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Sample records for biocompatible synthetic non-biodegradable

  1. Synthetic cornea: biocompatibility and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Kaminski, Stefan; Fernandez, Viviana; Alfonso, E.; Lamar, Peggy; Lacombe, Emmanuel; Duchesne, Bernard; Dubovy, Sander; Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose. Experimentally find a method to provide a safe surgical technique and an inexpensive and long lasting mesoplant for the restoration of vision in patients with bilateral corneal blindness due to ocular surface and stromal diseases. Methods. Identify the least invasive and the safest surgical technique for synthetic cornea implantation. Identify the most compatible biomaterials and the optimal shape a synthetic cornea must have to last a long time when implanted in vivo. Results. Penetrating procedures were deemed too invasive, time consuming, difficult and prone to long term complications. Therefore a non-penetrating delamination technique with central trephination was developed to preserve the integrity of Descemet's membrane and the anterior segment. Even though this approach limits the number of indications, it is acceptable since the majority of patients only have opacities in the stroma. The prosthesis was designed to fit in the removed tissue plane with its skirt fitted under the delaminated stroma. To improve retention, the trephination wall was made conical with the smallest opening on the anterior surface and a hat-shaped mesoplant was made to fit. The skirt was perforated in its perimeter to allow passage of nutrients and tissues ingrowths. To simplify the fabrication procedure, the haptic and optic were made of the same polymer. The intrastromal biocompatibility of several hydrogels was found superior to current clinically used PMMA and PTFE materials. Monobloc mesoplants made of 4 different materials were implanted in rabbits and followed weekly until extrusion occurred. Some remained optically clear allowing for fundus photography. Conclusions. Hydrogel synthetic corneas can be made to survive for periods longer than 1 year. ArF excimer laser photoablation studies are needed to determine the refractive correction potential of these mesoplants. A pilot FDA clinical trial is needed to assess the mesoplant efficacy and very long-term stability.

  2. Effect of microwave power on EPR spectra of natural and synthetic dental biocompatible materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamczyk Jakub

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paramagnetic centers in the two exemplary synthetic and natural dental biocompatible materials applied in implantology were examined by the use of an X-band (9.3 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. The EPR spectra were measured in the range of microwave power 2.2–70 mW. The aims of this work were to compare paramagnetic centers concentrations in different dental biocompatible materials and to determine the effect of microwave power on parameters of their EPR spectra. It is the very first and innovatory examination of paramagnetic centers in these materials. It was pointed out that paramagnetic centers existed in both natural (~1018 spin/g and synthetic (~1019 spin/g dental biocompatible materials, but the lower free radical concentration characterized the natural sample. Continuous microwave saturation of EPR spectra indicated that faster spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in synthetic dental biocompatible materials than in natural material. Linewidths (ΔBpp of the EPR spectra of the natural dental material slightly increased for the higher microwave powers. Such effect was not observed for the synthetic material. The broad EPR lines (ΔBpp: 2.4 mT, 3.9 mT, were measured for the natural and synthetic dental materials, respectively. Probably strong dipolar interactions between paramagnetic centers in the studied samples may be responsible for their line broadening. EPR spectroscopy is the useful experimental method in the examination of paramagnetic centers in dental biocompatible materials.

  3. Frontiers in biomaterials the design, synthetic strategies and biocompatibility of polymer scaffolds for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Frontiers in Biomaterials: The Design, Synthetic Strategies and Biocompatibility of Polymer Scaffolds for Biomedical Application, Volume 1" highlights the importance of biomaterials and their interaction with biological system. The need for the development of biomaterials as scaffold for tissue regeneration is driven by the increasing demands for materials that mimic functions of extracellular matrices of body tissues.This ebook covers the latest challenges on the biocompatibility of scaffold overtime after implantation and discusses the requirement of innovative technologies and strategies f

  4. In vitro biocompatibility testing of some synthetic polymers used for the achievement of nervous conduits

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai, R; Florescu, IP; Coroiu, V; Oancea, A; Lungu, M.

    2011-01-01

    Biocompatible synthetic polymers are largely used in the bio–medical domain, tissue engineering and in controlled release of medicines. Polymers can be used in the achievement of cardiac and vascular devices, mammary implants, eye lenses, surgical threads, nervous conduits, adhesives, blood substitutes, etc. Our study was axed on the development of cytotoxicity tests for 3 synthetic polymers, namely polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl chloride. These tests targeted to determi...

  5. Biocompatibility and preliminary clinical application of HA/HDPE nanocomposites synthetic auditory ossicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shai-hong; WANG Guo-hui; ZHAO Yan-zhong; QI You-fei; ZHOU Ke-chao; HUANG Su-ping; LI Zhi-you; HUANG Bai-yun

    2006-01-01

    The biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite/high density polyethtlene(HA/HDPE) nanocomposites synthetic auditory ossicle was evaluated, the percentage of S-period cells was detected by flow cytometry after L929 incubated with extraction of the HA/HDPE nanocomposites, titanium materials of clinical application as the control. Both of them were implanted in the animals and the histopathological evaluations were carried out, and the preliminary clinical trials about HA/HDPE nanocomposites synthetic auditory ossicles were also carried out. The statistical analysis show that there are no statistically significant differences between HA/HDPE test groups and control groups (P>0.05), which demonstrates that the HA/HDPE nanocomposites synthetic auditory ossicle has a good biocompatibility and clinical application outlook.

  6. Effect of microwave power on EPR spectra of natural and synthetic dental biocompatible materials

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczyk Jakub; Ramos Paweł; Pilawa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic centers in the two exemplary synthetic and natural dental biocompatible materials applied in implantology were examined by the use of an X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The EPR spectra were measured in the range of microwave power 2.2–70 mW. The aims of this work were to compare paramagnetic centers concentrations in different dental biocompatible materials and to determine the effect of microwave power on parameters of their EPR spectra. It i...

  7. Biocompatibility, resorption and biofunctionality of a new synthetic biodegradable membrane for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoornaert, Alain; d'Arros, Cyril; Heymann, Marie-Francoise; Layrolle, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Membranes for guided bone regeneration (GBR) were prepared from the synthetic biodegradable polymer poly-D,L-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA). This GBR membrane has a bi-layered structure with a dense film to prevent gingival fibroblast ingrowth and ensure mechanical function, and a micro-fibrous layer to support colonization by osteogenic cells and promote bone regeneration. Hydrolysis and biodegradation were both studied in vitro through soaking in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and in vivo by implantation in the subcutis of rats for 4, 8, 16, 26, 48 and 52 weeks. Histology revealed an excellent colonization of the micro-fibrous layer by cells with a minimal inflammatory reaction during resorption. GBR using the synthetic PLGA membrane was evaluated on critical-size calvaria defects in rats for 4 and 8 weeks. Radiographs, micro-computed tomography and histology showed bone regeneration with the PLGA membrane, while the defects covered with a collagen membrane showed a limited amount of mineralized bone, similar to that of the defect left empty. The biofunctionality of the PLGA membranes was also compared to collagen membranes in mandible defects in rabbits, associated or not with beta-tricalcium phosphate granules. This study revealed that the bi-layered synthetic membrane made of PLGA was safer, more biocompatible, and had a greater controlled resorption rate and bone regeneration capacity than collagen membranes. This new PLGA membrane could be used in pre-implantology and peri-odontology surgery. PMID:27509180

  8. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF A SYNTHETIC EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX ON IMMORTALIZED VOCAL FOLD FIBROBLASTS IN 3D CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xia; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to promote wound repair and induce tissue regeneration, an engineered hyaluronan (HA) hydrogel – Carbylan GSX, which contains di(thiopropionyl) bishydrazide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA-DTPH), di(thiopropionyl) bishydrazide-modified gelatin (Gtn-DTPH) and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), has been developed for extracellular matrix (ECM) defects of the superficial and middle layers of the lamina propria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of Carbylan...

  9. A study on the treatment of non-biodegradable wastewater by using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out for decomposition of dye wastewater which has been called non-biodegradable wastewater by using gamma radiation combined with ozone. When dye wastewater was oxidized by ozone combined with irradiation, a large amount of dye wastewater could be easily oxidized to final products. The irradiation acts an important roll of production of O2-radical which is essential in decomposition of tert-butanol. 2 tabs., 22 figs. (Author)

  10. Review of Methods of Wastewater Reuse to Diminish Non-Biodegradable Organic Compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Bitow Meles, Desbele

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater reuse is very important in water resource management for both environmental and economic reasons. Unfortunately, wastewater from textile industries is difficult to treat by convectional wastewater treatment technologies. Now days, polluted water due to color from textile dyeing and finishing industries is burning issue for researchers. Textile or industrial wastewaters contain non-biodegradable organic compounds, which cannot be easily biodegraded because of their complex chemical ...

  11. Synthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Manferdini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally materials have been associated with a series of physical properties that can be used as inputs to production and manufacturing. Recently we witnessed an interest in materials considered not only as ‘true matter’, but also as new breeds where geometry, texture, tooling and finish are able to provoke new sensations when they are applied to a substance. These artificial materials can be described as synthetic because they are the outcome of various qualities that are not necessarily true to the original matter, but they are the combination of two or more parts, whether by design or by natural processes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of architectural surfaces to produce effects through the invention of new breeds of artificial matter, using micro-scale details derived from Nature as an inspiration.

  12. Compared in vivo toxicity in mice of lung delivered biodegradable and non-biodegradable nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragao-Santiago, Letícia; Hillaireau, Hervé; Grabowski, Nadège; Mura, Simona; Nascimento, Thais L; Dufort, Sandrine; Coll, Jean-Luc; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2016-04-01

    To design nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems for pulmonary administration, biodegradable materials are considered safe, but their potential toxicity is poorly explored. We here explore the lung toxicity in mice of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) and compare it to the toxicity of non-biodegradable ones. NP formulations of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coated with chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) or poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which renders 200 nm NPs of positive, negative or neutral surface charge respectively, were analyzed for their biodistribution by in vivo fluorescence imaging and their inflammatory potential after single lung nebulization in mice. After exposure, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell population, protein secretion and cytokine release as well as lung histology were carried out. The inflammatory response was compared to the one induced by non-biodegradable counterparts, namely, TiO2 of rutile and anatase crystal form and polystyrene (PS). PLGA NPs were mostly present in mice lungs, with little passage to other organs. An increase in neutrophil recruitment was observed in mice exposed to PS NPs 24 h after nebulization, which declined at 48 h. This result was supported by an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) in BAL supernatant at 24 h. TiO2 anatase NPs were still present in lung cells 48 h after nebulization and induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells to BAL. In contrast, regardless of their surface charge, PLGA NPs did not induce significant changes in the inflammation markers analyzed. In conclusion, these results point out to a safe use of PLGA NPs regardless of their surface coating compared to non-biodegradable ones. PMID:26573338

  13. Histological evaluation of different biodegradable and non-biodegradable membranes implanted subcutaneously in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, S; Pinholt, E M; Madsen, J E; Donath, K

    2000-01-01

    Different types of biodegradable membranes have become available for guided tissue regeneration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate histologically three different biodegradable membranes (Bio-Gide, Resolut and Vicryl) and one non-biodegradable membrane (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/e-PTFE...... that e-PTFE was well tolerated and encapsulated by a fibrous connective tissue capsule. There was capsule formation around Resolut and Vicryl and around Bio-Gide in the early phase there was a wide inflammatory zone already. e-PTFE and Vicryl were stable materials while Resolut and Bio-Gide fragmented...

  14. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abood, Alkhafaji R. [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Thi Qar University, Nasiriyah (Iraq); Bao, Jianguo, E-mail: bjianguo888@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup −1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup −1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup −1}, 22.8 mg L{sup −1}, 24.2 mg L{sup −1}, 18.4 mg L{sup −1} and 50.8 mg L{sup −1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated

  15. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH3-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH3-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s−1 within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L−1 at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD5/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD5, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH3-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD5, suspended solid (SS), NH3-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L−1, 22.8 mg L−1, 24.2 mg L−1, 18.4 mg L−1 and 50.8 mg L−1 respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated pollutant loading from landfill leachate

  16. Removal of non-biodegradable organic matter from landfill leachates by adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J; Castrillón, L; Marañón, E; Sastre, H; Fernández, E

    2004-01-01

    Leachates produced at the La Zoreda landfill in Asturias, Spain, were recirculated through a simulated landfill pilot plant. Prior to recirculation, three loads of different amounts of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) were added to the plant, forming in this way consecutive layers. When anaerobic digestion was almost completed, the leachates from the landfill were recirculated. After recirculation, a new load of MSW was added and two new recirculations were carried out. The organic load of the three landfill leachates recirculated through the anaerobic pilot plant decreased from initial values of 5108, 3782 and 2560 mg/l to values of between 1500 and 1600 mg/l. Despite achieving reductions in the organic load of the leachate, a residual organic load still remained that was composed of non-biodegradable organic constituents such as humic substances. Similar values of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) were obtained when the landfill leachate was treated by a pressurised anoxic-aerobic process followed by ultrafiltration. After recirculation through the pilot plant, physico-chemical treatment was carried out to reduce the COD of the leachate. The pH of the leachate was decreased to a value of 1.5 to precipitate the humic fraction, obtaining a reduction in COD of about 13.5%. The supernatant liquid was treated with activated carbon and different resins, XAD-8, XAD-4 and IR-120. Activated carbon presented the highest adsorption capacities, obtaining COD values for the treated leachate in the order of 200mg/l. Similar results were obtained when treating with activated carbon, the leachate from the biological treatment plant at the La Zoreda landfill; in this case without decreasing the pH. PMID:15276746

  17. A new synthetic methodology for the preparation of biocompatible and organo-soluble barbituric- and thiobarbituric acid based chitosan derivatives for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Sohail; Shahzadi, Lubna; Mahmood, Nasir; Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar; Rauf, Abdul; Manzoor, Faisal; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur; Yar, Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Chitosan's poor solubility especially in organic solvents limits its use with other organo-soluble polymers; however such combinations are highly required to tailor their properties for specific biomedical applications. This paper describes the development of a new synthetic methodology for the synthesis of organo-soluble chitosan derivatives. These derivatives were synthesized from chitosan (CS), triethyl orthoformate and barbituric or thiobarbituric acid in the presence of 2-butannol. The chemical interactions and new functional motifs in the synthesized CS derivatives were evaluated by FTIR, DSC/TGA, UV/VIS, XRD and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity investigation for these materials was performed by cell culture method using VERO cell line and all the synthesized derivatives were found to be non-toxic. The solubility analysis showed that these derivatives were readily soluble in organic solvents including DMSO and DMF. Their potential to use with organo-soluble commercially available polymers was exploited by electrospinning; the synthesized derivatives in combination with polycaprolactone delivered nanofibrous membranes. PMID:27207049

  18. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  19. Biocompatibility of Poly(ester amide (PEA Microfibrils in Ocular Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kropp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery systems (DDS are able to deliver, over long periods of time, therapeutic concentrations of drugs requiring frequent administration. Two classes of DDS are available, biodegradable and non-biodegradable. The larger non-biodegradable implants ensure long-term delivery, but require surgical interventions. Biodegradable biomaterials are smaller, injectable implants, but degrade hydrolytically and release drugs in non-zero order kinetics, which is inefficient for long-term sustained drug release. Biodegradable poly(ester amides (PEAs may overcome these difficulties. To assess their ocular biocompatibility and long-term behavior, PEA fibrils were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, incubation in vitreous humor changes to PEA structure, suggests degradation by surface erosion, enabling drug release with zero order kinetics. Clinical and histological analysis of PEA fibrils implanted subconjunctivally and intravitreally showed the absence of an inflammatory response or other pathological tissue alteration. This study shows that PEA fibrils are biocompatible with ocular environment and degrade by surface erosion.

  20. Bioglass: A novel biocompatible innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancement of materials technology has been immense, especially in the past 30 years. Ceramics has not been new to dentistry. Porcelain crowns, silica fillers in composite resins, and glass ionomer cements have already been proved to be successful. Materials used in the replacement of tissues have come a long way from being inert, to compatible, and now regenerative. When hydroxyapatite was believed to be the best biocompatible replacement material, Larry Hench developed a material using silica (glass as the host material, incorporated with calcium and phosphorous to fuse broken bones. This material mimics bone material and stimulates the regrowth of new bone material. Thus, due to its biocompatibility and osteogenic capacity it came to be known as "bioactive glass-bioglass." It is now encompassed, along with synthetic hydroxyapatite, in the field of biomaterials science known as "bioactive ceramics." The aim of this article is to give a bird′s-eye view, of the various uses in dentistry, of this novel, miracle material which can bond, induce osteogenesis, and also regenerate bone.

  1. Biocompatibility of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavar, Fereydoon; Sabirianov, Renat; Marton, Denes; Rubinstein, Alexander; Garvin, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Titanium is the material of choice for orthopaedic applications because of its known biocompatibility. In order to enhance osteogenic properties of the Ti implants, it is necessary to understand the origin of its biocompatibility. We addresses the origin of Ti biocompatibility through (1) theoretical modeling, (2) the precise determination of Ti surface chemistry by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), (3) and the study of fibronectin adsorption as a function of Ti (near) surface chemistry by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We compare the protein adsorption on Ti with the native oxide layer and the one coated by TiO2 in anatase phase using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). We show that the thin native sub-stoichiometric titanium oxide layer is crucial for biocompatibility of Ti surface. This is due to the enhancement of the non-specific adsorption of proteins which mediate cell adhesion. Improving the surface oxide quality, i.e. fabricating stoichiometric TiO2 (using IBAD) as well as nanoengineering the surface topology that matches its dimensions to that of adhesive proteins, is crucial for increased protein adsorption and, as a result, further increases biocompatibility of Ti implant materials.

  2. Biocompatibility of polyaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíček, P.; Kašpárková, V.; Saha, P.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 162, 7/8 (2012), s. 722-727. ISSN 0379-6779 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : conducting polymer * polyaniline * biocompatibility Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.109, year: 2012

  3. Biocompatibility of polyaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíček, P.; Kašpárková, V.; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Sáha, P.; Kuceková, Z.

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2011. s. 129. ISBN 978-80-85009-69-9. [Prague Meeting on Macromolecules /75./ - Conducting Polymers - Formation, Structure, Properties, and Applications. 10.07.2011-14.07.2011, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyaniline * biocompatibility Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  4. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    René Olivares-Navarrete; Jhon Jairo Olaya; Claudia Ramírez; Sandra Elizabeth Rodil

    2011-01-01

    Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS) substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainles...

  5. Biocompatibility of Dental Amalgams

    OpenAIRE

    Yurdanur Uçar; Brantley, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words “dental amalgam” and “toxicity” were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on ...

  6. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concern...

  7. 天然及合成尿道重建支架材料的生物相容性及力学性能%Biocompatibility and mechanical properties of naturally derived and synthetic scaffolds for urethral reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯超; 徐月敏; 朱卫东; 崔磊; 陈杰

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently debates on what kinds of urethral repair and reconstruction of tissue engineering scaffolds are more suitable occurred constantly, its evaluation of biocompatibility and mechanical properties are also poorly reported.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the mechanical properties and biocompatibility applied to urethral repair and reconstruction of a variety of biomaterials.METHODS: Small intestinal submucosa (SIS), bladder acellular matrix graft (BAMG), and acellular corpus spongiosum matrix (ACSM) were prepared by decellularization method; polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffold was prepared by knitting method. Uniaxial tensile mechanical testing was conducted to determine biomechanical properties of each scaffold; the surface pore size of scaffold was determined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity of various biomaterials was detected by MTT assay. Corporal cavernosum smooth muscle cells (CCMSc) were inoculated in all scaffolds, cell permeability was further assessed after 13 days cultured in vitro.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION : Biomechanical evaluation showed that the detection results of ACSM in terms of elastic modulus and fracture strength was prior to other materials (P < 0.05). MTT assay showed that all the scaffolds were in support of normal cell growth and metabolism without obvious cytotoxicity. PGA showed the largest pore size in the scanning electron microscope (> 200 μm); meanwhile, the ACSM has different pore sizes in urethral (< 5 μm) and corpus cavernosum surfaces (> 10 μm). Widespread distribution of cells could be observed in PGA 14 days after seeding. There was no obvious sign of cell penetration in BAMG and ACSM urethral surfaces. However, significant cell penetration growth performances in cavernosal su rfaces of SIS and ACSM were observed. It is indicated that all scaffolds demonstrated good biocompatibility, which is similar to normal urethral tissue in terms of mechanical properties. However, ACSM has

  8. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Olivares-Navarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainless steel substrates and tissue culture plastic were also studied, in order to give comparative information. No toxic response was observed for any of the surfaces, indicating that the Nb coatings act as a biocompatible, bioinert material. Cell morphology was also studied by immune-fluorescence and the results confirmed the healthy state of the cells on the Nb surface. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating shows that the film is polycrystalline with a body centered cubic structure. The surface composition and corrosion resistance of both the substrate and the Nb coating were also studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic tests. Water contact angle measurements showed that the Nb surface is more hydrophobic than the SS substrate.

  9. Comparison of the efficacy of biodegradable and non-biodegradable scintillation liquids on the counting of tritium- and [14C]- labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespread use of 3H and 14C in research has generated a large volume of waste mixed with scintillation liquid, requiring an effective control and appropriate storage of liquid radioactive waste. In the present study, we compared the efficacy of three commercially available scintillation liquids, Optiphase Hi Safe 3, Ultima-GoldTM AB (biodegradable) and Insta-Gel-XF (non-biodegradable), in terms of [14 C]-glucose and [3 H]-thymidine counting efficiency. We also analyzed the effect of the relative amount of water (1.6 to 50%), radioisotope concentration (0.1 to 100 nCi/ml), pH (2 to 10) and color of the solutions (samples containing 0.1 to 1.0 mg/ml of Trypan blue) on the counting efficiency in the presence of these scintillation liquids. There were few significant differences in the efficiency of 14C and 3H counting obtained with biodegradable or non-biodegradable scintillation liquids. However, there was an 83 and 94% reduction in the efficiency of 14 C and 3 H counting, respectively, in samples colored with 1 mg/ml Trypan blue, but not with 0.1 mg/ml, independent of the scintillation liquid used. Considering the low cost of biodegradable scintillation cocktails and their efficacy, these results show that traditional hazardous scintillation fluids may be replaced with the new safe biodegradable fluids without impairment of 3 H and 14 C counting efficiency. The use of biodegradable scintillation cocktails minimizes both human and environmental exposure to hazardous solvents. In addition, some biodegradable scintillation liquids can be 40% less expensive than the traditional hazardous cocktails. (author)

  10. Comparison of the efficacy of biodegradable and non-biodegradable scintillation liquids on the counting of tritium- and [14C]-labeled compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros R.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of ³H and 14C in research has generated a large volume of waste mixed with scintillation liquid, requiring an effective control and appropriate storage of liquid radioactive waste. In the present study, we compared the efficacy of three commercially available scintillation liquids, Optiphase HiSafe 3, Ultima-Gold(TM AB (biodegradable and Insta-Gel-XF (non-biodegradable, in terms of [14C]-glucose and [³H]-thymidine counting efficiency. We also analyzed the effect of the relative amount of water (1.6 to 50%, radioisotope concentration (0.1 to 100 nCi/ml, pH (2 to 10 and color of the solutions (samples containing 0.1 to 1.0 mg/ml of Trypan blue on the counting efficiency in the presence of these scintillation liquids. There were few significant differences in the efficiency of 14C and ³H counting obtained with biodegradable or non-biodegradable scintillation liquids. However, there was an 83 and 94% reduction in the efficiency of 14C and ³H counting, respectively, in samples colored with 1 mg/ml Trypan blue, but not with 0.1 mg/ml, independent of the scintillation liquid used. Considering the low cost of biodegradable scintillation cocktails and their efficacy, these results show that traditional hazardous scintillation fluids may be replaced with the new safe biodegradable fluids without impairment of ³H and 14C counting efficiency. The use of biodegradable scintillation cocktails minimizes both human and environmental exposure to hazardous solvents. In addition, some biodegradable scintillation liquids can be 40% less expensive than the traditional hazardous cocktails.

  11. Preparation of a biocompatible magnetic film from an aqueous ferrofluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very promising nanoparticles for biomedical applications or in medical drug targeting are superparamagnetic nanoparticles based on a core consisting of iron oxides (SPION) that can be targeted through external magnets. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a unique synthetic biocompatible polymer that can be chemically cross-linked to form a gel. Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. In this paper we report the synthesis of an aqueous ferrofluid and the preparation of a biocompatible magnetic gel with polyvinyl alcohol and glutharaldehyde (GTA). HClO4 was used to induce the peptization since this kind of ferrofluid does not have surfactant. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible film

  12. Preparation of a biocompatible magnetic film from an aqueous ferrofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Cecilia; Jacobo, Silvia E.

    2006-10-01

    Very promising nanoparticles for biomedical applications or in medical drug targeting are superparamagnetic nanoparticles based on a core consisting of iron oxides (SPION) that can be targeted through external magnets. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a unique synthetic biocompatible polymer that can be chemically cross-linked to form a gel. Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. In this paper we report the synthesis of an aqueous ferrofluid and the preparation of a biocompatible magnetic gel with polyvinyl alcohol and glutharaldehyde (GTA). HClO 4 was used to induce the peptization since this kind of ferrofluid does not have surfactant. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible film.

  13. Interfacing Microbial Styrene Production with a Biocompatible Cyclopropanation Reaction**

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Stephen; Balskus, Emily P.

    2015-01-01

    Introducing new reactivity into living organisms is a major challenge in synthetic biology. Despite an increasing interest in both developing aqueous-compatible small molecule catalysts and engineering enzymes to perform new chemistry in vitro, the integration of non-native reactivity into metabolic pathways for small molecule production has been underexplored. Herein we report a biocompatible iron(III) phthalocyanine catalyst capable of efficient olefin cyclopropanation in the presence of a ...

  14. Biocompatibility of Coronary Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamarasee M. Jeewandara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the dominant cause of mortality in developed countries, with coronary artery disease (CAD a predominant contributor. The development of stents to treat CAD was a significant innovation, facilitating effective percutaneous coronary revascularization. Coronary stents have evolved from bare metal compositions, to incorporate advances in pharmacological therapy in what are now known as drug eluting stents (DES. Deployment of a stent overcomes some limitations of balloon angioplasty alone, but provides an acute stimulus for thrombus formation and promotes neointimal hyperplasia. First generation DES effectively reduced in-stent restenosis, but profoundly delay healing and are susceptible to late stent thrombosis, leading to significant clinical complications in the long term. This review characterizes the development of coronary stents, detailing the incremental improvements, which aim to attenuate the major clinical complications of thrombosis and restenosis. Despite these enhancements, coronary stents remain fundamentally incompatible with the vasculature, an issue which has largely gone unaddressed. We highlight the latest modifications and research directions that promise to more holistically design coronary implants that are truly biocompatible.

  15. An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones

    OpenAIRE

    Boos Alois; Auer Joerg A; Nuss Katja; Rechenberg Brigitte von

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. Methods A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. Result...

  16. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasálková-Slepičková, N.; Slepička, P.; Bačáková, Lucie; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 307, Jul 15 (2013), s. 642-646. ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : biopolymer * plasma treatment * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.186, year: 2013

  17. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PL

  18. Biocompatible polysaccharide-based cryogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the development of novel biocompatible macroporous cryogels by electron-beam assisted free-radical crosslinking reaction of polymerizable dextran and hyaluronan derivatives. As a main advantage this straightforward approach provides highly pure materials of high porosity without using additional crosslinkers or initiators. The cryogels were characterized with regard to their morphology and their basic properties including thermal and mechanical characteristics, and swellability. It was found that the applied irradiation dose and the chemical composition strongly influence the material properties of the resulting cryogels. Preliminary cytotoxicity tests illustrate the excellent in vitro-cytocompatibility of the fabricated cryogels making them especially attractive as matrices in tissue regeneration procedures. - Graphical abstract: Electron-beam initiated synthesis of biocompatible cryogels based on natural polymers. - Highlights: • Successful electron-beam induced synthesis of dextran and hyaluronan cryogels. • Mechanical and thermal stable cryogels were obtained. • Excellent cytocompatibility of the materials was proven. • Promising materials for tissue engineering were developed

  19. Biocompatible polysaccharide-based cryogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichelt, Senta, E-mail: senta.reichelt@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Becher, Jana; Weisser, Jürgen [Innovent e.V., Pruessingstr. 27B, 07745 Jena (Germany); Prager, Andrea; Decker, Ulrich [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Möller, Stephanie; Berg, Albrecht; Schnabelrauch, Matthias [Innovent e.V., Pruessingstr. 27B, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    This study focuses on the development of novel biocompatible macroporous cryogels by electron-beam assisted free-radical crosslinking reaction of polymerizable dextran and hyaluronan derivatives. As a main advantage this straightforward approach provides highly pure materials of high porosity without using additional crosslinkers or initiators. The cryogels were characterized with regard to their morphology and their basic properties including thermal and mechanical characteristics, and swellability. It was found that the applied irradiation dose and the chemical composition strongly influence the material properties of the resulting cryogels. Preliminary cytotoxicity tests illustrate the excellent in vitro-cytocompatibility of the fabricated cryogels making them especially attractive as matrices in tissue regeneration procedures. - Graphical abstract: Electron-beam initiated synthesis of biocompatible cryogels based on natural polymers. - Highlights: • Successful electron-beam induced synthesis of dextran and hyaluronan cryogels. • Mechanical and thermal stable cryogels were obtained. • Excellent cytocompatibility of the materials was proven. • Promising materials for tissue engineering were developed.

  20. Biocompatible and Bioeliminable Hydrophilic Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo; FerrutiUniversità

    2007-01-01

    1 Introduction This presentation will report on some recent results obtained in Milan on two polymer families of biomedical interest, namely poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) and polyamidoamines. 2 Results and DiscussionPoly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PVP) is a well known bioactive and biocompatible polymer. In its soluble form, it is largely used as excipient of oral pharmaceutical formulations, especially for its high water solubilising power.In its crosslinked form, it plays a relevant role as biomateria...

  1. Radiation crosslinking of biocompatible polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, Ondřej; Kučka, Jan; Monnery, B. D.; Hoogenboom, R.; Hrubý, Martin

    Bratislava : Young Scientists Council of Polymer Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, 2016. s. 89. ISBN 978-80-970923-8-2. [Bratislava Young Polymer Scientists workshop /6./ - BYPoS 2016. 14.03.2016-18.03.2016, Ždiar] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14079; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25781A; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08336S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : radiolysis * radiotherapeutics * biocompatible polymer s Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  2. The Biocompatibility of Wool Keratin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Mei; YU Wei-dong; WANG Xue-lei

    2007-01-01

    Keratin is the major structural fibrous protein providing outer covering such as hair, wool, feathers, etc. When being used as a kind of biomaterials, the biocompatibility of wool keratin is one of the most critical questions. By now, there has not been systemic study on the biocompatibiiity of keratin. Therefore, in this article we used the procedures of skin irritation, haemolysis and subcutaneous implantation according to ISO 10993 to study it. Moreover, the Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was utilized to analyse the impurity and structure modification of wool keratin film. The part of the animal tests showed that the wool keratin films prepared by authors were biocompatible. But the residual of sodium dodecyi sulfate (SDS) affected the results of other tests. Consequently, the wool keratin membrane is one kind of favourable and promising biomaterial for biomedical and histological utilization. The residual SDS used as an agent should be eliminated from the keratin solution or membrane completely if for biological usage. In conclusion, wool keratin, as a kind of natural protein, prospectively could be applied in biomedical materials and scaffolds of tissue engineering.

  3. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  4. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface

  5. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  6. Photocatalytic degradation of synthetic dye under sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijin Dušan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic dyes are widely used in the textile industry. Dye pollutants from the textile industry are an important source of environmental contamination. The majority of these dyes are toxic, mostly non-biodegradable and also resistant to decomposition by physico-chemical methods. Among new oxidation methods or "advanced oxidation processes", heterogeneous photocatalysis appears as an emerging destructive technology leading to the total mineralization of many organic pollutants. CI Basic Yellow 28 (BY28, commonly used as a textile dye, could be photocatalytically degraded using TiU2 as catalyst under sunlight. The effect of some parameters such as the initial catalyst concentration, initial dye concentration, initial NaCl and Na2CO3 concentrations, pH, H2O2 and type of catalyst on the degradation rate of BY28 was examined in details. The presence of NaCl and Na2CO3 led to inhibition of the photodegradation process. The highest photodegradation rate was observed at high pH, while the rate was the lowest at low pH. Increase of the initial H2O2 concentration increased the initial BY28 photodegradation efficiency. ZnO was a better catalyst than TiO2 at low dye concentrations.

  7. Polycrystalline Silicon: a Biocompatibility Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) layers were functionalized through the growth of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) on their surface. HA is the mineral component of bones and teeth and thus possesses excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on both HA-coated and un-coated poly-Si surfaces for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days and toxicity, proliferation and cell morphology were investigated. The results revealed that the poly-Si layers were bioactive and compatible with the osteoblast-like cells. Nevertheless, the HA coating improved the cell interactions with the poly-Si surfaces based on the cell affinity to the specific chemical composition of the bone-like HA and/or to the higher HA roughness.

  8. In-situ biopreparation of biocompatible bacterial cellulose/graphene oxide composites pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenkun, E-mail: zhuwenkun@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Wei [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); He, Yi; Duan, Tao [Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • The in situ vibration method was used to synthetize BC/GO composite. • The cytotoxicity assays of BC/GO showed a better biocompatibility. • It is first time to use BC/GO composite for drug delivery. - Abstract: In the present work, a composite material formed by bacterial cellulose (BC) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and characterized. GO was added in the bacteria culture media and then the bacteria was inoculated. The BC/GO pellets composite was prepared into the bacteria culture media and vibrated in Erlenmeyer flask. Characterization of the BC/GO composite showed GO nanosheets embedded in the nanofibers network of BC. The experiments in this study demonstrated BC and GO effectively interacted by hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assays showed the material had a better biocompatibility than the counterparts and promoted the cell proliferation excellently. The biocompatibility of BC/GO has the potential to be used for drug delivery.

  9. In-situ biopreparation of biocompatible bacterial cellulose/graphene oxide composites pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The in situ vibration method was used to synthetize BC/GO composite. • The cytotoxicity assays of BC/GO showed a better biocompatibility. • It is first time to use BC/GO composite for drug delivery. - Abstract: In the present work, a composite material formed by bacterial cellulose (BC) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and characterized. GO was added in the bacteria culture media and then the bacteria was inoculated. The BC/GO pellets composite was prepared into the bacteria culture media and vibrated in Erlenmeyer flask. Characterization of the BC/GO composite showed GO nanosheets embedded in the nanofibers network of BC. The experiments in this study demonstrated BC and GO effectively interacted by hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assays showed the material had a better biocompatibility than the counterparts and promoted the cell proliferation excellently. The biocompatibility of BC/GO has the potential to be used for drug delivery

  10. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  11. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  12. Synthetic Rutile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the laboratory scale investigation of the conditions in the rutile synthetic production from one me nita in Aguas Dulces reservoir. The iron mineral is chlorinated and volatilized selectively leaving a residue enriched in titanium dioxide which can be used as a substitute of rutile mineral

  13. Synthetic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    O’ Driscoll, Aisling; Sleator, Roy D.

    2013-01-01

    With world wide data predicted to exceed 40 trillion gigabytes by 2020, big data storage is a very real and escalating problem. Herein, we discuss the utility of synthetic DNA as a robust and eco-friendly archival data storage solution of the future.

  14. Biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; Tsai, C; Gerberich, W W; Kruckeberg, L; Kania, D R

    1995-04-01

    The biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited (CVD) diamond surfaces has been assessed. Our results indicate that CVD diamond is as biocompatible as titanium (Ti) and 316 stainless steel (SS). First, the amount of adsorbed and 'denatured' fibrinogen on CVD diamond was very close to that of Ti and SS. Second, both in vitro and in vivo there appears to be less cellular adhesion and activation on the surface of CVD diamond surfaces compared to Ti and SS. This evident biocompatibility, coupled with the corrosion resistance and notable mechanical integrity of CVD diamond, suggests that diamond-coated surfaces may be highly desirable in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:7654876

  15. Biocompatible magnetic core-shell nanocomposites for engineered magnetic tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Arco, Laura; Rodriguez, Ismael A.; Carriel, Victor; Bonhome-Espinosa, Ana B.; Campos, Fernando; Kuzhir, Pavel; Duran, Juan D. G.; Lopez-Lopez, Modesto T.

    2016-04-01

    The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare biocompatible core-shell nanostructures consisting of a polymeric core and a magnetic shell, which are used for this purpose. We show that using a core-shell architecture is doubly advantageous. First, gravitational settling for core-shell nanocomposites is slower because of the reduction of the composite average density connected to the light polymer core. Second, the magnetic response of core-shell nanocomposites can be tuned by changing the thickness of the magnetic layer. The incorporation of the composites into biopolymer hydrogels containing cells results in magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues whose mechanical properties can be controlled by external magnetic forces. Indeed, we obtain a significant increase of the viscoelastic moduli of the engineered tissues when exposed to an external magnetic field. Because the composites are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, the prepared bio-artificial tissue-like constructs also display excellent ex vivo cell viability and proliferation. When implanted in vivo, the engineered tissues show good biocompatibility and outstanding interaction with the host tissue. Actually, they only cause a localized transitory inflammatory reaction at the implantation site, without any effect on other organs. Altogether, our results suggest that the inclusion of magnetic core-shell nanocomposites into biomaterials would enable tissue engineering of artificial substitutes whose mechanical properties could be tuned to match those of the potential target tissue. In a wider perspective, the good biocompatibility and magnetic behavior of the composites could be beneficial for many other applications.The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we

  16. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  17. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  18. Synthetic jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dančová, P.; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Vít, T.

    Praha: Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR, v. v. i., 2007 - (Zolotarev, I.), s. 35-36 ISBN 978-80-87012-06-2. [Engineering Mechanics 2007: national conference with international participation. Svratka (CZ), 14.05.2007-17.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/05/2681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : synthetic jets * zero-net-mass-flux jet * flow control Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  19. Biocompatibility evaluation of magnetosomes formed by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Lei [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, 163319 (China); Yue Xiaoxuan [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Zhang Shuang [College of Life Science and Technology, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, 163319 (China); Chen Peng [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); GIBT, Gansu Institute of Business and Technology, Yannan Road 18, Lanzhou, 730010 (China); Xu Zhiliang; Li Yang [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Li Hongyu, E-mail: hekouyanlei@gmail.com [Institute of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Magnetite nanocrystal has been extensively used in biomedical field. Currently, an interesting alternative to synthetic magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, called magnetosome, has been found in magnetotactic bacteria. It has been reported that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At. ferrooxidans) has a potential to synthesize magnetosome. In this study, transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to analyze the magnetite particles in At. ferrooxidans BY-3. The magnetosomes formed by this bacterium were isolated by a method combining ultracentrifugation and magnetic separation. Crystalline phase and surface functional group of the magnetosomes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. Biocompatibility of the magnetosomes was systematically evaluated at various concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/ml). MTT test, hemolysis assay and Micronucleus Test were carried out to evaluate in vitro cytotoxicity, blood toxicity and genotoxicity of magnetosomes, respectively. Under these conditions, magnetosomes showed no cytotoxic, genotoxic and hemolytic effects up to 4.0 mg/ml indicating good biocompatibility of these biological nanoparticles. These revealed that the magnetosomes might have a potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications in the future. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The production of magnetosomes from At. ferrooxidans has been easily available. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several techniques are used to characterize properties of the magnetosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetosomes have no cytotoxicity, no hemolysis activity and no genotoxicity.

  20. Biocompatibility evaluation of magnetosomes formed by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetite nanocrystal has been extensively used in biomedical field. Currently, an interesting alternative to synthetic magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, called magnetosome, has been found in magnetotactic bacteria. It has been reported that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At. ferrooxidans) has a potential to synthesize magnetosome. In this study, transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to analyze the magnetite particles in At. ferrooxidans BY-3. The magnetosomes formed by this bacterium were isolated by a method combining ultracentrifugation and magnetic separation. Crystalline phase and surface functional group of the magnetosomes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. Biocompatibility of the magnetosomes was systematically evaluated at various concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/ml). MTT test, hemolysis assay and Micronucleus Test were carried out to evaluate in vitro cytotoxicity, blood toxicity and genotoxicity of magnetosomes, respectively. Under these conditions, magnetosomes showed no cytotoxic, genotoxic and hemolytic effects up to 4.0 mg/ml indicating good biocompatibility of these biological nanoparticles. These revealed that the magnetosomes might have a potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications in the future. - Highlights: ► The production of magnetosomes from At. ferrooxidans has been easily available. ► Several techniques are used to characterize properties of the magnetosomes. ► The magnetosomes have no cytotoxicity, no hemolysis activity and no genotoxicity.

