EVDF is used to construct synthetic LP current–voltage (IV) characteristics and evaluation of Te is performed in the same way as for experimental data. Results indicate that the process does not explain the anomalously high Te values estimated from the target probe measurements if the EDGE2D-EIRENE simulated parallel profiles are a good representation of reality

  12. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    Full Text Available Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways.

  13. In situ detection of denitrifying bacteria by mRNA-targeted nucleic acid probes and catalyzed reporter deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Michael Vedel; Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Schramm, Andreas

    In situ detection of denitrifying bacteria by mRNA-targeted nucleic acid probes and catalyzed reporter deposition   Michael V.W. Kofoed, Peter Stief, Morten Poulsen, and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Denitrification, the sequential...... and catalyzed fluorescent reporter deposition (CARD-FISH). The general feasibility of the approach was first tested with pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and various denitrifying and nitrate-reducing isolates. Detailed studies of probe specificity and hybridization conditions using Clone-FISH of...

  14. Visualization of Endogenous and Exogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Using A Lysosome-Targetable Fluorescent Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dabin; Kim, Gyoungmi; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yin, Jun; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play crucial roles in diverse physiological processes; therefore, the efficient detection of ROS is very crucial. In this study, we report a boronate-based hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) probe having naphthalimide fluorophore. This probe also contained a morpholine moiety as a directing group for lysosome. The recognition property indicated that the probe exhibited high selectivity towards H2O2 not only in the solution but also in the living cells. Furthermore, it was used to monitor the level of endogenous and exogenous H2O2. These results support that the probe can function as an efficient indicator to detect H2O2.

  15. Probing of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances using HF-induced scatter targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Blagoveshchenskaya

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results from the Tromsø and Sura heating experiments at high and mid-latitudes are examined. It is shown that the combination of HF-induced target and bi-static HF Doppler radio scatter observations is a profitable method for probing medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs at high and mid-latitudes. HF ionospheric modification experiments provide a way of producing the HF-induced scatter target in a controlled manner at altitudes where the sensitivity to TIDs is highest. Bi-static HF Doppler radio scatter observations were carried out on the London-Tromsø-St. Petersburg path in the course of a Tromsø heating experiment on 16 November 2004 when the pump wave was reflected from an auroral Es-layer. During Sura heating experiments on 19 and 20 August 2004, when the HF pump wave was reflected from the F2 ionospheric layer, multi-position bi-static HF Doppler radio scatter observations were simultaneously performed at three reception points including St. Petersburg, Kharkov, and Rostov-on-Don. Ray tracing and Doppler shift simulations were made for all experiments. A computational technique has been developed allowing the reconstruction of the TID phase velocities from multi-position bi-static HF Doppler scatters. Parameters of medium-scale TIDs were found. In all experiments they were observed in the evening and pre-midnight hours. TIDs in the auroral E-region with periods of about 23 min were traveling southward at speeds of 210 m/s. TIDs in the mid-latitudinal F-region with periods from 20 to 45 min travelled at speeds between 40 and 150 m/s. During quiet magnetic conditions the waves were traveling in the north-east direction. In disturbed conditions the waves were moving in the south-west direction with higher speeds as compared with quiet conditions. Possible sources for the atmospheric gravity waves at middle and high latitudes are discussed.

  16. Biocompatibility of polyaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíček, P.; Kašpárková, V.; Saha, P.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 162, 7/8 (2012), s. 722-727. ISSN 0379-6779 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : conducting polymer * polyaniline * biocompatibility Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.109, year: 2012

  17. Preparation of MR molecular probes targeting CD40 mutant and the preliminary study of imaging ovarian cancer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) based MR probe targeting CD40 mutant and investigate its biological and chemical properties and its targeting effect on ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Methods: To prepare immunologically competent probe, the monoclonal antibody was conjugated with USPIO particles modified by DMSA based on chemical crosslinking method. The USPIO labeled anti-human CD40 mutant monoclonal antibody 5H6 (5H6-USPIO) was the experimental probe, and the USPIO labeled anti-human CD40 monoclonal antibody 5C11 (5C11-USPIO) and USPIO served as control agents. The flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and Prussian blue staining were employed to assess the magnetic performance and analyze its bioactivity of the probe. The probe's cell MR imaging in vitro was carried out using ovarian caner cells (HO8910) with high CD40 mutant expression. The analysis of signal data of different groups was conducted by using one-way ANOVA and LSD test. The probe's effect on ovarian caner cells' growth was measured by CCK-8 kit. Results: The stable molecular probe carrying nanoparticles and CD40 mutant antibody was built and purified successfully. The probe had similar magnetic property compared with original USPIO. Immunofluorescence and Prussian blue staining confirmed that the molecular probe could recognize CD40 mutant on ovarian cancer cells (HO8910) with high specificity. The probe had no effect on the growth of HO8910 cells. MR cell imaging in vitro showed that the value of T2 and T2* decreased significantly after the probe binding with HO8910 cells and T2WI became darker than control groups. The T2 and T2* relaxation time of 5H6-USPIO group was (40.05 ± 1.62) ms and (3.08 ± 0.11) ms, respectively. The T2 and T2* relaxation time of 5H6-USPIO group was shorter than 5C11-USPIO [(85.38 ± 4.74) and (11.82 ± 1.00) ms, respectively] and USPIO [(91.62 ± 3.35) and (13.60 ± 1.92) ms, respectively] groups with statistical

  18. Investigation of free surface fluctuations of liquid lithium flow for IFMIF lithium target by using an electro-contact probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports an experimental study on flow characteristics of lithium target flow of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Free surface fluctuations of the liquid lithium flow were directly measured by using an electro-contact probe. As a result, it was found that the flow amplitude grew with increase of the flow velocity, and reached 2.2 mm at 15 m/s. In the current design of IFMIF, the shape of the lithium target is considered to be 25 mm in depth and 260 mm in width, and a range of the flow velocity is 10 to 20 m/s. The target flow has to be stable and the free surface is necessary to be smooth in vacuum. It is important to know fluctuations of the free surface of the liquid lithium target in estimating the flux of neutrons generated, and it is necessary to experimentally grasp variations of the target thickness and the amplitude of surface waves. But, fluctuations of the free surface have never been measured in detail. That results from the fact that it is difficult or impossible to apply the method which has been used mainly for water on a liquid metal. Aim of this study is to investigate the target thickness and the amplitude of surface waves in details by using an electro-contact probe. The experiments were carried out by using a lithium loop apparatus at Osaka University. The test section of the lithium loop consists of honeycomb and perforated plates, a two-stage contraction nozzle, and a flow channel of 70 mm in width. Lithium jet flows in the flat plane shape of 10 mm in depth and 70 mm in width. The channel is placed horizontally. The nozzle consists of two contractions section whose ratios are 4 and 2.5, respectively. The electro-contact probe was placed at 175 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. The existence or the nonexistence of the lithium surface corresponding to the position of the probe tip can be measured when the surface and the tip contact. The probe was moved in a vertical direction to the lithium flow by 0.1 mm

  19. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (Cdbnd C) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210 nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140 nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50 s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution.

  20. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (CC) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution. PMID:27236136

  1. A dual mode targeting probe for distinguishing HER2-positive breast cancer cells using silica-coated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jia [Medical School Southeast University, Department of Ultrasonography, Zhongda Hospital (China); An, Yan-Li; Zang, Feng-Chao [Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging (China); Zong, Shen-Fei; Cui, Yi-Ping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, Advanced Photonics Center (China); Teng, Gao-Jun, E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com [Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging (China)

    2013-10-15

    We report a composite nanoprobe based on silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) for distinguishing breast cancers at different HER2 statuses. The nanoprobe has a core-shell structure, with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs as the magnetic core and dye-embedded silica as the fluorescent shell, whose average size is about 150 nm. Besides, the outmost surfaces of the probes were modified with specific antibodies to endow the probe with a targeting ability. With such a structure, the nanoprobe can accomplish dual mode targeting of human breast cancer cells based on fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the experiments, three human breast cancer cell lines were used to test the targeting ability of the nanoprobe. Specifically, SKBR3 cells with a high HER2 expression level were used as the model target cells, while MCF7 cells with a lower HER2 expression levels and HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 cells were used as the controls. Both the fluorescence and MRI imaging results confirmed that the nanoprobe can distinguish three cancer cell lines with different HER2 expression levels. With the dual mode imaging and specific targeting properties, we anticipate that the presented nanoprobe may have a great potential in the diagnosis and treatment of cancerous diseases.

  2. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  3. SU-E-I-81: Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors with Dual PET-MR Imaging Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression in malignant tumors provides important information influencing patient management. Radionuclide in vivo imaging of HER2 may permit the detection of HER2 in both primary tumors and metastases by a single noninvasive procedure. Trastuzumab, effective in about 15 % of women with breast cancer, downregulates signalling through the Akt/PI3K and MAPK pathways.These pathways modulate metabolism which can be monitored by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: The relationship between response of HER2 overexpressing tumours and changes in imaging PET or SPECT and MRI will be examined by a integrated bimodal imaging probe.Small (7 kDa) high-affinity anti-HER2 Affibody molecules and KCCYSL targeting peptide may be suitable tracers for visualization of HER2-expressing tumors. Peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) as MRI imaging and CB-TE2A as PET imaging are integrated into a single synthetic molecule in the HER2 positive cancer. Results: One of targeted contrast bimodal imaging probe agents was synthesized and evaluated to target HER2-expressing tumors in a HER2 positive rat model. We will report the newest results regarding the development of bimodal imaging probes. Conclusion: The preliminary results of the bimodal imaging probe presents high correlation of MRI signal and PET imaging intensity in vivo. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by single model contrast agents. It is envisioned that this bimodal agents can hold great potential for accurate detection of HER2-expressing tumors which are critical for clinical management of the disease

  4. SU-E-I-81: Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors with Dual PET-MR Imaging Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, P; Peng, Y; Sun, M; Yang, X [Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology Chinese Academy o, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression in malignant tumors provides important information influencing patient management. Radionuclide in vivo imaging of HER2 may permit the detection of HER2 in both primary tumors and metastases by a single noninvasive procedure. Trastuzumab, effective in about 15 % of women with breast cancer, downregulates signalling through the Akt/PI3K and MAPK pathways.These pathways modulate metabolism which can be monitored by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: The relationship between response of HER2 overexpressing tumours and changes in imaging PET or SPECT and MRI will be examined by a integrated bimodal imaging probe.Small (7 kDa) high-affinity anti-HER2 Affibody molecules and KCCYSL targeting peptide may be suitable tracers for visualization of HER2-expressing tumors. Peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) as MRI imaging and CB-TE2A as PET imaging are integrated into a single synthetic molecule in the HER2 positive cancer. Results: One of targeted contrast bimodal imaging probe agents was synthesized and evaluated to target HER2-expressing tumors in a HER2 positive rat model. We will report the newest results regarding the development of bimodal imaging probes. Conclusion: The preliminary results of the bimodal imaging probe presents high correlation of MRI signal and PET imaging intensity in vivo. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by single model contrast agents. It is envisioned that this bimodal agents can hold great potential for accurate detection of HER2-expressing tumors which are critical for clinical management of the disease.

  5. Biocompatibility of polyaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíček, P.; Kašpárková, V.; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Sáha, P.; Kuceková, Z.

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2011. s. 129. ISBN 978-80-85009-69-9. [Prague Meeting on Macromolecules /75./ - Conducting Polymers - Formation, Structure, Properties, and Applications. 10.07.2011-14.07.2011, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyaniline * biocompatibility Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  6. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    René Olivares-Navarrete; Jhon Jairo Olaya; Claudia Ramírez; Sandra Elizabeth Rodil

    2011-01-01

    Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS) substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainles...

  7. Biocompatibility of Dental Amalgams

    OpenAIRE

    Yurdanur Uçar; Brantley, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words “dental amalgam” and “toxicity” were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on ...

  8. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concern...

  9. Exonuclease III-based target recycling for ultrasensitive homogeneous monitoring of HIV DNA using Ag(+)-coordinated hairpin probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Li; Deng, Kun; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2015-12-15

    A new homogeneous electrochemical sensing strategy based on exonuclease III-assisted target recycling amplification was utilized for simple, rapid and highly sensitive detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA on an immobilization-free Ag(I)-assisted hairpin DNA through the cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine coordination chemistry. The assay involved target-induced strand-displacement reaction accompanying dissociation of the chelated Ag(+) in the hairpins and exonuclease III-triggered target recycling. Initially, the added target DNA hybridized with hairpin DNA to disrupt the Ag(I)-coordinated hairpin probe and releases the coordinated Ag(+) ion. Then, the newly formed DNA double-stranded DNA could be cleaved by exonuclease III, and released target HIV DNA, which retriggered the strand-displacement reaction with the hairpin for target recycling, thereby resulting in formation of numerous free Ag(+) ions in the detection cell. The released Ag(+) ions can be readily captured by the negatively charged electrode, and subsequent anodic-stripping voltammetric detection of the captured Ag(+) ions are conducted to form the anodic current for the production of the electronic signal within the applied potential. Under optimal conditions, the exonuclease III-based sensing system exhibited good electrochemical responses for the detection of HIV DNA at a concentration as low as 23 fM. PMID:26120811

  10. Fluoroscence in situ hybridization of chicken intestinal samples with bacterial rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Katja Nyholm; Francesch, M.; Christensen, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    338, Probe D and Non-EUB338 according to previous publications. Cultures of 38 bacterial strains representing type strains within the genera Bacillus, Listeria, Campylobacter, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Escherichia, Salmonella and Lactobacillus were used for optimization of......RNA of genera Lactobacillus, Bacillus, Enterococcus-Streptococcus, Enterobacteriaceae, Salmonella, Clostridium and Bacteriodes were around 1 ×108 bacterial cells per g of gut material. As for the EUB338 probe, huge variations were observed between the six different samples analysed even though each...... sample was obtained from a pool of six chickens allocated in the same cage. The technique will be used to investigate the effect of antimicrobials, feed additive, rearing conditions and Salmonella - and Campylobacter status on the bacterial composition of the chicken intestine....

  11. Progress in modifications and applications of fluorescent dye probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuening Fei; Yingchun Gu

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes the labeling technology and applications of fluorescent dye probe in biology,especially the characteristics,modifications and applications of cyanine dyes.Based on the currently available modification methods of fluorescent dye probe,we discuss the studies of enhancing the water-solubility,improving the degree of biocompatibility and target-labeling,increasing the sensitivity and decreasing the toxicity of fluorescent dye.We also give a brief introduction on the modification method,that the fluorescent dye is directly introduced onto the cell surfaces by amine derivatives or azides to intensify the transferring information of aberrant cells.We suggest that fluorescent dye modified with chitosan oligosaccharide can obviously increase the degree of biocompatibility and targetlabeling,and decrease the degree of toxicity.

  12. Identification of polymorphic and off-target probe binding sites on the Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Daniel L; Walker, Rosie M; Morris, Stewart W; McIntosh, Andrew M; Porteous, David J; Evans, Kathryn L

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation has now become a relatively inexpensive technique thanks to array-based methylation profiling technologies. The recently developed Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip interrogates methylation at over 850,000 sites across the human genome, covering 99% of RefSeq genes. This array supersedes the widely used Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, which has permitted insights into the relationship between DNA methylation and a wide range of conditions and traits. Previous research has identified issues with certain probes on both the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip and its predecessor, the Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, which were predicted to affect array performance. These issues concerned probe-binding specificity and the presence of polymorphisms at target sites. Using in silico methods, we have identified probes on the Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip that are predicted to (i) measure methylation at polymorphic sites and (ii) hybridise to multiple genomic regions. We intend these resources to be used for quality control procedures when analysing data derived from this platform. PMID:27330998

  13. Waves of visibility: probing the depth of inter-ocular suppression with transient and sustained targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandro eKaunitz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study non-conscious visual processing, researchers render otherwise consciously perceived images into invisible stimuli. Through the years, several psychophysical techniques have been developed for this purpose. Yet the comparison of experimental results across techniques remains a difficult task as the depth of suppression depends on the interactions between the type of stimuli and the suppression methods employed. This poses a limit to the inferences that researchers make about the extent of non-conscious processes. We investigated the mechanisms underlying inter-ocular suppression during continuous flash suppression (CFS and dichoptic visual masking using a transient onset target stimulus and a variety of stimulus / mask temporal manipulations. We show that target duration, timing of target onset, and mask frequency are key aspects of inter-ocular suppression during CFS with transient targets. The differences between our results and sustained target CFS studies suggest that two distinct mechanisms are involved in the detection of transient and prolonged target stimuli during CFS. Our results provide insight into the dynamics of CFS together with evidence for similarities between transient target CFS and dichoptic visual masking.

  14. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Olivares-Navarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainless steel substrates and tissue culture plastic were also studied, in order to give comparative information. No toxic response was observed for any of the surfaces, indicating that the Nb coatings act as a biocompatible, bioinert material. Cell morphology was also studied by immune-fluorescence and the results confirmed the healthy state of the cells on the Nb surface. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating shows that the film is polycrystalline with a body centered cubic structure. The surface composition and corrosion resistance of both the substrate and the Nb coating were also studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic tests. Water contact angle measurements showed that the Nb surface is more hydrophobic than the SS substrate.

  15. A Molecular Fluorescent Probe for Targeted Visualization of Temperature at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Arai; Sung-Chan Lee; Duanting Zhai; Madoka Suzuki; Young Tae Chang

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of cellular heat production and propagation remains elusive at a subcellular level. Here we report the first small molecule fluorescent thermometer selectively targeting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER thermo yellow), with the highest sensitivity reported so far (3.9%/°C). Unlike nanoparticle thermometers, ER thermo yellow stains the target organelle evenly without the commonly encountered problem of aggregation, and successfully demonstrates the ability to monitor intracellular te...

  16. High resolution probe of coherence in low-energy charge exchange collisions with oriented targets

    OpenAIRE

    Leredde, A.; Fléchard, X.; Cassimi, A.; Hennecart, D.; Pons, B.

    2013-01-01

    The trapping lasers of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are used to bring Rb atoms into well defined oriented states. Coupled to recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS), this yields a unique MOTRIMS setup which is able to probe scattering dynamics, including their coherence features, with unprecedented resolution. This technique is applied to the low-energy charge exchange processes Na$^+$+Rb($5p_{\\pm 1}$) $\\rightarrow$ Na($3p,4s$)+Rb$^+$. The measurements reveal detailed features of the collisio...

  17. High resolution probe of coherence in low-energy charge exchange collisions with oriented targets

    CERN Document Server

    Leredde, A; Cassimi, A; Hennecart, D; Pons, B

    2013-01-01

    The trapping lasers of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are used to bring Rb atoms into well defined oriented states. Coupled to recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS), this yields a unique MOTRIMS setup which is able to probe scattering dynamics, including their coherence features, with unprecedented resolution. This technique is applied to the low-energy charge exchange processes Na$^+$+Rb($5p_{\\pm 1}$) $\\rightarrow$ Na($3p,4s$)+Rb$^+$. The measurements reveal detailed features of the collisional interaction which are employed to improve the theoretical description. All of this enables to gauge the reliability of intuitive pictures predicting the most likely capture transitions.

  18. Principles of Manufacturing Biocompatible and Biostable Polymer Implants (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.М. Treushnikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The review concerns the basic theoretical aspects of manufacturing biocompatible and biostable implants and represents, mainly, the experience of our research team. Biocompatible implants have been shown to be understood to mean both: those, which are not rejected by the body as well as those, which are not capsulated in the body. They are to be fabricated according to one-stage frontal photopolymerization with shallow reaction front to avoid defect formation in a polymer. Moreover, an additional operation/stage is required to result in the death of end free macroradicals and labile products in a polymer. For implant fabrication we used photopolimerizable compositions resulting in the formation of hydrophobic spatially cross-linked polymers, their correlation time of rotational motion of a paramagnetic probe of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxypiperidine-1-oxide approximately being 6·10–10 s. The fulfillment of these conditions means the use of radically polymerizable oligomer-based compositions (oligoester methacrylates, oligocarbonate methacrylates, oligourethane methacrylates, etc.. Compositions having lower or higher correlation time of the specified probe are not appropriate for the fabrication of biocompatible and biostable implants. The characteristics of oligomer-monomer compounds have a greater effect on physicochemical properties of implants rather than on their biocompatibility and biostability. No implant incapsulation is determined by the initial composition formulation provided that the mentioned conditions are fulfilled. A polymer in biostable and biocompatible implants can be only optically transparent, though the converse is not necessary.

  19. Radioiodine labeled CdSe/CdS quantum dots. Lectin targeted dual probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akca, Ozlet; Unak, Perihan; Medine, E. Ilker; Kilcar, Ayfer Yurt; Ichedef, Cigdem [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications; Sakarya, Serhan [Adnan Menderes Univ., Aydin (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bekis, Recep [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Timur, Suna [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Biochemistry Dept.

    2014-11-01

    CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QD) were synthesized and bioconjugated with Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) lectin (Lec). Mannose triflate and cysteamine molecules (MTC) were also utilized to prepare MTC-QDs and MTC-QDs-Lec probes as well as Lec bound QDs. Afterwards; potential use of these nanoparticles as radiolabeled fluorescence nano-probes for the cell imaging studies has been investigated. Biological activities of {sup 125}I{sup -}, {sup 125}I-MTC-QDs, MTC-QDs- Lec-{sup 125}I, QDs-Lec-{sup 125}I and Lec-{sup 125}I were examined on various cancer cell lines such as Caco-2, MCF-7 and A-549 in terms of cell incorporation. QDs-Lec-{sup 125}I exhibited the highest cell incorporation on whole cell lines. In addition, the QDs-Lec-{sup 131}I, was used for in vivo imaging. The whole body distribution of the radiolabeled QDs on New Zealand rabbits and Balb C mice were examined by taking dynamic and static images. Radioactivity cleared from the kidneys and the bladder, while significant amount radioactivity was retained in the heart and liver within 24 h.

  20. Radioiodine labeled CdSe/CdS quantum dots. Lectin targeted dual probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QD) were synthesized and bioconjugated with Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) lectin (Lec). Mannose triflate and cysteamine molecules (MTC) were also utilized to prepare MTC-QDs and MTC-QDs-Lec probes as well as Lec bound QDs. Afterwards; potential use of these nanoparticles as radiolabeled fluorescence nano-probes for the cell imaging studies has been investigated. Biological activities of 125I-, 125I-MTC-QDs, MTC-QDs- Lec-125I, QDs-Lec-125I and Lec-125I were examined on various cancer cell lines such as Caco-2, MCF-7 and A-549 in terms of cell incorporation. QDs-Lec-125I exhibited the highest cell incorporation on whole cell lines. In addition, the QDs-Lec-131I, was used for in vivo imaging. The whole body distribution of the radiolabeled QDs on New Zealand rabbits and Balb C mice were examined by taking dynamic and static images. Radioactivity cleared from the kidneys and the bladder, while significant amount radioactivity was retained in the heart and liver within 24 h.

  1. Biofunctional quantum dots as fluorescence probe for cell-specific targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ag, Didem; Bongartz, Rebecca; Dogan, Leyla Eral; Seleci, Muharrem; Walter, Johanna-G; Demirkol, Dilek Odaci; Stahl, Frank; Ozcelik, Serdar; Timur, Suna; Scheper, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We describe here the synthesis, characterization, bioconjugation, and application of water-soluble thioglycolic acid TGA-capped CdTe/CdS quantum dots (TGA-QDs) for targeted cellular imaging. Anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibodies were conjugated to TGA-QDs to target HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. TGA-QDs and TGA-QDs/anti-HER2 bioconjugates were characterized by fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), hydrodynamic sizing, electron microscopy, and gel electrophoresis. TGA-QDs and TGA-QDs/anti-HER2 were incubated with cells to examine cytotoxicity, targeting efficiency, and cellular localization. The cytotoxicity of particles was measured using an MTT assay and the no observable adverse effect concentration (NOAEC), 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50), and total lethal concentration (TLC) were calculated. To evaluate localization and targeting efficiency of TGA-QDs with or without antibodies, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were performed. Our results indicate that antibody-conjugated TGA-QDs are well-suited for targeted cellular imaging studies. PMID:24176888

  2. A biocompatible magnetic film: synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Jhunu; Haik, Yousef; Chen, Ching Jen

    2004-01-01

    Background Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. Methods A biocompatible magnetic gel film has been synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible magnetic film. Nanosized iron oxide particles (γ-Fe2O3, ~7 nm) have been used to produce the magnetic gel. Results The surface morphology and magnetic properties of the gel films were studied. The iron oxide particles are superparamagnetic and the gel film also showed superparamagnetic behavior. Conclusion Magnetic gel made out of crosslinked magnetic nanoparticles in the polymer network was found to be stable and possess the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. PMID:14761251

  3. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3d-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27237093

  4. A Molecular Fluorescent Probe for Targeted Visualization of Temperature at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Satoshi; Lee, Sung-Chan; Zhai, Duanting; Suzuki, Madoka; Chang, Young Tae

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of cellular heat production and propagation remains elusive at a subcellular level. Here we report the first small molecule fluorescent thermometer selectively targeting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER thermo yellow), with the highest sensitivity reported so far (3.9%/°C). Unlike nanoparticle thermometers, ER thermo yellow stains the target organelle evenly without the commonly encountered problem of aggregation, and successfully demonstrates the ability to monitor intracellular temperature gradients generated by external heat sources in various cell types. We further confirm the ability of ER thermo yellow to monitor heat production by intracellular Ca2+ changes in HeLa cells. Our thermometer anchored at nearly-zero distance from the ER, i.e. the heat source, allowed the detection of the heat as it readily dissipated, and revealed the dynamics of heat production in real time at a subcellular level.

  5. Developing a fluorescence-coupled capillary electrophoresis based method to probe interactions between QDs and colorectal cancer targeting peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Wang, Jianhao; Yang, Li; Liu, Li; Ding, Shumin; Fu, Minli; Deng, Linhong; Gao, Li-Qian

    2016-08-01

    As is well known, quantum dots (QDs) have become valuable probes for cancer imaging. In particular, QD-labeled targeting peptides are capable of identifying cancer or tumors cells. A new colorectal cancer targeting peptide, cyclo(1, 9)-CTPSPFSHC, has strong targeting ability and also shows great potential in the identification and treatment of colon cancer. Herein, we synthesized a dual functional polypeptide, cyclo(1, 9)-CTPSPFSHCD2 G2 DP9 G3 H6 (H6 -TCP), to investigate its interaction with QDs inside the capillary. Fluorescence-coupled CE was adopted and applied to characterize the self-assembly of H6 -TCP onto QDs. It was indicated that the formation of the assembly was affected by H6 -TCP/QD molar ratio and sampling time. This novel in-capillary assay greatly reduced the sample consumption and the detection time, which was beneficial for the environment. It is expected that this kind of detection method could find more applications to provide more useful information for cancer diagnosis and detection of harm and hazardous substances/organisms in the environment in the future. PMID:27159348

  6. Preparation of a biocompatible magnetic film from an aqueous ferrofluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very promising nanoparticles for biomedical applications or in medical drug targeting are superparamagnetic nanoparticles based on a core consisting of iron oxides (SPION) that can be targeted through external magnets. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a unique synthetic biocompatible polymer that can be chemically cross-linked to form a gel. Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. In this paper we report the synthesis of an aqueous ferrofluid and the preparation of a biocompatible magnetic gel with polyvinyl alcohol and glutharaldehyde (GTA). HClO4 was used to induce the peptization since this kind of ferrofluid does not have surfactant. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible film

  7. Preparation of a biocompatible magnetic film from an aqueous ferrofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Cecilia; Jacobo, Silvia E.

    2006-10-01

    Very promising nanoparticles for biomedical applications or in medical drug targeting are superparamagnetic nanoparticles based on a core consisting of iron oxides (SPION) that can be targeted through external magnets. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a unique synthetic biocompatible polymer that can be chemically cross-linked to form a gel. Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. In this paper we report the synthesis of an aqueous ferrofluid and the preparation of a biocompatible magnetic gel with polyvinyl alcohol and glutharaldehyde (GTA). HClO 4 was used to induce the peptization since this kind of ferrofluid does not have surfactant. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible film.

  8. Microenvironmental Effect of 2'-O-(1-Pyrenylmethyl)uridine Modified Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Sensitive and Selective Detection of Target RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imincan, Gülnur; Pei, Fen; Yu, Lijia; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Yang, Xiaoda; Zhang, Lihe; Tang, XinJing

    2016-04-19

    2'-O-(1-Pyrenylmethyl)uridine modified oligoribonucleotides provide highly sensitive pyrene fluorescent probes for detecting specific nucleotide mutation of RNA targets. To develop more stable and cost-effective oligonucleotide probes, we investigated the local microenvironmental effects of nearby nucleobases on pyrene fluorescence in duplexes of RNAs and 2'-O-(1-pyrenylmethyl)uridine modified oligonucleotides. By incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides, ribonucleotides, 2'-MeO-nucleotides and 2'-F-nucleotides at both sides of 2'-O-(1-pyrenylmethyl)uridine (Up) in oligodeoxynucleotide probes, we synthesized a series of pyrene modified oligonucleotide probes. Their pyrene fluorescence emission spectra indicated that only two proximal nucleotides have a substantial effect on the pyrene fluorescence properties of these oligonucleotide probes hybridized with target RNA with an order of fluorescence sensitivity of 2'-F-nucleotides > 2'-MeO-nucleotides > ribonucleotides ≫ deoxyribonucleotides. While based on circular dichroism spectra, overall helix conformations (either A- or B-form) of the duplexes have marginal effects on the sensitivity of the probes. Instead, the local substitution reflected the propensity of the nucleotide sugar ring to adopt North type conformation and, accordingly, shifted their helix geometry toward a more A-type like conformation in local microenvironments. Thus, higher enhancement of pyrene fluorescence emission favored local A-type helix structures and more polar and hydrophobic environments (F > MeO > OH at 2' substitution) of duplex minor grooves of probes with the target RNA. Further dynamic simulation revealed that local microenvironmental effect of 2'-F-nucleotides or ribonucleotides was enough for pyrene moiety to move out of nucleobases to the minor groove of duplexes; in addition, 2'-F-nucleotide had less effect on π-stack of pyrene-modified uridine with upstream and downstream nucleobases. The present oligonucleotide probes

  9. Identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium species isolated from food with genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes by colony hybridization and PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, P; Pfefferkorn, A; Teuber, M; Meile, L

    1997-01-01

    A Bifidobacterium genus-specific target sequence in the V9 variable region of the 16S rRNA has been elaborated and was used to develop a hybridization probe. The specificity of this probe, named lm3 (5'-CGGGTGCTI*CCCACTTTCATG-3'), was used to identify all known type strains and distinguish them from other bacteria. All of the 30 type strains of Bifidobacterium which are available at the German culture collection Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, 6 commercially available ...

  10. Biocompatibility of Coronary Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamarasee M. Jeewandara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the dominant cause of mortality in developed countries, with coronary artery disease (CAD a predominant contributor. The development of stents to treat CAD was a significant innovation, facilitating effective percutaneous coronary revascularization. Coronary stents have evolved from bare metal compositions, to incorporate advances in pharmacological therapy in what are now known as drug eluting stents (DES. Deployment of a stent overcomes some limitations of balloon angioplasty alone, but provides an acute stimulus for thrombus formation and promotes neointimal hyperplasia. First generation DES effectively reduced in-stent restenosis, but profoundly delay healing and are susceptible to late stent thrombosis, leading to significant clinical complications in the long term. This review characterizes the development of coronary stents, detailing the incremental improvements, which aim to attenuate the major clinical complications of thrombosis and restenosis. Despite these enhancements, coronary stents remain fundamentally incompatible with the vasculature, an issue which has largely gone unaddressed. We highlight the latest modifications and research directions that promise to more holistically design coronary implants that are truly biocompatible.

  11. Detection of Misdistribution of Tyrosinase from Melanosomes to Lysosomes and Its Upregulation under Psoralen/Ultraviolet A with a Melanosome-Targeting Tyrosinase Fluorescent Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Shi, Wen; Li, Lihong; Gong, Qiuyu; Wu, Xiaofeng; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2016-04-19

    Tyrosinase is regarded as an important biomarker of melanoma cancer, and its metabolism is closely related to some severe skin diseases such as vitiligo. Since tyrosinase is mainly located in the melanosomes of melanocytes, a probe that can specifically detect and image tysosinase in melanosomes would be in urgent demand to study the behavior of the enzyme in cells, but unfortunately, no melanosome-targeting tyrosinase fluorescent probe has been reported so far to the best of our knowledge. In this work, we have developed such a new probe, Mela-TYR, which bears morpholine as a melanosome-targeting group and 4-aminophenol as a tyrosinase reaction group. The probe exhibits not only a highly sensitive and selective off-on response to tyrosinase via oxidization cleavage, but also an accurate targeting ability toward the acidic organelles of melanosomes and lyososomes, which is validated by colocalization experiments with mCherry-tagged melanosomes as well as DND-99 (a commercial dye). The probe has been used to image the relative contents of tyrosinase in different cells. Notably, because of the tyrosinase deficiency in normal lysosomes, the probe only fluoresces in melanosomes in principle although it can accumulate in other acidic organelles like lysosomes. By virtue of this property, the misdistribution of tyrosinase from melanosomes to lysosomes in murine melanoma B16 cells under the stimulation of inulavosin is imaged in real time for the first time. Moreover, the upregulation of melanosomal tyrosinase in live B16 cells under the stimulation of psoralen/ultraviolet A is detected with our probe, and this upregulation is further verified by standard colorimetric assay. The probe provides a simple, visual method to study the metabolism of tyrosinase in cells and shows great potential in clinical diagnosis and treatments of tyrosinase-associated diseases. PMID:27021123

  12. Preparation of radiolabeling small molecular peptide probe for specific targeting lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a radiolabelling method of specific small molecule peptide for lung cancer targeting with 99mTc by means of NHS-MAG3 as bifunctional chelating agents. Methods: The combinatorial library technique was used for screening small molecule peptide specific binding to non-small cell lung cancer cell (A549). Peptide sequence of cNGQGEQc was identified. Chelant NHS-NAG3 was directly conjugated with peptide cNGQGEQc during the synthesis of cNGQGEQc. The optimal labeling conditions and stability in vitro were investigated. Labeling rates was determined by paper chromatography. Results: The couple method of NHS-MAG3 with peptide cNGQGEQc by solid-phase synthesis was simplified and improved the couple efficiency. Peptide cNGQGEQc was successfully radiolabeled with 99mTc and the labeling ratio of 85% was obtained. The radiochemical purity was higher than 95% by HPLC purification. The labeled compounds of 99mTc-MAG3-cNGQGEQc was stable in vitro at room temperature. Conclusion: It is feasible for coupling of NHS-MAG3 to peptide cNGQGEQc and its radiolabeling with high efficiency and better stability in vitro. It appears to be suitable for further experiments requirement in vivo and in vitro application. (authors)

  13. Galactose targeted pH-responsive copolymer conjugated with near infrared fluorescence probe for imaging of intelligent drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liyi; Sun, Chunyang; Yan, Lifeng

    2015-01-28

    Theranostic polymeric nanomaterials are of special important in cancer treatment. Here, novel galactose targeted pH-responsive amphiphilic multiblock copolymer conjugated with both drug and near-infrared fluorescence (NIR) probe has been designed and prepared by a four-steps process: (1) ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of N-carboxy anhydride (NCA) monomers using propargylamine as initiator; (2) reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (OEGMA) and gal monomer by an azido modified RAFT agent; (3) combing the obtained two polymeric segments by click reaction; (4) NIR copolymer prodrug was synthesized by chemical linkage of both cyanine dye and anticancer drug doxorubicin to the block copolymer via amide bond and hydrazone, respectively. The obtained NIRF copolymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and its was measured by means of micelles dynamic light scattering (DLS), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM), and UV-vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The prodrug has strong fluorescence in the near-infrared region, and a pH sensitive drug release was confirmed at pH of 5.4 via an in vitro drug release experiment. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry experiments of the prodrug on both HepG2 and NIH3T3 cells reveal that the galactose targeted polymeric prodrug shows a fast and enhanced endocytosis due to the specific interaction for HepG2 cells, indicating the as-prepared polymer is a candidate for theranosis of liver cancer. PMID:25569169

  14. Nanoclusters of iron oxide: effect of core composition on structure, biocompatibility and cell labeling efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    van Tilborg, Geralda A. F.; Cormode, David P.; Jarzyna, Peter A.; van der Toorn, Annette; van der Pol, Susanne M. A.; van Bloois, Louis; Fayad, Zahi A.; Storm, Gert; Mulder, Willem J. M.; de Vries, Helga E.; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals have a variety of applications in medicine. They may serve as contrast agents, therapeutics and for in vitro diagnostics. Frequently, the synthesis route yields hydrophobically capped nanocrystals, which necessitates their subsequent coating to render a water-soluble and biocompatible probe. Biocompatibility is crucial for cellular imaging applications, which require large quantities of diagnostically active nanoparticles to be loaded into cells. We have previously repo...

  15. 16S rRNA-targeted probes for specific detection of Thermoanaerobacterium spp., Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, and Caldicellulosiruptor spp. by fluorescent in situ hybridization in biohydrogen producing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O-Thong, Sompong [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet Bg 115, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Thaksin University, Patthalung 93110 (Thailand); Prasertsan, Poonsuk [Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, Songkhla 90112 (Thailand); Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet Bg 115, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark)

    2008-11-15

    16S rRNA gene targeted oligonucleotide probes for specific detection of genera Thermoanaerobacterium (Tbm1282), Caldicellulosiruptor (Ccs432), and specie Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum (Tbmthsacc184) were designed and used to monitor the spatial distribution of hydrogen producing bacteria in sludge and granules from anaerobic reactors. The designed probes were checked for their specificity and then validated using fluorescence in situ hybridization with target microorganisms and non-target microorganisms. Thermoanaerobacterium spp., T. thermosaccharolyticum and Caldicellulosiruptor spp. were detected with the probes designed with coverage of 75%, 100% and 93%, respectively. Thermophilic (60 C) hydrogen producing reactors, one fed with sucrose and another, fed with palm oil mill effluent comprised of following major groups of hydrogen producers: Thermoanaerobacterium spp. (49% and 36%), T. thermosaccharolyticum (16% and 10%), phylum Firmicutes (low G+C) gram positive bacteria (15% and 27%). Extreme-thermophilic (70 C) hydrogen producing reactors, one fed with xylose and another, fed with lignocellulosic hydrolysate comprised of following major groups of hydrogen producers: Caldicellulosiruptor spp. (40.5% and 20.5%), phylum Firmicutes (low G+C) gram positive bacteria (17% and 20%), Archaea (7% and 8.5%), and Thermoanaerobacterium spp. (0% and 5%). Results obtained, showed good applicability of the probes Tbm1282, Tbmthsacc184 and Ccs432 for specific detection and quantification of thermophilic and extreme-thermophilic hydrogen producers in complex environments. (author)

  16. The preliminary study of molecular imaging of colorectal cancer cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide-based MR targeting probe containing vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-based MR probe containing vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) to investigate their biological and chemical properties and targeting effect of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Methods: The anti-VEGF-SPIO probe was fabricated with VEGF antibody and SPIO through chemical method. Its biological and chemical properties and reflexivity were tested with SDS-PAGE and MRL The SW620 cells incubated with anti-VEGF-SPIO probe for 30, 60 and 90 minutes respectively and compared with marrow mesenchymal stem cell at 37 degree C. The comparison among groups was conducted by using analysis of variance and LSD-t test. The MRI results were confirmed by the Prussian blue staining. The comparison among groups was performed by analysis of variance and factorial experiment. Results: SPIO-based MR probe containing VEGF was successfully contributed and isolated. The reflexivity of anti-VEGF-SPIO probe was 0.0426 x 106 mol/s. The immunofluorescence and prussia blue stain proved high expression of VEGF in SW620 cells. Anti-VEGF-SPIO probe and SW620 cellscombined at 37 degree C in vitro MRI proved the SW620 cells incubated with anti-VEGF-SPIO probe appeared hypointense on T2WI and T2* WI. MR signal were 392 ± 7, 91 ± 8, 264 ± 10 for 30, 60 and 90 minutes respectively, which were statistically different from that before incubation 679 ± 12 (F=4735.489, P0.05). Conclusion: Nanoscale iron particles containing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor molecular probe can evaluate tumor angiogenesis at the receptor level, which provides a new way of the tumor angiogenesis diagnosis and anti-angiogenesis therapy. (authors)

  17. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasálková-Slepičková, N.; Slepička, P.; Bačáková, Lucie; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 307, Jul 15 (2013), s. 642-646. ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : biopolymer * plasma treatment * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.186, year: 2013

  18. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PL

  19. Development of 18S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for specific detection of Hartmannella and Naegleria in Legionella-positive environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, D; Ludwig, W F; Brandt, B C; Michel, R; Schleifer, K H; Hacker, J; Steinert, M

    2001-04-01

    Aquatic protozoa are natural hosts of the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. The fluorescence labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe LEGPNE1 has recently been shown to specifically detect extracellular legionellae as well as intracellular legionellae parasitizing protozoa. In this study we designed oligonucleotide probes which are complementary to distinct regions of the 18S rRNA of the Legionella host organisms of the genera Hartmannella and Naegleria. The specificity of the probes, HART498 and NAEG1088, was tested by in situ hybridization of various laboratory reference strains. In order to evaluate the fluorescent probes for environmental studies three selected Legionella-positive cold water habitats were examined for the presence of these protozoa. Traditional culture methods followed by morphological identification revealed an almost consistent presence of Naegleria spp. in cold water habitats. Other protozoa species including Acanthamoeba spp., Echinamoeba spp., Hartmannella spp., Platyamoeba placida, Saccamoeba spp., Thecamoeba quadrilineata, and Vexillifera spp. were found sporadically. Concomitant analysis of the pH, conductivity and temperature of the water samples revealed no preference of Legionella or the respective protozoa for certain environmental conditions. The specificity of the newly designed 18S rRNA probes demonstrates that they are valuable and rapid tools for the identification of culturable environmental protozoa. PMID:11403402

  20. Quantification of uncultured Ruminococcus obeum-like bacteria in human fecal samples with fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry using 16S ribosomal RNA targeted probes

    OpenAIRE

    Zoetendal, E.G.; Ben-Amor, K.; Harmsen, H. J. M.; Schut, F; Akkermans, A. D. L.; Vos, de, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    A 16S rRNA-targeted probe was designed and validated in order to quantify the number of uncultured Ruminococcus obeum-like bacteria by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). These bacteria have frequently been found in 16S ribosomal DNA clone libraries prepared from bacterial communities in the human intestine. Thirty-two reference strains from the human intestine, including a phylogenetically related strain and strains of some other Ruminococcus species, were used as negative controls and...

  1. Quantification of Uncultured Ruminococcus obeum-Like Bacteria in Human Fecal Samples by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization and Flow Cytometry Using 16S rRNA-Targeted Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Ben-Amor, Kaouther; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Schut, Frits; Akkermans, Antoon D. L.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2002-01-01

    A 16S rRNA-targeted probe was designed and validated in order to quantify the number of uncultured Ruminococcus obeum-like bacteria by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). These bacteria have frequently been found in 16S ribosomal DNA clone libraries prepared from bacterial communities in the human intestine. Thirty-two reference strains from the human intestine, including a phylogenetically related strain and strains of some other Ruminococcus species, were used as negative controls and...

  2. A Targeted DNAzyme-Nanocomposite Probe Equipped with Built-in Zn2+ Arsenal for Combined Treatment of Gene Regulation and Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Mei He; Peng-Hui Zhang; Xin Li; Jian-Rong Zhang; Jun-Jie Zhu

    2016-01-01

    As catalytic nucleic acids, DNAzymes have been extensively used in the design of sensing platforms. However, their potentials as intelligent drug carriers for responsive drug release in gene therapy and chemotherapy were rarely explored. Herein, we report a dual-functional probe composed of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), catalytic Zn2+-dependent DNAzyme, anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox), targeted AS1411 aptamer and acid-decomposable ZnO quantum dots (ZnO QDs) to achieve intracellular gene regula...

  3. Quantification of microRNA by DNA-Peptide Probe and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Quasi-Targeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Chen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The distorted and unique expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer makes them an attractive source of biomarkers. However, one of prerequisites for the application of miRNAs in clinical practice is to accurately profile their expression. Currently available assays normally require pre-enrichment, amplification, and labeling steps, and most of them are semiquantitative. In this study, we converted the signal of target miR-21 into reporter peptide by a DNA-peptide probe and the reporter peptide was ultimately quantified using LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics. Specifically, substrate peptide GDKAVLGVDPFR containing reporter peptide AVLGVDPFR and tryptic cleavage site (lysine at position 3) was first designed, followed by the conjugation with DNA sequence that was complementary to miR-21. The newly formed DNA-peptide probe was then hybridized with miR-21, which was biotinylated and attached to streptavidin agarose in advance. After trypsin digestion, the reporter peptide was released and monitored by a targeted proteomics assay. The obtained limit of quantification (LOQ) was 1 pM, and the detection dynamic range spanned ∼5 orders of magnitude. Using this assay, the developed quasi-targeted proteomics approach was applied to determine miR-21 level in breast cells and tissue samples. Finally, qRT-PCR was also performed for a comparison. This report grafted the strategy of targeted proteomics into miRNA quantification. PMID:26641144

  4. Biocompatible polysaccharide-based cryogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the development of novel biocompatible macroporous cryogels by electron-beam assisted free-radical crosslinking reaction of polymerizable dextran and hyaluronan derivatives. As a main advantage this straightforward approach provides highly pure materials of high porosity without using additional crosslinkers or initiators. The cryogels were characterized with regard to their morphology and their basic properties including thermal and mechanical characteristics, and swellability. It was found that the applied irradiation dose and the chemical composition strongly influence the material properties of the resulting cryogels. Preliminary cytotoxicity tests illustrate the excellent in vitro-cytocompatibility of the fabricated cryogels making them especially attractive as matrices in tissue regeneration procedures. - Graphical abstract: Electron-beam initiated synthesis of biocompatible cryogels based on natural polymers. - Highlights: • Successful electron-beam induced synthesis of dextran and hyaluronan cryogels. • Mechanical and thermal stable cryogels were obtained. • Excellent cytocompatibility of the materials was proven. • Promising materials for tissue engineering were developed

  5. Biocompatible polysaccharide-based cryogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichelt, Senta, E-mail: senta.reichelt@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Becher, Jana; Weisser, Jürgen [Innovent e.V., Pruessingstr. 27B, 07745 Jena (Germany); Prager, Andrea; Decker, Ulrich [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Möller, Stephanie; Berg, Albrecht; Schnabelrauch, Matthias [Innovent e.V., Pruessingstr. 27B, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    This study focuses on the development of novel biocompatible macroporous cryogels by electron-beam assisted free-radical crosslinking reaction of polymerizable dextran and hyaluronan derivatives. As a main advantage this straightforward approach provides highly pure materials of high porosity without using additional crosslinkers or initiators. The cryogels were characterized with regard to their morphology and their basic properties including thermal and mechanical characteristics, and swellability. It was found that the applied irradiation dose and the chemical composition strongly influence the material properties of the resulting cryogels. Preliminary cytotoxicity tests illustrate the excellent in vitro-cytocompatibility of the fabricated cryogels making them especially attractive as matrices in tissue regeneration procedures. - Graphical abstract: Electron-beam initiated synthesis of biocompatible cryogels based on natural polymers. - Highlights: • Successful electron-beam induced synthesis of dextran and hyaluronan cryogels. • Mechanical and thermal stable cryogels were obtained. • Excellent cytocompatibility of the materials was proven. • Promising materials for tissue engineering were developed.

  6. Biocompatible and Bioeliminable Hydrophilic Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo; FerrutiUniversità

    2007-01-01

    1 Introduction This presentation will report on some recent results obtained in Milan on two polymer families of biomedical interest, namely poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) and polyamidoamines. 2 Results and DiscussionPoly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PVP) is a well known bioactive and biocompatible polymer. In its soluble form, it is largely used as excipient of oral pharmaceutical formulations, especially for its high water solubilising power.In its crosslinked form, it plays a relevant role as biomateria...

  7. 探索新绿色革命的靶标%Probing the Targets of New Green Revolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许大全

    2012-01-01

    第一次绿色革命的潜力已经被充分利用,第二次绿色革命正在兴起.全世界的科学家都在探讨新绿色革命的靶标,包括改善核酮糖-1,5-二磷酸(RuBP)羧化酶/加氧酶(Rubisco)、降低光呼吸和呼吸作用损失、提高RuBP再生能力、改造C3植物成为C4植物例如C4水稻、将蓝细菌的CO2浓缩机制引入C3植物、增加转运蛋白,以及改善作物根系、优化产物品质和加强作物对环境胁迫的抗性.这篇综述主要考察这些靶标的研究进展,并指出潜在的问题.尽管基因工程是一个强有力的工具,但是人们不应当把新绿色革命成功的希望全部寄托在它上面.一些传统的和非转基因的方法也将在这个革命中发挥重要的作用.这个革命的前途是光明的,但是获得成功所需要的时间可能要比一些人估计的15年长得多.%The potential of the first green revolution has been exploited to a full extent, while the second green revolution is rising. Scientists of all over the world are exploring the possible targets of the new green revolution including improving ribulose-l,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), decreasing pho-torespiratory and respiratory losses, increasing RuBP regeneration capacity, changing C3 plants into C4 plants such as C4 rice, introducing the CO2 concentrating mechanism of cyanobacteria into C3 plants, increasing transporters, as well as improving crop roots, optimizing product quality, and enhancing crop resistances to environmental stresses. This review examines mainly the progress in probing these targets, and points out that the potential problems. Although the gene engineering is a powerful tool, peoples should not put all hopes of success of the new green revolution on it. Some conventional and non-transgenic methods will also play important role in the revolution. The perspective of the revolution is bright, but the time to obtain the success may be much longer than 15 years

  8. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results. PMID:27577771

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of a radioiodinated peptide probe targeting αvβ6 integrin for the detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We developed a radioiodinated peptide probe targeting αvβ6 integrin (123I-IFMDV2). • 123I-IFMDV2 had a high affinity and selectivity for αvβ6 integrin. • 123I-IFMDV2 showed a specific binding to αvβ6 integrin in vivo. • 123I-IFMDV2 enabled clear visualization of the αvβ6-integrin-positive tumor. - Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a major cause of cancer-related death. Since significant upregulation of αvβ6 integrin has been reported in PDAC, this integrin is a promising target for PDAC detection. In this study, we aimed to develop a radioiodinated probe for the imaging of αvβ6 integrin-positive PDAC with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Four peptide probes were synthesized and screened by competitive and saturation binding assays using 2 PDAC cell lines (AsPC-1, αvβ6 integrin-positive; MIA PaCa-2, αvβ6 integrin-negative). The probe showing the best affinity was used to study the biodistribution assay, an in vivo blocking study, and SPECT imaging using tumor bearing mice. Autoradiography and immunohistochemical analysis were also performed. Results: Among the 4 probes examined in this study, 125I-IFMDV2 showed the highest affinity for αvβ6 integrin expressed in AsPC-1 cells and no affinity for MIA PaCa-2 cells. The accumulation of 125I-IFMDV2 in the AsPC-1 xenograft was 3–5 times greater than that in the MIA PaCa-2 xenograft, consistent with the expression of αvβ6 integrin in each xenograft, and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Pretreatment with excess amounts of A20FMDV2 significantly blocked the accumulation of 125I-IFMDV2 in the AsPC-1 xenograft, but not in the MIA PaCa-2 xenograft. Furthermore, 123I-IFMDV2 enabled clear visualization of the AsPC-1 xenograft. Conclusion: 123I-IFMDV2 is a potential SPECT probe for the imaging of αvβ6 integrin in PDAC

  10. Radiation crosslinking of biocompatible polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, Ondřej; Kučka, Jan; Monnery, B. D.; Hoogenboom, R.; Hrubý, Martin

    Bratislava : Young Scientists Council of Polymer Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, 2016. s. 89. ISBN 978-80-970923-8-2. [Bratislava Young Polymer Scientists workshop /6./ - BYPoS 2016. 14.03.2016-18.03.2016, Ždiar] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14079; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25781A; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08336S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : radiolysis * radiotherapeutics * biocompatible polymer s Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. Detection of vulnerable atherosclerosis plaques with a dual-modal single-photon-emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging probe targeting apoptotic macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Chunfu; Tan, Hui; Wang, Cong; Pang, Lifang; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), especially the vulnerable AS plaque rupture-induced acute obstructive vascular disease, is a leading cause of death. Accordingly, there is a need for an effective method to draw accurate predictions about AS progression and plaque vulnerability. Herein we report on an approach to constructing a hybrid nanoparticle system using a single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) multimodal probe, aiming for a comprehensive evaluation of AS progression by achieving high sensitivity along with high resolution. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) was covered by aminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and carboxylated PEG simultaneously and then functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentacetate acid for (99m)Tc coordination and subsequently Annexin V for targeting apoptotic macrophages abundant in vulnerable plaques. The in vivo accumulations of imaging probe reflected by SPECT and MRI were consistent and accurate in highlighting lesions. Intense radioactive signals detected by SPECT facilitated focus recognization and quantification, while USPIO-based T2-weighted MRI improved the focal localization and volumetry of AS plaques. For subsequent ex vivo planar images, targeting effects were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, including CD-68 and TUNEL staining; meanwhile, the degree of concentration was proven to be statistically correlated with the Oil Red O staining results. In conclusion, these results indicated that the Annexin V-modified hybrid nanoparticle system specifically targeted the vulnerable AS plaques containing apoptotic macrophages and could be of great value in the invasively accurate detection of vulnerable plaques. PMID:25569777

  12. Diversity of radioprobes targeted to tumor angiogenesis on molecular functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular functional imaging could visualize, characterize, and measure the bio- logical processes including tumor angiogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The molecular probes labeled by a variety of radionuclide used in the field of the nuclear medicine play pivotal roles in molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the regulatory role of different probes in tumor angiogenesis has not been systematically illustrated. The current status of tumor angiogenesis imaging with radiolabeled probes of peptide, monoclonal antibody as well as its fragment, especially nanoparticle-based probes to gain insights into the robust tumor angiogenesis development were summarized. It was recognized that only the probes such as nanoparticle-based probes, which truly target the tumor vasculature rather than tumor cells because of poor extravasation, are really tumor angiogenesis imaging agent. The research of molecular probe targeted to angiogenesis would meet its flourish just after the outstanding improvements in the in vivo stability and biocompatibility, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of tumor angiogenesis imaging probes are made. Translation to clinical applications will also be critical for the maximize benefits of these novel agents. The future of tumor angiogenesis imaging lies in liable imaging probes and multiple imaging modalities, imaging of protein-protein interactions, and quantitative molecular imaging. (authors)

  13. Whole-body multicolor spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging for development of target-specific optical contrast agents using genetically engineered probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Urano, Yasuteru; Choyke, Peter L.

    2007-02-01

    Target-specific contrast agents are being developed for the molecular imaging of cancer. Optically detectable target-specific agents are promising for clinical applications because of their high sensitivity and specificity. Pre clinical testing is needed, however, to validate the actual sensitivity and specificity of these agents in animal models, and involves both conventional histology and immunohistochemistry, which requires large numbers of animals and samples with costly handling. However, a superior validation tool takes advantage of genetic engineering technology whereby cell lines are transfected with genes that induce the target cell to produce fluorescent proteins with characteristic emission spectra thus, identifying them as cancer cells. Multicolor fluorescence imaging of these genetically engineered probes can provide rapid validation of newly developed exogenous probes that fluoresce at different wavelengths. For example, the plasmid containing the gene encoding red fluorescent protein (RFP) was transfected into cell lines previously developed to either express or not-express specific cell surface receptors. Various antibody-based or receptor ligand-based optical contrast agents with either green or near infrared fluorophores were developed to concurrently target and validate cancer cells and their positive and negative controls, such as β-D-galactose receptor, HER1 and HER2 in a single animal/organ. Spectrally resolved fluorescence multicolor imaging was used to detect separate fluorescent emission spectra from the exogenous agents and RFP. Therefore, using this in vivo imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the target-specific optical contrast agents, thus reducing the number of animals needed to conduct these experiments.

  14. Cancer cell-targeted two-photon fluorescence probe for the real-time ratiometric imaging of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Kui; Xuan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Qingzhang; Nie, Yamin; Guo, Haiming

    2016-05-01

    Real-time imaging of DNA damage in cancer cells could provide valuable information on the formation and development of cancer. Herein, a two-photon fluorescence probe was discovered. Through sequential ICT processes, it allows successful in vivo visualization of DNA damage in cancer cells by one/two-photon microscopic imaging or by the unaided eye and a hand-held ultraviolet lamp. PMID:27087314

  15. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Adachi; Marina Kishida; Shio Watanabe; Yuuki Hashimoto; Kazuna Fukamizu; Takeshi Tomonaga

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome) are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes) that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014) [1]. As a result, we identified ...

  16. Bioglass: A novel biocompatible innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancement of materials technology has been immense, especially in the past 30 years. Ceramics has not been new to dentistry. Porcelain crowns, silica fillers in composite resins, and glass ionomer cements have already been proved to be successful. Materials used in the replacement of tissues have come a long way from being inert, to compatible, and now regenerative. When hydroxyapatite was believed to be the best biocompatible replacement material, Larry Hench developed a material using silica (glass as the host material, incorporated with calcium and phosphorous to fuse broken bones. This material mimics bone material and stimulates the regrowth of new bone material. Thus, due to its biocompatibility and osteogenic capacity it came to be known as "bioactive glass-bioglass." It is now encompassed, along with synthetic hydroxyapatite, in the field of biomaterials science known as "bioactive ceramics." The aim of this article is to give a bird′s-eye view, of the various uses in dentistry, of this novel, miracle material which can bond, induce osteogenesis, and also regenerate bone.

  17. The Biocompatibility of Wool Keratin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Mei; YU Wei-dong; WANG Xue-lei

    2007-01-01

    Keratin is the major structural fibrous protein providing outer covering such as hair, wool, feathers, etc. When being used as a kind of biomaterials, the biocompatibility of wool keratin is one of the most critical questions. By now, there has not been systemic study on the biocompatibiiity of keratin. Therefore, in this article we used the procedures of skin irritation, haemolysis and subcutaneous implantation according to ISO 10993 to study it. Moreover, the Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was utilized to analyse the impurity and structure modification of wool keratin film. The part of the animal tests showed that the wool keratin films prepared by authors were biocompatible. But the residual of sodium dodecyi sulfate (SDS) affected the results of other tests. Consequently, the wool keratin membrane is one kind of favourable and promising biomaterial for biomedical and histological utilization. The residual SDS used as an agent should be eliminated from the keratin solution or membrane completely if for biological usage. In conclusion, wool keratin, as a kind of natural protein, prospectively could be applied in biomedical materials and scaffolds of tissue engineering.

  18. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  19. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface

  20. Assessment of the effect of parallel temperature gradients in the JET SOL on Te measured by divertor target Langmuir probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ďuran, Ivan; Ješko, Karol; Fuchs, Vladimír; Groth, M.; Guillemaut, C.; Gunn, J. P.; Horáček, Jan; Pitts, R.A.; Tskhakaya, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 463, August (2015), s. 432-435. ISSN 0022-3115. [PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS 21: International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices. Kanazawa, 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Langmuir probes * SOL Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.865, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311515000665

  1. Evaluation of 68Ga-Labeled MG7 Antibody: A Targeted Probe for PET/CT Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Xu; Xiaowei Li; Jipeng Yin; Cong Liang; Lijuan Liu; Zhaoyan Qiu; Liping Yao; Yongzhan Nie; Jing Wang; Kaichun Wu

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabel...

  2. MUC1 aptamer based near infrared fluorescence probes for tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Ma, Yuxiang; Cui, Sisi; Cao, Jie; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a cell surface mucin broadly expressed in mucosal tissues. The aberrant expression of MUC1 under-glycosylated forms has been reported in various carcinomas of the epithelium, such as breast, pancreatic and ovarian cancers. Using the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology, aptamers previously selected against MUC1 glycoprotein with high affinities and specificities. In this study, we developed two targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes for tumor in-vivo diagnostics using a MUC1 aptamer(APT) as targeted ligand and near-infrared fluorescent dye (ICG-Der-02) as labelling. MUC1 aptamer conjugated ICG-Der-02 (APT-ICG-Der-02) displayed a great selectivity to MUC1 positive cell line MCF7 and MCF7 xenograft-bearing nude mice. To improve the high targeting of the probe to the tumor cells, PEG, with high biocompatibility, non immunogenicity and long circulation, was conjugated to the probe .The new probe (APT-PEG-ICG-Der-02) showed better tumour uptake and clearance, and also displayed a great selectivity to MCF7 tumor-bearing nude mice. Data obtained demonstrate a high potential of the targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer early diagnosis.

  3. Polycrystalline Silicon: a Biocompatibility Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) layers were functionalized through the growth of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) on their surface. HA is the mineral component of bones and teeth and thus possesses excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on both HA-coated and un-coated poly-Si surfaces for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days and toxicity, proliferation and cell morphology were investigated. The results revealed that the poly-Si layers were bioactive and compatible with the osteoblast-like cells. Nevertheless, the HA coating improved the cell interactions with the poly-Si surfaces based on the cell affinity to the specific chemical composition of the bone-like HA and/or to the higher HA roughness.

  4. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of a radioiodinated 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone derivative as a survivin targeting SPECT probe for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Natsumi; Haratake, Mamoru; Yoshida, Sakura; Magata, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Morio

    2016-02-01

    Survivin is overexpressed in most of the cancerous tissues but not in terminally differentiated normal tissues, making it an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy of various types of cancers. In this study, we aimed to develop 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone (DCP) derivatives, as novel cancer imaging probes that target survivin. Chloro and iodo analogs of DCP (CDCP and IDCP, respectively) were successfully synthesized by using a previously unreported carbon monoxide-free procedure. IDCP exhibited a slightly higher binding affinity for recombinant human survivin (Kd=34 nM) than that of CDCP (Kd=44 nM). Fluorescence staining indicated that both CDCP and IDCP showed high signals in MDA-MB-231 cells with high levels of survivin expression. Significantly low fluorescent signals were observed in MCF-10A cells, which showed low levels of survivin expression. [(125)I]IDCP was synthesized for the application of IDCP to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Quantitative in vitro binding of [(125)I]IDCP in cell cultures showed results consistent to those observed after fluorescent staining. In vivo biodistribution studies in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that the tumor uptake of [(125)I]IDCP increased gradually with time and was 0.65% injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 180 min. The maximum tumor/blood and tumor/muscle ratio at 60 min were 0.87 and 2.27, respectively, indicating inadequate [(125)I]IDCP accumulation in tumors necessary for in vivo imaging. Although further structural modifications are necessary to improve pharmacokinetic properties of IDCP, this study demonstrates the feasibility of using the DCP backbone as a scaffold for the development of survivin-targeting tumor imaging probes. PMID:26733475

  6. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe(2)O(3) can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe(2)O(3) could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646

  7. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: Launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Alexander D.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Dlott, Dana D., E-mail: dlott@illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s{sup −1} impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25–100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  8. Biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; Tsai, C; Gerberich, W W; Kruckeberg, L; Kania, D R

    1995-04-01

    The biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited (CVD) diamond surfaces has been assessed. Our results indicate that CVD diamond is as biocompatible as titanium (Ti) and 316 stainless steel (SS). First, the amount of adsorbed and 'denatured' fibrinogen on CVD diamond was very close to that of Ti and SS. Second, both in vitro and in vivo there appears to be less cellular adhesion and activation on the surface of CVD diamond surfaces compared to Ti and SS. This evident biocompatibility, coupled with the corrosion resistance and notable mechanical integrity of CVD diamond, suggests that diamond-coated surfaces may be highly desirable in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:7654876

  9. Identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium species isolated from food with genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes by colony hybridization and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, P; Pfefferkorn, A; Teuber, M; Meile, L

    1997-01-01

    A Bifidobacterium genus-specific target sequence in the V9 variable region of the 16S rRNA has been elaborated and was used to develop a hybridization probe. The specificity of this probe, named lm3 (5'-CGGGTGCTI*CCCACTTTCATG-3'), was used to identify all known type strains and distinguish them from other bacteria. All of the 30 type strains of Bifidobacterium which are available at the German culture collection Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, 6 commercially available production strains, and 34 closely related relevant strains (as negative controls) were tested. All tested bifidobacteria showed distinct positive signals by colony hybridization, whereas all negative controls showed no distinct dots except Gardnerella vaginalis DSM4944 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii DSM4902, which gave slight signals. Furthermore, we established a method for isolation and identification of bifidobacteria from food by using a PCR assay without prior isolation of DNA but breaking the cells with proteinase K. By this method, all Bifidobacterium strains lead to a DNA product of the expected size. We also established a quick assay to quantitatively measure Bifidobacterium counts in food and feces by dilution plating and colony hybridization. We were able to demonstrate that 2.1 x 10(6) to 2.3 x 10(7) colonies/g of sour milk containing bifidobacteria hybridized with the specific nucleotide probe. With these two methods, genus-specific colony hybridization and genus-specific PCR, it is now possible to readily and accurately detect any bifidobacteria in food and fecal samples and to discriminate between them and members of other genera. PMID:9097423

  10. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  11. A new fluorescence/PET probe for targeting intracellular human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) using Tat peptide-conjugated IgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung Oh; Youn, Hyewon; Kim, Seung Hoo; Kim, Young-Hwa; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key

    2016-08-26

    Despite an increasing need for methods to visualize intracellular proteins in vivo, the majority of antibody-based imaging methods available can only detect membrane proteins. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is an intracellular target of great interest because of its high expression in several types of cancer. In this study, we developed a new probe for hTERT using the Tat peptide. An hTERT antibody (IgG or IgM) was conjugated with the Tat peptide, a fluorescence dye and (64)Cu. HT29 (hTERT+) and U2OS (hTERT-) were used to visualize the intracellular hTERT. The hTERT was detected by RT-PCR and western blot. Fluorescence signals for hTERT were obtained by confocal microscopy, live cell imaging, and analyzed by Tissue-FAXS. In nude mice, tumors were visualized using the fluorescence imaging devices Maestro™ and PETBOX. In RT-PCR and western blot, the expression of hTERT was detected in HT29 cells, but not in U2OS cells. Fluorescence signals were clearly observed in HT29 cells and in U2OS cells after 1 h of treatment, but signals were only detected in HT29 cells after 24 h. Confocal microscopy showed that 9.65% of U2OS and 78.54% of HT29 cells had positive hTERT signals. 3D animation images showed that the probe could target intranuclear hTERT in the nucleus. In mice models, fluorescence and PET imaging showed that hTERT in HT29 tumors could be efficiently visualized. In summary, we developed a new method to visualize intracellular and intranuclear proteins both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27317485

  12. Improving biocompatibility of implants with nanolayering

    OpenAIRE

    Homar, Miha; GAŠPERLIN, MIRJANA; Dolenc, Andrej; Kristl, Julijana

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatibility of different materials in the body is very complicated phenomenon. Although structural characteristics of implant are decisive for its specific purpose, biologic response mainly depends on surface characteristics of the implant and its interaction with biologic environment. Nanolayering of the implant to improve biocompatibility presents a recent innovation in this field of research. One method of nanolayering is layer-by-layer assembly which has many advantages over other na...

  13. Rational targeting of the urokinase receptor (uPAR): development of antagonists and non-invasive imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Mette Camilla; Persson, Morten; Haldager, L; Alpizar, Warner Enrique Alpizar; Jacobsen, Benedikte; Gårdsvoll, H; Kjær, Andreas; Ploug, Michael

    2011-01-01

    PA-mediated plasminogen activation at the cell surface, which is accomplished by its high-affinity interaction with the growth factor-like domain of uPA. Detailed insights into the molecular basis underlying the interactions between uPAR and its two bona fide ligands, uPA and vitronectin, have been obtained recently by X......-ray crystallography and surface plasmon resonance studies. Importantly, these structural studies also define possible druggable target sites in uPAR for small molecules and provide guidelines for the development of reporter groups applicable for non-invasive molecular imaging of uPAR expression in vivo by positron...... emission tomography. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our perception of the structure-function relationships of uPAR ligation and how these may assist translational research in preclinical intervention studies of uPAR function....

  14. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  15. Synthetic cornea: biocompatibility and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Kaminski, Stefan; Fernandez, Viviana; Alfonso, E.; Lamar, Peggy; Lacombe, Emmanuel; Duchesne, Bernard; Dubovy, Sander; Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose. Experimentally find a method to provide a safe surgical technique and an inexpensive and long lasting mesoplant for the restoration of vision in patients with bilateral corneal blindness due to ocular surface and stromal diseases. Methods. Identify the least invasive and the safest surgical technique for synthetic cornea implantation. Identify the most compatible biomaterials and the optimal shape a synthetic cornea must have to last a long time when implanted in vivo. Results. Penetrating procedures were deemed too invasive, time consuming, difficult and prone to long term complications. Therefore a non-penetrating delamination technique with central trephination was developed to preserve the integrity of Descemet's membrane and the anterior segment. Even though this approach limits the number of indications, it is acceptable since the majority of patients only have opacities in the stroma. The prosthesis was designed to fit in the removed tissue plane with its skirt fitted under the delaminated stroma. To improve retention, the trephination wall was made conical with the smallest opening on the anterior surface and a hat-shaped mesoplant was made to fit. The skirt was perforated in its perimeter to allow passage of nutrients and tissues ingrowths. To simplify the fabrication procedure, the haptic and optic were made of the same polymer. The intrastromal biocompatibility of several hydrogels was found superior to current clinically used PMMA and PTFE materials. Monobloc mesoplants made of 4 different materials were implanted in rabbits and followed weekly until extrusion occurred. Some remained optically clear allowing for fundus photography. Conclusions. Hydrogel synthetic corneas can be made to survive for periods longer than 1 year. ArF excimer laser photoablation studies are needed to determine the refractive correction potential of these mesoplants. A pilot FDA clinical trial is needed to assess the mesoplant efficacy and very long-term stability.

  16. Fluorescent nanoparticle probes for imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Malhotra, Astha

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) have received immense popularity in cancer imaging in recent years because of their attractive optical properties. In comparison to traditional organic-based fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins, FNPs offer much improved sensitivity and photostability. FNPs in certain size range have a strong tendency to enter and retain in solid tumor tissue with abnormal (leaky) vasculature--a phenomenon known as Enhanced Permeation and Retention (EPR) effect, advancing their use for in vivo tumor imaging. Furthermore, large surface area of FNPs and their usual core-shell structure offer a platform for designing and fabricating multimodal/multifunctional nanoparticles (MMNPs). For effective cancer imaging, often the optical imaging modality is integrated with other nonoptical-based imaging modalities such as MRI, X-ray, and PET, thus creating multimodal nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging probes. Such multimodal NP probes can be further integrated with therapeutic drug as well as cancer targeting agent leading to multifunctional NPs. Biocompatibility of FNPs is an important criterion that must be seriously considered during FNP design. NP composition, size, and surface chemistry must be carefully selected to minimize potential toxicological consequences both in vitro and in vivo. In this article, we will mainly focus on three different types of FNPs: dye-loaded NPs, quantum dots (Qdots), and phosphores; briefly highlighting their potential use in translational research. PMID:21480546

  17. Fluorine-labeled Dasatinib Nanoformulations as Targeted Molecular Imaging Probes in a PDGFB-driven Murine Glioblastoma Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Benezra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dasatinib, a new-generation Src and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR inhibitor, is currently under evaluation in high-grade glioma clinical trials. To achieve optimum physicochemical and/or biologic properties, alternative drug delivery vehicles may be needed. We used a novel fluorinated dasatinib derivative (F-SKI249380, in combination with nanocarrier vehicles and metabolic imaging tools (microPET to evaluate drug delivery and uptake in a platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB-driven genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM of high-grade glioma. We assessed dasatinib survival benefit on the basis of measured tumor volumes. Using brain tumor cells derived from PDGFB-driven gliomas, dose-dependent uptake and time-dependent inhibitory effects of F-SKI249380 on biologic activity were investigated and compared with the parent drug. PDGFR receptor status and tumor-specific targeting were non-invasively evaluated in vivo using 18F-SKI249380 and 18F-SKI249380-containing micellar and liposomal nanoformulations. A statistically significant survival benefit was found using dasatinib (95 mg/kg versus saline vehicle (P < .001 in tumor volume-matched GEMM pairs. Competitive binding and treatment assays revealed comparable biologic properties for F-SKI249380 and the parent drug. In vivo, Significantly higher tumor uptake was observed for 18F-SKI249380-containing micelle formulations [4.9 percentage of the injected dose per gram tissue (%ID/g; P = .002] compared to control values (1.6%ID/g. Saturation studies using excess cold dasatinib showed marked reduction of tumor uptake values to levels in normal brain (1.5%ID/g, consistent with in vivo binding specificity. Using 18F-SKI249380-containing micelles as radiotracers to estimate therapeutic dosing requirements, we calculated intratumoral drug concentrations (24–60 nM that were comparable to in vitro 50% inhibitory concentration values. 18F-SKI249380 is a PDGFR-selective tracer, which

  18. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point to...... mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development of...

  19. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte;

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company....... Findings point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The...

  20. Combined scanning probe and light scattering characterization of multi-stage self-assembly of targeted liposome-based delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mean size and size distribution of a targeted nanoparticle delivery system (NDS) strongly influences the intrinsic stability and functionality of this molecular complex, affects its performance as a systemic drug delivery platform and ultimately determines its efficacy toward early detection and treatment of cancer. Since its components undergo significant reorganization during multiple stages of self-assembly, it is essential to monitor the size and stability of the complex throughout the NDS formulation in order to ensure its potency and manufacturability prior to entering clinical trials. This work combines scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques to obtain quantitative and reliable size measurements of the NDS, and to investigate how variations in the NDS formulation or self-assembly process impact the size, structure and functionality of the complex with various therapeutic and diagnostic agent payloads. These combined SPM and DLS methods, when implemented at an early stage of the NDS formulation, present a potential measurement approach to facilitate drug discovery and development, optimization and quality control during manufacturing of the NDS

  1. Biocompatible composites of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Suan, T. Nguen; Ivanova, L. P.; Korchagin, M. A.; Chaikina, M. V.; Shilko, S. V.; Pleskachevskiy, Yu. M.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical and tribotechnical characteristics of biocompatible, antifriction and extrudable composites based on ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as well as hybrid matrix "UHMWPE + PTFE" with biocompatible hydroxyapatite filler under the dry friction and boundary lubrication were investigated. A comparative analysis of effectiveness of adding the hydroxyapatite to improve the wear resistance of composites based on these two matrices was performed. It is shown that the wear intensity of nanocomposites based on the hybrid matrix is lower than that for the composites based on pure UHMWPE. Possibilities of using the composites of the polymer "UHMWPE-PTFE" mixture as a material for artificial joints implants are discussed.

  2. Biocompatible magnetic core-shell nanocomposites for engineered magnetic tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Arco, Laura; Rodriguez, Ismael A.; Carriel, Victor; Bonhome-Espinosa, Ana B.; Campos, Fernando; Kuzhir, Pavel; Duran, Juan D. G.; Lopez-Lopez, Modesto T.

    2016-04-01

    The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare biocompatible core-shell nanostructures consisting of a polymeric core and a magnetic shell, which are used for this purpose. We show that using a core-shell architecture is doubly advantageous. First, gravitational settling for core-shell nanocomposites is slower because of the reduction of the composite average density connected to the light polymer core. Second, the magnetic response of core-shell nanocomposites can be tuned by changing the thickness of the magnetic layer. The incorporation of the composites into biopolymer hydrogels containing cells results in magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues whose mechanical properties can be controlled by external magnetic forces. Indeed, we obtain a significant increase of the viscoelastic moduli of the engineered tissues when exposed to an external magnetic field. Because the composites are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, the prepared bio-artificial tissue-like constructs also display excellent ex vivo cell viability and proliferation. When implanted in vivo, the engineered tissues show good biocompatibility and outstanding interaction with the host tissue. Actually, they only cause a localized transitory inflammatory reaction at the implantation site, without any effect on other organs. Altogether, our results suggest that the inclusion of magnetic core-shell nanocomposites into biomaterials would enable tissue engineering of artificial substitutes whose mechanical properties could be tuned to match those of the potential target tissue. In a wider perspective, the good biocompatibility and magnetic behavior of the composites could be beneficial for many other applications.The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we

  3. A capillary viscometer designed for the characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J.; Odenbach, S.

    2016-08-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles are receiving a growing interest in biomedical research. These ferrofluids can, e.g., be used for the treatment of cancer, making use of the drug targeting principle or using an artificially induced heating. To enable a safe application the basic properties of the ferrofluids have to be well understood, including the viscosity of the fluids if an external magnetic field is applied. It is well known that the viscosity of ferrofluids rises if a magnetic field is applied, where the rise depends on shear rate and magnetic field strength. In case of biocompatible ferrofluids such investigations proved to be rather complicated as the experimental setup should be close to the actual application to allow justified predictions of the effects which have to be expected. Thus a capillary viscometer, providing a flow situation comparable to the flow in a blood vessel, has been designed. The glass capillary is exchangeable and different inner diameters can be used. The range of the shear rates has been adapted to the range found in the human organism. The application of an external magnetic field is enabled with two different coil setups covering the ranges of magnetic field strengths required on the one hand for a theoretical understanding of particle interaction and resulting changes in viscosity and on the other hand for values necessary for a potential biomedical application. The results show that the newly designed capillary viscometer is suitable to measure the magnetoviscous effect in biocompatible ferrofluids and that the results appear to be consistent with data measured with rotational rheometry. In addition, a strong change of the flow behaviour of a biocompatible ferrofluid was proven for ranges of the shear rate and the magnetic field strength expected for a potential biomedical application.

  4. A rheological and microscopical characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, J., E-mail: johannes.nowak@tu-dresden.de [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Measuring and Automation Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Germany (Germany); Wolf, D. [Triebenberg Laboratory, Technische Universität Dresden, 01328 Germany (Germany); Odenbach, S. [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Measuring and Automation Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Germany (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    There is an increasing interest in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in the biomedical area. Those ferrofluids are e.g. used for magnetic resonance imaging and emerging research focuses on employing the fluids for magnetic drug targeting or magnetic particle heating as a potential treatment for cancer. For these applications the knowledge of the suspensions' thermophysical properties is of major interest to guarantee a safe and effective application. Therefore the flow behavior cannot be neglected as it might significantly influence the execution of the aforementioned applications. In this experimental study two biocompatible ferrofluids were investigated. Rheological measurements were carried out using rotational rheometry. To allow an interpretation of the fluids' behavior the microscopic make-up was investigated using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Measurements of diluted ferrofluids were carried out as a first step to simulate the rheological behavior reflecting the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles found in blood flow for most biomedical applications of such fluids. The detected strong effects show the potential to significantly influence application and handling of the biocompatible ferrofluids in the medical area and should therefore be taken into account for further research as well as for the application of such fluids. - Highlights: • The rheology of biocompatible multicore ferrofluids is influenced by magnetic fields. • The flow curves can be described by the Herschel–Bulkley model. • A connection between the magnetoviscous effect and the particle size is found. • The strong magnetoviscous effect exists even if the fluids are diluted. • The connection between the effect and the dilution is mathematically described.

  5. A rheological and microscopical characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing interest in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in the biomedical area. Those ferrofluids are e.g. used for magnetic resonance imaging and emerging research focuses on employing the fluids for magnetic drug targeting or magnetic particle heating as a potential treatment for cancer. For these applications the knowledge of the suspensions' thermophysical properties is of major interest to guarantee a safe and effective application. Therefore the flow behavior cannot be neglected as it might significantly influence the execution of the aforementioned applications. In this experimental study two biocompatible ferrofluids were investigated. Rheological measurements were carried out using rotational rheometry. To allow an interpretation of the fluids' behavior the microscopic make-up was investigated using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Measurements of diluted ferrofluids were carried out as a first step to simulate the rheological behavior reflecting the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles found in blood flow for most biomedical applications of such fluids. The detected strong effects show the potential to significantly influence application and handling of the biocompatible ferrofluids in the medical area and should therefore be taken into account for further research as well as for the application of such fluids. - Highlights: • The rheology of biocompatible multicore ferrofluids is influenced by magnetic fields. • The flow curves can be described by the Herschel–Bulkley model. • A connection between the magnetoviscous effect and the particle size is found. • The strong magnetoviscous effect exists even if the fluids are diluted. • The connection between the effect and the dilution is mathematically described

  6. Polymer Coated Biocompatible Nanodiamonds as Targeted Fluorescent Labels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlegerová, Jitka; Řehoř, Ivan; Hrubý, Martin; Macková, Hana; Šácha, Pavel; Tykvart, Jan; Konvalinka, Jan; Hájek, Miroslav; Cígler, Petr

    Boston: -, 2013. S5.04. [2013 MRS Fall Meeting & Exhibit. 01.12.2013-06.12.2013, Boston] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluorescent nanodiamonds Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  7. Hydrophilic polymers - biocompatibility testing in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kejlová, K.; Labský, Jiří; Jírová, D.; Bendová, H.

    Warsaw : Dept.Transpl & CBT , Centre of Biostructure Research, Medical University of Warsaw, 2004. s. 71. [Workshop of the European Society of Toxicology In Vitro: Invitox /13./. 08.09.2004-11.09.2004, Zegrze] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050301 Keywords : hydrophilic polymers * biocompatibility * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  8. Site-specific conjugation of the quencher on peptide's N-terminal for the synthesis of a targeted non-spreading activatable optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Bryan; Mironov, Gleb G; Tomanek, Boguslaw; van Veggel, Frank C J M; Abulrob, Abedelnasser

    2016-06-01

    Optical imaging offers high sensitivity and portability at low cost. The design of 'smart' or 'activatable' probes can decrease the background noise and increase the specificity of the signal. By conjugating a fluorescent dye and a compatible quencher on each side of an enzyme's substrate, the signal remains in its 'off ' state until it reaches the area where a specific enzyme is expressed. However, the signal can leak from that area unless the dye is attached to a molecule able to bind to a specific target also presented in that area. The aim of this study was to (i) specifically conjugate the quencher on the α-amino group of the peptide's N-terminus, (ii) conjugate the dye on the ε-amino group of a lysine in C-terminus, and (iii) conjugate the carboxyl group of the peptide's C-terminus to an amino group present on an antibody, using carbodiimide chemistry. The use of protecting groups, such as Boc or Fmoc, to allow site-specific conjugation, presents several drawbacks including 'on beads labeling', additional steps required for deprotection and removal from the resin, decreased yield, and dye degradation. A method of preferential labeling of α-amino N-terminal group in slightly acidic solution, proposed by Selo et al. (1996) has partially solved the problem. The present study reports improvements of the method allowing to (i) avoid the homo-bilabeling, (ii) increase the yield of the N-terminal labeling by two folds, and (iii) decrease the cost by 44-fold. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27282138

  9. Translational Applications of Nanodiamonds: From Biocompatibility to Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura Kent

    Nanotechnology marks the next phase of development for drug delivery, contrast agents and gene therapy. For these novel systems to achieve success in clinical translation we must see that they are both effective and safe. Diamond nanoparticles, also known as nanodiamonds (NDs), have been gaining popularity as molecular delivery vehicles over the last decade. The uniquely faceted, carbon nanoparticles possess a number of beneficial properties that are being harnessed for applications ranging from small-molecule drug delivery to biomedical imaging and gene therapy. In addition to improving the effectiveness of a variety of therapeutics and contrast agents, initial studies indicate that NDs are biocompatible. In this work we evaluate the translational potential of NDs by demonstrating efficacy in molecular delivery and scrutinizing particle tolerance. Previous work has demonstrated that NDs are effective vehicles for the delivery of anthracycline chemotherapeutics and gadolinium(III) based contrast agents. We have sought to enhance the gains made in both areas through the addition of active targeting. We find that ND-mediated targeted delivery of epirubicin to triple negative breast cancers induces tumor regression and virtually eliminates drug toxicities. Additionally, ND-mediated delivery of the MRI contrast agent ProGlo boosts the per gadolinium relaxivity four fold, eliminates water solubility issues and effectively labels progesterone receptor expressing breast cancer cells. Both strategies open the door to the development of targeted, theranostic constructs based on NDs, capable of treating and labeling breast cancers at the same time. Although we have seen that NDs are effective vehicles for molecular delivery, for any nanoparticle to achieve clinical utility it must be biocompatible. Preliminary research has shown that NDs are non-toxic, however only a fraction of the ND-subtypes have been evaluated. Here we present an in depth analysis of the cellular

  10. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Liu, Ru-Shi [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hwu, Yeu-Kuang [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Din Ping [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S, E-mail: rsliu@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhsiao@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  11. Multispectral imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  12. Ion implantation and bio-compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface modification of polymers by ion implantation has been carried out to control surface properties such as conductivity, wettability, blood and tissue compatibility. Ion implantation into silicone rubber, polystyrene and segmented polyurethane was performed at 150 keV with doses ranging from 1 x 1015 to 3 x 1017 ions/cm2 to improve bio-compatibility. The platelet accumulation on ion implanted silicone rubber decreased and non-thrombogenicity of ion implanted specimens were improved. The ion implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane have been found to exhibit remarkably higher adhesion and spreading of endothelial cells compared to the non-implanted case. It is concluded that ion implantation into polymers is effective in controlling their bio-compatibility. (author)

  13. Infrared study of biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic fluids mainly consist of nano sized iron oxide particles (FesO4) that are suspended in carrier liquid. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in developing technologies in the field of magnetic nanoparticles. Techniques based on using of these biocompatible magnetizable complex systems have found application in numerous biological fields. Generally, the magnetic component of the particle is coated by a biocompatible polymer such as PEG (polyethylene glycol), policyholder's as dextran, starch, have been developed. The coating acts to shield the magnetic particle from the surrounding environment. This review is focused on describing the infrared spectroscopy as method that allows checking starting materials and reactions while work is in progress. FTIR method is correlated with others spectral methods as XRD, TEM. Keywords: Magnetic nanoparticles, infrared spectroscopy, biomedicine

  14. Exfoliating biocompatible ferromagnetic Cr-trihalide monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyi; Sun, Qiang; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-03-23

    In addition to spintronics another motivation for exploring ferromagnetic two-dimensional materials is for biomedical applications such as magnetic labeling and hyperthermia treatment of tumors. Unfortunately, the widely studied Mn-containing monolayer is not biocompatible, although it is ferromagnetic. Here using first principles calculations combined with Monte Carlo simulations based on the Ising model, we systematically study a class of 2D ferromagnetic monolayers CrX3 (X = Cl, Br, I). The feasibility of exfoliation from their layered bulk phase is confirmed by the small cleavage energy and high in-plane stiffness. Spin-polarized calculations, combined with self-consistently determined Hubbard U that accounts for strong correlation energy, demonstrate that CrX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) monolayers are ferromagnetic and that Cr is trivalent and carries a magnetic moment of 3 μB; the resulting Cr(3+) ions are biocompatible. The corresponding Curie temperatures for CrCl3, CrBr3 and CrI3 are found to be 66, 86, and 107 K, respectively, which can be increased to 323, 314, and 293 K by hole doping. The biocompatibility and ferromagnetism render these Cr-containing trihalide monolayers unique for applications. PMID:26452203

  15. Facile semi-automated forensic body fluid identification by multiplex solution hybridization of NanoString® barcode probes to specific mRNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, Patrick; White, Robin Lynn; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-01-01

    A DNA profile from the perpetrator does not reveal, per se, the circumstances by which it was transferred. Body fluid identification by mRNA profiling may allow extraction of contextual 'activity level' information from forensic samples. Here we describe the development of a prototype multiplex digital gene expression (DGE) method for forensic body fluid/tissue identification based upon solution hybridization of color-coded NanoString(®) probes to 23 mRNA targets. The method identifies peripheral blood, semen, saliva, vaginal secretions, menstrual blood and skin. We showed that a simple 5 min room temperature cellular lysis protocol gave equivalent results to standard RNA isolation from the same source material, greatly enhancing the ease-of-use of this method in forensic sample processing. We first describe a model for gene expression in a sample from a single body fluid and then extend that model to mixtures of body fluids. We then describe calculation of maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) of body fluid quantities in a sample, and we describe the use of likelihood ratios to test for the presence of each body fluid in a sample. Known single source samples of blood, semen, vaginal secretions, menstrual blood and skin all demonstrated the expected tissue-specific gene expression for at least two of the chosen biomarkers. Saliva samples were more problematic, with their previously identified characteristic genes exhibiting poor specificity. Nonetheless the most specific saliva biomarker, HTN3, was expressed at a higher level in saliva than in any of the other tissues. Crucially, our algorithm produced zero false positives across this study's 89 unique samples. As a preliminary indication of the ability of the method to discern admixtures of body fluids, five mixtures were prepared. The identities of the component fluids were evident from the gene expression profiles of four of the five mixtures. Further optimization of the biomarker 'CodeSet' will be required

  16. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  17. Biocompatible surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanotags for in vivo cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Animesh; Jana, Santanu; Das, Raj Kumar; Chang, Young Tae

    2014-03-01

    The advancement of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is significantly increasing as an ultra-sensitive sensing technology in biomedical research. In this review, we focus on the most recent developments of biocompatible nanoprobes for cancer research. First, we discuss coating approaches to enhance the biocompatibility of SERS substrate and Raman reporters. Furthermore, interesting ligands such as antibodies, aptamers and polypeptides are attached to the surface of nanotags for targeting the cancerous cells in vitro. The unique multiplexing capabilities of the SERS technique have been applied for simultaneous multiple target recognition. Finally, these noninvasive, ultrasensitive tools are mostly highlighted for in vivo tumor detection. Potential application of SERS nanotags in therapeutic study and the possibility of SERS nanotags in biomedical applications are outlined briefly in this review. PMID:24746194

  18. In vitro and in vivo CT imaging using bismuth sulfide modified with a highly biocompatible Pluronic F127

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probe bismuth sulfide modified with Pluronic F127 (Bi2S3-PF127), which has high biocompatibility and dispersibility, is synthesized using triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 to modify hydrophobic Bi2S3 nanoparticles that are prepared by a hot injection method. TEM results show that most of the probe has a length of about 14.85 ± 1.70 nm and a breadth of about 4.79 ± 0.63 nm. After injected into the tail vein of a mouse, the probe has obvious CT contrast enhancement capability from x-ray CT imaging results. Meanwhile, the probe’s in vivo toxicity is also studied. It is found that hematoxylin and eosin stains of major organs have no change. A biochemical analysis (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) prove the probe has no adverse effects. The results of a blood analysis (white blood cell count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and platelet count) are also normal. The biological distribution of Bi by ICP-AES shows that most of nanoparticles are cleaned out after injection 48 h, and the circulation half-life of the probe is 5.0 h, suggesting that Bi2S3-PF127 has a long circulation and indicating that the Bi2S3-PF127 probe has good biocompatibility and safety. (paper)

  19. In vitro biocompatibility testing of some synthetic polymers used for the achievement of nervous conduits

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai, R; Florescu, IP; Coroiu, V; Oancea, A; Lungu, M.

    2011-01-01

    Biocompatible synthetic polymers are largely used in the bio–medical domain, tissue engineering and in controlled release of medicines. Polymers can be used in the achievement of cardiac and vascular devices, mammary implants, eye lenses, surgical threads, nervous conduits, adhesives, blood substitutes, etc. Our study was axed on the development of cytotoxicity tests for 3 synthetic polymers, namely polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl chloride. These tests targeted to determi...

  20. Doped biocompatible layers prepared by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, M.; Weiserová, M.; Kocourek, T.; Jurek, K.; Strnad, J.

    2010-03-01

    The contribution deals with KrF laser synthesis and study of doped biocompatible materials with focus on diamond-like carbon (DLC) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Overview of materials used for dopation is given. Experimental results of study of HA layers doped with silver are presented. Films properties were characterized using profilometer, SEM, WDX, XRD and optical transmission. Content of silver in layers moved from 0.06 to 13.7 at %. The antibacterial properties of HA, silver and doped HA layers were studied in vivo using Escherichia coli cells.