  1. Manipulation of chemical composition and architecture of non-biodegradable poly(ethylene terephthalate)/chitosan fibrous scaffolds and their effects on L929 cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veleirinho, Beatriz [QOPNA Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Berti, Fernanda V. [Integrated Technologies Laboratory, Chemical and Food Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis (Brazil); Dias, Paulo F. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetics, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis (Brazil); Maraschin, Marcelo [Department of Plant Science, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis (Brazil); Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa M. [Department of Pharmacology, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis (Brazil); Lopes-da-Silva, Jose A., E-mail: jals@ua.pt [QOPNA Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2013-01-01

    Microporous, non-woven fibrous scaffolds made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and chitosan were produced by electrospinning. Fiber morphology, diameter, pore size, and wettability were manipulated by varying the chemical composition of the electrospinning solution, i.e. chitosan concentration and molecular weight, and by post-electrospinning treatment with glutaraldehyde. In vitro studies were conducted using a fibroblast cell line toward a comprehensive understanding of how scaffolds characteristics can modulate the cell behavior, i.e. viability, adhesion, proliferation, extracellular matrix secretion, and three-dimensional colonization. Substantial differences were found as a result of scaffold morphological changes. Higher levels of adhesion, spreading, and superficial proliferation were achieved for scaffolds with smaller fiber and pore diameters while cell penetration and internal colonization were enhanced for scaffolds with larger pores. Additionally, the available area for cell adhesion, which is related to fiber and pore size, was a crucial factor for the viability of L929 cells. This paper provides significant insights for the development and optimization of electrospun scaffolds toward an improved biological performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid PET/chitosan mats were produced by electrospinning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scaffold architecture was manipulated by changing composition of the spun solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The scaffolds showed in vitro biocompatibility to L929 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smaller fiber diameters and pore areas allowed for higher levels of cell adhesion and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A 3D cell colonization was achieved for scaffolds with higher fiber diameters.

  2. Designer Micelles Accelerate Flux Through Engineered Metabolism in E. coli and Support Biocompatible Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Stephen; Balskus, Emily P

    2016-05-10

    Synthetic biology has enabled the production of many value-added chemicals via microbial fermentation. However, the problem of low product titers from recombinant pathways has limited the utility of this approach. Methods to increase metabolic flux are therefore critical to the success of metabolic engineering. Here we demonstrate that vitamin E-derived designer micelles, originally developed for use in synthetic chemistry, are biocompatible and accelerate flux through a styrene production pathway in Escherichia coli. We show that these micelles associate non-covalently with the bacterial outer-membrane and that this interaction increases membrane permeability. In addition, these micelles also accommodate both heterogeneous and organic-soluble transition metal catalysts and accelerate biocompatible cyclopropanation in vivo. Overall, this work demonstrates that these surfactants hold great promise for further application in the field of synthetic biotechnology, and for expanding the types of molecules that can be readily accessed from renewable resources via the combination of microbial fermentation and biocompatible chemistry. PMID:27061024

  3. Improving biocompatibility of implants with nanolayering

    OpenAIRE

    Homar, Miha; GAŠPERLIN, MIRJANA; Dolenc, Andrej; Kristl, Julijana

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatibility of different materials in the body is very complicated phenomenon. Although structural characteristics of implant are decisive for its specific purpose, biologic response mainly depends on surface characteristics of the implant and its interaction with biologic environment. Nanolayering of the implant to improve biocompatibility presents a recent innovation in this field of research. One method of nanolayering is layer-by-layer assembly which has many advantages over other na...

  4. A biocompatible magnetic film: synthesis and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Jhunu; Haik, Yousef; Chen, Ching Jen

    2004-01-01

    Background Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. Methods A biocompatible magnetic gel film has been synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible magnetic film. Nanosized iron oxide particles (γ-Fe2O3, ~7 nm) have been used to produce the magnetic gel. Results The surface ...

  5. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  6. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  7. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshatwi, Ali A., E-mail: alshatwi@ksu.edu.sa; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica.

  8. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO2 nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica

  9. Synthetic Brainbows

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Brainbow is a genetic engineering technique that randomly colorizes cells. Biological samples processed with this technique and imaged with confocal microscopy have distinctive colors for individual cells. Complex cellular structures can then be easily visualized. However, the complexity of the Brainbow technique limits its applications. In practice, most confocal microscopy scans use different florescence staining with typically at most three distinct cellular structures. These structures are often packed and obscure each other in rendered images making analysis difficult. In this paper, we leverage a process known as GPU framebuffer feedback loops to synthesize Brainbow-like images. In addition, we incorporate ID shuffing and Monte-Carlo sampling into our technique, so that it can be applied to single-channel confocal microscopy data. The synthesized Brainbow images are presented to domain experts with positive feedback. A user survey demonstrates that our synthetic Brainbow technique improves visualizations of volume data with complex structures for biologists.

  10. Biocompatible composites of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Suan, T. Nguen; Ivanova, L. P.; Korchagin, M. A.; Chaikina, M. V.; Shilko, S. V.; Pleskachevskiy, Yu. M.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical and tribotechnical characteristics of biocompatible, antifriction and extrudable composites based on ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as well as hybrid matrix "UHMWPE + PTFE" with biocompatible hydroxyapatite filler under the dry friction and boundary lubrication were investigated. A comparative analysis of effectiveness of adding the hydroxyapatite to improve the wear resistance of composites based on these two matrices was performed. It is shown that the wear intensity of nanocomposites based on the hybrid matrix is lower than that for the composites based on pure UHMWPE. Possibilities of using the composites of the polymer "UHMWPE-PTFE" mixture as a material for artificial joints implants are discussed.

  11. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120°C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. PMID:25492167

  12. Hydrophilic polymers - biocompatibility testing in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kejlová, K.; Labský, Jiří; Jírová, D.; Bendová, H.

    Warsaw : Dept.Transpl & CBT , Centre of Biostructure Research, Medical University of Warsaw, 2004. s. 71. [Workshop of the European Society of Toxicology In Vitro: Invitox /13./. 08.09.2004-11.09.2004, Zegrze] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050301 Keywords : hydrophilic polymers * biocompatibility * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  13. Synthetic biology, inspired by synthetic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Malinova, V; Nallani, M.; Meier, W. P.; Sinner, E. K.

    2012-01-01

    The topic synthetic biology appears still as an 'empty basket to be filled'. However, there is already plenty of claims and visions, as well as convincing research strategies about the theme of synthetic biology. First of all, synthetic biology seems to be about the engineering of biology -about bottom-up and top-down approaches, compromising complexity versus stability of artificial architectures, relevant in biology. Synthetic biology accounts for heterogeneous approaches towards minimal an...

  14. Ion implantation and bio-compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface modification of polymers by ion implantation has been carried out to control surface properties such as conductivity, wettability, blood and tissue compatibility. Ion implantation into silicone rubber, polystyrene and segmented polyurethane was performed at 150 keV with doses ranging from 1 x 1015 to 3 x 1017 ions/cm2 to improve bio-compatibility. The platelet accumulation on ion implanted silicone rubber decreased and non-thrombogenicity of ion implanted specimens were improved. The ion implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane have been found to exhibit remarkably higher adhesion and spreading of endothelial cells compared to the non-implanted case. It is concluded that ion implantation into polymers is effective in controlling their bio-compatibility. (author)

  15. Infrared study of biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic fluids mainly consist of nano sized iron oxide particles (FesO4) that are suspended in carrier liquid. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in developing technologies in the field of magnetic nanoparticles. Techniques based on using of these biocompatible magnetizable complex systems have found application in numerous biological fields. Generally, the magnetic component of the particle is coated by a biocompatible polymer such as PEG (polyethylene glycol), policyholder's as dextran, starch, have been developed. The coating acts to shield the magnetic particle from the surrounding environment. This review is focused on describing the infrared spectroscopy as method that allows checking starting materials and reactions while work is in progress. FTIR method is correlated with others spectral methods as XRD, TEM. Keywords: Magnetic nanoparticles, infrared spectroscopy, biomedicine

  16. A biocompatible magnetic film: synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Jhunu; Haik, Yousef; Chen, Ching Jen

    2004-01-01

    Background Biotechnology applications of magnetic gels include biosensors, targeted drug delivery, artificial muscles and magnetic buckles. These gels are produced by incorporating magnetic materials in the polymer composites. Methods A biocompatible magnetic gel film has been synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol. The magnetic gel was dried to generate a biocompatible magnetic film. Nanosized iron oxide particles (γ-Fe2O3, ~7 nm) have been used to produce the magnetic gel. Results The surface morphology and magnetic properties of the gel films were studied. The iron oxide particles are superparamagnetic and the gel film also showed superparamagnetic behavior. Conclusion Magnetic gel made out of crosslinked magnetic nanoparticles in the polymer network was found to be stable and possess the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. PMID:14761251

  17. Biocompatible self-assembly of nano-materials for Bio-MEMS and insect reconnaissance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozik, Susan Marie; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Sinclair, Michael B.; Manginell, Monica; Ashley, Carlee E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Calvert, Paul Davidson (University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA); Hartenberger, Tamara N.; Flemming, Jeb Hunter; Baca, Helen Kennicott (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the development of new biocompatible self-assembly procedures enabling the immobilization of genetically engineered cells in a compact, self-sustaining, remotely addressable sensor platform. We used evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) to immobilize cells within periodic silica nanostructures, characterized by unimodal pore sizes and pore connectivity, that can be patterned using ink-jet printing or photo patterning. We constructed cell lines for the expression of fluorescent proteins and induced reporter protein expression in immobilized cells. We investigated the role of the abiotic/biotic interface during cell-mediated self-assembly of synthetic materials.

  18. Exfoliating biocompatible ferromagnetic Cr-trihalide monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyi; Sun, Qiang; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-03-23

    In addition to spintronics another motivation for exploring ferromagnetic two-dimensional materials is for biomedical applications such as magnetic labeling and hyperthermia treatment of tumors. Unfortunately, the widely studied Mn-containing monolayer is not biocompatible, although it is ferromagnetic. Here using first principles calculations combined with Monte Carlo simulations based on the Ising model, we systematically study a class of 2D ferromagnetic monolayers CrX3 (X = Cl, Br, I). The feasibility of exfoliation from their layered bulk phase is confirmed by the small cleavage energy and high in-plane stiffness. Spin-polarized calculations, combined with self-consistently determined Hubbard U that accounts for strong correlation energy, demonstrate that CrX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) monolayers are ferromagnetic and that Cr is trivalent and carries a magnetic moment of 3 μB; the resulting Cr(3+) ions are biocompatible. The corresponding Curie temperatures for CrCl3, CrBr3 and CrI3 are found to be 66, 86, and 107 K, respectively, which can be increased to 323, 314, and 293 K by hole doping. The biocompatibility and ferromagnetism render these Cr-containing trihalide monolayers unique for applications. PMID:26452203

  19. Pictures of Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cserer, Amelie; Seiringer, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This article is concerned with the representation of Synthetic Biology in the media and by biotechnology experts. An analysis was made of German-language media articles published between 2004 and 2008, and interviews with biotechnology-experts at the Synthetic Biology conference SB 3.0 in Zurich 2007. The results have been reflected in terms of the definition of Synthetic Biology, applications of Synthetic Biology and the perspectives of opportunities and risks. In the media, Synthetic Biolog...

  20. Facile Synthesis, Silanization and Biodistribution of Biocompatible Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nan; Marshall, Ann F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a facile strategy to the synthesis of silica-coated quantum dots (QDs) for in vivo imaging. All the QD synthesis and silanization steps are conducted in water and methanol under mild conditions without involving any organometallic precursors and high temperature, oxygen-free environments. The as-prepared silica-coated QDs possess high quantum yields and are extremely stable in mouse serum. In addition, the silanization method developed here produces nanoparticles (NPs) with small sizes that are difficult to achieve via conventional silanization methods. The silica coating helps to prevent the exposure of QD surface to the biological milieu and therefore increases the biocompatibility of QDs for in vivo applications. Interestingly, the silica-coated QDs exhibit a different biodistribution pattern than commercially available Invitrogen QD605 (carboxylate) with a similar size and emission wavelength. The Invitrogen QD605 exhibited predominant liver (57.2% ID g-1) and spleen (46.1% ID g-1) uptakes 30 mins after intravenous injection, whereas the silica-coated QDs exhibited much lower liver (16.2% ID g-1) and spleen (3.67% ID g-1) uptakes but higher kidney uptake (8.82% ID g-1), blood retention (15.0% ID g-1) and partial renal clearance. Overall, this straightforward synthetic strategy paves the way for routine and customized synthesis of silica-coated QDs for biological use. PMID:20564726

  1. Flexible organic light emitting diodes fabricated on biocompatible silk fibroin substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexible and biodegradable electronics are currently under extensive investigation for biocompatible and environmentally-friendly applications. Synthetic plastic foils are widely used as substrates for flexible electronics. But typical plastic substrates such as polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) could not be degraded in a natural bio-environment. A great demand still exists for a next-generation biocompatible and biodegradable substrate for future application. For example, electronic devices can be potentially integrated into the human body. In this work, we demonstrate that the biocompatible and biodegradable natural silk fibroin (SF) films embedded with silver nanowires (AgNWs) mesh could be employed as conductive transparent substrates to fabricate flexible organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Compared with commercial PEN substrates coated with indium tin oxide, the AgNWs/SF composite substrates exhibit a similar sheet resistance of 12 Ω sq−1, a lower surface roughness, as well as a broader light transmission range. Flexible OLEDs based on AgNWs/SF substrates achieve a current efficiency of 19 cd A−1, demonstrating the potential of the flexible AgNWs/SF films as conductive and transparent substrates for next-generation biodegradable devices. (paper)

  2. An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boos Alois

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. Methods A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. Results This present sheep model allows the placing of up to 8 different test materials within one animal and because of the standardization of the bone defect, routine evaluation by means of histomorphometry is easily conducted. This method was used successfully in 66 White Alpine Sheep. When the drill holes were correctly placed no complications such as spontaneous fractures were encountered. Conclusion This experimental animal model serves an excellent basis for testing the biocompatibility of novel biomaterials to be used as bone replacement or new bone formation enhancing materials.

  3. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Liu, Ru-Shi [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hwu, Yeu-Kuang [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Din Ping [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S, E-mail: rsliu@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhsiao@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  4. Flexible organic light emitting diodes fabricated on biocompatible silk fibroin substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuqiang; Xie, Yuemin; Liu, Yuan; Song, Tao; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Liao, Liangsheng; Sun, Baoquan

    2015-10-01

    Flexible and biodegradable electronics are currently under extensive investigation for biocompatible and environmentally-friendly applications. Synthetic plastic foils are widely used as substrates for flexible electronics. But typical plastic substrates such as polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) could not be degraded in a natural bio-environment. A great demand still exists for a next-generation biocompatible and biodegradable substrate for future application. For example, electronic devices can be potentially integrated into the human body. In this work, we demonstrate that the biocompatible and biodegradable natural silk fibroin (SF) films embedded with silver nanowires (AgNWs) mesh could be employed as conductive transparent substrates to fabricate flexible organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Compared with commercial PEN substrates coated with indium tin oxide, the AgNWs/SF composite substrates exhibit a similar sheet resistance of 12 Ω sq-1, a lower surface roughness, as well as a broader light transmission range. Flexible OLEDs based on AgNWs/SF substrates achieve a current efficiency of 19 cd A-1, demonstrating the potential of the flexible AgNWs/SF films as conductive and transparent substrates for next-generation biodegradable devices.

  5. Doped biocompatible layers prepared by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, M.; Weiserová, M.; Kocourek, T.; Jurek, K.; Strnad, J.

    2010-03-01

    The contribution deals with KrF laser synthesis and study of doped biocompatible materials with focus on diamond-like carbon (DLC) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Overview of materials used for dopation is given. Experimental results of study of HA layers doped with silver are presented. Films properties were characterized using profilometer, SEM, WDX, XRD and optical transmission. Content of silver in layers moved from 0.06 to 13.7 at %. The antibacterial properties of HA, silver and doped HA layers were studied in vivo using Escherichia coli cells.

  6. Biocompatibility of poly allylamine synthesized by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the electric and hydrophilic properties of poly allylamine (PAI) synthesized by plasma whose structure contains N-H, C-H, C-O and O-H bonds is presented, that promote the biocompatibility with the human body. To study the PAI hydrolytic affinity, solutions of salt concentration similar to those of the human body were used. The results indicate that the solutions modify the charge balance in the surfaces reducing the hydrophobicity in the poly allylamine whose contact angle oscillates among 10 and 16 degrees and the liquid-solid surface tension between 4 and 8 dina/cm. (Author)

  7. Titanium nanostructural surface processing for improved biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing incident x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were conducted to evaluate the effect of titanium hydride on the formation of nanoporous TiO2 on Ti during anodization. Nano-titanium-hydride was formed cathodically before anodizing and served as a sacrificial nanoprecipitate during anodization. Surface oxidation occurred and a multinanoporous structure formed after cathodic pretreatments followed by anodization treatment. The sacrificial nanoprecipitate is directly dissolved and the Ti transformed to nanoporous TiO2 by anodization. The formation of sacrificial nanoprecipitates by cathodic pretreatment and of the multinanostructure by anodization is believed to improve biocompatibility, thereby promoting osseointegration

  8. Radiotracer experiments with biopolymers and bio-compatible polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of biopolymer and biocompatible polymer employing radiotracers have been reviewed. Two different aspects have been studied. Environmentally benign methodologies for the removal, immobilization, separation or speciation of heavy, toxic elements and clinically important radionuclides have been developed using biopolymer and bio-compatible polymer as well. The complex formation ability of a bio-compatible polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), with clinically important radionuclides have been tested which have tremendous importance in radiopharmaceutical sciences. (author)

  9. Biocompatibility of Bletilla striata Microspheres as a Novel Embolic Agent

    OpenAIRE

    ShiHua Luo; SongLin Song; ChuanSheng Zheng; Yong Wang; XiangWen Xia; Bin Liang; GanSheng Feng

    2015-01-01

    We have prepared Chinese traditional herb Bletilla striata into microspheres as a novel embolic agent for decades. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of Bletilla striata microspheres (BSMs). After a thermal test of BSMs in vitro, the cell biocompatibility of BSMs was investigated in mouse fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells using the methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. In addition, blood biocompatibility was evaluated. In vivo intramuscular implantation ...

  10. Biocompatibility of polymethylmethacrylate resins used in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rupali; Singh, Raghuwar D; Sharma, Vinod P; Siddhartha, Ramashanker; Chand, Pooran; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    Biocompatibility or tissue compatibility describes the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response when applied as intended. Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) based resins are most widely used resins in dentistry, especially in fabrication of dentures and orthodontic appliances. They are considered cytotoxic on account of leaching of various potential toxic substances, most common being residual monomer. Various in vitro and in vivo experiments and cell based studies conducted on acrylic based resins or their leached components have shown them to have cytotoxic effects. They can cause mucosal irritation and tissue sensitization. These studies are not only important to evaluate the long term clinical effect of these materials, but also help in further development of alternate resins. This article reviews information from scientific full articles, reviews, or abstracts published in dental literature, associated with biocompatibility of PMMA resins and it is leached out components. Published materials were searched in dental literature using general and specialist databases, like the PubMED database. PMID:22454327

  11. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar P. Troncoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received much attention, because of the possibility of combining the good properties of BC with other materials for specific applications. BC nanocomposites can be processed either in a static or an agitated medium. The fabrication of BC nanocomposites in static media can be carried out while keeping the original mat structure obtained after the synthesis to form the final nanocomposite or by altering the culture media with other components. The present article reviews the issue of biocompatibility of BC and BC nanocomposites. Biomedical aspects, such as surface modification for improving cell adhesion, in vitro and in vivo studies are given along with details concerning the physics of network formation and the changes that occur in the cellulose networks due to the presence of a second phase. The relevance of biocompatibility studies for the development of BC-based materials in bone, skin and cardiovascular tissue engineering is also discussed.

  12. Biocompatible Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids: Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoungjee Cho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis (PD is a preferred home dialysis modality and has a number of added advantages including improved initial patient survival and cost effectiveness over haemodialysis. Despite these benefits, uptake of PD remains relatively low, especially in developed countries. Wider implementation of PD is compromised by higher technique failure from infections (e.g., PD peritonitis and ultrafiltration failure. These are inevitable consequences of peritoneal injury, which is thought to result primarily from continuous exposure to PD fluids that are characterised by their “unphysiologic” composition. In order to overcome these barriers, a number of more biocompatible PD fluids, with neutral pH, low glucose degradation product content, and bicarbonate buffer have been manufactured over the past two decades. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated their benefit in terms of improvement in host cell defence, peritoneal membrane integrity, and cytokine profile. This paper aims to review randomised controlled trials assessing the use of biocompatible PD fluids and their effect on clinical outcomes.

  13. Biocompatible Polymeric Materials Intended for Drug Delivery and Therapeutic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren; Javakhishvili, Irakli; Bednarek, Melania;

    2007-01-01

    elucidating strategies for combination of biocompatible polymers in unique but amphiphilic manners. The targeted, documented biocompatible polymers like polycapro-lactone (PCL), poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate)2 (PMEA) with the highest known blood compatibility, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and the two...

  14. Biostability and biocompatibility of modified polyurethane elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Elizabeth Marie

    Several strategies have been employed to increase the biostability of medical grade polyurethanes while maintaining the desirable properties of current poly(ether urethanes). It was hypothesized that polyurethane surface chemistry controls biodegradation/biostability that can lead to ultimate failure/success of these materials in clinical applications. Chemical modification or replacement of the susceptible soft segment was evaluated as a design strategy to increase the biostability of medical grade polyurethanes. The effect of soft segment chemistry on the phase morphology, mechanical properties and in vivo response of commercial polyurethanes were compared. Poly(ether urethane) (PEU), silicone-modified poly(ether urethane) (PEU-S), poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU) and silicone-modified poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU-S) elastomers were investigated. AFM phase imaging indicated that the overall two-phase morphology of poly(ether urethanes), necessary for its thermoplastic elastomeric properties, was not disrupted by changing the soft segment chemistry. All of the polyurethanes exhibited thermoplastic elastomeric behavior similar to that of the poly(ether urethane). Following material characterization, the biocompatibility of the polyurethane elastomers was evaluated using a subcutaneous cage implant protocol. All of the polyurethanes tested retained the excellent biocompatibility typical of poly(ether urethane) elastomers. Overall, the candidate polyurethanes were concluded to be suitable replacements of current poly(ether urethane) elastomers in medical applications. The results from the cage implant study and cell culture experiments indicated that monocytes adhere, differentiate and fuse to form foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) on all of the polyurethane specimens. It is now generally accepted that the reactive oxygen species released by these adherent macrophages and FBGCs initiate PEU biodegradation. ATR-FTIR analysis of explanted samples provided evidence of

  15. FABRICATION AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF CELL OUTER MEMBRANE MIMETIC SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-ming Zong; Yong-kuan Gong

    2011-01-01

    The surface design used for improving biocompatibility is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. For mimicking the ideal surface structure of cell outer membrane, a large number of polymers bearing phosphorylcholine (PC) groups have been employed to modify the surfaces of biomaterials and medical devices. It has been demonstrated that the biocompatibility of the modified materials whose surface is required to interact with a living organism has been obviously improved by introducing PC groups. In this review, the fabrication strategies of cell outer membrane mimetic surfaces and their resulted biocompatibilities were summarized.

  16. Overview of Stabilizing Ligands for Biocompatible Quantum Dot Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Clapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent colloidal quantum dots (QDs possess numerous advantages as fluorophores in biological applications. However, a principal challenge is how to retain the desirable optical properties of quantum dots in aqueous media while maintaining biocompatibility. Because QD photophysical properties are directly related to surface states, it is critical to control the surface chemistry that renders QDs biocompatible while maintaining electronic passivation. For more than a decade, investigators have used diverse strategies for altering the QD surface. This review summarizes the most successful approaches for preparing biocompatible QDs using various chemical ligands.

  17. Variable Synthetic Capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feedback amplifier circuit synthesizes electronically variable capacitance. Variable Synthetic Capacitor is amplifier circuit with follower/feedback configuration. Effective input capacitance depends on input set current. If synthetic capacitor is connected across resonant element of oscillator, oscillator frequency controlled via input set current. Circuit especially suitable for fine frequency adjustments of piezoelectric-crystal or inductor/capacitor resonant oscillators.

  18. Designing synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology. PMID:24156739

  19. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2008-01-01

    A synthetic aperture focusing (SAF) technique denoted Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) suitable for 2D and 3D imaging is presented. The technique differ from prior art of SAF in the sense that SAF is performed on pre-beamformed data contrary to channel data. The objective is to...

  20. Tribological study of lubricious DLC biocompatible coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, M; Garcia-Luis, A; Viviente, J L; Braceras, I; Oñate, J I

    2002-12-01

    DLC (diamond-like carbon) coatings have remarkable tribological properties due mainly to their good frictional behavior. These coatings can be applied in many industrial and biomedical applications, where sliding can generate wear and frictional forces on the components, such as orthopaedic metal implants. This work reports on the development and tribological characterization of functionally gradient titanium alloyed DLC coatings. A PVD-magnetron sputtering technique has been used as the deposition method. The aim of this work was to study the tribological performance of the DLC coating when metal to metal contact (cobalt chromium or titanium alloys) takes place under dry and lubricated test conditions. Prior work by the authors demonstrates that the DLC coating reduced considerably the wear of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The DLC coating during mechanical testing exhibited a high elastic recovery (65%) compared to the values obtained from Co-Cr-Mo (15%) and Ti-6Al-4V (23%). The coating exhibited an excellent tribo-performance against the Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys, especially under dry conditions presenting a friction value of 0.12 and almost negligible wear. This coating has passed biocompatibility tests for implant devices on tissue/bone contact according to international standards (ISO 10993). PMID:15348654

  1. Material Biocompatibility for PCR Microfluidic Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-04-23

    As part of the current miniaturization trend, biological reactions and processes are being adapted to microfluidics devices. PCR is the primary method employed in DNA amplification, its miniaturization is central to efforts to develop portable devices for diagnostics and testing purposes. A problem is the PCR-inhibitory effect due to interaction between PCR reagents and the surrounding environment, which effect is increased in high-surface-are-to-volume ration microfluidics. In this study, we evaluated the biocompatibility of various common materials employed in the fabrication of microfluidic chips, including silicon, several kinds of silicon oxide, glasses, plastics, wax, and adhesives. Two-temperature PCR was performed with these materials to determine their PCR-inhibitory effect. In most of the cases, addition of bovine serum albumin effectively improved the reaction yield. We also studied the individual PCR components from the standpoint of adsorption. Most of the materials did not inhibit the DNA, whereas they did show noticeable interaction with the DNA polymerase. Our test, instead of using microfluidic devices, can be easily conducted in common PCR tubes using a standard bench thermocycler. Our data supports an overview of the means by which the materials most bio-friendly to microfluidics can be selected.

  2. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe(2)O(3) can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe(2)O(3) could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646

  3. Biofunctionalised biocompatible titania coatings for implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, V.; Heidenau, F.; Stenzel, F. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Friedrich-Baur-Research Inst. for Biomaterials; Schmidgall, J.; Lipps, G. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Biochemistry Dept.; Ziegler, G. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Friedrich-Baur-Research Inst. for Biomaterials; Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

    2002-07-01

    The biological response of an organism to an implant can be influenced by structuring and/or functionalisation of the implant surface. The goal of our study is to improve the osseointegration of orthopaedic endoprothesis by coating metal substrates with dense or nanoporous titania layers combined with biofunctionalisation of the surface with peptides and proteins. The sol-gel method is used to produce titania coatings on medical relevant substrates such as titanium or titanium alloys. Control of the educt ratios and the processing, like drying the specimens in air (xerogel) or supercritical drying in an autoclave unit (aerogel), results in dense or nanoporous titania films. Pore diameters can be adjusted between 10 and 120 nanometers. A remarkable characteristic of the coatings is the high number of surface hydroxy functionalities even after calcination. These reactive groups give ideal conditions for the biofunctionalisation. The immobilisation of biological active substances is carried out by successive covalent silanisation with an aminosilane using a dicarbonic acid as a spacer molecule, and binding of peptides to the spacers. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the materials were tested with cell culture assays. (orig.)

  4. Biocompatibility index of Ag-containing antiseptics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkour, Yousef

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We defined a biocompatibility index (BI for comparing. The BI takes into account both the results of the in-vitro cytotoxicity, i.e. the concentration at which 50% of the cells are damaged, and the microbiocidal activity, i.e. the concentration at which the baseline burden of the test micro-organisms is reduced by at least 5-log steps. For AgNO3 and Ag-SD no BI value was calculable since the highest tested active substance concentration of 1% corresponding to the concentration for use results in no reduction in the baseline bacterial burden. However, the theoretical value should be much smaller than 0.002 All tested silver-containing preparations were not effective against Staphylococcus aureus using 30 min contact time. Using Escherichia coli as test microorganisms, colloidal silver in the form of mild silver protein (based on Ag has a BI value of 0.002, chlorhexidine 0.8, PVP-iodine (based on iodine 1.0, polihexanide 1.5, and octenidine 1.8, i.e. the Ag-containing preparations do not act antiseptically within 30 min of contact time. Therefore, depending from the kind of the wound in clinical practice Ag-containing preparations should be substituted by e.g. polihexanide-, octenidine- or PVP-iodine-containing preparations, which show in lower concentration than in the concentration in use microbicidal effect within 30 min.

  5. Forsterite Nanopowder: Structural Characterization and Biocompatibility Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.A.Naghiu; M.Gorea; E.Mutch; F.Kristaly; M.Tomoaia-Cotisel

    2013-01-01

    Forsterite,a new biocompatible material was synthesized from Mg(NO3)2·6H20 and TEOS by using the sol-gel method.The material was then heated at 800,900 and 1000 ℃.The forsterite was noticed as the main crystalline phase in the material fired at 900 and 1000 ℃,while periclase (MgO) was present in all the samples.The tests confirm that in the first two samples forsterite is present as crystallites <60 nm,while in the sample synthesized at 1000 ℃ it forms aggregates of micrometre-sized grains.In vitro test was performed by immersing the forsterite powder in the simulating body fluids (SBF) and hydroxyapatite formation on the surface was investigated.We could evidence the formation of hydroxyapatite on the forsterite surface after 7 days of immersion.The MTT test confirmed that forsterite powders dissolution promote osteoblast proliferation of the human-type osteoblasts with no significant cytotoxicity effects.

  6. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ion

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL, hydroxyapatite (HAp, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD and usnic acid (UA. The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD. In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  7. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of lyophilized bovine bone biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Galia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of bone grafts in orthopedic, maxillofacial and dental surgery has been growing. Nevertheless, both fresh autografts and frozen allografts have limitations, and therefore, alternative synthetic or natural biomaterials, such as processed and lyophilized bovine bone graft have been developed. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of lyophilized bovine bone manufactured in a semi-industrial scale, according to a modifical protocol developed by the authors. METHODS: Samples of bovine cancellous bone were processed according to a protocol developed by Kakiuchi et al., and modified to process samples of bovine cancellous bone. The following trials were performed: in vitro cytotoxicity, in vivo acute systemic toxicity, in vivo oral irritation potential, in vitro pyrogenic reaction, and bioburden. RESULTS: The in vitro evaluation of lyophilized bovine cancellous bone revealed an absence of cytotoxicity in 100% of the samples. Regarding in vivo evaluation of acute systemic toxicity, neither macroscopic abnormalities nor deaths were noted in the animals. Pyrogenicity was not greater than 0.125 UE/ml in any of the samples. The bioburden revealed negative results for microbial growth before sterilization. Regarding the oral irritation potential, in vivo evaluation at 24 and 72 hours showed that the animals had no edema or erythema on the oral mucosa. CONCLUSION: The protocol changes established by the authors to prepare lyophilized bovine cancellous bone at a semi-industrial scale is reproducible and yielded a product with excellent biocompatibility.

  8. Biocompatibility evaluation of hydroxyapatite/collagen nanocomposites doped with Zn+2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, novel composites based on calcium phosphates (CaP)/collagen (COL) doped with Zn+2 have been synthesized. They were characterized by SEM coupled to EDS microprobe in order to evaluate their morphology and chemical composition, respectively. The biocompatibility of these synthetic CaP/COL nanocomposites doped and undoped with Zn+2 was investigated through osteoblast cell culture assay. Calcium phosphates were produced via aqueous precipitation routes where two different phases were obtained, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and biphasic hydroxyapatite-βtricalcium phosphate (HAPβTCP). In the sequence, the type-I collagen (COL) was added to the inorganic phase based on calcium phosphate and the mixture was blended until a homogenous composite was obtained. Zn+2 aqueous solution (1.0 wt%) was used as the doping reagent. The cell viability and the alkaline phosphatase production of osteoblasts in the presence of the composites were evaluated and compared to control osteoblasts. Also, the biocompatibility of the composite was investigated through cell morphological analysis using optical microscopy of osteoblasts. All experiments were performed in triplicates (n = 3) from three different experiments. They were analyzed by variance test (ANOVA) and Bonferroni's post-test with differences statistically significant at p +2 did not present alterations in cell morphology in 72 h and had similar cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity to the control. All the tested CaP/COL composites showed adequate biological properties with the potential to be used in bone tissue replacement applications

  9. Vectorization of copper complexes via biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double emulsion-solvent diffusion approach with fully biocompatible materials was used to encapsulate copper complexes within biodegradable nanoparticles, for which the release kinetics profiles have highlighted their potential use for a prolonged circulating administration.

  10. Controlled Growth of Biocompatible Polymers from Diamond Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cígler, Petr; Řehoř, Ivan; Šlegerová, Jitka; Hrubý, Martin; Macková, Hana; Kučka, Jan; Filippov, Sergey K.

    San Francisco: -, 2013. ZZ10.04. [2013 MRS Spring Meeting & Exhibit. 01.04.2013-05.04.2013, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluorescent nanodiamonds * biocompatible polymers Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  11. Biocompatible peritoneal dialysis solutions: many questions but few answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter G; Jain, Arsh K; Yohanna, Sechelle

    2013-11-01

    The clinical value of biocompatible peritoneal dialysis solutions is uncertain because of inconsistent findings in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review by Cho et al. examining 20 such trials suggests a beneficial effect on residual renal function. However, the finding is not robust and may relate to decreased ultrafiltration causing hypervolemia. Future prescribing of these biocompatible solutions will probably continue to be driven by opinion, marketing, and cost considerations rather than by evidence-based medicine. PMID:24172730

  12. Microstructural Properties of Biocompatible Nanofibrous Membranes Prepared by Electrospinning Technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Petráš, D.; Šolcová, Olga

    - : -, 2013, s. 525. ISBN N. [European Congress of Chemical Engineering /9./. The Hague (NL), 21.04.2013-25.04.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP106/11/P459; GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1206 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : electrospinning * biocompatible membranes * biocompatible membranes * adsorption-desorption measurements Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.ecce2013.eu/index.php

  13. Fibrous scaffolds fabricated by emulsion electrospinning: from hosting capacity to in vivo biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, F.; Quarta, A.; Martelli, C.; Ottobrini, L.; Rossi, R. M.; Gigli, G.; Blasi, L.

    2016-04-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile method for preparing functional three-dimensional scaffolds. Synthetic and natural polymers have been used to produce micro- and nanofibers that mimic extracellular matrices. Here, we describe the use of emulsion electrospinning to prepare blended fibers capable of hosting aqueous species and releasing them in solution. The existence of an aqueous and a non-aqueous phase allows water-soluble molecules to be introduced without altering the structure and the degradation of the fibers, and means that their release properties under physiological conditions can be controlled. To demonstrate the loading capability and flexibility of the blend, various species were introduced, from magnetic nanoparticles and quantum rods to biological molecules. Cellular studies showed the spontaneous adhesion and alignment of cells along the fibers. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated the high biocompatibility and safety of the scaffolds up to 21 days post-implantation.Electrospinning is a versatile method for preparing functional three-dimensional scaffolds. Synthetic and natural polymers have been used to produce micro- and nanofibers that mimic extracellular matrices. Here, we describe the use of emulsion electrospinning to prepare blended fibers capable of hosting aqueous species and releasing them in solution. The existence of an aqueous and a non-aqueous phase allows water-soluble molecules to be introduced without altering the structure and the degradation of the fibers, and means that their release properties under physiological conditions can be controlled. To demonstrate the loading capability and flexibility of the blend, various species were introduced, from magnetic nanoparticles and quantum rods to biological molecules. Cellular studies showed the spontaneous adhesion and alignment of cells along the fibers. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated the high biocompatibility and safety of the scaffolds up to 21 days post

  14. Synthetic biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite their obvious relationship and overlap, the field of physics is blessed with many insightful laws, while such laws are sadly absent in biology. Here we aim to discuss how the rise of a more recent field known as synthetic biology may allow us to more directly test hypotheses regarding the possible design principles of natural biological networks and systems. In particular, this review focuses on synthetic gene regulatory networks engineered to perform specific functions or exhibit particular dynamic behaviors. Advances in synthetic biology may set the stage to uncover the relationship of potential biological principles to those developed in physics. (review article)

  15. Enamel surface remineralization: Using synthetic nanohydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Shanti Swarup

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of synthetically processed hydroxyapatite particles in remineralization of the early enamel lesions in comparison with 2% sodium fluoride. Materials and Methods: Thirty sound human premolars were divided into nanohydroxyapatite group (n0 = 15 and the sodium fluoride group (n = 15. The specimens were subjected to demineralization before being coated with 10% aqueous slurry of 20 nm nanohydroxyapatite or 2% sodium fluoride. The remineralizing efficacy of the materials was evaluated using surface microhardness (SMH measurements, scanning microscopic analysis and analysis of the Ca/P ratio of the surface enamel. Data analysis was carried out using paired t-test and independent t-test. Results: The results showed that the nanohydroxyapatite group produced a surface morphology close to the biologic enamel, the increase in mineral content (Ca/P ratio was more significant in the nanohydroxyapatite group ( P 0.05. Conclusion: The use of biomimetic nanohydroxyapatite as a remineralizing agent holds promise as a new synthetic enamel biocompatible material to repair early carious lesions.

  16. Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they are not increased sociability increased sex drive panic attacks excited delirium —extreme agitation and violent behavior What ... nosebleeds paranoia increased sociability increased sex drive hallucinations panic attacks Intoxication from synthetic cathinones has resulted in death. ...

  17. Building synthetic memory

    OpenAIRE

    Inniss, Mara C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular memory – conversion of a transient signal into a sustained response – is a common feature of biological systems. Synthetic biologists aim to understand and reengineer such systems in a reliable and predictable manner. Synthetic memory circuits have been designed and built in vitro and in vivo based on diverse mechanisms such as oligonucleotide hybridization, recombination, transcription, phosphorylation, and RNA editing. Thus far, building these circuits has helped us explore the bas...

  18. Synthetic Vision Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzel, L.J.; Kramer, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic vision system is an aircraft cockpit display technology that presents the visual environment external to the aircraft using computer-generated imagery in a manner analogous to how it would appear to the pilot if forward visibility were not restricted. The purpose of this chapter is to review the state of synthetic vision systems, and discuss selected human factors issues that should be considered when designing such displays.

  19. Synthetic biology and biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robienski, Jürgen; Simon, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the conflict fields and legal questions of synthetic biology, esp. concerning biosecurity. A respective jurisprudential discussion has not taken place yet in Germany apart from few statements and recommendations. But in Germany, Europe and the USA, it is generally accepted that a broad discussion is necessary. This is esp. true for the question of biosecurity and the possible dangers arising from Synthetic Biology. PMID:25845204

  20. Molecular Design of Synthetic Biodegradable Polymers as Cell Scaffold Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shen-guo; WAN Yu-qing; CAI Qing; HE Bin; CHEN Wen-na

    2004-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers are regarded as the most useful biomaterials. The good biocompatibility, biodegradability and mechanical properties of them make the synthetic biodegradable polymers have primary application to tissue engineering. The advantages and disadvantages of the synthetic biodegradable polymers as cell scaffold materials are evaluated. This article reviews the modification of polylactide-family aliphatic polymers to improve the cell affinity when the polymers are used as cell scaffolds. We have developed four main approaches: to modify polyester cell scaffolds in combination of plasma treating and collagen coating; to introduce hydrophilic segments into aliphatic polyester backbones; to introduce pendant functional groups into polyester chains; to modify polyester with dextran. The results of the cell cultures prove that the approaches mentioned above have improved the cell affinity of the polyesters and have modulated cell function such as adhesion, proliferation and migration.

  1. Synthetic gauge fields in synthetic dimensions,

    OpenAIRE

    Celi, A; Massignan, P.; Ruseckas, J.; Goldman, N; Spielman, I. B.; Juzeliūnas, G.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a simple technique for generating a cold-atom lattice pierced by a uniform magnetic field. Our method is to extend a one-dimensional optical lattice into the "dimension" provided by the internal atomic degrees of freedom, yielding a synthetic 2D lattice. Suitable laser-coupling between these internal states leads to a uniform magnetic flux within the 2D lattice. We show that this setup reproduces the main features of magnetic lattice systems, such as the fractal Hofstadter butterf...

  2. Principles of Manufacturing Biocompatible and Biostable Polymer Implants (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.М. Treushnikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The review concerns the basic theoretical aspects of manufacturing biocompatible and biostable implants and represents, mainly, the experience of our research team. Biocompatible implants have been shown to be understood to mean both: those, which are not rejected by the body as well as those, which are not capsulated in the body. They are to be fabricated according to one-stage frontal photopolymerization with shallow reaction front to avoid defect formation in a polymer. Moreover, an additional operation/stage is required to result in the death of end free macroradicals and labile products in a polymer. For implant fabrication we used photopolimerizable compositions resulting in the formation of hydrophobic spatially cross-linked polymers, their correlation time of rotational motion of a paramagnetic probe of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxypiperidine-1-oxide approximately being 6·10–10 s. The fulfillment of these conditions means the use of radically polymerizable oligomer-based compositions (oligoester methacrylates, oligocarbonate methacrylates, oligourethane methacrylates, etc.. Compositions having lower or higher correlation time of the specified probe are not appropriate for the fabrication of biocompatible and biostable implants. The characteristics of oligomer-monomer compounds have a greater effect on physicochemical properties of implants rather than on their biocompatibility and biostability. No implant incapsulation is determined by the initial composition formulation provided that the mentioned conditions are fulfilled. A polymer in biostable and biocompatible implants can be only optically transparent, though the converse is not necessary.

  3. Automated synthetic scene generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Ryan N.

    Physics-based simulations generate synthetic imagery to help organizations anticipate system performance of proposed remote sensing systems. However, manually constructing synthetic scenes which are sophisticated enough to capture the complexity of real-world sites can take days to months depending on the size of the site and desired fidelity of the scene. This research, sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory's Sensors Directorate, successfully developed an automated approach to fuse high-resolution RGB imagery, lidar data, and hyperspectral imagery and then extract the necessary scene components. The method greatly reduces the time and money required to generate realistic synthetic scenes and developed new approaches to improve material identification using information from all three of the input datasets.

  4. Solubility of dense CO2 in two biocompatible acrylate copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. C. Duarte

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible polymers and copolymers are frequently being used as part of controlled delivery systems. These systems can be prepared using a "clean and environment friendly" technology like supercritical fluids. One great advantage of this process is that compressed carbon dioxide has excellent plasticizing properties and can swell most biocompatible polymeric matrixes, thus promoting drug impregnation processes. Mass sorption of two acrylate biocompatible copolymers contact with supercritical carbon dioxide is reported. Equilibrium solubility of dense carbon dioxide in poly(methylmethacrylate-co-ethylhexylacrylate and poly(methylmethacrylate-co-ethylhexylacrylate-co-ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate was studied by a static method at 10.0 MPa and 313 K. The reticulated copolymer had Fickean behavior and its diffusion coefficient was calculated, under operating conditions.

  5. BIOCOMPATIBILITY EVALUATION OF XANTHAN/CHONDROITIN SULFATE HYDROGELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Oprea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of xanthan/chondroitin sulfate hydrogels (X/CS in differentmixing ratios was investigated. The in vitro biocompatibility evaluation was performed by a chemiluminescent assayusing microorganisms such as Saccharomyces pombe. The cellular growth of S. pombe in presence of thexanthan/chondroitin sulfate hydrogels containing up to 20 % chondroitin sulfate was examinated comparatively withxanthan hydrogel.The in vivo evaluation was performed by toxicity test and subcutaneously implantation in rats. It has been establisheda lethal dose (LD50 bigger than 3200 mg/kg for all studied hydrogels, therefore they are nontoxic materials.The in vivo 30 days testing performed by subcutaneous implantation showed that the X/CS matrices were easilyabsorbed without side-effects, demonstrating their biocompatibility and effectiveness as potential drug delivery systems.

  6. Biocompatibility of Ti-alloys for long-term implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hady Gepreel, Mohamed; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2013-04-01

    The design of new low-cost Ti-alloys with high biocompatibility for implant applications, using ubiquitous alloying elements in order to establish the strategic method for suppressing utilization of rare metals, is a challenge. To meet the demands of longer human life and implantation in younger patients, the development of novel metallic alloys for biomedical applications is aiming at providing structural materials with excellent chemical, mechanical and biological biocompatibility. It is, therefore, likely that the next generation of structural materials for replacing hard human tissue would be of those Ti-alloys that do not contain any of the cytotoxic elements, elements suspected of causing neurological disorders or elements that have allergic effect. Among the other mechanical properties, the low Young's modulus alloys have been given a special attention recently, in order to avoid the occurrence of stress shielding after implantation. Therefore, many Ti-alloys were developed consisting of biocompatible elements such as Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Ta, and showed excellent mechanical properties including low Young's modulus. However, a recent attention was directed towards the development of low cost-alloys that have a minimum amount of the high melting point and high cost rare-earth elements such as Ta, Nb, Mo, and W. This comes with substituting these metals with the common low cost, low melting point and biocompatible metals such as Fe, Mn, Sn, and Si, while keeping excellent mechanical properties without deterioration. Therefore, the investigation of mechanical and biological biocompatibility of those low-cost Ti-alloys is highly recommended now lead towards commercial alloys with excellent biocompatibility for long-term implantation. PMID:23507261

  7. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines

  8. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  9. The quantification of biocompatibility: toward a new definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Buddy

    2008-03-01

    Implantable medical devices, and the biomaterials that comprise them, form a 100B business worldwide. Medical devices save lives and/or improve the quality of life for millions. Tissue engineering also makes extensive use of biomaterials -- biomaterials are an enabling technology for tissue engineering. A central word to understanding the effectiveness of such materials and devices is biocompatibility. The word ``biocompatible'' is widely used in reference to biomaterials and medical devices and most everyone has some value understanding of its meaning. Many formal definitions have been proposed for this word, but it is still largely used in an imprecise manner. Four descriptions or definitions of biocompatibility will be reviewed: a widely adopted definition from a consensus conference, a surgeon's perspective on this word, the regulatory agency view and the factors that clearly influence biocompatibility. In this talk, the classical definition of biocompatibility will be contrasted to a newer definition embracing molecular concepts and the understanding of normal wound healing. The biological data on the in vivo healing responses of mammals to implants will be described. A strategy to improve the healing of biomaterials will be presented. It is based upon surface molecular engineering. First, non-specific protein adsorption must be inhibited. Strategies to achieve this design parameter will be presented. Then methods to deliver the specific protein signals will be addressed. Matricellular proteins such as osteopontin, thrombospondin 2 and SPARC will be introduced with an emphasis on exploiting the special reactivity of such proteins. A discussion of the influence of surface textures and porosities will also be presented. Finally a new scheme based upon macrophage phenotypic pathways will be proposed that may allow a quantitative measure of extent of biocompatibility.

  10. Synthetic guide star generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  11. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  12. Synthesis of biocompatible polymers by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work biocompatible polymers were synthesized by plasma based on pyrrole, ethyleneglycol and allylamine. These monomers are biologically important because they contain oxygen and nitrogen in their structure and they form bonding like; N-H, C-N, C-O and O-H that are also in the human system. The polymers were synthesized with splendor electric discharges to 13.5 MHz, among 10 and 100 W, resistive coupling, pressure of 10-1 mbar and 180 minutes of reaction. The interaction of the biological systems with biomaterials depends in many cases of the properties that present the surfaces, because the rough and/or porous surfaces favor the adherence of cells. The results indicate that the ruggedness of the polymers can be controlled with the synthesis energy, since when modifying it flat and/or rough surfaces they are obtained. The compatibility of water with other solutions that it is a form of increasing the adhesion of cells with biopolymers. The affinity with water and solutions is evaluated calculating the contact angle of the polymers surface with drops of concentration solutions and similar composition to the extracellular liquid of the spinal marrow of the human body. The solutions that were proven were based on NaCl, NaCl-MgSO4, and a mixture Krebs-Ringer that has chemical composition and similar concentration to that of the fluids of the spinal marrow. In the Poly pyrrole (PPy)/Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) copolymer, the biggest angles corresponded to the Krebs-Ringer solution, in the interval of 18 to 14 degrees and those lowest to the NaCl solution, of 14.5 at 11 degrees. The Poly allylamine had the more high values with water in the interval of 16.5 to 12.5 degrees and those lowest with the NaCl solution, of 13 at 9.5 degrees. On the other hand, in the derived polymers of pyrrole the more high values corresponded to the treatment with water, until 37, and those lowest to the NaCl-MgSO4 solution, up to 10. The solutions where participated NaCl its produced the

  13. Synthetic River Valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    The description of fluvial form has evolved from anecdotal descriptions to artistic renderings to 2D plots of cross section or longitudinal profiles and more recently 3D digital models. Synthetic river valleys, artificial 3D topographic models of river topography, have a plethora of potential applications in fluvial geomorphology, and the earth sciences in general, as well as in computer science and ecology. Synthetic river channels have existed implicitly since approximately the 1970s and can be simulated from a variety of approaches spanning the artistic and numerical. An objective method of synthesizing 3D stream topography based on reach scale attributes would be valuable for sizing 3D flumes in the physical and numerical realms, as initial input topography for morphodynamic models, stream restoration design, historical reconstruction, and mechanistic testing of interactions of channel geometric elements. Quite simply - simulation of synthetic channel geometry of prescribed conditions can allow systematic evaluation of the dominant relationships between river flow and geometry. A new model, the control curve method, is presented that uses hierarchically scaled parametric curves in over-lapping 2D planes to create synthetic river valleys. The approach is able to simulate 3D stream geometry from paired 2D descriptions and can allow experimental insight into form-process relationships in addition to visualizing past measurements of channel form that are limited to two dimension descriptions. Results are presented that illustrate the models ability to simulate fluvial topography representative of real world rivers as well as how channel geometric elements can be adjusted. The testing of synthetic river valleys would open up a wealth of knowledge as to why some 3D attributes of river channels are more prevalent than others as well as bridging the gap between the 2D descriptions that have dominated fluvial geomorphology the past century and modern, more complete, 3D

  14. Biocompatibility studies of polyacrylonitrile membranes modified with carboxylated polyetherimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, S.; Rajesh, S.; Jayalakshmi, A.; Mohan, D., E-mail: mohantarun@gmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Poly (ether-imide) (PEI) was carboxylated and used as the hydrophilic modification agent for the preparation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes. Membranes were prepared with different blend compositions of PAN and CPEI by diffusion induced precipitation. The modified membranes were characterized by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), mechanical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurement to understand the influence of CPEI on the properties of the membranes. The biocompatibility studies exhibited reduced plasma protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on the modified membrane surface. The complete blood count (CBC) results of CPEI incorporated membranes showed stable CBC values and significant decrease in the complement activation were also observed. In addition to good cytocompatibility, monocytes cultured on these modified membranes exhibited improved functional profiles in 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Thus it could be concluded that PAN/CPEI membranes with excellent biocompatibility can be useful for hemodialysis. Highlights: • Carboxylated PEI was prepared and utilized as hydrophilic modification agent. • CPEI incorporated into PAN to improved biocompatibility and cyto compatibility • Biocompatibility of membranes was correlated with morphology and hydrophilicity. • Antifouling studies of the PAN/CPEI membranes was studied by BSA as model foulant.

  15. Biocompatibility of phosphorylcholine coated stents in normal porcine coronary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Whelan (Deirdre); S.C. Krabbendam; P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); E.A. van Vliet (Erwin); W.J. van der Giessen (Wim); H.M.M. van Beusekom (Heleen)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To improve the biocompatibility of stents using a phosphorylcholine coated stent as a form of biomimicry. INTERVENTIONS: Implantation of phosphorylcholine coated (n = 20) and non-coated (n = 21) stents was performed in the coronary arteries of 25 pigs. The an

  16. In vivo biocompatibility of nanostructured Chitosan/Peo membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A.S. Vulcani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a technique that allows the preparation of nanofibers from various materials. Chitosan is a natural and abundant easily obtained polymer, which, in addition to those features, proved to be biocompatible. This work used nanostructured chitosan and polyoxyethylene membranes as subcutaneous implants in Wistar rats to evaluate the biocompatibility of the material. Samples of the material and tissues adjacent to the implant were collected 7, 15, 30, 45 and 60 days post-implantation. Macroscopic integration of the material to the tissues was observed in the samples and slides for histopathological examination that were prepared. It was noticed that the material does not stimulate the formation of adherences to the surrounding tissues and that there is initial predominance of neutrophilia and lymphocytosis, with a declining trend according to the increase of time, featuring a non-persistent acute inflammatory process. However, the material showed fast degradation, impairing the macroscopic observation after fifteen days of implantation. It was concluded that the material is biocompatible and that new studies should be conducted, modifying the time of degradation by changes in obtaining methods and verifying the biocompatibility in specific tissues for biomedical applications.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Deb; J Giri; S Dasgupta; D Datta; D Bahadur

    2003-12-01

    Ferrite particles coated with biocompatible phases can be used for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. We have synthesized substituted calcium hexaferrite, which is not stable on its own but is stabilized with small substitution of La. Hexaferrite of chemical composition (CaO)0.75(La2O3)0.20(Fe2O3)6 was prepared using citrate gel method. Hydroxyapatite was prepared by precipitating it from aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 maintaining pH above 11. Four different methods were used for coating of hydroxyapatite on ferrite particles. SEM with EDX and X-ray diffraction analysis shows clear evidence of coating of hydroxy-apatite on ferrite particles. These coated ferrite particles exhibited coercive field up to 2 kOe, which could be made useful for hysteresis heating in hyperthermia. Studies by culturing BHK-21 cells and WBC over the samples show evidence of biocompatibility. SEM micrographs and cell counts give clear indication of cell growth on the surface of the sample. Finally coated ferrite particle was implanted in Kasaulli mouse to test its biocompatibility. The magnetic properties and biocompatibility studies show that these hydroxyapatite coated ferrites could be useful for hyperthermia.

  18. [Biocompatibility of dental materials: Part 2. Materials with mucosal contact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klötzer, W T; Reuling, N

    1990-08-01

    Dental materials which are supposed to contact the oral, mucous membranes during their intended dental use may affect our patients health in different ways. Their local and systemic toxicity, and their allergenic and tumorigenic potential are reviewed and methods of biocompatibility testing discussed. Special emphasis is placed on impression materials, denture base resins and dental alloys. PMID:2269166

  19. Biocompatibility studies of polyacrylonitrile membranes modified with carboxylated polyetherimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly (ether-imide) (PEI) was carboxylated and used as the hydrophilic modification agent for the preparation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes. Membranes were prepared with different blend compositions of PAN and CPEI by diffusion induced precipitation. The modified membranes were characterized by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), mechanical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurement to understand the influence of CPEI on the properties of the membranes. The biocompatibility studies exhibited reduced plasma protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on the modified membrane surface. The complete blood count (CBC) results of CPEI incorporated membranes showed stable CBC values and significant decrease in the complement activation were also observed. In addition to good cytocompatibility, monocytes cultured on these modified membranes exhibited improved functional profiles in 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Thus it could be concluded that PAN/CPEI membranes with excellent biocompatibility can be useful for hemodialysis. Highlights: • Carboxylated PEI was prepared and utilized as hydrophilic modification agent. • CPEI incorporated into PAN to improved biocompatibility and cyto compatibility • Biocompatibility of membranes was correlated with morphology and hydrophilicity. • Antifouling studies of the PAN/CPEI membranes was studied by BSA as model foulant

  20. Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for Enzyme Immobilization with Enhanced Activity and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong J.; Lin, Chiann Tso; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-01

    Apoferritin is a nanostructured material with a uniform size and spherical structure, and it has excellent bio-compatibility. In this work, we report the use of apoferritin as a novel and biocompatible carrier for stabilizing enzymes and their activities. We used glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. GOx was immobilized on the surface of the apoferritin through a green synthetic approach taking advantage of bioaffinity binding between streptavidin and biotin. As a result, a glucose oxidase-biotin/streptavidin/biotin-apoferritin conjugate (Apo-GOx) was prepared using streptavidin as a bridge. The synthesized Apo-GOx was characterized with transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The activity and stability of GOx on the surface of the apoferritin were studied in different environments, such as temperature, chemicals, and pH, in comparison with the biotinylated GOx (B-GOx). The results showed that the activity of GOx on the apoferritin surface was significantly enhanced. The thermal and chemical stability of the GOx on the apoferritin was also greatly improved compared to free B-GOx in a solution. It was found that the activity of the GOx on the apoferritin only lost 30% in comparison to a 70% loss of free B-GOx after a 2 h incubation at 50oC. There was almost no decrease in activity for the GOx on the apoferritin as compared to an 80% activity decrease for free B-GOx after 30 min incubation in a 5 M urea solution. Glucose detection was used as a model application for the enzyme immobilization method developed in this work. The GOx immobilized apoferritin nanoparticles exhibited high sensitivity for glucose detection with a detection limit of 3 nM glucose. This work offers a novel approach for immobilizing enzymes with enhanced stability and activity, and this method may find a number of applications, such as in enzyme catalysis, DNA assays and immunoassays.

  1. Biocompatibility evaluation of hydroxyapatite/collagen nanocomposites doped with Zn{sup +2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, M H [Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, FCBS/UFVJM, mailbox 38, 39.100-000, Diamantina, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Valerio, P [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, ICB/UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Goes, A M [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, ICB/UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Leite, M F [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, ICB/UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Heneine, L G D [Laboratory of Immunology, Fundacao Ezequiel Dias-FUNED, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Mansur, H S [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, EE/UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2007-06-01

    In this work, novel composites based on calcium phosphates (CaP)/collagen (COL) doped with Zn{sup +2} have been synthesized. They were characterized by SEM coupled to EDS microprobe in order to evaluate their morphology and chemical composition, respectively. The biocompatibility of these synthetic CaP/COL nanocomposites doped and undoped with Zn{sup +2} was investigated through osteoblast cell culture assay. Calcium phosphates were produced via aqueous precipitation routes where two different phases were obtained, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and biphasic hydroxyapatite-{beta}tricalcium phosphate (HAP{beta}TCP). In the sequence, the type-I collagen (COL) was added to the inorganic phase based on calcium phosphate and the mixture was blended until a homogenous composite was obtained. Zn{sup +2} aqueous solution (1.0 wt%) was used as the doping reagent. The cell viability and the alkaline phosphatase production of osteoblasts in the presence of the composites were evaluated and compared to control osteoblasts. Also, the biocompatibility of the composite was investigated through cell morphological analysis using optical microscopy of osteoblasts. All experiments were performed in triplicates (n = 3) from three different experiments. They were analyzed by variance test (ANOVA) and Bonferroni's post-test with differences statistically significant at p < 0.05. The results showed that the CaP/COL composites doped and undoped with Zn{sup +2} did not present alterations in cell morphology in 72 h and had similar cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity to the control. All the tested CaP/COL composites showed adequate biological properties with the potential to be used in bone tissue replacement applications.

  2. Biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate and three new endodontic cements: An animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ghasem Aminozarbian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of the current study, biocompatibility of CAAC and WOLCA cement were comparable with that of MTA, but CAAC Plus induced an inflammatory response higher than MTA, therefore is not biocompatible.

  3. Synthetic Genomics and Synthetic Biology Applications Between Hopes and Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    König, Harald; Frank, Daniel; Heil, Reinhard; Coenen, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    New organisms and biological systems designed to satisfy human needs are among the aims of synthetic genomics and synthetic biology. Synthetic biology seeks to model and construct biological components, functions and organisms that do not exist in nature or to redesign existing biological systems to perform new functions. Synthetic genomics, on the other hand, encompasses technologies for the generation of chemically-synthesized whole genomes or larger parts of genomes, allowing to simultaneo...

  4. Biodegradable synthetic polymers for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunatillake P. A.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews biodegradable synthetic polymers focusing on their potential in tissue engineering applications. The major classes of polymers are briefly discussed with regard to synthesis, properties and biodegradability, and known degradation modes and products are indicated based on studies reported in the literature. A vast majority of biodegradable polymers studied belongs to the polyester family, which includes polyglycolides and polylactides. Some disadvantages of these polymers in tissue engineering applications are their poor biocompatibility, release of acidic degradation products, poor processability and loss of mechanical properties very early during degradation. Other degradable polymers such as polyorthoesters, polyanhydrides, polyphosphazenes, and polyurethanes are also discussed and their advantages and disadvantages summarised. With advancements in tissue engineering it has become necessary to develop polymers that meet more demanding requirements. Recent work has focused on developing injectable polymer compositions based on poly (propylene fumarate and poly (anhydrides to meet these requirements in orthopaedic tissue engineering. Polyurethanes have received recent attention for development of degradable polymers because of their great potential in tailoring polymer structure to achieve mechanical properties and biodegradability to suit a variety of applications.

  5. Synthetic Fuels Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on waste water derived from synthetic fuel processes included acute toxicity of coal conversion effluent components and acute toxicity of aqueous waste and wastewater components of the ORNL Bench-Scale hydrocarbonization process. The potential hazards of synthetic fuels technology development to terrestrial ecosystems were studied with regard to toxicity of PAH and azaarenes. Aquatic transport studies included the following: aquatic transport of PAH and rates of PAH photolysis at the Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, coking plant site; microbial transformations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and sediment samples; persistence of azaarenes in aquatic systems; bioaccumulation of pathways of azaarenes; sorption of PAH to suspended particles in natural waters; and transport and fate of anthracene in pond microcosms. Studies were also conducted on environmental characterization of solid waste from a Lurgi facility

  6. Engineered Asymmetric Synthetic Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic vesicles are small, fluid-filled spheres that are enclosed by a bilayer of lipid molecules. They can be used as models for investigating membrane biology and as delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals. In practice, it is difficult to simultaneously control membrane asymmetry, unilamellarity, vesicle size, vesicle-to-vesicle uniformity, and luminal content. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the bilayer is composed of different lipids, is of particular importance as it is a feature of most natural membranes. In this study, we leverage microfluidic technology to build asymmetric vesicles at high-throughput. We use the precise flow control offered by microfluidic devices to make highly uniform emulsions, with controlled internal content, that serve as templates to build the synthetic vesicles. Flow focusing, dielectrophoretic steering, and interfacial lipid self-assembly are critical procedures performed on-chip to produce the vesicles. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy are used to evaluate the vesicle characteristics.

  7. Wholly Synthetic Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuyang; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-06-17

    The past quarter of a century has witnessed an increasing engagement on the part of physicists and chemists in the design and synthesis of molecular machines de novo. This minireview traces the development of artificial molecular machines from their prototypes in the form of shuttles and switches to their emergence as motors and pumps where supplies of energy in the form of chemical fuel, electrochemical potential and light activation become a minimum requirement for them to function away from equilibrium. The challenge facing this rapidly growing community of scientists and engineers today is one of putting wholly synthetic molecules to work, both individually and as collections. Here, we highlight some of the recent conceptual and practical advances relating to the operation of wholly synthetic rotary and linear motors. PMID:26833859

  8. These Synthetic Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIT GILLET

    2008-01-01

    @@ Already slated to be one of the most important cultural events in the buildup to this summer's Olympic games, Synthetic Times-Media Art China 2008 will feature the works of more than 30 artists from around the world. Upwards of 40 media art installations will be exhibited in the National Art Museum of China alone, along with performances, workshops, presentations, and discussion panels focusing on the art works and the growth of media art as a discipline.

  9. Chemical communication between synthetic and natural cells: a possible experimental design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Leoni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The bottom-up construction of synthetic cells is one of the most intriguing and interesting research arenas in synthetic biology. Synthetic cells are built by encapsulating biomolecules inside lipid vesicles (liposomes, allowing the synthesis of one or more functional proteins. Thanks to the in situ synthesized proteins, synthetic cells become able to perform several biomolecular functions, which can be exploited for a large variety of applications. This paves the way to several advanced uses of synthetic cells in basic science and biotechnology, thanks to their versatility, modularity, biocompatibility, and programmability. In the previous WIVACE (2012 we presented the state-of-the-art of semi-synthetic minimal cell (SSMC technology and introduced, for the first time, the idea of chemical communication between synthetic cells and natural cells. The development of a proper synthetic communication protocol should be seen as a tool for the nascent field of bio/chemical-based Information and Communication Technologies (bio-chem-ICTs and ultimately aimed at building soft-wet-micro-robots. In this contribution (WIVACE, 2013 we present a blueprint for realizing this project, and show some preliminary experimental results. We firstly discuss how our research goal (based on the natural capabilities of biological systems to manipulate chemical signals finds a proper place in the current scientific and technological contexts. Then, we shortly comment on the experimental approaches from the viewpoints of (i synthetic cell construction, and (ii bioengineering of microorganisms, providing up-to-date results from our laboratory. Finally, we shortly discuss how autopoiesis can be used as a theoretical framework for defining synthetic minimal life, minimal cognition, and as bridge between synthetic biology and artificial intelligence.

  10. Synthetic staggered architecture composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Composite design inspired by nature. ► Tuning microstructure via changing ceramic content and aspect ratio. ► Experimental display of structure–property correlationship in synthetic composites. - Abstract: Structural biocomposites (for example, nacre in seashells, bone, etc.) are designed according to the functional role they are delegated for. For instance, bone is primarily designed for withstanding time-dependent loading (for example, withstanding stresses while running, jumping, accidental fall) and hence the microstructure is designed primarily from enhanced toughness and moderate stiffness point of view. On the contrary, seashells (which lie in the abyss of oceans) apart from providing defense to the organism (it is hosting) against predatory attacks, are subjected to static loading (for example, enormous hydrostatic pressure). Hence, emphasis on the shell structure evolution is directed primarily towards providing enhanced stiffness. In order to conform between stiffness and toughness, nature precisely employs a staggered arrangement of inorganic bricks in a biopolymer matrix (at its most elementary level of architecture). Aspect ratio and content of ceramic bricks are meticulously used by nature to synthesize composites having varying degrees of stiffness, strength and toughness. Such an amazing capability of structure–property correlationship has rarely been demonstrated in synthetic composites. Therefore, in order to better understand the mechanical behavior of synthetic staggered composites, the problem becomes two-pronged: (a) synthesize composites with varying brick size and contents and (b) experimental investigation of the material response. In this article, an attempt has been made to synthesize and characterize staggered ceramic–polymer composites having varying aspect ratio and ceramic content using freeze-casting technique. This will in-turn help us in custom-design manufacture of hybrid bio-inspired composite materials

  11. Biodegradable/biocompatible coated metal implants for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohamed M; Touny, A H; Al-Omair, Mohammed A; Saleh, M M

    2016-05-12

    Biocompatible metals have been suggested as revolutionary biomaterials for bone-grafting therapies. Although metals and their alloys are widely and successfully used in producing biomedical implants due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, they have a lack in bioactivity. Therefore coating of the metal surface with calcium phosphates (CaP) is a benign way to achieve well bioactivity and get controlled corrosion properties. The biocompatibility and bioactivity calcium phosphates (CaP) in bone growth were guided them to biomedical treatment of bone defects and fractures. Many techniques have been used for fabrication of CaP coatings on metal substrates such as magnesium and titanium. The present review will focus on the synthesis of CaP and their relative forms using different techniques especially electrochemical techniques. The latter has always been known of its unique way of optimizing the process parameters that led to a control in the structure and characteristics of the produced materials. PMID:27175470

  12. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  13. Biocompatibility of Compounds of Extracellular Matrix and Thermally Reversible Hydrogel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new scaffold material composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) and thermal sensitive hydrogel (HG), and evaluated its biocompatibility were investigated. We cultured bladder smooth muscle cells with this compound material, and then observed with phase contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to assess the cell growth and morphology. The cell adhesion and proliferation were detected with MTT assay and cell count. Results show the ECM/HG compounds appeared as a net-like and red-stained construction with enough meshes and without any cellular fragments. 6 h after implantation, cells were observed adhere on the compounds and extend spurious along the fibers 12 h later. Under SEM even some ECM was observed to be secreted. MTT assay shows there was obvious statistic difference among 3 groups (P<0.05).ECM/HG compound materials show a good biocompatibility, which confirms that it would be an ideal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  14. Biocompatibility assessment of fibrous nanomaterials in mammalian embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Michele; Camargo, Luiz S A; Quintão, Carolina C R; Silva, Saulo R; Souza, Eliza D; Raposo, Nádia R B; Marconcini, Jose M; Jorio, Ado; Ladeira, Luiz O; Brandão, Humberto M

    2016-07-01

    Currently there is a growing interest in the use of nanotechnology in reproductive medicine and reproductive biology. However, their toxic effects on mammalian embryos remain poorly understood. In this work, we evaluate the biocompatibility of two fibrous nanomaterials (NMs): cotton cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH), by performing an investigation of the embryonic development, gene expression (biomarkers focused on cell stress, apoptosis and totipotency) and in situ apoptosis in bovine embryos. Exposure to NMs did not interfere in preimplantation development or in the incidence of apoptosis in the bovine embryo, but they did affect the gene expression. The results presented are important for an understanding of the toxicity of cotton CNF and MWCNT-COOH on mammalian embryos. To our knowledge, we report the first evaluation of biocompatibility between these NMs on preimplantation embryos, which may open a new window for reproductive biomedical applications. PMID:26949162

  15. CASH vs. SYNTHETIC CDOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Eduard Dinca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, in the recent post-crisis aftermath, global asset managers are constantly searching new ways to optimize their investment portfolios while financial and banking institutions around the world are exploring new alternatives to better secure their financing and refinancing demands altogether with the enhancement of their risk management capabilities. We will exhibit herewith a comparison between the true-sale and synthetic CDO securitizations as financial markets-based funding, investment and risks mitigation techniques, highlighting certain key structuring and implementation specifics on each of them.

  16. Transition in synthetic jets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Kordík, Jozef

    Roč. 187, NOV 2012 ( 2012 ), s. 105-117. ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA02020795; GA ČR(CZ) GPP101/12/P556; GA ČR(CZ) GCP101/11/J019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : turbulence * synthetic jet * transition * velocity spectra Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.841, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424712005031

  17. Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk

    Medical ultrasound imaging is used for many purposes, e.g. for localizing and classifying cysts, lesions, and other processes. Almost any mass is first observed using B-mode imaging and later classified using e.g. color flow, strain, or attenuation imaging. It is therefore important that the B...... and the limiting factor is the amount of memory IO resources available. An equally high demand for memory throughput is found in the computer gaming industry, where a large part of the processing takes place on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Using the GPU, a framework for synthetic aperture imaging...

  18. Nanocellulose for Biomedical Applications : Modification, Characterisation and Biocompatibility Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade there has been increasing interest in exploring the use of nanocellulose in medicine. However, the influence of the physicochemical properties of nanocellulose on the material´s biocompatibility has not been fully investigated.  In this thesis, thin films of nanocellulose from wood (NFC) and from Cladophora algae (CC) were modified by the addition of charged groups on their surfaces and the influence of these modifications on the material´s physicochemical properties and on...

  19. Biomolecular modification of zirconia surfaces for enhanced biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) is a preferred biomaterial due to its good mechanical properties. In order to improve the biocompatibility of zirconia, RGD-peptide derived from extracellular matrix proteins was employed to modify the surface of Y-TZP to promote cell adhesion in this study. The surface of Y-TZP specimens was first modified using a hydrothermal method for different lengths of time. The topographies of modified Y-TZP specimens were analyzed by contact angle, XRD, FTIR, AFM, and FE-SEM. The mechanical properties were evaluated using Vickers hardness and three point bending strength. Then, the RGD-peptide was immobilized on the surface of the Y-TZP by chemical treatment. These RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP specimens were characterized by FTIR and AFM, and then were cocultured with MG-63 osteoblast cells for biocompatibility assay. The cell morphology and proliferation were evaluated by SEM, WST-1, and ALP activity assay. The XRD results indicated that the phase transition, from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase, was increased with a longer incubation time of hydrothermal treatment. However, there were no significant differences in mechanical strengths after RGD-peptide was successfully grafted onto the Y-TZP surface. The SEM images showed that the MG-63 cells appeared polygonal, spindle-shaped, and attached on the RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP. The proliferation and cellular activities of MG-63 cells on the RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP were better than that on the unmodified Y-TZP. From the above results, the RGD-peptide can be successfully grafted onto the hydrothermal modified Y-TZP surface. The RGD-peptide immobilized Y-TZP can increase cell adhesion, and thus, improve the biocompatibility of Y-TZP. - Highlights: • Covalent bonding between peptide and Y-TZP was proposed. • Stable biomimetic structures produced on the surface of zirconia. • The biocompatibility was improved

  20. Biocompatibility of Chitosan Carriers with Application in Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Grenha; Susana Rodrigues; Carmen Remuñán López; Marita Dionísio

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan is one of the most used polysaccharides in the design of drug delivery strategies for administration of either biomacromolecules or low molecular weight drugs. For these purposes, it is frequently used as matrix forming material in both nano and micron-sized particles. In addition to its interesting physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which include high mucoadhesion and a great capacity to produce drug delivery systems, ensuring the biocompatibility of the drug delivery...

  1. Fabrication of Biocompatible, Vibrational Magnetoelastic Materials for Controlling Cellular Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Rajachar, Rupak M.; Keat Ghee Ong; Ee Lim Tan; Hal R. Holmes

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME) materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of ...

  2. Biocompatible polymer microarrays for cellular high-content screening

    OpenAIRE

    Pernagallo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    The global aim of this thesis was to study the use of microarray technology for the screening and identification of biocompatible polymers, to understand physiological phenomena, and the design of biomaterials, implant surfaces and tissue-engineering scaffolds. This work was based upon the polymer microarray platform developed by the Bradley group. Polymer microarrays were successfully applied to find the best polymer supports for: (i) mouse fibroblast cells and used to eval...

  3. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Pircher, N.; Veigel, S.; Aigner, N; Nedelec, J. M.; Rosenau, T.; Liebner, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating...

  4. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of a new biomembrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Mrue

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatibility has been considered one of the most important items to validate a biomaterial for its application in human organisms. The present work evaluates the biocompatibility of a new biomembrane using in vivo assay in different animal species. The experiments to evaluate the cellular reaction were carried out through the implantation of the material into the subcutaneous tissue of animals and the results showed a good reaction of the host tissue without any signal of fibrosis or rejection. The cell adhesion experiments were done by means of the measure of the DNA content on the material surface after its implantation into the subcutaneous tissue of animals and the results showed a growing number of DNA that was proportional to the time of implantation. The healing process was evaluated using a dermal ulcer model and the results showed a good tissue repair resembling a physiologic process. The overall results presented here lead to the conclusion that this new biomembrane is a biocompatible material but more research must be done, as it is a new material desired for medical use.

  5. Biocompatible two-layer tantalum/titania-polymer hybrid coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortecchia, Elisa; Pacilli, Annalisa; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Scandola, Mariastella

    2010-09-13

    Using a two-step procedure, radiopaque and biocompatible coatings were obtained, consisting of a tantalum layer deposited by sputtering technique and of an upper organic-inorganic hybrid layer synthesized via sol-gel. As shown by radiographic images, tantalum confers to plastic substrates good X-ray visibility, adjustable via control of deposition time, but its adhesion to the substrate is poor and manipulation easily damages the metal layer. Polymer-titania hybrid coatings, synthesized using poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) or carboxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as organic precursors, were applied on the metal layer as biocompatible protective coatings. Biocompatibility is demonstrated by cytotoxicity tests conducted using vascular wall resident-mesenchymal stem cells (VW-MSCs). Both coatings show very good adhesion to the substrate, showing no sign of detachment upon large substrate deformations. Under such conditions, SEM observations show that the PCL-containing hybrid forms cracks, whereas the PDMS-based hybrid does not crack, suggesting possible applications of the latter material as a protective layer of sputtered tantalum radiopaque markers for flexible medical devices. PMID:20831278

  6. Biocompatibility of two experimental scaffolds for regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzer, Frank C.; Trope, Martin; Karabucak, Bekir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The biocompatibility of two experimental scaffolds for potential use in revascularization or pulp regeneration was evaluated. Materials and Methods One resilient lyophilized collagen scaffold (COLL), releasing metronidazole and clindamycin, was compared to an experimental injectable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold (PLGA), releasing clindamycin. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were seeded at densities of 1.0 × 104, 2.5 × 104, and 5.0 × 104. The cells were investigated by light microscopy (cell morphology), MTT assay (cell proliferation) and a cytokine (IL-8) ELISA test (biocompatibility). Results Under microscope, the morphology of cells coincubated for 7 days with the scaffolds appeared healthy with COLL. Cells in contact with PLGA showed signs of degeneration and apoptosis. MTT assay showed that at 5.0 × 104 hDPSCs, COLL demonstrated significantly higher cell proliferation rates than cells in media only (control, p < 0.01) or cells co-incubated with PLGA (p < 0.01). In ELISA test, no significant differences were observed between cells with media only and COLL at 1, 3, and 6 days. Cells incubated with PLGA expressed significantly higher IL-8 than the control at all time points (p < 0.01) and compared to COLL after 1 and 3 days (p < 0.01). Conclusions The COLL showed superior biocompatibility and thus may be suitable for endodontic regeneration purposes. PMID:27200277

  7. Sputtered Gum metal thin films showing bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, S; Alhussein, A; Lamri, S; François, M; Sanchette, F; Pulgarin, C; Kiwi, J; Rtimi, S

    2016-10-01

    Super-elastic Titanium based thin films Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-(O) (TNTZ-O) and Ti-24Nb-(N) (TN-N) (at.%) were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) in different reactive atmospheres. The effects of oxygen doping (TNTZ-O) and/or nitrogen doping (TN-N) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the as-deposited coatings were investigated. Nano-indentation measurements show that, in both cases, 1sccm of reactive gas in the mixture is necessary to reach acceptable values of hardness and Young's modulus. Mechanical properties are considered in relation to the films compactness, the compressive stress and the changes in the grain size. Data on Bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility are reported in this study. The biocompatibility tests showed that O-containing samples led to higher cells proliferation. Bacterial inactivation was concomitant with the observed pH and surface potential changes under light and in the dark. The increased cell fluidity leading to bacterial lysis was followed during the bacterial inactivation time. The increasing cell wall fluidity was attributed to the damage of the bacterial outer cell which losing its capacity to regulate the ions exchange in and out of the bacteria. PMID:27434155

  8. Biocompatibility of Chitosan Carriers with Application in Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grenha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is one of the most used polysaccharides in the design of drug delivery strategies for administration of either biomacromolecules or low molecular weight drugs. For these purposes, it is frequently used as matrix forming material in both nano and micron-sized particles. In addition to its interesting physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which include high mucoadhesion and a great capacity to produce drug delivery systems, ensuring the biocompatibility of the drug delivery vehicles is a highly relevant issue. Nevertheless, this subject is not addressed as frequently as desired and even though the application of chitosan carriers has been widely explored, the demonstration of systems biocompatibility is still in its infancy. In this review, addressing the biocompatibility of chitosan carriers with application in drug delivery is discussed and the methods used in vitro and in vivo, exploring the effect of different variables, are described. We further provide a discussion on the pros and cons of used methodologies, as well as on the difficulties arising from the absence of standardization of procedures.

  9. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Endodontic Sealers Incorporating Antibacterial Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzhak Abramovitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of endodontic disease is bacteria. Disinfection is presently achieved by cleaning the root canal system prior to obturation. Following setting, root canal filling is devoid of any antibacterial effect. Endodontic sealers with antimicrobial properties yet biocompatible may enhance root canal therapy. For this purpose, quaternized polyethylenimine nanoparticles which are antibacterial polymers, biocompatible, nonvolatile, and stable may be used. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of added QPEI on the cytotoxicity of AH Plus, Epiphany, and GuttaFlow endodontic sealers. The effect of these sealers on the proliferation of RAW 264.7 macrophage and L-929 fibroblast cell lines and on the production of TNFα from macrophages was examined. Cell vitality was evaluated using a colorimetric XTT assay. The presence of cytokines was determined by two-site ELISA. Results show that QPEI at 1% concentration does not impair the basic properties of the examined sealers in both macrophages and fibroblast cell lines. Incorporation of 1% QPEI into the sealers did not impair their biocompatibility. QPEI is a potential clinical candidate to improve antibacterial activity of sealers without increasing cytotoxicity.

  10. Analog synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpeshkar, R

    2014-03-28

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA-protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  11. Synthetic biology: Understanding biological design from synthetic circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherji, Shankar; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    An important aim of synthetic biology is to uncover the design principles of natural biological systems through the rational design of gene and protein circuits. Here, we highlight how the process of engineering biological systems — from synthetic promoters to the control of cell–cell interactions — has contributed to our understanding of how endogenous systems are put together and function. Synthetic biological devices allow us to grasp intuitively the ranges of behaviour generated by simple...