  1. Biocompatibility of poly allylamine synthesized by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the electric and hydrophilic properties of poly allylamine (PAI) synthesized by plasma whose structure contains N-H, C-H, C-O and O-H bonds is presented, that promote the biocompatibility with the human body. To study the PAI hydrolytic affinity, solutions of salt concentration similar to those of the human body were used. The results indicate that the solutions modify the charge balance in the surfaces reducing the hydrophobicity in the poly allylamine whose contact angle oscillates among 10 and 16 degrees and the liquid-solid surface tension between 4 and 8 dina/cm. (Author)

  2. Titanium nanostructural surface processing for improved biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing incident x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were conducted to evaluate the effect of titanium hydride on the formation of nanoporous TiO2 on Ti during anodization. Nano-titanium-hydride was formed cathodically before anodizing and served as a sacrificial nanoprecipitate during anodization. Surface oxidation occurred and a multinanoporous structure formed after cathodic pretreatments followed by anodization treatment. The sacrificial nanoprecipitate is directly dissolved and the Ti transformed to nanoporous TiO2 by anodization. The formation of sacrificial nanoprecipitates by cathodic pretreatment and of the multinanostructure by anodization is believed to improve biocompatibility, thereby promoting osseointegration

  3. Preparation and properties of bio-compatible magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study the preparation and properties of bio-compatible magnetic nanoparticles for immunoassay and DNA detection. The magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were prepared by a chemical co-precipitation method and dextran was selected as the surfactant to suspend the nanoparticles. Suspended particles associated with avidin followed by biotin were qualitatively analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. We found further the ethylenediamine blocked activated residual groups efficiently, hence enhancing the attachment of biotin for probing the avidin

  4. Radiotracer experiments with biopolymers and bio-compatible polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of biopolymer and biocompatible polymer employing radiotracers have been reviewed. Two different aspects have been studied. Environmentally benign methodologies for the removal, immobilization, separation or speciation of heavy, toxic elements and clinically important radionuclides have been developed using biopolymer and bio-compatible polymer as well. The complex formation ability of a bio-compatible polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), with clinically important radionuclides have been tested which have tremendous importance in radiopharmaceutical sciences. (author)

  5. Biocompatibility of Bletilla striata Microspheres as a Novel Embolic Agent

    OpenAIRE

    ShiHua Luo; SongLin Song; ChuanSheng Zheng; Yong Wang; XiangWen Xia; Bin Liang; GanSheng Feng

    2015-01-01

    We have prepared Chinese traditional herb Bletilla striata into microspheres as a novel embolic agent for decades. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of Bletilla striata microspheres (BSMs). After a thermal test of BSMs in vitro, the cell biocompatibility of BSMs was investigated in mouse fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells using the methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. In addition, blood biocompatibility was evaluated. In vivo intramuscular implantation ...

  6. Probing and Improving Student's Understanding of Protein a-Helix Structure Using Targeted Assessment and Classroom Interventions in Collaboration with a Faculty Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Villafañe, Sachel M.; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of concept inventories and other assessment tools in the molecular life sciences provides instructors with myriad avenues to probe student understanding. For example, although molecular visualization is central to the study of biochemistry, a growing body of evidence suggests that students have substantial limitations…

  7. Biocompatibility of polymethylmethacrylate resins used in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rupali; Singh, Raghuwar D; Sharma, Vinod P; Siddhartha, Ramashanker; Chand, Pooran; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    Biocompatibility or tissue compatibility describes the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response when applied as intended. Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) based resins are most widely used resins in dentistry, especially in fabrication of dentures and orthodontic appliances. They are considered cytotoxic on account of leaching of various potential toxic substances, most common being residual monomer. Various in vitro and in vivo experiments and cell based studies conducted on acrylic based resins or their leached components have shown them to have cytotoxic effects. They can cause mucosal irritation and tissue sensitization. These studies are not only important to evaluate the long term clinical effect of these materials, but also help in further development of alternate resins. This article reviews information from scientific full articles, reviews, or abstracts published in dental literature, associated with biocompatibility of PMMA resins and it is leached out components. Published materials were searched in dental literature using general and specialist databases, like the PubMED database. PMID:22454327

  8. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar P. Troncoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received much attention, because of the possibility of combining the good properties of BC with other materials for specific applications. BC nanocomposites can be processed either in a static or an agitated medium. The fabrication of BC nanocomposites in static media can be carried out while keeping the original mat structure obtained after the synthesis to form the final nanocomposite or by altering the culture media with other components. The present article reviews the issue of biocompatibility of BC and BC nanocomposites. Biomedical aspects, such as surface modification for improving cell adhesion, in vitro and in vivo studies are given along with details concerning the physics of network formation and the changes that occur in the cellulose networks due to the presence of a second phase. The relevance of biocompatibility studies for the development of BC-based materials in bone, skin and cardiovascular tissue engineering is also discussed.

  9. Biocompatible Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids: Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoungjee Cho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis (PD is a preferred home dialysis modality and has a number of added advantages including improved initial patient survival and cost effectiveness over haemodialysis. Despite these benefits, uptake of PD remains relatively low, especially in developed countries. Wider implementation of PD is compromised by higher technique failure from infections (e.g., PD peritonitis and ultrafiltration failure. These are inevitable consequences of peritoneal injury, which is thought to result primarily from continuous exposure to PD fluids that are characterised by their “unphysiologic” composition. In order to overcome these barriers, a number of more biocompatible PD fluids, with neutral pH, low glucose degradation product content, and bicarbonate buffer have been manufactured over the past two decades. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated their benefit in terms of improvement in host cell defence, peritoneal membrane integrity, and cytokine profile. This paper aims to review randomised controlled trials assessing the use of biocompatible PD fluids and their effect on clinical outcomes.

  10. Artemisinin activity-based probes identify multiple molecular targets within the asexual stage of the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum 3D7

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Hanafy M; Barton, Victoria; Phanchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Wong, Michael H. L.; Hemingway, Janet; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the artemisinin (ART) class of antimalarial drugs, the most important antimalarial drug class in use today, remains controversial, despite more than three decades of intensive research. We have developed an unbiased chemical proteomic approach using a suite of ART activity-based protein profiling probes to identify proteins within the malaria parasite that are alkylated by ART, including proteins involved in glycolysis, hemoglobin metabolism, and redox defense. The ...

  11. Polynucleotide Probes That Target a Hypervariable Region of 16S rRNA Genes To Identify Bacterial Isolates Corresponding to Bands of Community Fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Heuer, Holger; Hartung, Kathrin; Wieland, Gabriele; Kramer, Ina; Smalla, Kornelia

    1999-01-01

    Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) is well suited for fingerprinting bacterial communities by separating PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes (16S ribosomal DNA [rDNA]). A strategy was developed and was generally applicable for linking 16S rDNA from community fingerprints to pure culture isolates from the same habitat. For this, digoxigenin-labeled polynucleotide probes were generated by PCR, using bands excised from TGGE community fingerprints as a template, and applied in ...

  12. Nanodiamonds as Intracellular Probes for Imaging in Biology and Medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlegerová, Jitka; Řehoř, Ivan; Havlík, Jan; Raabová, Helena; Muchová, Eva; Cígler, Petr

    Dordrecht : Springer, 2014 - (Prokop, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Harada, A.), s. 363-401 ISBN 978-94-017-8895-3. - (Fundamental Biomedical Technologies. 7) Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nanodiamond * fluorescence * nitrogen-vacancy center * intracellular probe * bioimaging * biocompatibility Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  13. Femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible thin layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopp, B. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: bhopp@physx.u-szeged.hu; Smausz, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Kecskemeti, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Klini, A. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (I.E.S.L.), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (F.O.R.T.H.), P.O. Box 1527, GR-711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Bor, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2007-07-31

    In our study we investigate and report the femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible materials. Teflon, polyhydroxybutyrate, polyglycolic-acid, pepsin and tooth in the form of pressed pellets were used as target materials. Thin layers were deposited using pulses from a femtosecond KrF excimer laser system (FWHM = 450 fs, {lambda} = 248 nm, f = 10 Hz) at different fluences: 0.6, 0.9, 1.6, 2.2, 2.8 and 3.5 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Potassium bromide were used as substrates for diagnostic measurements of the films on a FTIR spectrometer. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 1 x 10{sup -3} Pa, and in the case of tooth and Teflon the substrates were heated at 250 deg. C. Under the optimized conditions the chemical structure of the deposited materials seemed to be largely preserved as evidenced by the corresponding IR spectra. The polyglycolic-acid films showed new spectral features indicating considerable morphological changes during PLD. Surface structure and thickness of the layers deposited on Si substrates were examined by an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a surface profilometer. An empirical model has been elaborated for the description of the femtosecond PLD process. According to this the laser photons are absorbed in the surface layer of target resulting in chemical dissociation of molecules. The fast decomposition causes explosion-like gas expansion generating recoil forces which can tear off and accelerate solid particles. These grains containing target molecules without any chemical damages are ejected from the target and deposited onto the substrate forming a thin layer.

  14. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  15. Biostability and biocompatibility of modified polyurethane elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Elizabeth Marie

    Several strategies have been employed to increase the biostability of medical grade polyurethanes while maintaining the desirable properties of current poly(ether urethanes). It was hypothesized that polyurethane surface chemistry controls biodegradation/biostability that can lead to ultimate failure/success of these materials in clinical applications. Chemical modification or replacement of the susceptible soft segment was evaluated as a design strategy to increase the biostability of medical grade polyurethanes. The effect of soft segment chemistry on the phase morphology, mechanical properties and in vivo response of commercial polyurethanes were compared. Poly(ether urethane) (PEU), silicone-modified poly(ether urethane) (PEU-S), poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU) and silicone-modified poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU-S) elastomers were investigated. AFM phase imaging indicated that the overall two-phase morphology of poly(ether urethanes), necessary for its thermoplastic elastomeric properties, was not disrupted by changing the soft segment chemistry. All of the polyurethanes exhibited thermoplastic elastomeric behavior similar to that of the poly(ether urethane). Following material characterization, the biocompatibility of the polyurethane elastomers was evaluated using a subcutaneous cage implant protocol. All of the polyurethanes tested retained the excellent biocompatibility typical of poly(ether urethane) elastomers. Overall, the candidate polyurethanes were concluded to be suitable replacements of current poly(ether urethane) elastomers in medical applications. The results from the cage implant study and cell culture experiments indicated that monocytes adhere, differentiate and fuse to form foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) on all of the polyurethane specimens. It is now generally accepted that the reactive oxygen species released by these adherent macrophages and FBGCs initiate PEU biodegradation. ATR-FTIR analysis of explanted samples provided evidence of

  16. Optical Imaging and Gene Therapy with Neuroblastoma-Targeting Polymeric Nanoparticles for Potential Theranostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangwook; Jeong, Eun Ju; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, targeted delivery systems based on functionalized polymeric nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Specifically, as neuroblastoma occurs in infancy and childhood, targeted delivery may be critical to reduce the side effects that can occur with conventional approaches, as well as to achieve precise diagnosis and efficient therapy. Thus, biocompatible poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles containing an imaging probe and therapeutic gene are prepared, followed by modification with rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) peptide for neuroblastoma-targeting delivery. RVG peptide is a well-known neuronal targeting ligand and is chemically conjugated to PLG nanoparticles without changing their size or shape. RVG-modified nanoparticles are effective in specifically targeting neuroblastoma both in vitro and in vivo. RVG-modified nanoparticles loaded with a fluorescent probe are useful to detect the tumor site in a neuroblastoma-bearing mouse model, and those encapsulating a therapeutic gene cocktail (siMyc, siBcl-2, and siVEGF) significantly suppressed tumor growth in the mouse model. This approach to designing and tailoring of polymeric nanoparticles for targeted delivery may be useful in the development of multimodality systems for theranostic approaches. PMID:26573885

  17. Experimental estimation of tungsten impurity sputtering due to Type i ELMs in JET-ITER-like wall using pedestal electron cyclotron emission and target Langmuir probe measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horáček, Jan; Borodkina, I.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.

    T167, February (2016), s. 014005. ISSN 0031-8949. [International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications, PFMC 2015/15./. Aix-en-Provence, 18.05.2015-22.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14002 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tungsten sputtering * edge localized mode * magnetic confinement fusion * ITER * H-mode * ELMs * Langmuir Probes (LP) Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.126, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/issue/1402-4896/2016/T167

  18. Design, Synthesis, and Validation of Axl-Targeted Monoclonal Antibody Probe for microPET Imaging in Human Lung Cancer Xenograft

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shuanglong; Li, Dan; Guo, Jiacong; Canale, Nicolette; Li, Xiuqing; Liu, Ren; Krasnoperov, Valery; Gill, Parkash S.; Conti, Peter S.; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence indicates that overexpression of the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase, Axl, plays a key role in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of various types of cancer. The objective of this study is to design a novel imaging probe based on the monoclonal antibody, h173, for microPET imaging of Axl expression in human lung cancer. A bifunctional chelator, DOTA, was conjugated to h173, followed by radiolabeling with 64Cu. The binding of DOTA-h173 to the Axl receptor wa...

  19. Experimental determination of the ion-ion potential in the N = 50 target region: A tool to probe ground-state nuclear densities

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, M A G; Pereira, D; Rossi, E S; Silva, C P; Gasques, L R; Dias, H; Roos, M O

    1999-01-01

    Precise elastic and inelastic differential cross sections have been measured for the sup 1 sup 6 O + sup 8 sup 8 Sr, sup 9 sup 0 sup , sup 9 sup 2 Zr, sup 9 sup 2 Mo systems at sub-barrier energies. From a coupled channel data analysis, the corresponding 'experimental' bare potentials have been determined. The comparison of these potentials with those derived from double-folding theoretical calculations and the high energy (96 MeV/nucleon) elastic scattering data analysis indicate that the method is a very sensitive probe of the ground-state nuclear densities in the surface region.

  20. Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing Pipeline Outperforms a Combined Approach Using Sanger Sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification in Targeted Gene Panel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Laila C; Kerkhof, Jennifer; Stuart, Alan; Reilly, Jack; Eng, Barry; Woodside, Crystal; Levstik, Alexander; Howlett, Christopher J; Rupar, Anthony C; Knoll, Joan H M; Ainsworth, Peter; Waye, John S; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2016-09-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have facilitated parallel analysis of multiple genes enabling the implementation of cost-effective, rapid, and high-throughput methods for the molecular diagnosis of multiple genetic conditions, including the identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in high-risk patients for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. We clinically validated a NGS pipeline designed to replace Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis and to facilitate detection of sequence and copy number alterations in a single test focusing on a BRCA1/BRCA2 gene analysis panel. Our custom capture library covers 46 exons, including BRCA1 exons 2, 3, and 5 to 24 and BRCA2 exons 2 to 27, with 20 nucleotides of intronic regions both 5' and 3' of each exon. We analyzed 402 retrospective patients, with previous Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification results, and 240 clinical prospective patients. One-hundred eighty-three unique variants, including sequence and copy number variants, were detected in the retrospective (n = 95) and prospective (n = 88) cohorts. This standardized NGS pipeline demonstrated 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, uniformity, and high-depth nucleotide coverage per sample (approximately 7000 reads per nucleotide). Subsequently, the NGS pipeline was applied to the analysis of larger gene panels, which have shown similar uniformity, sample-to-sample reproducibility in coverage distribution, and sensitivity and specificity for detection of sequence and copy number variants. PMID:27376475

  1. Sensitive voltammetric determination of DNA via a target-induced strand-displacement reaction using quantum dot-labeled probe DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on a new square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric method for sensitive determination of nucleic acids. It is based on a target-induced strand displacement reaction with blocker DNA (labeled with a CdS quantum dot) from a biotinylated hairpin DNA. First, a hairpin-blocker DNA duplex was immobilized on the surface of the well in a microtiter plate via biotin-streptavidin interaction. On addition of target DNA to the well, the CdS-labeled blocker DNA is displaced by target DNA from the hairpin-blocker duplex to form a new target-blocker DNA duplex. This is accompanied by the release of CdS-labeled blocker DNA. Next, cadmium ions are released from the Q-dots (by adding 1 M nitric acid) and then quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry using an in-situ prepared mercury film electrode. The voltammetric signal increases with the concentration of target DNA in the 5.0 pM to 1.0 nM concentration range, and the detection limit is as low as 1.2 pM. The assay has a good repeatability and displays an intermediate precision of down to 10 %. (author)

  2. FABRICATION AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF CELL OUTER MEMBRANE MIMETIC SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-ming Zong; Yong-kuan Gong

    2011-01-01

    The surface design used for improving biocompatibility is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. For mimicking the ideal surface structure of cell outer membrane, a large number of polymers bearing phosphorylcholine (PC) groups have been employed to modify the surfaces of biomaterials and medical devices. It has been demonstrated that the biocompatibility of the modified materials whose surface is required to interact with a living organism has been obviously improved by introducing PC groups. In this review, the fabrication strategies of cell outer membrane mimetic surfaces and their resulted biocompatibilities were summarized.

  3. Overview of Stabilizing Ligands for Biocompatible Quantum Dot Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Clapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent colloidal quantum dots (QDs possess numerous advantages as fluorophores in biological applications. However, a principal challenge is how to retain the desirable optical properties of quantum dots in aqueous media while maintaining biocompatibility. Because QD photophysical properties are directly related to surface states, it is critical to control the surface chemistry that renders QDs biocompatible while maintaining electronic passivation. For more than a decade, investigators have used diverse strategies for altering the QD surface. This review summarizes the most successful approaches for preparing biocompatible QDs using various chemical ligands.

  4. Preparation and biocompatibility of grafted functional β-cyclodextrin copolymers from the surface of PET films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan, E-mail: yan_jiang_72@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Hongwen [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Weiwei [College of Life Science, Agriculture and Forestry, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006, Heilongjiang (China); Tu, Shanshan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-08-01

    The hydrophobic inert surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film has limited its practical bioapplications, in which case, better biocompatibility should be achieved by surface modification. In this work, the copolymer of functional β-cyclodextrin derivatives and styrene grafted surfaces was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on initiator-immobilized PET. The structures, composition, properties, and surface morphology of the modified PET films were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that the surface of PET films was covered by a thick targeted copolymer layer, and the hydrophobic surface of PET was changed into an amphiphilic surface. The copolymer-grafted surfaces were also shown good biocompatibility on which SGC-7901 A549 and A549/DDP cells readily attached and proliferated, demonstrating that the functional copolymer-grafted PET films could be a promising alternative to biomaterials especially for tissue engineering. - Highlights: • The PET film was grafted by functional β-CD copolymers, which owns amphiphilicity. • The surface of grafted PET film by copolymers enhanced the cell adhesion and growth. • The biocompatible PET film may be used in tissue engineering and cell cultivation.

  5. Fabrication of biocompatible free-standing nanopatterned films for primary neuronal cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Cesca, F.

    2014-09-10

    Devising and constructing biocompatible devices for nervous system regeneration is an extremely challenging task. Besides tackling the issue of biocompatibility, biomaterials for neuroscience applications should mimic the complex environment of the extracellular matrix, which in vivo provides neurons with a series of cues and signals to guide cells towards their appropriate targets. In this work, a novel nanopatterned biocompatible poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) film is realized to assist the attachment and growth of primary hippocampal neurons. Costly and time-consuming processes can be avoided using plasma-surface nanotexturing obtained by a mixed gas SF6/Ar at −5 °C. The intrinsic composition and line topography of nanopatterned PCL ensure healthy development of the neuronal network, as shown by confocal microscopy, by analysing the expression of a range of neuronal markers typical of mature cultures, as well as by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we show that surface nanopatterning improves differentiation of neurons compared to flat PCL films, while no neural growth was observed on either flat or nanopatterned substrates in the absence of a poly-D-lysine coating. Thus, we successfully optimized a nanofabrication protocol to obtain nanostructured PCL layers endowed with several mechanical and structural characteristics that make them a promising, versatile tool for future tissue engineering studies aimed at neural tissue regeneration.

  6. Preparation and biocompatibility of grafted functional β-cyclodextrin copolymers from the surface of PET films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrophobic inert surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film has limited its practical bioapplications, in which case, better biocompatibility should be achieved by surface modification. In this work, the copolymer of functional β-cyclodextrin derivatives and styrene grafted surfaces was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on initiator-immobilized PET. The structures, composition, properties, and surface morphology of the modified PET films were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that the surface of PET films was covered by a thick targeted copolymer layer, and the hydrophobic surface of PET was changed into an amphiphilic surface. The copolymer-grafted surfaces were also shown good biocompatibility on which SGC-7901 A549 and A549/DDP cells readily attached and proliferated, demonstrating that the functional copolymer-grafted PET films could be a promising alternative to biomaterials especially for tissue engineering. - Highlights: • The PET film was grafted by functional β-CD copolymers, which owns amphiphilicity. • The surface of grafted PET film by copolymers enhanced the cell adhesion and growth. • The biocompatible PET film may be used in tissue engineering and cell cultivation

  7. Biocompatible fluorescent zein nanoparticles for simultaneous bioimaging and drug delivery application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) loaded biocompatible fluorescent zein nanoparticles. Zein is the storage protein in corn kernels that has a variety of unique characteristics and functionalities that makes zein valuable in various commercial applications. It is classified as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We synthesized zein nanoparticles of around 800 nm in size and conjugated with quantum dot ZnS:Mn. The nanoparticle was in turn encapsulated with the drug 5-FU. The luminescent properties of these nanoparticles were studied by using fluorescence microscopy. The nanoparticles were characterized and the drug release profile was studied. The biocompatibility of zein nanoparticle and the cytotoxicity with drug-loaded nanoparticle was studied in L929 and MCF-7 cell lines. The nanoparticles were successfully employed for cellular imaging. In vitro drug release studies were also performed. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticle showed that nanoparticles at higher concentrations are compatible for cells and are expected to be promising agents for the targeted delivery of drugs in the near future

  8. Bioinspired fluorescent dipeptide nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and real-time monitoring of drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-04-01

    Peptide nanostructures are biodegradable and are suitable for many biomedical applications. However, to be useful imaging probes, the limited intrinsic optical properties of peptides must be overcome. Here we show the formation of tryptophan–phenylalanine dipeptide nanoparticles (DNPs) that can shift the peptide's intrinsic fluorescent signal from the ultraviolet to the visible range. The visible emission signal allows the DNPs to act as imaging and sensing probes. The peptide design is inspired by the red shift seen in the yellow fluorescent protein that results from π–π stacking and by the enhanced fluorescence intensity seen in the green fluorescent protein mutant, BFPms1, which results from the structure rigidification by Zn(II). We show that DNPs are photostable, biocompatible and have a narrow emission bandwidth and visible fluorescence properties. DNPs functionalized with the MUC1 aptamer and doxorubicin can target cancer cells and can be used to image and monitor drug release in real time.

  9. Tribological study of lubricious DLC biocompatible coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, M; Garcia-Luis, A; Viviente, J L; Braceras, I; Oñate, J I

    2002-12-01

    DLC (diamond-like carbon) coatings have remarkable tribological properties due mainly to their good frictional behavior. These coatings can be applied in many industrial and biomedical applications, where sliding can generate wear and frictional forces on the components, such as orthopaedic metal implants. This work reports on the development and tribological characterization of functionally gradient titanium alloyed DLC coatings. A PVD-magnetron sputtering technique has been used as the deposition method. The aim of this work was to study the tribological performance of the DLC coating when metal to metal contact (cobalt chromium or titanium alloys) takes place under dry and lubricated test conditions. Prior work by the authors demonstrates that the DLC coating reduced considerably the wear of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The DLC coating during mechanical testing exhibited a high elastic recovery (65%) compared to the values obtained from Co-Cr-Mo (15%) and Ti-6Al-4V (23%). The coating exhibited an excellent tribo-performance against the Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys, especially under dry conditions presenting a friction value of 0.12 and almost negligible wear. This coating has passed biocompatibility tests for implant devices on tissue/bone contact according to international standards (ISO 10993). PMID:15348654

  10. Material Biocompatibility for PCR Microfluidic Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-04-23

    As part of the current miniaturization trend, biological reactions and processes are being adapted to microfluidics devices. PCR is the primary method employed in DNA amplification, its miniaturization is central to efforts to develop portable devices for diagnostics and testing purposes. A problem is the PCR-inhibitory effect due to interaction between PCR reagents and the surrounding environment, which effect is increased in high-surface-are-to-volume ration microfluidics. In this study, we evaluated the biocompatibility of various common materials employed in the fabrication of microfluidic chips, including silicon, several kinds of silicon oxide, glasses, plastics, wax, and adhesives. Two-temperature PCR was performed with these materials to determine their PCR-inhibitory effect. In most of the cases, addition of bovine serum albumin effectively improved the reaction yield. We also studied the individual PCR components from the standpoint of adsorption. Most of the materials did not inhibit the DNA, whereas they did show noticeable interaction with the DNA polymerase. Our test, instead of using microfluidic devices, can be easily conducted in common PCR tubes using a standard bench thermocycler. Our data supports an overview of the means by which the materials most bio-friendly to microfluidics can be selected.

  11. Biofunctionalised biocompatible titania coatings for implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, V.; Heidenau, F.; Stenzel, F. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Friedrich-Baur-Research Inst. for Biomaterials; Schmidgall, J.; Lipps, G. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Biochemistry Dept.; Ziegler, G. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Friedrich-Baur-Research Inst. for Biomaterials; Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

    2002-07-01

    The biological response of an organism to an implant can be influenced by structuring and/or functionalisation of the implant surface. The goal of our study is to improve the osseointegration of orthopaedic endoprothesis by coating metal substrates with dense or nanoporous titania layers combined with biofunctionalisation of the surface with peptides and proteins. The sol-gel method is used to produce titania coatings on medical relevant substrates such as titanium or titanium alloys. Control of the educt ratios and the processing, like drying the specimens in air (xerogel) or supercritical drying in an autoclave unit (aerogel), results in dense or nanoporous titania films. Pore diameters can be adjusted between 10 and 120 nanometers. A remarkable characteristic of the coatings is the high number of surface hydroxy functionalities even after calcination. These reactive groups give ideal conditions for the biofunctionalisation. The immobilisation of biological active substances is carried out by successive covalent silanisation with an aminosilane using a dicarbonic acid as a spacer molecule, and binding of peptides to the spacers. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the materials were tested with cell culture assays. (orig.)

  12. Biocompatibility index of Ag-containing antiseptics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkour, Yousef

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We defined a biocompatibility index (BI for comparing. The BI takes into account both the results of the in-vitro cytotoxicity, i.e. the concentration at which 50% of the cells are damaged, and the microbiocidal activity, i.e. the concentration at which the baseline burden of the test micro-organisms is reduced by at least 5-log steps. For AgNO3 and Ag-SD no BI value was calculable since the highest tested active substance concentration of 1% corresponding to the concentration for use results in no reduction in the baseline bacterial burden. However, the theoretical value should be much smaller than 0.002 All tested silver-containing preparations were not effective against Staphylococcus aureus using 30 min contact time. Using Escherichia coli as test microorganisms, colloidal silver in the form of mild silver protein (based on Ag has a BI value of 0.002, chlorhexidine 0.8, PVP-iodine (based on iodine 1.0, polihexanide 1.5, and octenidine 1.8, i.e. the Ag-containing preparations do not act antiseptically within 30 min of contact time. Therefore, depending from the kind of the wound in clinical practice Ag-containing preparations should be substituted by e.g. polihexanide-, octenidine- or PVP-iodine-containing preparations, which show in lower concentration than in the concentration in use microbicidal effect within 30 min.

  13. Forsterite Nanopowder: Structural Characterization and Biocompatibility Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.A.Naghiu; M.Gorea; E.Mutch; F.Kristaly; M.Tomoaia-Cotisel

    2013-01-01

    Forsterite,a new biocompatible material was synthesized from Mg(NO3)2·6H20 and TEOS by using the sol-gel method.The material was then heated at 800,900 and 1000 ℃.The forsterite was noticed as the main crystalline phase in the material fired at 900 and 1000 ℃,while periclase (MgO) was present in all the samples.The tests confirm that in the first two samples forsterite is present as crystallites <60 nm,while in the sample synthesized at 1000 ℃ it forms aggregates of micrometre-sized grains.In vitro test was performed by immersing the forsterite powder in the simulating body fluids (SBF) and hydroxyapatite formation on the surface was investigated.We could evidence the formation of hydroxyapatite on the forsterite surface after 7 days of immersion.The MTT test confirmed that forsterite powders dissolution promote osteoblast proliferation of the human-type osteoblasts with no significant cytotoxicity effects.

  14. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ion

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL, hydroxyapatite (HAp, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD and usnic acid (UA. The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD. In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  15. The properties of Gd2O3-assembled silica nanocomposite targeted nanoprobes and their application in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuanzhi; Tian, Xiumei; Hu, Wenyong; Zhang, Yongyu; Liu, Huan; He, Haoqiang; Shen, Yingying; Xie, Fukang; Li, Li

    2012-09-01

    The feasibility of the gadolinium-doped mesoporous silica nanocomposite Gd(2)O(3)@MCM-41 as a safe, effective MRI nanoprobe has been validated in the current investigation systematically from atomistic and molecular modeling to its synthesis and characterization on in vivo MR imaging and biocompatibility. The first-principles calculation indicates that it is nearly impossible for toxic Gd ions to dissociate freely from silica. The biocompatibility studies confirm that the nanocomposite is lack of any potential toxicity; the biodistribution studies reveal a greater accumulation of the nanocomposite in liver, spleen, lung and tumor than in kidney, heart and brain; the excretion studies show that the nanocomposite can be cleared nearly 50% via the hepatobiliary transport mechanism after 1.5 months of injection. A larger water proton relaxivity r(1) and a better T(1)-weighted phantom MR imaging capability were detected in the nanocomposite than in the commercially available gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate. The results demonstrate that the nanocomposite is superior to the commercial counterpart in terms of contrast enhancement with a satisfactory biocompatibility, and it has a high potential to be developed into a safe and effective targeted probe for in vivo molecular imaging of cancer. PMID:22704842

  16. PEG-b-AGE Polymer Coated Magnetic Nanoparticle Probes with Facile Functionalization and Anti-fouling Properties for Reducing Non-specific Uptake and Improving Biomarker Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuancheng; Lin, Run; Wang, Liya; Huang, Jing; Wu, Hui; Cheng, Guojun; Zhou, Zhengyang; MacDonald, Tobey; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Non-specific surface adsorption of bio-macromolecules (e.g. proteins) on nanoparticles, known as biofouling, and the uptake of nanoparticles by the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) and reticuloendothelial system (RES) lead to substantial reduction in the efficiency of target-directed imaging and delivery in biomedical applications of engineered nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. In this work, a novel copolymer consisting of blocks of poly ethylene glycol and allyl glycidyl ether (PEG-b-AGE...

  17. Vectorization of copper complexes via biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double emulsion-solvent diffusion approach with fully biocompatible materials was used to encapsulate copper complexes within biodegradable nanoparticles, for which the release kinetics profiles have highlighted their potential use for a prolonged circulating administration.

  18. Controlled Growth of Biocompatible Polymers from Diamond Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cígler, Petr; Řehoř, Ivan; Šlegerová, Jitka; Hrubý, Martin; Macková, Hana; Kučka, Jan; Filippov, Sergey K.

    San Francisco: -, 2013. ZZ10.04. [2013 MRS Spring Meeting & Exhibit. 01.04.2013-05.04.2013, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluorescent nanodiamonds * biocompatible polymers Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  19. Biocompatible peritoneal dialysis solutions: many questions but few answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter G; Jain, Arsh K; Yohanna, Sechelle

    2013-11-01

    The clinical value of biocompatible peritoneal dialysis solutions is uncertain because of inconsistent findings in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review by Cho et al. examining 20 such trials suggests a beneficial effect on residual renal function. However, the finding is not robust and may relate to decreased ultrafiltration causing hypervolemia. Future prescribing of these biocompatible solutions will probably continue to be driven by opinion, marketing, and cost considerations rather than by evidence-based medicine. PMID:24172730

  20. Microstructural Properties of Biocompatible Nanofibrous Membranes Prepared by Electrospinning Technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Petráš, D.; Šolcová, Olga

    - : -, 2013, s. 525. ISBN N. [European Congress of Chemical Engineering /9./. The Hague (NL), 21.04.2013-25.04.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP106/11/P459; GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1206 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : electrospinning * biocompatible membranes * biocompatible membranes * adsorption-desorption measurements Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.ecce2013.eu/index.php

  1. 磁探搜潜系统的目标信号识别%Magnetec Probe Anti-submarine System Target Signal Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹景涯

    2012-01-01

    This paper mainly introduces the system structure and working principle of magnetic anomaly detector.Focus on the magnetic detector of magnetic target signal recognition fuction,and the prospect of future development of magnetic anomaly detector.%文章主要介绍了磁探仪的系统结构和工作原理,重点介绍了磁探仪对磁目标信号的识别功能,以及对磁探仪未来发展的展望。

  2. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  3. Probing Capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Asnani, Himanshu; Weissman, Tsachy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of optimal probing of states of a channel by transmitter and receiver for maximizing rate of reliable communication. The channel is discrete memoryless (DMC) with i.i.d. states. The encoder takes probing actions dependent on the message. It then uses the state information obtained from probing causally or non-causally to generate channel input symbols. The decoder may also take channel probing actions as a function of the observed channel output and use the channel state information thus acquired, along with the channel output, to estimate the message. We refer to the maximum achievable rate for reliable communication for such systems as the 'Probing Capacity'. We characterize this capacity when the encoder and decoder actions are cost constrained. To motivate the problem, we begin by characterizing the trade-off between the capacity and fraction of channel states the encoder is allowed to observe, while the decoder is aware of channel states. In this setting of 'to observe or not to o...

  4. Mitochondria-Targeted Approach: Remarkably Enhanced Cellular Bioactivities of TPP2a as Selective Inhibitor and Probe toward TrxR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Baoxia; Shao, Weiyan; Zhu, Cuige; Wen, Gesi; Yue, Xin; Wang, Ruimin; Quan, Junmin; Du, Jun; Bu, Xianzhang

    2016-02-19

    A mitochondria-targeted approach was developed to increase the cellular bioactivities of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitors. By being conjugated with a triphenylphosphine (TPP) motif to a previously found TrxR inhibitor 2a, the resulted compound TPP2a can target subcellular mitochondria and efficiently inhibit cellular TrxR, leading to remarkably increased cellular ROS level and mitochondrial apoptosis of HeLa cancer cells. The cellular bioactivities of TPP2a, including its cytotoxicity against a panel of cancer cell lines, dramatically elevated compared with its parental compound 2a. The selectively and covalently interaction of TPP2a with subcellular mitochondrial TrxR was validated by fluorescent microscopy. Moreover, a nonspecific signal quenching coupled strategy was proposed based on the environmentally sensitive fluorescence of TPP2a, which makes it possible to label TrxR by removing the nonspecific backgrounds caused by TPP2a under complex biosettings such as cellular lysates and living cells, implicating a potential of TPP2a for TrxR-specific labeling. PMID:26653078

  5. Probing the transport of plasma-generated RONS in an agarose target as surrogate for real tissue: dependency on time, distance and material composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a simple experimental approach to follow the transport of helium (He) plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) through millimetre thick agarose targets. These RONS may be either primary RONS, generated directly by the plasma jet, or secondary RONS generated for example at the surface of, or within, the material. Our experiment involves placing an agarose film over a quartz cuvette filled with deionized water. The agarose film is exposed to a He plasma jet and the UV absorption profile (of the deionized water) is recorded in real-time. Plasma exposure time, source-target distance and agarose film thickness and composition are varied to explore their effects on the depth of RONS delivery by the plasma jet. We conclude that plasma UV plays a minor role in the transport of RONS; whereas direct plasma contact and the He gas flow promote the transport of RONS into tissue. Our data indicate an accumulation of RONS within the agarose film (during plasma exposure) and a subsequent (time-lagged) release into the deionized water. Our approach can be readily adapted to other plasma sources; it can accommodate more complex biological materials, and has the potential to provide new insights into plasma-induced phenomena within real tissues. (fast track communication)

  6. (Un)targeted metabolomics in Asteraceae: probing the applicability of essential-oil profiles of senecio L. (Senecioneae) taxa in chemotaxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Niko S; Mladenović, Marko Z; Blagojević, Polina D

    2014-09-01

    The possible applicability of (un)targeted metabolomics (volatile metabolites) for revealing taxonomic/evolutionary relationships among Senecio L. species (Asteraceae; tribe Senecioneae) was explored. Essential-oil compositional data of selected Senecio/Senecioneae/Asteraceae taxa (93 samples in total) were mutually compared by means of multivariate statistical analysis (MVA), i.e., agglomerative hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis. The MVA input data set included the very first compositional data on the essential oil extracted from the aerial parts of S. viscosus L. as well as on four different Serbian populations of S. vernalis Waldst. & Kit. (oils from aerial parts and roots; eight samples in total). This metabolomic screening of Senecio/Senecioneae/Asteraceae species (herein presented results and data from the literature) pointed to short-chain alk-1-enes (e.g., oct-1-ene, non-1-ene, and undec-1-ene), with up to now restricted general occurrence in Plantae, as characteristic chemotaxonomic markers/targets for future metabolomic studies of Senecio/Senecioneae taxa. The MVA additionally showed that the evolution of the terpene metabolism (volatile mono- and sesquiterpenoids) within the Asteraceae tribe Senecioneae was not genera specific. However, the MVA did confirm plant-organ specific production/accumulation of volatiles within S. vernalis and suggested the existence of at least two volatile chemotypes for this species. PMID:25238075

  7. Synthesis, biological targeting and photophysics of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Samuel Jon

    Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic nanoparticles that have exceptional optical properties. Currently, QDs have failed to reach their potential as fluorescent probes in live cells, due to the nontrivial requirements for biological interfacing. The goal of this thesis is to address technical hurdles related to the reproducible synthesis of QDs, strategies for the specific targeting of QDs to biological cells and to understanding and exploitation of the photophysical properties. High quality QDs of varying composition (CdSe, CdTe and core/shell CdSe/ZnS) were synthesized with an organometallic method. To prepare biocompatible QDs, three strategies were used. The simplest strategy used small mercaptocarboxylic acids, while performance improvements were realized with engineered-peptide and lipid-micelle coatings. For specific biological targeting of the QDs, conjugation strategies were devised to attach biomolecules, while spectroscopic characterization methods were developed to assess conjugation efficiencies. To target gram-negative bacterial cells, an electrostatic self-assembly method was used to attach an antibiotic selective for this class of bacteria, polymyxin B. To target dopamine neurotransmitter receptor, a covalent conjugation method was used to attach dopamine, the endogenous ligand for that receptor. It was shown that dopamine molecule enabled electron transfer to QDs and the photophysics was studied in detail. A novel conjugation and targeting strategy was explored to enable the selective binding of QDs to polyhistidine epitopes on membrane proteins. Epifluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the biological activity of the three QD probes. Combined, they add to the QD 'toolkit' for live-cell imaging. Finally, due to its negative implications in biological imaging, the fluorescent intermittency (blinking) of CdTe QDs was investigated. It was shown that mercaptocarboxylic acids contribute to the blinking suppression of the QDs, results that may aid in

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles as both imaging probes and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ho, Don; Sun, Shouheng

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been explored extensively as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or as heating agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) [1]. To achieve optimum operation conditions in MRI and MFH, these NPs should have well-controlled magnetic properties and biological functionalities. Although numerous efforts have been dedicated to the investigations on MNPs for biomedical applications [2-5], the NP optimizations for early diagnostics and efficient therapeutics are still far from reached. Recent efforts in NP syntheses have led to some promising MNP systems for sensitive MRI and efficient MFH applications. This review summarizes these advances in the synthesis of monodisperse MNPs as both contrast probes in MRI and as therapeutic agents via MFH. It will first introduce the nanomagnetism and elucidate the critical parameters to optimize the superparamagnetic NPs for MRI and ferromagnetic NPs for MFH. It will further outline the new chemistry developed for making monodisperse MNPs with controlled magnetic properties. The review will finally highlight the NP functionalization with biocompatible molecules and biological targeting agents for tumor diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20388109

  9. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

  10. Probing the G‑quadruplex from hsa-miR-3620-5p and inhibition of its interaction with the target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Zhou, Jiang; Gu, Jiangyong; Xu, Ming; Xu, Xiaojie; Yuan, Gu

    2016-07-01

    G-quadruplexes have been reported to exist both in human genome and transcriptome and are of great interests due to their important biological functions. Up to now, the formation and property of G-quadruplex in human mature microRNAs has not been explored yet. In this study, we discovered that hsa-miR-3620-5p, a guanine rich human mature microRNA, could fold into a stable parallel G-quadruplex in near physiological condition for the first time. We explored the formation, folding pattern and binding affinity of the miR-3620-5p G-quadruplex by ESI-MS, CD, NMR and SPR. The results indicated that its high-order structure was comprised of three G-quartets with two bases in each parallel loop stretching outward and two bases flanking at each end. In addition, sanguinarine, a natural alkaloid screened from traditional Chinese medicine was characterized to have high binding affinity and thermodynamic stabilization effects through π-π stacking interaction with the external G-quartets. Furthermore, the potent interaction of sanguinarine with miR-3620-5p G-quadruplex could block the base pairing between miR-3620-5p and its target sequence. Therefore, our study revealed the possibility of regulating microRNA functions using potent G-quadruplex binders, and could provide a new approach to affect the microRNA:mRNA interactions. PMID:27154715

  11. Biocompatible fluorescent supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel for long-term cell tracking and tumor imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Mao, Duo; Wang, Youzhi; Wang, Kai; Yi, Xiaoyong; Kong, Deling; Yang, Zhimou; Liu, Qian; Ding, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible peptide-based supramolecular hydrogel has recently emerged as a new and promising system for biomedical applications. In this work, Rhodamine B is employed as a new capping group of self-assembling peptide, which not only provides the driving force for supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel formation, but also endows the hydrogel with intrinsic fluroescence signal, allowing for various bioimaging applications. The fluorescent peptide nanofibrous hydrogel can be formed via disulfide bond reduction. After dilution of the hydrogel with aqueous solution, the fluorescent nanofiber suspension can be obtained. The resultant nanofibers are able to be internalized by the cancer cells and effectively track the HeLa cells for as long as 7 passages. Using a tumor-bearing mouse model, it is also demonstrated that the fluorescent supramolecular nanofibers can serve as an efficient probe for tumor imaging in a high-contrast manner.

  12. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent. (paper)

  13. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  14. Solubility of dense CO2 in two biocompatible acrylate copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. C. Duarte

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible polymers and copolymers are frequently being used as part of controlled delivery systems. These systems can be prepared using a "clean and environment friendly" technology like supercritical fluids. One great advantage of this process is that compressed carbon dioxide has excellent plasticizing properties and can swell most biocompatible polymeric matrixes, thus promoting drug impregnation processes. Mass sorption of two acrylate biocompatible copolymers contact with supercritical carbon dioxide is reported. Equilibrium solubility of dense carbon dioxide in poly(methylmethacrylate-co-ethylhexylacrylate and poly(methylmethacrylate-co-ethylhexylacrylate-co-ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate was studied by a static method at 10.0 MPa and 313 K. The reticulated copolymer had Fickean behavior and its diffusion coefficient was calculated, under operating conditions.

  15. BIOCOMPATIBILITY EVALUATION OF XANTHAN/CHONDROITIN SULFATE HYDROGELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Oprea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of xanthan/chondroitin sulfate hydrogels (X/CS in differentmixing ratios was investigated. The in vitro biocompatibility evaluation was performed by a chemiluminescent assayusing microorganisms such as Saccharomyces pombe. The cellular growth of S. pombe in presence of thexanthan/chondroitin sulfate hydrogels containing up to 20 % chondroitin sulfate was examinated comparatively withxanthan hydrogel.The in vivo evaluation was performed by toxicity test and subcutaneously implantation in rats. It has been establisheda lethal dose (LD50 bigger than 3200 mg/kg for all studied hydrogels, therefore they are nontoxic materials.The in vivo 30 days testing performed by subcutaneous implantation showed that the X/CS matrices were easilyabsorbed without side-effects, demonstrating their biocompatibility and effectiveness as potential drug delivery systems.

  16. Biocompatibility of Ti-alloys for long-term implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hady Gepreel, Mohamed; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2013-04-01

    The design of new low-cost Ti-alloys with high biocompatibility for implant applications, using ubiquitous alloying elements in order to establish the strategic method for suppressing utilization of rare metals, is a challenge. To meet the demands of longer human life and implantation in younger patients, the development of novel metallic alloys for biomedical applications is aiming at providing structural materials with excellent chemical, mechanical and biological biocompatibility. It is, therefore, likely that the next generation of structural materials for replacing hard human tissue would be of those Ti-alloys that do not contain any of the cytotoxic elements, elements suspected of causing neurological disorders or elements that have allergic effect. Among the other mechanical properties, the low Young's modulus alloys have been given a special attention recently, in order to avoid the occurrence of stress shielding after implantation. Therefore, many Ti-alloys were developed consisting of biocompatible elements such as Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Ta, and showed excellent mechanical properties including low Young's modulus. However, a recent attention was directed towards the development of low cost-alloys that have a minimum amount of the high melting point and high cost rare-earth elements such as Ta, Nb, Mo, and W. This comes with substituting these metals with the common low cost, low melting point and biocompatible metals such as Fe, Mn, Sn, and Si, while keeping excellent mechanical properties without deterioration. Therefore, the investigation of mechanical and biological biocompatibility of those low-cost Ti-alloys is highly recommended now lead towards commercial alloys with excellent biocompatibility for long-term implantation. PMID:23507261

  17. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines

  18. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  19. The quantification of biocompatibility: toward a new definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Buddy

    2008-03-01

    Implantable medical devices, and the biomaterials that comprise them, form a 100B business worldwide. Medical devices save lives and/or improve the quality of life for millions. Tissue engineering also makes extensive use of biomaterials -- biomaterials are an enabling technology for tissue engineering. A central word to understanding the effectiveness of such materials and devices is biocompatibility. The word ``biocompatible'' is widely used in reference to biomaterials and medical devices and most everyone has some value understanding of its meaning. Many formal definitions have been proposed for this word, but it is still largely used in an imprecise manner. Four descriptions or definitions of biocompatibility will be reviewed: a widely adopted definition from a consensus conference, a surgeon's perspective on this word, the regulatory agency view and the factors that clearly influence biocompatibility. In this talk, the classical definition of biocompatibility will be contrasted to a newer definition embracing molecular concepts and the understanding of normal wound healing. The biological data on the in vivo healing responses of mammals to implants will be described. A strategy to improve the healing of biomaterials will be presented. It is based upon surface molecular engineering. First, non-specific protein adsorption must be inhibited. Strategies to achieve this design parameter will be presented. Then methods to deliver the specific protein signals will be addressed. Matricellular proteins such as osteopontin, thrombospondin 2 and SPARC will be introduced with an emphasis on exploiting the special reactivity of such proteins. A discussion of the influence of surface textures and porosities will also be presented. Finally a new scheme based upon macrophage phenotypic pathways will be proposed that may allow a quantitative measure of extent of biocompatibility.