  12. A green chemistry approach for synthesizing biocompatible gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, JaeWoong; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a fascinating class of nanomaterial that can be used for a wide range of biomedical applications, including bio-imaging, lateral flow assays, environmental detection and purification, data storage, drug delivery, biomarkers, catalysis, chemical sensors, and DNA detection. Biological synthesis of nanoparticles appears to be simple, cost-effective, non-toxic, and easy to use for controlling size, shape, and stability, which is unlike the chemically synthesized nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to synthesize homogeneous AuNPs using pharmaceutically important Ganoderma spp . We developed a simple, non-toxic, and green method for water-soluble AuNP synthesis by treating gold (III) chloride trihydrate (HAuCl4) with a hot aqueous extract of the Ganoderma spp . mycelia. The formation of biologically synthesized AuNPs (bio-AuNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the biocompatibility of as-prepared AuNPs was evaluated using a series of assays, such as cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, and reactive oxygen species generation (ROS) in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). The color change of the solution from yellow to reddish pink and strong surface plasmon resonance were observed at 520 nm using UV-visible spectroscopy, and that indicated the formation of AuNPs. DLS analysis revealed the size distribution of AuNPs in liquid solution, and the average size of AuNPs was 20 nm. The size and morphology of AuNPs were investigated using TEM. The biocompatibility effect of as-prepared AuNPs was investigated in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by using various concentrations of AuNPs (10 to 100 μM) for 24 h. Our findings suggest that AuNPs are non-cytotoxic and biocompatible. To the best of our knowledge

  13. Application of Polyethylene Glycol to Promote Cellular Biocompatibility of Polyhydroxybutyrate Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodman T. H. Chan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB is a biomaterial with potential for applications in biomedical and tissue engineering; however, its brittle nature and high crystallinity limit its potential. Blending PHB with a variety of PEGs produced natural-synthetic composite films composed of FDA-approved polymers with significant reductions in crystallinity, from 70.1% for PHB films to 41.5% for its composite with a 30% (w/w loading of PEG2000. Blending also enabled manipulation of the material properties, increasing film flexibility with an extension to break of 2.49±1.01% for PHB films and 8.32±1.06% for films containing 30% (w/w PEG106. Significant changes in the film surface properties, as measured by porosity, contact angles, and water uptake, were also determined as a consequence of the blending process, and these supported greater adhesion and proliferation of neural-associated olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs. A growth rate of 7.2×105 cells per day for PHB films with 30% (w/w PEG2000 loading compared to 2.5×105 for PHB films was observed. Furthermore, while cytotoxicity of the films as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release was unaffected, biocompatibility, as measured by mitochondrial activity, was found to increase. It is anticipated that fine control of PEG composition in PHB-based composite biomaterials can be utilised to support their applications in medicinal and tissue engineering applications.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and biocompatibility of ``green'' synthesized silver nanoparticles using tea polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Michael C.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; NadagoudaPresent Address: Pegasus Technical Services, 46 E. Hollister Street, Cincinnati, 45219, Ohio, Usa., Mallikarjuna N.; Kunzelman, Samantha; Hussain, Saber M.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2010-05-01

    Since ancient times, people have taken advantage of the antimicrobial effects of colloidal silver particles. Aside from the medical prospects, silver nanoparticles are found in a wide range of commercially available consumer products ranging from cosmetics to household cleansers. Current synthetic methods for creating silver nanoparticles typically call for potentially hazardous chemicals, extreme heat, and produce environmentally dangerous byproducts. Therefore, it is essential that novel ``green'' synthesis of nanoparticles becomes a reality, and it is imperative to fully analyze the potential toxic effects of these nanoparticles. In this study, we have shown that by reducing silver nitrate in solutions of tea extract or epicatechin of varying concentrations, spherical silver nanoparticles were formed that had controllable size distributions depending on the concentration of tea extract or epicatechin in the samples. Our ultra-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the nanoparticles were in fact interacting with the keratinocytes. Furthermore, evaluation of mitochondrial function (MTS) to assess cell viability and membrane integrity (LDH) in human keratinocytes showed that the silver nanoparticles were nontoxic. These results demonstrated that these nanoparicles are potentially biocompatible and warrant further evaluation in other biological systems.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biocompatibility of "green" synthesized silver nanoparticles using tea polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Michael C; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Kunzelman, Samantha; Hussain, Saber M; Varma, Rajender S

    2010-05-01

    Since ancient times, people have taken advantage of the antimicrobial effects of colloidal silver particles. Aside from the medical prospects, silver nanoparticles are found in a wide range of commercially available consumer products ranging from cosmetics to household cleansers. Current synthetic methods for creating silver nanoparticles typically call for potentially hazardous chemicals, extreme heat, and produce environmentally dangerous byproducts. Therefore, it is essential that novel "green" synthesis of nanoparticles becomes a reality, and it is imperative to fully analyze the potential toxic effects of these nanoparticles. In this study, we have shown that by reducing silver nitrate in solutions of tea extract or epicatechin of varying concentrations, spherical silver nanoparticles were formed that had controllable size distributions depending on the concentration of tea extract or epicatechin in the samples. Our ultra-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the nanoparticles were in fact interacting with the keratinocytes. Furthermore, evaluation of mitochondrial function (MTS) to assess cell viability and membrane integrity (LDH) in human keratinocytes showed that the silver nanoparticles were nontoxic. These results demonstrated that these nanoparicles are potentially biocompatible and warrant further evaluation in other biological systems. PMID:20648322

  16. Entrapping quercetin in silica/polyethylene glycol hybrid materials: Chemical characterization and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catauro, Michelina; Bollino, Flavia; Nocera, Paola; Piccolella, Simona; Pacifico, Severina

    2016-11-01

    Sol-gel synthesis was exploited to entrap quercetin, a natural occurring antioxidant polyphenol, in silica-based hybrid materials, which differed in their polyethylene glycol (PEG) content (6, 12, 24 and 50wt%). The materials obtained, whose nano-composite nature was ascertained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), were chemically characterized by Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) and UV-Vis spectroscopies. The results prove that a reaction between the polymer and the drug occurred. Bioactivity tests showed their ability to induce hydroxyapatite nucleation on the sample surfaces. The direct contact method was applied to screen the cytotoxicity of the synthetized materials towards fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells, commonly used for in vitro biocompatibility studies, and three nervous system cell lines (neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y, glioma U251, and pheochromocytoma PC12 cell lines), adopted as models in oxidative stress related studies. Using the MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay NIH 3T3 proliferation was assessed and the morphology was not compromised by direct exposure to the materials. Analogously, PC-12, and U-251 cell lines were not affected by new materials. SH-SY5Y appeared to be the most sensitive cell line with cytotoxic effects of 20-35%. PMID:27524014

  17. Bioprinting synthetic self-assembling peptide hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Yihua; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a disruptive technology for creating organotypic constructs for high-throughput screening and regenerative medicine. One major challenge is the lack of suitable bioinks. Short synthetic self-assembling peptides are ideal candidates. Several classes of peptides self-assemble into nanofibrous hydrogels resembling the native extracellular matrix. This is a conducive microenvironment for maintaining cell survival and physiological function. Many peptides also demonstrate stimuli-responsive gelation and tuneable mechanical properties, which facilitates extrusion before dispensing and maintains the shape fidelity of the printed construct in aqueous media. The inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability bodes well for in vivo applications as implantable tissues and drug delivery matrices, while their short length and ease of functionalization facilitates synthesis and customization. By applying self-assembling peptide inks to bioprinting, the dynamic complexity of biological tissue can be recreated, thereby advancing current biomedical applications of peptide hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26694103

  18. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... harmonic techniques have been made, but none of these methods have so far been applicable for in-vivo imaging. The basis of this project is a synthetic aperture technique known as synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB). The technique utilizes a two step beamforming approach to drastically reduce...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB. The...

  19. Synthetic circuits, devices and modules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2010-01-01

    The aim of synthetic biology is to design artificial biological systems for novel applications. From an engineering perspective, construction of biological systems of defined functionality in a hierarchical way is fundamental to this emerging field. Here, we highlight some current advances on design of several basic building blocks in synthetic biology including the artificial gene control elements, synthetic circuits and their assemblies into devices and modules. Such engineered basic buildi...

  20. Synthetic Biology for Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abil, Zhanar; Xiong, Xiong; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new field with the key aim of designing and constructing biological systems with novel functionalities. Today, synthetic biology devices are making their first steps in contributing new solutions to a number of biomedical challenges, such as emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance and cancer therapy. This review discusses some synthetic biology approaches and applications that were recently used in disease mechanism investigation and disease modeling, drug d...

  1. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke;

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring a...... SA imaging. Due to the complete data set, it is possible to have both dynamic transmit and receive focusing to improve contrast and resolution. It is also possible to improve penetration depth by employing codes during ultrasound transmission. Data sets for vector flow imaging can be acquired using...... short imaging sequences, whereby both the correct velocity magnitude and angle can be estimated. A number of examples of both phantom and in-vivo SA images will be presented measured by the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS to demonstrate the many benefits of SA imaging....

  2. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  3. Variation and Synthetic Speech

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, C; Massey, N; Miller, Corey; Karaali, Orhan; Massey, Noel

    1997-01-01

    We describe the approach to linguistic variation taken by the Motorola speech synthesizer. A pan-dialectal pronunciation dictionary is described, which serves as the training data for a neural network based letter-to-sound converter. Subsequent to dictionary retrieval or letter-to-sound generation, pronunciations are submitted a neural network based postlexical module. The postlexical module has been trained on aligned dictionary pronunciations and hand-labeled narrow phonetic transcriptions. This architecture permits the learning of individual postlexical variation, and can be retrained for each speaker whose voice is being modeled for synthesis. Learning variation in this way can result in greater naturalness for the synthetic speech that is produced by the system.

  4. Study on the biodegradability and biocompatibility of WE magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium alloys have been widely applied in biomedical devices because of their high strength, toughness, processing performance and the trace release of Mg2+. In this study, we investigated the biodegradability, cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility of four kinds of WE Mg alloys (where “W” indicates the metallic element Y and “E” represents mixed rare earth [RE] elements; Y: 2.5, 5.0, 6.5, and 7.5 wt.%; Nd: 1.0, 2.5, 2.6, and 4.2 wt.%; Zr: 0.8 wt.%) for their application in intravascular stent fabrication. The content of alloying elements affected not only mechanical properties of materials, but also their biocompatibility. We found that addition of RE elements could reduce the corrosion rates. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultured in different extracts of WE Mg alloys. MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to examine the cytotoxicity. The nitric oxide (NO) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were used to evaluate effects of Mg alloys on HUVECs. The addition of Y, Nd and Zr increased the cell viability and improved the hemocompatibility. Different alloy elements affected the morphology of samples, Mg2+ release, and pH values in the medium. The results of mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability showed that Mg–5.0Y–2.6Nd–0.8Zr might be used as alternative materials of stent. However, it still needs to be further modified for clinical use. These findings suggest that selecting suitable alloying elements is particularly important. - Highlights: ► Y, Nd and Zr are used as alloying elements of magnesium alloys. ► Biodegradability and biocompatibility are explored. ► Cell viability and hemocompatibility are improved as compared with pure Mg.

  5. A capillary viscometer designed for the characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J.; Odenbach, S.

    2016-08-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles are receiving a growing interest in biomedical research. These ferrofluids can, e.g., be used for the treatment of cancer, making use of the drug targeting principle or using an artificially induced heating. To enable a safe application the basic properties of the ferrofluids have to be well understood, including the viscosity of the fluids if an external magnetic field is applied. It is well known that the viscosity of ferrofluids rises if a magnetic field is applied, where the rise depends on shear rate and magnetic field strength. In case of biocompatible ferrofluids such investigations proved to be rather complicated as the experimental setup should be close to the actual application to allow justified predictions of the effects which have to be expected. Thus a capillary viscometer, providing a flow situation comparable to the flow in a blood vessel, has been designed. The glass capillary is exchangeable and different inner diameters can be used. The range of the shear rates has been adapted to the range found in the human organism. The application of an external magnetic field is enabled with two different coil setups covering the ranges of magnetic field strengths required on the one hand for a theoretical understanding of particle interaction and resulting changes in viscosity and on the other hand for values necessary for a potential biomedical application. The results show that the newly designed capillary viscometer is suitable to measure the magnetoviscous effect in biocompatible ferrofluids and that the results appear to be consistent with data measured with rotational rheometry. In addition, a strong change of the flow behaviour of a biocompatible ferrofluid was proven for ranges of the shear rate and the magnetic field strength expected for a potential biomedical application.

  6. A rheological and microscopical characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, J., E-mail: johannes.nowak@tu-dresden.de [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Measuring and Automation Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Germany (Germany); Wolf, D. [Triebenberg Laboratory, Technische Universität Dresden, 01328 Germany (Germany); Odenbach, S. [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Measuring and Automation Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Germany (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    There is an increasing interest in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in the biomedical area. Those ferrofluids are e.g. used for magnetic resonance imaging and emerging research focuses on employing the fluids for magnetic drug targeting or magnetic particle heating as a potential treatment for cancer. For these applications the knowledge of the suspensions' thermophysical properties is of major interest to guarantee a safe and effective application. Therefore the flow behavior cannot be neglected as it might significantly influence the execution of the aforementioned applications. In this experimental study two biocompatible ferrofluids were investigated. Rheological measurements were carried out using rotational rheometry. To allow an interpretation of the fluids' behavior the microscopic make-up was investigated using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Measurements of diluted ferrofluids were carried out as a first step to simulate the rheological behavior reflecting the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles found in blood flow for most biomedical applications of such fluids. The detected strong effects show the potential to significantly influence application and handling of the biocompatible ferrofluids in the medical area and should therefore be taken into account for further research as well as for the application of such fluids. - Highlights: • The rheology of biocompatible multicore ferrofluids is influenced by magnetic fields. • The flow curves can be described by the Herschel–Bulkley model. • A connection between the magnetoviscous effect and the particle size is found. • The strong magnetoviscous effect exists even if the fluids are diluted. • The connection between the effect and the dilution is mathematically described.

  7. A rheological and microscopical characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing interest in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in the biomedical area. Those ferrofluids are e.g. used for magnetic resonance imaging and emerging research focuses on employing the fluids for magnetic drug targeting or magnetic particle heating as a potential treatment for cancer. For these applications the knowledge of the suspensions' thermophysical properties is of major interest to guarantee a safe and effective application. Therefore the flow behavior cannot be neglected as it might significantly influence the execution of the aforementioned applications. In this experimental study two biocompatible ferrofluids were investigated. Rheological measurements were carried out using rotational rheometry. To allow an interpretation of the fluids' behavior the microscopic make-up was investigated using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Measurements of diluted ferrofluids were carried out as a first step to simulate the rheological behavior reflecting the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles found in blood flow for most biomedical applications of such fluids. The detected strong effects show the potential to significantly influence application and handling of the biocompatible ferrofluids in the medical area and should therefore be taken into account for further research as well as for the application of such fluids. - Highlights: • The rheology of biocompatible multicore ferrofluids is influenced by magnetic fields. • The flow curves can be described by the Herschel–Bulkley model. • A connection between the magnetoviscous effect and the particle size is found. • The strong magnetoviscous effect exists even if the fluids are diluted. • The connection between the effect and the dilution is mathematically described

  8. Synthesis of biocompatible polymers by plasma; Sintesis de polimeros biocompatibles por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin O, E

    2007-07-01

    In this work biocompatible polymers were synthesized by plasma based on pyrrole, ethyleneglycol and allylamine. These monomers are biologically important because they contain oxygen and nitrogen in their structure and they form bonding like; N-H, C-N, C-O and O-H that are also in the human system. The polymers were synthesized with splendor electric discharges to 13.5 MHz, among 10 and 100 W, resistive coupling, pressure of 10{sup -1} mbar and 180 minutes of reaction. The interaction of the biological systems with biomaterials depends in many cases of the properties that present the surfaces, because the rough and/or porous surfaces favor the adherence of cells. The results indicate that the ruggedness of the polymers can be controlled with the synthesis energy, since when modifying it flat and/or rough surfaces they are obtained. The compatibility of water with other solutions that it is a form of increasing the adhesion of cells with biopolymers. The affinity with water and solutions is evaluated calculating the contact angle of the polymers surface with drops of concentration solutions and similar composition to the extracellular liquid of the spinal marrow of the human body. The solutions that were proven were based on NaCl, NaCl-MgSO{sub 4}, and a mixture Krebs-Ringer that has chemical composition and similar concentration to that of the fluids of the spinal marrow. In the Poly pyrrole (PPy)/Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) copolymer, the biggest angles corresponded to the Krebs-Ringer solution, in the interval of 18 to 14 degrees and those lowest to the NaCl solution, of 14.5 at 11 degrees. The Poly allylamine had the more high values with water in the interval of 16.5 to 12.5 degrees and those lowest with the NaCl solution, of 13 at 9.5 degrees. On the other hand, in the derived polymers of pyrrole the more high values corresponded to the treatment with water, until 37, and those lowest to the NaCl-MgSO{sub 4} solution, up to 10. The solutions where participated Na

  9. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ...

  10. Sequential Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) is a novel technique which allows to implement synthetic aperture beamforming on a system with a restricted complexity, and without storing RF-data. The objective is to improve lateral resolution and obtain a more depth independent resolution...

  11. Model Operation of the Strength Properties of Ventplant Biocompatible Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyasnikova A.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A special porous coating is applied on the surface of dental implants to improve it`s biocompatibility. During the maintenance the tensions originate in such coatings, which is added to the residual pressure and significantly reduce the strength of the coatings. It is almost impossible to get the numericalled value of these tensions experimentally, so in this article we solve the problem of mathematical model operation of the tension originating in porous coatings in the process of their forming, and in the course of maintenance

  12. Corrigendum: Softec HD hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens: biocompatibility and precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espandar L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Espandar L, Sikder S, Moshirfar M. Softec HD hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens: biocompatibility and precision. Clin Ophthalmol. 2011;5:65–70.There was an error in the reported optic size of Lenstec’s Softec HD intraocular lens, which was reported to be 5.5 mm in Espandar et al’s work, but is 5.75 mm.Please see the specifications on Lenstec’s Web site for further details (see http://www.lenstec.com/lenstec/hd_specs.html.Read the original article

  13. Biocompatibility of root-end filling materials: recent update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Newaskar, Vilas

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of a root-end filling is to establish a seal between the root canal space and the periradicular tissues. As root-end filling materials come into contact with periradicular tissues, knowledge of the tissue response is crucial. Almost every available dental restorative material has been suggested as the root-end material of choice at a certain point in the past. This literature review on root-end filling materials will evaluate and comparatively analyse the biocompatibility and tissue response to these products, with primary focus on newly introduced materials. PMID:24010077

  14. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  15. Biocompatible layers fabricated using KrF laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Vrbová, M.; Koňařík, D.; Remsa, Jan

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2008 - (Tománek, P.; Senderáková, D.; Hrabovský, M.), 71380G/1-71380G/7. (Proceedings of SPIE. 7138). ISBN 978-0-8194-7379-0. [Photonics Prague 2008 - International Conference on Photonics, Devices and Systems /6./. Prague (CZ), 27.08.2008-29.08.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : biocompatible materials * thin films * PLD * hydroxyapatite * DLC Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.817980

  16. Biodegradable Xylitol-Based Elastomers: In Vivo Behavior and Biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Joost P.; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers based on polycondensation reactions of xylitol with sebacic acid, referred to as poly(xylitol sebacate) (PXS) elastomers have recently been developed. Herein, we describe the in vivo behavior of PXS elastomers. Four PXS elastomers were synthesized, characterized and compared to poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). PXS elastomers displayed a high level of structural integrity and form stability during degradation. The in vivo half-life ranged from approximately 3 to 52 weeks. PXS elastomers exhibited increased biocompatibility compared to PLGA implants. PMID:20540093

  17. Biocompatibility of phosphorylcholine coated stents in normal porcine coronary arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Deirdre; Krabbendam, S.C.; Verdouw, Pieter; Serruys, Patrick; van Vliet, Erwin; Giessen, Wim; Van Beusekom, Heleen

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To improve the biocompatibility of stents using a phosphorylcholine coated stent as a form of biomimicry.
INTERVENTIONS—Implantation of phosphorylcholine coated (n = 20) and non-coated (n = 21) stents was performed in the coronary arteries of 25 pigs. The animals were killed after five days (n = 6), four weeks (n = 7), and 12 weeks (n = 8), and the vessels harvested for histology, scanning electron microscopy, and morphometry.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Stent performance was assessed by ...

  18. Plasma polymerized carvone as an antibacterial and biocompatible coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuen Wah; Siow, Kim Shyong; Ng, Pei Yuen; Gires, Usup; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2016-11-01

    Antibacterial coating is important to prevent the colonization of medical devices by biofilm forming bacteria that would cause infection and sepsis in patients. Current coating techniques such as immobilization of antimicrobial compounds, time-releasing antibiotic agents and silver nanoparticles, require multiple processing steps, and they have low efficacy and low stability. We proposed a single-step plasma polymerization of an essential oil known as carvone to produce a moderately hydrophobic antibacterial coating (ppCar) with an average roughness of cell line. This study would be of interest to researcher keen on producing a bacteria-resistance and biocompatible coating on different substrates in a cost-effective manner. PMID:27524089

  19. Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-06-01

    Nature has evolved complex and elegant materials well suited to fulfill a myriad of functions. Lubricants, structural scaffolds and protective sheaths can all be found in nature, and these provide a rich source of inspiration for the rational design of materials for biomedical applications. Many biological materials are based in some fashion on hydrogels, the crosslinked polymers that absorb and hold water. Biological hydrogels contribute to processes as diverse as mineral nucleation during bone growth and protection and hydration of the cell surface. The carbohydrate layer that coats all living cells, often referred to as the glycocalyx, has hydrogel-like properties that keep cell surfaces well hydrated, segregated from neighboring cells, and resistant to non-specific protein deposition. With the molecular details of cell surface carbohydrates now in hand, adaptation of these structural motifs to synthetic materials is an appealing strategy for improving biocompatibility. The goal of this collaborative project between Prof. Bertozzi's research group, the Center for Advanced Materials at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sunsoft Corporation was the design, synthesis and characterization of novel hydrogel polymers for improved soft contact lens materials. Our efforts were motivated by the urgent need for improved materials that allow extended wear, and essential feature for those whose occupation requires the use of contact lenses rather than traditional spectacles. Our strategy was to transplant the chemical features of cell surface molecules into contact lens materials so that they more closely resemble the tissue in which they reside. Specifically, we integrated carbohydrate molecules similar to those found on cell surfaces, and sulfoxide materials inspired by the properties of the carbohydrates, into hydrogels composed of biocompatible and manufacturable substrates. The new materials were characterized with respect to surface and bulk hydrophilicity

  20. Surface modification of polymers for biocompatibility via exposure to extreme ultraviolet radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahad, I.U.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Korkzyc, Barbara; Ciach, Tomasz; Brabazon, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are being widely used for the treatment of various traumata, diseases and defects in human beings due to ease in their synthesis. As biomaterials have direct interaction with the extracellular environment in the biological world, biocompatibility is a topic of great significance. The introduction or enhancement of biocompatibility in certain polymers is still a challenge to overcome. Polymer biocompatibility can be controlled by surface modification. Various physical an...

  1. In vitro and in vivo ocular biocompatibility of electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibers.

    OpenAIRE

    Da Silva G.R.; Lima T.H.; Oréfice R.L.; Fernandes-Cunha G.M.; Silva-Cunha A.; Zhao M; Behar-Cohen F.

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatibility is a requirement for the development of nanofibers for ophthalmic applications. In this study, nanofibers were elaborated using poly(ε-caprolactone) via electrospinning. The ocular biocompatibility of this material was investigated. MIO-M1 and ARPE-19 cell cultures were incubated with nanofibers and cellular responses were monitored by viability and morphology. The in vitro biocompatibility revealed that the nanofibers were not cytotoxic to the ocular cells. These cells ...

  2. Enhanced biocompatibility for plasmid DNA on patterned TiO2 surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, I.; Subudhi, U.; Varma, Shikha

    2013-08-01

    An enhanced biocompatibility from nanodot patterned TiO2 surfaces, fabricated by ion beam sputtering, has been observed here through its interaction with plasmid DNA. Investigations of the persistence length and the areal conformation of DNA show that the biocompatibility increases with ion fluence. Presence of nanostructures and increased surface roughness, in conjugation with higher oxygen vacancy sites that promote charge transfer from DNA moiety, are responsible for the increased hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of the patterned surfaces.

  3. Biocompatible post-polymerization functionalization of a water soluble poly(p-phenylene ethynylene)

    OpenAIRE

    Swager, Timothy Manning; Vanveller, Brett Steven

    2010-01-01

    A biocompatible post-polymerization functionalization reaction takes advantage of a polymer's structural motif for the controllable attachment of biotin as a model biosensor that responds to streptavidin.

  4. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Scott Carney, P.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light-sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy.

  5. Computing with synthetic protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbet, Alexis; Molina, Franck; Amar, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    In this article we present a new kind of computing device that uses biochemical reactions networks as building blocks to implement logic gates. The architecture of a computing machine relies on these generic and composable building blocks, computation units, that can be used in multiple instances to perform complex boolean functions. Standard logical operations are implemented by biochemical networks, encapsulated and insulated within synthetic vesicles called protocells. These protocells are capable of exchanging energy and information with each other through transmembrane electron transfer. In the paradigm of computation we propose, protoputing, a machine can solve only one problem and therefore has to be built specifically. Thus, the programming phase in the standard computing paradigm is represented in our approach by the set of assembly instructions (specific attachments) that directs the wiring of the protocells that constitute the machine itself. To demonstrate the computing power of protocellular machines, we apply it to solve a NP-complete problem, known to be very demanding in computing power, the 3-SAT problem. We show how to program the assembly of a machine that can verify the satisfiability of a given boolean formula. Then we show how to use the massive parallelism of these machines to verify in less than 20 min all the valuations of the input variables and output a fluorescent signal when the formula is satisfiable or no signal at all otherwise. PMID:25969126

  6. Synthetic plasma ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved crossed-beam charge-exchange ion gun in which a synthetic plasma is formed by injecting an electron beam into a collimated molecular beam just before the molecules are ionized by charge exchange with a crossed primary ion beam, thereby forming a secondary ion beam from the ionized but space-charge-neutralized and substantially undeflected molecular beam. The plasma thus formed extends to an aperture stop in an aperture tube which extends upstream from an anode downstream of which anode a cathode is placed. A field is formed within the cathode/anode space and within the aperture tube into which the plasma extends. The sheath edge of the plasma within the tube is curved by the field to form a meniscus, and the aperture, being smaller in area than the secondary ion beam upstream of the aperture, both collimates the secondary ion beam and acts as a lens stop for the subsequent immersion lens formed by the meniscus and the field region

  7. Synthetic Genetic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Elena; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Genetic interaction studies have been used to characterize unknown genes, assign membership in pathway and complex, and build a comprehensive functional map of a eukaryotic cell. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) methodology automates yeast genetic analysis and enables systematic mapping of genetic interactions. In its simplest form, SGA consists of a series of replica pinning steps that enable construction of haploid double mutants through automated mating and meiotic recombination. Using this method, a strain carrying a query mutation, such as a deletion allele of a nonessential gene or a conditional temperature-sensitive allele of an essential gene, can be crossed to an input array of yeast mutants, such as the complete set of approximately 5000 viable deletion mutants. The resulting output array of double mutants can be scored for genetic interactions based on estimates of cellular fitness derived from colony-size measurements. The SGA score method can be used to analyze large-scale data sets, whereas small-scale data sets can be analyzed using SGAtools, a simple web-based interface that includes all the necessary analysis steps for quantifying genetic interactions. PMID:27037072

  8. Biocompatible and target specific hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei; Li, Weiyi; Rubenstein, David A; Meng, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Atherosclerosis is a major cause for cardiovascular diseases. Drugs that treat atherosclerosis usually act nonspecifically. To enhance drug delivery specificity, the authors developed a hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan (HGC) nanoparticle that can specifically target activated endothelial cells. The biocompatibility of these nanoparticles toward red blood cells and platelets was evaluated through hemolysis, platelet activation, platelet thrombogenicity, and platelet aggregation assays. The biocompatibility of these nanoparticles toward vascular endothelial cells was evaluated by their effects on endothelial cell growth, metabolic activity, and activation. The results demonstrated that HGC nanoparticles did not cause hemolysis, or affect platelet activation, thrombogenicity, and aggregation capability in vitro. The nanoparticles did not impair vascular endothelial cell growth or metabolic activities in vitro, and did not cause cell activation either. When conjugated with intercellular adhesion molecular 1 antibodies, HGC nanoparticles showed a significantly increased targeting specificity toward activated endothelial cells. These results suggested that HGC nanoparticles are likely compatible toward red blood cells, platelets, and endothelial cells, and they can be potentially used to identify activated endothelial cells at atherosclerotic lesion areas within the vasculature, and deliver therapeutic drugs. PMID:27126597

  9. Dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in biocompatible dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to their phenomenal electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been an area of intense research since their discovery in 1991. Different applications for these nanoparticles have been proposed, among others, in electronics and optics but also in the medical field. In parallel, emerging studies have suggested potential toxic effects of CNT while others did not, generating some conflicting outcomes. These discrepancies could be, in part, due to different suspension approaches used and to the agglomeration state of CNT in solution. In this study, we described a standardized protocol to obtain stable CNT suspensions, using two biocompatible dispersants (Pluronic F108 and hydroxypropylcellulose) and to estimate the concentration of CNT in solution. CNT appear to be greatly individualized in these two dispersants with no detection of remaining bundles or agglomerates after sonication and centrifugation. Moreover, CNT remained perfectly dispersed when added to culture medium used for in vitro cell experiments. We also showed that Pluronic F108 is a better dispersant than hydroxypropylcellulose. In conclusion, we have developed a standardized protocol using biocompatible surfactants to obtain reproducible and stable multi-walled carbon nanotubes suspensions which can be used for in vitro or in vivo toxicological studies.

  10. Biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles for in vivo stem cell tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient application of stem cells to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases requires safe cell tracking to follow stem cell fate over time in the host environment after transplantation. In this work, for the first time, fluorescent and biocompatible methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based nanoparticles (fluoNPs) were synthesized through a free-radical co-polymerization process with a fluorescent macromonomer obtained by linking Rhodamine B and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. We demonstrate that the fluoNPs produced by polymerization of MMA–Rhodamine complexes (1) were efficient for the labeling and tracking of multipotent human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs); (2) did not alter the main biological features of hAFCs (such as viability, cell growth and metabolic activity); (3) enabled us to determine the longitudinal bio-distribution of hAFCs in different brain areas after graft in the brain ventricles of healthy mice by a direct fluorescence-based technique. The reliability of our approach was furthermore confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging analyses, carried out by incubating hAFCs with both superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and fluoNPs. Our data suggest that these finely tunable and biocompatible fluoNPs can be exploited for the longitudinal tracking of stem cells. (paper)

  11. Polymeric barrier membranes for device packaging, diffusive control and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current state-of-the-art implantable micron feature electronic devices are capable of monitoring and stimulating functions in vivo. Within an EU Framework VI project a further step was taken in developing key microsystem technologies and communication methods that could bring intelligence directly to the human interface, in the form of reactive medical implants and ambulatory measurement systems. Information from these devices is planned to be transmitted out into the wider environment for remote processing. However, the packaging of such state-of-the-art devices to enhance tissue biocompatibility, and to protect conducting elements from in vivo corrosion during extended use, along with protecting the body from toxins leaching from implant components, remains a concern. Candidate polymeric barriers as hydration resistant and solute impermeable interfaces to mitigate such major problems of chronic implantation were investigated. Materials studied included silicone rubber, PVC, polyurethane, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). Polymer permeability to water solutes was marginally improved through incorporation of lipid into these structures. Surface biocompatibility was assessed on the basis of protein film deposition in vitro and by cell viability studies in tissue culture. Short-term toxicity was not observed for any of the tested materials, though there were substantial differences in hydration. Additionally, polypyrrole over active electrodes shows feasibility for controlled tissue interfacing whilst retaining electrical conductivity

  12. Biocompatible Coating of Encapsulated Cells Using Ionotropic Gelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, Friederike; Mettler, Esther; Böse, Thomas; Weber, Matthias Max; Vásquez, Julio Alberto; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The technique of immunoisolated transplantation has seen in the last twenty years improvements in biocompatibility, long term stability and methods for avoidance of fibrosis in alginate capsules. However, two major problems are not yet solved: living cellular material that is not centered in the capsule is not properly protected from the hosts’ immune system and the total transplant volume needs to be reduced. To solve these problems, we present a method for applying fully biocompatible alginate multilayers to a barium-alginate core without the use of polycations. We report on the factors that influence layer formation and stability and can therefore provide data for full adjustability of the additional layer. Although known for yeast and plant cells, this technique has not previously been demonstrated with mammalian cells or ultra-high viscous alginates. Viability of murine insulinoma cells was investigated by live-dead staining and live cell imaging, for murine Langerhans’ islets viability and insulin secretion have been measured. No hampering effects of the second alginate layer were found. This multi-layer technique therefore has great potential for clinical and in vitro use and is likely to be central in alginate matrix based immunoisolated cell therapy. PMID:24039964

  13. Biodegradation and biocompatibility of mechanically active magnetoelastic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetoelastic (ME) materials have many advantages for use as sensors and actuators due to their wireless, passive nature. This paper describes the application of ME materials as biodegradable implants with controllable degradation rates. Experiments have been conducted to show that degradation rates of ME materials are dependent on the material compositions. In addition, it was shown that the degradation rates of the ME materials can be controlled remotely by applying a magnetic field, which causes the ME materials to generate low-magnitude vibrations that hasten their degradation rates. Another concern of ME materials for medical applications is biocompatibility. Indirect cytotoxicity analyses were performed on two types of ME materials: Metglas™ 2826 MB (FeNiMoB) and iron–gallium alloy. While results indicate Metglas is not biocompatible, the degradation products of iron–gallium materials have shown no adverse effects on cell viability. Overall, these results present the possibility of using ME materials as biodegradable, magnetically-controlled active implants. (paper)

  14. Preparation of biocompatible structural gradient coatings on pure titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Guang-xin; ZHANG Ren-ji; YAN Yong-nian

    2004-01-01

    In order to overcome the poor osteo-inductive properties of titanium implant, some methods have been used. The efforts to improve implant biocompatibility and durability by applying a hybrid technique of composite oxidation (pre-anodic and micro-arc oxidation) and hydrothermal treatment were described. Pure titanium was used as the substrate material. An oxalic acid was used as the electrolyte for the pre-anodic oxidation. A calcium and phosphate salt solution was acted as the electrolyte of micro-arc oxidation and the common pure water was used for hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coatings. The results show that a compact TiO2 film can be made by pre-anodic oxidation, which is effective as chemical barriers against the in-vivo release of metal ions from the implants. A porous TiO2 coating can be produced by micro-arc oxidation on titanium plate, which is beneficial to bone tissue growth and enhancing anchorage of implant to bone. De-calcium HA can be formed on the coating using hydrothermal treatment, which is similar with the primary component of bone and has a very good osteo-inductivity.The porous gradient titania coating made by the hybrid oxidation and hydrothermal treatment should show good biocompatibility in the environment of the human body.

  15. Synthetic biology: advancing biological frontiers by building synthetic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonne Yu-Hsuan; Galloway, Kate E.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology are contributing to diverse research areas, from basic biology to biomanufacturing and disease therapy. We discuss the theoretical foundation, applications, and potential of this emerging field.

  16. A Course on Synthetic Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Howard S.; Tomkins, Reginald P. T.

    1985-01-01

    A senior-level, elective course on synthetic fuels was developed for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. The topics covered in this course, instructional strategies used, and independent student projects are described. (JN)

  17. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    OpenAIRE

    Rosner, V.; Seller, R.; L. Dudas; Kazi, K.; Miko, G.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  18. Novel biocompatible materials for in vivo two-photon polymerisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-photon polymerisation (2PP) is a versatile laser fabrication technique that allows the creation of 3D structures at micro- and nanometre precision. The structures are created additively in direct accordance to a computer-aided design (CAD). It requires tightly focused fs-pulsed light sources usually operating in the near infrared wavelength range. In this region, biological tissues exhibit a window of transparency and only absorb light minimally. When operating below a certain pulse energy threshold, the laser light does not cause any cellular damage. This theoretically allows inducing 2PP in the presence of living biological tissues and cells. Suitable biocompatible formulations that can render bioactive constructs would potentially allow building a dynamic environment with topographical, chemical and mechanical cues similar to that of the natural extracellular matrix. In that way, 2PP would allow to alter key elements of this environment without changing any other influencing factors. To explore these possibilities, 2PP has to overcome two main limitations, the slow process speeds and the lack of available optimised formulations. In this thesis, we report the design and realisation of a 2PP experimental setup, which allows fabricating hydrogel structures from novel water-based formulations. Writing speeds of above 100 mm/s are feasible, which is the highest speed reported in 2PP. Moreover, the presented components have the potential to be formed in vivo, in the presence of living cells and tissues. Using water-soluble two-photon optimised photoinitiators, we could effectively cross-link acrylates in formulations of up to 80% water content. As acrylates show a tendency towards Michael addition to proteins, we explored the use of vinyl ester and vinyl carbonate monomers for 2PP. In contrast to acrylic polymers, which form potentially toxic poly (acrylic acid), vinyl ester and carbonate polymers form biocompatible poly (vinyl alcohol) during degradation

  19. Green chemistry approach for the synthesis of biocompatible graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Jin-Hoi Kim Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea Background: Graphene is a single-atom thick, two-dimensional sheet of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms isolated from its three-dimensional parent material, graphite. One of the most common methods for preparation of graphene is chemical exfoliation of graphite using powerful oxidizing agents. Generally, graphene is synthesized through deoxygenation of graphene oxide (GO by using hydrazine, which is one of the most widespread and strongest reducing agents. Due to the high toxicity of hydrazine, it is not a promising reducing agent in large-scale production of graphene; therefore, this study focused on a green or sustainable synthesis of graphene and the biocompatibility of graphene in primary mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (PMEFs. Methods: Here, we demonstrated a simple, rapid, and green chemistry approach for the synthesis of reduced GO (rGO from GO using triethylamine (TEA as a reducing agent and stabilizing agent. The obtained TEA reduced GO (TEA-rGO was characterized by ultraviolet (UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, particle size dynamic light scattering (DLS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Results: The transition of graphene oxide to graphene was confirmed by UV–visible spectroscopy. XRD and SEM were used to investigate the crystallinity of graphene and the surface morphologies of prepared graphene respectively. The formation of defects further supports the functionalization of graphene as indicated in the Raman spectrum of TEA-rGO. Surface morphology and the thickness of the GO and TEA-rGO were analyzed using AFM. The presented results suggest that TEA-rGO shows significantly more biocompatibility with PMEFs cells than GO. Conclusion: This is the first report about using TEA as a reducing as well as a stabilizing agent for the

  20. Translational Applications of Nanodiamonds: From Biocompatibility to Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura Kent

    Nanotechnology marks the next phase of development for drug delivery, contrast agents and gene therapy. For these novel systems to achieve success in clinical translation we must see that they are both effective and safe. Diamond nanoparticles, also known as nanodiamonds (NDs), have been gaining popularity as molecular delivery vehicles over the last decade. The uniquely faceted, carbon nanoparticles possess a number of beneficial properties that are being harnessed for applications ranging from small-molecule drug delivery to biomedical imaging and gene therapy. In addition to improving the effectiveness of a variety of therapeutics and contrast agents, initial studies indicate that NDs are biocompatible. In this work we evaluate the translational potential of NDs by demonstrating efficacy in molecular delivery and scrutinizing particle tolerance. Previous work has demonstrated that NDs are effective vehicles for the delivery of anthracycline chemotherapeutics and gadolinium(III) based contrast agents. We have sought to enhance the gains made in both areas through the addition of active targeting. We find that ND-mediated targeted delivery of epirubicin to triple negative breast cancers induces tumor regression and virtually eliminates drug toxicities. Additionally, ND-mediated delivery of the MRI contrast agent ProGlo boosts the per gadolinium relaxivity four fold, eliminates water solubility issues and effectively labels progesterone receptor expressing breast cancer cells. Both strategies open the door to the development of targeted, theranostic constructs based on NDs, capable of treating and labeling breast cancers at the same time. Although we have seen that NDs are effective vehicles for molecular delivery, for any nanoparticle to achieve clinical utility it must be biocompatible. Preliminary research has shown that NDs are non-toxic, however only a fraction of the ND-subtypes have been evaluated. Here we present an in depth analysis of the cellular

  1. Whole genome expression profiling using DNA microarray for determining biocompatibility of polymeric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Wang, Zhenyu; Kutter, Jörg Peter;

    2006-01-01

    There is an ever increasing need to find surfaces that are biocompatible for applications like medical implants and microfluidics-based cell culture systems. The biocompatibility of five different surfaces with different hydrophobicity was determined using gene expression profiling as well as more...

  2. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers.

  3. Rapid Biocompatibility Analysis of Materials via In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Dang, Tram T.; Lyle, Stephen; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many materials are unsuitable for medical use because of poor biocompatibility. Recently, advances in the high throughput synthesis of biomaterials has significantly increased the number of potential biomaterials, however current biocompatibility analysis methods are slow and require histological analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we develop rapid, non-invasive methods for in vivo quantification of the inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials. Material...

  4. Synthetic Biology: Integrated Gene Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Nandagopal, Nagarajan; Michael B Elowitz

    2011-01-01

    A major goal of synthetic biology is to develop a deeper understanding of biological design principles from the bottom up, by building circuits and studying their behavior in cells. Investigators initially sought to design circuits “from scratch” that functioned as independently as possible from the underlying cellular system. More recently, researchers have begun to develop a new generation of synthetic circuits that integrate more closely with endogenous cellular processes. These approaches...

  5. Compounding in synthetic aperture imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-09-01

    A method for obtaining compound images using synthetic aperture data is investigated using a convex array transducer. The new approach allows spatial compounding to be performed for any number of angles without reducing the frame rate or temporal resolution. This important feature is an intrinsic property of how the compound images are constructed using synthetic aperture data and an improvement compared with how spatial compounding is obtained using conventional methods. The synthetic aperture compound images are created by exploiting the linearity of delay-and-sum beamformation for data collected from multiple spherical emissions to synthesize multiple transmit and receive apertures, corresponding to imaging the tissue from multiple directions. The many images are added incoherently, to produce a single compound image. Using a 192-element, 3.5-MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated from tissue-phantom measurements that the speckle is reduced and the contrast resolution improved when applying synthetic aperture compound imaging. At a depth of 4 cm, the size of the synthesized apertures is optimized for lesion detection based on the speckle information density. This is a performance measure for tissue contrast resolution which quantifies the tradeoff between resolution loss and speckle reduction. The speckle information density is improved by 25% when comparing synthetic aperture compounding to a similar setup for compounding using dynamic receive focusing. The cystic resolution and clutter levels are measured using a wire phantom setup and compared with conventional application of the array, as well as to synthetic aperture imaging without compounding. If the full aperture is used for synthetic aperture compounding, the cystic resolution is improved by 41% compared with conventional imaging, and is at least as good as what can be obtained using synthetic aperture imaging without compounding. PMID:23007781

  6. Synthetic Life: Our Hybrid Future

    OpenAIRE

    Rickus, Jenna

    2014-01-01

    Several fields of science and engineering, including synthetic biology, neuroengineering, computer science, and nanotechnology, are working toward the creation of new forms of and modifications to life. This session will explore what we can do now to create synthetic life, what has already been done, and what we might do in the future. The session will include a discussion on possible frameworks for how science and society can responsibly move forward together.

  7. Synthetic aperture controlled source electromagnetics

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Y.; Snieder, R.; Slob, E.; Hunziker, J.W.; Singer, J.; Sheiman, J.; Rosenquist, M.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled‐source electromagnetics (CSEM) has been used as a de‐risking tool in the hydrocarbon exploration industry. Although there have been successful applications of CSEM, this technique is still not widely used in the industry because the limited types of hydrocarbon reservoirs CSEM can detect. In this paper, we apply the concept of synthetic aperture to CSEM data. Synthetic aperture allows us to design sources with specific radiation patterns for different purposes. The ability to detec...

  8. SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

    2009-10-26

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall

  9. Recent Advances in Synthetic Bioelastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tian

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the degradability of chemically synthesized bioelastomers, mainly designed for soft tissue repair. These bioelastomers involve biodegradable polyurethanes, polyphosphazenes, linear and crosslinked poly(ether/esters, poly(ε-caprolactone copolymers, poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate and their copolymers, poly(polyol sebacates, poly(diol-citrates and poly(ester amides. The in vitro and in vivo degradation mechanisms and impact factors influencing degradation behaviors are discussed. In addition, the molecular designs, synthesis methods, structure properties, mechanical properties, biocompatibility and potential applications of these bioelastomers were also presented.

  10. Biocompatibility and tissue interactions of a new filler material for medical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarini, Elena; Supino, Rosanna; Pratesi, Graziella; Laccabue, Diletta; Tortoreto, Monica; Scanziani, Eugenio; Ghisleni, Gabriele; Paltrinieri, Saverio; Tunesi, Gianfranco; Nava, Maurizio

    2004-09-15

    Filler materials for medical use present limits, such as the induction of chronic inflammation and fibrosis. In the search for synthetic materials with improved biocompatible properties, a new polyacrylamide hydrogel, Aquamid (Contura SA, Montreux, Switzerland), has been investigated in preclinical systems. In cell cultures (endothelial cells and fibroblast), no or only transient biological effects were associated with 10% Aquamid exposure. The Aquamid-host interactions were examined in mice (10 mice per group) implanted subcutaneously or in the mammary fat pad with a very large volume (1.5 ml) of the material. Blood analysis, performed after 15 and 94 days (five mice per time for each group) to detect acute or late manifestations of toxicity, did not reveal relevant abnormalities in either group of Aquamid-bearing mice compared with control mice, except for a transient thrombocytopenia and a mild leukocytosis. Histological analysis of the pellet showed the presence of a thin, poorly vascularized cyst wall in implants. Only mild mesenchymal reparative and inflammatory processes were observed, even at longer observation times (more than 400 days). No alterations in any organ were detected. Despite the large volume implanted (approximately 5 percent of mouse body weight), the Aquamid pellet maintained its original size and shape without spreading or sticking to surrounding tissues. In conclusion, the study indicated a good tolerability of the new biopolymer in preclinical systems. The clinical utility of this new compound, if confirmed by clinical randomized trials showing its atoxic properties, could be in the field of aesthetic plastic surgery as a filler material for body contouring and in reconstructive surgery and above all in cancer patients to restore surgical defects. PMID:15468401

  11. Synthesis and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of biocompatible branched copolymer nanocontrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson AW

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander W Jackson,1,* Prashant Chandrasekharan,2,* Jian Shi,3 Steven P Rannard,4 Quan Liu,5 Chang-Tong Yang,6 Tao He1,7 1Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences (ICES, 2Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A* STAR, 3Department of Biological Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 4Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; 5School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 7School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, HeFei University of Technology, Anhui, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Branched copolymer nanoparticles (Dh =20–35 nm possessing 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid macrocycles within their cores have been synthesized and applied as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI nanosized contrast agents in vivo. These nanoparticles have been generated from novel functional monomers via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The process is very robust and synthetically straightforward. Chelation with gadolinium and preliminary in vivo experiments have demonstrated promising characteristics as MRI contrast agents with prolonged blood retention time, good biocompatibility, and an intravascular distribution. The ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively target tumor cells through the enhanced permeability and retention effect is also demonstrated. These novel highly functional nanoparticle platforms have succinimidyl ester-activated benzoate functionalities within their corona, which make them suitable for future peptide conjugation and subsequent active cell-targeted MRI or the conjugation of fluorophores for bimodal imaging. We have also demonstrated that these branched copolymer nanoparticles are able to noncovalently

  12. Softec HD hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens: biocompatibility and precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Espandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ladan Espandar1, Shameema Sikder2, Majid Moshirfar31Department of Ophthalmology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: Intraocular lens development is driven by higher patient expectations for ideal visual outcomes. The recently US Food and Drug Administration-approved Softec HD™ lens is an aspheric, hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens (IOL. The hydrophilic design of the lens is optimized to address dysphotopsia while maintaining biocompatibility, optical clarity, resistance to damage, and resistance to biocontamination. Aspheric lenses decrease postoperative spherical aberration. The addition of the Softec lens provides clinicians with another option for IOL placement; however, randomized comparative studies of this lens to others already on the market remain to be completed.Keywords: hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens, Softec HD intraocular lens, aspheric intraocular lens, IOL

  13. Rapid microfabrication of solvent-resistant biocompatible microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Lung-Hsin; Lin, Robert; Lee, Abraham Phillip

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a rapid, simple, and low-cost fabrication method to prepare solvent resistant and biocompatible microfluidic devices with three-dimensional geometries. The devices were fabricated in thiolene and replicated from PDMS master with high molding fidelity. Good chemical compatibility for organic solvents allows volatile chemicals in synthesis and analysis applications. The surface can be processed to be hydrophobic or hydrophilic for water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. Monodisperse organic solvent droplet generation is demonstrated to be reproducible in thiolene microchannels without swelling. The thiolene surface prevents cell adhesion but normal cell growth and adhesion on glass substrates is not affected by the adjacent thiolene patterns. PMID:18497921

  14. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of direct and indirect pulp capping materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Cristina da Silva Modena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There are several studies about the cytotoxic effects of dental materials in contact with the pulp tissue, such as calcium hydroxide (CH, adhesive systems, resin composite and glass ionomer cements. The aim of this review article was to summarize and discuss the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of materials used for protection of the dentin-pulp complex, some components of resin composites and adhesive systems when placed in direct or indirect contact with the pulp tissue. A large number of dental materials present cytotoxic effects when applied close or directly to the pulp, and the only material that seems to stimulate early pulp repair and dentin hard tissue barrier formation is CH.

  15. Biocompatibility of epoxidized styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer (SBS) membrane was prepared by solution casting method and then was epoxidized with peroxyformic acid generated in situ to yield the epoxidized styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer membrane (ESBS). The structure and properties of ESBS were characterized with infrared spectroscopy, Universal Testing Machine, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The performances of contact angle, water content, protein adsorption, and water vapor transmission rate on ESBS membrane were determined. After epoxidation, the hydrophilicity of the membrane increased. The water vapor transmission rate of ESBS membrane is similar to human skin. The biocompatibility of ESBS membrane was evaluated with the cell culture of fibroblasts on the membrane. It revealed that the cells not only remained viable but also proliferated on the surface of the various ESBS membranes and the population doubling time for fibroblast culture decreased.

  16. Vertically, interconnected carbon nanowalls as biocompatible scaffolds for osteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Raluca; Vizireanu, Sorin; Luculescu, Catalin; Cimpean, Anisoara; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2016-07-01

    The response of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts to vertically aligned, interconnected carbon nanowalls prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrate has been evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, viability and cell proliferation. The behavior of osteoblasts seeded on carbon nanowalls was analyzed in parallel and compared with the behavior of the cells maintained in contact with tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The results demonstrate that osteoblasts adhere and remain viable in the long term on carbon nanowalls. Moreover, on the investigated scaffold cell proliferation was significantly promoted, although to a lower extent than on TCPS. Overall, the successful culture of osteoblasts on carbon nanowalls coated substrate confirms the biocompatibility of this scaffold, which could have potential applications in the development of orthopedic biomaterials.

  17. High content analysis of the biocompatibility of nickel nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Fiona [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: fibyrne@tcd.ie; Prina-Mello, Adriele [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Whelan, Aine [CRANN and School of Chemistry, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mohamed, Bashir M.; Davies, Anthony [Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Health Sciences Centre, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Gun' ko, Yurii K. [CRANN and School of Chemistry, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Coey, J.M.D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Volkov, Yuri [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Health Sciences Centre, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2009-05-15

    Nickel nanowires, 20 {mu}m long and 200 nm in diameter, were fabricated by electrodeposition into alumina templates, and characterised by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility studies of nickel nanowires with differentiated THP-1 cell line-derived macrophages were carried out. From a multiparametric assay, using high content analysis (HCA), the critical time points and concentrations of nickel nanowires on THP-1 cellular response were identified. The nanowires displayed little or no toxic effects on THP-1 cells over short incubation times (10 h), and at low concentrations (<100 nanowires per cell). Our findings indicate the potential suitability of these wires for biological and clinical applications.

  18. 3D Printing of Biocompatible Supramolecular Polymers and their Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lewis R; Li, Siwei; Sturgess, Craig; Wildman, Ricky; Jones, Julian R; Hayes, Wayne

    2016-02-10

    A series of polymers capable of self-assembling into infinite networks via supramolecular interactions have been designed, synthesized, and characterized for use in 3D printing applications. The biocompatible polymers and their composites with silica nanoparticles were successfully utilized to deposit both simple cubic structures, as well as a more complex twisted pyramidal feature. The polymers were found to be not toxic to a chondrogenic cell line, according to ISO 10993-5 and 10993-12 standard tests and the cells attached to the supramolecular polymers as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Silica nanoparticles were then dispersed within the polymer matrix, yielding a composite material which was optimized for inkjet printing. The hybrid material showed promise in preliminary tests to facilitate the 3D deposition of a more complex structure. PMID:26766139

  19. Motion Control of Urea-Powered Biocompatible Hollow Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xing; Wang, Xu; Hahn, Kersten; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-03-22

    The quest for biocompatible microswimmers powered by compatible fuel and with full motion control over their self-propulsion is a long-standing challenge in the field of active matter and microrobotics. Here, we present an active hybrid microcapsule motor based on Janus hollow mesoporous silica microparticles powered by the biocatalytic decomposition of urea at physiological concentrations. The directional self-propelled motion lasts longer than 10 min with an average velocity of up to 5 body lengths per second. Additionally, we control the velocity of the micromotor by chemically inhibiting and reactivating the enzymatic activity of urease. The incorporation of magnetic material within the Janus structure provides remote magnetic control on the movement direction. Furthermore, the mesoporous/hollow structure can load both small molecules and larger particles up to hundreds of nanometers, making the hybrid micromotor an active and controllable drug delivery microsystem. PMID:26863183

  20. Biocompatible benzocyclobutene-based intracortical neural implant with surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keekeun; Massia, Stephen; He, Jiping

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of a benzocyclobutene (BCB) polymer-based intracortical neural implant for reliable and stable long-term implant function. BCB polymer has many attractive features for chronic implant application: flexibility, biocompatibility, low moisture uptake, low dielectric constant and easy surface modification. A 2 µm thick silicon backbone layer was attached underneath a flexible BCB electrode to improve mechanical stiffness. No insertion trauma was observed during penetrating into the dura of a rat. In vitro cytotoxicity tests of the completed BCB electrode revealed no toxic effects on cultured cells. The modified BCB surface with a dextran coating showed a significant reduction in 3T3 cell adhesion and spreading, indicating that this coating has the potential for lowering protein adsorption, minimizing inflammatory cell adhesion and glial scar formation in vivo, and thereby enhancing long-term implant performance.

  1. Preparation and biocompatibility of BSA monolayer on silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Caihong; Zhang, Junyan; Yang, Shengrong

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a general strategy for grafting protein molecules on silicon surface by using dopamine as adhesive layer. With this method, silicon surface had been successfully modified by BSA monolayer. Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle analysis and atomic force microscopy confirmed the sequential grafting of initiator and protein molecules. Cell adhesion experiments with PC-12 cells showed that the obtained monolayer exhibits good biocompatibility. The corrosion resistance behavior of the polydopamine and BSA modified silicon wafers was investigated by potentiodynamic test, which indicated that the modified surfaces exhibited a better anti-corrosion capability than silicon surface. All these results must be valuable for the application of protein monolayer in biological and biomedical technology. PMID:21770145

  2. How hydrophobically modified chitosans are stabilized by biocompatible lipid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Nino; Frielinghaus, Heide; Vitiello, Giuseppe; D'Errico, Gerardino; Leal, Leslie G; Richter, Dieter; Ortona, Ornella; Paduano, Luigi

    2015-08-15

    Nanostructured hydrogels composed by biocompatible molecules are formulated and characterized. They are based on a polymer network formed by hydrophobically modified chitosans (HMCHIT or CnCHIT) in which vesicles of monoolein (MO) and oleic acid or sodium oleate (NaO), depending on pH, are embedded. The best conditions for gel formation, in terms of pH, length of the hydrophobic moieties of chitosan, and weight proportion among the three components were estimated by visual inspection of a large number of samples. Among all possible combinations, the system C12CHIT-MO-NaO in the weight proportion (1:1:1) is optimal for the formation of a well-structured gel-like system, which is also confirmed by rheological experiments. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements unambiguously show the presence of lipid bilayers in this mixture, indicating that MO-NaO vesicles are stabilized by C12CHIT even at acid pH. A wide small angle neutron scattering investigation performed on several ternary systems of general formula CnCHIT-MO-NaO shows that the length of the hydrophobic tail Cn is a crucial parameter in stabilizing the polymer network in which lipid vesicles are embedded. Structural parameters for the vesicles are determined by using a multilamellar model that admits the possibility of displacement of the center of each shell. The number of shells tends to be reduced by increasing the polymer content. The thickness and the distance between consecutive lamellae are not influenced by either the polymer or MO-NaO concentration. The hydrogel presented in this work, being fully biocompatible and nanostructured, is well-suited for possible application in drug delivery. PMID:25935287

  3. Biocompatibility of chitosan/Mimosa tenuiflora scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The porosity of the composites allow biological processes for the cell adaptation on the scaffolds. • The composites improve the viability and proliferation of cells. • Composition of the scaffold plays an important role in the biocompatibility. • The results indicate that Mimosa Tenuiflora can induce the differentiation of osteoblast cells. - Abstract: In search of a plant that exhibits osteogenic activity, Mimosa tenuiflora (M. tenuiflora) cortex represents the opportunity to create a biomaterial that, together with the chitosan, is osteoconductive and promote better and rapid regeneration of bone tissue. Thus, the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex fabricated will have properties of biocompatibility and allow the osteoblast proliferation. Composites were developed with different concentrations of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex (w/w) using thermally induced phase separation technique (TIPS). To analyze the effects of composite on osteoblasts, primary cultures, each sample was collected on days 1, 3 and 7 after seeding. The evaluation of composites consisted of viability and proliferation tests in which we observed the metabolic activity of the cells using MTT reagent and determined the DNA concentration by means of fluorescence. The expression of the marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using p-nitrophenyl phosphate was examined, allowing the observation to the activity of proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. Moreover, an analysis of biomineralization was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that 80/20 chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex biocomposite has the best performance with osteoblasts compared to biomaterials 100/0 and 70/30 chitosan/M. tenuiflora composites. Finally, it was determined that the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex presents no cytotoxicity and increases the capacity of the osteoblasts

  4. Designing biocompatible Ti-based metallic glasses for implant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti-based metallic glasses show high potential for implant applications; they overcome in several crucial respects their well-established biocompatible crystalline counterparts, e.g. improved corrosion properties, higher fracture strength and wear resistance, increased elastic strain range and lower Young's modulus. However, some of the elements required for glass formation (e.g. Cu, Ni) are harmful for the human body. We critically reviewed the biological safety and glass forming tendency in Ti of 27 elements. This can be used as a basis for the future designing of novel amorphous Ti-based implant alloys entirely free of harmful additions. In this paper, two first alloys were developed: Ti75Zr10Si15 and Ti60Nb15Zr10Si15. The overheating temperature of the melt before casting can be used as the controlling parameter to produce fully amorphous materials or bcc-Ti-phase reinforced metallic glass nano-composites. The beneficial effect of Nb addition on the glass-formation and amorphous phase stability was assessed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Crystallization and mechanical behavior of ribbons are influenced by the amount and distribution of the nano-scaled bcc phase existing in the as-cast state. Their electrochemical stability in Ringer's solution at 310 K was found to be significantly better than that of commercial Ti-based biomaterials; no indication for pitting corrosion was recorded. Highlights: ► Link between biocompatibility and glass-forming ability of alloying additions in Ti ► Selection of Ti–Zr–Si and Ti–Zr–Nb–Si glass-forming alloys ► Two novel glassy alloys were developed: Ti75Zr10Si15 and Ti60Nb15Zr10Si15. ► Glass-formation, thermal stability, corrosion and mechanical behavior were studied. ► Assessing the suitability for orthopedic applications.

  5. Biocompatibility of chitosan/Mimosa tenuiflora scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel-Estrada, Santos Adriana [Instituto de arquitectura diseño y arte, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ave. Del Charro #610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Rodríguez-Espinoza, Brenda [Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Anillo envolvente del PRONAF y Estocolmo, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Santos-Rodríguez, Elí [ICTP Meso-American Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP-MCTP)/Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Ciudad Universitaria, Carretera Zapata Km. 4, Real del Bosque (Terán), C.P. 29040 Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Jiménez-Vega, Florinda [Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Anillo envolvente del PRONAF y Estocolmo, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); García-Casillas, Perla E.; Martínez-Pérez, Carlos A. [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ave. Del Charro #610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The porosity of the composites allow biological processes for the cell adaptation on the scaffolds. • The composites improve the viability and proliferation of cells. • Composition of the scaffold plays an important role in the biocompatibility. • The results indicate that Mimosa Tenuiflora can induce the differentiation of osteoblast cells. - Abstract: In search of a plant that exhibits osteogenic activity, Mimosa tenuiflora (M. tenuiflora) cortex represents the opportunity to create a biomaterial that, together with the chitosan, is osteoconductive and promote better and rapid regeneration of bone tissue. Thus, the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex fabricated will have properties of biocompatibility and allow the osteoblast proliferation. Composites were developed with different concentrations of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex (w/w) using thermally induced phase separation technique (TIPS). To analyze the effects of composite on osteoblasts, primary cultures, each sample was collected on days 1, 3 and 7 after seeding. The evaluation of composites consisted of viability and proliferation tests in which we observed the metabolic activity of the cells using MTT reagent and determined the DNA concentration by means of fluorescence. The expression of the marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using p-nitrophenyl phosphate was examined, allowing the observation to the activity of proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. Moreover, an analysis of biomineralization was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that 80/20 chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex biocomposite has the best performance with osteoblasts compared to biomaterials 100/0 and 70/30 chitosan/M. tenuiflora composites. Finally, it was determined that the composite of chitosan/M. tenuiflora cortex presents no cytotoxicity and increases the capacity of the osteoblasts

  6. Biocompatibility of Advanced Manufactured Titanium Implants—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred T. Sidambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium (Ti and its alloys may be processed via advanced powder manufacturing routes such as additive layer manufacturing (or 3D printing or metal injection moulding. This field is receiving increased attention from various manufacturing sectors including the medical devices sector. It is possible that advanced manufacturing techniques could replace the machining or casting of metal alloys in the manufacture of devices because of associated advantages that include design flexibility, reduced processing costs, reduced waste, and the opportunity to more easily manufacture complex or custom-shaped implants. The emerging advanced manufacturing approaches of metal injection moulding and additive layer manufacturing are receiving particular attention from the implant fabrication industry because they could overcome some of the difficulties associated with traditional implant fabrication techniques such as titanium casting. Using advanced manufacturing, it is also possible to produce more complex porous structures with improved mechanical performance, potentially matching the modulus of elasticity of local bone. While the economic and engineering potential of advanced manufacturing for the manufacture of musculo-skeletal implants is therefore clear, the impact on the biocompatibility of the materials has been less investigated. In this review, the capabilities of advanced powder manufacturing routes in producing components that are suitable for biomedical implant applications are assessed with emphasis placed on surface finishes and porous structures. Given that biocompatibility and host bone response are critical determinants of clinical performance, published studies of in vitro and in vivo research have been considered carefully. The review concludes with a future outlook on advanced Ti production for biomedical implants using powder metallurgy.

  7. Hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of antibacterial biomimetic hybrid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous work, we developed novel antibacterial hybrid coatings based on dextran containing dispersed Ag NPs (∼ 5 nm, DEX-Ag) aimed to offer dual protection against two of the most common complications associated with implant surgery, infections and rejection of the implant. However, their blood-material interactions are unknown. In this study, we assess the hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of DEX-Ag using fresh blood and two cell lines of the immune system, monocytes (THP-1 cells) and macrophages (PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells). Glass, polyurethane (PU) and bare dextran (DEX) were used as reference surfaces. PU, DEX and DEX-Ag exhibited non-hemolytic properties. Relative to glass (100%), platelet attachment on PU, DEX and DEX-Ag was 15%, 10% and 34%, respectively. Further, we assessed cell morphology and viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (TNF-α and IL-1β), pro-inflammatory eicosanoid expression (Prostaglandin E2, PGE2) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide and H2O2) following incubation of the cells with the surfaces. The morphology and cell viability of THP-1 cells were not affected by DEX-Ag whereas DEX-Ag minimized spreading of PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells and caused a reduction in cell viability (16% relative to other surfaces). Although DEX-Ag slightly enhanced release of ROS, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained minimal with similar levels of PGE2, as compared to the other surfaces studied. These results highlight low toxicity of DEX-Ag and hold promise for future applications in vivo. - Highlights: • We examined specific blood-contact reactions of dextran doped with Ag NPs coatings. • Biocompatibility was assessed with THP-1 cells and PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. • Glass, polyurethane and dextran were used as reference surfaces. • Hybrid coatings exhibited non-hemolytic properties. • Low toxicity, inflammatory response and ROS suggest potential for in vivo use

  8. Emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-shell nanocapsules: biocompatibility and neuroprotection against SH-SY5Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowski, Marek, E-mail: ncpiotro@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof [Polish Academy of Sciences, Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry (Poland); Jantas, Danuta; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Lasoń, Władysław [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Pharmacology (Poland); Warszyński, Piotr [Polish Academy of Sciences, Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry (Poland)

    2013-11-15

    The emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules, designed as water-insoluble neuroprotective drug delivery system, were synthesized using layer-by-layer saturation method. The isopropyl myristate was used as oil phase and docusate sodium salt as emulsifier. For the polyelectrolyte shell preparation, synthetic polyelectrolytes, cationic (PDADMAC, PAH, and PLL) and anionic (PGA) were used. The particle size and zeta potential of nanocapsules were characterized by the dynamic light scattering. The average size of synthesized nanocapsules ranged from ∼80 to ∼100 nm. Zeta potential values ranged from less than approximately −30 mV for the polyanion layers to greater than approximately +30 mV for the polycation layers. Biocompatibilities of the synthesized nanocarriers were evaluated against SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells using various biochemical assays. The results obtained show that synthesized nanocapsules coated with PLL and PGA were nontoxic to SH-SY5Y cells, and they were used as nanocarriers for model neuroprotective drug (a calpain inhibitor MDL 28170). The neuroprotective action of the encapsulated MDL 28170 against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress cytotoxicity was evaluated in the same cell line. The results showed that nanoencapsulated form of MDL 28170 were biocompatible and protected SH-SY5Y cells against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.5 mM/24 h)-induced damage in 20–40 times lower concentrations than those of the same drug added directly to the culture medium. These data suggest that the nanoscale carriers of neuroprotective drugs might serve as novel promising therapeutic agents for oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative processes.

  9. Emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-shell nanocapsules: biocompatibility and neuroprotection against SH-SY5Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules, designed as water-insoluble neuroprotective drug delivery system, were synthesized using layer-by-layer saturation method. The isopropyl myristate was used as oil phase and docusate sodium salt as emulsifier. For the polyelectrolyte shell preparation, synthetic polyelectrolytes, cationic (PDADMAC, PAH, and PLL) and anionic (PGA) were used. The particle size and zeta potential of nanocapsules were characterized by the dynamic light scattering. The average size of synthesized nanocapsules ranged from ∼80 to ∼100 nm. Zeta potential values ranged from less than approximately −30 mV for the polyanion layers to greater than approximately +30 mV for the polycation layers. Biocompatibilities of the synthesized nanocarriers were evaluated against SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells using various biochemical assays. The results obtained show that synthesized nanocapsules coated with PLL and PGA were nontoxic to SH-SY5Y cells, and they were used as nanocarriers for model neuroprotective drug (a calpain inhibitor MDL 28170). The neuroprotective action of the encapsulated MDL 28170 against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress cytotoxicity was evaluated in the same cell line. The results showed that nanoencapsulated form of MDL 28170 were biocompatible and protected SH-SY5Y cells against the H2O2 (0.5 mM/24 h)-induced damage in 20–40 times lower concentrations than those of the same drug added directly to the culture medium. These data suggest that the nanoscale carriers of neuroprotective drugs might serve as novel promising therapeutic agents for oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative processes

  10. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  11. Content metamorphosis in synthetic holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synthetic hologram is an optical system made of hundreds of images amalgamated in a structure of holographic cells. Each of these images represents a point of view on a three-dimensional space which makes us consider synthetic holography as a multiple points of view perspective system. In the composition of a computer graphics scene for a synthetic hologram, the field of view of the holographic image can be divided into several viewing zones. We can attribute these divisions to any object or image feature independently and operate different transformations on image content. In computer generated holography, we tend to consider content variations as a continuous animation much like a short movie. However, by composing sequential variations of image features in relation with spatial divisions, we can build new narrative forms distinct from linear cinematographic narration. When observers move freely and change their viewing positions, they travel from one field of view division to another. In synthetic holography, metamorphoses of image content are within the observer's path. In all imaging Medias, the transformation of image features in synchronisation with the observer's position is a rare occurrence. However, this is a predominant characteristic of synthetic holography. This paper describes some of my experimental works in the development of metamorphic holographic images.

  12. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Si Alloyed Multi-Principal Element Carbide Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladescu, Alina; Titorencu, Irina; Dekhtyar, Yuri; Jinga, Victor; Pruna, Vasile; Balaceanu, Mihai; Dinu, Mihaela; Pana, Iulian; Vendina, Viktorija; Braic, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we have examined the possibility to improve the biocompatibility of the (TiZrNbTaHf)C through replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si. The coatings were deposited on Si and 316L stainless steel substrates by magnetron sputtering in an Ar+CH4 mixed atmosphere and were examined for elemental composition, chemical bonds, surface topography, surface electrical charge and biocompatible characteristics. The net surface charge was evaluated at nano and macroscopic scale by measuring the electrical potential and work function, respectively. The biocompatible tests comprised determination of cell viability and cell attachment to the coated surface. The deposited coatings had C/(metal+Si) ratios close to unity, while a mixture of metallic carbide, free-carbon and oxidized species formed on the film surface. The coatings' surfaces were smooth and no influence of surface roughness on electrical charge or biocompatibility was found. The biocompatible characteristics correlated well with the electrical potential/work function, suggesting a significant role of surface charge in improving biocompatibility, particularly cell attachment to coating's surface. Replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si in the (TiZrNbTaHf)C coating led to an enhanced surface electrical charge, as well as to superior biocompatible properties, with best results for the (TiZrNbSiHf)C coating. PMID:27571361

  13. Synthetic neurosteroids on brain protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariana Rey; Hctor Coirini

    2015-01-01

    Neurosteroids, like allopregnanolone and pregnanolone, are endogenous regulators of neuronal excitability. Inside the brain, they are highly selective and potent modulators of GABAA receptor activity. Their anticonvulsant, anesthetics and anxiolytic properties are useful for the treatments of several neurological and psychiatric disordersvia reducing the risks of side effects obtained with the commercial drugs. The principal disadvantages of endogenous neurosteroids adminis-tration are their rapid metabolism and their low oral bioavailability. Synthetic steroids analogues with major stability or endogenous neurosteroids stimulation synthesis might constitute prom-ising novel strategies for the treatment of several disorders. Numerous studies indicate that the 3α-hydroxyl conifguration is the key for binding and activity, but modiifcations in the steroid nucleus may emphasize different pharmacophores. So far, several synthetic steroids have been developed with successful neurosteroid-like effects. In this work, we summarize the properties of various synthetic steroids probed in trials throughout the analysis of several neurosteroids-like actions.

  14. Designer Drugs: A Synthetic Catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Fratantonio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic stimulants can cause hallucinations, aggressive behaviors, death and are sometimes legal. These substances are sold as plant food and bath salts that are "Not for Human Consumption", therefore skirting the 1986 Federal Analogue Act and giving a false pretense of safety. Studies have proved that these substances are toxic, have a high abuse potential, and are becoming extremely prevalent in the United States. This creates a dilemma for law enforcement agents, hospitals, and substance use disorder treatment centers. Urine Drug Testing is utilized as a clinical diagnostic tool in substance use disorder treatment centers, and the furious pace at which new synthetic stimulants are introduced to the black market are making the detection via urine increasingly difficult. This article will discuss the prevalence, pharmacology and difficulty developing laboratory assays to detect synthetic stimulants.

  15. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  16. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative--additional investments will expand markets--but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized. PMID:26690379

  17. SYNTHETIC APPROACHES TO POLIFUNCTIONALIZED PERHYDRINDANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Kulciţki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current communication represents an extended abstract of the presentation delivered on the joint Moldo-Italian seminar “New frontiers in natural product chemistry”, held in the Institute of Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of Moldova on 31 September. An overview of the synthetic methods oriented to the synthesis of functionalized terpenic perhydrindanes is provided. Different synthetic strategies are considered, including those based on biomimetic approach. The array of obtained new structures can serve as leads in structure-activity studies as well as useful building blocks towards other perhydrindanes.

  18. The Case for Synthetic Injectables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, John H

    2015-11-01

    There are several different classes of synthetic dermal fillers and volume enhancers including semipermanent and permanent products available in the United States. Based on clinical and scientific evidence, this article reviews the chemical and polymeric properties, clinical data, patient selection, indications for use, injection technique, and adverse event profiles of permanent synthetic injectables currently used in clinical practice in the United States: medical-grade liquid injectable silicone and polymethyl methacrylate. Understanding the unique characteristics of these two products reinforces the advantages and disadvantages of each, including under what circumstances they should be used and why they perform the way they do. PMID:26505540

  19. Hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of antibacterial biomimetic hybrid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coll Ferrer, M. Carme [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Eckmann, Uriel N. [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Composto, Russell J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Eckmann, David M., E-mail: eckmanndm@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    In previous work, we developed novel antibacterial hybrid coatings based on dextran containing dispersed Ag NPs (∼ 5 nm, DEX-Ag) aimed to offer dual protection against two of the most common complications associated with implant surgery, infections and rejection of the implant. However, their blood-material interactions are unknown. In this study, we assess the hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of DEX-Ag using fresh blood and two cell lines of the immune system, monocytes (THP-1 cells) and macrophages (PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells). Glass, polyurethane (PU) and bare dextran (DEX) were used as reference surfaces. PU, DEX and DEX-Ag exhibited non-hemolytic properties. Relative to glass (100%), platelet attachment on PU, DEX and DEX-Ag was 15%, 10% and 34%, respectively. Further, we assessed cell morphology and viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (TNF-α and IL-1β), pro-inflammatory eicosanoid expression (Prostaglandin E{sub 2}, PGE{sub 2}) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) following incubation of the cells with the surfaces. The morphology and cell viability of THP-1 cells were not affected by DEX-Ag whereas DEX-Ag minimized spreading of PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells and caused a reduction in cell viability (16% relative to other surfaces). Although DEX-Ag slightly enhanced release of ROS, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained minimal with similar levels of PGE{sub 2}, as compared to the other surfaces studied. These results highlight low toxicity of DEX-Ag and hold promise for future applications in vivo. - Highlights: • We examined specific blood-contact reactions of dextran doped with Ag NPs coatings. • Biocompatibility was assessed with THP-1 cells and PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. • Glass, polyurethane and dextran were used as reference surfaces. • Hybrid coatings exhibited non-hemolytic properties. • Low toxicity, inflammatory response and ROS suggest potential for in vivo use.

  20. Biocompatibility evaluation of tissue-engineered decellularized scaffolds for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Kamal Hany; Park, Kyung-Mee; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Woo, Heung-Myong

    2016-10-01

    Biomaterials based on seeding of cells on decellularized scaffolds have gained increasing interest in the last few years and suggested to serve as an alternative approach to bioengineer artificial organs and tissues for transplantation. The reaction of the host toward the decellularized scaffold and transplanted cells depends on the biocompatibility of the construct. Before proceeding to the clinical application step of decellularized scaffolds, it is greatly important to apply a number of biocompatibility tests in vitro and in vivo. This review describes the different methodology involved in cytotoxicity, pathogenicity, immunogenicity and biodegradability testing for evaluating the biocompatibility of various decellularized matrices obtained from human or animals. PMID:27287176

  1. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  2. Cosmo Cassette: A Microfluidic Microgravity Microbial System For Synthetic Biology Unit Tests and Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Although methods in the design-build-test life cycle of the synthetic biology field have grown rapidly, the expansion has been non-uniform. The design and build stages in development have seen innovations in the form of biological CAD and more efficient means for building DNA, RNA, and other biological constructs. The testing phase of the cycle remains in need of innovation. Presented will be both a theoretical abstraction of biological measurement and a practical demonstration of a microfluidics-based platform for characterizing synthetic biological phenomena. Such a platform demonstrates a design of additive manufacturing (3D printing) for construction of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to be used in experiments carried out in space. First, the biocompatibility of the polypropylene chassis will be demonstrated. The novel MFCs will be cheaper, and faster to make and iterate through designs. The novel design will contain a manifold switchingdistribution system and an integrated in-chip set of reagent reservoirs fabricated via 3D printing. The automated nature of the 3D printing yields itself to higher resolution switching valves and leads to smaller sized payloads, lower cost, reduced power and a standardized platform for synthetic biology unit tests on Earth and in space. It will be demonstrated that the application of unit testing in synthetic biology will lead to the automatic construction and validation of desired constructs. Unit testing methodologies offer benefits of preemptive problem identification, change of facility, simplicity of integration, ease of documentation, and separation of interface from implementation, and automated design.

  3. Initial biocompatibility of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane films with different wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasteva, N A; Toromanov, G; Hristova, K T; Radeva, E I; Pecheva, E V; Dimitrova, R P; Altankov, G P; Pramatarova, L D, E-mail: nataly@bio21.bas.b

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the relationships between material surface properties, behaviour of adsorbed proteins and cellular responses is essential to design optimal material surfaces for tissue engineering. In this study we modify thin layers of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDS) by ammonia treatment in order to increase surface wettability and the corresponding biological response. The physico-chemical properties of the polymer films were characterized by contact angle (CA) measurements and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis.Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used as model system for the initial biocompatibility studies following their behavior upon preadsorption of polymer films with three adhesive proteins: fibronectin (FN), fibrinogen (FG) and vitronectin (VN). Adhesive interaction of HUVEC was evaluated after 2 hours by analyzing the overall cell morphology, and the organization of focal adhesion contacts and actin cytoskeleton. We have found similar good cellular response on FN and FG coated polymer films, with better pronounced vinculin expression on FN samples while. Conversely, on VN coated surfaces the wettability influenced significantly initial celular interaction spreading. The results obtained suggested that ammonia plasma treatment can modulate the biological activity of the adsorbed protein s on PPHMDS surfaces and thus to influence the interaction with endothelial cells.

  4. Viability of biocompatible and biodegradable seeds production with incorporated radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims the development of radioactive seeds, biocompatible and biodegradable, with the objective of adding options in the cancer treatment. The work focus on the production of seeds biodegradable that incorporate radioisotopes with half life inferior than the degradation time of the material. The idea of producing devices with biodegradable materials impregnated with radioisotopes of short half life will offer new possibilities in the cancer treatment, since they can be used following the same procedures of the permanent interstitial brachytherapy, but using degradable materials compatible with the physiological environment. It will be discussed in particular the possible application of these seeds in the treatment of prostate cancer. A review of the subject and a preliminary evaluation of the viability of production of the seeds will be presented. The method of production of the seeds is based on the incorporation of Iodine and Samarium in glass matrixes obtained by sol-gel processing. X-ray fluorescence was done in the samples produced and the incorporation of Iodine and Samarium atoms was confirmed. (author)

  5. Impact of trace elements on biocompatibility of titanium scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A titanium oxide scaffold has recently been reported with high compressive strength (>2 MPa) which may allow its use in bone. However, would it be possible to enhance the scaffolds' performance by selecting a titanium oxide raw material without elemental contamination? Elements in implant surfaces have been reported to provoke implant failure. Thus, this study aims to compare different commercial titanium dioxide powders in order to choose the appropriate powder for scaffold making. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis identified the trace elements, mainly Al, Si, C, Ca and P. Cellular response was measured by cytotoxic effect, cell growth and cytokine secretion from murine preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) in vitro. The XPS data showed that traces of carbon-based molecules, silicon, nitrogen and aluminium in the powder were greatly reduced after cleaning in 1 M NaOH. As a result, reduction in cytotoxicity and inflammatory response was observed. Carbon contamination seemed to have a minor effect on the cellular response. Strong correlations were found between Al and Si contamination levels and the inflammatory response and cytotoxic effect. Thus, it is suggested that the concentration of these elements should be reduced in order to enhance the scaffolds' biocompatibility.