  20. Targeting and Therapeutic Peptides in Nanomedicine for Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality, and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis are provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as ...

  1. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Materials for Sensing of Biological Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Xiaojun Zhao

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF materials are promising labeling reagents for sensitive determination and imaging of biological targets. In the near-infrared region biological samples have low background fluorescence signals, providing high signal to noise ratio. Meanwhile, near-infrared radiation can penetrate into sample matrices deeply due to low light scattering. Thus, in vivo and in vitro imaging of biological samples can be achieved by employing the NIRF probes. To take full advantage of NIRF materials in the biological and biomedical field, one of the key issues is to develop intense and biocompatible NIRF probes. In this review, a number of NIRF materials are discussed including traditional NIRF dye molecules, newly developed NIRF quantum dots and single-walled carbon nanotubes, as well as rare earth metal compounds. The use of some NIRF materials in various nanostructures is illustrated. The enhancement of NIRF using metal nanostructures is covered as well. The fluorescence mechanism and bioapplications of each type of the NIRF materials are discussed in details.

  2. Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of zirconium oxynitride thin film growth by RF sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Olaya, J. J.; Clavijo, D.; Alfonso, J. E. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Carrera 45 No. 26-85, AA 14490 Bogota D. C. (Colombia); Bethencourt, M., E-mail: jealfonsoo@unal.edu.co [Universidad de Cadiz, Centro Andaluz de Ciencia y Tecnologia Marinas, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Av. Republica de Saharaui, Puerto Real, E-11510 Cadiz (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    Thin films of zirconium oxynitride were grown on common glass, silicon (100) and stainless steel 316 L substrates using the reactive RF magnetron sputtering technique. The films were analyzed through structural, morphological and biocompatibility studies. The structural analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the morphological analysis was carried out using scanning electron microscopy (Sem) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These studies were done as a function of growth parameters, such as power applied to the target, substrate temperature, and flow ratios. The corrosion resistance studies were made on samples of stainless steel 316 L coated and uncoated with Zr{sub x}N{sub y}O films, through of polarization curves. The studies of biocompatibility were carried out on zirconium oxynitride films deposited on stainless steel 316 L through proliferation and cellular adhesion. The XRD analysis shows that films deposited at 623 K, with a flow ratio {Phi}N{sub 2}/{Phi}O{sub 2} of 1.25 and a total deposit time of 30 minutes grew preferentially oriented along the (111) plane of the zirconium oxynitride monoclinic phase. The Sem analyses showed that the films grew homogeneously, and the AFM studies indicated that the average rugosity of the film was 5.9 nm and the average particle size was 150 nm. The analysis of the corrosion resistant, shows that the stainless steel coated with the film was increased a factor 10. Finally; through the analysis of the biocompatibility we established that the films have a better surface than the substrate (stainless steel 316 L) in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of bone cells. (Author)

  3. Synthesis of biocompatible polymers by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work biocompatible polymers were synthesized by plasma based on pyrrole, ethyleneglycol and allylamine. These monomers are biologically important because they contain oxygen and nitrogen in their structure and they form bonding like; N-H, C-N, C-O and O-H that are also in the human system. The polymers were synthesized with splendor electric discharges to 13.5 MHz, among 10 and 100 W, resistive coupling, pressure of 10-1 mbar and 180 minutes of reaction. The interaction of the biological systems with biomaterials depends in many cases of the properties that present the surfaces, because the rough and/or porous surfaces favor the adherence of cells. The results indicate that the ruggedness of the polymers can be controlled with the synthesis energy, since when modifying it flat and/or rough surfaces they are obtained. The compatibility of water with other solutions that it is a form of increasing the adhesion of cells with biopolymers. The affinity with water and solutions is evaluated calculating the contact angle of the polymers surface with drops of concentration solutions and similar composition to the extracellular liquid of the spinal marrow of the human body. The solutions that were proven were based on NaCl, NaCl-MgSO4, and a mixture Krebs-Ringer that has chemical composition and similar concentration to that of the fluids of the spinal marrow. In the Poly pyrrole (PPy)/Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) copolymer, the biggest angles corresponded to the Krebs-Ringer solution, in the interval of 18 to 14 degrees and those lowest to the NaCl solution, of 14.5 at 11 degrees. The Poly allylamine had the more high values with water in the interval of 16.5 to 12.5 degrees and those lowest with the NaCl solution, of 13 at 9.5 degrees. On the other hand, in the derived polymers of pyrrole the more high values corresponded to the treatment with water, until 37, and those lowest to the NaCl-MgSO4 solution, up to 10. The solutions where participated NaCl its produced the

  4. Two-photon graphene oxide/aptamer nanosensing conjugate for in vitro or in vivo molecular probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Mei; Yang, Sheng; Peng, Zanying; Liu, Changhui; Li, Jishan; Zhong, Wenwan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-04-01

    Two-photon excitation (TPE) with near-infrared (NIR) photons as the excitation source have the unique properties of lower tissue autofluorescence and self-absorption, reduced photodamage and photobleaching, higher spatial resolution, and deeper penetration depth (>500 μm). Carbon nanomaterials, for example, graphene oxide (GO), have the advantages of good biocompatibility, efficient transporters into cells, protecting the carried DNA or peptides from enzymatic cleavage, and super fluorescence quenching efficiency. By combination of the nanostructured carbon materials with the TPE technique, herein we have designed an aptamer-two-photon dye (TPdye)/GO TPE fluorescent nanosensing conjugate for molecular probing in biological fluids, living cells, and zebrafish. This approach takes advantage of the exceptional quenching capability of GO for the proximate TP dyes and the higher affinity of single-stranded DNA on GO than the aptamer-target complex. Successful in vitro and in vivo detection of ATP was demonstrated with this sensing strategy. Our results reveal that the GO/Aptamer-TPdye system not only is a robust, sensitive, and selective sensor for quantitative detection of ATP in the complex biological environment but also can be efficiently delivered into live cells or tissues and act as a "signal-on" in vivo sensor for specific, high-contrast imaging of target biomolecules. Our design provides a methodology model scheme for development of future carbon nanomaterial-based two-photon fluorescent probes for in vitro or in vivo determination of biological or biologically relevant species. PMID:24592855

  5. Diagnostic deoxyribonucleic acid probes for infectious diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Tenover, F C

    1988-01-01

    Virtually all microorganisms contain some unique nucleotide sequences which can be the target of deoxyribonucleic acid probes. Probes have been used successfully to identify a wide variety of pathogens from the simple ribonucleic acid-containing polioviruses to the complex filarial worms Brugia malayi. Probe technology offers the clinical laboratory the potential both to extend the types of pathogens that can be readily identified and to reduce significantly the time associated with the ident...

  6. Biocompatibility studies of polyacrylonitrile membranes modified with carboxylated polyetherimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, S.; Rajesh, S.; Jayalakshmi, A.; Mohan, D., E-mail: mohantarun@gmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Poly (ether-imide) (PEI) was carboxylated and used as the hydrophilic modification agent for the preparation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes. Membranes were prepared with different blend compositions of PAN and CPEI by diffusion induced precipitation. The modified membranes were characterized by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), mechanical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurement to understand the influence of CPEI on the properties of the membranes. The biocompatibility studies exhibited reduced plasma protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on the modified membrane surface. The complete blood count (CBC) results of CPEI incorporated membranes showed stable CBC values and significant decrease in the complement activation were also observed. In addition to good cytocompatibility, monocytes cultured on these modified membranes exhibited improved functional profiles in 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Thus it could be concluded that PAN/CPEI membranes with excellent biocompatibility can be useful for hemodialysis. Highlights: • Carboxylated PEI was prepared and utilized as hydrophilic modification agent. • CPEI incorporated into PAN to improved biocompatibility and cyto compatibility • Biocompatibility of membranes was correlated with morphology and hydrophilicity. • Antifouling studies of the PAN/CPEI membranes was studied by BSA as model foulant.

  7. Biocompatibility of phosphorylcholine coated stents in normal porcine coronary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Whelan (Deirdre); S.C. Krabbendam; P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); E.A. van Vliet (Erwin); W.J. van der Giessen (Wim); H.M.M. van Beusekom (Heleen)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To improve the biocompatibility of stents using a phosphorylcholine coated stent as a form of biomimicry. INTERVENTIONS: Implantation of phosphorylcholine coated (n = 20) and non-coated (n = 21) stents was performed in the coronary arteries of 25 pigs. The an

  8. In vivo biocompatibility of nanostructured Chitosan/Peo membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A.S. Vulcani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a technique that allows the preparation of nanofibers from various materials. Chitosan is a natural and abundant easily obtained polymer, which, in addition to those features, proved to be biocompatible. This work used nanostructured chitosan and polyoxyethylene membranes as subcutaneous implants in Wistar rats to evaluate the biocompatibility of the material. Samples of the material and tissues adjacent to the implant were collected 7, 15, 30, 45 and 60 days post-implantation. Macroscopic integration of the material to the tissues was observed in the samples and slides for histopathological examination that were prepared. It was noticed that the material does not stimulate the formation of adherences to the surrounding tissues and that there is initial predominance of neutrophilia and lymphocytosis, with a declining trend according to the increase of time, featuring a non-persistent acute inflammatory process. However, the material showed fast degradation, impairing the macroscopic observation after fifteen days of implantation. It was concluded that the material is biocompatible and that new studies should be conducted, modifying the time of degradation by changes in obtaining methods and verifying the biocompatibility in specific tissues for biomedical applications.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Deb; J Giri; S Dasgupta; D Datta; D Bahadur

    2003-12-01

    Ferrite particles coated with biocompatible phases can be used for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. We have synthesized substituted calcium hexaferrite, which is not stable on its own but is stabilized with small substitution of La. Hexaferrite of chemical composition (CaO)0.75(La2O3)0.20(Fe2O3)6 was prepared using citrate gel method. Hydroxyapatite was prepared by precipitating it from aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 maintaining pH above 11. Four different methods were used for coating of hydroxyapatite on ferrite particles. SEM with EDX and X-ray diffraction analysis shows clear evidence of coating of hydroxy-apatite on ferrite particles. These coated ferrite particles exhibited coercive field up to 2 kOe, which could be made useful for hysteresis heating in hyperthermia. Studies by culturing BHK-21 cells and WBC over the samples show evidence of biocompatibility. SEM micrographs and cell counts give clear indication of cell growth on the surface of the sample. Finally coated ferrite particle was implanted in Kasaulli mouse to test its biocompatibility. The magnetic properties and biocompatibility studies show that these hydroxyapatite coated ferrites could be useful for hyperthermia.

  10. [Biocompatibility of dental materials: Part 2. Materials with mucosal contact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klötzer, W T; Reuling, N

    1990-08-01

    Dental materials which are supposed to contact the oral, mucous membranes during their intended dental use may affect our patients health in different ways. Their local and systemic toxicity, and their allergenic and tumorigenic potential are reviewed and methods of biocompatibility testing discussed. Special emphasis is placed on impression materials, denture base resins and dental alloys. PMID:2269166

  11. Biocompatibility studies of polyacrylonitrile membranes modified with carboxylated polyetherimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly (ether-imide) (PEI) was carboxylated and used as the hydrophilic modification agent for the preparation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes. Membranes were prepared with different blend compositions of PAN and CPEI by diffusion induced precipitation. The modified membranes were characterized by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), mechanical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurement to understand the influence of CPEI on the properties of the membranes. The biocompatibility studies exhibited reduced plasma protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on the modified membrane surface. The complete blood count (CBC) results of CPEI incorporated membranes showed stable CBC values and significant decrease in the complement activation were also observed. In addition to good cytocompatibility, monocytes cultured on these modified membranes exhibited improved functional profiles in 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Thus it could be concluded that PAN/CPEI membranes with excellent biocompatibility can be useful for hemodialysis. Highlights: • Carboxylated PEI was prepared and utilized as hydrophilic modification agent. • CPEI incorporated into PAN to improved biocompatibility and cyto compatibility • Biocompatibility of membranes was correlated with morphology and hydrophilicity. • Antifouling studies of the PAN/CPEI membranes was studied by BSA as model foulant

  12. Biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate and three new endodontic cements: An animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ghasem Aminozarbian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of the current study, biocompatibility of CAAC and WOLCA cement were comparable with that of MTA, but CAAC Plus induced an inflammatory response higher than MTA, therefore is not biocompatible.

  13. Miniature probe for the delivery and monitoring of a photopolymerizable material

    OpenAIRE

    Schmocker, Andreas; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Schizas, Constantin; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Pioletti, Dominique; Moser, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Photopolymerization is a common method to cure materials initially in a liquid state, such as dental implants or bone or tissue fillers. Recent advances in the development of biocompatible gel- and cement-systems open up an avenue for in situ photopolymerization. For minimally invasive surgery, such procedures require miniaturized surgical endoscopic probes to activate and control photopolymerization in situ. We present a miniaturized light probe in which a photoactive material can be (1) mix...

  14. A robust ligand exchange approach for preparing hydrophilic, biocompatible photoluminescent quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Sujuan; Zhou, Changhua [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Yuan, Hang [Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Shen, Huaibin [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhao, Wenxiu [Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Ma, Lan, E-mail: malan@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn [Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Li, Lin Song, E-mail: lsli@henu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Aqueous CdSe/ZnS QDs were prepared using polymaleic anhydrides as capping ligand. • Effect of reaction temperature and time were systematically studied in the synthesis process. • Water-soluble QDs exhibited a good stability in physiological relevant environment. • The aqueous QDs were applied as biological probe to detect human embryonic stem cell. - Abstract: This paper describes a robust ligand exchange approach for preparing biocompatible CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) to make bioprobe for effective cell imaging. In this method, polymaleic anhydride (PMA) ligand are first used to replace original hydrophobic ligand (oleic acid) and form a protection shell with multiple hydrophilic groups to coat and protect CdSe/ZnS QDs. The as-prepared aqueous QDs exhibit small particle size, good colloidal stability in aqueous solutions with a wide range of pH, salt concentrations and under thermal treatment, which are necessary for biological applications. The use of this new class of aqueous QDs for effective cell imaging shows strong fluorescence signal to human embryonic stem cell, which demonstrate that PMA coated QDs are fully satisfied with the requirements of preparing high quality biological probe.

  15. Biocompatible fluorescent silicon nanocrystals for single-molecule tracking and fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hirohito; Ritchie, Ken; Kasai, Rinshi S; Goto, Miki; Morone, Nobuhiro; Sugimura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Koichiro; Sase, Ichiro; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakano, Yoshitaro; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2013-09-16

    Fluorescence microscopy is used extensively in cell-biological and biomedical research, but it is often plagued by three major problems with the presently available fluorescent probes: photobleaching, blinking, and large size. We have addressed these problems, with special attention to single-molecule imaging, by developing biocompatible, red-emitting silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) with a 4.1-nm hydrodynamic diameter. Methods for producing SiNCs by simple chemical etching, for hydrophilically coating them, and for conjugating them to biomolecules precisely at a 1:1 ratio have been developed. Single SiNCs neither blinked nor photobleached during a 300-min overall period observed at video rate. Single receptor molecules in the plasma membrane of living cells (using transferrin receptor) were imaged for ≥10 times longer than with other probes, making it possible for the first time to observe the internalization process of receptor molecules at the single-molecule level. Spatial variations of molecular diffusivity in the scale of 1-2 µm, i.e., a higher level of domain mosaicism in the plasma membrane, were revealed. PMID:24043702

  16. A robust ligand exchange approach for preparing hydrophilic, biocompatible photoluminescent quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Aqueous CdSe/ZnS QDs were prepared using polymaleic anhydrides as capping ligand. • Effect of reaction temperature and time were systematically studied in the synthesis process. • Water-soluble QDs exhibited a good stability in physiological relevant environment. • The aqueous QDs were applied as biological probe to detect human embryonic stem cell. - Abstract: This paper describes a robust ligand exchange approach for preparing biocompatible CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) to make bioprobe for effective cell imaging. In this method, polymaleic anhydride (PMA) ligand are first used to replace original hydrophobic ligand (oleic acid) and form a protection shell with multiple hydrophilic groups to coat and protect CdSe/ZnS QDs. The as-prepared aqueous QDs exhibit small particle size, good colloidal stability in aqueous solutions with a wide range of pH, salt concentrations and under thermal treatment, which are necessary for biological applications. The use of this new class of aqueous QDs for effective cell imaging shows strong fluorescence signal to human embryonic stem cell, which demonstrate that PMA coated QDs are fully satisfied with the requirements of preparing high quality biological probe

  17. Manufacture of a weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold with excellent biocompatibility and space maintenance ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although collagen scaffolds have been used for regenerative medicine, they have insufficient mechanical strength. We made a weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold from a collagen fiber suspension (physiological pH 7.4) through a process of freeze drying and denaturation with heat under low pressure (1 × 10−1 Pa). Heat treatment formed cross-links between the collagen fibers, providing the scaffold with sufficient mechanical strength to maintain the space for tissue regeneration in vivo. The scaffold was embedded under the back skin of a rat, and biocompatibility and space maintenance ability were examined after 2 weeks. These were evaluated by using the ratio of foreign body giant cells and thickness of the residual scaffold. A weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold with moderate biocompatibility and space maintenance ability was made by freezing at −10 °C, followed by denaturation at 140 °C for 6 h. In addition, the direction of the collagen fibers in the scaffold was adjusted by cooling the suspension only from the bottom of the container. This process increased the ratio of cells that infiltrated into the scaffold. A weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold thus made can be used for tissue regeneration or delivery of cells or proteins to a target site. (paper)

  18. Preparation and biocompatibility of grafted functional β-cyclodextrin copolymers from the surface of PET films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Hongwen; Zhang, Weiwei; Tu, Shanshan

    2014-08-01

    The hydrophobic inert surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film has limited its practical bioapplications, in which case, better biocompatibility should be achieved by surface modification. In this work, the copolymer of functional β-cyclodextrin derivatives and styrene grafted surfaces was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on initiator-immobilized PET. The structures, composition, properties, and surface morphology of the modified PET films were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that the surface of PET films was covered by a thick targeted copolymer layer, and the hydrophobic surface of PET was changed into an amphiphilic surface. The copolymer-grafted surfaces were also shown good biocompatibility on which SGC-7901 A549 and A549/DDP cells readily attached and proliferated, demonstrating that the functional copolymer-grafted PET films could be a promising alternative to biomaterials especially for tissue engineering. PMID:24907730

  19. Biocompatible medical implant materials with binding sites for a biodegradable drug-delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Dubai H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Haifa Al-Dubai1, Gisela Pittner1, Fritz Pittner1, Franz Gabor21Max F Perutz Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Feasibility studies have been carried out for development of a biocompatible coating of medical implant materials allowing the binding of biodegradable drug-delivery systems in a way that their reloading might be possible. These novel coatings, able to bind biodegradable nanoparticles, may serve in the long run as drug carriers to mediate local pharmacological activity. After biodegradation of the nanoparticles, the binding sites could be reloaded with fresh drug-delivering particles. As a suitable receptor system for the nanoparticles, antibodies are anchored. The design of the receptor is of great importance as any bio- or chemorecognitive interaction with other components circulating in the blood has to be avoided. Furthermore, the binding between receptor and the particles has to be strong enough to keep them tightly bound during their lifetime, but on the other hand allow reloading after final degradation of the particles. The nanoparticles suggested as a drug-delivery system for medical implants can be loaded with different pharmaceuticals such as antibiotics, growth factors, or immunosuppressives. This concept may enable the changing of medication, even after implantation of the medical device, if afforded by patients’ needs.Keywords: antibody immobilization, biocompatible coating, chitosan nanoparticles, drug targeting, medical device

  20. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism. PMID:27607999

  1. Nonionic, water self-dispersible "hairy-rod" poly(p-phenylene)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer/carbon nanotube conjugates for targeted cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Merve; Colak, Demet Goen; Akin, Mehriban; Cianga, Ioan; Kukut, Manolya; Medine, E Ilker; Can, Mustafa; Sakarya, Serhan; Unak, Perihan; Timur, Suna; Yagci, Yusuf

    2012-09-10

    The generation and fabrication of nanoscopic structures are of critical technological importance for future implementations in areas such as nanodevices and nanotechnology, biosensing, bioimaging, cancer targeting, and drug delivery. Applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biological fields have been impeded by the incapability of their visualization using conventional methods. Therefore, fluorescence labeling of CNTs with various probes under physiological conditions has become a significant issue for their utilization in biological processes. Herein, we demonstrate a facile and additional fluorophore-free approach for cancer cell-imaging and diagnosis by combining multiwalled CNTs with a well-known conjugated polymer, namely, poly(p-phenylene) (PP). In this approach, PP decorated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was noncovalently (π-π stacking) linked to acid-treated CNTs. The obtained water self-dispersible, stable, and biocompatible f-CNT/PP-g-PEG conjugates were then bioconjugated to estrogen-specific antibody (anti-ER) via -COOH functionalities present on the side-walls of CNTs. The resulting conjugates were used as an efficient fluorescent probe for targeted imaging of estrogen receptor overexpressed cancer cells, such as MCF-7. In vitro studies and fluorescence microscopy data show that these conjugates can specifically bind to MCF-7 cells with high efficiency. The represented results imply that CNT-based materials could easily be fabricated by the described approach and used as an efficient "fluorescent probe" for targeting and imaging, thereby providing many new possibilities for various applications in biomedical sensing and diagnosis. PMID:22866988

  2. Biocompatible properties induced on the solid surface by low temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of the low temperature plasma make this medium very efficient for various treatments of the solid surfaces. High electron temperatures (of the order of one or more tens eV) but ion temperature in most cases corresponding to the room temperature may lead to formation, by inelastic collisions, of a large variety of excited species, metastables and radicals. These particles with low kinetic energy but high internal energetic states can interact each other or with any solid surface in such a manner and having as result such compounds which are never possible to be obtained in a thermodynamic equilibrium state. Among the most interesting properties of the surface, which can be obtained in this way are the biocompatible ones. Today there is a large variety of methods and devices used for scientific research or for industrial production, which are based or related to low temperature plasma as active medium. The variety of the problems related to this field of activity is so large that the interest is still growing both in fundamental research and applications. In this paper an overview is presented of the results obtained in our plasma laboratory on the surface treatment mainly of the polymer surfaces in order to obtain the biocompatible properties. Two main systems have been used, namely corona (as barrier) discharge and a plasma - low energy ion beam ensemble. The former system refers to a new device realized in order to operate at atmospheric pressure for various conditions and applications with rather low cost. The second device was realized in order to investigate the role of the ions in surface treatment using plasma - ion beam system. Experiments were made in order to find the experimental conditions in which the biocompatible properties on samples made of the following group of polymers: PET, PP, PCV. and PS. Properties of both plasma and ion beam - plasma system were studied using electrical probes, electrostatic analyzer, mass spectrometer and

  3. An albumin nanocomplex-based endosomal pH-activatable on/off probe system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changkyu; Lee, Seunghyun; Thao, Le Quang; Hwang, Ha Shin; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Eun Seong; Oh, Kyung Taek; Shin, Beom Soo; Choi, Han-Gon; Youn, Yu Seok

    2016-08-01

    Albumin has gained considerable interest as a material for fabricating nanoparticulate systems due to its biomedical advantages, such as biocompatibility and chemical functionality. Here, we report a new pH-sensitive albumin nanocomplex prototype with a zinc-imidazole coordination bond. Albumin was conjugated with 1-(3-aminopropyl)imidazole and mPEG10kDa-NHS, and the resulting albumin conjugate (PBI) was then modified with either Cy5.5 or BHQ-3. The newly formed albumin nanocomplex (C/BQ-PBI Zn NCs: ∼116nm) system was facilely self-assembled around pH 7.4 in the presence of Zn(2+), but it quickly disassembled in an acidic environment (∼pH 5.0). Based on this pH-sensitivity, C/BQ-PBI Zn NCs emitted strong near-infrared fluorescence and released Zn(2+), turning "off" at pH ∼7.4 (e.g., plasma) and "on" at pH ∼5.0 (e.g., endo/lysosomes in tumor cells) on account of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. C/BQ-PBI Zn NCs displayed significant cytotoxicity due to an increase in cellular Zn(2+) in response to endosomal pH (∼5.0) in breast cancer MCF-7 cells and lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopic images showed a strong fluorescence signal caused by the disassembly of C/BQ-PBI Zn NCs in the endosomal region of MCF-7 cells. Based on these results, we believe that this albumin nanocomplex is an attractive biocompatible tumor targeting probe carrier for the theranostic purpose. PMID:27108210

  4. Aligned ion implantation using scanning probes

    OpenAIRE

    Persaud, Arun

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for precision ion implantation has been developed. A scanning probe has been equipped with a small aperture and incorporated into an ion beamline, so that ions can be implanted through the aperture into a sample. By using a scanning probe the target can be imaged in a non-destructive way prior to implantation and the probe together with the aperture can be placed at the desired location with nanometer precision. In this work first results of a scanning probe integrated into an...

  5. Biodegradable/biocompatible coated metal implants for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohamed M; Touny, A H; Al-Omair, Mohammed A; Saleh, M M

    2016-05-12

    Biocompatible metals have been suggested as revolutionary biomaterials for bone-grafting therapies. Although metals and their alloys are widely and successfully used in producing biomedical implants due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, they have a lack in bioactivity. Therefore coating of the metal surface with calcium phosphates (CaP) is a benign way to achieve well bioactivity and get controlled corrosion properties. The biocompatibility and bioactivity calcium phosphates (CaP) in bone growth were guided them to biomedical treatment of bone defects and fractures. Many techniques have been used for fabrication of CaP coatings on metal substrates such as magnesium and titanium. The present review will focus on the synthesis of CaP and their relative forms using different techniques especially electrochemical techniques. The latter has always been known of its unique way of optimizing the process parameters that led to a control in the structure and characteristics of the produced materials. PMID:27175470

  6. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  7. Biocompatibility of Compounds of Extracellular Matrix and Thermally Reversible Hydrogel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new scaffold material composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) and thermal sensitive hydrogel (HG), and evaluated its biocompatibility were investigated. We cultured bladder smooth muscle cells with this compound material, and then observed with phase contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to assess the cell growth and morphology. The cell adhesion and proliferation were detected with MTT assay and cell count. Results show the ECM/HG compounds appeared as a net-like and red-stained construction with enough meshes and without any cellular fragments. 6 h after implantation, cells were observed adhere on the compounds and extend spurious along the fibers 12 h later. Under SEM even some ECM was observed to be secreted. MTT assay shows there was obvious statistic difference among 3 groups (P<0.05).ECM/HG compound materials show a good biocompatibility, which confirms that it would be an ideal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  8. Biocompatibility assessment of fibrous nanomaterials in mammalian embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Michele; Camargo, Luiz S A; Quintão, Carolina C R; Silva, Saulo R; Souza, Eliza D; Raposo, Nádia R B; Marconcini, Jose M; Jorio, Ado; Ladeira, Luiz O; Brandão, Humberto M

    2016-07-01

    Currently there is a growing interest in the use of nanotechnology in reproductive medicine and reproductive biology. However, their toxic effects on mammalian embryos remain poorly understood. In this work, we evaluate the biocompatibility of two fibrous nanomaterials (NMs): cotton cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH), by performing an investigation of the embryonic development, gene expression (biomarkers focused on cell stress, apoptosis and totipotency) and in situ apoptosis in bovine embryos. Exposure to NMs did not interfere in preimplantation development or in the incidence of apoptosis in the bovine embryo, but they did affect the gene expression. The results presented are important for an understanding of the toxicity of cotton CNF and MWCNT-COOH on mammalian embryos. To our knowledge, we report the first evaluation of biocompatibility between these NMs on preimplantation embryos, which may open a new window for reproductive biomedical applications. PMID:26949162

  9. Novel biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles: generation and size-tuning of nanoparticles by the formation of micelle templates obtained from thermo-responsive monomers mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria [Bar Ilan University, Department of Chemistry (Israel); Shainer, Inbal [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Neurobiology, The George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences (Israel); Gottlieb, Hugo E. [Bar Ilan University, Department of Chemistry (Israel); Gothilf, Yoav [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Neurobiology, The George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, and Sagol School of Neuroscience (Israel); Ebenstein, Yuval [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Chemistry (Israel); Weiss, Aryeh [Bar Ilan University, School of Engineering (Israel); Byk, Gerardo, E-mail: gerardo.byk@biu.ac.il [Bar Ilan University, Department of Chemistry (Israel)

    2014-12-15

    Biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles are prepared by polymerization and cross-linking of N-isopropyl acrylamide in a micelle template formed by block copolymers macro-monomers at high temperature. Different monomer ratios form, at high temperature, well-defined micelles of different sizes which are further polymerized leading to nanoparticles with varied sizes from 20 to 390 nm. Physico-chemical characterization of the nanoparticles demonstrates their composition and homogeneity. The NPs were tested in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility assays, and their lack of toxicity was proven. The NPs can be labeled with fluorescent probes, and their intracellular fate can be visualized and quantified using confocal microscopy. Their uptake by live stem cells and distribution in whole developing animals is reported. On the basis of our results, a mechanism of nanoparticle formation is suggested. The lack of toxicity makes these nanoparticles especially attractive for biological applications such as screening and bio-sensing.

  10. Novel biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles: generation and size-tuning of nanoparticles by the formation of micelle templates obtained from thermo-responsive monomers mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles are prepared by polymerization and cross-linking of N-isopropyl acrylamide in a micelle template formed by block copolymers macro-monomers at high temperature. Different monomer ratios form, at high temperature, well-defined micelles of different sizes which are further polymerized leading to nanoparticles with varied sizes from 20 to 390 nm. Physico-chemical characterization of the nanoparticles demonstrates their composition and homogeneity. The NPs were tested in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility assays, and their lack of toxicity was proven. The NPs can be labeled with fluorescent probes, and their intracellular fate can be visualized and quantified using confocal microscopy. Their uptake by live stem cells and distribution in whole developing animals is reported. On the basis of our results, a mechanism of nanoparticle formation is suggested. The lack of toxicity makes these nanoparticles especially attractive for biological applications such as screening and bio-sensing

  11. Interfacing Microbial Styrene Production with a Biocompatible Cyclopropanation Reaction**

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Stephen; Balskus, Emily P.

    2015-01-01

    Introducing new reactivity into living organisms is a major challenge in synthetic biology. Despite an increasing interest in both developing aqueous-compatible small molecule catalysts and engineering enzymes to perform new chemistry in vitro, the integration of non-native reactivity into metabolic pathways for small molecule production has been underexplored. Herein we report a biocompatible iron(III) phthalocyanine catalyst capable of efficient olefin cyclopropanation in the presence of a ...

  12. Nanocellulose for Biomedical Applications : Modification, Characterisation and Biocompatibility Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade there has been increasing interest in exploring the use of nanocellulose in medicine. However, the influence of the physicochemical properties of nanocellulose on the material´s biocompatibility has not been fully investigated.  In this thesis, thin films of nanocellulose from wood (NFC) and from Cladophora algae (CC) were modified by the addition of charged groups on their surfaces and the influence of these modifications on the material´s physicochemical properties and on...

  13. Biomolecular modification of zirconia surfaces for enhanced biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) is a preferred biomaterial due to its good mechanical properties. In order to improve the biocompatibility of zirconia, RGD-peptide derived from extracellular matrix proteins was employed to modify the surface of Y-TZP to promote cell adhesion in this study. The surface of Y-TZP specimens was first modified using a hydrothermal method for different lengths of time. The topographies of modified Y-TZP specimens were analyzed by contact angle, XRD, FTIR, AFM, and FE-SEM. The mechanical properties were evaluated using Vickers hardness and three point bending strength. Then, the RGD-peptide was immobilized on the surface of the Y-TZP by chemical treatment. These RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP specimens were characterized by FTIR and AFM, and then were cocultured with MG-63 osteoblast cells for biocompatibility assay. The cell morphology and proliferation were evaluated by SEM, WST-1, and ALP activity assay. The XRD results indicated that the phase transition, from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase, was increased with a longer incubation time of hydrothermal treatment. However, there were no significant differences in mechanical strengths after RGD-peptide was successfully grafted onto the Y-TZP surface. The SEM images showed that the MG-63 cells appeared polygonal, spindle-shaped, and attached on the RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP. The proliferation and cellular activities of MG-63 cells on the RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP were better than that on the unmodified Y-TZP. From the above results, the RGD-peptide can be successfully grafted onto the hydrothermal modified Y-TZP surface. The RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP can increase cell adhesion, and thus, improve the biocompatibility of Y-TZP. - Highlights: • Covalent bonding between peptide and Y-TZP was proposed. • Stable biomimetic structures produced on the surface of zirconia. • The biocompatibility was improved

  14. Biocompatibility of Chitosan Carriers with Application in Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Grenha; Susana Rodrigues; Carmen Remuñán López; Marita Dionísio

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan is one of the most used polysaccharides in the design of drug delivery strategies for administration of either biomacromolecules or low molecular weight drugs. For these purposes, it is frequently used as matrix forming material in both nano and micron-sized particles. In addition to its interesting physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which include high mucoadhesion and a great capacity to produce drug delivery systems, ensuring the biocompatibility of the drug delivery...

  15. Fabrication of Biocompatible, Vibrational Magnetoelastic Materials for Controlling Cellular Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Rajachar, Rupak M.; Keat Ghee Ong; Ee Lim Tan; Hal R. Holmes

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME) materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of ...

  16. Biocompatible polymer microarrays for cellular high-content screening

    OpenAIRE

    Pernagallo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    The global aim of this thesis was to study the use of microarray technology for the screening and identification of biocompatible polymers, to understand physiological phenomena, and the design of biomaterials, implant surfaces and tissue-engineering scaffolds. This work was based upon the polymer microarray platform developed by the Bradley group. Polymer microarrays were successfully applied to find the best polymer supports for: (i) mouse fibroblast cells and used to eval...

  17. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Pircher, N.; Veigel, S.; Aigner, N; Nedelec, J. M.; Rosenau, T.; Liebner, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating...

  18. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of a new biomembrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Mrue

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatibility has been considered one of the most important items to validate a biomaterial for its application in human organisms. The present work evaluates the biocompatibility of a new biomembrane using in vivo assay in different animal species. The experiments to evaluate the cellular reaction were carried out through the implantation of the material into the subcutaneous tissue of animals and the results showed a good reaction of the host tissue without any signal of fibrosis or rejection. The cell adhesion experiments were done by means of the measure of the DNA content on the material surface after its implantation into the subcutaneous tissue of animals and the results showed a growing number of DNA that was proportional to the time of implantation. The healing process was evaluated using a dermal ulcer model and the results showed a good tissue repair resembling a physiologic process. The overall results presented here lead to the conclusion that this new biomembrane is a biocompatible material but more research must be done, as it is a new material desired for medical use.

  19. Biocompatible two-layer tantalum/titania-polymer hybrid coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortecchia, Elisa; Pacilli, Annalisa; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Scandola, Mariastella

    2010-09-13

    Using a two-step procedure, radiopaque and biocompatible coatings were obtained, consisting of a tantalum layer deposited by sputtering technique and of an upper organic-inorganic hybrid layer synthesized via sol-gel. As shown by radiographic images, tantalum confers to plastic substrates good X-ray visibility, adjustable via control of deposition time, but its adhesion to the substrate is poor and manipulation easily damages the metal layer. Polymer-titania hybrid coatings, synthesized using poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) or carboxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as organic precursors, were applied on the metal layer as biocompatible protective coatings. Biocompatibility is demonstrated by cytotoxicity tests conducted using vascular wall resident-mesenchymal stem cells (VW-MSCs). Both coatings show very good adhesion to the substrate, showing no sign of detachment upon large substrate deformations. Under such conditions, SEM observations show that the PCL-containing hybrid forms cracks, whereas the PDMS-based hybrid does not crack, suggesting possible applications of the latter material as a protective layer of sputtered tantalum radiopaque markers for flexible medical devices. PMID:20831278

  20. Biocompatibility of two experimental scaffolds for regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzer, Frank C.; Trope, Martin; Karabucak, Bekir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The biocompatibility of two experimental scaffolds for potential use in revascularization or pulp regeneration was evaluated. Materials and Methods One resilient lyophilized collagen scaffold (COLL), releasing metronidazole and clindamycin, was compared to an experimental injectable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold (PLGA), releasing clindamycin. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were seeded at densities of 1.0 × 104, 2.5 × 104, and 5.0 × 104. The cells were investigated by light microscopy (cell morphology), MTT assay (cell proliferation) and a cytokine (IL-8) ELISA test (biocompatibility). Results Under microscope, the morphology of cells coincubated for 7 days with the scaffolds appeared healthy with COLL. Cells in contact with PLGA showed signs of degeneration and apoptosis. MTT assay showed that at 5.0 × 104 hDPSCs, COLL demonstrated significantly higher cell proliferation rates than cells in media only (control, p < 0.01) or cells co-incubated with PLGA (p < 0.01). In ELISA test, no significant differences were observed between cells with media only and COLL at 1, 3, and 6 days. Cells incubated with PLGA expressed significantly higher IL-8 than the control at all time points (p < 0.01) and compared to COLL after 1 and 3 days (p < 0.01). Conclusions The COLL showed superior biocompatibility and thus may be suitable for endodontic regeneration purposes. PMID:27200277

  1. Sputtered Gum metal thin films showing bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, S; Alhussein, A; Lamri, S; François, M; Sanchette, F; Pulgarin, C; Kiwi, J; Rtimi, S

    2016-10-01

    Super-elastic Titanium based thin films Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-(O) (TNTZ-O) and Ti-24Nb-(N) (TN-N) (at.%) were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) in different reactive atmospheres. The effects of oxygen doping (TNTZ-O) and/or nitrogen doping (TN-N) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the as-deposited coatings were investigated. Nano-indentation measurements show that, in both cases, 1sccm of reactive gas in the mixture is necessary to reach acceptable values of hardness and Young's modulus. Mechanical properties are considered in relation to the films compactness, the compressive stress and the changes in the grain size. Data on Bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility are reported in this study. The biocompatibility tests showed that O-containing samples led to higher cells proliferation. Bacterial inactivation was concomitant with the observed pH and surface potential changes under light and in the dark. The increased cell fluidity leading to bacterial lysis was followed during the bacterial inactivation time. The increasing cell wall fluidity was attributed to the damage of the bacterial outer cell which losing its capacity to regulate the ions exchange in and out of the bacteria. PMID:27434155

  2. Biocompatibility of Chitosan Carriers with Application in Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grenha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is one of the most used polysaccharides in the design of drug delivery strategies for administration of either biomacromolecules or low molecular weight drugs. For these purposes, it is frequently used as matrix forming material in both nano and micron-sized particles. In addition to its interesting physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which include high mucoadhesion and a great capacity to produce drug delivery systems, ensuring the biocompatibility of the drug delivery vehicles is a highly relevant issue. Nevertheless, this subject is not addressed as frequently as desired and even though the application of chitosan carriers has been widely explored, the demonstration of systems biocompatibility is still in its infancy. In this review, addressing the biocompatibility of chitosan carriers with application in drug delivery is discussed and the methods used in vitro and in vivo, exploring the effect of different variables, are described. We further provide a discussion on the pros and cons of used methodologies, as well as on the difficulties arising from the absence of standardization of procedures.

  3. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Endodontic Sealers Incorporating Antibacterial Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzhak Abramovitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of endodontic disease is bacteria. Disinfection is presently achieved by cleaning the root canal system prior to obturation. Following setting, root canal filling is devoid of any antibacterial effect. Endodontic sealers with antimicrobial properties yet biocompatible may enhance root canal therapy. For this purpose, quaternized polyethylenimine nanoparticles which are antibacterial polymers, biocompatible, nonvolatile, and stable may be used. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of added QPEI on the cytotoxicity of AH Plus, Epiphany, and GuttaFlow endodontic sealers. The effect of these sealers on the proliferation of RAW 264.7 macrophage and L-929 fibroblast cell lines and on the production of TNFα from macrophages was examined. Cell vitality was evaluated using a colorimetric XTT assay. The presence of cytokines was determined by two-site ELISA. Results show that QPEI at 1% concentration does not impair the basic properties of the examined sealers in both macrophages and fibroblast cell lines. Incorporation of 1% QPEI into the sealers did not impair their biocompatibility. QPEI is a potential clinical candidate to improve antibacterial activity of sealers without increasing cytotoxicity.

  4. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  5. A green chemistry approach for synthesizing biocompatible gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, JaeWoong; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a fascinating class of nanomaterial that can be used for a wide range of biomedical applications, including bio-imaging, lateral flow assays, environmental detection and purification, data storage, drug delivery, biomarkers, catalysis, chemical sensors, and DNA detection. Biological synthesis of nanoparticles appears to be simple, cost-effective, non-toxic, and easy to use for controlling size, shape, and stability, which is unlike the chemically synthesized nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to synthesize homogeneous AuNPs using pharmaceutically important Ganoderma spp . We developed a simple, non-toxic, and green method for water-soluble AuNP synthesis by treating gold (III) chloride trihydrate (HAuCl4) with a hot aqueous extract of the Ganoderma spp . mycelia. The formation of biologically synthesized AuNPs (bio-AuNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the biocompatibility of as-prepared AuNPs was evaluated using a series of assays, such as cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, and reactive oxygen species generation (ROS) in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). The color change of the solution from yellow to reddish pink and strong surface plasmon resonance were observed at 520 nm using UV-visible spectroscopy, and that indicated the formation of AuNPs. DLS analysis revealed the size distribution of AuNPs in liquid solution, and the average size of AuNPs was 20 nm. The size and morphology of AuNPs were investigated using TEM. The biocompatibility effect of as-prepared AuNPs was investigated in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by using various concentrations of AuNPs (10 to 100 μM) for 24 h. Our findings suggest that AuNPs are non-cytotoxic and biocompatible. To the best of our knowledge

  6. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide tide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Steen; Christensen, H.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    A method for the detection of Salmonella based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been developed and applied for the direct detection of Salmonella in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. On the basis of the 23S rRNA gene sequences representing all...... with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin-fixed......, paraffin-embedded tissue from experimentally infected mice or from animals with a history of clinical salmonellosis. In these tissue sections the probe hybridized specifically to Salmonella serovars, allowing for the detection of single bacterial cells. The development of a fluorescence-labelled specific...

  7. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide tide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Steen; Christensen, H.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    A method for the detection of Salmonella based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been developed and applied for the direct detection of Salmonella in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. On the basis of the 23S rRNA gene sequences representing all...... oligonucleotide probe makes the FISH technique a promising tool for the rapid identification of S. enterica in bacterial smears, as well as for the detection of S. enterica in histological tissue sections....... of the S. enterica subspecies and S. bongori, an 18-mer oligonucleotide probe was selected. The specificity of the probe was tested by in situ hybridization to bacterial cell smears of pur cultures. Forty-nine of 55 tested Salmonella serovars belonging to subspecies I, II, IIIb, IV, and VI hybridized...... with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin...

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Folate Targeting CdTe/CdS Quantum Dots Fluorescent Probe%叶酸受体靶向的CdTe/CdS量子点荧光探针的制备和表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江珊珊; 谢民强; 符小艺

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] To develop a CdTe/CdS quantum dots fluorescent probe (FA-PEG-CdTe/CdS) modified with folate receptor and to detect its targeting.[Methods] CdTe/CdS QD were synthesized in aqueous phase by using mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) as stabilizer and linker.The spectral properties were investigated via fluorescence spectrophotometer and UV spectrophotometry.Crystal composition was determined via X-radial diffractometer.Morphology of the prepared QD was determined on a transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The folate receptor targeting quantum dots fluorescent probe FA-PEG-CdTe/CdS was made by coupling CdTe/CdS QD with FA-PEG-NH2.The Coupling effect was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis and spectral analysis.The cellular uptake in FR-positive human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (HNE-1cells) and FR-negative human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE-2 cell) for FA-PEG-CdTe/CdS was found by means of inverted fluorescence microscopy.We can test the targeting property and specificity by observing the mark situation of different cells which cultured in different medium.[Result] In the condition of pH =10,n(Te2+):n(Cd2-):n(MSA) =1:10:10.5,with reaction time prolonging,the diameters of MSA-stabilized CdTe is increasing and the adsorption spectra and emission spectrum is constantly red shifting but the fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe QD is decreasing.The quantum yield of CdTe QD had reached 72.5% in the reaction of ten minutes.The XRD patterns of MSA-stabilized CdTe had proved the corresponding (111),(220),(311) lattice faces of cubic crystal CdTe.The picture of TEM show the CdTe particle size distribution is uniform and the average particle diameter is 3 nm (10 min).The agarose gel electrophoresis and spectral analysis proved that CdTe/CdS-PEG-FA is Stable.From the result of inverted fluorescence microscopy,FR-positive HNE-1,Hep-2 can be specific marked by FA-PEG-CdTe/CdS.[Conclusion] CdTe quantum dots can be used as a new fluorescent marking material

  9. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  10. Detection of early primary colorectal cancer with upconversion luminescent NP-based molecular probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Qi, Yifei; Qiao, Ruirui; Hou, Yi; Chan, Kaying; Li, Ziqian; Huang, Jiayi; Jing, Lihong; Du, Jun; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in Kunming mice and the tumor development was carefully monitored through histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses to reveal the pathophysiological processes and molecular features of the cancer microenvironment. The upconversion imaging probe was constructed through covalent coupling of PEGylated core-shell NPs with folic acid whose receptor is highly expressed in the primary tumors. Upon 980 nm laser excitation, the primary colorectal tumors in the complex abdominal environment were sensitively imaged owing to the ultralow background of the upconversion luminescence and the high tumor-targeting specificity of the nanoprobe. We believe that the current studies provide a highly effective and potential approach for early colorectal cancer diagnosis and tumor surgical navigation.Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual

  11. Molecular probes for malignant melanoma imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gang; Pan, Ying; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-09-01

    Malignant melanoma represents a serious public health problem and is a deadly disease when it is diagnosed at late stage. Though (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used clinically for melanoma imaging, other approaches to specifically identify, characterize, monitor and guide therapeutics for malignant melanoma are still needed. Consequently, many probes targeting general molecular events including metabolism, angiogenesis, hypoxia and apoptosis in melanoma have been successfully developed. Furthermore, probes targeting melanoma associated targets such as melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), melanin, etc. have undergone active investigation and have demonstrated high melanoma specificity. In this review, these molecular probes targeting diverse melanoma biomarkers have been summarized. Some of them may eventually contribute to the improvement of personalized management of malignant melanoma. PMID:20497118

  12. Probe Selection for DNA Microarrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Juncker, Agnieszka; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    Nucleotide abundance measurements using DNA microarray technology are possible only if appropriate probes complementary to the target nucleotides can be identified. Here we present a protocol for selecting DNA probes for microarrays using the OligoWiz application. OligoWiz is a client...... computer skills and can be executed from any Internet-connected computer. The probe selection procedure for a standard microarray design targeting all yeast transcripts can be completed in 1 h....