  6. Effect of plasma surface modification on the biocompatibility of UHMWPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaklamani, G; Chen, J; Dong, H; Stamboulis, A [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mehrban, N; Bowen, J; Grover, L, E-mail: a.stamboulis@bham.ac.u [School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    In this paper active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is used to chemically modify the surface of UHMWPE. This is an unexplored and new area of research. ASPN allows the homogeneous treatment of any shape or surface at low temperature; therefore, it was thought that ASPN would be an effective technique to modify organic polymer surfaces. ASPN experiments were carried out at 120 {sup 0}C using a dc plasma nitriding unit with a 25% N{sub 2} and 75% H{sub 2} atmosphere at 2.5 mbar of pressure. UHMWPE samples treated for different time periods were characterized by nanoindentation, FTIR, XPS, interferometry and SEM. A 3T3 fibroblast cell line was used for in vitro cell culture experiments. Nanoindentation of UHMWPE showed that hardness and elastic modulus increased with ASPN treatment compared to the untreated material. FTIR spectra did not show significant differences between the untreated and treated samples; however, some changes were observed at 30 min of treatment in the range of 1500-1700 cm{sup -1} associated mainly with the presence of N-H groups. XPS studies showed that nitrogen was present on the surface and its amount increased with treatment time. Interferometry showed that no significant changes were observed on the surfaces after the treatment. Finally, cell culture experiments and SEM showed that fibroblasts attached and proliferated to a greater extent on the plasma-treated surfaces leading to the conclusion that ASPN surface treatment can potentially significantly improve the biocompatibility behaviour of polymeric materials.

  7. Metallic ion release from biocompatible cobalt-based alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Ivana D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials, which are mainly used for the damaged hard tissue replacements, are materials with high strength, excellent toughness and good wear resistance. The disadvantages of metals as implant materials are their susceptibility to corrosion, the elastic modulus mismatch between metals and human hard tissues, relatively high density and metallic ion release which can cause serious health problems. The aim of this study was to examine metallic ion release from Co-Cr-Mo alloy in artificial saliva. In that purpose, alloy samples were immersed into artificial saliva with different pH values (4.0, 5.5 and 7.5. After a certain immersion period (1, 3 and 6 weeks the concentrations of released ions were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS. The research findings were used in order to define the dependence between the concentration of released metallic ions, artificial saliva pH values and immersion time. The determined released metallic ions concentrations were compared with literature data in order to describe and better understand the phenomenon of metallic ion release from the biocompatible cobalt-based alloy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46010 i br. ON 174004

  8. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Tejashree; Ghoderao, Prachi; Sanghavi, Sonali; Babrekar, Harshada; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Ganesan, V.; Kulkarni, Anjali

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle-RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml-1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml-1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle-RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs-RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates.

  9. A new biocompatible nanocomposite as a promising constituent of sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rehab M; Elfeky, Souad A; Verwanger, Thomas; Krammer, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Skin naturally uses antioxidants to protect itself from the damaging effects of sunlight. If this is not sufficient, other measures have to be taken. Like this, hydroxyapatite has the potential to be applied as an active constituent of sunscreens since calcium phosphate absorbs in the ultraviolet region (UV). The objective of the present work was to synthesize a hydroxyapatite-ascorbic acid nanocomposite (HAp/AA-NC) as a new biocompatible constituent of sunscreens and to test its efficiency with skin cell models. The synthesized HAp/AA-NC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, absorption spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction analysis. The protective effect of the construct was tested with respect to viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of primary human dermal fibroblasts (SKIN) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Both cell lines were irradiated with UV light, λmax=254 nm with a fluence of 25 mJ cm(-2) to mimic the effect of UV radiation of sunlight on the skin. Results showed that HAp/AA-NC had a stimulating effect on the cell viability of both, HaCaT and SKIN cells, relative to the irradiated control. Intracellular ROS significantly decreased in UV irradiated cells when treated with HAp/AA-NC. We conclude that the synthesized HAp/AA-NC have been validated in vitro as a skin protector against the harmful effect of UV-induced ROS. PMID:27040194

  10. Biocompatibility of new Ti-Nb-Ta base alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Abdelrahman H; Gepreel, Mohamed A-H; Gouda, Mohamed K; Hefnawy, Ahmad M; Kandil, Sherif H

    2016-04-01

    β-type titanium alloys are promising materials in the field of medical implants. The effect of β-phase stability on the mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity of a newly designed β-type (Ti77Nb17Ta6) biocompatible alloys are studied. The β-phase stability was controlled by the addition of small quantities of Fe and O. X-ray diffraction and microstructural analysis showed that the addition of O and Fe stabilized the β-phase in the treated solution condition. The strength and hardness have increased with the increase in β-phase stability while ductility and Young's modulus have decreased. The potentio-dynamic polarization tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the new alloys is better than Ti-6Al-4V alloy by at least ten times. Neutral red uptake assay cytotoxicity test showed cell viability of at least 95%. The new alloys are promising candidates for biomedical applications due to their high mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and reduced cytotoxicity. PMID:26838885

  11. Effect of plasma surface modification on the biocompatibility of UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaklamani, G; Mehrban, N; Chen, J; Bowen, J; Dong, H; Grover, L; Stamboulis, A

    2010-10-01

    In this paper active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is used to chemically modify the surface of UHMWPE. This is an unexplored and new area of research. ASPN allows the homogeneous treatment of any shape or surface at low temperature; therefore, it was thought that ASPN would be an effective technique to modify organic polymer surfaces. ASPN experiments were carried out at 120 °C using a dc plasma nitriding unit with a 25% N(2) and 75% H(2) atmosphere at 2.5 mbar of pressure. UHMWPE samples treated for different time periods were characterized by nanoindentation, FTIR, XPS, interferometry and SEM. A 3T3 fibroblast cell line was used for in vitro cell culture experiments. Nanoindentation of UHMWPE showed that hardness and elastic modulus increased with ASPN treatment compared to the untreated material. FTIR spectra did not show significant differences between the untreated and treated samples; however, some changes were observed at 30 min of treatment in the range of 1500-1700 cm(-1) associated mainly with the presence of N-H groups. XPS studies showed that nitrogen was present on the surface and its amount increased with treatment time. Interferometry showed that no significant changes were observed on the surfaces after the treatment. Finally, cell culture experiments and SEM showed that fibroblasts attached and proliferated to a greater extent on the plasma-treated surfaces leading to the conclusion that ASPN surface treatment can potentially significantly improve the biocompatibility behaviour of polymeric materials. PMID:20876959

  12. Current and future biocompatibility aspects of biomaterials for hip prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Aherwar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of biomaterials has turn into an electrifying area because these materials improve the quality and longevity of human life. The first and foremost necessity for the selection of the biomaterial is the acceptability by human body. However, the materials used in hip implants are designed to sustain the load bearing function of human bones for the start of the patient’s life. The most common classes of biomaterials used are metals, polymers, ceramics, composites and apatite. These five classes are used individually or in combination with other materials to form most of the implantation devices in recent years. Numerous current and promising new biomaterials i.e. metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite are discussed to highlight their merits and their frailties in terms of mechanical and metallurgical properties in this review. It is concluded that current materials have their confines and there is a need for more refined multi-functional materials to be developed in order to match the biocompatibility, metallurgical and mechanical complexity of the hip prosthesis.

  13. Conversion of bulk seashells to biocompatible hydroxyapatite for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Kenneth S; Zhang, Xing; Massie, Jennifer B; Wang, Mark; Kim, Choll W

    2007-11-01

    Strombus gigas (conch) shells and Tridacna gigas (Giant clam) shells have dense, tailored structures that impart excellent mechanical properties to these shells. In this investigation, conch and clam seashells were converted to hydroxyapatite (HAP) by a hydrothermal method at different temperatures and for different conversion durations. Dense HAP structures were created from these shells throughout the majority of the samples at the relative low temperature of approximately 200 degrees C. The average fracture stress was found to be approximately 137-218MPa for partially converted conch shell samples and approximately 70-150MPa for original and converted clamshell samples, which is close to the mechanical strength of compact human bone. This indicates that the converted shell samples can be used as implants in load-bearing cases. In vivo tests of converted shell samples were performed in rat femoral defects for 6 weeks. The microtomography images at 6 weeks show that the implants did not move, and untreated control defects remain empty with no evidence of a spontaneous fusion. Histological study reveals that there is newly formed bone growing up to and around the implants. There is no evidence of a fibrosis tissue ring around the implants, also indicating that there is no loosening of the implants. In contrast, the untreated controls remain empty with some evidence of a fibrosis ring around the defect hole. These results indicate good biocompatibility and bioactivity of the converted shell implants. PMID:17684000

  14. Fabrication of Biocompatible, Vibrational Magnetoelastic Materials for Controlling Cellular Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak M. Rajachar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of the ME material in an aqueous and biological environment is achieved by chemical-vapor deposition of a conformal Parylene-C layer, and further functionalized by methods of oxygen plasma etching and protein adsorption. In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material. This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

  15. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Electrospun Chitosan/Collagen Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiwei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan/collagen composite nanofibrous scaffold has been greatly concerned in recent years for its favorable physicochemical properties which mimic the native extracellular matrix (ECM both morphologically and chemically. In a previous study, we had successfully fabricated nanofibrous chitosan/collagen composite by electrospinning. In the present study, we further investigate the biocompatibility of such chitosan/collagen composite nanofiber to be used as scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering. The porcine iliac artery endothelial cells (PIECs were employed for morphogenesis, attachment, proliferation, and phenotypic studies. Four characteristic EC markers, including two types of cell adhesion molecules, one proliferation molecule (PCNA, and one function molecule (p53, were studied by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results showed that the chitosan/collagen composite nanofibrous scaffold could enhance the attachment, spreading, and proliferation of PIECs and preserve the EC phenotype. Our work provides profound proofs for the applicable potency of scaffolds made from chitosan/collagen composite nanofiber to be used in vascular tissue engineering.

  16. Fabrication and Biocompatibility of Electrospun Silk Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ick-Soo Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin has attracted great interest in tissue engineering because of its outstanding biocompatibility, biodegradability and minimal inflammatory reaction. In this study, two kinds of biocomposites based on regenerated silk fibroin are fabricated by electrospinning and post-treatment processes, respectively. Firstly, regenerated silk fibroin/tetramethoxysilane (TMOS hybrid nanofibers with high hydrophilicity are prepared, which is superior for fibroblast attachment. The electrospinning process causes adjacent fibers to ‘weld’ at contact points, which can be proved by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The water contact angle of silk/tetramethoxysilane (TMOS composites shows a sharper decrease than pure regenerated silk fibroin nanofiber, which has a great effect on the early stage of cell attachment behavior. Secondly, a novel tissue engineering scaffold material based on electrospun silk fibroin/nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA biocomposites is prepared by means of an effective calcium and phosphate (Ca–P alternate soaking method. nHA is successfully produced on regenerated silk fibroin nanofiber within several min without any pre-treatments. The osteoblastic activities of this novel nanofibrous biocomposites are also investigated by employing osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cell line. The cell functionality such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity is ameliorated on mineralized silk nanofibers. All these results indicate that this silk/nHA biocomposite scaffold material may be a promising biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  17. Effect of plasma surface modification on the biocompatibility of UHMWPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is used to chemically modify the surface of UHMWPE. This is an unexplored and new area of research. ASPN allows the homogeneous treatment of any shape or surface at low temperature; therefore, it was thought that ASPN would be an effective technique to modify organic polymer surfaces. ASPN experiments were carried out at 120 0C using a dc plasma nitriding unit with a 25% N2 and 75% H2 atmosphere at 2.5 mbar of pressure. UHMWPE samples treated for different time periods were characterized by nanoindentation, FTIR, XPS, interferometry and SEM. A 3T3 fibroblast cell line was used for in vitro cell culture experiments. Nanoindentation of UHMWPE showed that hardness and elastic modulus increased with ASPN treatment compared to the untreated material. FTIR spectra did not show significant differences between the untreated and treated samples; however, some changes were observed at 30 min of treatment in the range of 1500-1700 cm-1 associated mainly with the presence of N-H groups. XPS studies showed that nitrogen was present on the surface and its amount increased with treatment time. Interferometry showed that no significant changes were observed on the surfaces after the treatment. Finally, cell culture experiments and SEM showed that fibroblasts attached and proliferated to a greater extent on the plasma-treated surfaces leading to the conclusion that ASPN surface treatment can potentially significantly improve the biocompatibility behaviour of polymeric materials.

  18. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Markides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is a pioneering field aimed at restoring and regenerating the function of damaged cells, organs and tissues in order to establish normal function. It demands the cross communication of disciplines to develop effective therapeutic stem cell based therapies. Nanotechnology has been instrumental in the development and translation of basic research to the clinically relevant therapies. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been applied to tag, track and activate stem cells offering an effective means of monitoring in vitro and in vivo behaviour. MNPs are comprised of an iron oxide core with a biocompatible biological polymer. Safety is an issue of constant concern and emphasises on the importance of investigating the issue of toxicity. Any indication of toxicity can ultimately limit the therapeutic efficiency of the therapy. Toxicity is highly dependent on the physical, chemical and structural properties of the MNP itself as well as dose and intended use. Few in vitro studies have reported adverse effects of MNP on cells at in vitro in therapeutic doses. However, long term in vivo studies have not been studied as extensively. This review aims to summarise current research in this topic highlighting commonly used toxicity assays to investigate this.

  19. Characterization and biocompatibility of fluoridated biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Z.L. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Yu, H.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: yhyang6812@tfol.com; Zeng, Q. [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); He, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    Biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP) has been widely used in tooth and bone implants due to its excellent biocompatibility. Incorporation of fluorine ions in BCP has drawn much attention because of the beneficial role played by the fluorine ions in bone and tooth growth. The aim of this study was to obtain fluoridated biphasic calcium phosphate (FBCP) by immersing BCP into saturated ZnF{sub 2} solution with F{sup -} concentration of 3500 mg/l at different times. The phase and incorporation of fluoride into BCP were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The biomineralization and influence of FBCP on osteoblastic behavior were evaluated and compared with that of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP). The results exhibited that the phase evolution of the BCP was affected by the fluoride incorporation and the FBCP significantly improved the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. These findings suggest that the FBCP would be very useful as a bone reconstructive material.

  20. Biomolecular interaction analysis for carbon nanotubes and for biocompatibility prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Fang, Jinzhang; Cheng, Yun; Zheng, Jianhui; Zhang, Jingjing; Chen, Tao; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    2016-07-15

    The interactions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and biologics have been commonly studied by various microscopy and spectroscopy methods. We tried biomolecular interaction analysis to measure the kinetic interactions between proteins and CNTs. The analysis demonstrated that wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and other proteins have high affinity toward carboxylated CNT (f-MWCNT) but essentially no binding to normal CNT (p-MWCNT). The binding of f-MWCNT-protein showed dose dependence, and the observed kinetic constants were in the range of 10(-9) to 10(-11) M with very small off-rates (10(-3) to 10(-7) s(-1)), indicating a relatively tight and stable f-MWCNT-protein complex formation. Interestingly in hemolysis assay, p-MWCNT showed good biocompatibility, f-MWCNT caused 30% hemolysis, but WGA-coated f-MWCNT did not show hemolysis. Furthermore, the f-MWCNT-WGA complex demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, perhaps through the glycoproteins expressed on the cells' surface. Taken together, biomolecular interaction analysis is a precise method that might be useful in evaluating the binding affinity of biologics to CNTs and in predicting biological actions. PMID:27108187

  1. Improved biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite thin film prepared by aerosol deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Soo; Kim, In-Sook; Kim, Hyeongil; Chou, Alex Hung Kuo; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Li, Long-Hao; Hwang, Soon-Jung

    2010-08-01

    Technical development for an efficient coating of bioactive materials improves the characteristics of a fully functional implant. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteoinductive effect of a newly developed hydroxyapatite (HA)-coating technique using aerosol deposition without post-heat treatment [room temperature (RT) group] on the titanium (Ti) dental implant in vitro and in vivo, compared with that of HA coating with post-heat treatment (HT-400 group) or machined surface (control group). Cell proliferation or attachment on the HA-coated Ti surface was assessed using tetrazolium salt, WST-8 or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Human osteoblasts (HOB) on RT group were well attached and grew alike in the control or HT-400 group. The alkaline phosphatase activity of HOB cultured on RT and HT-400 group was significantly higher than the control group (p coating using aerosol deposition without post-heat treatment has a good biocompatibility, and provide a promoting strategy to enhance osseointegration in the application of the dental implant. PMID:20574972

  2. Spheroid model study comparing the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérard, Matthieu; Le Clerc, Justine; Watrin, Tanguy; Meary, Fleur; Pérez, Fabienne; Tricot-Doleux, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the biological effects of a new dentine substitute based on Ca₃SiO₅ (Biodentine™) for use in pulp-capping treatment, on pseudo-odontoblastic (MDPC-23) and pulp (Od-21) cells. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effects of Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on gene expression in cultured spheroids. We used the acid phosphatase assay to compare the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA. Cell differentiation was investigated by RT-qPCR. We investigated the expression of genes involved in odontogenic differentiation (Runx2), matrix secretion (Col1a1, Spp1) and mineralisation (Alp). ANOVA and PLSD tests were used for data analysis. MDPC-23 cells cultured in the presence of MTA had higher levels of viability than those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and control cells on day 7 (P = 0.0065 and P = 0.0126, respectively). For Od-21 cells, proliferation rates on day 7 were significantly lower in the presence of Biodentine or MTA than for control (P Biodentine and in control cells. Biodentine and MTA may modify the proliferation of pulp cell lines. Their effects may fluctuate over time, depending on the cell line considered. The observed similarity between Biodentine and MTA validates the indication for direct pulp-capping claimed by the manufacturers. PMID:23515903

  3. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, N; Veigel, S; Aigner, N; Nedelec, J M; Rosenau, T; Liebner, F

    2014-10-13

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating the secondary polymer into the BC matrix and to convert the formed composite organogels into aerogels. Uniaxial compression tests revealed a considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties as compared to BC aerogels. Nitrogen sorption experiments at 77K and scanning electron micrographs confirmed the preservation (or even enhancement) of the surface-area-to-volume ratio for most of the samples. The formation of an open-porous, interpenetrating network of the second polymer has been demonstrated by treatment of BC/PMMA hybrid aerogels with EMIM acetate, which exclusively extracted cellulose, leaving behind self-supporting organogels. PMID:25037381

  4. Where Synthetic Biology Meets ET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  5. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  6. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rosner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  7. Spatial cognition in synthetic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The current dissertation discussed the use of Virtual Reality in product design, referred to as the use of Synthetic Environments (SEs). The research of two basic and two case studies focused on investigating the effectiveness of SEs for the users. We expected that the users’ insight in the possibil

  8. Analysis of the Synthetic Jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dančová, Petra; Vít, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2009), s. 11-17. ISSN 1803-0203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : synthetic jet * actuator * nominal frequency Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics

  9. New Synthetic Method of Ciprofloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new synthetic method of ciprofloxacin is started with 2,4-dichloro-5-fluoroacetophenone, via oxaly lation, ethoxymethylenation, amination, cyclization, hydrolysis, decarbonylation and piperazination. The reaction temperature is moderate and the operation is easily controlled. Additional four new compounds are prepared by the method.

  10. New Synthetic Method of Ciprofloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英奇; 戴立言

    2001-01-01

    A new synthetic method of ciprofloxacin is started with 2,4-dichloro-5-fluoroacetophenone, via oxaly-lation, ethoxymethylenation, amination, cyclization, hydrolysis, decarbonylation and piperazination. The reaction temperature is moderate and the operation is easily controlled. Additional four new compounds are prepared by the method.

  11. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  12. Electrospun poly(L-lactide/poly(ε-caprolactone blend nanofibrous scaffold: characterization and biocompatibility with human adipose-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    Full Text Available The essence of tissue engineering is the fabrication of autologous cells or induced stem cells in naturally derived or synthetic scaffolds to form specific tissues. Polymer is thought as an appealing source of cell-seeded scaffold owing to the diversity of its physicochemical property and can be electrospun into nano-size to mimic natural structure. Poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA and poly (ε-caprolactone (PCL are both excellent aliphatic polyester with almost "opposite" characteristics. The controlling combination of PLLA and PCL provides varying properties and makes diverse applications. Compared with the copolymers of the same components, PLLA/PCL blend demonstrates its potential in regenerative medicine as a simple, efficient and scalable alternative. In this study, we electrospun PLLA/PCL blends of different weight ratios into nanofibrous scaffolds (NFS and their properties were detected including morphology, porosity, degradation, ATR-FTIR analysis, stress-stain assay, and inflammatory reaction. To explore the biocompatibility of the NFS we synthesized, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs were used to evaluate proliferation, attachment, viability and multi-lineage differentiation. In conclusion, the electrospun PLLA/PCL blend nanofibrous scaffold with the indicated weight ratios all supported hASCs well. However, the NFS of 1/1 weight ratio showed better properties and cellular responses in all assessments, implying it a biocompatible scaffold for tissue engineering.

  13. Development of a discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-12-01

    To develop an enhanced, reproducible and discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys, prepared to a clinically relevant surface finishing condition, using TR146 oral keratinocyte cells.

  14. Whole genome expression profiling using DNA microarray for determining biocompatibility of polymeric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Wang, Zhenyu; Kutter, Jörg Peter; Dufva, Hans Martin; Wolff, Anders

    2006-01-01

    There is an ever increasing need to find surfaces that are biocompatible for applications like medical implants and microfluidics-based cell culture systems. The biocompatibility of five different surfaces with different hydrophobicity was determined using gene expression profiling as well as more...... conventional methods to determine biocompatibility such as cellular growth rate, morphology and the hydrophobicity of the surfaces. HeLa cells grown on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or a SU-8 surface treated with HNO3-ceric ammonium nitrate (HNO3-CAN) and ethanolamine showed no differences in growth rate......, morphology or gene expression profiles as compared to HeLa cells grown in cell culture flasks. Cells grown on SU-8 treated with only HNO3-CAN showed almost the same growth rate (36 ¡ 1 h) and similar morphology as cells grown in cell culture flasks (32 ¡ 1 h), indicating good biocompatibility. However, more...

  15. Mechanical Strength and Biocompatibility of Ultrafine-Grained Commercial Purity Titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri Estrin; Hyoun-Ee Kim; Rimma Lapovok; Hoi Pang Ng; Ji-Hoon Jo

    2013-01-01

    The effect of grain refinement of commercial purity titanium by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) on its mechanical performance and bone tissue regeneration is reported. In vivo studies conducted on New Zealand white rabbits did not show an enhancement of biocompatibility of ECAP-modified titanium found earlier by in vitro testing. However, the observed combination of outstanding mechanical properties achieved by ECAP without a loss of biocompatibility suggests that this is a very promisi...

  16. Z nanooblaganjem do izboljšanja biokompatibilnosti vsadkov: Improving biocompatibility of implants with nanolayering:

    OpenAIRE

    Dolenc, Andrej; GAŠPERLIN, MIRJANA; Homar, Miha; Kristl, Julijana

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatibility of different materials in the body is very complicated phenomenon. Although structural characteristics of implant are decisive for its specific purpose, biologic response mainly depends on surface characteristics of the implant and its interaction with biologic environment. Nanolayering of the implant to improve biocompatibility presents a recent innovation in this field of research. One method of nanolayering is layer-by-layer assembly which has many advantages over other na...

  17. In vivo qualitative analysis of the biocompatibility of different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Tobias Moretti Neto; Isabel Mello; Ana Beatriz da Silveira Moretti; Carlos Roberto Colombo Robazza; Alessandro Antônio Costa Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Cyanocrylates have been widely used in the medical and dental fields for several years. In Dentistry, cyanoacrylates have been used for suturing, pulp capping, as retrofilling material in endodontic surgeries, and as cervical plug for pulpless teeth bleaching. The biocompatibility of these adhesives has been the topic of many researches and subcutaneous implantation is an effective methodology for these studies. The present study evaluated the biocompatibility of three different cyanoacrylate...

  18. Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond electrodes for neural interfaces: In vivo biocompatibility evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    María eAlcaide; Andrew eTaylor; Morten eFjorback; Vladimir eZachar; Cristian Pablo Pennisi

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended ...

  19. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P.

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended ...

  20. Nanoclusters of iron oxide: effect of core composition on structure, biocompatibility and cell labeling efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    van Tilborg, Geralda A. F.; Cormode, David P.; Jarzyna, Peter A.; van der Toorn, Annette; van der Pol, Susanne M. A.; van Bloois, Louis; Fayad, Zahi A.; Storm, Gert; Mulder, Willem J. M.; de Vries, Helga E.; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals have a variety of applications in medicine. They may serve as contrast agents, therapeutics and for in vitro diagnostics. Frequently, the synthesis route yields hydrophobically capped nanocrystals, which necessitates their subsequent coating to render a water-soluble and biocompatible probe. Biocompatibility is crucial for cellular imaging applications, which require large quantities of diagnostically active nanoparticles to be loaded into cells. We have previously repo...

  1. Bioinspired, Ultrastrong, Highly Biocompatible, and Bioactive Natural Polymer/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-Kun; Cong, Huai-Ping; Yao, Hong-Bin; Mao, Li-Bo; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Marwani, Hadi M; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Tough and biocompatible nanocomposite films: A new type of bioinspired ultrastrong, highly biocompatible, and bioactive konjac glucomannan (KGM)/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite film is fabricated on a large scale by a simple solution-casting method. Such KGM-GO composite films exhibit much enhanced mechanical properties under the strong hydrogen-bonding interactions, showing great potential in the fields of tissue engineering and food package. PMID:26097134

  2. Assembly-Controlled Biocompatible Interface on a Microchip: Strategy to Highly Efficient Proteolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y; Zhong, W.; Meng, S; Kong, J.; Lu, H.; Yang, P.; Girault, HH; Liu, B

    2006-01-01

    A biocompatible interface was constructed on a microchip by using the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of charged polysaccharides incorporating proteases for highly efficient proteolysis. The controlled assembly of natural polyelectrolytes and the enzyme-adsorption step were monitored by using a quartz-crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Such a multilayer-assembled membrane provides a biocompatible interconnected network with high enzyme-loading capacity. The maximum digest...

  3. In Vitro Models in Biocompatibility Assessment for Biomedical-Grade Chitosan Derivatives in Wound Management

    OpenAIRE

    Lim Chin Keong; Ahmad Sukari Halim

    2009-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of wound healing research is to find effective healing techniques that utilize the regeneration of similar tissues. This involves the modification of various wound dressing biomaterials for proper wound management. The biopolymer chitosan (b-1,4-D-glucosamine) has natural biocompatibility and biodegradability that render it suitable for wound management. By definition, a biocompatible biomaterial does not have toxic or injurious effects on biological systems. Chemica...

  4. Graphene Films Show Stable Cell Attachment and Biocompatibility with Electrogenic Primary Cardiac Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taeyong; Kahng, Yung Ho; Lee, Takhee; Lee, Kwanghee; Kim, Do Han

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has attracted substantial attention due to its advantageous materialistic applicability. In the present study, we tested the biocompatibility of graphene films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition with electrogenic primary adult cardiac cells (cardiomyocytes) by measuring the cell properties such as cell attachment, survival, contractility and calcium transients. The results show that the graphene films showed stable cell attachment and excellent biocompatibility with the electro...

  5. In Vivo Biocompatibility of PLGA-Polyhexylthiophene Nanofiber Scaffolds in a Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Swaminathan Sethuraman; Anuradha Subramanian; Uma Maheswari Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Electroactive polymers have applications in tissue engineering as a physical template for cell adhesion and carry electrical signals to improve tissue regeneration. Present study demonstrated the biocompatibility and biodegradability of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (PLGA-PHT) blend electrospun scaffolds in a subcutaneous rat model. The biocompatibility of PLGA-undoped PHT, PLGA-doped PHT, and aligned PLGA-doped PHT nanofibers was evaluated and compared with random PLGA fi...

  6. In vivo MRI biocompatibility evaluation of functionalized carbon fibers in reaction with soft tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Prokić B.B.; Bačić G.; Prokić B.; Kalijadis Ana; Todorović Vera; Puškaš Nela; Vidojević D.; Laušević Mila; Laušević Z.

    2012-01-01

    In modern medicine implants are very important and so is their design and choice of materials. Almost equally important is the choice of imaging technique used to in vivo monitor their fate and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in monitoring the biocompatibility of two newly designed carbon fibers. We have analyzed the interaction of surface functionalized carbon fibers (basic and acidic)...

  7. Tantalum, Niobium and Titanium Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement of Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Mohammad Hossein Fathi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Metals have a wide range of applications in implant and prosthetic materials in dentistry.Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of metals should be improved in order to utilizethem as biomaterials. The aim of this work was to prepare metallic coatings on 316L stainless steel dental implants, to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of the uncoated and metallic coated dentalimplants as an indication of biocompatibility and, to compare the effect of the type of the coatings o...

  8. In Vitro Models in BiocompatibilityAssessment for Biomedical-Grade Chitosan Derivatives in Wound Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chin Keong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the ultimate goals of wound healing research is to find effective healing techniques that utilize the regeneration of similar tissues. This involves the modification of various wound dressing biomaterials for proper wound management. The biopolymer chitosan (b-1,4-D-glucosamine has natural biocompatibility and biodegradability that render it suitable for wound management. By definition, a biocompatible biomaterial does not have toxic or injurious effects on biological systems. Chemical and physical modifications of chitosan influence its biocompatibility and biodegradability to an uncertain degree. Hence, the modified biomedical-grade of chitosan derivatives should be pre-examined in vitro in order to produce high-quality, biocompatible dressings. In vitro toxicity examinations are more favorable than those performed in vivo, as the results are more reproducible and predictive. In this paper, basic in vitro tools were used to evaluate cellular and molecular responses with regard to the biocompatibility of biomedical-grade chitosan. Three paramount experimental parameters of biocompatibility in vitro namely cytocompatibility, genotoxicity and skin pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, were generally reviewed for biomedical-grade chitosan as wound dressing.

  9. Biocompatibility of nanostructured boron doped diamond for the attachment and proliferation of human neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alice C.; Vagaska, Barbora; Edgington, Robert; Hébert, Clément; Ferretti, Patrizia; Bergonzo, Philippe; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. We quantitatively investigate the biocompatibility of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) after the inclusion of boron, with and without nanostructuring. The nanostructuring method involves a novel approach of growing NCD over carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that act as a 3D scaffold. This nanostructuring of BNCD leads to a material with increased capacitance, and this along with wide electrochemical window makes BNCD an ideal material for neural interface applications, and thus it is essential that their biocompatibility is investigated. Approach. Biocompatibility was assessed by observing the interaction of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) with a variety of NCD substrates including un-doped ones, and NCD doped with boron, which are both planar, and nanostructured. hNSCs were chosen due to their sensitivity, and various methods including cell population and confluency were used to quantify biocompatibility. Main results. Boron inclusion into NCD film was shown to have no observable effect on hNSC attachment, proliferation and viability. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of nanostructured boron-doped NCD is increased upon nanostructuring, potentially due to the increased surface area. Significance. Diamond is an attractive material for supporting the attachment and development of cells as it can show exceptional biocompatibility. When boron is used as a dopant within diamond it becomes a p-type semiconductor, and at high concentrations the diamond becomes quasi-metallic, offering the prospect of a direct electrical device-cell interfacing system.

  10. Synthesis of polycarbonate urethane elastomers and effects of the chemical structures on their thermal, mechanical and biocompatibility properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Wang, Yiyu; Zhang, Zongrui; Ma, Daiwei; Wang, Xinyu

    2016-06-01

    In this study, to obtain biomedical polyurethane elastomers with good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, a series of polycarbonate urethanes were synthesized via a two-step solution of polymerization method using the poly(1,6-hexanediol)carbonate diols (PCDL) as the soft segment, 4,4'-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) (H12MDI), 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and 1,4-butanediol (BDO) as the hard segment with dibutyltin dilaurate as the catalyst. In this article, we illustrated the physical behaviors were obviously influenced by synthetic routes. And their chemical and physical structures were investigated by gel permeation chromatograph (GPC), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), fourier transform infrared spectrography (FT-IR) and mechanical properties tests. The surface wettability were studied by contact angle measurement (CA). As a kind of short-term implant biomaterial, the results of the hemolysis and platelet adhesive tests were recorded by spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicating the materials have a great potential for developments and applications in biomedical field. PMID:27441296

  11. Femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible thin layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopp, B. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: bhopp@physx.u-szeged.hu; Smausz, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Kecskemeti, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Klini, A. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (I.E.S.L.), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (F.O.R.T.H.), P.O. Box 1527, GR-711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Bor, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2007-07-31

    In our study we investigate and report the femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible materials. Teflon, polyhydroxybutyrate, polyglycolic-acid, pepsin and tooth in the form of pressed pellets were used as target materials. Thin layers were deposited using pulses from a femtosecond KrF excimer laser system (FWHM = 450 fs, {lambda} = 248 nm, f = 10 Hz) at different fluences: 0.6, 0.9, 1.6, 2.2, 2.8 and 3.5 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Potassium bromide were used as substrates for diagnostic measurements of the films on a FTIR spectrometer. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 1 x 10{sup -3} Pa, and in the case of tooth and Teflon the substrates were heated at 250 deg. C. Under the optimized conditions the chemical structure of the deposited materials seemed to be largely preserved as evidenced by the corresponding IR spectra. The polyglycolic-acid films showed new spectral features indicating considerable morphological changes during PLD. Surface structure and thickness of the layers deposited on Si substrates were examined by an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a surface profilometer. An empirical model has been elaborated for the description of the femtosecond PLD process. According to this the laser photons are absorbed in the surface layer of target resulting in chemical dissociation of molecules. The fast decomposition causes explosion-like gas expansion generating recoil forces which can tear off and accelerate solid particles. These grains containing target molecules without any chemical damages are ejected from the target and deposited onto the substrate forming a thin layer.

  12. Comparison of the biocompatibility of different root canal irrigants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Eduardo Gomes-Filho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the reaction of rat subcutaneous connective tissue to 0.9% sterile saline, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate solution or gel. Six circles were demarcated on the dorsal skin of 24 male Wistar rats, leaving 2 cm between each circle. Using a syringe, 0.1 mL of each root canal irrigant was injected subcutaneously into 5 circles. In the 6th circle, the needle of an empty syringe was introduced into the skin, but no irrigant was injected (control group. Evaluations were undertaken at 2 h, 48 h, 14 days and 30 days post-procedure. Tissue samples were excised, embedded in paraffin blocks and 3-µm-thick sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The areas of inflammatory reaction were evaluated and analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The control group showed few or no inflammatory reaction areas in the subcutaneous tissue. 0.9% saline solution, 2.0% chlorhexidine solution and 2.5% NaOCl showed a good biocompatibility, as very mild inflammatory reaction was detected at 14 days and tissue repair occurred at 30 days. 5.25% NaOCl was the most toxic irrigant, as the number of inflammatory cells remained elevated at 14 and 30 days. The group treated with 2.0% chlorhexidine gluconate gel presented a moderate inflammatory response at 14 days, which decreased at 30 days, being considered similar to that of the control group, 0.9% saline solution, 2.0% chlorhexidine solution and 2.5% NaOCl at this experimental period.

  13. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle–RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml−1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml−1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle–RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml−1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs–RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates. (paper)

  14. DNA Nanostructures on Membranes as Tools for Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogalla, Aleksander; Franquelim, Henri G; Schwille, Petra

    2016-04-26

    Over the last decade, functionally designed DNA nanostructures applied to lipid membranes prompted important achievements in the fields of biophysics and synthetic biology. Taking advantage of the universal rules for self-assembly of complementary oligonucleotides, DNA has proven to be an extremely versatile biocompatible building material on the nanoscale. The possibility to chemically integrate functional groups into oligonucleotides, most notably with lipophilic anchors, enabled a widespread usage of DNA as a viable alternative to proteins with respect to functional activity on membranes. As described throughout this review, hybrid DNA-lipid nanostructures can mediate events such as vesicle docking and fusion, or selective partitioning of molecules into phase-separated membranes. Moreover, the major benefit of DNA structural constructs, such as DNA tiles and DNA origami, is the reproducibility and simplicity of their design. DNA nanotechnology can produce functional structures with subnanometer precision and allow for a tight control over their biochemical functionality, e.g., interaction partners. DNA-based membrane nanopores and origami structures able to assemble into two-dimensional networks on top of lipid bilayers are recent examples of the manifold of complex devices that can be achieved. In this review, we will shortly present some of the potentially most relevant avenues and accomplishments of membrane-anchored DNA nanostructures for investigating, engineering, and mimicking lipid membrane-related biophysical processes. PMID:27119630

  15. Synthetic biology character and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Pade, Christian; Wigger, Henning; Gleich, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is already an object of intensive debate. However, to a great extent the discussion to date has been concerned with fundamental ethical, religious and philosophical questions. By contrast, based on an investigation of the field’s scientific and technological character, this book focuses on new functionalities provided by synthetic biology and explores the associated opportunities and risks. Following an introduction to the subject and a discussion of the most central paradigms and methodologies, the book provides an overview of the structure of this field of science and technology. It informs the reader about the current stage of development, as well as topical problems and potential opportunities in important fields of application. But not only the science itself is in focus. In order to investigate its broader impact, ecological as well as ethical implications will be considered, paving the way for a discussion of responsibilities in the context of a field at a transitional crossroads be...

  16. Synthetic Metal-Containing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, Ian

    2004-04-01

    The development of the field of synthetic metal-containing polymers - where metal atoms form an integral part of the main chain or side group structure of a polymer - aims to create new materials which combine the processability of organic polymers with the physical or chemical characteristics associated with the metallic element or complex. This book covers the major developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of synthetic metal-containing macromolecules, and includes chapters on the preparation and characterization of metal-containing polymers, metallocene-based polymers, rigid-rod organometallic polymers, coordination polymers, polymers containing main group metals, and also covers dendritic and supramolecular systems. The book describes both polymeric materials with metals in the main chain or side group structure and covers the literature up to the end of 2002.

  17. Compounding in synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. M.; Jensen, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for obtaining compound images using synthetic aperture data is investigated using a convex array transducer. The new approach allows spatial compounding to be performed for any number of angles without reducing the frame rate or temporal resolution. This important feature is an intrinsic...... from multiple spherical emissions to synthesize multiple transmit and receive apertures, corresponding to imaging the tissue from multiple directions. The many images are added incoherently, to produce a single compound image. Using a 192-element, 3.5-MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated from...... tissue-phantom measurements that the speckle is reduced and the contrast resolution improved when applying synthetic aperture compound imaging. At a depth of 4 cm, the size of the synthesized apertures is optimized for lesion detection based on the speckle information density. This is a performance...

  18. Synthetic approaches to multifunctional indenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Sara; Dinarès, Immaculada

    2011-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of multifunctional indenes with at least two different functional groups has not yet been extensively explored. Among the plausible synthetic routes to 3,5-disubstituted indenes bearing two different functional groups, such as the [3-(aminoethyl)inden-5-yl)]amines, a reasonable pathway involves the (5-nitro-3-indenyl)acetamides as key intermediates. Although several multistep synthetic approaches can be applied to obtain these advanced intermediates, we describe herein their preparation by an aldol-type reaction between 5-nitroindan-1-ones and the lithium salt of N,N-disubstituted acetamides, followed immediately by dehydration with acid. This classical condensation process, which is neither simple nor trivial despite its apparent directness, permits an efficient entry to a variety of indene-based molecular modules, which could be adapted to a range of functionalized indanones. PMID:22238553

  19. Synthetic approaches to multifunctional indenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Mesquida

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of multifunctional indenes with at least two different functional groups has not yet been extensively explored. Among the plausible synthetic routes to 3,5-disubstituted indenes bearing two different functional groups, such as the [3-(aminoethylinden-5-yl]amines, a reasonable pathway involves the (5-nitro-3-indenylacetamides as key intermediates. Although several multistep synthetic approaches can be applied to obtain these advanced intermediates, we describe herein their preparation by an aldol-type reaction between 5-nitroindan-1-ones and the lithium salt of N,N-disubstituted acetamides, followed immediately by dehydration with acid. This classical condensation process, which is neither simple nor trivial despite its apparent directness, permits an efficient entry to a variety of indene-based molecular modules, which could be adapted to a range of functionalized indanones.

  20. Synthetic greenhouse gases under control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses new Swiss regulations on the use of synthetic materials that posses a considerable greenhouse-warming potential. Synthetic materials such as hydro-chlorofluorocarbons HCFCs, perfluoride-hydrocarbons and sulphur hexafluoride have, in recent years, replaced chlorofluorocarbons CFCs, which were banned on account of their ozone depletion characteristics. The use of these persistent substances is now being limited to applications where more environment-friendly alternatives are not available. The measures decreed in the legislation, which include a general ban on HCFCs as of 2004 and a ban on the export of installations and equipment that use ozone-depleting refrigerants are described. Details on the legislation's effects on the Swiss refrigeration industry are listed and discussed

  1. Airborne synthetic aperture acoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumekh, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a system model and inversion for airborne synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging. The system model accurately represents the intercation of the acoustic source and the target region at near range values. Moreover, the model incorporates the fact that the relative speed of the vehicle's (transmitter/receiver) with respect to the target region is comparable to the acoustic wave propagation speed. The inversion utilizes the principle of spectral decomposition of spherical phase functions to develop a wavefront reconstruction method from SAA data. Processing issues and selection of appropriate acoustic FM-CW sources are discussed. Results are provided that exhibit the superior accuracy of the proposed SAA system model and inversion over their synthetic aperture radar (SAR) counterpart in which the vehicle's speed is assumed to be much smaller than the wave propagation speed. PMID:18282912

  2. Ionoluminescence (IL) of synthetic diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds have been extensively characterized in the past by absorption and luminescence. The use of such techniques as cathodoluminescence, photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation and electron spin and paramagnetic resonance has resulted in the identification of many impurity and defect related optical centres in diamond. Of the impurities found in diamond, nitrogen is by far the most abundant and hence responsible for most of the optical properties. The development of diamond synthesis methods has resulted in the discovery of a number of a new optically active impurities and defects which are introduced during the growth process. These include Si, O, Ni and B. In this study we identify a number of defect and impurity related centres in two commercially produced synthetic diamond samples by using the novel technique of ionoluminescence. The results are consistent with previous studies which have shown that Ni impurities segregate in [111] growth sector. (authors)

  3. Optimizing Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Spatial compound images are constructed from synthetic aperture data acquired using a linear phased-array transducer. Compound images of wires, tissue, and cysts are created using a method, which allows both transmit and receive compounding without any loss in temporal resolution. Similarly to...... optimal for lesion detection. Synthetic aperture data are acquired from unfocused emissions and 154 compound images are constructed by synthesizing different aperture configurations with more or less compounding, all maintaining a constant resolution across depth corresponding to an f-number of 2.0 for...... transmit and receive. The same configurations are used for scanning a phantom with cysts, and it is demonstrated how an improved cysts contrast follows from an aperture configuration, which gives a higher value for the performance measure extracted from the phantom without cysts. A correlation value R = 0...

  4. Synthetic Studies directed towards Asmarines

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis is focused on the design of synthetic routes towards asmarine analogues. Asmarines are marine natural products isolated from the sponges Raspalia sp. The asmarine molecule contains a seven-membered ring fused with a purine core. This tetrahydrodiazepinopurine moiety has previously been constructed for example by ringclosing metathesis (RCM). We were focused on developing this RCM reaction pathway further, in order to introduce a chiral centre to the 7-membered ring. The att...

  5. Structural Aspects of Synthetic Ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. M.; Cismasu, C.; Tcaciuc, A. P.; Parise, J. B.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    The role of natural ferrihydrite in geochemical and biological systems, and use of synthetic ferrihydrite in technological and industrial applications, is attracting broad scientific attention. The importance of ferrihydrite in these systems is primarily related to its large amount of reactive surface area (>350 m2 g-1) which has been shown to effectively scavenge a variety of potential contaminants (e.g., arsenic, chromium). In general, the association of ferrihydrite with metals and metalloids through sorption and co-precipitation is expected to alter its reactivity and thus affect its overall role in aqueous geochemical systems. Such changes in the reactivity of ferrihydrite nanoparticles, typically with all dimensions less than ~7 nm, are inextricably related to their atomic structure, i.e., the 3-dimensional arrangement of atoms. Evaluating the structures of particles with extreme small particle sizes (structure determination which are most sensitive to either short-range order (X-ray absorption spectroscopy) or long-range periodicity (X-ray or electron diffraction). However, the recent application of high-energy X-ray total scattering coupled with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis is providing new insight into the structural aspects of ferrihydrite, a material with no known crystalline counterpart. The information obtainable both directly and indirectly from the PDF will be discussed primarily using examples of synthetic inorganically-derived ferrihydrites. This work on synthetic samples complements our investigations of natural ferrihydrites forming in acid mine drainage-impacted waters. Such natural samples are inherently more complex because they typically form in the presence of dissolved inorganic species such as silica, aluminum, chromium, sulphate, etc., as well as organic matter. The complexity of natural ferrihydrites necessitates the use of synthetically-derived samples in order to evaluate specific changes in certain fundamental aspects of

  6. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining mu...

  7. Synthetically Simple, Highly Resilient Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Jun; Lackey, Melissa A.; Madkour, Ahmad E.; Saffer, Erika M.; Griffin, David M.; Bhatia, Surita R.; Crosby, Alfred J.; Tew, Gregory N.

    2012-01-01

    Highly resilient synthetic hydrogels were synthesized by using the efficient thiol-norbornene chemistry to cross-link hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer chains. The swelling and mechanical properties of the hydrogels were well-controlled by the relative amounts of PEG and PDMS. In addition, the mechanical energy storage efficiency (resilience) was more than 97% at strains up to 300%. This is comparable with one of the most resilient mat...

  8. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Tonidandel Scott; Bye-Nagel Kyri; Snell Sam; Pearson Brianna; Heyer Laurie J; Campbell A Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (...

  9. Understanding the risk of synthetic CDOs

    OpenAIRE

    Michael S. Gibson

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic collateralized debt obligations, or synthetic CDOs, are popular vehicles for trading the credit risk of a portfolio of assets. Following a brief summary of the development of the synthetic CDO market, I draw on recent innovations in modeling to present a pricing model for CDO tranches that does not require Monte Carlo simulation. I use the model to analyze the risk characteristics of the tranches of synthetic CDOs. The analysis shows that although the more junior CDO tranches -- equ...

  10. Microbial synthetic biology for human therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Aastha; Bhatia, Pooja; Chugh, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology holds tremendous potential for developing novel drugs to treat various human conditions. The current study discusses the scope of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach. In this context, synthetic biology aims at designing, engineering and building new microbial synthetic cells that do not pre-exist in nature as well as re-engineer existing microbes for synthesis of therapeutic products. It is expected that the construction of n...

  11. Cell microencapsulation with synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabisi, Ronke M

    2015-02-01

    The encapsulation of cells into polymeric microspheres or microcapsules has permitted the transplantation of cells into human and animal subjects without the need for immunosuppressants. Cell-based therapies use donor cells to provide sustained release of a therapeutic product, such as insulin, and have shown promise in treating a variety of diseases. Immunoisolation of these cells via microencapsulation is a hotly investigated field, and the preferred material of choice has been alginate, a natural polymer derived from seaweed due to its gelling conditions. Although many natural polymers tend to gel in conditions favorable to mammalian cell encapsulation, there remain challenges such as batch to batch variability and residual components from the original source that can lead to an immune response when implanted into a recipient. Synthetic materials have the potential to avoid these issues; however, historically they have required harsh polymerization conditions that are not favorable to mammalian cells. As research into microencapsulation grows, more investigators are exploring methods to microencapsulate cells into synthetic polymers. This review describes a variety of synthetic polymers used to microencapsulate cells. PMID:24771675

  12. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  13. Different lattice geometries with synthetic dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Suszalski, Dominik; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of creating different geometries with the help of an extra synthetic dimension in optical lattices is studied. Additional linear potential and Raman assisted tunnelings are used to engineer well controlled tunnelings between available states. The great flexibility of the system allows us to obtain different geometries of synthetic lattices with possibility of adding synthetic gauge fields.

  14. Bioinspired silica as drug delivery systems and their biocompatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steven, Christopher R.; Busby, Grahame A.; Mather, Craig;

    2014-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles have been shown to have great potential as drug delivery systems (DDS), however, their fabrication often involves harsh chemicals and energy intensive laborious methods. This work details the employment of a bioinspired "green" method for the controlled synthesis of silica, use...... of the products to entrap and release drug molecules and their cytotoxicity in order to develop novel DDS. Bioinspired silica synthesis occurs at pH 7, room temperature and in less than 5 minutes, resulting in a rapid, cheaper and greener route. Drugs were loaded into silica during the silica...... formation, thus allowing a one step and one pot method for simultaneous silica synthesis and drug loading. We established that the drug release profile can be modulated by synthetic parameters, which can allow design of tailored DDS. A systematic investigation using a two level factorial design was adopted...

  15. Laser surface modification of PET to improve biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve biocompatibility, the surfaces of polyethylene terephthalate obtained by irradiation with a CO2 pulsed laser in air without a photo sensitizer were studied. The complicated microstructures were obtained on the polyethylene terephthalate surface due to irradiation with various wavelengths of CO2 laser and observed by scanning electron microscope. The changes in chemical and physical properties of the irradiated polyethylene terephthalate surface were investigated by attenuated total reflectance fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The water drop contact angle also decreased with increasing of laser pulses. The density of peroxides formed on the irradiated polyethylene terephthalate surface were determined by iodide method. The Kr F and CO2 laser treated polyethylene terephthalate surface were compared from viewpoints of the morphology, chemical and physical properties. Graft copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid onto the surface of polyethylene terephthalate were performed to improved water wettability using the CO2 pulsed laser. After laser irradiation in air, the films were placed in the aqueous solution of monomer and then heated to decompose peroxides formed onto the irradiated polyethylene terephthalate film. The grafted polyethylene terephthalate surfaces were characterized by ATR-IR spectroscopy, Sem, contact angle measurements, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray analysis. The compatibility of the laser irradiated polyethylene terephthalate films was examined in vitro, evaluating their capability of inducing platelet adhesion in comparison with the unmodified polyethylene terephthalate. The number of adhered platelets was determined by lactate dehydrogenase activity measurement. The morphology of adhered platelets on the polyethylene terephthalate surfaces was investigated by scanning electron microscope. The scanning electron microscope observations were consistent

  16. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijin; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Shaojie; Zhang, Na; Ma, Chunhong; Lu, Zaijun

    2009-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid-polyethylene glycol/gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA) nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA-PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd-DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was -12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed ( r = 0.987). The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd-DTPA. PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular targeted imaging contrast agent.

  17. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Dexin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid–polyethylene glycol/gadolinium–diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. The PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA–PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd–DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was −12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed (r = 0.987. The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd–DTPA. PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular

  18. Printability of Synthetic Papers by Electrophotography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozália Szentgyörgyvölgyi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the printability of synthetic papers by the electrophotography technique. Prints of cmyk colour fields from 20% to 100% raster tone values were printed on three types of synthetic papers (one film synthetic paper and two fiber synthetic papers. The investigation of the appearance included densitometric measurement of the cmyk prints. The results have shown differences in the optical density and optical tone value between cmyk prints made on various synthetic papers. The highest optical density and the increase of the optical tone value were observed on the film synthetic paper, where cmyk prints were more saturated. The highest abrasion resistance of cmyk prints was obtained from the fibre synthetic paper.

  19. A pore way to heal and regenerate: 21st century thinking on biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Buddy D

    2016-06-01

    This article raises central questions about the definition of biocompatibility, and also about how we assess biocompatibility. We start with the observation that a porous polymer where every pore is spherical, ∼40 microns in diameter and interconnected, can heal into vascularized tissues with little or no fibrosis and good restoration of vascularity (i.e., little or no foreign body reaction). The same polymer in solid form will trigger the classic foreign body reaction characterized by a dense, collagenous foreign body capsule and low vascularity. A widely used definition of biocompatibility is 'the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response in a specific application'. With precision-porous polymers, in direct comparison with the same polymer in solid form, we have the same material, in the same application, with two entirely different biological reactions. Can both reactions be 'biocompatible?' This conundrum will be elaborated upon and proposals will be made for future considerations and measurement of biocompatibility. PMID:27047676

  20. Biocompatibility of microplates for culturing epithelial renal cells evaluated by a microcalorimetric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y; DePierre, J W; Nässberger, L

    2000-09-01

    In the present study we have developed a microcalorimetric procedure which allows convenient investigation of biocompatibility in a microsystem. We examined the biocompatibility of a porcine renal epithelial tubule cell line LLC-PK1 and a human primary renal epithelial tubule cell (RPTEC) with microplates composed of three different materials, i.e. Thermanox, transparent film and titanium. All three materials showed equal biocompatibility with LLC-PK1 cells, judging from the attainment of steady-state power curves and the same rate of heat production per cell (2.5 microW / microg DNA). The human renal cells were poorly biocompatible with the Thermanox and transparent film. However, on titanium the RPTEC cell did adhere, as demonstrated by a steady-state power curve. The human cells also showed a higher metabolic activity (3.0 microW / microg DNA), than did LLC-PK1 cells cultured on the same type of microplates. In research on biocompatibility there is a need for alternatives to experimental animal investigations. The present technique allows studies of cellular interactions with different biomaterials in a rapid and standardized manner and may therefore prove to be a useful screening procedure. PMID:15348389

  1. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Connor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges.

  2. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2004-01-01

    A method for flow estimation using synthetic aperture imaging and focusing along the flow direction is presented. The method can find the correct velocity magnitude for any flow angle and full color flow images can be measured using only 32 to 128 pulse emissions. The approach uses spherical wave...... emissions using a number of defocused elements and a linear frequency modulated pulse (chirp) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The received signals are dynamically focused along the flow direction and these signals are used in a cross-correlation estimator for finding the velocity magnitude. The flow...

  3. Protease-Sensitive Synthetic Prions

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, David W; Rachel Wain; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Giuseppe Legname; Palmer, Christina G.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Azucena Lemus; Cohen, Fred E.; Stephen J DeArmond; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2010-01-01

    Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc). Frequently, PrP(Sc) is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s) prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec) PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, ...

  4. Synthetic magnetism for photon fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Westerberg, N; Faccio, D; Wilson, K; Öhberg, P; Wright, E M

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory of artificial gauge fields in photon fluids for the cases of both second-order and third-order optical nonlinearities. This applies to weak excitations in the presence of pump fields carrying orbital angular momentum, and is thus a type of Bogoliubov theory. The resulting artificial gauge fields experienced by the weak excitations are an interesting generalization of previous cases and reflect the PT-symmetry properties of the underlying non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. We illustrate the observable consequences of the resulting synthetic magnetic fields for examples involving both second-order and third-order nonlinearities.

  5. Synthetic magnetism for photon fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, N.; Maitland, C.; Faccio, D.; Wilson, K.; Öhberg, P.; Wright, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a theory of artificial gauge fields in photon fluids for the cases of both second-order and third-order optical nonlinearities. This applies to weak excitations in the presence of pump fields carrying orbital angular momentum and is thus a type of Bogoliubov theory. The resulting artificial gauge fields experienced by the weak excitations are an interesting generalization of previous cases and reflect the PT-symmetry properties of the underlying non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. We illustrate the observable consequences of the resulting synthetic magnetic fields for examples involving both second-order and third-order nonlinearities.

  6. Skull melting of synthetic minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, S.D.; Hull, D.E.; Herrick, C.C.

    1977-12-01

    Direct high-frequency induction melting of dielectric materials in a water-cooled cage has been developed in the LASL synthetic minerals program. Molten material is contained in a skull, i.e., sintered shell, of its own composition so the traditional problems associated with refractory melt contamination are essentially eliminated. Preliminary analyses of power input, cage design, and coil geometry are discussed. Initial experimental results on the preparation of polycrystalline ingots, single crystals, and glasses are presented along with possible applications of this technique.

  7. Ethical Issues in Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Heavey, Patrick Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology has been defined as: “the design and construction of new biological parts, devices, and systems, and the re-design of existing, natural biological systems for useful purposes” (syntheticbiology.org). The convergence of scientific fields such as molecular biology, computer science and others have rendered it a natural progression, based on existing knowledge.The fact that humanity has reached a stage of development where it seems feasible to “create” life, or design it to a h...

  8. A preclinical evaluation of alternative synthetic biomaterials for fascial defect repair using a rat abdominal hernia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ulrich

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fascial defects are a common problem in the abdominal wall and in the vagina leading to hernia or pelvic organ prolapse that requires mesh enhancement to reduce operation failure. However, the long-term outcome of synthetic mesh surgery may be unsatisfactory due to post-surgical complications. We hypothesized that mesh fabricated from alternative synthetic polymers may evoke a different tissue response, and provide more appropriate mechanical properties for hernia repair. Our aim was to compare the in vivo biocompatibility of new synthetic meshes with a commercial mesh. METHODS: We have fabricated 3 new warp-knitted synthetic meshes from different polymers with different tensile properties polyetheretherketone (PEEK, polyamide (PA and a composite, gelatin coated PA (PA+G. The rat abdominal hernia model was used to implant the meshes (25 × 35 mm, n = 24/ group. After 7, 30, 60, 90 days tissues were explanted for immunohistochemical assessment of foreign body reaction and tissue integration, using CD31, CD45, CD68, alpha-SMA antibodies. The images were analysed using an image analysis software program. Biomechanical properties were uniaxially evaluated using an Instron Tensile® Tester. RESULTS: This study showed that the new meshes induced complex differences in the type of foreign body reaction over the time course of implantation. The PA, and particularly the composite PA+G meshes, evoked a milder early inflammatory response, and macrophages were apparent throughout the time course. Our meshes led to better tissue integration and new collagen deposition, particularly with the PA+G meshes, as well as greater and sustained neovascularisation compared with the PP meshes. CONCLUSION: PA, PA+G and PEEK appear to be well tolerated and are biocompatible, evoking an overlapping and different host tissue response with time that might convey mechanical variations in the healing tissue. These new meshes comprising different polymers may

  9. A Synthetic Multicellular Memory Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrios, Arturo; Macia, Javier; Manzoni, Romilde; Conde, Núria; Bonforti, Adriano; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc; Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    Changing environments pose a challenge to living organisms. Cells need to gather and process incoming information, adapting to changes in predictable ways. This requires in particular the presence of memory, which allows different internal states to be stored. Biological memory can be stored by switches that retain information on past and present events. Synthetic biologists have implemented a number of memory devices for biological applications, mostly in single cells. It has been shown that the use of multicellular consortia provides interesting advantages to implement biological circuits. Here we show how to build a synthetic biological memory switch using an eukaryotic consortium. We engineered yeast cells that can communicate and retain memory of changes in the extracellular environment. These cells were able to produce and secrete a pheromone and sense a different pheromone following NOT logic. When the two strains were cocultured, they behaved as a double-negative-feedback motif with memory. In addition, we showed that memory can be effectively changed by the use of external inputs. Further optimization of these modules and addition of other cells could lead to new multicellular circuits that exhibit memory over a broad range of biological inputs. PMID:27439436

  10. Synthetic population system user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TRansportation Analysis SIMulatiuon System (TRANSIMS) synthetic population system (SYN) is designed to produce populations (family households, non-family households, and group quarters) that are statistically equivalent to actual populations when compared at the level of block group or higher. The methodology used by this system is described in a report entitled Creating Synthetic Baseline Populations. The inputs to the system are US Census Bureau data (STF3A and PUMS) and MABLE/GEOCORR data. Census Bureau STF3A and PUMS data formats are commonly used and are available on CD-ROM from the Census Bureau. These data inputs will not be described in any detail in this guide. The primary function of MABLE/GEOCORR data is to cross-reference STF3 block group data to PUMS areas. The outputs of the system are files that contain family household, non-family household, and group quarters data in the form of household and person records. SYN will run on a variety of Unix platforms.

  11. Shape analysis of synthetic diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional images of synthetic industrial diamond particles were obtained using a camera, framegrabber and PC-based image analysis software. Various methods for shape quantification were applied, including two-dimensional shape factors, Fourier series expansion of radius as a function of angle, boundary fractal analysis, polygonal harmonics, and comer counting methods. The shape parameter found to be the most relevant was axis ratio, defined as the ratio of the minor axis to the major axis of the ellipse with the same second moments of area as the particle. Axis ratio was used in an analysis of the sorting of synthetic diamonds on a vibrating table. A model was derived based on the probability that a particle of a given axis ratio would travel to a certain bin. The model described the sorting of bulk material accurately but it was found not to be applicable if the shape mix of the feed material changed dramatically. This was attributed to the fact that the particle-particle interference was not taken into account. An expert system and a neural network were designed in an attempt to classify particles by a combination of four shape parameters. These systems gave good results when discriminating between particles from bin 1 and bin 9 but not for neighbouring bins or for more than two classes. The table sorting process was discussed in light of the findings and it was demonstrated that the shape distributions of sorted diamond fractions can be quantified in a useful and meaningful way. (author)

  12. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems. PMID:27284033

  13. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  14. Synthetic in vitro transcriptional oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongmin; Winfree, Erik

    2011-02-01

    The construction of synthetic biochemical circuits from simple components illuminates how complex behaviors can arise in chemistry and builds a foundation for future biological technologies. A simplified analog of genetic regulatory networks, in vitro transcriptional circuits, provides a modular platform for the systematic construction of arbitrary circuits and requires only two essential enzymes, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and Escherichia coli ribonuclease H, to produce and degrade RNA signals. In this study, we design and experimentally demonstrate three transcriptional oscillators in vitro. First, a negative feedback oscillator comprising two switches, regulated by excitatory and inhibitory RNA signals, showed up to five complete cycles. To demonstrate modularity and to explore the design space further, a positive-feedback loop was added that modulates and extends the oscillatory regime. Finally, a three-switch ring oscillator was constructed and analyzed. Mathematical modeling guided the design process, identified experimental conditions likely to yield oscillations, and explained the system's robust response to interference by short degradation products. Synthetic transcriptional oscillators could prove valuable for systematic exploration of biochemical circuit design principles and for controlling nanoscale devices and orchestrating processes within artificial cells. PMID:21283141

  15. Animal timing: a synthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Marilia Pinheiro; Machado, Armando; Vasconcelos, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Inspired by Spence's seminal work on transposition, we propose a synthetic approach to understanding the temporal control of operant behavior. The approach takes as primitives the temporal generalization gradients obtained in prototypical concurrent and retrospective timing tasks and then combines them to synthetize more complex temporal performances. The approach is instantiated by the learning-to-time (LeT) model. The article is divided into three parts. In the first part, we review the basic findings concerning the generalization gradients observed in fixed-interval schedules, the peak procedure, and the temporal generalization procedure and then describe how LeT explains them. In the second part, we use LeT to derive by gradient combination the typical performances observed in mixed fixed-interval schedules, the free-operant psychophysical procedure, the temporal bisection task, and the double temporal bisection task. We also show how the model plays the role of a useful null hypothesis to examine whether temporal control in the bisection task is relative or absolute. In the third part, we identify a set of issues that must be solved to advance our understanding of temporal control, including the shape of the generalization gradients outside the range of trained stimulus durations, the nature of temporal memories, the influence of context on temporal learning, whether temporal control can be inhibitory, and whether temporal control is also relational. These issues attest to the heuristic value of a Spencean approach to temporal control. PMID:27000781

  16. Synthetic vision display evaluation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, David M.; Whittington, David H.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research was to help us understand the display requirements for a synthetic vision system for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Four experiments were conducted to examine the effects of different levels of perceptual cue complexity in displays used by pilots in a flare and landing task. Increased levels of texture mapping of terrain and runway produced mixed results, including harder but shorter landings and a lower flare initiation altitude. Under higher workload conditions, increased texture resulted in an improvement in performance. An increase in familiar size cues did not result in improved performance. Only a small difference was found between displays using two patterns of high resolution texture mapping. The effects of increased perceptual cue complexity on performance was not as strong as would be predicted from the pilot's subjective reports or from related literature. A description of the role of a synthetic vision system in the High Speed Civil Transport is provide along with a literature review covering applied research related to perceptual cue usage in aircraft displays.

  17. Doppler synthetic aperture hitchhiker imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we consider passive airborne receivers that use backscattered signals from sources of opportunity transmitting single-frequency or ultra-narrowband waveforms. Because of its combined passive synthetic aperture and the single-frequency nature of the transmitted waveforms, we refer to the system under consideration as Doppler synthetic aperture hitchhiker (DSAH). We present a novel image formation method for DSAH. Our method first correlates the windowed signal obtained from one receiver with the windowed, filtered, scaled and translated version of the received signal from another receiver. This processing removes the transmitter-related variables from the phase of the Fourier integral operator that maps the radiance of the scene to the correlated signal. Next, we use microlocal analysis to reconstruct the scene radiance by the weighted backprojection of the correlated signal. The image reconstruction method is applicable to both cooperative and non-cooperative sources of opportunity using one or more airborne receivers. It has the desirable property of preserving the visible edges of the scene radiance. Additionally, it is an analytic reconstruction technique that can be made computationally efficient. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate the performance of the image reconstruction method and to verify the theoretical results

  18. The major synthetic evolutionary transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    Evolution is marked by well-defined events involving profound innovations that are known as 'major evolutionary transitions'. They involve the integration of autonomous elements into a new, higher-level organization whereby the former isolated units interact in novel ways, losing their original autonomy. All major transitions, which include the origin of life, cells, multicellular systems, societies or language (among other examples), took place millions of years ago. Are these transitions unique, rare events? Have they instead universal traits that make them almost inevitable when the right pieces are in place? Are there general laws of evolutionary innovation? In order to approach this problem under a novel perspective, we argue that a parallel class of evolutionary transitions can be explored involving the use of artificial evolutionary experiments where alternative paths to innovation can be explored. These 'synthetic' transitions include, for example, the artificial evolution of multicellular systems or the emergence of language in evolved communicating robots. These alternative scenarios could help us to understand the underlying laws that predate the rise of major innovations and the possibility for general laws of evolved complexity. Several key examples and theoretical approaches are summarized and future challenges are outlined.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431528

  19. Microbial synthetic biology for human therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aastha; Bhatia, Pooja; Chugh, Archana

    2012-06-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology holds tremendous potential for developing novel drugs to treat various human conditions. The current study discusses the scope of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach. In this context, synthetic biology aims at designing, engineering and building new microbial synthetic cells that do not pre-exist in nature as well as re-engineer existing microbes for synthesis of therapeutic products. It is expected that the construction of novel microbial genetic circuitry for human therapeutics will greatly benefit from the data generated by 'omics' approaches and multidisciplinary nature of synthetic biology. Development of novel antimicrobial drugs and vaccines by engineering microbial systems are a promising area of research in the field of synthetic biology for human theragnostics. Expression of plant based medicinal compounds in the microbial system using synthetic biology tools is another avenue dealt in the present study. Additionally, the study suggest that the traditional medicinal knowledge can do value addition for developing novel drugs in the microbial systems using synthetic biology tools. The presented work envisions the success of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach in a holistic manner. Keeping this in view, various legal and socio-ethical concerns emerging from the use of synthetic biology via microbial approach such as patenting, biosafety and biosecurity issues have been touched upon in the later sections. PMID:23730360

  20. Interaction of derived polymers from pyrrole with biocompatible solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a study about the synthesis by plasma, the electric properties and superficial interaction of polymers derived from pyrrole doped with Iodine with potential use as bio material. Poly-pyrrole is a semiconductor and biocompatible polymer with potential application in the development of artificial muscles and implants where the electric interaction between cells and material is an important variable. The syntheses were made at 13.5 MHz in a glass tubular reactor of 1500 cm3 with electrodes of 6.5 cm diameter and stainless steel flanges. An electrode was connected to the RF terminal of the power supply that is combined with a matching coupling resistance. The monomer and dopant used in this work were pyrrole and Iodine respectively, in closed containers. They were vaporized and injected separately into the reactor at room temperature and 0.1 mbar. The vapors of the reagents mixed freely in the reactor. The synthesis time was 240 min at 40, 60, 80 and 100 W. The polymers were obtained as thin films adhered to the reactor walls. The films were washed and swollen with distilled water and removed from the reactor walls with a small spatula. The polymers were irradiated with gamma rays at 18 and 22 KGy. Due to the fact that the doses are cumulative, the final dose applied was 40 KGy. The polymers characterization was carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, electrical conductivity and X-ray diffraction. The analyses indicates that the polymers have very similar structure in almost the entire power range, showing C-O, C=C, C-H, O-H, N-H bonds with a predominantly amorphous structure. The TGA analyses showed that the material has 4 or 5 loses of material. The first one starts after that 115 C except for the material irradiated at 40 KGy, this one begins in 87 C, the second one is in the interval of 196 and 295 C, the third one between 311 and 500 C, and the last

  1. Biocompatibility of coronary stent materials: effect of electrochemical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheerder, I. de [University Hospital Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Cardiology; Sohier, J.; Froyen, L.; Humbeeck, J. van [Louvain Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Verbeken, E. [University Hospital Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Pathology

    2001-02-01

    Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Revascularization (PTCR) is now a widely accepted treatment modality for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Current multicenter randomized trials comparing PTCR with the more invasive Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting could not show long-term significant survival differences. During the last two decades progress has been made to further optimize PTCR. The most logic approach to treat atherosclerotic coronary narrowings is to remove the atherosclerotic material using especially developed devices. Several trials, however, could not show a significant beneficial outcome after use of these devices compared to plain old balloon angioplasty. Another approach was to implant a coronary prothesis (stent), scaffolding the diseased coronary artery after PTCA. This approach resulted in a decreased restenosis rate at follow-up. The beneficial effects of stenting, however, was not found to be related to the inhibition of the neointimal cellular proliferation after vascular injury, but simply to be the mechanical result of overstretching of the treated vessel segment. The most important remaining clinical problem after stenting remains the neointimal hyperplasia within the stent, resulting in a significant stent narrowing in 13 to 30% of patients. Further efforts to improve the clinical results of coronary stenting should focus on the reduction of this neointimal hyperplasia. Neointimal hyperplasia after stent implantation results from (1) a healting response to the injury caused by the stent implantation and (2) a foreign body response to the stent itself. Factors that seem to influence the neointimal hyperplastic response are genetic, local disease related, stent delivery related and stent related factors. Biocompatibilisation of coronary stents by looking for more biocompatible metal alloys, optimized surface characteristics and optimized stent designs should result in a better late patency. Furthermore drug eluting and radioactive stents

  2. Biocompatibility of various ferrite nanoparticles evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomitaka, Asahi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: d07gd158@ynu.ac.jp; Hirukawa, Atsuo; Yamada, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Morishita, Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Takemura, Yasushi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles for thermotherapy must be biocompatible and possess high thermal efficiency as heating elements. The biocompatibility of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm), ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (15-30 nm) and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm) nanoparticles was studied using a cytotoxicity colony formation assay and a cell viability assay. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} sample was found to be biocompatible on HeLa cells. While ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were non-toxic at low concentrations, HeLa cells exhibited cytotoxic effects when exposed to concentrations of 100 {mu}g/ml nanoparticles.

  3. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility of alginate-polycation microcapsules designed for islet transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Susan Kimberly

    Microencapsulation represents a method for immunoprotecting transplanted therapeutic cells or tissues from graft rejection using a physical barrier. This approach is advantageous in that it eliminates the need to induce long-term immunosuppression and allows the option of transplanting non-cadaveric cell sources, such as animal cells and stem cell-derived tissues. The microcapsules that we have investigated are designed to immunoprotect islets of Langerhans (i.e. clusters of insulin-secreting cells), with the goal of treating insulin-dependent diabetes. With the aid of techniques for physicochemical analysis, this research focused on understanding which properties of the microcapsule are the most important for determining its biocompatibility. The objective of this work was to elucidate correlations between the chemical make-up, physicochemical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of alginate-based microcapsules. Our approach was based on the hypothesis that the immune response to the microcapsules is governed by, and can therefore be controlled by, specific physicochemical properties of the microcapsule and its material components. The experimental work was divided into five phases, each associated with a specific aim : (1) To prove that immunoglobulins adsorb to the surface of alginate-polycation microcapsules, and to correlate this adsorption with the microcapsule chemistry. (2) To test interlaboratory reproducibility in making biocompatible microcapsules, and evaluate the suitability of our materials and fabrication protocols for subsequent studies. (3) To determine which physicochemical properties of alginates affect the in vivo biocompatibility of their gels. (4) To determine which physiochemical properties of alginate-polycation microcapsules are most important for determining their in vivo biocompatibility (5) To determine whether a modestly immunogenic membrane hinders or helps the ability of the microcapsule to immunoprotect islet xenografts in

  4. Fabrication and biocompatibility of polyethyleneimine/heparin self-assembly coating on NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NiTi alloy has been used widely as biomaterials. But because of toxic effects possibly caused by excess Ni ions released during the corrosion process in the physiological environment, it is still a controversial material. Fabricating medicine-loaded coating, which is expected to decrease the release of Ni ions and improve the biocompatibility of the materials, is a potential way to solve the problem. In this paper, NiTi alloy is coated by polyethyleneimine/heparin films via layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly method. UV-Vis, FT-IR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements are used to characterize the microstructure of coatings and select the best fabrication conditions. Potentiodynamic polarization researches in sodium chloride and dynamic clotting time experiment are utilized to study its corrosion resistance capability and biocompatibility of coatings, respectively. The results indicate that PEI/heparin multilayer coating can improve the biocompatibility of NiTi alloy surface

  5. Degradation and in Vitro Biocompatibility studies of Citric acid based polyesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Margaret Marie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of a polymer for a particular application is dependent on its physical and chemical properties. The monomers used play a significant role in the synthesis of polymers for biomedical applications. In the present work two copolyesters, poly (1,12-dodecanediol citrate-co-1,12- dodecanediol sebacate (PP1; poly (1,12-dodecanediol citrate-co-1,12- dodecanediol itaconate (PP2 were synthesized by catalyst-free melt polyesterification using monomers - citric acid, sebacic acid, itaconic acid and 1,12-dodecanediol. The polymers exhibited mechanical and thermal properties that made them suitable candidates for degradation and biocompatibility studies. In the present work the degradation and in vitro biocompatibility studies were carried out. The degradation and biocompatibility data support the potential use of the elastomers in tissue engineering applications as well as other clinical procedures that may require a biodegradable elastomeric implant.

  6. Mechanical properties and biocompatibility of functionalized carbon nanotubes/polypropylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Nan, Xi; Larsen, Raino Mikael; Huang, Xiaobo; Yu, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement for polypropylene (PP) for biocompatible application as a function of different surface functionalization of CNTs. PP composites were reinforced using various CNTs: single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, MWCNTs), SWCNTs were covalently functionalized by plasma, for comparison, the MWCNTs were functionalized noncovalently. Different CNTs were incorporated into PP by solution blending. The type of CNTs and surface functionalization affects the mechanical and biocompatibility results significantly. Differences in nanostructure and the chemical compositions, number of functional groups, and structural defects for the CNTs may be the key factors affecting the mechanical properties and biocompatibility of PP nanocomposites compared to the neat PP. Finally, suitable CNTs and surface functionalization of CNTs were selected for making the PP/CNTs composites. PMID:27052820

  7. The Use of Nanoscaled Fibers or Tubes to Improve Biocompatibility and Bioactivity of Biomedical Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers and nanotubes have recently gained substantial interest for potential applications in tissue engineering due to their large ratio of surface area to volume and unique microstructure. It has been well proved that the mechanical property of matrix could be largely enhanced by the addition of nanoscaled fibers or tubes. At present, more and more researches have shown that the biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomedical materials could be improved by the addition of nanofibers or nanotubes. In this review, the efforts using nanofibers and nanotubes to improve biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomedical materials, including polymeric nanofibers/nanotubes, metallic nanofibers/nanotubes, and inorganic nanofibers/nanotubes, as well as their researches related, are demonstrated in sequence. Furthermore, the possible mechanism of improving biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomedical materials by nanofibers or nanotubes has been speculated to be that the specific protein absorption on the nanoscaled fibers or tubes plays important roles.

  8. Biocompatibility of the micro-patterned NiTi surface produced by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We fabricated different micro-patterns (grooves, ripples, holes and nanoparticles) on NiTi alloy surfaces to improve the biocompatibility. ► The new method of femtosecond laser (FSL) machining technique was used to obtain the novel micro-patterns, and the authors explored the mechanism of the FSL machining process. ► We the surface characteristics of NiTi surfaces before and after the FSL treatment, and evaluated the influence of FSL treatment on biocompatibility of NiTi alloys. - Abstract: Biocompatibility of the micro-patterned NiTi surface produced by femtosecond laser (FSL) was studied in this work. The surface characteristics of the laser treated NiTi alloys were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atom force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). The biocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro cell culture test. The results showed that, grooves, ripples, which covered by nanoparticles were formed on the sample surfaces, and the Ni/Ti ratio on the alloy surface increased with increasing laser energy. The crystal structure was not changed by laser treatment. However, the cell culture test proved that the micro-patterns induced by FSL were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility of NiTi alloys: the growth of osteoblasts oriented along the grooves, a large amount of synapses and filopodias were formed due to the ripples, holes and nanoparticles on the alloy surface, and the proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content of cells were increased after FSL treatment. However, due to the toxicity of Ni ions on cell growth, the NiTi alloy surface should not be treated by laser fluence of more than 3.82 J/cm2 to obtain the ideal biocompatibility.

  9. Is degradable antibiotic coating for synthetic meshes provide protection against experimental animal infection after fascia repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letouzey, Vincent; Lavigne, Jean Philippe; Garric, Xavier; Coudane, Jean; de Tayrac, Renaud; Callaghan, David O

    2012-02-01

    The surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse using synthetic mesh can fail because of slow or partial implant integration due to poor biocompatibility or infection. As systemic antibiotic prophylaxis has only limited success, we have developed a system that coats standard polypropylene mesh with clinically relevant antibiotics. Amoxicillin and ofloxacin are both released from the mesh in vitro at high levels over 3 days, preventing adhesion and biofilm formation by a clinical isolate of E. coli. In an in vivo incisional hernia repair model in rats, the antibiotic-coated mesh results in appropriate tissue integration with adequate vascularization and collagen formation. When implanted animals are infected with virulent E. coli, both antibiotic coatings provide full protection against infection (as assessed both clinically and microbiologically), thus demonstrating their bioavailability. This method is a specific approach for producing a therapeutic coating that could reduce postsurgical infections. PMID:22102417

  10. Mechanical strength and biocompatibility of ultrafine-grained commercial purity titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrin, Yuri; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Lapovok, Rimma; Ng, Hoi Pang; Jo, Ji-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The effect of grain refinement of commercial purity titanium by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) on its mechanical performance and bone tissue regeneration is reported. In vivo studies conducted on New Zealand white rabbits did not show an enhancement of biocompatibility of ECAP-modified titanium found earlier by in vitro testing. However, the observed combination of outstanding mechanical properties achieved by ECAP without a loss of biocompatibility suggests that this is a very promising processing route to bioimplant manufacturing. The study thus supports the expectation that commercial purity titanium modified by ECAP can be seen as an excellent candidate material for bone implants suitable for replacing conventional titanium alloy implants. PMID:23936857

  11. MgO-doped tantalum coating on Ti: microstructural study and biocompatibility evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mangal; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-02-01

    Pure and MgO incorporated Ta coatings were prepared on Cp-Ti substrate using laser engineered net shaping (LENS), which resulted in diffuse coating-substrate interface. MgO was found along the Ta grain boundaries in the Ta matrix that increased the coating hardness from 185 ± 2.7 HV to 794 ± 93 HV. In vitro biocompatibility study showed excellent early cellular attachment and later stage proliferation in MgO incorporated coatings. The results indicated that although Ta coatings had higher biocompatibility than Ti, it could further be improved by incorporating MgO in the coating, while simultaneously improving the mechanical properties. PMID:22248182

  12. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Poly(vinyl alcohol)/N,O-Carboxymethyl Chitosan Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Tunku Kamarul; Krishnamurithy, G.; Salih, Noman D.; Nurul Syuhada Ibrahim; Hanumantha Rao Balaji Raghavendran; Abdul Razzaq Suhaeb; D. S. K. Choon

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo biocompatibility and toxicity of PVA/NOCC scaffold were tested by comparing them with those of a biocompatible inert material HAM in a rat model. On Day 5, changes in the blood parameters of the PVA/NOCC-implanted rats were significantly higher than those of the control. The levels of potassium, creatinine, total protein, A/G, hemoglobulin, erythrocytes, WBC, and platelets were not significantly altered in the HAM-implanted rats, when compared with those in the control. On Day 10,...

  13. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Biocompatibility Study of Highly Crystalline Carbonated Hydroxyapatite Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Caibao; Chen, Yingzhi; Huang, Yongzhuo; Zhu, Peizhi

    2015-08-01

    Highly crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanorods with different carbonate contents were synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method. The crystallinity and chemical structure of synthesized nanorods were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo-electronic spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The biocompatibility of synthesized CHA nanorods was evaluated by cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MG-63 cell line. The biocompatibility evaluation results show that these CHA nanorods are biologically active apatites and potentially promising bone-substitute biomaterials for orthopedic application.