  13. Synthesis of biocompatible and highly photoluminescent nitrogen doped carbon dots from lime: Analytical applications and optimization using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein, a facile hydrothermal treatment of lime juice to prepare biocompatible nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs) in the presence of ammonium bicarbonate as a nitrogen source has been presented. The resulting N-CQDs exhibited excitation and pH independent emission behavior; with the quantum yield (QY) up to 40%, which was several times greater than the corresponding value for CQDs with no added nitrogen source. The N-CQDs were applied as a fluorescent probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ ions with a detection limit of 14 nM. Moreover, the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of N-CQDs at different concentration ranges from 0.0 to 0.8 mg/ml were investigated by using PC12 cells as a model system. Response surface methodology was used for optimization and systematic investigation of the main variables that influence the QY, including reaction time, reaction temperature, and ammonium bicarbonate weight. - Highlights: • High fluorescent N-doped CQDs from lime juice have been prepared. • Response surface methodology was used to optimize and model the main factors. • N-doped CQDs were used in the selective and sensitive detection of Hg(II). • The biocompatibility of prepared N-doped CQDs was conformed using PC12 cells

  14. Synthesis of biocompatible and highly photoluminescent nitrogen doped carbon dots from lime: Analytical applications and optimization using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arkan, Elham [Nano Drug Delivery Research Center Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinzadeh, Leila [Novel Drug Delivery Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: abd@iasbs.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Herein, a facile hydrothermal treatment of lime juice to prepare biocompatible nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs) in the presence of ammonium bicarbonate as a nitrogen source has been presented. The resulting N-CQDs exhibited excitation and pH independent emission behavior; with the quantum yield (QY) up to 40%, which was several times greater than the corresponding value for CQDs with no added nitrogen source. The N-CQDs were applied as a fluorescent probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg{sup 2+} ions with a detection limit of 14 nM. Moreover, the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of N-CQDs at different concentration ranges from 0.0 to 0.8 mg/ml were investigated by using PC12 cells as a model system. Response surface methodology was used for optimization and systematic investigation of the main variables that influence the QY, including reaction time, reaction temperature, and ammonium bicarbonate weight. - Highlights: • High fluorescent N-doped CQDs from lime juice have been prepared. • Response surface methodology was used to optimize and model the main factors. • N-doped CQDs were used in the selective and sensitive detection of Hg(II). • The biocompatibility of prepared N-doped CQDs was conformed using PC12 cells.

  15. Study on the biodegradability and biocompatibility of WE magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium alloys have been widely applied in biomedical devices because of their high strength, toughness, processing performance and the trace release of Mg2+. In this study, we investigated the biodegradability, cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility of four kinds of WE Mg alloys (where “W” indicates the metallic element Y and “E” represents mixed rare earth [RE] elements; Y: 2.5, 5.0, 6.5, and 7.5 wt.%; Nd: 1.0, 2.5, 2.6, and 4.2 wt.%; Zr: 0.8 wt.%) for their application in intravascular stent fabrication. The content of alloying elements affected not only mechanical properties of materials, but also their biocompatibility. We found that addition of RE elements could reduce the corrosion rates. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultured in different extracts of WE Mg alloys. MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to examine the cytotoxicity. The nitric oxide (NO) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were used to evaluate effects of Mg alloys on HUVECs. The addition of Y, Nd and Zr increased the cell viability and improved the hemocompatibility. Different alloy elements affected the morphology of samples, Mg2+ release, and pH values in the medium. The results of mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability showed that Mg–5.0Y–2.6Nd–0.8Zr might be used as alternative materials of stent. However, it still needs to be further modified for clinical use. These findings suggest that selecting suitable alloying elements is particularly important. - Highlights: ► Y, Nd and Zr are used as alloying elements of magnesium alloys. ► Biodegradability and biocompatibility are explored. ► Cell viability and hemocompatibility are improved as compared with pure Mg.

  16. Synthesis of biocompatible polymers by plasma; Sintesis de polimeros biocompatibles por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin O, E

    2007-07-01

    In this work biocompatible polymers were synthesized by plasma based on pyrrole, ethyleneglycol and allylamine. These monomers are biologically important because they contain oxygen and nitrogen in their structure and they form bonding like; N-H, C-N, C-O and O-H that are also in the human system. The polymers were synthesized with splendor electric discharges to 13.5 MHz, among 10 and 100 W, resistive coupling, pressure of 10{sup -1} mbar and 180 minutes of reaction. The interaction of the biological systems with biomaterials depends in many cases of the properties that present the surfaces, because the rough and/or porous surfaces favor the adherence of cells. The results indicate that the ruggedness of the polymers can be controlled with the synthesis energy, since when modifying it flat and/or rough surfaces they are obtained. The compatibility of water with other solutions that it is a form of increasing the adhesion of cells with biopolymers. The affinity with water and solutions is evaluated calculating the contact angle of the polymers surface with drops of concentration solutions and similar composition to the extracellular liquid of the spinal marrow of the human body. The solutions that were proven were based on NaCl, NaCl-MgSO{sub 4}, and a mixture Krebs-Ringer that has chemical composition and similar concentration to that of the fluids of the spinal marrow. In the Poly pyrrole (PPy)/Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) copolymer, the biggest angles corresponded to the Krebs-Ringer solution, in the interval of 18 to 14 degrees and those lowest to the NaCl solution, of 14.5 at 11 degrees. The Poly allylamine had the more high values with water in the interval of 16.5 to 12.5 degrees and those lowest with the NaCl solution, of 13 at 9.5 degrees. On the other hand, in the derived polymers of pyrrole the more high values corresponded to the treatment with water, until 37, and those lowest to the NaCl-MgSO{sub 4} solution, up to 10. The solutions where participated Na

  17. Thermo-Responsive and Biocompatible Diblock Copolymers Prepared via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Fukuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Poly(2-(methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-b-poly(N,N-diethyl acrylamide (PMPCm-PDEAn was synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT controlled radical polymerization. Below, the critical aggregation temperature (CAT the diblock copolymer dissolved in water as a unimer with a hydrodynamic radius (Rh of ca. 5 nm. Above the CAT the diblock copolymers formed polymer micelles composed of a PDEA core and biocompatible PMPC shells, due to hydrophobic self-aggregation of the thermo-responsive PDEA block. A fluorescence probe study showed that small hydrophobic small guest molecules could be incorporated into the core of the polymer micelle above the CAT. The incorporated guest molecules were released from the core into the bulk aqueous phase when the temperature decreased to values below the CAT because of micelle dissociation.

  18. Model Operation of the Strength Properties of Ventplant Biocompatible Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyasnikova A.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A special porous coating is applied on the surface of dental implants to improve it`s biocompatibility. During the maintenance the tensions originate in such coatings, which is added to the residual pressure and significantly reduce the strength of the coatings. It is almost impossible to get the numericalled value of these tensions experimentally, so in this article we solve the problem of mathematical model operation of the tension originating in porous coatings in the process of their forming, and in the course of maintenance

  19. Corrigendum: Softec HD hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens: biocompatibility and precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espandar L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Espandar L, Sikder S, Moshirfar M. Softec HD hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens: biocompatibility and precision. Clin Ophthalmol. 2011;5:65–70.There was an error in the reported optic size of Lenstec’s Softec HD intraocular lens, which was reported to be 5.5 mm in Espandar et al’s work, but is 5.75 mm.Please see the specifications on Lenstec’s Web site for further details (see http://www.lenstec.com/lenstec/hd_specs.html.Read the original article

  20. Biocompatibility of root-end filling materials: recent update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Newaskar, Vilas

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of a root-end filling is to establish a seal between the root canal space and the periradicular tissues. As root-end filling materials come into contact with periradicular tissues, knowledge of the tissue response is crucial. Almost every available dental restorative material has been suggested as the root-end material of choice at a certain point in the past. This literature review on root-end filling materials will evaluate and comparatively analyse the biocompatibility and tissue response to these products, with primary focus on newly introduced materials. PMID:24010077

  1. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  2. Biocompatible layers fabricated using KrF laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Vrbová, M.; Koňařík, D.; Remsa, Jan

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2008 - (Tománek, P.; Senderáková, D.; Hrabovský, M.), 71380G/1-71380G/7. (Proceedings of SPIE. 7138). ISBN 978-0-8194-7379-0. [Photonics Prague 2008 - International Conference on Photonics, Devices and Systems /6./. Prague (CZ), 27.08.2008-29.08.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : biocompatible materials * thin films * PLD * hydroxyapatite * DLC Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.817980

  3. Biodegradable Xylitol-Based Elastomers: In Vivo Behavior and Biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Joost P.; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers based on polycondensation reactions of xylitol with sebacic acid, referred to as poly(xylitol sebacate) (PXS) elastomers have recently been developed. Herein, we describe the in vivo behavior of PXS elastomers. Four PXS elastomers were synthesized, characterized and compared to poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). PXS elastomers displayed a high level of structural integrity and form stability during degradation. The in vivo half-life ranged from approximately 3 to 52 weeks. PXS elastomers exhibited increased biocompatibility compared to PLGA implants. PMID:20540093

  4. Biocompatibility of phosphorylcholine coated stents in normal porcine coronary arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Deirdre; Krabbendam, S.C.; Verdouw, Pieter; Serruys, Patrick; van Vliet, Erwin; Giessen, Wim; Van Beusekom, Heleen

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To improve the biocompatibility of stents using a phosphorylcholine coated stent as a form of biomimicry.
INTERVENTIONS—Implantation of phosphorylcholine coated (n = 20) and non-coated (n = 21) stents was performed in the coronary arteries of 25 pigs. The animals were killed after five days (n = 6), four weeks (n = 7), and 12 weeks (n = 8), and the vessels harvested for histology, scanning electron microscopy, and morphometry.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Stent performance was assessed by ...

  5. Plasma polymerized carvone as an antibacterial and biocompatible coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuen Wah; Siow, Kim Shyong; Ng, Pei Yuen; Gires, Usup; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2016-11-01

    Antibacterial coating is important to prevent the colonization of medical devices by biofilm forming bacteria that would cause infection and sepsis in patients. Current coating techniques such as immobilization of antimicrobial compounds, time-releasing antibiotic agents and silver nanoparticles, require multiple processing steps, and they have low efficacy and low stability. We proposed a single-step plasma polymerization of an essential oil known as carvone to produce a moderately hydrophobic antibacterial coating (ppCar) with an average roughness of cell line. This study would be of interest to researcher keen on producing a bacteria-resistance and biocompatible coating on different substrates in a cost-effective manner. PMID:27524089

  6. Harnessing what lies within: Programming immunity with biocompatible devices to treat human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Reid Austin

    Advances in our mechanistic insight of cellular function and how this relates to host physiology have revealed a world which is intimately connected at the macro and micro level. Our increasing understanding of biology exemplifies this, where cells respond to environmental cues through interconnected networks of proteins which function as receptors and adaptors to elicit gene expression changes that drive appropriate cellular programs for a given stimulus. Consequently, our deeper molecular appreciation of host homeostasis implicates aberrations of these pathways in nearly all major human disease categories, including those of infectious, metabolic, neurologic, oncogenic, and autoimmune etiology. We have come to recognize the mammalian immune system as a common network hub among all these varied pathologies. As such, the major goal of this dissertation is to identify a platform to program immune responses in mammals so that we may enhance our ability to treat disease and improve health in the 21st century. Using advances in materials science, in particular a recently developed particle fabrication technology termed Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT), our studies systematically assess the murine and human immune response to precisely fabricated nano- and microscale particles composed of biodegradable and biocompatible materials. We then build on these findings and present particle design parameters to program a number of clinically attractive immune responses by targeting endogenous cellular signaling pathways. These include control of particle uptake through surface modification, design parameters that modulate the magnitude and kinetics of biological signaling dynamics that can be used to exacerbate or dampen inflammatory responses, as well as particle designs which may be of use in treating allergies and autoimmune disorders. In total, this dissertation provides evidence that rational design of biocompatible nano- and microparticles is a viable

  7. Surface modification of polymers for biocompatibility via exposure to extreme ultraviolet radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahad, I.U.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Korkzyc, Barbara; Ciach, Tomasz; Brabazon, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are being widely used for the treatment of various traumata, diseases and defects in human beings due to ease in their synthesis. As biomaterials have direct interaction with the extracellular environment in the biological world, biocompatibility is a topic of great significance. The introduction or enhancement of biocompatibility in certain polymers is still a challenge to overcome. Polymer biocompatibility can be controlled by surface modification. Various physical an...

  8. In vitro and in vivo ocular biocompatibility of electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibers.

    OpenAIRE

    Da Silva G.R.; Lima T.H.; Oréfice R.L.; Fernandes-Cunha G.M.; Silva-Cunha A.; Zhao M; Behar-Cohen F.

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatibility is a requirement for the development of nanofibers for ophthalmic applications. In this study, nanofibers were elaborated using poly(ε-caprolactone) via electrospinning. The ocular biocompatibility of this material was investigated. MIO-M1 and ARPE-19 cell cultures were incubated with nanofibers and cellular responses were monitored by viability and morphology. The in vitro biocompatibility revealed that the nanofibers were not cytotoxic to the ocular cells. These cells ...

  9. Enhanced biocompatibility for plasmid DNA on patterned TiO2 surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, I.; Subudhi, U.; Varma, Shikha

    2013-08-01

    An enhanced biocompatibility from nanodot patterned TiO2 surfaces, fabricated by ion beam sputtering, has been observed here through its interaction with plasmid DNA. Investigations of the persistence length and the areal conformation of DNA show that the biocompatibility increases with ion fluence. Presence of nanostructures and increased surface roughness, in conjugation with higher oxygen vacancy sites that promote charge transfer from DNA moiety, are responsible for the increased hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of the patterned surfaces.

  10. Biocompatible post-polymerization functionalization of a water soluble poly(p-phenylene ethynylene)

    OpenAIRE

    Swager, Timothy Manning; Vanveller, Brett Steven

    2010-01-01

    A biocompatible post-polymerization functionalization reaction takes advantage of a polymer's structural motif for the controllable attachment of biotin as a model biosensor that responds to streptavidin.

  11. Development of probes for bioanalytic applications of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering; Entwicklung neuer Sonden fuer bioanalytische Anwendungen der oberflaechenverstaerkten Raman-Streuung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matschulat, Andrea Isabel

    2011-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been established as a versatile tool for probing and labeling in analytical applications, based on the vibrational spectra of samples as well as label molecules in the proximity of noble metal nanostructures. The aim of this work was the construction of novel SERS hybrid probes. The hybrid probes consisted of Au and Ag nanoparticles and reporter molecules, as well as a targeting unit. The concept for the SERS hybrid probe design was followed by experiments comprising characterization techniques such as UV/Vis-spectroscopy (UV/Vis), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), respectively. SERS experiments were performed for studying and optimizing the plasmonic properties of nanoparticles with respect to their enhancement capabilities. The SERS-probes had to meet following requirements: biocompatibility, stability in physiological media, and enhancement of Raman-signals from Raman reporter molecules enabling the identification of different probes even in a complex biological environment. Au and Ag nanoaggregates were found to be the most appropriate SERS substrates for the hybrid probe design. The utilization of Raman reporters enabled the identification of different SERS probes in multiplexing experiments. In particular, the multiplexing capability of ten various reporter molecules para-aminobenzenethiol, 2-naphthalenethiol, crystal violet, rhodamine (B) isothiocyanate, fluorescein isothiocyanate, 5,5'dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), para-mercaptobenzoic acid, acridine orange, safranine O und nile blue was studied using NIR-SERS excitation. As demonstrated by the results the reporters could be identified through their specific Raman signature even in the case of high structural similarity. Chemical separation analysis of the reporter signatures was performed in a trivariate approach, enabling the discrimination through an automated calculation of specific band ratios. The trivariate

  12. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of a myo-inositol hexakisphosphate gelated polyaniline hydrogel in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kwang-Hsiao; Liu, Zhao; Liu, Changjian; Yu, Tong; Shang, Tao; Huang, Chen; Zhou, Min; Liu, Cheng; Ran, Feng; Li, Yun; Shi, Yi; Pan, Lijia

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the interaction between electricity and cells/biomolecules have generated great interest in developing biocompatible electrically conductive materials. In this study, we investigated the biocompatibility of a myo-inositol hexakisphosphate gelated polyaniline hydrogel using in vitro and in vivo experiments in a rat model. The polyaniline hydrogel was used to coat a polycaprolactone scaffold and was cultured with rat endothelial progenitor cells differentiated from rat adipose-derived stem cells. Compared with the control sample on a pristine polycaprolactone scaffold, the treated polyaniline hydrogel had the same non-poisonous/cytotoxicity grade, enhanced cell adhesion, and a higher cell proliferation/growth rate. In implant studies, the polyaniline hydrogel sample induced milder inflammatory responses than did the control at the same time points. Combining the advantages of a biocompatible hydrogel and an organic conductor, the inositol phosphate-gelated polyaniline hydrogel could be used in bioelectronics applications such as biosensors, neural probes, cell stimulators, medical electrodes, tissue engineering, and electro-controlled drug delivery.

  13. Preparation and characterization of a magnetic and optical dual-modality molecular probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, A; Brechbiel, M W [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH, Building 10, Room 1B53, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Regino, C A S; Ogawa, M; Choyke, P L [Molecular Imaging Program, NCI, NIH, Building 10, Room B3B69, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Perkins, M R [Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH, Building 40, Room 3608B, 40 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Bernardo, M [SAIC-Frederick Inc., NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Fugger, L [MRC Human Immunology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, The University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dobson, P J, E-mail: Bumba@mail.nih.gov, E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov [Oxford University Begbroke Science Park, Sandy Lane, Kidlington, Oxon OX5 1PF (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-30

    Multi-modality imaging probes combine the advantages of individual imaging techniques to yield highly detailed anatomic and molecular information in living organisms. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of a dual-modality nanoprobe that couples the magnetic properties of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) with the near infrared fluorescence of Cy5.5. The fluorophore is encapsulated in a biocompatible shell of silica surrounding the iron oxide core for a final diameter of {approx} 17 nm. This silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticle (SCION) has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The particle demonstrates a strong negative surface charge and maintains colloidal stability in the physiological pH range. Magnetic hysteresis analysis confirms superparamagnetic properties that could be manipulated for thermotherapy. The viability of primary human monocytes, T cells, and B cells incubated with the particle has been examined in vitro. In vivo analysis of agent leakage into subcutaneous A431 tumors in mice was also conducted. This particle has been designed for diagnostic application with magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, and has future potential to serve as a heat-sensitive targeted drug delivery platform.

  14. Development of chitosan-coated gold nanoflowers as SERS-active probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been intensely researched for many years as a potential technique for highly sensitive detection. This work, through the reduction of HAuCl4 with pyrrole in aqueous solutions, investigated a facile one-pot synthesis of flower-like Au nanoparticles with rough surfaces. The formation process of the Au nanoflowers (AuNFs) was carefully studied, and a spontaneous assembly mechanism was proposed based on the time-course experimental results. The key synthesis strategy was to use pyrrole as a weak particle stabilizing and reducing agent to confine crystal growth in the limited ligand protection region. The nanometer-scale surface roughness of AuNFs provided several hot spots on a single particle, which significantly increased SERS enhancement. Good biocompatible stable Raman-active probes were synthesized by coating AuNFs with chitosan. The conservation of the SERS effects in living cells suggested that the chitosan-capped AuNFs could be suitable for highly sensitive detection and have potential for targeting of tumors in vivo.

  15. Biocompatibility and characterisation of a candidate microelectrode material for biosensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in microcircuit technology have enabled the fabrication of Multiple Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for investigating the characteristics of networks of neuronal cells either in vivo or in vitro. When producing a MEA materials used must be corrosion resistant, have low electrical impedance and the materials must be biocompatible. Existing MEA's have limited life spans, relatively high impedance values and limited uses. Thus creating a requirement for new MEA technology. TiN thin films have become increasingly useful in a wide variety of applications, due to their nature, which includes chemical stability, high hardness, excellent wear and electrical properties and also biocompatibility. The favourable electrical and biocompatibility characteristics of thin films of TiN make them a possible candidate for use in a MEA. TiN thin films can be deposited by a number of methods including evaporation, ion plating and sputtering. The method of deposition, along with process parameters used can have a marked effect on the characteristics of TiN films, including changes in preferred orientation, hardness and wear and also biocompatibility. TiN thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering of a Ti target, with Argon and nitrogen gas mixtures and labelled Type I TiN films. Also industrial TIN films deposited by Arc Ion plating were carefully selected for comparison and labelled Type II TiN films. The microstructure, composition, surface chemistry, surface topography and roughness were studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Profilometry. Type I TIN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone I and Type II TiN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone 2 of the Movchan and Dernchishin structure zone model for sputtered films. XPS showed that the surface composition of all TiN films was predominantly TiO2, TiN and TiNxOy. Significant differences in

  16. Biocompatibility evaluation of magnetosomes formed by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Lei [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, 163319 (China); Yue Xiaoxuan [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Zhang Shuang [College of Life Science and Technology, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, 163319 (China); Chen Peng [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); GIBT, Gansu Institute of Business and Technology, Yannan Road 18, Lanzhou, 730010 (China); Xu Zhiliang; Li Yang [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Li Hongyu, E-mail: hekouyanlei@gmail.com [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Magnetite nanocrystal has been extensively used in biomedical field. Currently, an interesting alternative to synthetic magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, called magnetosome, has been found in magnetotactic bacteria. It has been reported that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At. ferrooxidans) has a potential to synthesize magnetosome. In this study, transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to analyze the magnetite particles in At. ferrooxidans BY-3. The magnetosomes formed by this bacterium were isolated by a method combining ultracentrifugation and magnetic separation. Crystalline phase and surface functional group of the magnetosomes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. Biocompatibility of the magnetosomes was systematically evaluated at various concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/ml). MTT test, hemolysis assay and Micronucleus Test were carried out to evaluate in vitro cytotoxicity, blood toxicity and genotoxicity of magnetosomes, respectively. Under these conditions, magnetosomes showed no cytotoxic, genotoxic and hemolytic effects up to 4.0 mg/ml indicating good biocompatibility of these biological nanoparticles. These revealed that the magnetosomes might have a potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications in the future. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The production of magnetosomes from At. ferrooxidans has been easily available. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several techniques are used to characterize properties of the magnetosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetosomes have no cytotoxicity, no hemolysis activity and no genotoxicity.

  17. Dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in biocompatible dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to their phenomenal electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been an area of intense research since their discovery in 1991. Different applications for these nanoparticles have been proposed, among others, in electronics and optics but also in the medical field. In parallel, emerging studies have suggested potential toxic effects of CNT while others did not, generating some conflicting outcomes. These discrepancies could be, in part, due to different suspension approaches used and to the agglomeration state of CNT in solution. In this study, we described a standardized protocol to obtain stable CNT suspensions, using two biocompatible dispersants (Pluronic F108 and hydroxypropylcellulose) and to estimate the concentration of CNT in solution. CNT appear to be greatly individualized in these two dispersants with no detection of remaining bundles or agglomerates after sonication and centrifugation. Moreover, CNT remained perfectly dispersed when added to culture medium used for in vitro cell experiments. We also showed that Pluronic F108 is a better dispersant than hydroxypropylcellulose. In conclusion, we have developed a standardized protocol using biocompatible surfactants to obtain reproducible and stable multi-walled carbon nanotubes suspensions which can be used for in vitro or in vivo toxicological studies.

  18. Biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles for in vivo stem cell tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient application of stem cells to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases requires safe cell tracking to follow stem cell fate over time in the host environment after transplantation. In this work, for the first time, fluorescent and biocompatible methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based nanoparticles (fluoNPs) were synthesized through a free-radical co-polymerization process with a fluorescent macromonomer obtained by linking Rhodamine B and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. We demonstrate that the fluoNPs produced by polymerization of MMA–Rhodamine complexes (1) were efficient for the labeling and tracking of multipotent human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs); (2) did not alter the main biological features of hAFCs (such as viability, cell growth and metabolic activity); (3) enabled us to determine the longitudinal bio-distribution of hAFCs in different brain areas after graft in the brain ventricles of healthy mice by a direct fluorescence-based technique. The reliability of our approach was furthermore confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging analyses, carried out by incubating hAFCs with both superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and fluoNPs. Our data suggest that these finely tunable and biocompatible fluoNPs can be exploited for the longitudinal tracking of stem cells. (paper)

  19. Polymeric barrier membranes for device packaging, diffusive control and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current state-of-the-art implantable micron feature electronic devices are capable of monitoring and stimulating functions in vivo. Within an EU Framework VI project a further step was taken in developing key microsystem technologies and communication methods that could bring intelligence directly to the human interface, in the form of reactive medical implants and ambulatory measurement systems. Information from these devices is planned to be transmitted out into the wider environment for remote processing. However, the packaging of such state-of-the-art devices to enhance tissue biocompatibility, and to protect conducting elements from in vivo corrosion during extended use, along with protecting the body from toxins leaching from implant components, remains a concern. Candidate polymeric barriers as hydration resistant and solute impermeable interfaces to mitigate such major problems of chronic implantation were investigated. Materials studied included silicone rubber, PVC, polyurethane, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). Polymer permeability to water solutes was marginally improved through incorporation of lipid into these structures. Surface biocompatibility was assessed on the basis of protein film deposition in vitro and by cell viability studies in tissue culture. Short-term toxicity was not observed for any of the tested materials, though there were substantial differences in hydration. Additionally, polypyrrole over active electrodes shows feasibility for controlled tissue interfacing whilst retaining electrical conductivity

  20. Biocompatible Coating of Encapsulated Cells Using Ionotropic Gelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, Friederike; Mettler, Esther; Böse, Thomas; Weber, Matthias Max; Vásquez, Julio Alberto; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The technique of immunoisolated transplantation has seen in the last twenty years improvements in biocompatibility, long term stability and methods for avoidance of fibrosis in alginate capsules. However, two major problems are not yet solved: living cellular material that is not centered in the capsule is not properly protected from the hosts’ immune system and the total transplant volume needs to be reduced. To solve these problems, we present a method for applying fully biocompatible alginate multilayers to a barium-alginate core without the use of polycations. We report on the factors that influence layer formation and stability and can therefore provide data for full adjustability of the additional layer. Although known for yeast and plant cells, this technique has not previously been demonstrated with mammalian cells or ultra-high viscous alginates. Viability of murine insulinoma cells was investigated by live-dead staining and live cell imaging, for murine Langerhans’ islets viability and insulin secretion have been measured. No hampering effects of the second alginate layer were found. This multi-layer technique therefore has great potential for clinical and in vitro use and is likely to be central in alginate matrix based immunoisolated cell therapy. PMID:24039964

  1. Biocompatibility evaluation of magnetosomes formed by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetite nanocrystal has been extensively used in biomedical field. Currently, an interesting alternative to synthetic magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, called magnetosome, has been found in magnetotactic bacteria. It has been reported that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At. ferrooxidans) has a potential to synthesize magnetosome. In this study, transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to analyze the magnetite particles in At. ferrooxidans BY-3. The magnetosomes formed by this bacterium were isolated by a method combining ultracentrifugation and magnetic separation. Crystalline phase and surface functional group of the magnetosomes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. Biocompatibility of the magnetosomes was systematically evaluated at various concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/ml). MTT test, hemolysis assay and Micronucleus Test were carried out to evaluate in vitro cytotoxicity, blood toxicity and genotoxicity of magnetosomes, respectively. Under these conditions, magnetosomes showed no cytotoxic, genotoxic and hemolytic effects up to 4.0 mg/ml indicating good biocompatibility of these biological nanoparticles. These revealed that the magnetosomes might have a potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications in the future. - Highlights: ► The production of magnetosomes from At. ferrooxidans has been easily available. ► Several techniques are used to characterize properties of the magnetosomes. ► The magnetosomes have no cytotoxicity, no hemolysis activity and no genotoxicity.

  2. Biodegradation and biocompatibility of mechanically active magnetoelastic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetoelastic (ME) materials have many advantages for use as sensors and actuators due to their wireless, passive nature. This paper describes the application of ME materials as biodegradable implants with controllable degradation rates. Experiments have been conducted to show that degradation rates of ME materials are dependent on the material compositions. In addition, it was shown that the degradation rates of the ME materials can be controlled remotely by applying a magnetic field, which causes the ME materials to generate low-magnitude vibrations that hasten their degradation rates. Another concern of ME materials for medical applications is biocompatibility. Indirect cytotoxicity analyses were performed on two types of ME materials: Metglas™ 2826 MB (FeNiMoB) and iron–gallium alloy. While results indicate Metglas is not biocompatible, the degradation products of iron–gallium materials have shown no adverse effects on cell viability. Overall, these results present the possibility of using ME materials as biodegradable, magnetically-controlled active implants. (paper)

  3. Preparation of biocompatible structural gradient coatings on pure titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Guang-xin; ZHANG Ren-ji; YAN Yong-nian

    2004-01-01

    In order to overcome the poor osteo-inductive properties of titanium implant, some methods have been used. The efforts to improve implant biocompatibility and durability by applying a hybrid technique of composite oxidation (pre-anodic and micro-arc oxidation) and hydrothermal treatment were described. Pure titanium was used as the substrate material. An oxalic acid was used as the electrolyte for the pre-anodic oxidation. A calcium and phosphate salt solution was acted as the electrolyte of micro-arc oxidation and the common pure water was used for hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coatings. The results show that a compact TiO2 film can be made by pre-anodic oxidation, which is effective as chemical barriers against the in-vivo release of metal ions from the implants. A porous TiO2 coating can be produced by micro-arc oxidation on titanium plate, which is beneficial to bone tissue growth and enhancing anchorage of implant to bone. De-calcium HA can be formed on the coating using hydrothermal treatment, which is similar with the primary component of bone and has a very good osteo-inductivity.The porous gradient titania coating made by the hybrid oxidation and hydrothermal treatment should show good biocompatibility in the environment of the human body.

  4. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  5. THE ORNL ATOM PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M

    1986-01-01

    The ORNL Atom Probe is a microanalytical tool for studies in materials science. The instrument is a combination of a customized version of the vacuum system of the VG FIM-100 atom probe, an ORNL-designed microcomputer-controlled digital timing system, and a double curved CEMA Imaging Atom Probe detector. The atom probe combines four instruments into one - namely a field ion microscope, an energy compensated time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an imaging atom probe, and a pulsed laser atom probe.

  6. Automated design of genomic Southern blot probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama Noboru H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sothern blotting is a DNA analysis technique that has found widespread application in molecular biology. It has been used for gene discovery and mapping and has diagnostic and forensic applications, including mutation detection in patient samples and DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Southern blotting has been employed as the definitive method for detecting transgene integration, and successful homologous recombination in gene targeting experiments. The technique employs a labeled DNA probe to detect a specific DNA sequence in a complex DNA sample that has been separated by restriction-digest and gel electrophoresis. Critically for the technique to succeed the probe must be unique to the target locus so as not to cross-hybridize to other endogenous DNA within the sample. Investigators routinely employ a manual approach to probe design. A genome browser is used to extract DNA sequence from the locus of interest, which is searched against the target genome using a BLAST-like tool. Ideally a single perfect match is obtained to the target, with little cross-reactivity caused by homologous DNA sequence present in the genome and/or repetitive and low-complexity elements in the candidate probe. This is a labor intensive process often requiring several attempts to find a suitable probe for laboratory testing. Results We have written an informatic pipeline to automatically design genomic Sothern blot probes that specifically attempts to optimize the resultant probe, employing a brute-force strategy of generating many candidate probes of acceptable length in the user-specified design window, searching all against the target genome, then scoring and ranking the candidates by uniqueness and repetitive DNA element content. Using these in silico measures we can automatically design probes that we predict to perform as well, or better, than our previous manual designs, while considerably reducing design time. We went on to

  7. Biocompatible Hollow Polydopamine Nanoparticles Loaded Ionic Liquid Enhanced Tumor Microwave Thermal Ablation in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Longfei; Tang, Wenting; Liu, Tianlong; Ren, Xiangling; Fu, Changhui; Liu, Bo; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-05-11

    Tumor microwave thermal therapy (MWTT) has attracted more attention because of the minimal damage to body function, convenient manipulation and low complications. Herein, a novel polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticle loading ionic liquids (ILs/PDA) as microwave susceptible agent is introduced for enhancing the selectivity and targeting of MWTT. ILs/PDA nanocomposites have an excellent microwave heating efficiency under an ultralow microwave power irradiation. Encouraging antitumor effect was observed when tumor bearing mice received ILs/PDA nanoparticles by intravenous injection and only single microwave irradiation. PDA nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles in core were constructed for tumor targeting study by ICP-MS and about 15% PDA nanoparticles were founded in tumor. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study in vivo of PDA showed the excellent biocompatibility of ILs/PDA nanocomposites. In addition, the degradation of ILs/PDA nanocomposites in simulated body fluid illustrated the low potential hazard when they entered the blood. The emergence of PDA as a novel and feasible platform for cancer thermal therapy will promote the rapid development of microwave therapy in clinics. PMID:27089478

  8. Biocompatible circuit-breaker chip for thermal management of biomedical microsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a thermoresponsive micro circuit breaker for biomedical applications specifically targeted at electronic intelligent implants. The circuit breaker is micromachined to have a shape-memory-alloy cantilever actuator as a normally closed temperature-sensitive switch to protect the device of interest from overheating, a critical safety feature for smart implants including those that are electrothermally driven with wireless micro heaters. The device is fabricated in a size of 1.5  ×  2.0  ×  0.46 mm3 using biocompatible materials and a chip-based titanium package, exhibiting a nominal cold-state resistance of 14 Ω. The breaker rapidly enters the full open condition when the chip temperature exceeds 63 °C, temporarily breaking the circuit of interest to lower its temperature until chip temperature drops to 51 °C, at which the breaker closes the circuit to allow current to flow through it again, physically limiting the maximum temperature of the circuit. This functionality is tested in combination with a wireless resonant heater powered by radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation, demonstrating self-regulation of heater temperature. The developed circuit-breaker chip operates in a fully passive manner that removes the need for active sensor and circuitry to achieve temperature regulation in a target device, contributing to the miniaturization of biomedical microsystems including electronic smart implants where thermal management is essential. (paper)

  9. CERN: Fixed target targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    visible for the first time, and help explain the continuing dilemma of the dearth of solar neutrinos (December 1992, page 12). For the longer term future, a larger detector could provide an increased yield, boosting the neutrino capture rate by up to a factor of ten. Other, more spectacular, option is to shine the CERN neutrino beam towards a detector a long way off. Such a beam is practically unimpeded by matter and could pass right through the earth. Possible contenders for underground target stations equipped with big detectors are the Italian Gran Sasso laboratory, 730 kilometres south, or Superkamiokande, 8750 kilometres away in Japan. Other major ongoing 'flagship' SPS projects include the NA48 experiment to continue precision measurements on the still unexplained phenomenon of CP violation (March 1992, page 7) and the 'Spin Muon Collaboration' looking to probe the spin structure of the proton and the neutron using high energy muon beams (April 1992, page 21). Both these experiments address important physics issues. While SMC is already taking data, NA48 will not become operational until 1995, but should run then for more than three years. Elsewhere at the SPS, ongoing studies include a programme using hyperon beams, and a study of beauty particles (WA92) which would be hampered once the new neutrino programme starts. The spectroscopy of particles containing light quarks, although far from having solved all outstanding questions, is slowly coming to the end of its SPS career. The WA91 glueball search at the big Omega detector will continue taking data in 1994. The GAMS experiment took its final CERN data last year. One of the long-standing examples of CERN-Russian collaboration, GAMS earned its acronym from the Russian abbreviation for its characteristic large lead-glass arrays. GAMS experiments have run both at CERN and at Serpukhov's Institute for High Energy Physics near Moscow

  10. Fluorescent oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) contained amphiphiles-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted magnetic resonance and two-photon optical imaging in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chao; Hong, Binbin; Gong, Zhaocui; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Wenbo; Lu, Xiaomei; Li, Jie; Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhen; Fan, Quli; Yao, Yuyu; Huang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Folate receptor-targeted multifunctional fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) composed of cores containing iron oxide nanocrystals and amphiphilic oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) shells with multimodal imaging capability were successfully prepared through a convenient hydrophobic encapsulation approach. The iron oxide nanoparticles in the core provided T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whereas the amphiphilic oligomers on the surface of the nanoparticles introduced good water-solubility, biocompatibility, excellent fluorescent properties and cancer-targeting. These nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties with saturation magnetization (Ms) of 23 emu g-1 and a transverse relaxivity rate of 140.89 mM-1 s-1. In vitro studies indicated that the dual-modal FMNPs can serve as an effective two-photon fluorescent and a magnetic probe to achieve the targeted imaging of Hela cells without obvious cytotoxicity. In vivo two-photon fluorescence and MRI results demonstrated that the FMNPs were able to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues to allow dual-modal detection of tumors in a living body. These studies provided insight in developing novel multifunctional probes for multimodal imaging, which would play an important role for theranostics in biomedical science.

  11. Biocompatible polymeric micelles with polysorbate 80 for use in brain targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craparo, E. F.; Ognibene, M. C.; Casaletto, M. P.; Pitarresi, G.; Teresi, G.; Giammona, G.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and characterization of novel amphiphilic graft copolymers based on an α,β-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-D,L-aspartamide (PHEA) backbone and D,L-polylactic acid (PLA) hydrophobic side chains are reported. These copolymers were obtained starting from PHEA-ethylenediamine (PHEA-EDA), which was functionalized with polysorbate 80 (PS80) and/or PLA in order to obtain the PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA and PHEA-EDA-PLA samples, respectively. The degrees of derivatization, DDPS80 and DDPLA, of PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA, calculated by 1H-NMR, resulted in being 1.2 ± 0.03 mol% and 0.54 ± 0.05 mol%, respectively, while that of PHEA-EDA-PLA was found to be 0.60 ± 0.05 mol%. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis confirmed the occurrence of derivatization, the molecular weight values being close to the theoretical ones. Polymeric micelles from PHEA-EDA-PLA and PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA copolymers were obtained by using the dialysis method and were characterized in terms of mean size, zeta potential, critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and surface composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, which demonstrated the presence of PS80 onto the PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA micelle surface. In vitro experiments demonstrated that these systems had no cytotoxic effects on 16 HBE, Caco2, HuDe and K562 cell lines, and no haemolytic activity. Moreover, both PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA and PHEA-EDA-PLA micelles were able to penetrate into Neuro2a cells and, in the case of PS80 decorated micelles, to escape from phagocytosis by the J774 A1 macrophages.

  12. Biocompatible polymeric micelles with polysorbate 80 for use in brain targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the synthesis and characterization of novel amphiphilic graft copolymers based on an α,β-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-D,L-aspartamide (PHEA) backbone and D,L-polylactic acid (PLA) hydrophobic side chains are reported. These copolymers were obtained starting from PHEA-ethylenediamine (PHEA-EDA), which was functionalized with polysorbate 80 (PS80) and/or PLA in order to obtain the PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA and PHEA-EDA-PLA samples, respectively. The degrees of derivatization, DDPS80 and DDPLA, of PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA, calculated by 1H-NMR, resulted in being 1.2 ± 0.03 mol% and 0.54 ± 0.05 mol%, respectively, while that of PHEA-EDA-PLA was found to be 0.60 ± 0.05 mol%. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis confirmed the occurrence of derivatization, the molecular weight values being close to the theoretical ones. Polymeric micelles from PHEA-EDA-PLA and PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA copolymers were obtained by using the dialysis method and were characterized in terms of mean size, zeta potential, critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and surface composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, which demonstrated the presence of PS80 onto the PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA micelle surface. In vitro experiments demonstrated that these systems had no cytotoxic effects on 16 HBE, Caco2, HuDe and K562 cell lines, and no haemolytic activity. Moreover, both PHEA-EDA-PS80-PLA and PHEA-EDA-PLA micelles were able to penetrate into Neuro2a cells and, in the case of PS80 decorated micelles, to escape from phagocytosis by the J774 A1 macrophages.

  13. Study of a Laser-Produced Plasma by Langmuir Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.; Hasimi, M.; Pant, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    The structure, the parameters and the expansion of the plasma produced by focusing a 7 J, 20 ns Nd-glass laser on stainless-steel and glass targets suspended in a high-vacuum chamber were investigated by Langmuir probes. It was observed that the probe signals consisted of a photoelectric-emission......The structure, the parameters and the expansion of the plasma produced by focusing a 7 J, 20 ns Nd-glass laser on stainless-steel and glass targets suspended in a high-vacuum chamber were investigated by Langmuir probes. It was observed that the probe signals consisted of a photoelectric...

  14. Novel biocompatible materials for in vivo two-photon polymerisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-photon polymerisation (2PP) is a versatile laser fabrication technique that allows the creation of 3D structures at micro- and nanometre precision. The structures are created additively in direct accordance to a computer-aided design (CAD). It requires tightly focused fs-pulsed light sources usually operating in the near infrared wavelength range. In this region, biological tissues exhibit a window of transparency and only absorb light minimally. When operating below a certain pulse energy threshold, the laser light does not cause any cellular damage. This theoretically allows inducing 2PP in the presence of living biological tissues and cells. Suitable biocompatible formulations that can render bioactive constructs would potentially allow building a dynamic environment with topographical, chemical and mechanical cues similar to that of the natural extracellular matrix. In that way, 2PP would allow to alter key elements of this environment without changing any other influencing factors. To explore these possibilities, 2PP has to overcome two main limitations, the slow process speeds and the lack of available optimised formulations. In this thesis, we report the design and realisation of a 2PP experimental setup, which allows fabricating hydrogel structures from novel water-based formulations. Writing speeds of above 100 mm/s are feasible, which is the highest speed reported in 2PP. Moreover, the presented components have the potential to be formed in vivo, in the presence of living cells and tissues. Using water-soluble two-photon optimised photoinitiators, we could effectively cross-link acrylates in formulations of up to 80% water content. As acrylates show a tendency towards Michael addition to proteins, we explored the use of vinyl ester and vinyl carbonate monomers for 2PP. In contrast to acrylic polymers, which form potentially toxic poly (acrylic acid), vinyl ester and carbonate polymers form biocompatible poly (vinyl alcohol) during degradation

  15. Green chemistry approach for the synthesis of biocompatible graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Jin-Hoi Kim Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea Background: Graphene is a single-atom thick, two-dimensional sheet of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms isolated from its three-dimensional parent material, graphite. One of the most common methods for preparation of graphene is chemical exfoliation of graphite using powerful oxidizing agents. Generally, graphene is synthesized through deoxygenation of graphene oxide (GO by using hydrazine, which is one of the most widespread and strongest reducing agents. Due to the high toxicity of hydrazine, it is not a promising reducing agent in large-scale production of graphene; therefore, this study focused on a green or sustainable synthesis of graphene and the biocompatibility of graphene in primary mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (PMEFs. Methods: Here, we demonstrated a simple, rapid, and green chemistry approach for the synthesis of reduced GO (rGO from GO using triethylamine (TEA as a reducing agent and stabilizing agent. The obtained TEA reduced GO (TEA-rGO was characterized by ultraviolet (UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, particle size dynamic light scattering (DLS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Results: The transition of graphene oxide to graphene was confirmed by UV–visible spectroscopy. XRD and SEM were used to investigate the crystallinity of graphene and the surface morphologies of prepared graphene respectively. The formation of defects further supports the functionalization of graphene as indicated in the Raman spectrum of TEA-rGO. Surface morphology and the thickness of the GO and TEA-rGO were analyzed using AFM. The presented results suggest that TEA-rGO shows significantly more biocompatibility with PMEFs cells than GO. Conclusion: This is the first report about using TEA as a reducing as well as a stabilizing agent for the

  16. Whole genome expression profiling using DNA microarray for determining biocompatibility of polymeric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Wang, Zhenyu; Kutter, Jörg Peter;

    2006-01-01

    There is an ever increasing need to find surfaces that are biocompatible for applications like medical implants and microfluidics-based cell culture systems. The biocompatibility of five different surfaces with different hydrophobicity was determined using gene expression profiling as well as more...

  17. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers.

  18. Rapid Biocompatibility Analysis of Materials via In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Dang, Tram T.; Lyle, Stephen; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many materials are unsuitable for medical use because of poor biocompatibility. Recently, advances in the high throughput synthesis of biomaterials has significantly increased the number of potential biomaterials, however current biocompatibility analysis methods are slow and require histological analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we develop rapid, non-invasive methods for in vivo quantification of the inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials. Material...

  19. Softec HD hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens: biocompatibility and precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Espandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ladan Espandar1, Shameema Sikder2, Majid Moshirfar31Department of Ophthalmology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: Intraocular lens development is driven by higher patient expectations for ideal visual outcomes. The recently US Food and Drug Administration-approved Softec HD™ lens is an aspheric, hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens (IOL. The hydrophilic design of the lens is optimized to address dysphotopsia while maintaining biocompatibility, optical clarity, resistance to damage, and resistance to biocontamination. Aspheric lenses decrease postoperative spherical aberration. The addition of the Softec lens provides clinicians with another option for IOL placement; however, randomized comparative studies of this lens to others already on the market remain to be completed.Keywords: hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens, Softec HD intraocular lens, aspheric intraocular lens, IOL

  20. Rapid microfabrication of solvent-resistant biocompatible microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Lung-Hsin; Lin, Robert; Lee, Abraham Phillip

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a rapid, simple, and low-cost fabrication method to prepare solvent resistant and biocompatible microfluidic devices with three-dimensional geometries. The devices were fabricated in thiolene and replicated from PDMS master with high molding fidelity. Good chemical compatibility for organic solvents allows volatile chemicals in synthesis and analysis applications. The surface can be processed to be hydrophobic or hydrophilic for water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. Monodisperse organic solvent droplet generation is demonstrated to be reproducible in thiolene microchannels without swelling. The thiolene surface prevents cell adhesion but normal cell growth and adhesion on glass substrates is not affected by the adjacent thiolene patterns. PMID:18497921

  1. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of direct and indirect pulp capping materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Cristina da Silva Modena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There are several studies about the cytotoxic effects of dental materials in contact with the pulp tissue, such as calcium hydroxide (CH, adhesive systems, resin composite and glass ionomer cements. The aim of this review article was to summarize and discuss the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of materials used for protection of the dentin-pulp complex, some components of resin composites and adhesive systems when placed in direct or indirect contact with the pulp tissue. A large number of dental materials present cytotoxic effects when applied close or directly to the pulp, and the only material that seems to stimulate early pulp repair and dentin hard tissue barrier formation is CH.

  2. Biocompatibility of epoxidized styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer (SBS) membrane was prepared by solution casting method and then was epoxidized with peroxyformic acid generated in situ to yield the epoxidized styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer membrane (ESBS). The structure and properties of ESBS were characterized with infrared spectroscopy, Universal Testing Machine, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The performances of contact angle, water content, protein adsorption, and water vapor transmission rate on ESBS membrane were determined. After epoxidation, the hydrophilicity of the membrane increased. The water vapor transmission rate of ESBS membrane is similar to human skin. The biocompatibility of ESBS membrane was evaluated with the cell culture of fibroblasts on the membrane. It revealed that the cells not only remained viable but also proliferated on the surface of the various ESBS membranes and the population doubling time for fibroblast culture decreased.

  3. Vertically, interconnected carbon nanowalls as biocompatible scaffolds for osteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Raluca; Vizireanu, Sorin; Luculescu, Catalin; Cimpean, Anisoara; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2016-07-01

    The response of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts to vertically aligned, interconnected carbon nanowalls prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrate has been evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, viability and cell proliferation. The behavior of osteoblasts seeded on carbon nanowalls was analyzed in parallel and compared with the behavior of the cells maintained in contact with tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The results demonstrate that osteoblasts adhere and remain viable in the long term on carbon nanowalls. Moreover, on the investigated scaffold cell proliferation was significantly promoted, although to a lower extent than on TCPS. Overall, the successful culture of osteoblasts on carbon nanowalls coated substrate confirms the biocompatibility of this scaffold, which could have potential applications in the development of orthopedic biomaterials.

  4. High content analysis of the biocompatibility of nickel nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Fiona [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: fibyrne@tcd.ie; Prina-Mello, Adriele [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Whelan, Aine [CRANN and School of Chemistry, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mohamed, Bashir M.; Davies, Anthony [Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Health Sciences Centre, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Gun' ko, Yurii K. [CRANN and School of Chemistry, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Coey, J.M.D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Volkov, Yuri [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Health Sciences Centre, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2009-05-15

    Nickel nanowires, 20 {mu}m long and 200 nm in diameter, were fabricated by electrodeposition into alumina templates, and characterised by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility studies of nickel nanowires with differentiated THP-1 cell line-derived macrophages were carried out. From a multiparametric assay, using high content analysis (HCA), the critical time points and concentrations of nickel nanowires on THP-1 cellular response were identified. The nanowires displayed little or no toxic effects on THP-1 cells over short incubation times (10 h), and at low concentrations (<100 nanowires per cell). Our findings indicate the potential suitability of these wires for biological and clinical applications.

  5. 3D Printing of Biocompatible Supramolecular Polymers and their Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lewis R; Li, Siwei; Sturgess, Craig; Wildman, Ricky; Jones, Julian R; Hayes, Wayne

    2016-02-10

    A series of polymers capable of self-assembling into infinite networks via supramolecular interactions have been designed, synthesized, and characterized for use in 3D printing applications. The biocompatible polymers and their composites with silica nanoparticles were successfully utilized to deposit both simple cubic structures, as well as a more complex twisted pyramidal feature. The polymers were found to be not toxic to a chondrogenic cell line, according to ISO 10993-5 and 10993-12 standard tests and the cells attached to the supramolecular polymers as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Silica nanoparticles were then dispersed within the polymer matrix, yielding a composite material which was optimized for inkjet printing. The hybrid material showed promise in preliminary tests to facilitate the 3D deposition of a more complex structure. PMID:26766139

  6. Motion Control of Urea-Powered Biocompatible Hollow Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xing; Wang, Xu; Hahn, Kersten; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-03-22

    The quest for biocompatible microswimmers powered by compatible fuel and with full motion control over their self-propulsion is a long-standing challenge in the field of active matter and microrobotics. Here, we present an active hybrid microcapsule motor based on Janus hollow mesoporous silica microparticles powered by the biocatalytic decomposition of urea at physiological concentrations. The directional self-propelled motion lasts longer than 10 min with an average velocity of up to 5 body lengths per second. Additionally, we control the velocity of the micromotor by chemically inhibiting and reactivating the enzymatic activity of urease. The incorporation of magnetic material within the Janus structure provides remote magnetic control on the movement direction. Furthermore, the mesoporous/hollow structure can load both small molecules and larger particles up to hundreds of nanometers, making the hybrid micromotor an active and controllable drug delivery microsystem. PMID:26863183

  7. Biocompatible benzocyclobutene-based intracortical neural implant with surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keekeun; Massia, Stephen; He, Jiping

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of a benzocyclobutene (BCB) polymer-based intracortical neural implant for reliable and stable long-term implant function. BCB polymer has many attractive features for chronic implant application: flexibility, biocompatibility, low moisture uptake, low dielectric constant and easy surface modification. A 2 µm thick silicon backbone layer was attached underneath a flexible BCB electrode to improve mechanical stiffness. No insertion trauma was observed during penetrating into the dura of a rat. In vitro cytotoxicity tests of the completed BCB electrode revealed no toxic effects on cultured cells. The modified BCB surface with a dextran coating showed a significant reduction in 3T3 cell adhesion and spreading, indicating that this coating has the potential for lowering protein adsorption, minimizing inflammatory cell adhesion and glial scar formation in vivo, and thereby enhancing long-term implant performance.

  8. Preparation and biocompatibility of BSA monolayer on silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Caihong; Zhang, Junyan; Yang, Shengrong

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a general strategy for grafting protein molecules on silicon surface by using dopamine as adhesive layer. With this method, silicon surface had been successfully modified by BSA monolayer. Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle analysis and atomic force microscopy confirmed the sequential grafting of initiator and protein molecules. Cell adhesion experiments with PC-12 cells showed that the obtained monolayer exhibits good biocompatibility. The corrosion resistance behavior of the polydopamine and BSA modified silicon wafers was investigated by potentiodynamic test, which indicated that the modified surfaces exhibited a better anti-corrosion capability than silicon surface. All these results must be valuable for the application of protein monolayer in biological and biomedical technology. PMID:21770145

  9. How hydrophobically modified chitosans are stabilized by biocompatible lipid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Nino; Frielinghaus, Heide; Vitiello, Giuseppe; D'Errico, Gerardino; Leal, Leslie G; Richter, Dieter; Ortona, Ornella; Paduano, Luigi

    2015-08-15

    Nanostructured hydrogels composed by biocompatible molecules are formulated and characterized. They are based on a polymer network formed by hydrophobically modified chitosans (HMCHIT or CnCHIT) in which vesicles of monoolein (MO) and oleic acid or sodium oleate (NaO), depending on pH, are embedded. The best conditions for gel formation, in terms of pH, length of the hydrophobic moieties of chitosan, and weight proportion among the three components were estimated by visual inspection of a large number of samples. Among all possible combinations, the system C12CHIT-MO-NaO in the weight proportion (1:1:1) is optimal for the formation of a well-structured gel-like system, which is also confirmed by rheological experiments. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements unambiguously show the presence of lipid bilayers in this mixture, indicating that MO-NaO vesicles are stabilized by C12CHIT even at acid pH. A wide small angle neutron scattering investigation performed on several ternary systems of general formula CnCHIT-MO-NaO shows that the length of the hydrophobic tail Cn is a crucial parameter in stabilizing the polymer network in which lipid vesicles are embedded. Structural parameters for the vesicles are determined by using a multilamellar model that admits the possibility of displacement of the center of each shell. The number of shells tends to be reduced by increasing the polymer content. The thickness and the distance between consecutive lamellae are not influenced by either the polymer or MO-NaO concentration. The hydrogel presented in this work, being fully biocompatible and nanostructured, is well-suited for possible application in drug delivery. PMID:25935287

  10. Biocompatibility of chitosan/Mimosa tenuiflora scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The porosity of the composites allow biological processes for the cell adaptation on the scaffolds. • The composites improve the viability and proliferation of cells. • Composition of the scaffold plays an important role in the biocompatibility. • The results indicate that Mimosa Tenuiflora can induce the differentiation of osteoblast cells. - Abstract: In search of a plant that exhibits osteogenic activity, Mimosa tenuiflora (M. tenuiflora) cortex represents the opportunity to create a biomaterial that, together with the chitosan, is osteoconductive and promote better and rapid regeneration of bone tissue. Thus, the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex fabricated will have properties of biocompatibility and allow the osteoblast proliferation. Composites were developed with different concentrations of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex (w/w) using thermally induced phase separation technique (TIPS). To analyze the effects of composite on osteoblasts, primary cultures, each sample was collected on days 1, 3 and 7 after seeding. The evaluation of composites consisted of viability and proliferation tests in which we observed the metabolic activity of the cells using MTT reagent and determined the DNA concentration by means of fluorescence. The expression of the marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using p-nitrophenyl phosphate was examined, allowing the observation to the activity of proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. Moreover, an analysis of biomineralization was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that 80/20 chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex biocomposite has the best performance with osteoblasts compared to biomaterials 100/0 and 70/30 chitosan/M. tenuiflora composites. Finally, it was determined that the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex presents no cytotoxicity and increases the capacity of the osteoblasts

  11. Designing biocompatible Ti-based metallic glasses for implant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti-based metallic glasses show high potential for implant applications; they overcome in several crucial respects their well-established biocompatible crystalline counterparts, e.g. improved corrosion properties, higher fracture strength and wear resistance, increased elastic strain range and lower Young's modulus. However, some of the elements required for glass formation (e.g. Cu, Ni) are harmful for the human body. We critically reviewed the biological safety and glass forming tendency in Ti of 27 elements. This can be used as a basis for the future designing of novel amorphous Ti-based implant alloys entirely free of harmful additions. In this paper, two first alloys were developed: Ti75Zr10Si15 and Ti60Nb15Zr10Si15. The overheating temperature of the melt before casting can be used as the controlling parameter to produce fully amorphous materials or bcc-Ti-phase reinforced metallic glass nano-composites. The beneficial effect of Nb addition on the glass-formation and amorphous phase stability was assessed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Crystallization and mechanical behavior of ribbons are influenced by the amount and distribution of the nano-scaled bcc phase existing in the as-cast state. Their electrochemical stability in Ringer's solution at 310 K was found to be significantly better than that of commercial Ti-based biomaterials; no indication for pitting corrosion was recorded. Highlights: ► Link between biocompatibility and glass-forming ability of alloying additions in Ti ► Selection of Ti–Zr–Si and Ti–Zr–Nb–Si glass-forming alloys ► Two novel glassy alloys were developed: Ti75Zr10Si15 and Ti60Nb15Zr10Si15. ► Glass-formation, thermal stability, corrosion and mechanical behavior were studied. ► Assessing the suitability for orthopedic applications.

  12. Biocompatibility of chitosan/Mimosa tenuiflora scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel-Estrada, Santos Adriana [Instituto de arquitectura diseño y arte, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ave. Del Charro #610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Rodríguez-Espinoza, Brenda [Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Anillo envolvente del PRONAF y Estocolmo, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Santos-Rodríguez, Elí [ICTP Meso-American Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP-MCTP)/Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Ciudad Universitaria, Carretera Zapata Km. 4, Real del Bosque (Terán), C.P. 29040 Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Jiménez-Vega, Florinda [Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Anillo envolvente del PRONAF y Estocolmo, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); García-Casillas, Perla E.; Martínez-Pérez, Carlos A. [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ave. Del Charro #610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The porosity of the composites allow biological processes for the cell adaptation on the scaffolds. • The composites improve the viability and proliferation of cells. • Composition of the scaffold plays an important role in the biocompatibility. • The results indicate that Mimosa Tenuiflora can induce the differentiation of osteoblast cells. - Abstract: In search of a plant that exhibits osteogenic activity, Mimosa tenuiflora (M. tenuiflora) cortex represents the opportunity to create a biomaterial that, together with the chitosan, is osteoconductive and promote better and rapid regeneration of bone tissue. Thus, the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex fabricated will have properties of biocompatibility and allow the osteoblast proliferation. Composites were developed with different concentrations of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex (w/w) using thermally induced phase separation technique (TIPS). To analyze the effects of composite on osteoblasts, primary cultures, each sample was collected on days 1, 3 and 7 after seeding. The evaluation of composites consisted of viability and proliferation tests in which we observed the metabolic activity of the cells using MTT reagent and determined the DNA concentration by means of fluorescence. The expression of the marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using p-nitrophenyl phosphate was examined, allowing the observation to the activity of proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. Moreover, an analysis of biomineralization was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that 80/20 chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex biocomposite has the best performance with osteoblasts compared to biomaterials 100/0 and 70/30 chitosan/M. tenuiflora composites. Finally, it was determined that the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex presents no cytotoxicity and increases the capacity of the osteoblasts

  13. Biocompatibility of Advanced Manufactured Titanium Implants—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred T. Sidambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium (Ti and its alloys may be processed via advanced powder manufacturing routes such as additive layer manufacturing (or 3D printing or metal injection moulding. This field is receiving increased attention from various manufacturing sectors including the medical devices sector. It is possible that advanced manufacturing techniques could replace the machining or casting of metal alloys in the manufacture of devices because of associated advantages that include design flexibility, reduced processing costs, reduced waste, and the opportunity to more easily manufacture complex or custom-shaped implants. The emerging advanced manufacturing approaches of metal injection moulding and additive layer manufacturing are receiving particular attention from the implant fabrication industry because they could overcome some of the difficulties associated with traditional implant fabrication techniques such as titanium casting. Using advanced manufacturing, it is also possible to produce more complex porous structures with improved mechanical performance, potentially matching the modulus of elasticity of local bone. While the economic and engineering potential of advanced manufacturing for the manufacture of musculo-skeletal implants is therefore clear, the impact on the biocompatibility of the materials has been less investigated. In this review, the capabilities of advanced powder manufacturing routes in producing components that are suitable for biomedical implant applications are assessed with emphasis placed on surface finishes and porous structures. Given that biocompatibility and host bone response are critical determinants of clinical performance, published studies of in vitro and in vivo research have been considered carefully. The review concludes with a future outlook on advanced Ti production for biomedical implants using powder metallurgy.

  14. Hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of antibacterial biomimetic hybrid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous work, we developed novel antibacterial hybrid coatings based on dextran containing dispersed Ag NPs (∼ 5 nm, DEX-Ag) aimed to offer dual protection against two of the most common complications associated with implant surgery, infections and rejection of the implant. However, their blood-material interactions are unknown. In this study, we assess the hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of DEX-Ag using fresh blood and two cell lines of the immune system, monocytes (THP-1 cells) and macrophages (PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells). Glass, polyurethane (PU) and bare dextran (DEX) were used as reference surfaces. PU, DEX and DEX-Ag exhibited non-hemolytic properties. Relative to glass (100%), platelet attachment on PU, DEX and DEX-Ag was 15%, 10% and 34%, respectively. Further, we assessed cell morphology and viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (TNF-α and IL-1β), pro-inflammatory eicosanoid expression (Prostaglandin E2, PGE2) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide and H2O2) following incubation of the cells with the surfaces. The morphology and cell viability of THP-1 cells were not affected by DEX-Ag whereas DEX-Ag minimized spreading of PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells and caused a reduction in cell viability (16% relative to other surfaces). Although DEX-Ag slightly enhanced release of ROS, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained minimal with similar levels of PGE2, as compared to the other surfaces studied. These results highlight low toxicity of DEX-Ag and hold promise for future applications in vivo. - Highlights: • We examined specific blood-contact reactions of dextran doped with Ag NPs coatings. • Biocompatibility was assessed with THP-1 cells and PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. • Glass, polyurethane and dextran were used as reference surfaces. • Hybrid coatings exhibited non-hemolytic properties. • Low toxicity, inflammatory response and ROS suggest potential for in vivo use

  15. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  16. Traversing probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  17. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:26759029

  18. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  19. Epithelial cell biocompatibility of silica nanospheres for contrast-enhanced ultrasound molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosized particles are receiving increasing attention as future contrast agents (CAs) for ultrasound (US) molecular imaging, possibly decorated on its surface with biological recognition agents for targeted delivery and deposition of therapeutics. In particular, silica nanospheres (SiNSs) have been demonstrated to be feasible in terms of contrast enhancement on conventional US systems. In this work, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of SiNSs on breast cancer (MCF-7) and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells employing NSs with sizes ranging from 160 to 330 nm and concentration range of 1.5–5 mg/mL. Cell viability was evaluated in terms of size, dose and time dependence, performing the MTT reduction assay with coated and uncoated SiNSs. Whereas uncoated SiNSs caused a variable significant decrease in cell viability on both cell lines mainly depending on size and exposure time, PEGylated SiNSs (SiNSs-PEG) exhibit a high level of biocompatibility. In fact, after 72-h incubation, viability of both cell types was above the cutoff value of 70 % at concentration up to 5 mg/mL. We also investigated the acoustical behavior of coated and uncoated SiNSs within conventional diagnostic US fields in order to determine a suitable configuration, in terms of particle size and concentration, for their employment as targetable CAs. Our results indicate that the employment of SiNSs with diameters around 240 nm assures the most effective contrast enhancement even at the lowest tested concentration, coupled with the possibility of targeting all tumor tissues, being the SiNSs still in a size range where reticuloendothelial system trapping effect is relatively low

  20. Epithelial cell biocompatibility of silica nanospheres for contrast-enhanced ultrasound molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriaco, Fernanda; Conversano, Francesco; Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Ernesto [Institute of Clinical Physiology, Bioengineering Division, National Research Council (Italy); Ragusa, Andrea [National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-NANO (Italy); Sbenaglia, Enzo Antonio; Dipaola, Lucia [Institute of Clinical Physiology, Bioengineering Division, National Research Council (Italy); Casciaro, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.casciaro@cnr.it [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica (CNR-IFC) c/o Campus Universitario Ecotekne, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Nanosized particles are receiving increasing attention as future contrast agents (CAs) for ultrasound (US) molecular imaging, possibly decorated on its surface with biological recognition agents for targeted delivery and deposition of therapeutics. In particular, silica nanospheres (SiNSs) have been demonstrated to be feasible in terms of contrast enhancement on conventional US systems. In this work, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of SiNSs on breast cancer (MCF-7) and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells employing NSs with sizes ranging from 160 to 330 nm and concentration range of 1.5-5 mg/mL. Cell viability was evaluated in terms of size, dose and time dependence, performing the MTT reduction assay with coated and uncoated SiNSs. Whereas uncoated SiNSs caused a variable significant decrease in cell viability on both cell lines mainly depending on size and exposure time, PEGylated SiNSs (SiNSs-PEG) exhibit a high level of biocompatibility. In fact, after 72-h incubation, viability of both cell types was above the cutoff value of 70 % at concentration up to 5 mg/mL. We also investigated the acoustical behavior of coated and uncoated SiNSs within conventional diagnostic US fields in order to determine a suitable configuration, in terms of particle size and concentration, for their employment as targetable CAs. Our results indicate that the employment of SiNSs with diameters around 240 nm assures the most effective contrast enhancement even at the lowest tested concentration, coupled with the possibility of targeting all tumor tissues, being the SiNSs still in a size range where reticuloendothelial system trapping effect is relatively low.

  1. An amperometric nanobiosensor using a biocompatible conjugate for early detection of metastatic cancer cells in biological fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallela, Ramjee; Chandra, Pranjal; Noh, Hui-Bog; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-11-15

    Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death in humans, and its early diagnosis will help clinicians to develop suitable therapeutic strategies which may save life of cancer patients. In this direction, we designed an amperometric biosensor using a biocompatible conjugate to diagnose cancer metastasis by detecting epithelial cell adhesion molecule expressing metastatic cancer cells (Ep-MCCs). The sensor probe is fabricated by immobilizing monoclonal capture antibody (CapAnti) on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)/conducting polymer composite layer. The detection relies on a sandwich-type approach using a bioconjugate composed of reporter antibody (RepAnti), nanostructured collagen (nCOL), AuNPs, and hydrazine (Hyd) which served as a nonenzymatic electrocatalyst for the reduction of H2O2. The binding of Ep-MCCs with the sensor probe was confirmed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry. A dynamic range for the Ep-MCCs detection is determined between 45 and 100,000 Ep-MCCs/mL with the detection limit of 28±3 Ep-MCCs/mL. The proposed immunosensor is successfully applied to detect Ep-MCCs in serum and mixed cell samples and interferences due to nontarget cells and molecules present in the real sample matrix are also examined. The early stage of Ep-MCCs was examined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting assay, which confirms that the developed biosensor has detected Ep-MCCs in its early stage. PMID:27311113

  2. Water-soluble and biocompatible MnO@PVP nanoparticles for MR imaging in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Yuxuan; Wang, Mingliang; Miao, Fei; Ma, Hongmei; Shen, Hebai; Jia, Nengqin

    2013-06-01

    The uniform-sized manganese oxide nanoparticles (the oleic-capped MnO NPs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of Mn-oleate complex and were transferred into water with the help of cationic surfactant of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), then the poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) membrane was further coated on to them with the aid of anionic dispersant of poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) by layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly to render them water soluble and biocompatible. They were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and MTT assay. In vitro cellular uptake test revealed the MnO@PVP NPs were low cytotoxic, biocompatible and could be used as a T,-positive contrast agent for passive targeting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Interestingly, signal enhancement in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces in vivo experiment suggested that the MnO@PVP NPs can pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB). These results show that MnO@PVP NPs are good candidates as MRI contrast agents with the lack of cytotoxicity and have great potential applications in magnetic nano-device and biomagnetic field. PMID:23858961

  3. Current Trends in Development of Liposomes for Targeting Bacterial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Zora Rukavina; Željka Vanić

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm targeting represents a great challenge for effective antimicrobial therapy. Increased biofilm resistance, even with the elevated concentrations of very potent antimicrobial agents, often leads to failed therapeutic outcome. Application of biocompatible nanomicrobials, particularly liposomally-associated nanomicrobials, presents a promising approach for improved drug delivery to bacterial cells and biofilms. Versatile manipulations of liposomal physicochemical properties, such as the b...

  4. Amino Acid-Modified Polyethylenimines with Enhanced Gene Delivery Efficiency and Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin-Fang Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of gene delivery vectors with high efficiency and biocompatibility is one of the key points of gene therapy. A series of polycations were prepared from polyethylenimine (PEI with several amino acids or their analogs. The target polymers have different charge and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties, which may affect their performance in the gene transfection process. Gel retardation and DLS assays showed that these polymers may condense DNA into nanoparticles with positive zeta potentials and proper sizes for cellular uptake. Luciferase reporter gene transfection results revealed their higher transfection efficiency than PEI; especially in the presence of serum, in which up to 23 times higher efficiency was achieved by employing glycolic acid-grafted PEI. Moreover, it was found that the degree of substitution on PEI has an apparent influence on the transfection, and the balance between electron-positive/negative groups largely affects the delivery process. The higher serum tolerance was also proven by BSA adsorption, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy assays. Results demonstrate that such type of polycations may serve as promising non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  5. Effect of the deposition temperature on corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladescu, A.; Braic, M.; Azem, F. Ak; Titorencu, I.; Braic, V.; Pruna, V.; Kiss, A.; Parau, A. C.; Birlik, I.

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics belong to a class of calcium phosphate-based materials, which have been widely used as coatings on titanium medical implants in order to improve bone fixation and thus to increase the lifetime of the implant. In this study, HAP coatings were deposited from pure HAP targets on Ti6Al4V substrates using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 800 °C. The surface morphology and the crystallographic structure of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the coatings in saliva solution at 37 °C was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) was used to test the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results showed that all of the coatings grown uniformly and that the increasing substrate temperature induced an increase in their crystallinity. Corrosion performance of the coatings was improved with the increase of the substrate temperature from 400 °C to 800 °C. Furthermore, all the coatings support the attachment and growth of the osteosarcoma cells with regard to the in vitro test findings.

  6. Biocompatibility evaluation of sputtered zirconium-based thin film metallic glass-coated steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian B

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Balasubramanian Subramanian,1 Sundaram Maruthamuthu,2 Senthilperumal Thanka Rajan1 1Electrochemical Material Science Division, 2Corrosion and Materials Protection Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi, India Abstract: Thin film metallic glasses comprised of Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 (at.% of approximately 1.5 µm and 3 µm in thickness were prepared using magnetron sputtering onto medical grade 316L stainless steel. Their structural and mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion, and antimicrobial activity were analyzed. The amorphous thin film metallic glasses consisted of a single glassy phase, with an absence of any detectable peaks corresponding to crystalline phases. Elemental composition close to the target alloy was noted from EDAX analysis of the thin film. The surface morphology of the film showed a smooth surface on scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the zirconium-based metallic glass could withstand body fluid, showing superior resistance to corrosion and electrochemical stability. Interactions between the coated surface and bacteria were investigated by agar diffusion, solution suspension, and wet interfacial contact methods. The results indicated a clear zone of inhibition against the growth of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, confirming the antimicrobial activity of the thin film metallic glasses. Cytotoxicity studies using L929 fibroblast cells showed these coatings to be noncytotoxic in nature. Keywords: thin film metallic glasses, sputtering, biocompatibility, corrosion, antimicrobial activity

  7. Preparation of Fluorescent Dye-Doped Biocompatible Nanoparticles for Cell Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Peng, Hongshang; Huang, Shihua; You, Fangtian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report a series of fluorescent biocompatible nanoparticles (NPs), prepared by a facile reprecipitation-encapsulation method, for cellular labeling. The as-prepared NPs exhibit a narrow size distribution of 70-110 nm, and a core-shell structure comprised of a hybrid core doped with different dyes and a poly-L-lysine (PLL) shell. With coumarin 6, nile red, and meso- tetraphenylporphyrin as the imaging agents, the fluorescent NPs gave green, orange, and red emissions respectively. Due to the positively charged PLL shell, the fluorescent NPs exhibit neglected cytotoxicity and efficient cellular uptake. After incubation with living cells, the results obtained by laser confocal microscope from green, orange, and red channels all clearly show that the fluores- cent NPs are inhomogenously localized inside the cytoplasm without penetrating into the nucleus. Since such PLL-modified NPs can encapsulate other hydrophobic dyes, a wide spectrum of nanoimaging agents is thus expected. Furthermore, the surface amino groups on the PLL shell afford an anchoring site for further bioconjugation, and targeted imaging is also very promising. PMID:27451673

  8. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Si Alloyed Multi-Principal Element Carbide Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladescu, Alina; Titorencu, Irina; Dekhtyar, Yuri; Jinga, Victor; Pruna, Vasile; Balaceanu, Mihai; Dinu, Mihaela; Pana, Iulian; Vendina, Viktorija; Braic, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we have examined the possibility to improve the biocompatibility of the (TiZrNbTaHf)C through replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si. The coatings were deposited on Si and 316L stainless steel substrates by magnetron sputtering in an Ar+CH4 mixed atmosphere and were examined for elemental composition, chemical bonds, surface topography, surface electrical charge and biocompatible characteristics. The net surface charge was evaluated at nano and macroscopic scale by measuring the electrical potential and work function, respectively. The biocompatible tests comprised determination of cell viability and cell attachment to the coated surface. The deposited coatings had C/(metal+Si) ratios close to unity, while a mixture of metallic carbide, free-carbon and oxidized species formed on the film surface. The coatings' surfaces were smooth and no influence of surface roughness on electrical charge or biocompatibility was found. The biocompatible characteristics correlated well with the electrical potential/work function, suggesting a significant role of surface charge in improving biocompatibility, particularly cell attachment to coating's surface. Replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si in the (TiZrNbTaHf)C coating led to an enhanced surface electrical charge, as well as to superior biocompatible properties, with best results for the (TiZrNbSiHf)C coating. PMID:27571361

  9. Protease-activated quantum dot probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Emmanuel; Sun, Jiantang; Miller, Jordan S.; Yu, William W.; Colvin, Vicki L.; West, Jennifer L.; Drezek, Rebekah

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel quantum dot based probe with inherent signal amplification upon interaction with a targeted proteolytic enzyme. This probe may be useful for imaging in cancer detection and diagnosis. In this system, quantum dots (QDs) are bound to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via a proteolytically-degradable peptide sequence to non-radiatively suppress luminescence. A 71% reduction in luminescence was achieved with conjugation of AuNPs to QDs. Peptide cleavage results in release of AuNPs and restores radiative QD photoluminescence. Initial studies observed a 52% rise in luminescence over 47 hours of exposure to 0.2 mg/mL collagenase. These probes can be customized for targeted degradation simply by changing the sequence of the peptide linker.

  10. Biocompatibility, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of mesoporous silica and polystyrene nanoparticles in ovarian cancer cells: effects of size and surface charge groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkapongpisit M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Maneerat Ekkapongpisit,1 Antonino Giovia,1 Carlo Follo,1 Giuseppe Caputo,2,3 Ciro Isidoro11Laboratory of Molecular Pathology and Nanobioimaging, Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “A Avogadro”, Novara, 2Dipartimento di Chimica dell’Università di Torino, Torino, 3Cyanine Technology SpA, Torino, ItalyBackground and methods: Nanoparticles engineered to carry both a chemotherapeutic drug and a sensitive imaging probe are valid tools for early detection of cancer cells and to monitor the cytotoxic effects of anticancer treatment simultaneously. Here we report on the effect of size (10–30 nm versus 50 nm, type of material (mesoporous silica versus polystyrene, and surface charge functionalization (none, amine groups, or carboxyl groups on biocompatibility, uptake, compartmentalization, and intracellular retention of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles in cultured human ovarian cancer cells. We also investigated the involvement of caveolae in the mechanism of uptake of nanoparticles.Results: We found that mesoporous silica nanoparticles entered via caveolae-mediated endocytosis and reached the lysosomes; however, while the 50 nm nanoparticles permanently resided within these organelles, the 10 nm nanoparticles soon relocated in the cytoplasm. Naked 10 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticles showed the highest and 50 nm carboxyl-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles the lowest uptake rates, respectively. Polystyrene nanoparticle uptake also occurred via a caveolae-independent pathway, and was negatively affected by serum. The 30 nm carboxyl-modified polystyrene nanoparticles did not localize in lysosomes and were not toxic, while the 50 nm amine-modified polystyrene nanoparticles accumulated within lysosomes and eventually caused cell death. Ovarian cancer cells expressing caveolin-1 were more likely to endocytose these nanoparticles.Conclusion: These data highlight the importance of considering both the

  11. Probe and method for DNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James Henry; Sharma, Jaswinder Kumar; Martinez, Jennifer Suzanne

    2013-07-02

    A hybridization probe containing two linear strands of DNA lights up upon hybridization to a target DNA using silver nanoclusters that have been templated onto one of the DNA strands. Hybridization induces proximity between the nanoclusters on one strand and an overhang on the other strand, which results in enhanced fluorescence emission from the nanoclusters.

  12. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga J

    2014-10-01

    interference device. Using flow cytometry, we further investigated the effects of the different types of nanoparticle coating on morphology, viability, and DNA integrity of Jurkat cells. We showed that by addition of bovine serum albumin, the toxicity of nanoparticles is greatly reduced. We also investigated the effect of the particles on the growth of primary human endothelial cells to further demonstrate the biocompatibility of the particles. As proof of principle, we showed that the hybrid-coated particles are able to carry payloads of up to 800 µg/mL of the cytostatic drug mitoxantrone while still staying colloidally stable. The drug-loaded system exhibited excellent therapeutic potential in vitro, exceeding that of free mitoxantrone. In conclusion, we have synthesized a biocompatible ferrofluid that shows great potential for clinical application. The synthesis is straightforward and reproducible and thus easily translatable into a good manufacturing practice environment. Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, drug delivery, protein corona, magnetic drug targeting, colloidal stability

  13. Hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of antibacterial biomimetic hybrid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coll Ferrer, M. Carme [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Eckmann, Uriel N. [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Composto, Russell J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Eckmann, David M., E-mail: eckmanndm@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    In previous work, we developed novel antibacterial hybrid coatings based on dextran containing dispersed Ag NPs (∼ 5 nm, DEX-Ag) aimed to offer dual protection against two of the most common complications associated with implant surgery, infections and rejection of the implant. However, their blood-material interactions are unknown. In this study, we assess the hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of DEX-Ag using fresh blood and two cell lines of the immune system, monocytes (THP-1 cells) and macrophages (PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells). Glass, polyurethane (PU) and bare dextran (DEX) were used as reference surfaces. PU, DEX and DEX-Ag exhibited non-hemolytic properties. Relative to glass (100%), platelet attachment on PU, DEX and DEX-Ag was 15%, 10% and 34%, respectively. Further, we assessed cell morphology and viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (TNF-α and IL-1β), pro-inflammatory eicosanoid expression (Prostaglandin E{sub 2}, PGE{sub 2}) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) following incubation of the cells with the surfaces. The morphology and cell viability of THP-1 cells were not affected by DEX-Ag whereas DEX-Ag minimized spreading of PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells and caused a reduction in cell viability (16% relative to other surfaces). Although DEX-Ag slightly enhanced release of ROS, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained minimal with similar levels of PGE{sub 2}, as compared to the other surfaces studied. These results highlight low toxicity of DEX-Ag and hold promise for future applications in vivo. - Highlights: • We examined specific blood-contact reactions of dextran doped with Ag NPs coatings. • Biocompatibility was assessed with THP-1 cells and PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. • Glass, polyurethane and dextran were used as reference surfaces. • Hybrid coatings exhibited non-hemolytic properties. • Low toxicity, inflammatory response and ROS suggest potential for in vivo use.

  14. Biocompatibility evaluation of tissue-engineered decellularized scaffolds for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Kamal Hany; Park, Kyung-Mee; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Woo, Heung-Myong

    2016-10-01

    Biomaterials based on seeding of cells on decellularized scaffolds have gained increasing interest in the last few years and suggested to serve as an alternative approach to bioengineer artificial organs and tissues for transplantation. The reaction of the host toward the decellularized scaffold and transplanted cells depends on the biocompatibility of the construct. Before proceeding to the clinical application step of decellularized scaffolds, it is greatly important to apply a number of biocompatibility tests in vitro and in vivo. This review describes the different methodology involved in cytotoxicity, pathogenicity, immunogenicity and biodegradability testing for evaluating the biocompatibility of various decellularized matrices obtained from human or animals. PMID:27287176

  15. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  16. Study of a Laser-Produced Plasma by Langmuir Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.; Hasimi, M.; Pant, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    The structure, the parameters and the expansion of the plasma produced by focusing a 7 J, 20 ns Nd-glass laser on stainless-steel and glass targets suspended in a high-vacuum chamber were investigated by Langmuir probes. It was observed that the probe signals consisted of a photoelectric...

  17. Preparation of a glypican-3-targeting hepatocellular carcinoma MR probe and its molecular imaging in HepG2 cells%靶向肝癌磷脂酰肌醇蛋白聚糖-3分子探针的构建及其在HepG2细胞中的磁共振成像

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾燕; 曾燕; 郭大静; 杨静; 周君; 刘欣杰; 王志刚

    2014-01-01

    目的 构建一种靶向肝癌磷脂酰肌醇蛋白聚糖-3 (GPC3)的磁共振(MR)分子探针,并探讨其靶向肝癌HepG2细胞的特异性及体外细胞MR成像的可行性.方法 用双乳化溶剂挥发法制备聚乳酸-羟基乙酸共聚物(PLGA)纳米粒,在纳米粒表面连接GPC3抗体及顺磁性对比剂Gd3+构建靶向肝癌GPC3的MR分子探针,利用荧光显微镜、电镜、Malvem激光粒径测量仪、电感偶合等离子体原子发射光谱仪及1.5T MR扫描仪观察其表征;利用激光共聚焦显微镜观察该探针与GPC3结合的特异性;利用MR扫描仪观察该探针标记肝癌HepG2细胞后的体外MR成像能力.多组均数间用方差分析进行比较,组内两均数间用LSD-t检验进行比较.结果 成功构建了靶向肝癌GPC3的MR分子探针GPC3抗体-PLGA-Gd纳米粒,其形态规则、呈球形,粒径(495.0±17.5)nm,大小、分布均匀,分散性好,无明显聚集.经电感偶合等离子体原子发射光谱仪测定,1 molPLGA上大约载有12 mol的Gd3+.随着Gd3+浓度的增加,MR扫描时的SNR值相应增加,组间SNR值差异具有统计学意义(F=1721.131,P<0.05);体外HepG2细胞寻靶后行MR成像并计算其相应SNR,靶向组SNR值为3.45±0.21,非靶向组SNR值为1.43±0.07,对照组SNR值为1.12±0.03,靶向组的SNR值明显高于非靶向组及对照组(LSD-t检验,P值均<0.05),非靶向组与对照组的SNR值差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 应用PLGA纳米粒、GPC3抗体及顺磁性对比剂Gd3+构建的靶向肝癌GPC3的MR分子探针在体外能与HepG2细胞特异性结合,且标记HepG2细胞后能在1.5T MR扫描仪上成像,有望应用于活体肝癌的特异性成像,为肝癌的早期诊断提供一种无创的成像手段.%Objective To prepare a glypican-3 (GPC3)-targeting hepatocellular carcinoma MR molecular probe and to evaluate its targeting specificity using HepG2 cells.Methods Poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were prepared by a double

  18. Synthesis and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of biocompatible branched copolymer nanocontrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson AW

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander W Jackson,1,* Prashant Chandrasekharan,2,* Jian Shi,3 Steven P Rannard,4 Quan Liu,5 Chang-Tong Yang,6 Tao He1,7 1Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences (ICES, 2Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A* STAR, 3Department of Biological Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 4Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; 5School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 7School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, HeFei University of Technology, Anhui, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Branched copolymer nanoparticles (Dh =20–35 nm possessing 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid macrocycles within their cores have been synthesized and applied as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI nanosized contrast agents in vivo. These nanoparticles have been generated from novel functional monomers via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The process is very robust and synthetically straightforward. Chelation with gadolinium and preliminary in vivo experiments have demonstrated promising characteristics as MRI contrast agents with prolonged blood retention time, good biocompatibility, and an intravascular distribution. The ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively target tumor cells through the enhanced permeability and retention effect is also demonstrated. These novel highly functional nanoparticle platforms have succinimidyl ester-activated benzoate functionalities within their corona, which make them suitable for future peptide conjugation and subsequent active cell-targeted MRI or the conjugation of fluorophores for bimodal imaging. We have also demonstrated that these branched copolymer nanoparticles are able to noncovalently

  19. Initial biocompatibility of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane films with different wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasteva, N A; Toromanov, G; Hristova, K T; Radeva, E I; Pecheva, E V; Dimitrova, R P; Altankov, G P; Pramatarova, L D, E-mail: nataly@bio21.bas.b

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the relationships between material surface properties, behaviour of adsorbed proteins and cellular responses is essential to design optimal material surfaces for tissue engineering. In this study we modify thin layers of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDS) by ammonia treatment in order to increase surface wettability and the corresponding biological response. The physico-chemical properties of the polymer films were characterized by contact angle (CA) measurements and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis.Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used as model system for the initial biocompatibility studies following their behavior upon preadsorption of polymer films with three adhesive proteins: fibronectin (FN), fibrinogen (FG) and vitronectin (VN). Adhesive interaction of HUVEC was evaluated after 2 hours by analyzing the overall cell morphology, and the organization of focal adhesion contacts and actin cytoskeleton. We have found similar good cellular response on FN and FG coated polymer films, with better pronounced vinculin expression on FN samples while. Conversely, on VN coated surfaces the wettability influenced significantly initial celular interaction spreading. The results obtained suggested that ammonia plasma treatment can modulate the biological activity of the adsorbed protein s on PPHMDS surfaces and thus to influence the interaction with endothelial cells.

  20. Viability of biocompatible and biodegradable seeds production with incorporated radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims the development of radioactive seeds, biocompatible and biodegradable, with the objective of adding options in the cancer treatment. The work focus on the production of seeds biodegradable that incorporate radioisotopes with half life inferior than the degradation time of the material. The idea of producing devices with biodegradable materials impregnated with radioisotopes of short half life will offer new possibilities in the cancer treatment, since they can be used following the same procedures of the permanent interstitial brachytherapy, but using degradable materials compatible with the physiological environment. It will be discussed in particular the possible application of these seeds in the treatment of prostate cancer. A review of the subject and a preliminary evaluation of the viability of production of the seeds will be presented. The method of production of the seeds is based on the incorporation of Iodine and Samarium in glass matrixes obtained by sol-gel processing. X-ray fluorescence was done in the samples produced and the incorporation of Iodine and Samarium atoms was confirmed. (author)

  1. Facile Synthesis, Silanization and Biodistribution of Biocompatible Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nan; Marshall, Ann F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a facile strategy to the synthesis of silica-coated quantum dots (QDs) for in vivo imaging. All the QD synthesis and silanization steps are conducted in water and methanol under mild conditions without involving any organometallic precursors and high temperature, oxygen-free environments. The as-prepared silica-coated QDs possess high quantum yields and are extremely stable in mouse serum. In addition, the silanization method developed here produces nanoparticles (NPs) with small sizes that are difficult to achieve via conventional silanization methods. The silica coating helps to prevent the exposure of QD surface to the biological milieu and therefore increases the biocompatibility of QDs for in vivo applications. Interestingly, the silica-coated QDs exhibit a different biodistribution pattern than commercially available Invitrogen QD605 (carboxylate) with a similar size and emission wavelength. The Invitrogen QD605 exhibited predominant liver (57.2% ID g-1) and spleen (46.1% ID g-1) uptakes 30 mins after intravenous injection, whereas the silica-coated QDs exhibited much lower liver (16.2% ID g-1) and spleen (3.67% ID g-1) uptakes but higher kidney uptake (8.82% ID g-1), blood retention (15.0% ID g-1) and partial renal clearance. Overall, this straightforward synthetic strategy paves the way for routine and customized synthesis of silica-coated QDs for biological use. PMID:20564726

  2. Impact of trace elements on biocompatibility of titanium scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A titanium oxide scaffold has recently been reported with high compressive strength (>2 MPa) which may allow its use in bone. However, would it be possible to enhance the scaffolds' performance by selecting a titanium oxide raw material without elemental contamination? Elements in implant surfaces have been reported to provoke implant failure. Thus, this study aims to compare different commercial titanium dioxide powders in order to choose the appropriate powder for scaffold making. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis identified the trace elements, mainly Al, Si, C, Ca and P. Cellular response was measured by cytotoxic effect, cell growth and cytokine secretion from murine preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) in vitro. The XPS data showed that traces of carbon-based molecules, silicon, nitrogen and aluminium in the powder were greatly reduced after cleaning in 1 M NaOH. As a result, reduction in cytotoxicity and inflammatory response was observed. Carbon contamination seemed to have a minor effect on the cellular response. Strong correlations were found between Al and Si contamination levels and the inflammatory response and cytotoxic effect. Thus, it is suggested that the concentration of these elements should be reduced in order to enhance the scaffolds' biocompatibility.

  3. Effect of plasma surface modification on the biocompatibility of UHMWPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaklamani, G; Chen, J; Dong, H; Stamboulis, A [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mehrban, N; Bowen, J; Grover, L, E-mail: a.stamboulis@bham.ac.u [School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    In this paper active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is used to chemically modify the surface of UHMWPE. This is an unexplored and new area of research. ASPN allows the homogeneous treatment of any shape or surface at low temperature; therefore, it was thought that ASPN would be an effective technique to modify organic polymer surfaces. ASPN experiments were carried out at 120 {sup 0}C using a dc plasma nitriding unit with a 25% N{sub 2} and 75% H{sub 2} atmosphere at 2.5 mbar of pressure. UHMWPE samples treated for different time periods were characterized by nanoindentation, FTIR, XPS, interferometry and SEM. A 3T3 fibroblast cell line was used for in vitro cell culture experiments. Nanoindentation of UHMWPE showed that hardness and elastic modulus increased with ASPN treatment compared to the untreated material. FTIR spectra did not show significant differences between the untreated and treated samples; however, some changes were observed at 30 min of treatment in the range of 1500-1700 cm{sup -1} associated mainly with the presence of N-H groups. XPS studies showed that nitrogen was present on the surface and its amount increased with treatment time. Interferometry showed that no significant changes were observed on the surfaces after the treatment. Finally, cell culture experiments and SEM showed that fibroblasts attached and proliferated to a greater extent on the plasma-treated surfaces leading to the conclusion that ASPN surface treatment can potentially significantly improve the biocompatibility behaviour of polymeric materials.

  4. Metallic ion release from biocompatible cobalt-based alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Ivana D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials, which are mainly used for the damaged hard tissue replacements, are materials with high strength, excellent toughness and good wear resistance. The disadvantages of metals as implant materials are their susceptibility to corrosion, the elastic modulus mismatch between metals and human hard tissues, relatively high density and metallic ion release which can cause serious health problems. The aim of this study was to examine metallic ion release from Co-Cr-Mo alloy in artificial saliva. In that purpose, alloy samples were immersed into artificial saliva with different pH values (4.0, 5.5 and 7.5. After a certain immersion period (1, 3 and 6 weeks the concentrations of released ions were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS. The research findings were used in order to define the dependence between the concentration of released metallic ions, artificial saliva pH values and immersion time. The determined released metallic ions concentrations were compared with literature data in order to describe and better understand the phenomenon of metallic ion release from the biocompatible cobalt-based alloy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46010 i br. ON 174004

  5. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Tejashree; Ghoderao, Prachi; Sanghavi, Sonali; Babrekar, Harshada; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Ganesan, V.; Kulkarni, Anjali

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle-RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml-1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml-1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle-RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs-RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates.

  6. A new biocompatible nanocomposite as a promising constituent of sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rehab M; Elfeky, Souad A; Verwanger, Thomas; Krammer, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Skin naturally uses antioxidants to protect itself from the damaging effects of sunlight. If this is not sufficient, other measures have to be taken. Like this, hydroxyapatite has the potential to be applied as an active constituent of sunscreens since calcium phosphate absorbs in the ultraviolet region (UV). The objective of the present work was to synthesize a hydroxyapatite-ascorbic acid nanocomposite (HAp/AA-NC) as a new biocompatible constituent of sunscreens and to test its efficiency with skin cell models. The synthesized HAp/AA-NC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, absorption spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction analysis. The protective effect of the construct was tested with respect to viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of primary human dermal fibroblasts (SKIN) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Both cell lines were irradiated with UV light, λmax=254 nm with a fluence of 25 mJ cm(-2) to mimic the effect of UV radiation of sunlight on the skin. Results showed that HAp/AA-NC had a stimulating effect on the cell viability of both, HaCaT and SKIN cells, relative to the irradiated control. Intracellular ROS significantly decreased in UV irradiated cells when treated with HAp/AA-NC. We conclude that the synthesized HAp/AA-NC have been validated in vitro as a skin protector against the harmful effect of UV-induced ROS. PMID:27040194

  7. Biocompatibility of new Ti-Nb-Ta base alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Abdelrahman H; Gepreel, Mohamed A-H; Gouda, Mohamed K; Hefnawy, Ahmad M; Kandil, Sherif H

    2016-04-01

    β-type titanium alloys are promising materials in the field of medical implants. The effect of β-phase stability on the mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity of a newly designed β-type (Ti77Nb17Ta6) biocompatible alloys are studied. The β-phase stability was controlled by the addition of small quantities of Fe and O. X-ray diffraction and microstructural analysis showed that the addition of O and Fe stabilized the β-phase in the treated solution condition. The strength and hardness have increased with the increase in β-phase stability while ductility and Young's modulus have decreased. The potentio-dynamic polarization tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the new alloys is better than Ti-6Al-4V alloy by at least ten times. Neutral red uptake assay cytotoxicity test showed cell viability of at least 95%. The new alloys are promising candidates for biomedical applications due to their high mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and reduced cytotoxicity. PMID:26838885

  8. Effect of plasma surface modification on the biocompatibility of UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaklamani, G; Mehrban, N; Chen, J; Bowen, J; Dong, H; Grover, L; Stamboulis, A

    2010-10-01

    In this paper active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is used to chemically modify the surface of UHMWPE. This is an unexplored and new area of research. ASPN allows the homogeneous treatment of any shape or surface at low temperature; therefore, it was thought that ASPN would be an effective technique to modify organic polymer surfaces. ASPN experiments were carried out at 120 °C using a dc plasma nitriding unit with a 25% N(2) and 75% H(2) atmosphere at 2.5 mbar of pressure. UHMWPE samples treated for different time periods were characterized by nanoindentation, FTIR, XPS, interferometry and SEM. A 3T3 fibroblast cell line was used for in vitro cell culture experiments. Nanoindentation of UHMWPE showed that hardness and elastic modulus increased with ASPN treatment compared to the untreated material. FTIR spectra did not show significant differences between the untreated and treated samples; however, some changes were observed at 30 min of treatment in the range of 1500-1700 cm(-1) associated mainly with the presence of N-H groups. XPS studies showed that nitrogen was present on the surface and its amount increased with treatment time. Interferometry showed that no significant changes were observed on the surfaces after the treatment. Finally, cell culture experiments and SEM showed that fibroblasts attached and proliferated to a greater extent on the plasma-treated surfaces leading to the conclusion that ASPN surface treatment can potentially significantly improve the biocompatibility behaviour of polymeric materials. PMID:20876959

  9. Current and future biocompatibility aspects of biomaterials for hip prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Aherwar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of biomaterials has turn into an electrifying area because these materials improve the quality and longevity of human life. The first and foremost necessity for the selection of the biomaterial is the acceptability by human body. However, the materials used in hip implants are designed to sustain the load bearing function of human bones for the start of the patient’s life. The most common classes of biomaterials used are metals, polymers, ceramics, composites and apatite. These five classes are used individually or in combination with other materials to form most of the implantation devices in recent years. Numerous current and promising new biomaterials i.e. metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite are discussed to highlight their merits and their frailties in terms of mechanical and metallurgical properties in this review. It is concluded that current materials have their confines and there is a need for more refined multi-functional materials to be developed in order to match the biocompatibility, metallurgical and mechanical complexity of the hip prosthesis.

  10. Conversion of bulk seashells to biocompatible hydroxyapatite for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Kenneth S; Zhang, Xing; Massie, Jennifer B; Wang, Mark; Kim, Choll W

    2007-11-01

    Strombus gigas (conch) shells and Tridacna gigas (Giant clam) shells have dense, tailored structures that impart excellent mechanical properties to these shells. In this investigation, conch and clam seashells were converted to hydroxyapatite (HAP) by a hydrothermal method at different temperatures and for different conversion durations. Dense HAP structures were created from these shells throughout the majority of the samples at the relative low temperature of approximately 200 degrees C. The average fracture stress was found to be approximately 137-218MPa for partially converted conch shell samples and approximately 70-150MPa for original and converted clamshell samples, which is close to the mechanical strength of compact human bone. This indicates that the converted shell samples can be used as implants in load-bearing cases. In vivo tests of converted shell samples were performed in rat femoral defects for 6 weeks. The microtomography images at 6 weeks show that the implants did not move, and untreated control defects remain empty with no evidence of a spontaneous fusion. Histological study reveals that there is newly formed bone growing up to and around the implants. There is no evidence of a fibrosis tissue ring around the implants, also indicating that there is no loosening of the implants. In contrast, the untreated controls remain empty with some evidence of a fibrosis ring around the defect hole. These results indicate good biocompatibility and bioactivity of the converted shell implants. PMID:17684000

  11. Fabrication of Biocompatible, Vibrational Magnetoelastic Materials for Controlling Cellular Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak M. Rajachar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of the ME material in an aqueous and biological environment is achieved by chemical-vapor deposition of a conformal Parylene-C layer, and further functionalized by methods of oxygen plasma etching and protein adsorption. In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material. This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

  12. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Electrospun Chitosan/Collagen Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiwei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan/collagen composite nanofibrous scaffold has been greatly concerned in recent years for its favorable physicochemical properties which mimic the native extracellular matrix (ECM both morphologically and chemically. In a previous study, we had successfully fabricated nanofibrous chitosan/collagen composite by electrospinning. In the present study, we further investigate the biocompatibility of such chitosan/collagen composite nanofiber to be used as scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering. The porcine iliac artery endothelial cells (PIECs were employed for morphogenesis, attachment, proliferation, and phenotypic studies. Four characteristic EC markers, including two types of cell adhesion molecules, one proliferation molecule (PCNA, and one function molecule (p53, were studied by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results showed that the chitosan/collagen composite nanofibrous scaffold could enhance the attachment, spreading, and proliferation of PIECs and preserve the EC phenotype. Our work provides profound proofs for the applicable potency of scaffolds made from chitosan/collagen composite nanofiber to be used in vascular tissue engineering.

  13. Fabrication and Biocompatibility of Electrospun Silk Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ick-Soo Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin has attracted great interest in tissue engineering because of its outstanding biocompatibility, biodegradability and minimal inflammatory reaction. In this study, two kinds of biocomposites based on regenerated silk fibroin are fabricated by electrospinning and post-treatment processes, respectively. Firstly, regenerated silk fibroin/tetramethoxysilane (TMOS hybrid nanofibers with high hydrophilicity are prepared, which is superior for fibroblast attachment. The electrospinning process causes adjacent fibers to ‘weld’ at contact points, which can be proved by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The water contact angle of silk/tetramethoxysilane (TMOS composites shows a sharper decrease than pure regenerated silk fibroin nanofiber, which has a great effect on the early stage of cell attachment behavior. Secondly, a novel tissue engineering scaffold material based on electrospun silk fibroin/nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA biocomposites is prepared by means of an effective calcium and phosphate (Ca–P alternate soaking method. nHA is successfully produced on regenerated silk fibroin nanofiber within several min without any pre-treatments. The osteoblastic activities of this novel nanofibrous biocomposites are also investigated by employing osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cell line. The cell functionality such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity is ameliorated on mineralized silk nanofibers. All these results indicate that this silk/nHA biocomposite scaffold material may be a promising biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  14. Effect of plasma surface modification on the biocompatibility of UHMWPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is used to chemically modify the surface of UHMWPE. This is an unexplored and new area of research. ASPN allows the homogeneous treatment of any shape or surface at low temperature; therefore, it was thought that ASPN would be an effective technique to modify organic polymer surfaces. ASPN experiments were carried out at 120 0C using a dc plasma nitriding unit with a 25% N2 and 75% H2 atmosphere at 2.5 mbar of pressure. UHMWPE samples treated for different time periods were characterized by nanoindentation, FTIR, XPS, interferometry and SEM. A 3T3 fibroblast cell line was used for in vitro cell culture experiments. Nanoindentation of UHMWPE showed that hardness and elastic modulus increased with ASPN treatment compared to the untreated material. FTIR spectra did not show significant differences between the untreated and treated samples; however, some changes were observed at 30 min of treatment in the range of 1500-1700 cm-1 associated mainly with the presence of N-H groups. XPS studies showed that nitrogen was present on the surface and its amount increased with treatment time. Interferometry showed that no significant changes were observed on the surfaces after the treatment. Finally, cell culture experiments and SEM showed that fibroblasts attached and proliferated to a greater extent on the plasma-treated surfaces leading to the conclusion that ASPN surface treatment can potentially significantly improve the biocompatibility behaviour of polymeric materials.

  15. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Markides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is a pioneering field aimed at restoring and regenerating the function of damaged cells, organs and tissues in order to establish normal function. It demands the cross communication of disciplines to develop effective therapeutic stem cell based therapies. Nanotechnology has been instrumental in the development and translation of basic research to the clinically relevant therapies. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been applied to tag, track and activate stem cells offering an effective means of monitoring in vitro and in vivo behaviour. MNPs are comprised of an iron oxide core with a biocompatible biological polymer. Safety is an issue of constant concern and emphasises on the importance of investigating the issue of toxicity. Any indication of toxicity can ultimately limit the therapeutic efficiency of the therapy. Toxicity is highly dependent on the physical, chemical and structural properties of the MNP itself as well as dose and intended use. Few in vitro studies have reported adverse effects of MNP on cells at in vitro in therapeutic doses. However, long term in vivo studies have not been studied as extensively. This review aims to summarise current research in this topic highlighting commonly used toxicity assays to investigate this.

  16. Characterization and biocompatibility of fluoridated biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Z.L. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Yu, H.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: yhyang6812@tfol.com; Zeng, Q. [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); He, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    Biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP) has been widely used in tooth and bone implants due to its excellent biocompatibility. Incorporation of fluorine ions in BCP has drawn much attention because of the beneficial role played by the fluorine ions in bone and tooth growth. The aim of this study was to obtain fluoridated biphasic calcium phosphate (FBCP) by immersing BCP into saturated ZnF{sub 2} solution with F{sup -} concentration of 3500 mg/l at different times. The phase and incorporation of fluoride into BCP were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The biomineralization and influence of FBCP on osteoblastic behavior were evaluated and compared with that of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP). The results exhibited that the phase evolution of the BCP was affected by the fluoride incorporation and the FBCP significantly improved the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. These findings suggest that the FBCP would be very useful as a bone reconstructive material.

  17. Biomolecular interaction analysis for carbon nanotubes and for biocompatibility prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Fang, Jinzhang; Cheng, Yun; Zheng, Jianhui; Zhang, Jingjing; Chen, Tao; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    2016-07-15

    The interactions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and biologics have been commonly studied by various microscopy and spectroscopy methods. We tried biomolecular interaction analysis to measure the kinetic interactions between proteins and CNTs. The analysis demonstrated that wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and other proteins have high affinity toward carboxylated CNT (f-MWCNT) but essentially no binding to normal CNT (p-MWCNT). The binding of f-MWCNT-protein showed dose dependence, and the observed kinetic constants were in the range of 10(-9) to 10(-11) M with very small off-rates (10(-3) to 10(-7) s(-1)), indicating a relatively tight and stable f-MWCNT-protein complex formation. Interestingly in hemolysis assay, p-MWCNT showed good biocompatibility, f-MWCNT caused 30% hemolysis, but WGA-coated f-MWCNT did not show hemolysis. Furthermore, the f-MWCNT-WGA complex demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, perhaps through the glycoproteins expressed on the cells' surface. Taken together, biomolecular interaction analysis is a precise method that might be useful in evaluating the binding affinity of biologics to CNTs and in predicting biological actions. PMID:27108187

  18. Improved biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite thin film prepared by aerosol deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Soo; Kim, In-Sook; Kim, Hyeongil; Chou, Alex Hung Kuo; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Li, Long-Hao; Hwang, Soon-Jung

    2010-08-01

    Technical development for an efficient coating of bioactive materials improves the characteristics of a fully functional implant. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteoinductive effect of a newly developed hydroxyapatite (HA)-coating technique using aerosol deposition without post-heat treatment [room temperature (RT) group] on the titanium (Ti) dental implant in vitro and in vivo, compared with that of HA coating with post-heat treatment (HT-400 group) or machined surface (control group). Cell proliferation or attachment on the HA-coated Ti surface was assessed using tetrazolium salt, WST-8 or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Human osteoblasts (HOB) on RT group were well attached and grew alike in the control or HT-400 group. The alkaline phosphatase activity of HOB cultured on RT and HT-400 group was significantly higher than the control group (p coating using aerosol deposition without post-heat treatment has a good biocompatibility, and provide a promoting strategy to enhance osseointegration in the application of the dental implant. PMID:20574972

  19. Spheroid model study comparing the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérard, Matthieu; Le Clerc, Justine; Watrin, Tanguy; Meary, Fleur; Pérez, Fabienne; Tricot-Doleux, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the biological effects of a new dentine substitute based on Ca₃SiO₅ (Biodentine™) for use in pulp-capping treatment, on pseudo-odontoblastic (MDPC-23) and pulp (Od-21) cells. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effects of Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on gene expression in cultured spheroids. We used the acid phosphatase assay to compare the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA. Cell differentiation was investigated by RT-qPCR. We investigated the expression of genes involved in odontogenic differentiation (Runx2), matrix secretion (Col1a1, Spp1) and mineralisation (Alp). ANOVA and PLSD tests were used for data analysis. MDPC-23 cells cultured in the presence of MTA had higher levels of viability than those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and control cells on day 7 (P = 0.0065 and P = 0.0126, respectively). For Od-21 cells, proliferation rates on day 7 were significantly lower in the presence of Biodentine or MTA than for control (P Biodentine and in control cells. Biodentine and MTA may modify the proliferation of pulp cell lines. Their effects may fluctuate over time, depending on the cell line considered. The observed similarity between Biodentine and MTA validates the indication for direct pulp-capping claimed by the manufacturers. PMID:23515903

  20. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, N; Veigel, S; Aigner, N; Nedelec, J M; Rosenau, T; Liebner, F

    2014-10-13

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating the secondary polymer into the BC matrix and to convert the formed composite organogels into aerogels. Uniaxial compression tests revealed a considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties as compared to BC aerogels. Nitrogen sorption experiments at 77K and scanning electron micrographs confirmed the preservation (or even enhancement) of the surface-area-to-volume ratio for most of the samples. The formation of an open-porous, interpenetrating network of the second polymer has been demonstrated by treatment of BC/PMMA hybrid aerogels with EMIM acetate, which exclusively extracted cellulose, leaving behind self-supporting organogels. PMID:25037381

  1. Development of a discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-12-01

    To develop an enhanced, reproducible and discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys, prepared to a clinically relevant surface finishing condition, using TR146 oral keratinocyte cells.

  2. Whole genome expression profiling using DNA microarray for determining biocompatibility of polymeric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Wang, Zhenyu; Kutter, Jörg Peter; Dufva, Hans Martin; Wolff, Anders

    2006-01-01

    There is an ever increasing need to find surfaces that are biocompatible for applications like medical implants and microfluidics-based cell culture systems. The biocompatibility of five different surfaces with different hydrophobicity was determined using gene expression profiling as well as more...... conventional methods to determine biocompatibility such as cellular growth rate, morphology and the hydrophobicity of the surfaces. HeLa cells grown on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or a SU-8 surface treated with HNO3-ceric ammonium nitrate (HNO3-CAN) and ethanolamine showed no differences in growth rate......, morphology or gene expression profiles as compared to HeLa cells grown in cell culture flasks. Cells grown on SU-8 treated with only HNO3-CAN showed almost the same growth rate (36 ¡ 1 h) and similar morphology as cells grown in cell culture flasks (32 ¡ 1 h), indicating good biocompatibility. However, more...

  3. Mechanical Strength and Biocompatibility of Ultrafine-Grained Commercial Purity Titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri Estrin; Hyoun-Ee Kim; Rimma Lapovok; Hoi Pang Ng; Ji-Hoon Jo

    2013-01-01

    The effect of grain refinement of commercial purity titanium by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) on its mechanical performance and bone tissue regeneration is reported. In vivo studies conducted on New Zealand white rabbits did not show an enhancement of biocompatibility of ECAP-modified titanium found earlier by in vitro testing. However, the observed combination of outstanding mechanical properties achieved by ECAP without a loss of biocompatibility suggests that this is a very promisi...

  4. Z nanooblaganjem do izboljšanja biokompatibilnosti vsadkov: Improving biocompatibility of implants with nanolayering:

    OpenAIRE

    Dolenc, Andrej; GAŠPERLIN, MIRJANA; Homar, Miha; Kristl, Julijana

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatibility of different materials in the body is very complicated phenomenon. Although structural characteristics of implant are decisive for its specific purpose, biologic response mainly depends on surface characteristics of the implant and its interaction with biologic environment. Nanolayering of the implant to improve biocompatibility presents a recent innovation in this field of research. One method of nanolayering is layer-by-layer assembly which has many advantages over other na...

  5. In vivo qualitative analysis of the biocompatibility of different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Tobias Moretti Neto; Isabel Mello; Ana Beatriz da Silveira Moretti; Carlos Roberto Colombo Robazza; Alessandro Antônio Costa Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Cyanocrylates have been widely used in the medical and dental fields for several years. In Dentistry, cyanoacrylates have been used for suturing, pulp capping, as retrofilling material in endodontic surgeries, and as cervical plug for pulpless teeth bleaching. The biocompatibility of these adhesives has been the topic of many researches and subcutaneous implantation is an effective methodology for these studies. The present study evaluated the biocompatibility of three different cyanoacrylate...

  6. Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond electrodes for neural interfaces: In vivo biocompatibility evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    María eAlcaide; Andrew eTaylor; Morten eFjorback; Vladimir eZachar; Cristian Pablo Pennisi

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended ...

  7. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P.

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended ...

  8. Frontiers in biomaterials the design, synthetic strategies and biocompatibility of polymer scaffolds for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Frontiers in Biomaterials: The Design, Synthetic Strategies and Biocompatibility of Polymer Scaffolds for Biomedical Application, Volume 1" highlights the importance of biomaterials and their interaction with biological system. The need for the development of biomaterials as scaffold for tissue regeneration is driven by the increasing demands for materials that mimic functions of extracellular matrices of body tissues.This ebook covers the latest challenges on the biocompatibility of scaffold overtime after implantation and discusses the requirement of innovative technologies and strategies f

  9. Bioinspired, Ultrastrong, Highly Biocompatible, and Bioactive Natural Polymer/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-Kun; Cong, Huai-Ping; Yao, Hong-Bin; Mao, Li-Bo; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Marwani, Hadi M; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Tough and biocompatible nanocomposite films: A new type of bioinspired ultrastrong, highly biocompatible, and bioactive konjac glucomannan (KGM)/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite film is fabricated on a large scale by a simple solution-casting method. Such KGM-GO composite films exhibit much enhanced mechanical properties under the strong hydrogen-bonding interactions, showing great potential in the fields of tissue engineering and food package. PMID:26097134

  10. Assembly-Controlled Biocompatible Interface on a Microchip: Strategy to Highly Efficient Proteolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y; Zhong, W.; Meng, S; Kong, J.; Lu, H.; Yang, P.; Girault, HH; Liu, B

    2006-01-01

    A biocompatible interface was constructed on a microchip by using the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of charged polysaccharides incorporating proteases for highly efficient proteolysis. The controlled assembly of natural polyelectrolytes and the enzyme-adsorption step were monitored by using a quartz-crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Such a multilayer-assembled membrane provides a biocompatible interconnected network with high enzyme-loading capacity. The maximum digest...

  11. In Vitro Models in Biocompatibility Assessment for Biomedical-Grade Chitosan Derivatives in Wound Management

    OpenAIRE

    Lim Chin Keong; Ahmad Sukari Halim

    2009-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of wound healing research is to find effective healing techniques that utilize the regeneration of similar tissues. This involves the modification of various wound dressing biomaterials for proper wound management. The biopolymer chitosan (b-1,4-D-glucosamine) has natural biocompatibility and biodegradability that render it suitable for wound management. By definition, a biocompatible biomaterial does not have toxic or injurious effects on biological systems. Chemica...

  12. Graphene Films Show Stable Cell Attachment and Biocompatibility with Electrogenic Primary Cardiac Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taeyong; Kahng, Yung Ho; Lee, Takhee; Lee, Kwanghee; Kim, Do Han

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has attracted substantial attention due to its advantageous materialistic applicability. In the present study, we tested the biocompatibility of graphene films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition with electrogenic primary adult cardiac cells (cardiomyocytes) by measuring the cell properties such as cell attachment, survival, contractility and calcium transients. The results show that the graphene films showed stable cell attachment and excellent biocompatibility with the electro...

  13. In Vivo Biocompatibility of PLGA-Polyhexylthiophene Nanofiber Scaffolds in a Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Swaminathan Sethuraman; Anuradha Subramanian; Uma Maheswari Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Electroactive polymers have applications in tissue engineering as a physical template for cell adhesion and carry electrical signals to improve tissue regeneration. Present study demonstrated the biocompatibility and biodegradability of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (PLGA-PHT) blend electrospun scaffolds in a subcutaneous rat model. The biocompatibility of PLGA-undoped PHT, PLGA-doped PHT, and aligned PLGA-doped PHT nanofibers was evaluated and compared with random PLGA fi...

  14. In vivo MRI biocompatibility evaluation of functionalized carbon fibers in reaction with soft tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Prokić B.B.; Bačić G.; Prokić B.; Kalijadis Ana; Todorović Vera; Puškaš Nela; Vidojević D.; Laušević Mila; Laušević Z.

    2012-01-01

    In modern medicine implants are very important and so is their design and choice of materials. Almost equally important is the choice of imaging technique used to in vivo monitor their fate and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in monitoring the biocompatibility of two newly designed carbon fibers. We have analyzed the interaction of surface functionalized carbon fibers (basic and acidic)...

  15. An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones

    OpenAIRE

    Boos Alois; Auer Joerg A; Nuss Katja; Rechenberg Brigitte von

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. Methods A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. Result...

  16. Tantalum, Niobium and Titanium Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement of Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Mohammad Hossein Fathi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Metals have a wide range of applications in implant and prosthetic materials in dentistry.Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of metals should be improved in order to utilizethem as biomaterials. The aim of this work was to prepare metallic coatings on 316L stainless steel dental implants, to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of the uncoated and metallic coated dentalimplants as an indication of biocompatibility and, to compare the effect of the type of the coatings o...

  17. Biocompatible inorganic nanocrystals for fluorescence and CT imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hezinger, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The enhancement of existing and development of new nanoparticular probes is a promising field of research, emanating from the increasing demand on nanoparticular contrast agents for luminescence and CT imaging. The first developed system is an ultra small inorganic semiconductor based nanoparticle with unique optical properties, ranging from size tunable emission to very high photostability. The second investigated nanoparticulate system is a lot less prominent on the field of molecular imagi...

  18. Exploring the Hybridization Thermodynamics of Spherical Nucleic Acids to Tailor Probes for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeria, Pratik Shailesh

    Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), three-dimensional nanoparticle conjugates composed of densely packed and highly oriented oligonucleotides around organic or inorganic nanoparticles, are an emergent class of nanostructures that show promise as single-entity agents for intracellular messenger RNA (mRNA) detection and gene regulation. SNAs exhibit superior biocompatibility and biological properties compared to linear oligonucleotides, enabling them to overcome many of the limitations of linear oligonucleotides for use in biomedical applications. However, the origins of these biologically attractive properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, the chemistry underlying one such property is studied in detail, and the findings are applied towards the rational design of more effective SNAs for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Chapter 1 introduces the synthesis of SNAs, the unique properties that make them superior to linear nucleic acids for biomedicine, and previously studied applications of these structures. Chapter 2 focuses on quantitatively studying the impact of the chemical structure of the SNA on its ability to hybridize multiple complementary nucleic acids. This chapter lays the groundwork for understanding the factors that govern SNA hybridization thermodynamics and how to tailor SNAs to increase their binding affinity to target mRNA strands. Chapters 3 and 4 capitalize on this knowledge to engineer probes for intracellular mRNA detection and gene regulation applications. Chapter 3 reports the development of an SNA-based probe that can simultaneously report the expression level of two different mRNA transcripts in live cells and differentiate diseased cells from non-diseased cells. Chapter 4 investigates the use of topically-applied SNAs to down-regulate a critical mediator of impaired wound healing in diabetic mice to accelerate wound closure. This study represents the first topical therapeutic application of SNA nanotechnology to treat open

  19. In Vitro Models in BiocompatibilityAssessment for Biomedical-Grade Chitosan Derivatives in Wound Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chin Keong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the ultimate goals of wound healing research is to find effective healing techniques that utilize the regeneration of similar tissues. This involves the modification of various wound dressing biomaterials for proper wound management. The biopolymer chitosan (b-1,4-D-glucosamine has natural biocompatibility and biodegradability that render it suitable for wound management. By definition, a biocompatible biomaterial does not have toxic or injurious effects on biological systems. Chemical and physical modifications of chitosan influence its biocompatibility and biodegradability to an uncertain degree. Hence, the modified biomedical-grade of chitosan derivatives should be pre-examined in vitro in order to produce high-quality, biocompatible dressings. In vitro toxicity examinations are more favorable than those performed in vivo, as the results are more reproducible and predictive. In this paper, basic in vitro tools were used to evaluate cellular and molecular responses with regard to the biocompatibility of biomedical-grade chitosan. Three paramount experimental parameters of biocompatibility in vitro namely cytocompatibility, genotoxicity and skin pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, were generally reviewed for biomedical-grade chitosan as wound dressing.

  20. Biocompatibility of nanostructured boron doped diamond for the attachment and proliferation of human neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alice C.; Vagaska, Barbora; Edgington, Robert; Hébert, Clément; Ferretti, Patrizia; Bergonzo, Philippe; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. We quantitatively investigate the biocompatibility of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) after the inclusion of boron, with and without nanostructuring. The nanostructuring method involves a novel approach of growing NCD over carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that act as a 3D scaffold. This nanostructuring of BNCD leads to a material with increased capacitance, and this along with wide electrochemical window makes BNCD an ideal material for neural interface applications, and thus it is essential that their biocompatibility is investigated. Approach. Biocompatibility was assessed by observing the interaction of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) with a variety of NCD substrates including un-doped ones, and NCD doped with boron, which are both planar, and nanostructured. hNSCs were chosen due to their sensitivity, and various methods including cell population and confluency were used to quantify biocompatibility. Main results. Boron inclusion into NCD film was shown to have no observable effect on hNSC attachment, proliferation and viability. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of nanostructured boron-doped NCD is increased upon nanostructuring, potentially due to the increased surface area. Significance. Diamond is an attractive material for supporting the attachment and development of cells as it can show exceptional biocompatibility. When boron is used as a dopant within diamond it becomes a p-type semiconductor, and at high concentrations the diamond becomes quasi-metallic, offering the prospect of a direct electrical device-cell interfacing system.

  1. Comparison of the biocompatibility of different root canal irrigants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Eduardo Gomes-Filho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the reaction of rat subcutaneous connective tissue to 0.9% sterile saline, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate solution or gel. Six circles were demarcated on the dorsal skin of 24 male Wistar rats, leaving 2 cm between each circle. Using a syringe, 0.1 mL of each root canal irrigant was injected subcutaneously into 5 circles. In the 6th circle, the needle of an empty syringe was introduced into the skin, but no irrigant was injected (control group. Evaluations were undertaken at 2 h, 48 h, 14 days and 30 days post-procedure. Tissue samples were excised, embedded in paraffin blocks and 3-µm-thick sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The areas of inflammatory reaction were evaluated and analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The control group showed few or no inflammatory reaction areas in the subcutaneous tissue. 0.9% saline solution, 2.0% chlorhexidine solution and 2.5% NaOCl showed a good biocompatibility, as very mild inflammatory reaction was detected at 14 days and tissue repair occurred at 30 days. 5.25% NaOCl was the most toxic irrigant, as the number of inflammatory cells remained elevated at 14 and 30 days. The group treated with 2.0% chlorhexidine gluconate gel presented a moderate inflammatory response at 14 days, which decreased at 30 days, being considered similar to that of the control group, 0.9% saline solution, 2.0% chlorhexidine solution and 2.5% NaOCl at this experimental period.

  2. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle–RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml−1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml−1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle–RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml−1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs–RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates. (paper)

  3. Bilayered near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles based on low molecular weight PEI for tumor-targeted in vivo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the tumor fluorescent imaging results in vivo, bilayered nanoparticles encapsulating a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindotri-carbocyanine iodide (DiR) were prepared using low molecular weight stearic acid-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid (DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles), which were investigated as a novel NIR fluorescent nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging. These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectra, UV-visual absorption, and fluorescent emission spectra. Their cytotoxicity in vitro and hepatotoxicity in vivo were tested by MTT assay and histological study, respectively. In vivo NIR fluorescence imaging of the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was performed using a Carestream imaging system. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles were sphere shaped with a diameter of approximately 50 nm according to the TEM images. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles had a low cytotoxicity in vitro according to the MTT assay and low hepatotoxicity in vivo as determined in histological studies. The fluorescent emission of DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was stable in pH values of 5–9 in solution, with only slight blue-shifts of the emission maxima at the basic pH range. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles exhibited a substantial tumor-targeting ability in the optical imaging with the use of tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrated that the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticle is an excellent biocompatible nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted NIR fluorescence imaging with a potential for clinical applications

  4. Bilayered near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles based on low molecular weight PEI for tumor-targeted in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ke [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China); Xu, Liang [The University of Kansas, Department of Molecular Biosciences (United States); Wu, Daocheng, E-mail: wudaocheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China)

    2014-12-15

    To improve the tumor fluorescent imaging results in vivo, bilayered nanoparticles encapsulating a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindotri-carbocyanine iodide (DiR) were prepared using low molecular weight stearic acid-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid (DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles), which were investigated as a novel NIR fluorescent nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging. These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectra, UV-visual absorption, and fluorescent emission spectra. Their cytotoxicity in vitro and hepatotoxicity in vivo were tested by MTT assay and histological study, respectively. In vivo NIR fluorescence imaging of the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was performed using a Carestream imaging system. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles were sphere shaped with a diameter of approximately 50 nm according to the TEM images. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles had a low cytotoxicity in vitro according to the MTT assay and low hepatotoxicity in vivo as determined in histological studies. The fluorescent emission of DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was stable in pH values of 5–9 in solution, with only slight blue-shifts of the emission maxima at the basic pH range. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles exhibited a substantial tumor-targeting ability in the optical imaging with the use of tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrated that the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticle is an excellent biocompatible nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted NIR fluorescence imaging with a potential for clinical applications.

  5. Diversity oriented fluorescence library approach (DOFLA) for live cell imaging probe development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seong-Wook; Kang, Nam-Young; Park, Sung-Jin; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Yun Kyung; Lee, Jun-Seok; Chang, Young-Tae

    2014-04-15

    A cell is the smallest functional unit of life. All forms of life rely on cellular processes to maintain normal functions, and changes in cell function induced by metabolic disturbances, physicochemical damage, infection, or abnormal gene expression may cause disease. To understand basic biology and to develop therapeutics for diseases, researchers need to study live cells. Along with advances in fluorescence microscopy and in vitro cell culture, live-cell imaging has become an essential tool in modern biology for the study of molecular and cellular events. Although researchers have often used fluorescent proteins to visualize cell-type-specific markers, this method requires genetic manipulations, which may not be appropriate in nontransgenic cells. Immunodetection of cellular markers requires the use of xenogenic antibodies, which may not detect intracellular markers in live cells. One option for overcoming these problems is the use of fluorescent small molecules targeted to specific cell types, which can enter live cells and interact with molecules of interest. We have used combinatorial chemistry to develop a large number of fluorescent small molecules as new imaging probes even without prior information about the probes' binding targets and mechanism, a strategy that we call the diversity oriented fluorescence library approach (DOFLA). We have used DOFLA to produce novel sensors and probes that detect a variety of biological and chemical molecules in vivo as well as in vitro. In this Account, we describe a series of fluorescent small molecules developed using DOFLA that bind specifically to particular cell types. These molecules provide new ways to detect and isolate these cells. The fluorescent probes CDy1, CDg4, and CDb8 tag embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells but not fibroblasts or germ-line cells. CDr3 binds to an intracellular neural stem cell marker, fatty acid binding protein 7, which allows researchers to separate neural stem cells

  6. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  7. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  8. Polymer microspheres carrying fluorescent DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Dai, Zhao; Zhang, Jimei; Xu, Shichao; Wu, Chunrong; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A polymer microspheres carried DNA probe, which was based on resonance energy transfer, was presented in this paper when CdTe quantum dots(QDs) were as energy donors, Au nanoparticles were as energy accepters and poly(4- vinylpyrindine-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) microspheres were as carriers. Polymer microspheres with functional group on surfaces were prepared by distillation-precipitation polymerization when ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was as crosslinker in acetonitrile. CdTe QDs were prepared when 3-mercaptopropionic acid(MPA) was as the stabilizer in aqueous solution. Because of the hydrogen-bonding between the carboxyl groups of MPA on QDs and the pyrindine groups on the microspheres, the QDs were self-assembled onto the surfaces of microspheres. Then, the other parts of DNA probe were finished according to the classic method. The DNA detection results indicated that this novel fluorescent DNA probe system could recognize the existence of complementary target DNA or not.

  9. Fireside corrosion probes--an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key metallic components in fossil fuel power plants will become increasingly important for FutureGen and ultra-supercritical power plants. A number of factors (ash deposition, coal composition changes, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others) which occur in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities, will contribute to fireside corrosion. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. Our recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Continuing research is targeted to help resolve these issues.

  10. Laser surface modification of PET to improve biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve biocompatibility, the surfaces of polyethylene terephthalate obtained by irradiation with a CO2 pulsed laser in air without a photo sensitizer were studied. The complicated microstructures were obtained on the polyethylene terephthalate surface due to irradiation with various wavelengths of CO2 laser and observed by scanning electron microscope. The changes in chemical and physical properties of the irradiated polyethylene terephthalate surface were investigated by attenuated total reflectance fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The water drop contact angle also decreased with increasing of laser pulses. The density of peroxides formed on the irradiated polyethylene terephthalate surface were determined by iodide method. The Kr F and CO2 laser treated polyethylene terephthalate surface were compared from viewpoints of the morphology, chemical and physical properties. Graft copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid onto the surface of polyethylene terephthalate were performed to improved water wettability using the CO2 pulsed laser. After laser irradiation in air, the films were placed in the aqueous solution of monomer and then heated to decompose peroxides formed onto the irradiated polyethylene terephthalate film. The grafted polyethylene terephthalate surfaces were characterized by ATR-IR spectroscopy, Sem, contact angle measurements, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray analysis. The compatibility of the laser irradiated polyethylene terephthalate films was examined in vitro, evaluating their capability of inducing platelet adhesion in comparison with the unmodified polyethylene terephthalate. The number of adhered platelets was determined by lactate dehydrogenase activity measurement. The morphology of adhered platelets on the polyethylene terephthalate surfaces was investigated by scanning electron microscope. The scanning electron microscope observations were consistent

  11. Synthesis of biocompatible AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters and their applications in photocatalysis and mercury detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a facile approach for preparation of AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters was developed. The unique AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters capped with biomolecules exhibit interesting excellent optical and catalytic properties. The fluorescent AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters show tunable luminescence depending on the nanocluster size. The apoptosis assay demonstrated that the AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters showed low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Therefore, the nanoclusters can be used not only as a probe for labeling cells but also for their photocatalytic activity for photodegradation of organic dye. Moreover, a highly selective and sensitive assay for detection of mercury including Hg2+ and undissociated mercury complexes was developed based on the quenching fluorescent AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters, which provides a promising approach for determining various forms of Hg in the mercury-based compounds in environment. These unique nanoclusters may have potential applications in biological labeling, sensing mercury, and photodegradation of various organic pollutants in waste water.Graphical Abstract

  12. Synthesis of biocompatible AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters and their applications in photocatalysis and mercury detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Shenna; Zhang, Lingyang; Huang, Haowen, E-mail: hhwn09@163.com; Liu, Fengping [Hunan University of Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Function Molecule, Ministry of Education, Hunan Provincial University Key Laboratory of QSAR/QSPR, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Liu, Xuanyong, E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics (China)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a facile approach for preparation of AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters was developed. The unique AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters capped with biomolecules exhibit interesting excellent optical and catalytic properties. The fluorescent AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters show tunable luminescence depending on the nanocluster size. The apoptosis assay demonstrated that the AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters showed low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Therefore, the nanoclusters can be used not only as a probe for labeling cells but also for their photocatalytic activity for photodegradation of organic dye. Moreover, a highly selective and sensitive assay for detection of mercury including Hg{sup 2+} and undissociated mercury complexes was developed based on the quenching fluorescent AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters, which provides a promising approach for determining various forms of Hg in the mercury-based compounds in environment. These unique nanoclusters may have potential applications in biological labeling, sensing mercury, and photodegradation of various organic pollutants in waste water.Graphical Abstract.

  13. A novel DNA biosensor integrated with Polypyrrole/streptavidin and Au-PAMAM-CP bionanocomposite probes to detect the rs4839469 locus of the vangl1 gene for dysontogenesis prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingying; Yu, Chao; Gao, Rufei; Xia, Chunyong; Yuan, Guolin; Li, Yuliang; Zhao, Yilin; Chen, Qiutong; He, Junlin

    2016-06-15

    The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the vangl1 gene is highly correlated with Neural Tube Defects (NTDs), a group of severe congenital malformations. It is hindered by the lack of a quantitative detection method. We first propose the use of a DNA biosensor to detect the missense single nucleotide polymorphism (rs4839469 c.346G>A p.Ala116Thr) of the vangl1 gene in this work. Polypyrrole (PPy) and streptavidin were integrated to modify a gold electrode. We took advantage of the PPy's good biocompatibility and excellent conductivity. To further accelerate the electron transfer process at the electrode surface, polyamidoamine dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (Au-PAMAM) were used, because Au-PAMAM possess a large number of amino groups to load capture probes (CP). Using the biotin-streptavidin system, the Au-PAMAM-CP bionanocomposite probe, which can detect the target DNA, was conjugated to the electrode surface. Under optimal conditions, the DNA biosensor exhibited a wide linear range of 0.1-100nM with a low detection limit of 0.033nM (S/N=3). The results suggest that this approach has the potential to be used in clinical research. PMID:26914375

  14. Path optimization for oil probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, O'Neil; Rahmes, Mark; Blue, Mark; Peter, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    We discuss a robust method for optimal oil probe path planning inspired by medical imaging. Horizontal wells require three-dimensional steering made possible by the rotary steerable capabilities of the system, which allows the hole to intersect multiple target shale gas zones. Horizontal "legs" can be over a mile long; the longer the exposure length, the more oil and natural gas is drained and the faster it can flow. More oil and natural gas can be produced with fewer wells and less surface disturbance. Horizontal drilling can help producers tap oil and natural gas deposits under surface areas where a vertical well cannot be drilled, such as under developed or environmentally sensitive areas. Drilling creates well paths which have multiple twists and turns to try to hit multiple accumulations from a single well location. Our algorithm can be used to augment current state of the art methods. Our goal is to obtain a 3D path with nodes describing the optimal route to the destination. This algorithm works with BIG data and saves cost in planning for probe insertion. Our solution may be able to help increase the energy extracted vs. input energy.

  15. Carbon nanotubes as in vivo bacterial probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Ghosh, Debadyuti; Belcher, Angela M.

    2014-09-01

    With the rise in antibiotic-resistant infections, non-invasive sensing of infectious diseases is increasingly important. Optical imaging, although safer and simpler, is less developed than other modalities such as radioimaging, due to low availability of target-specific molecular probes. Here we report carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as bacterial probes for fluorescence imaging of pathogenic infections. We demonstrate that SWNTs functionalized using M13 bacteriophage (M13-SWNT) can distinguish between F‧-positive and F‧-negative bacterial strains. Moreover, through one-step modification, we attach an anti-bacterial antibody on M13-SWNT, making it easily tunable for sensing specific F‧-negative bacteria. We illustrate detection of Staphylococcus aureus intramuscular infections, with ~3.4 × enhancement in fluorescence intensity over background. SWNT imaging presents lower signal spread ~0.08 × and higher signal amplification ~1.4 × , compared with conventional dyes. We show the probe offers greater ~5.7 × enhancement in imaging of S. aureus infective endocarditis. These biologically functionalized, aqueous-dispersed, actively targeted, modularly tunable SWNT probes offer new avenues for exploration of deeply buried infections.

  16. Probing a Bose-Einstein Condensate with an Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, D.; Robins, N. P.; Figl, C.; Close, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    A pulsed atom laser derived from a Bose-Einstein condensate is used to probe a second target condensate. The target condensate scatters the incident atom laser pulse. From the spatial distribution of scattered atoms, one can infer important properties of the target condensate and its interaction with the probe pulse. As an example, we measure the s-wave scattering length that, in low energy collisions, describes the interaction between the |F=1,m_F=-1> and |F=2,m_F=0> hyperfine ground states ...

  17. A pore way to heal and regenerate: 21st century thinking on biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Buddy D

    2016-06-01

    This article raises central questions about the definition of biocompatibility, and also about how we assess biocompatibility. We start with the observation that a porous polymer where every pore is spherical, ∼40 microns in diameter and interconnected, can heal into vascularized tissues with little or no fibrosis and good restoration of vascularity (i.e., little or no foreign body reaction). The same polymer in solid form will trigger the classic foreign body reaction characterized by a dense, collagenous foreign body capsule and low vascularity. A widely used definition of biocompatibility is 'the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response in a specific application'. With precision-porous polymers, in direct comparison with the same polymer in solid form, we have the same material, in the same application, with two entirely different biological reactions. Can both reactions be 'biocompatible?' This conundrum will be elaborated upon and proposals will be made for future considerations and measurement of biocompatibility. PMID:27047676

  18. Biocompatibility of microplates for culturing epithelial renal cells evaluated by a microcalorimetric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y; DePierre, J W; Nässberger, L

    2000-09-01

    In the present study we have developed a microcalorimetric procedure which allows convenient investigation of biocompatibility in a microsystem. We examined the biocompatibility of a porcine renal epithelial tubule cell line LLC-PK1 and a human primary renal epithelial tubule cell (RPTEC) with microplates composed of three different materials, i.e. Thermanox, transparent film and titanium. All three materials showed equal biocompatibility with LLC-PK1 cells, judging from the attainment of steady-state power curves and the same rate of heat production per cell (2.5 microW / microg DNA). The human renal cells were poorly biocompatible with the Thermanox and transparent film. However, on titanium the RPTEC cell did adhere, as demonstrated by a steady-state power curve. The human cells also showed a higher metabolic activity (3.0 microW / microg DNA), than did LLC-PK1 cells cultured on the same type of microplates. In research on biocompatibility there is a need for alternatives to experimental animal investigations. The present technique allows studies of cellular interactions with different biomaterials in a rapid and standardized manner and may therefore prove to be a useful screening procedure. PMID:15348389

  19. Effect of microwave power on EPR spectra of natural and synthetic dental biocompatible materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamczyk Jakub

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paramagnetic centers in the two exemplary synthetic and natural dental biocompatible materials applied in implantology were examined by the use of an X-band (9.3 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. The EPR spectra were measured in the range of microwave power 2.2–70 mW. The aims of this work were to compare paramagnetic centers concentrations in different dental biocompatible materials and to determine the effect of microwave power on parameters of their EPR spectra. It is the very first and innovatory examination of paramagnetic centers in these materials. It was pointed out that paramagnetic centers existed in both natural (~1018 spin/g and synthetic (~1019 spin/g dental biocompatible materials, but the lower free radical concentration characterized the natural sample. Continuous microwave saturation of EPR spectra indicated that faster spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in synthetic dental biocompatible materials than in natural material. Linewidths (ΔBpp of the EPR spectra of the natural dental material slightly increased for the higher microwave powers. Such effect was not observed for the synthetic material. The broad EPR lines (ΔBpp: 2.4 mT, 3.9 mT, were measured for the natural and synthetic dental materials, respectively. Probably strong dipolar interactions between paramagnetic centers in the studied samples may be responsible for their line broadening. EPR spectroscopy is the useful experimental method in the examination of paramagnetic centers in dental biocompatible materials.

  20. Synthesis and application of rhodamine-based fluorescent probe dyes with spacer linker arm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Gao; Jian Li Li; Zhen Shi

    2007-01-01

    When rhodamine-based fluorescent probe dyes are used to track target molecules they always perturb the behavior of target molecules because of steric hindrance effect.In order to minimize potential steric problems, a kind of rhodamine-based fluorescent probe dye with spacer linker arm was designed and synthesized and its application in immunofluorescence histochemistry was investigated.

  1. Protease-activated quantum dot probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a novel nanoparticulate luminescent probe with inherent signal amplification upon interaction with a targeted proteolytic enzyme. This construct may be useful for imaging in cancer detection and diagnosis. In this system, quantum dots (QDs) are bound to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via a proteolytically degradable peptide sequence to non-radiatively suppress luminescence. A 71% reduction in luminescence was achieved with conjugation of AuNPs to QDs. Release of AuNPs by peptide cleavage restores radiative QD photoluminescence. Initial studies observed a 52% rise in luminescence over 47 h of exposure to 0.2 mg/mL collagenase. These probes can be customized for targeted degradation simply by changing the sequence of the peptide linker

  2. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  3. A small dimension intraoperative probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This article introduces the usage of the intraoperative probe in surgical based on RGS and proposes one method to design the probe. Also, a charge-sensitive preamplifier used in semiconductor detector was constructed which can reduce the dimension of the probe. At last the probe is tested by some animal experiments. Results showed that the property of this system are reliable.

  4. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding and RAD (control probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111 In(3+, a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111In] RGD and [(111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.. The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide, which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  5. Thermocouple probe manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermocouple probe for high temperature measuring was carried out. Aim of this experiment is to refunction of the thermocouple, so this thermocouple can be used for measuring temperature. Probe is made of stainless steel pipe in which that size are 53 cm length, 0,25 cm thick, and 2,24 cm of outer diameter. One ending of the probe was closed off by a piece of stainless steel in which the welding process was carried out on this connection. After probe was integrated on the thermocouple, calibration of this system was investigated. A process of comparing between this thermocouple to the oven thermocouple is a method for calibration. Oven temperature was increased from 150°C up to 700°C in 50°C intervals. Result of this experiment show that thermocouple covered by stainless steel has a deviation of 0,7 % - 6,7 %. Conclusion of thi activity is that thermocouple covered by stainless steel probe is suitable for measuring temperature. (author)

  6. Langmuir Probe Measurements in Plasma Shadows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When immersing a target into a plasma streaming along magnetic field lines, a distinct shadow region extending over large distances is observed by the naked eye downstream of the target. In this work we present an experimental study of the effect applying Langmuir probes. In contrast to expectations, there are only marginal changes in the profiles of temperature and density behind masks that cut away about 50% of the plasma cross-section. On the other hand, the mean density is drastically reduced by an order of magnitude. First attempts to simulate the observations by solving the classical 2D diffusion equation were not successful. (author)

  7. Interaction of derived polymers from pyrrole with biocompatible solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a study about the synthesis by plasma, the electric properties and superficial interaction of polymers derived from pyrrole doped with Iodine with potential use as bio material. Poly-pyrrole is a semiconductor and biocompatible polymer with potential application in the development of artificial muscles and implants where the electric interaction between cells and material is an important variable. The syntheses were made at 13.5 MHz in a glass tubular reactor of 1500 cm3 with electrodes of 6.5 cm diameter and stainless steel flanges. An electrode was connected to the RF terminal of the power supply that is combined with a matching coupling resistance. The monomer and dopant used in this work were pyrrole and Iodine respectively, in closed containers. They were vaporized and injected separately into the reactor at room temperature and 0.1 mbar. The vapors of the reagents mixed freely in the reactor. The synthesis time was 240 min at 40, 60, 80 and 100 W. The polymers were obtained as thin films adhered to the reactor walls. The films were washed and swollen with distilled water and removed from the reactor walls with a small spatula. The polymers were irradiated with gamma rays at 18 and 22 KGy. Due to the fact that the doses are cumulative, the final dose applied was 40 KGy. The polymers characterization was carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, electrical conductivity and X-ray diffraction. The analyses indicates that the polymers have very similar structure in almost the entire power range, showing C-O, C=C, C-H, O-H, N-H bonds with a predominantly amorphous structure. The TGA analyses showed that the material has 4 or 5 loses of material. The first one starts after that 115 C except for the material irradiated at 40 KGy, this one begins in 87 C, the second one is in the interval of 196 and 295 C, the third one between 311 and 500 C, and the last

  8. Biocompatibility of coronary stent materials: effect of electrochemical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheerder, I. de [University Hospital Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Cardiology; Sohier, J.; Froyen, L.; Humbeeck, J. van [Louvain Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Verbeken, E. [University Hospital Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Pathology

    2001-02-01

    Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Revascularization (PTCR) is now a widely accepted treatment modality for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Current multicenter randomized trials comparing PTCR with the more invasive Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting could not show long-term significant survival differences. During the last two decades progress has been made to further optimize PTCR. The most logic approach to treat atherosclerotic coronary narrowings is to remove the atherosclerotic material using especially developed devices. Several trials, however, could not show a significant beneficial outcome after use of these devices compared to plain old balloon angioplasty. Another approach was to implant a coronary prothesis (stent), scaffolding the diseased coronary artery after PTCA. This approach resulted in a decreased restenosis rate at follow-up. The beneficial effects of stenting, however, was not found to be related to the inhibition of the neointimal cellular proliferation after vascular injury, but simply to be the mechanical result of overstretching of the treated vessel segment. The most important remaining clinical problem after stenting remains the neointimal hyperplasia within the stent, resulting in a significant stent narrowing in 13 to 30% of patients. Further efforts to improve the clinical results of coronary stenting should focus on the reduction of this neointimal hyperplasia. Neointimal hyperplasia after stent implantation results from (1) a healting response to the injury caused by the stent implantation and (2) a foreign body response to the stent itself. Factors that seem to influence the neointimal hyperplastic response are genetic, local disease related, stent delivery related and stent related factors. Biocompatibilisation of coronary stents by looking for more biocompatible metal alloys, optimized surface characteristics and optimized stent designs should result in a better late patency. Furthermore drug eluting and radioactive stents

  9. Biocompatibility of various ferrite nanoparticles evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomitaka, Asahi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: d07gd158@ynu.ac.jp; Hirukawa, Atsuo; Yamada, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Morishita, Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Takemura, Yasushi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles for thermotherapy must be biocompatible and possess high thermal efficiency as heating elements. The biocompatibility of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm), ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (15-30 nm) and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm) nanoparticles was studied using a cytotoxicity colony formation assay and a cell viability assay. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} sample was found to be biocompatible on HeLa cells. While ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were non-toxic at low concentrations, HeLa cells exhibited cytotoxic effects when exposed to concentrations of 100 {mu}g/ml nanoparticles.

  10. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility of alginate-polycation microcapsules designed for islet transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Susan Kimberly

    Microencapsulation represents a method for immunoprotecting transplanted therapeutic cells or tissues from graft rejection using a physical barrier. This approach is advantageous in that it eliminates the need to induce long-term immunosuppression and allows the option of transplanting non-cadaveric cell sources, such as animal cells and stem cell-derived tissues. The microcapsules that we have investigated are designed to immunoprotect islets of Langerhans (i.e. clusters of insulin-secreting cells), with the goal of treating insulin-dependent diabetes. With the aid of techniques for physicochemical analysis, this research focused on understanding which properties of the microcapsule are the most important for determining its biocompatibility. The objective of this work was to elucidate correlations between the chemical make-up, physicochemical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of alginate-based microcapsules. Our approach was based on the hypothesis that the immune response to the microcapsules is governed by, and can therefore be controlled by, specific physicochemical properties of the microcapsule and its material components. The experimental work was divided into five phases, each associated with a specific aim : (1) To prove that immunoglobulins adsorb to the surface of alginate-polycation microcapsules, and to correlate this adsorption with the microcapsule chemistry. (2) To test interlaboratory reproducibility in making biocompatible microcapsules, and evaluate the suitability of our materials and fabrication protocols for subsequent studies. (3) To determine which physicochemical properties of alginates affect the in vivo biocompatibility of their gels. (4) To determine which physiochemical properties of alginate-polycation microcapsules are most important for determining their in vivo biocompatibility (5) To determine whether a modestly immunogenic membrane hinders or helps the ability of the microcapsule to immunoprotect islet xenografts in

  11. Fabrication and biocompatibility of polyethyleneimine/heparin self-assembly coating on NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NiTi alloy has been used widely as biomaterials. But because of toxic effects possibly caused by excess Ni ions released during the corrosion process in the physiological environment, it is still a controversial material. Fabricating medicine-loaded coating, which is expected to decrease the release of Ni ions and improve the biocompatibility of the materials, is a potential way to solve the problem. In this paper, NiTi alloy is coated by polyethyleneimine/heparin films via layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly method. UV-Vis, FT-IR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements are used to characterize the microstructure of coatings and select the best fabrication conditions. Potentiodynamic polarization researches in sodium chloride and dynamic clotting time experiment are utilized to study its corrosion resistance capability and biocompatibility of coatings, respectively. The results indicate that PEI/heparin multilayer coating can improve the biocompatibility of NiTi alloy surface

  12. In-situ biopreparation of biocompatible bacterial cellulose/graphene oxide composites pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenkun, E-mail: zhuwenkun@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Wei [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); He, Yi; Duan, Tao [Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • The in situ vibration method was used to synthetize BC/GO composite. • The cytotoxicity assays of BC/GO showed a better biocompatibility. • It is first time to use BC/GO composite for drug delivery. - Abstract: In the present work, a composite material formed by bacterial cellulose (BC) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and characterized. GO was added in the bacteria culture media and then the bacteria was inoculated. The BC/GO pellets composite was prepared into the bacteria culture media and vibrated in Erlenmeyer flask. Characterization of the BC/GO composite showed GO nanosheets embedded in the nanofibers network of BC. The experiments in this study demonstrated BC and GO effectively interacted by hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assays showed the material had a better biocompatibility than the counterparts and promoted the cell proliferation excellently. The biocompatibility of BC/GO has the potential to be used for drug delivery.

  13. Degradation and in Vitro Biocompatibility studies of Citric acid based polyesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Margaret Marie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of a polymer for a particular application is dependent on its physical and chemical properties. The monomers used play a significant role in the synthesis of polymers for biomedical applications. In the present work two copolyesters, poly (1,12-dodecanediol citrate-co-1,12- dodecanediol sebacate (PP1; poly (1,12-dodecanediol citrate-co-1,12- dodecanediol itaconate (PP2 were synthesized by catalyst-free melt polyesterification using monomers - citric acid, sebacic acid, itaconic acid and 1,12-dodecanediol. The polymers exhibited mechanical and thermal properties that made them suitable candidates for degradation and biocompatibility studies. In the present work the degradation and in vitro biocompatibility studies were carried out. The degradation and biocompatibility data support the potential use of the elastomers in tissue engineering applications as well as other clinical procedures that may require a biodegradable elastomeric implant.

  14. Mechanical properties and biocompatibility of functionalized carbon nanotubes/polypropylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Nan, Xi; Larsen, Raino Mikael; Huang, Xiaobo; Yu, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement for polypropylene (PP) for biocompatible application as a function of different surface functionalization of CNTs. PP composites were reinforced using various CNTs: single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, MWCNTs), SWCNTs were covalently functionalized by plasma, for comparison, the MWCNTs were functionalized noncovalently. Different CNTs were incorporated into PP by solution blending. The type of CNTs and surface functionalization affects the mechanical and biocompatibility results significantly. Differences in nanostructure and the chemical compositions, number of functional groups, and structural defects for the CNTs may be the key factors affecting the mechanical properties and biocompatibility of PP nanocomposites compared to the neat PP. Finally, suitable CNTs and surface functionalization of CNTs were selected for making the PP/CNTs composites. PMID:27052820

  15. In-situ biopreparation of biocompatible bacterial cellulose/graphene oxide composites pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The in situ vibration method was used to synthetize BC/GO composite. • The cytotoxicity assays of BC/GO showed a better biocompatibility. • It is first time to use BC/GO composite for drug delivery. - Abstract: In the present work, a composite material formed by bacterial cellulose (BC) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and characterized. GO was added in the bacteria culture media and then the bacteria was inoculated. The BC/GO pellets composite was prepared into the bacteria culture media and vibrated in Erlenmeyer flask. Characterization of the BC/GO composite showed GO nanosheets embedded in the nanofibers network of BC. The experiments in this study demonstrated BC and GO effectively interacted by hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assays showed the material had a better biocompatibility than the counterparts and promoted the cell proliferation excellently. The biocompatibility of BC/GO has the potential to be used for drug delivery

  16. The Use of Nanoscaled Fibers or Tubes to Improve Biocompatibility and Bioactivity of Biomedical Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers and nanotubes have recently gained substantial interest for potential applications in tissue engineering due to their large ratio of surface area to volume and unique microstructure. It has been well proved that the mechanical property of matrix could be largely enhanced by the addition of nanoscaled fibers or tubes. At present, more and more researches have shown that the biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomedical materials could be improved by the addition of nanofibers or nanotubes. In this review, the efforts using nanofibers and nanotubes to improve biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomedical materials, including polymeric nanofibers/nanotubes, metallic nanofibers/nanotubes, and inorganic nanofibers/nanotubes, as well as their researches related, are demonstrated in sequence. Furthermore, the possible mechanism of improving biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomedical materials by nanofibers or nanotubes has been speculated to be that the specific protein absorption on the nanoscaled fibers or tubes plays important roles.

  17. Ice-Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  18. Pressure measuring probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, George C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a probe for measuring changes in pressure in a high velocity fluid stream over and adjacent to the surface of an object. The probe is formed of an exterior housing having a closed pressure chamber in which a piezoelectric pressure transducer is mounted. An open connector tube having a probe tip passes a portion of the fluid stream into the closed pressure chamber; any change of pressure within, which requires a settling-time to appear in the closed pressure chamber, is inversely proportional to the cross-sectional area of the connector tube. A cooling chamber formed around the pressure chamber is connected to a source of cooling fluid by means of inlet and outlet tubes.

  19. In Vivo Tumor Vasculature Targeting of CuS@MSN Based Theranostic Nanomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Goel, Shreya; Graves, Stephen A.; Orbay, Hakan; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Shi, Sixiang; Theuer, Charles P.; Robert J. Nickles; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Actively targeted theranostic nanomedicine may be the key for future personalized cancer management. Although numerous types of theranostic nanoparticles have been developed in the past decade for cancer treatment, challenges still exist in the engineering of biocompatible theranostic nanoparticles with highly specific in vivo tumor targeting capabilities. Here, we report the design, synthesis, surface engineering, and in vivo active vasculature targeting of a new category of theranostic nano...

  20. Biocompatibility of the micro-patterned NiTi surface produced by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We fabricated different micro-patterns (grooves, ripples, holes and nanoparticles) on NiTi alloy surfaces to improve the biocompatibility. ► The new method of femtosecond laser (FSL) machining technique was used to obtain the novel micro-patterns, and the authors explored the mechanism of the FSL machining process. ► We the surface characteristics of NiTi surfaces before and after the FSL treatment, and evaluated the influence of FSL treatment on biocompatibility of NiTi alloys. - Abstract: Biocompatibility of the micro-patterned NiTi surface produced by femtosecond laser (FSL) was studied in this work. The surface characteristics of the laser treated NiTi alloys were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atom force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). The biocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro cell culture test. The results showed that, grooves, ripples, which covered by nanoparticles were formed on the sample surfaces, and the Ni/Ti ratio on the alloy surface increased with increasing laser energy. The crystal structure was not changed by laser treatment. However, the cell culture test proved that the micro-patterns induced by FSL were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility of NiTi alloys: the growth of osteoblasts oriented along the grooves, a large amount of synapses and filopodias were formed due to the ripples, holes and nanoparticles on the alloy surface, and the proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content of cells were increased after FSL treatment. However, due to the toxicity of Ni ions on cell growth, the NiTi alloy surface should not be treated by laser fluence of more than 3.82 J/cm2 to obtain the ideal biocompatibility.

  1. Strand-invading linear probe combined with unmodified PNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Hiroyuki; Niwa, Rie; Akahane, Mariko; Murayama, Keiji; Kashida, Hiromu; Kamiya, Yukiko

    2016-09-15

    Efficient strand invasion by a linear probe to fluorescently label double-stranded DNA has been implemented by employing a probe and unmodified PNA. As a fluorophore, we utilized ethynylperylene. Multiple ethynylperylene residues were incorporated into the DNA probe via a d-threoninol scaffold. The ethynylperylene did not significantly disrupt hybridization with complementary DNA. The linear probe self-quenched in the absence of target DNA and did not hybridize with PNA. A gel-shift assay revealed that linear probe and PNA combination invaded the central region of double-stranded DNA upon heat-shock treatment to form a double duplex. To further suppress the background emission and increase the stability of the probe/DNA duplex, a probe containing anthraquinones as well as ethynylperylene was synthesized. This probe and PNA invader pair detected an internal sequence in a double-stranded DNA with high sensitivity when heat shock treatment was used. The probe and PNA pair was able to invade at the terminus of a long double-stranded DNA at 40°C at 100mM NaCl concentration. PMID:27394693

  2. Sputter target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  3. Mechanical strength and biocompatibility of ultrafine-grained commercial purity titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrin, Yuri; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Lapovok, Rimma; Ng, Hoi Pang; Jo, Ji-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The effect of grain refinement of commercial purity titanium by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) on its mechanical performance and bone tissue regeneration is reported. In vivo studies conducted on New Zealand white rabbits did not show an enhancement of biocompatibility of ECAP-modified titanium found earlier by in vitro testing. However, the observed combination of outstanding mechanical properties achieved by ECAP without a loss of biocompatibility suggests that this is a very promising processing route to bioimplant manufacturing. The study thus supports the expectation that commercial purity titanium modified by ECAP can be seen as an excellent candidate material for bone implants suitable for replacing conventional titanium alloy implants. PMID:23936857

  4. MgO-doped tantalum coating on Ti: microstructural study and biocompatibility evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mangal; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-02-01

    Pure and MgO incorporated Ta coatings were prepared on Cp-Ti substrate using laser engineered net shaping (LENS), which resulted in diffuse coating-substrate interface. MgO was found along the Ta grain boundaries in the Ta matrix that increased the coating hardness from 185 ± 2.7 HV to 794 ± 93 HV. In vitro biocompatibility study showed excellent early cellular attachment and later stage proliferation in MgO incorporated coatings. The results indicated that although Ta coatings had higher biocompatibility than Ti, it could further be improved by incorporating MgO in the coating, while simultaneously improving the mechanical properties. PMID:22248182

  5. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Poly(vinyl alcohol)/N,O-Carboxymethyl Chitosan Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Tunku Kamarul; Krishnamurithy, G.; Salih, Noman D.; Nurul Syuhada Ibrahim; Hanumantha Rao Balaji Raghavendran; Abdul Razzaq Suhaeb; D. S. K. Choon

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo biocompatibility and toxicity of PVA/NOCC scaffold were tested by comparing them with those of a biocompatible inert material HAM in a rat model. On Day 5, changes in the blood parameters of the PVA/NOCC-implanted rats were significantly higher than those of the control. The levels of potassium, creatinine, total protein, A/G, hemoglobulin, erythrocytes, WBC, and platelets were not significantly altered in the HAM-implanted rats, when compared with those in the control. On Day 10,...

  6. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Biocompatibility Study of Highly Crystalline Carbonated Hydroxyapatite Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Caibao; Chen, Yingzhi; Huang, Yongzhuo; Zhu, Peizhi

    2015-08-01

    Highly crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanorods with different carbonate contents were synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method. The crystallinity and chemical structure of synthesized nanorods were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo-electronic spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The biocompatibility of synthesized CHA nanorods was evaluated by cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MG-63 cell line. The biocompatibility evaluation results show that these CHA nanorods are biologically active apatites and potentially promising bone-substitute biomaterials for orthopedic application.

  7. Effect of microwave power on EPR spectra of natural and synthetic dental biocompatible materials

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczyk Jakub; Ramos Paweł; Pilawa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic centers in the two exemplary synthetic and natural dental biocompatible materials applied in implantology were examined by the use of an X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The EPR spectra were measured in the range of microwave power 2.2–70 mW. The aims of this work were to compare paramagnetic centers concentrations in different dental biocompatible materials and to determine the effect of microwave power on parameters of their EPR spectra. It i...

  8. Biocompatibility of magnesium implants in primary human reaming debris-derived cells stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Charyeva, Olga; Dakischew, Olga; Sommer, Ursula; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of magnesium for resorbable metal implants is a new concept in orthopaedic and dental medicine. The majority of studies on magnesium’s biocompatibility in vitro have assessed the short-term effect of magnesium extract on cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of direct exposure to magnesium alloys on the bioactivity of primary human reaming debris-derived (HRD) cells. Materials and methods Pure Mg, Mg2Ag, WE43 and Mg10Gd were tested for biocompatibility. The...

  9. Biodegradation and in vivo biocompatibility of rosin: a natural film-forming polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Satturwar, Prashant M.; Fulzele, Suniket V.; Dorle, Avinash K

    2003-01-01

    The specific aim of the present study was to investigate the biodegradation and biocompatibility characteristics of rosin, a natural film-forming polymer. Both in vitro as well as in vivo methods were used for assessment of the same. The in vitro degradation of rosin films was followed in pH 7.4 phosphate buffered saline at 37°C and in vivo by subdermal implantation in rats for up to 90 days. Initial biocompatibility was followed on postoperative days 7, 14, 21, and 28 by histological observa...

  10. Loading, Release, Biodegradation, and Biocompatibility of a Nanovector Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrai, Mauro; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2012-01-01

    A nanovector multistage system has been created to overcome or bypass sequential barriers within the human body, in order to deliver a therapeutic or imaging agent to a specific location. This innovation consists of a composition that includes two or more stages of particles, such that smaller, later-stage particles are contained in the larger, early-stage particles. An active agent, such as a therapeutic agent or imaging agent, is preferentially delivered and/or localized to a particular target site in the body of a subject. The multistage composition overcomes multiple biological barriers in the body. The multistage composition also allows for simultaneous delivery and localization at the same or different target sites of multiple active agents.

  11. Development of ECT probe for detection of deeper cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces a novel eddy current testing probe that realizes deep penetration of eddy currents. The key idea of the probe is the excitation using phase-shifted fields: four coaxial coils are excited with phase-shifted AC currents to suppress eddy current density on the surface of a target and induced eddy currents penetrate deeply into the target. Results of experiments and numerical simulations demonstrate that the new probe provides 20% difference between signals due to a 15 mm deep notch and those due to a 20 mm deep one although an excitation frequency of 10 kHz is applied. In contrast, a conventional eddy current probe driven with the same frequency show as small as 1% difference between signals due to the two notches. (orig.)

  12. Interaction of derived polymers from pyrrole with biocompatible solutions; Interaccion de polimeros derivados de pirrol con soluciones biocompatibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez G, O. G.

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a study about the synthesis by plasma, the electric properties and superficial interaction of polymers derived from pyrrole doped with Iodine with potential use as bio material. Poly-pyrrole is a semiconductor and biocompatible polymer with potential application in the development of artificial muscles and implants where the electric interaction between cells and material is an important variable. The syntheses were made at 13.5 MHz in a glass tubular reactor of 1500 cm{sup 3} with electrodes of 6.5 cm diameter and stainless steel flanges. An electrode was connected to the RF terminal of the power supply that is combined with a matching coupling resistance. The monomer and dopant used in this work were pyrrole and Iodine respectively, in closed containers. They were vaporized and injected separately into the reactor at room temperature and 0.1 mbar. The vapors of the reagents mixed freely in the reactor. The synthesis time was 240 min at 40, 60, 80 and 100 W. The polymers were obtained as thin films adhered to the reactor walls. The films were washed and swollen with distilled water and removed from the reactor walls with a small spatula. The polymers were irradiated with gamma rays at 18 and 22 KGy. Due to the fact that the doses are cumulative, the final dose applied was 40 KGy. The polymers characterization was carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, electrical conductivity and X-ray diffraction. The analyses indicates that the polymers have very similar structure in almost the entire power range, showing C-O, C=C, C-H, O-H, N-H bonds with a predominantly amorphous structure. The TGA analyses showed that the material has 4 or 5 loses of material. The first one starts after that 115 C except for the material irradiated at 40 KGy, this one begins in 87 C, the second one is in the interval of 196 and 295 C, the third one between 311 and 500 C, and the

  13. Empirical study of unipolar and bipolar configurations using high resolution single multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes for electrophysiological probing of electrically excitable cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identifying the neurophysiological basis underlying learning and memory in the mammalian central nervous system requires the development of biocompatible, high resolution, low electrode impedance electrophysiological probes; however, physically, electrode impedance will always be finite and, at times, large. Herein, we demonstrate through experiments performed on frog sartorius muscle that single multi-walled carbon nanotube electrode (sMWNT electrode) geometry and placement are two degrees of freedom that can improve biocompatibility of the probe and counteract the detrimental effects of MWNT/electrolyte interface impedance on the stimulation efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We show that high aspect ratio dependent electric field enhancement at the MWNT tip can boost stimulation efficiency. Derivation of the sMWNT electrode's electrical equivalent indicates that, at low stimulus voltage regimes below 1 V, current conduction is mediated by charge fluctuation in the double layer obviating electrolysis of water, which is potentially toxic to pH sensitive biological tissue. Despite the accompanying increase in electrode impedance, a pair of closely spaced sMWNT electrodes in a two probe (bipolar) configuration maintains biocompatibility and enhances stimulation efficiency and SNR compared to the single probe (unipolar) configuration. For stimulus voltages below 1 V, the electrical equivalent verifies that current conduction in the two probe configuration still proceeds via charge fluctuation in the double layer. As an extracellular stimulation electrode, the two sMWNT electrodes comprise a current dipole that concentrates the electric field and the current density in a smaller region of sartorius; consequently, the bipolar configuration can elicit muscle fiber twitching at low voltages that preclude electrolysis of water. When recording field potentials, the bipolar configuration subtracts the potential between two points allowing for the detection of

  14. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility of alginate-polycation microcapsules designed for islet transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Susan Kimberly

    Microencapsulation represents a method for immunoprotecting transplanted therapeutic cells or tissues from graft rejection using a physical barrier. This approach is advantageous in that it eliminates the need to induce long-term immunosuppression and allows the option of transplanting non-cadaveric cell sources, such as animal cells and stem cell-derived tissues. The microcapsules that we have investigated are designed to immunoprotect islets of Langerhans (i.e. clusters of insulin-secreting cells), with the goal of treating insulin-dependent diabetes. With the aid of techniques for physicochemical analysis, this research focused on understanding which properties of the microcapsule are the most important for determining its biocompatibility. The objective of this work was to elucidate correlations between the chemical make-up, physicochemical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of alginate-based microcapsules. Our approach was based on the hypothesis that the immune response to the microcapsules is governed by, and can therefore be controlled by, specific physicochemical properties of the microcapsule and its material components. The experimental work was divided into five phases, each associated with a specific aim : (1) To prove that immunoglobulins adsorb to the surface of alginate-polycation microcapsules, and to correlate this adsorption with the microcapsule chemistry. (2) To test interlaboratory reproducibility in making biocompatible microcapsules, and evaluate the suitability of our materials and fabrication protocols for subsequent studies. (3) To determine which physicochemical properties of alginates affect the in vivo biocompatibility of their gels. (4) To determine which physiochemical properties of alginate-polycation microcapsules are most important for determining their in vivo biocompatibility (5) To determine whether a modestly immunogenic membrane hinders or helps the ability of the microcapsule to immunoprotect islet xenografts in

  15. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  16. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  17. Aligned ion implantation using scanning probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique for precision ion implantation has been developed. A scanning probe has been equipped with a small aperture and incorporated into an ion beamline, so that ions can be implanted through the aperture into a sample. By using a scanning probe the target can be imaged in a non-destructive way prior to implantation and the probe together with the aperture can be placed at the desired location with nanometer precision. In this work first results of a scanning probe integrated into an ion beamline are presented. A placement resolution of about 120 nm is reported. The final placement accuracy is determined by the size of the aperture hole and by the straggle of the implanted ion inside the target material. The limits of this technology are expected to be set by the latter, which is of the order of 10 nm for low energy ions. This research has been carried out in the context of a larger program concerned with the development of quantum computer test structures. For that the placement accuracy needs to be increased and a detector for single ion detection has to be integrated into the setup. Both issues are discussed in this thesis. To achieve single ion detection highly charged ions are used for the implantation, as in addition to their kinetic energy they also deposit their potential energy in the target material, therefore making detection easier. A special ion source for producing these highly charged ions was used and their creation and interactions with solids of are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  18. Aligned ion implementation using scanning probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, A.

    2006-12-12

    A new technique for precision ion implantation has been developed. A scanning probe has been equipped with a small aperture and incorporated into an ion beamline, so that ions can be implanted through the aperture into a sample. By using a scanning probe the target can be imaged in a non-destructive way prior to implantation and the probe together with the aperture can be placed at the desired location with nanometer precision. In this work first results of a scanning probe integrated into an ion beamline are presented. A placement resolution of about 120 nm is reported. The final placement accuracy is determined by the size of the aperture hole and by the straggle of the implanted ion inside the target material. The limits of this technology are expected to be set by the latter, which is of the order of 10 nm for low energy ions. This research has been carried out in the context of a larger program concerned with the development of quantum computer test structures. For that the placement accuracy needs to be increased and a detector for single ion detection has to be integrated into the setup. Both issues are discussed in this thesis. To achieve single ion detection highly charged ions are used for the implantation, as in addition to their kinetic energy they also deposit their potential energy in the target material, therefore making detection easier. A special ion source for producing these highly charged ions was used and their creation and interactions with solids of are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  19. In Vivo Tumor Vasculature Targeting of CuS@MSN Based Theranostic Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Goel, Shreya; Graves, Stephen A; Orbay, Hakan; Ehlerding, Emily B; Shi, Sixiang; Theuer, Charles P; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Actively targeted theranostic nanomedicine may be the key for future personalized cancer management. Although numerous types of theranostic nanoparticles have been developed in the past decade for cancer treatment, challenges still exist in the engineering of biocompatible theranostic nanoparticles with highly specific in vivo tumor targeting capabilities. Here, we report the design, synthesis, surface engineering, and in vivo active vasculature targeting of a new category of theranostic nanoparticle for future cancer management. Water-soluble photothermally sensitive copper sulfide nanoparticles were encapsulated in biocompatible mesoporous silica shells, followed by multistep surface engineering to form the final theranostic nanoparticles. Systematic in vitro targeting, an in vivo long-term toxicity study, photothermal ablation evaluation, in vivo vasculature targeted imaging, biodistribution and histology studies were performed to fully explore the potential of as-developed new theranostic nanoparticles. PMID:25843647

  20. Fast Diagnosis of Transient Plasma by Langmuir Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG En-ling; ZHANG Qing-ming; OUYANG Ji-ting

    2007-01-01

    A method for the fast measurement of electron temperature and density with temporal resolution in transient plasma has been implemented by Langmuir probe. The diagnostic system consists of a single Langmuir probe driven by a high frequency sinusoidal voltage. The current and voltage spectrum on the probe were detected synchronously by an oscilloscope with sampling rate being at least 5 times higher than the frequency of sweep voltage. The system has been used to diagnose the transient plasma generated by hypervelocity-impact of LY12 aluminum projectile into LY12 aluminum target.

  1. Alendronate conjugated nanoparticles for calcification targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nanying; Song, Juqing; Zhu, Guanglin; Shi, Xuetao; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-06-01

    In this article, the synthesis of a novel calcification-targeting nanoparticle (NP) is reported, which is realized through dopamine self-polymerization on the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particle surface and subsequent alendronate conjugation. Cell viability and proliferation tests confirmed that such particle has low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Experiments were designed to observe whether the synthesized NPs can pass through an obstructive hydrogel and directly bind themselves to hydroxyapatite (HA) NPs (mimicking calcified spots) and HA porous scaffolds (mimicking calcified tissues); and the result was positive, indicating ingenious targeting of NPs on calcifications. The calcification-targeting NPs are expected to be with promising applications on calcification-related disease diagnoses and therapies. PMID:26970822

  2. Autonomous Target Ranging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz;

    2003-01-01

    determination two ranging strategies are presented. One is an improved laser ranger with an effective range with non-cooperative targets of at least 10,000 km, demonstrated in ground tests. The accuracy of the laser ranging will be approximately 1 m. The laser ranger may furthermore be used for trajectory...... determination of nano-gravity probes, which will perform direct mass measurements of selected targets. The other is triangulation from two spacecraft. For this method it is important to distinguish between detection and tracking range, which will be different for Bering since different instruments are used for......For the deep space asteroid mission, Bering, the main goal is the detection and tracking of near Earth objects (NEOs) and asteroids. One of the key science instruments is the 0.3-m telescope used for imaging and tracking of the detected asteroidal objects. For efficient use of the observation time...

  3. Target capture and target ghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Steven P.

    1996-05-01

    Optimal detection methods for small targets rely on whitened matched filters, which convolve the measured data with the signal model, and whiten the result with the noise covariance. In real-world implementations of such filters, the noise covariance must be estimated from the data, and the resulting covariance estimate may be corrupted by presence of the target. The resulting loss in SNR is called 'target capture'. Target capture is often thought to be a problem only for bright targets. This presentation shows that target capture also arises for dim targets, leading to an SNR loss which is independent of target strength and depends on the averaging method used to estimate the noise covariance. This loss is due to a 'coherent beat' between the true noise and that portion of the estimated noise covariance due to the target. This beat leads to 'ghost targets', which diminish the target SNR by producing a negative target ghost at the target's position. A quantitative estimate of this effect will be given, and shown to agree with numerical results. The effect of averaging on SNR is also discussed for data scenes with synthetic injected targets, in cases where the noise covariance is estimated using 'no target' data. For these cases, it is shown that the so-called 'optimal' filter, which uses the true noise covariance, is actually worse than a 'sub-optimal' filter which estimates the noise from scene. This apparent contradiction is resolved by showing that the optimal filter is best if the same filter is used for many scenes, but is outperformed by a filter adapted to a specific scene.

  4. Three-dimensional macroporous nanoelectronic networks as minimally invasive brain probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chong; Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Dai, Xiaochuan; Zhou, Wei; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-12-01

    Direct electrical recording and stimulation of neural activity using micro-fabricated silicon and metal micro-wire probes have contributed extensively to basic neuroscience and therapeutic applications; however, the dimensional and mechanical mismatch of these probes with the brain tissue limits their stability in chronic implants and decreases the neuron-device contact. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a three-dimensional macroporous nanoelectronic brain probe that combines ultra-flexibility and subcellular feature sizes to overcome these limitations. Built-in strains controlling the local geometry of the macroporous devices are designed to optimize the neuron/probe interface and to promote integration with the brain tissue while introducing minimal mechanical perturbation. The ultra-flexible probes were implanted frozen into rodent brains and used to record multiplexed local field potentials and single-unit action potentials from the somatosensory cortex. Significantly, histology analysis revealed filling-in of neural tissue through the macroporous network and attractive neuron-probe interactions, consistent with long-term biocompatibility of the device. PMID:26436341

  5. Three-dimensional macroporous nanoelectronic networks as minimally invasive brain probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chong; Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Dai, Xiaochuan; Zhou, Wei; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-12-01

    Direct electrical recording and stimulation of neural activity using micro-fabricated silicon and metal micro-wire probes have contributed extensively to basic neuroscience and therapeutic applications; however, the dimensional and mechanical mismatch of these probes with the brain tissue limits their stability in chronic implants and decreases the neuron-device contact. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a three-dimensional macroporous nanoelectronic brain probe that combines ultra-flexibility and subcellular feature sizes to overcome these limitations. Built-in strains controlling the local geometry of the macroporous devices are designed to optimize the neuron/probe interface and to promote integration with the brain tissue while introducing minimal mechanical perturbation. The ultra-flexible probes were implanted frozen into rodent brains and used to record multiplexed local field potentials and single-unit action potentials from the somatosensory cortex. Significantly, histology analysis revealed filling-in of neural tissue through the macroporous network and attractive neuron-probe interactions, consistent with long-term biocompatibility of the device.

  6. Endothelial biocompatibility and accumulation of SPION under flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuszak, Jasmin; Zaloga, Jan; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Lyer, Stefan [Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftungsprofessur for Nanomedicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Measuring and Automation Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftungsprofessur for Nanomedicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Cicha, Iwona, E-mail: Iwona_Cicha@yahoo.com [Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftungsprofessur for Nanomedicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic targeting is considered a promising method to accumulate the nanoparticles at the sites of atherosclerotic lesions, but little is known about the biological effects of magnetic nanoparticles on the vascular wall. Here, we investigated endothelial cell growth and vitality upon treatment with SPION (0–60 µg/mL) using two complementing methods: real-time cell analysis and live-cell microscopy. Moreover, the uptake of circulating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) was assessed in an in vitro model of arterial bifurcations. At the tested concentrations, SPIONs were well tolerated and had no major influence on endothelial cell growth. Our results further showed a uniform distribution of endothelial SPION uptake independent of channel geometry or hemodynamic conditions: In the absence of magnetic force, no increase in accumulation of SPIONs at non-uniform shear stress region at the outer walls of bifurcation was observed. Application of external magnet allowed enhanced accumulation of SPIONs at the regions of non-uniform shear stress. Increased uptake of SPIONs at non-uniform shear stress region was well tolerated by endothelial cells (ECs) and did not affect endothelial cell viability or attachment. These findings indicate that magnetic targeting can constitute a promising and safe technique for the delivery of imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles to atherosclerotic lesions.

  7. Comparison of in vivo biocompatibilities between parylene-C and polydimethylsiloxane for implantable microelectronic devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dong Sup Lee; Su Jin Kim; Eun Bi Kwon; Cheol Whee Park; Su Min Jun; Bumkyoo Choi; Sae Woong Kim

    2013-11-01

    Implantable devices are often composed of or coated with different biologically compatible materials based on their requirements. Selecting a surface material for an implantable device is not an easy task, and it is necessary to compare the biocompatibilities of the available surface materials. In this study, we perform a comparison of the in vivo biocompatibilities of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and para-xylyene polymer (parylene-C) as they are considered to be candidates for a coating material for implantable microelectronic devices. For in vivo biocompatibility testing, fifty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for testing, and they were divided into three groups (PDMS, parylene-C and a positive control). At one, four and twelve weeks after implantation of the test object, the density of inflammatory cells and the granulation layer thickness were recorded for each group and compared with other groups using visible light and fluorescence microscopy. The thickness of the granulation layer tended to decrease over time for all of the experimental groups, whereas the granulation layer thickness remained constant in the positive control group. The thinnest capsular layer was observed for the parylene-C group and fewest inflammatory cells were observed in this group during the entire experimental period. Macrophage infiltration was minimal, even at one week, and was not observed thereafter. The parylene-C group showed better biocompatibility than the PDMS groups, both for acute and chronic implantation. Thus, parylene-C is the best candidate of the tested materials for applications involving permanent implantable micro-devices.

  8. Structural and biocompatible characterization of TiC/a:C nanocomposite thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balázsi, K.; Vandrovcová, Marta; Bačáková, Lucie; Balázsi, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2013), s. 1671-1675. ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1858 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : TiC * nanocomposite * biocompatibility , * MG63 osteoblast Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2013

  9. Diamond/graphite content and biocompatibility of DLC filmsfabricated by PLD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Remsa, Jan; Mikšovský, Jan; Zemek, Josef; Smetana, K. Jr.; Dvořánková, B.; Luxbacher, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 4 (2010), 579-583. ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : biocompatibility * DLC * PLD Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2010

  10. Controllable synthesis of functional nanocomposites: Covalently functionalize graphene sheets with biocompatible L-lysine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The biocompatible L-lysine functionalized graphene sheets (Gs/Lys) were synthesized controllably using a novel method. ► The Gs/Lys nanocomposites are water-soluble, biocompatible and chiral. ► A chiral graphene derivative was proposed. - Abstract: In this paper a novel method to synthesize functionalize graphene sheets (Gs) by biocompatible L-lysine (Gs/Lys) is reported. The method was composed of two steps: (1) we controllably synthesized self-assembly Gs/Lys-Cu-Lys through the terminal amino of copper L-lysine (Lys-Cu-Lys) attaching to graphite oxide (GO) and then reducing. (2) Obtained the Gs/Lys by eliminating the copper ion. This method could also be used to functionalize other nanomaterials by L-lysine. The Gs/Lys nanocomposites are water-soluble, biocompatible, and above all, it is a chiral material of graphene, which is proposed by us. This novel material will be promising for more applications of graphene. The formation of Gs/Lys nanocomposites were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis.

  11. In vitro and in vivo studies on biocompatibility of carbon fibres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajzer, I.; Menaszek, E.; Bačáková, Lucie; Rom, M.; Blazewicz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 9 (2010), s. 2611-2622. ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1000 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : carbon fibres * biocompatibility Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2010

  12. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hua; Ye Xiaojian; Li Jiashun, E-mail: ljsspine@163.co [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  13. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ye, Xiao-Jian; Li, Jia-Shun

    2009-08-01

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:19605959

  14. Zero-field birefringence of biocompatible magnetic fluids: A concentration dependence investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero-field birefringence was used to investigate maghemite-based biocompatible magnetic fluids surface-coated with citrate. The model used to analyze the birefringence signal considers the dipolar magnetic interaction among dimers and the onset of a nematic phase near the sample holder surface. The data show that zero-field birefringence grows with sample dilution

  15. Tailoring Properties of Biocompatible PEG-DMA Hydrogels with UV Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Sania; Benavente, Juana; Berg, Rolf W.;

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are highly water-absorbent hydrophilic polymer networks, which show potential in many biocompatible ap- plications. In previous work, we demonstrated the feasibility of using poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEG-DMA) gels polymerized with a photoinitiator for encapsulation and stab...

  16. Enhanced biocompatibility and wound healing properties of biodegradable polymer-modified allyl 2-cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ju; Son, Ho Sung; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Ji Hye; Choi, Samjin; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-06-01

    As poly L-lactic acid (PLLA) is a polymer with good biocompatibility and biodegradability, we created a new tissue adhesive (TA), pre-polymerized allyl 2-cyanoacrylate (PACA) mixed with PLLA in an effort to improve biocompatibility and mechanical properties in healing dermal wound tissue. We determined optimal mixing ratios of PACA and PLLA based on their bond strengths and chemical structures analyzed by the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In vitro biocompatibility of the PACA/PLLA was evaluated using direct- and indirect-contact methods according to the ISO-10993 cytotoxicity test for medical devices. The PACA/PLLA have similar or even better biocompatibility than those of commercially available cyanoacrylate (CA)-based TAs such as Dermabond® and Histoacryl®. The PACA/PLLA were not different from those exposed to Dermabond® and Histoacryl® in Raman spectra when biochemical changes of protein and DNA/RNA underlying during cell death were compared utilizing Raman spectroscopy. Histological analysis revealed that incised dermal tissues of rats treated with PACA/PLLA showed less inflammatory signs and enhanced collagen formation compared to those treated with Dermabond® or Histoacryl®. Of note, tissues treated with PACA/PLLA were stronger in the tensile strength compared to those treated with the commercially available TAs. Therefore, taking all the results into consideration, the PACA/PLLA we created might be a clinically useful TA for treating dermal wounds. PMID:25842106

  17. Synthesis of microbial elastomers based on soybean oily acids. Biocompatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocompatibility studies of the autoxidized and unoxidized unsaturated medium-long chain length (m-lcl) co-poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (m-lclPHAs) derived from soya oily acids have been reported. Pseudomonas oleovorans was grown on a series of mixtures of octanoic acid (OA) and soya oily acids (Sy) with weight ratios of 20:80, 28:72 and 50:50 in order to obtain unsaturated m-lcl copolyesters coded PHO-Sy-2080, PHO-Sy-2872 and PHO-Sy-5050, respectively. The PHA films were obtained by solvent cast from CHCl3. They were all originally sticky and waxy except PHO-Sy-5050. Autoxidation of the unsaturated copolyester films was carried out on exposure to air at room temperature in order to obtain crosslinked polymers. They became a highly flexible elastomer after being autoxidized (about 40 days of autoxidation). The in vivo tissue reactions of the autoxidized PHAs were evaluated by subcutaneous implantation in rats. The rats appeared to be healthy throughout the implantation period. No symptom such as necrosis, abscess or tumorigenesis was observed in the vicinity of the implants. Retrieved materials varied in their physical appearance after 6 weeks of implantation. In vivo biocompatibility studies of the medical applications indicated that the microbial copolyesters obtained were all biocompatible and especially the PHOSy series of copolyesters had the highest biocompatibility among them.

  18. Modified titanium surface with gelatin nano gold composite increases osteoblast cell biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Bhattarai, Govinda [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Aryal, Santosh [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nan-Hee [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min-Ho [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Gun [Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Jhee, Eun-Chung [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Yong [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun, E-mail: yihokn@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the gelatin nano gold (GnG) composite for surface modification of titanium in addition to insure biocompatibility on dental implants or biomaterials. The GnG composite was constructed by gelatin and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate in presence of reducing agent, sodium borohydrate (NabH{sub 4}). The GnG composite was confirmed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A dipping method was used to modify the titanium surface by GnG composite. Surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The MC-3T3 E1 cell viability was assessed by trypan blue and the expression of proteins to biocompatibility were analyzed by Western blotting. The GnG composite showed well dispersed character, the strong absorption at 530 nm, roughness, regular crystal and clear C, Na, Cl, P, and Au signals onto titanium. Further, this composite allowed MC-3T3 E1 growth and viability compared to gelatin and pure titanium. It induced ERK activation and the expression of cell adherent molecules, FAK and SPARC, and growth factor, VEGF. However, GnG decreased the level of SAPK/JNK. This shows that GnG composite coated titanium surfaces have a good biocompatibility for osteoblast growth and attachment than in intact by simple and versatile dipping method. Furthermore, it offers good communication between cell and implant surfaces by regulating cell signaling and adherent molecules, which are useful to enhance the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.

  19. Thermodynamics of non-bridging oxigen in silica bio-compatible glass-ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koga, N.; Strnad, Z.; Šesták, Jaroslav; Strnad, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2003), s. 927-937. ISSN 1418-2874 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4010101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : bio-compatible * bone-like apatite * glass-ceramics * mimetic material * thermodynamic s Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2002

  20. Modified titanium surface with gelatin nano gold composite increases osteoblast cell biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the gelatin nano gold (GnG) composite for surface modification of titanium in addition to insure biocompatibility on dental implants or biomaterials. The GnG composite was constructed by gelatin and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate in presence of reducing agent, sodium borohydrate (NabH4). The GnG composite was confirmed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A dipping method was used to modify the titanium surface by GnG composite. Surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The MC-3T3 E1 cell viability was assessed by trypan blue and the expression of proteins to biocompatibility were analyzed by Western blotting. The GnG composite showed well dispersed character, the strong absorption at 530 nm, roughness, regular crystal and clear C, Na, Cl, P, and Au signals onto titanium. Further, this composite allowed MC-3T3 E1 growth and viability compared to gelatin and pure titanium. It induced ERK activation and the expression of cell adherent molecules, FAK and SPARC, and growth factor, VEGF. However, GnG decreased the level of SAPK/JNK. This shows that GnG composite coated titanium surfaces have a good biocompatibility for osteoblast growth and attachment than in intact by simple and versatile dipping method. Furthermore, it offers good communication between cell and implant surfaces by regulating cell signaling and adherent molecules, which are useful to enhance the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.