  14. Biocompatibility of magnesium implants in primary human reaming debris-derived cells stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Charyeva, Olga; Dakischew, Olga; Sommer, Ursula; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of magnesium for resorbable metal implants is a new concept in orthopaedic and dental medicine. The majority of studies on magnesium’s biocompatibility in vitro have assessed the short-term effect of magnesium extract on cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of direct exposure to magnesium alloys on the bioactivity of primary human reaming debris-derived (HRD) cells. Materials and methods Pure Mg, Mg2Ag, WE43 and Mg10Gd were tested for biocompatibility. The...

  15. Biodegradation and in vivo biocompatibility of rosin: a natural film-forming polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Satturwar, Prashant M.; Fulzele, Suniket V.; Dorle, Avinash K

    2003-01-01

    The specific aim of the present study was to investigate the biodegradation and biocompatibility characteristics of rosin, a natural film-forming polymer. Both in vitro as well as in vivo methods were used for assessment of the same. The in vitro degradation of rosin films was followed in pH 7.4 phosphate buffered saline at 37°C and in vivo by subdermal implantation in rats for up to 90 days. Initial biocompatibility was followed on postoperative days 7, 14, 21, and 28 by histological observa...

  16. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  17. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonidandel Scott

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (p = 0.008. Contrary to popular opinion among synthetic biologists, however, low religiosity individuals were more influenced negatively by the framing manipulation than high religiosity people. Our results suggest that synthetic biologists directly influence public perception of their field through avoidance of the word "create".

  18. Practical Applications of Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging has been a focus of research for almost 3 decades. The research carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging has demonstrated that synthetic aperture focusing not only can be used in-vivo, but that it also yields superior B-mode and blood flow images. In the last...... years synthetic aperture focusing has moved from the lab to commercial products. The implementations vary in their scope and purpose. Some scanners use synthetic aperture imaging to improve the detail and contrast resolution of the system. Others to increase the image uniformity. Yet others use...... synthetic aperture acquisition to achieve high frame rates and superior flow estimations. On the other end of the scale are the systems that utilize synthetic aperture techniques to reduce the data rate and take advantage of modern computer hardware. Retrospecitve transmit beamformation, zone sonography...

  19. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryJoe K Rice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  20. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Krams, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON–OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and tog...

  1. Synergistic Synthetic Biology: Units in Concert

    OpenAIRE

    PabloCarbonell; Jean-YvesTrosset

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims at translating the methods and strategies from engineering into biology in order to streamline the design and construction of biological devices through standardized parts. Modular synthetic biology devices are designed by means of an adequate elimination of cross-talk that makes circuits orthogonal and specific. To that end, synthetic constructs need to be adequately optimized through in silico modeling by choosing the right complement of genetic parts and by experimen...

  2. The population genetics of synthetic lethals.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, P. C.; Johnson, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic lethals are variants at different loci that have little or no effect on viability singly but cause lethality in combination. The importance of synthetic lethals and, more generally, of synthetic deleterious loci (SDL) has been controversial. Here, we derive the expected frequencies for SDL under a mutation-selection balance for the complete haploid model and selected cases of the diploid model. We have also obtained simple approximations that demonstrate good fit to exact solutions ...

  3. Synthetic Jet Propulsion for Small Underwater Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, AnnMarie Polsenberg; Milano, Michele; G’Sell, Maxwell Grazier; Fischer, Kathleen; Burdick, Joel

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new synthetic jet actuation concept for small, low speed, highly maneuverable AUVs. Synthetic jet thrusters, which produce jets of vortex rings, are inspired by the pulsatile jet propulsion of salps, jellyfish, and squid. To assess the potential utility of this scheme, we developed synthetic jet actuator prototypes, and verified their function via both force measurement and flow visualization experiments. We used a genetic-algorithm based technique for optimizin...

  4. Experimental investigation of a control synthetic jet

    OpenAIRE

    Kopecký Václav; Trávníček Zdeněk; Kordík Jozef; Němcová Lucie

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic jets were used in previous studies to control a continuous round air jet. This study focuses on the single synthetic jet, which is measured using Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Velocity profiles and frequency characteristics of the single synthetic jet are discussed and the velocity maps at frequencies of 30 Hz, 81 Hz and 190 Hz are presented. Finally, velocity, flow rate and momentum coefficients featured the present flow control are eva...

  5. NPS high resolution synthetic aperture sonar

    OpenAIRE

    Welter, Joseph Donald

    1995-01-01

    This thesis investigated the use of synthetic aperture techniques to achieve a long effective aperture, high resolution, imaging sonar. The approach included a full simulation of the system using the MATLAB programming environment that provided a model for developing six data processing algorithms and a working 25KHz, 1 m baseline, air medium synthetic aperture sonar. The six azimuthal processing techniques included: (1) a normal, real aperture, (2) an unfocussed synthetic aperture, (3) a hyb...

  6. Synthetic Cathinones: A New Public Health Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Karila, Laurent; Megarbane, Bruno; Cottencin, Olivier; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) have completely modified the drug scene and the current landscape of addiction. Synthetic substances, such as substituted or synthetic cathinones, also known as « legal highs », are often produced and used to mimic the effects of controlled drugs such as cocaine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), and methamphetamine. The overwhelming majority of synthetic cathinones are produced in China and South East Asian countries. The Internet has emerged as...

  7. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    MaryJoe K Rice; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic bi...

  8. Interaction of derived polymers from pyrrole with biocompatible solutions; Interaccion de polimeros derivados de pirrol con soluciones biocompatibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez G, O. G.

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a study about the synthesis by plasma, the electric properties and superficial interaction of polymers derived from pyrrole doped with Iodine with potential use as bio material. Poly-pyrrole is a semiconductor and biocompatible polymer with potential application in the development of artificial muscles and implants where the electric interaction between cells and material is an important variable. The syntheses were made at 13.5 MHz in a glass tubular reactor of 1500 cm{sup 3} with electrodes of 6.5 cm diameter and stainless steel flanges. An electrode was connected to the RF terminal of the power supply that is combined with a matching coupling resistance. The monomer and dopant used in this work were pyrrole and Iodine respectively, in closed containers. They were vaporized and injected separately into the reactor at room temperature and 0.1 mbar. The vapors of the reagents mixed freely in the reactor. The synthesis time was 240 min at 40, 60, 80 and 100 W. The polymers were obtained as thin films adhered to the reactor walls. The films were washed and swollen with distilled water and removed from the reactor walls with a small spatula. The polymers were irradiated with gamma rays at 18 and 22 KGy. Due to the fact that the doses are cumulative, the final dose applied was 40 KGy. The polymers characterization was carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, electrical conductivity and X-ray diffraction. The analyses indicates that the polymers have very similar structure in almost the entire power range, showing C-O, C=C, C-H, O-H, N-H bonds with a predominantly amorphous structure. The TGA analyses showed that the material has 4 or 5 loses of material. The first one starts after that 115 C except for the material irradiated at 40 KGy, this one begins in 87 C, the second one is in the interval of 196 and 295 C, the third one between 311 and 500 C, and the

  9. Parity-Time Synthetic Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Liang; Ma, Renmin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetry is a fundamental notion in quantum field theories1,2. It has opened a new paradigm for non-Hermitian Hamiltonians ranging from quantum mechanics, electronics, to optics. In the realm of optics, optical loss is responsible for power dissipation, therefore typically degrading device performance such as attenuation of a laser beam. By carefully exploiting optical loss in the complex dielectric permittivity, however, recent exploration of PT symmetry revolutionizes our understandings in fundamental physics and intriguing optical phenomena such as exceptional points and phase transition that are critical for high-speed optical modulators3-9. The interplay between optical gain and loss in photonic PT synthetic matters offers a new criterion of positively utilizing loss to efficiently manipulate gain and its associated optical properties10-19. Instead of simply compensating optical loss in conventional lasers, for example, it is theoretically proposed that judiciously designed delicate modu...

  10. Engineering life through Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Paras; Kamma, Akhil

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is a field involving synthesis of novel biological systems which are not generally found in nature. It has brought a new paradigm in science as it has enabled scientists to create life from the scratch, hence helping better understand the principles of biology. The viability of living organisms that use unnatural molecules is also being explored. Unconventional projects such as DNA playing tic-tac-toe, bacterial photographic film, etc. are taking biology to its extremes. The field holds a promise for mass production of cheap drugs and programming bacteria to seek-and-destroy tumors in the body. However, the complexity of biological systems make the field a challenging one. In addition to this, there are other major technical and ethical challenges which need to be addressed before the field realizes its true potential. PMID:17274769

  11. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2014-06-30

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  12. Synthetically simple, highly resilient hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jun; Lackey, Melissa A; Madkour, Ahmad E; Saffer, Erika M; Griffin, David M; Bhatia, Surita R; Crosby, Alfred J; Tew, Gregory N

    2012-03-12

    Highly resilient synthetic hydrogels were synthesized by using the efficient thiol-norbornene chemistry to cross-link hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer chains. The swelling and mechanical properties of the hydrogels were controlled by the relative amounts of PEG and PDMS. The fracture toughness (G(c)) was increased to 80 J/m(2) as the water content of the hydrogel decreased from 95% to 82%. In addition, the mechanical energy storage efficiency (resilience) was more than 97% at strains up to 300%. This is comparable with one of the most resilient materials known: natural resilin, an elastic protein found in many insects, such as in the tendons of fleas and the wings of dragonflies. The high resilience of these hydrogels can be attributed to the well-defined network structure provided by the versatile chemistry, low cross-link density, and lack of secondary structure in the polymer chains. PMID:22372639

  13. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  14. Synthetic biology: a utilitarian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    I examine the positive and negative features of synthetic biology ('SynBio') from a utilitarian ethical perspective. The potential beneficial outcomes from SynBio in the context of medicine are substantial; however it is not presently possible to predict precise outcomes due to the nascent state of the field. Potential negative outcomes from SynBio also exist, including iatrogenesis and bioterrorism; however it is not yet possible to quantify these risks. I argue that the application of a 'precautionary' approach to SynBio is ethically fraught, as is the notion that SynBio-associated knowledge ought to be restricted. I conclude that utilitarians ought to support a broadly laissez-faire stance in respect of SynBio. PMID:24010857

  15. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  16. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  17. Practical Applications of Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging has been a focus of research for almost 3 decades. The research carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging has demonstrated that synthetic aperture focusing not only can be used in-vivo, but that it also yields superior B-mode and blood flow images. In the last years synthetic aperture focusing has moved from the lab to commercial products. The implementations vary in their scope and purpose. Some scanners use synthetic aperture imaging to improve the det...

  18. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  19. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility of alginate-polycation microcapsules designed for islet transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Susan Kimberly

    Microencapsulation represents a method for immunoprotecting transplanted therapeutic cells or tissues from graft rejection using a physical barrier. This approach is advantageous in that it eliminates the need to induce long-term immunosuppression and allows the option of transplanting non-cadaveric cell sources, such as animal cells and stem cell-derived tissues. The microcapsules that we have investigated are designed to immunoprotect islets of Langerhans (i.e. clusters of insulin-secreting cells), with the goal of treating insulin-dependent diabetes. With the aid of techniques for physicochemical analysis, this research focused on understanding which properties of the microcapsule are the most important for determining its biocompatibility. The objective of this work was to elucidate correlations between the chemical make-up, physicochemical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of alginate-based microcapsules. Our approach was based on the hypothesis that the immune response to the microcapsules is governed by, and can therefore be controlled by, specific physicochemical properties of the microcapsule and its material components. The experimental work was divided into five phases, each associated with a specific aim : (1) To prove that immunoglobulins adsorb to the surface of alginate-polycation microcapsules, and to correlate this adsorption with the microcapsule chemistry. (2) To test interlaboratory reproducibility in making biocompatible microcapsules, and evaluate the suitability of our materials and fabrication protocols for subsequent studies. (3) To determine which physicochemical properties of alginates affect the in vivo biocompatibility of their gels. (4) To determine which physiochemical properties of alginate-polycation microcapsules are most important for determining their in vivo biocompatibility (5) To determine whether a modestly immunogenic membrane hinders or helps the ability of the microcapsule to immunoprotect islet xenografts in

  20. The 'atom-splitting' moment of synthetic biology: Nuclear physics and synthetic biology share common features

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, Alex J; Kleinert, Aleysia; Verdier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology and nuclear physics share many commonalities in terms of public perception and funding. Synthetic biologists could learn valuable lessons from the history of the atomic bomb and nuclear power.

  1. Approaches to hybrid synthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek

    All living creatures are made up of cells that have the ability to replicate themselves in a repetitive process called cell division. As these cells mature and divide into two there is an extensive movement of cellular components. In order to perform this essential task that sustains life, cells have evolved machines composed of proteins. Biological motors, such as kinesin, transport intracellular cargo and position organelles in eukaryotic cells via unidirectional movement on cytoskeletal tracts called microtubules. Biomolecular motor proteins have the potential to be used as 'nano-engines' for switchable devices, directed self assembly, controlled bioseparations and powering nano- and microelectromechanical systems. However, engineering such systems requires fabrication processes that are compatible with biological materials such as kinesin motor proteins and microtubules. The first objective of the research was to establish biocompatibility between protein systems and nanofabrication. The second objective was to use current micro- and nanofabrication techniques for patterning proteins at specific locations and to study role of casein in supporting the operation of surface bound kinesin. The third objective was to link kinesin and microtubule system to cellulose nanowhiskers. The effects of micro- and nanofabrication processing chemicals and resists on the functionality of casein, kinesin, and microtubule proteins are systematically examined to address the important missing link of the biocompatibility of micro- and nanofabrication processes needed to realize hybrid system fabrication. It was found that both casein, which is used to prevent motor denaturation on surfaces, and kinesin motors are surprisingly tolerant of most of the processing chemicals examined. Microtubules, however, are much more sensitive. Exposure to the processing chemicals leads to depolymerization, which is partially attributed to the pH of the solutions examined. When the chemicals were

  2. Cell-free biology: exploiting the interface between synthetic biology and synthetic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, D. Calvin; Jewett, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Just as synthetic organic chemistry once revolutionized the ability of chemists to build molecules (including those that did not exist in nature) following a basic set of design rules, cell-free synthetic biology is beginning to provide an improved toolbox and faster process for not only harnessing but also expanding the chemistry of life. At the interface between chemistry and biology, research in cell-free synthetic systems is proceeding in two different directions: using synthetic biology ...

  3. Comparison of in vivo biocompatibilities between parylene-C and polydimethylsiloxane for implantable microelectronic devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dong Sup Lee; Su Jin Kim; Eun Bi Kwon; Cheol Whee Park; Su Min Jun; Bumkyoo Choi; Sae Woong Kim

    2013-11-01

    Implantable devices are often composed of or coated with different biologically compatible materials based on their requirements. Selecting a surface material for an implantable device is not an easy task, and it is necessary to compare the biocompatibilities of the available surface materials. In this study, we perform a comparison of the in vivo biocompatibilities of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and para-xylyene polymer (parylene-C) as they are considered to be candidates for a coating material for implantable microelectronic devices. For in vivo biocompatibility testing, fifty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for testing, and they were divided into three groups (PDMS, parylene-C and a positive control). At one, four and twelve weeks after implantation of the test object, the density of inflammatory cells and the granulation layer thickness were recorded for each group and compared with other groups using visible light and fluorescence microscopy. The thickness of the granulation layer tended to decrease over time for all of the experimental groups, whereas the granulation layer thickness remained constant in the positive control group. The thinnest capsular layer was observed for the parylene-C group and fewest inflammatory cells were observed in this group during the entire experimental period. Macrophage infiltration was minimal, even at one week, and was not observed thereafter. The parylene-C group showed better biocompatibility than the PDMS groups, both for acute and chronic implantation. Thus, parylene-C is the best candidate of the tested materials for applications involving permanent implantable micro-devices.

  4. Structural and biocompatible characterization of TiC/a:C nanocomposite thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balázsi, K.; Vandrovcová, Marta; Bačáková, Lucie; Balázsi, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2013), s. 1671-1675. ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1858 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : TiC * nanocomposite * biocompatibility , * MG63 osteoblast Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2013

  5. Diamond/graphite content and biocompatibility of DLC filmsfabricated by PLD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Remsa, Jan; Mikšovský, Jan; Zemek, Josef; Smetana, K. Jr.; Dvořánková, B.; Luxbacher, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 4 (2010), 579-583. ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : biocompatibility * DLC * PLD Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2010

  6. Controllable synthesis of functional nanocomposites: Covalently functionalize graphene sheets with biocompatible L-lysine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The biocompatible L-lysine functionalized graphene sheets (Gs/Lys) were synthesized controllably using a novel method. ► The Gs/Lys nanocomposites are water-soluble, biocompatible and chiral. ► A chiral graphene derivative was proposed. - Abstract: In this paper a novel method to synthesize functionalize graphene sheets (Gs) by biocompatible L-lysine (Gs/Lys) is reported. The method was composed of two steps: (1) we controllably synthesized self-assembly Gs/Lys-Cu-Lys through the terminal amino of copper L-lysine (Lys-Cu-Lys) attaching to graphite oxide (GO) and then reducing. (2) Obtained the Gs/Lys by eliminating the copper ion. This method could also be used to functionalize other nanomaterials by L-lysine. The Gs/Lys nanocomposites are water-soluble, biocompatible, and above all, it is a chiral material of graphene, which is proposed by us. This novel material will be promising for more applications of graphene. The formation of Gs/Lys nanocomposites were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis.

  7. TEM studies of biocompatible nanodiamond probes for in vivo multimodal bioimaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Jiří; Hrubý, Martin; Filippov, Sergey K.; Macková, Hana; Kučka, Jan; Proks, Vladimír; Turner, S.; Bals, S.; Řehoř, Ivan; Cígler, Petr

    Pisa : European Polymer Federation, 2013. P6-78. [European Polymer Congress - EPF 2013. 16.06.2013-21.06.2013, Pisa] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0640 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : nanodiamond * biocompatibility Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X)

  8. In vitro and in vivo studies on biocompatibility of carbon fibres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajzer, I.; Menaszek, E.; Bačáková, Lucie; Rom, M.; Blazewicz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 9 (2010), s. 2611-2622. ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1000 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : carbon fibres * biocompatibility Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2010

  9. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hua; Ye Xiaojian; Li Jiashun, E-mail: ljsspine@163.co [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  10. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ye, Xiao-Jian; Li, Jia-Shun

    2009-08-01

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:19605959

  11. Zero-field birefringence of biocompatible magnetic fluids: A concentration dependence investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero-field birefringence was used to investigate maghemite-based biocompatible magnetic fluids surface-coated with citrate. The model used to analyze the birefringence signal considers the dipolar magnetic interaction among dimers and the onset of a nematic phase near the sample holder surface. The data show that zero-field birefringence grows with sample dilution

  12. Tailoring Properties of Biocompatible PEG-DMA Hydrogels with UV Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Sania; Benavente, Juana; Berg, Rolf W.;

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are highly water-absorbent hydrophilic polymer networks, which show potential in many biocompatible ap- plications. In previous work, we demonstrated the feasibility of using poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEG-DMA) gels polymerized with a photoinitiator for encapsulation and stab...

  13. Enhanced biocompatibility and wound healing properties of biodegradable polymer-modified allyl 2-cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ju; Son, Ho Sung; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Ji Hye; Choi, Samjin; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-06-01

    As poly L-lactic acid (PLLA) is a polymer with good biocompatibility and biodegradability, we created a new tissue adhesive (TA), pre-polymerized allyl 2-cyanoacrylate (PACA) mixed with PLLA in an effort to improve biocompatibility and mechanical properties in healing dermal wound tissue. We determined optimal mixing ratios of PACA and PLLA based on their bond strengths and chemical structures analyzed by the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In vitro biocompatibility of the PACA/PLLA was evaluated using direct- and indirect-contact methods according to the ISO-10993 cytotoxicity test for medical devices. The PACA/PLLA have similar or even better biocompatibility than those of commercially available cyanoacrylate (CA)-based TAs such as Dermabond® and Histoacryl®. The PACA/PLLA were not different from those exposed to Dermabond® and Histoacryl® in Raman spectra when biochemical changes of protein and DNA/RNA underlying during cell death were compared utilizing Raman spectroscopy. Histological analysis revealed that incised dermal tissues of rats treated with PACA/PLLA showed less inflammatory signs and enhanced collagen formation compared to those treated with Dermabond® or Histoacryl®. Of note, tissues treated with PACA/PLLA were stronger in the tensile strength compared to those treated with the commercially available TAs. Therefore, taking all the results into consideration, the PACA/PLLA we created might be a clinically useful TA for treating dermal wounds. PMID:25842106

  14. Synthesis of microbial elastomers based on soybean oily acids. Biocompatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocompatibility studies of the autoxidized and unoxidized unsaturated medium-long chain length (m-lcl) co-poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (m-lclPHAs) derived from soya oily acids have been reported. Pseudomonas oleovorans was grown on a series of mixtures of octanoic acid (OA) and soya oily acids (Sy) with weight ratios of 20:80, 28:72 and 50:50 in order to obtain unsaturated m-lcl copolyesters coded PHO-Sy-2080, PHO-Sy-2872 and PHO-Sy-5050, respectively. The PHA films were obtained by solvent cast from CHCl3. They were all originally sticky and waxy except PHO-Sy-5050. Autoxidation of the unsaturated copolyester films was carried out on exposure to air at room temperature in order to obtain crosslinked polymers. They became a highly flexible elastomer after being autoxidized (about 40 days of autoxidation). The in vivo tissue reactions of the autoxidized PHAs were evaluated by subcutaneous implantation in rats. The rats appeared to be healthy throughout the implantation period. No symptom such as necrosis, abscess or tumorigenesis was observed in the vicinity of the implants. Retrieved materials varied in their physical appearance after 6 weeks of implantation. In vivo biocompatibility studies of the medical applications indicated that the microbial copolyesters obtained were all biocompatible and especially the PHOSy series of copolyesters had the highest biocompatibility among them.

  15. Modified titanium surface with gelatin nano gold composite increases osteoblast cell biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Bhattarai, Govinda [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Aryal, Santosh [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nan-Hee [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min-Ho [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Gun [Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Jhee, Eun-Chung [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Yong [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun, E-mail: yihokn@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, BK21 program, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the gelatin nano gold (GnG) composite for surface modification of titanium in addition to insure biocompatibility on dental implants or biomaterials. The GnG composite was constructed by gelatin and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate in presence of reducing agent, sodium borohydrate (NabH{sub 4}). The GnG composite was confirmed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A dipping method was used to modify the titanium surface by GnG composite. Surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The MC-3T3 E1 cell viability was assessed by trypan blue and the expression of proteins to biocompatibility were analyzed by Western blotting. The GnG composite showed well dispersed character, the strong absorption at 530 nm, roughness, regular crystal and clear C, Na, Cl, P, and Au signals onto titanium. Further, this composite allowed MC-3T3 E1 growth and viability compared to gelatin and pure titanium. It induced ERK activation and the expression of cell adherent molecules, FAK and SPARC, and growth factor, VEGF. However, GnG decreased the level of SAPK/JNK. This shows that GnG composite coated titanium surfaces have a good biocompatibility for osteoblast growth and attachment than in intact by simple and versatile dipping method. Furthermore, it offers good communication between cell and implant surfaces by regulating cell signaling and adherent molecules, which are useful to enhance the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.

  16. Thermodynamics of non-bridging oxigen in silica bio-compatible glass-ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koga, N.; Strnad, Z.; Šesták, Jaroslav; Strnad, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2003), s. 927-937. ISSN 1418-2874 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4010101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : bio-compatible * bone-like apatite * glass-ceramics * mimetic material * thermodynamic s Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2002

  17. Modified titanium surface with gelatin nano gold composite increases osteoblast cell biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the gelatin nano gold (GnG) composite for surface modification of titanium in addition to insure biocompatibility on dental implants or biomaterials. The GnG composite was constructed by gelatin and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate in presence of reducing agent, sodium borohydrate (NabH4). The GnG composite was confirmed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A dipping method was used to modify the titanium surface by GnG composite. Surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The MC-3T3 E1 cell viability was assessed by trypan blue and the expression of proteins to biocompatibility were analyzed by Western blotting. The GnG composite showed well dispersed character, the strong absorption at 530 nm, roughness, regular crystal and clear C, Na, Cl, P, and Au signals onto titanium. Further, this composite allowed MC-3T3 E1 growth and viability compared to gelatin and pure titanium. It induced ERK activation and the expression of cell adherent molecules, FAK and SPARC, and growth factor, VEGF. However, GnG decreased the level of SAPK/JNK. This shows that GnG composite coated titanium surfaces have a good biocompatibility for osteoblast growth and attachment than in intact by simple and versatile dipping method. Furthermore, it offers good communication between cell and implant surfaces by regulating cell signaling and adherent molecules, which are useful to enhance the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.

  18. Nanocomposite coatings on biomedical grade stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Srinivasan; Mohana, Marimuthu; Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Raman, Vedarajan; Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Kim, Sanghyo; Kang, Yong Soo; Rajendran, Nallaiyan

    2012-10-24

    The 316 L stainless steel is one of the most commonly available commercial implant materials with a few limitations in its ease of biocompatibility and long-standing performance. Hence, porous TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated over 316 L stainless steels was studied for their enhanced performance in terms of its biocompatibility and corrosion resistance, following a sol-gel process via dip-coating technique. The surface composition and porosity texture was studied to be uniform on the substrate. Biocompatibility studies on the TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coatings were investigated by placing the coated substrate in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The immersion procedure resulted in the complete coverage of the TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite (coated on the surface of 316 L stainless steel) with the growth of a one-dimensional (1D) rod-like carbonate-containing apatite. The TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated specimens showed a higher corrosion resistance in the SBF solution with an enhanced biocompatibility, surpassing the performance of the pure oxide coatings. The cell viability of TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated implant surface was examined under human dermal fibroblasts culture, and it was observed that the composite coating enhances the proliferation through effective cellular attachment compared to pristine 316 L SS surface. PMID:22967070

  19. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  20. Development of novel biocompatible hybrid nanocomposites based on polyurethane-silica prepared by sol gel process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashti, Ali; Yahyaei, Hossein; Firoozi, Saman; Ramezani, Sara; Rahiminejad, Ali; Karimi, Roya; Farzaneh, Khadijeh; Mohseni, Mohsen; Ghanbari, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Due to high biocompatibility, polyurethane has found many applications, particularly in development of biomedical devices. A new nanocomposite based on thermoset polyurethane and silica nanoparticles was synthesized using sol-gel method. Sol-gel process was fulfilled in two acidic and basic conditions by using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and trimethoxyisocyanatesilane as precursors. The hybrid films characterized for mechanical and surface properties using tensile strength, contact angle, ATR-FTIR and scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the hybrids were assessed using standard MTT, LDH and TUNEL assays. The results revealed that incorporation of silica nanoparticles was significantly improved tensile strength and mechanical properties of the hybrids. Based on the contact angle results, silica nanoparticles increased hydrophilicity of the hybrids. Biocompatibility by using human lung epithelial cell line (MRC-5) demonstrated that the hybrids were significantly less cytotoxic compared to pristine polymer as tested by MTT and LDH assays. TUNEL assay revealed no signs of apoptosis in all tested samples. The results of this study demonstrated that incorporation of silica nanoparticles into polyurethane lead to the enhancement of biocompatibility, indicating that these hybrids could potentially be used in biomedical field in particular as a new coating for medical implants. PMID:27612823

  1. Palladium-Catalyzed Chemoselective and Biocompatible Functionalization of Cysteine-Containing Molecules at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shuaeeb, Riyadh Ahmed Atto; Kolodych, Sergii; Koniev, Oleksandr; Delacroix, Sébastien; Erb, Stéphane; Nicolaÿ, Stéphanie; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Cianférani, Sarah; Alami, Mouâd; Wagner, Alain; Messaoudi, Samir

    2016-08-01

    The third generation of aminobiphenyl palladacycle pre-catalyst "G3-Xantphos" enables functionalization of peptides containing cysteine in high yields. The conjugation (bioconjugation) occurs chemoselectively at room temperature under biocompatible conditions. Extension of the method to protein functionalization allows selective bioconjugation of the trastuzumab antibody. PMID:27362372

  2. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron Particles (NZVI) Synthesized using tea-polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A “green” protocol was used for the rapid generation of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles using tea polyphenols. The NZVI particles were subsequently examined for in vitro biocompatibility using the human keratinocyte cell (HaCaT) line as a skin exposure model. The cell...

  3. Biocompatibility and tolerability of a purely bicarbonate-buffered peritoneal dialysis solution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, L.; Stegmayr, B.; Malmsten, G.; Tejde, M.; Hadimeri, H.; Siegert, C.E.; Ahlmen, J.; Larsson, R.; Ingman, B.; Simonsen, O.; Hamersvelt, H.W. van; Johansson, A.C.; Hylander, B.; Mayr, M.; Nilsson, P.H.; Andersson, P.O.; Los Rios, T. De

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Novel peritoneal dialysis solutions are characterized by a minimal content of glucose degradation products and a neutral pH. Many studies have shown the biocompatibility of neutral lactate-buffered solutions; however, until now, the effect of purely bicarbonate-buffered solutions has not

  4. Influence of mechanical instruments on the biocompatibility of titanium dental implants surfaces: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Louropoulou; D.E. Slot; F. van der Weijden

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of mechanical instruments on the biocompatibility of titanium dental implant surfaces. Materials and methods MEDLINE, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched up to December 2013, to identify controlled studies o

  5. Short-and long-term neural biocompatibility of heparin coated sapphire implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Anfeng [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); McAllister, James P. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Wayne State University, 4201 Antoine Street, UHC-6E, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Finlayson, Paul [Department of Otolaryngology, Wayne State University, 550 E Canfield, Lande Room 327, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Li, Jie [Department of Neurological Surgery, Wayne State University, 4201 Antoine Street, UHC-6E, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Brabant, Kelley [Department of Neurological Surgery, Wayne State University, 4201 Antoine Street, UHC-6E, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Tang Haiying [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Black, Carolyn [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Wayne State University, 4201 Antoine Street, UHC-6E, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Cao Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Liang Xuemei [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Salley, Steven O. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Auner, Gregory W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Ng, K.Y. Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)]. E-mail: sng@wayne.edu

    2007-03-15

    Sapphire is one of the most promising materials for the development of implantable biomedical devices due to its exceptional chemical, mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. Silicon has also been widely used to manufacture neuroprosthetic devices in the past. However, both of these materials have been found to cause the most severe tissue reactions while implanted in vivo in the rat brain, compared with other biomaterials. In order to enhance the biocompatibility of sapphire and silicon, their surfaces were modified by depositing a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS), followed by the photo-immobilization of heparin. To comprehensively evaluate the short- and long-term neural biocompatibility, sapphire and silicon wafers (2.5 mm dia x 0.25 mm thick) with and without heparin coating were implanted on the surface of adult rat's cortex for 10, 28 and 90 days. Specific evaluations of the cell types that contribute to an inflammatory response were performed. The histological results indicate that the biocompatibility of sapphire is dramatically improved by heparin immobilization, while this dramatic improvement is not observed on heparin coated silicon. The failure to improve the biocompatibility of silicon by heparin immobilization can be attributed to the corrosion of the silicon surface in vivo, which was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Meanwhile, no corrosion was observed on heparin coated sapphire surfaces and a very thin layer of proteins or extracellular matrix was deposited on the surfaces.

  6. Short-and long-term neural biocompatibility of heparin coated sapphire implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapphire is one of the most promising materials for the development of implantable biomedical devices due to its exceptional chemical, mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. Silicon has also been widely used to manufacture neuroprosthetic devices in the past. However, both of these materials have been found to cause the most severe tissue reactions while implanted in vivo in the rat brain, compared with other biomaterials. In order to enhance the biocompatibility of sapphire and silicon, their surfaces were modified by depositing a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS), followed by the photo-immobilization of heparin. To comprehensively evaluate the short- and long-term neural biocompatibility, sapphire and silicon wafers (2.5 mm dia x 0.25 mm thick) with and without heparin coating were implanted on the surface of adult rat's cortex for 10, 28 and 90 days. Specific evaluations of the cell types that contribute to an inflammatory response were performed. The histological results indicate that the biocompatibility of sapphire is dramatically improved by heparin immobilization, while this dramatic improvement is not observed on heparin coated silicon. The failure to improve the biocompatibility of silicon by heparin immobilization can be attributed to the corrosion of the silicon surface in vivo, which was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Meanwhile, no corrosion was observed on heparin coated sapphire surfaces and a very thin layer of proteins or extracellular matrix was deposited on the surfaces

  7. Modified titanium surface with gelatin nano gold composite increases osteoblast cell biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Bhattarai, Govinda; Aryal, Santosh; Lee, Nan-Hee; Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Tae-Gun; Jhee, Eun-Chung; Kim, Hak-Yong; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the gelatin nano gold (GnG) composite for surface modification of titanium in addition to insure biocompatibility on dental implants or biomaterials. The GnG composite was constructed by gelatin and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate in presence of reducing agent, sodium borohydrate (NabH 4). The GnG composite was confirmed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A dipping method was used to modify the titanium surface by GnG composite. Surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The MC-3T3 E1 cell viability was assessed by trypan blue and the expression of proteins to biocompatibility were analyzed by Western blotting. The GnG composite showed well dispersed character, the strong absorption at 530 nm, roughness, regular crystal and clear C, Na, Cl, P, and Au signals onto titanium. Further, this composite allowed MC-3T3 E1 growth and viability compared to gelatin and pure titanium. It induced ERK activation and the expression of cell adherent molecules, FAK and SPARC, and growth factor, VEGF. However, GnG decreased the level of SAPK/JNK. This shows that GnG composite coated titanium surfaces have a good biocompatibility for osteoblast growth and attachment than in intact by simple and versatile dipping method. Furthermore, it offers good communication between cell and implant surfaces by regulating cell signaling and adherent molecules, which are useful to enhance the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.

  8. In vivo qualitative analysis of the biocompatibility of different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Tobias Moretti Neto

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanocrylates have been widely used in the medical and dental fields for several years. In Dentistry, cyanoacrylates have been used for suturing, pulp capping, as retrofilling material in endodontic surgeries, and as cervical plug for pulpless teeth bleaching. The biocompatibility of these adhesives has been the topic of many researches and subcutaneous implantation is an effective methodology for these studies. The present study evaluated the biocompatibility of three different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives. Thirty-six Wistar rats were used, divided into four groups of 9 animals each: A (control - distilled water, B - cyanoacrylate ester (Super Bonder, C - n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl and D - alpha-cyanoacrylate (Three Bond. The materials were dispensed in sponges of polyvinyl chloride, the animals were incised and the sponges were inserted in the subcutaneous tissue and sutured. Each group was sub-divided according to the time of sacrifice of the animals: 7, 21 and 45 days. Subjective analysis of the histologic material showed that all groups presented some degree of irritability, but the inflammatory reaction decreased with the experimental time in all groups. Group D showed an inflammatory reaction which was closer to that of the control group and was considered to have good biocompatibility. Groups B and C were similar and presented more aggressive inflammatory reactions when compared to the control group. Based on the results, it was concluded that alpha-cyanoacrylate (Three Bond was the most biocompatible adhesive because it caused the lowest levels of inflammation.

  9. Soft and Stretchable Sensor Using Biocompatible Electrodes and Liquid for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzani, Tommaso; Liu, Hongbin; Nefti-Meziani, Samia; Althoefer, Kaspar; Menciassi, Arianna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article introduces a soft and stretchable sensor composed of silicone rubber integrating a conductive liquid-filled channel with a biocompatible sodium chloride (NaCl) solution and novel stretchable gold sputtered electrodes to facilitate the biocompatibility of the sensor. By stretching the sensor, the cross section of the channel deforms, thus leading to a change in electrical resistance. The functionalities of the sensor have been validated experimentally: changes in electrical resistance are measured as a function of the applied strain. The experimentally measured values match theoretical predictions, showing relatively low hysteresis. A preliminary assessment on the proposed sensor prototype shows good results with a maximum tested strain of 64%. The design optimization of the saline solution, the electrodes, and the algebraic approximations derived for integrating the sensors in a flexible manipulator for surgery has been discussed. The contribution of this article is the introduction of the biocompatible and stretchable gold sputtered electrodes integrated with the NaCl-filled channel rubber as a fully biocompatible solution for measuring deformations in soft and stretchable medical instruments.

  10. Effects of acid treatment on structure, properties and biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Incubation of carbon nanotubes in an acid mixture changes their chemical and physical properties as shown using spectroscopy and microscopy assays. ► Acid incubation of single-walled carbon nanotubes reduces their intrinsic cytotoxicity in relation to human epithelial cells. ► Multi-walled carbon nanotubes with user-controlled physical and chemical properties serve as platforms for the next generation of biosensors. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising to be the next generation of viable tools for bioapplications. Further advances in such bioapplications may depend on improved understanding of CNTs physical and chemical properties as well as control over their biocompatibility. Herein we performed a systematic study to show how acid oxidation treatment changes CNTs physical and chemical properties and leads to improved CNTs biocompatibility. Specifically, by incubating CNTs in a strong acid mixture we created a user-defined library of CNTs samples with different characteristics as recorded using Raman energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, or solubility tests. Systematically characterized CNTs were subsequently tested for their biocompatibility in relation to human epithelial cells or enzymes. Such selected examples are building pertinent relationships between CNTs biocompatibility and their intrinsic properties by showing that acid oxidation treatment lowers CNTs toxicity providing feasible platforms to be used for biomedical applications or the next generation of biosensors.

  11. Effects of acid treatment on structure, properties and biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Chenbo; Campell, Alan S.; Eldawud, Reem; Perhinschi, Gabriela [Department of Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Dinu, Cerasela Zoica, E-mail: cerasela-zoica.dinu@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of carbon nanotubes in an acid mixture changes their chemical and physical properties as shown using spectroscopy and microscopy assays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid incubation of single-walled carbon nanotubes reduces their intrinsic cytotoxicity in relation to human epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multi-walled carbon nanotubes with user-controlled physical and chemical properties serve as platforms for the next generation of biosensors. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising to be the next generation of viable tools for bioapplications. Further advances in such bioapplications may depend on improved understanding of CNTs physical and chemical properties as well as control over their biocompatibility. Herein we performed a systematic study to show how acid oxidation treatment changes CNTs physical and chemical properties and leads to improved CNTs biocompatibility. Specifically, by incubating CNTs in a strong acid mixture we created a user-defined library of CNTs samples with different characteristics as recorded using Raman energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, or solubility tests. Systematically characterized CNTs were subsequently tested for their biocompatibility in relation to human epithelial cells or enzymes. Such selected examples are building pertinent relationships between CNTs biocompatibility and their intrinsic properties by showing that acid oxidation treatment lowers CNTs toxicity providing feasible platforms to be used for biomedical applications or the next generation of biosensors.

  12. Steel desulphurization with synthetic slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heput, T.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, sulphur is considered a harmful element for steel quality, reason why all the technological steps are being taken in order to eliminate it from the metal bath. This paper deals with the influence of the chemical composition, on the slag quantity and of the bath stirring condition upon the desulphurization process in the casting ladle by treatment with synthetic slag. The experiments were made at an open-hearth plant with the steel tapping in two ladles (the desulphurization was made with synthetic slag at one ladle while the other one was considered standard and at the electric steel plant and for the synthetic slag formation a mix was used, made, according to several receipts, of: lime (50-75%, fluorine (0-17%, bauxite (0-32% and aluminous slag (8-22%. The data were processed in the calculation programs EXCEL and MATLAB, which resulted in a series of correlations between the desulphurization degree and the chemical composition of the slag, respectively the slag quantity both for the charges bubbled with Argon and the unbubbled ones.

    En general, el azufre es considerado un elemento nocivo para la calidad del acero y, por eso, en la práctica, se toman todas las medidas de orden tecnológico para su eliminación del baño metálico. En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la composición química, de la cantidad de escoria y del estado de agitación del baño sobre el proceso de desulfuración en la cuchara para fundir por tratamiento con escoria sintética. Los experimentos se han realizado en una acería evacuando el acero en dos ollas (en una cuchara se efectuó la desulfuración con escoria sintética y a la otra se consideró como patrón y en un acería eléctrica y para la formación de la escoria sintética se utilizó una mezcla producida según muchas recetas, formada por: cal (50-75%, fluorina (0-17%, bauxita (0-32% y escoria aluminosa (8-22%. Los datos han sido procesados en los programas de c

  13. Synthetic biology: programming cells for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörner, Maximilian; Reischmann, Nadine; Weber, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology is a novel biological discipline at the interface between traditional biology, chemistry, and engineering sciences. Synthetic biology aims at the rational design of complex synthetic biological devices and systems with desired properties by combining compatible, modular biological parts in a systematic manner. While the first engineered systems were mainly proof-of-principle studies to demonstrate the power of the modular engineering approach of synthetic biology, subsequent systems focus on applications in the health, environmental, and energy sectors. This review describes recent approaches for biomedical applications that were developed along the synthetic biology design hierarchy, at the level of individual parts, of devices, and of complex multicellular systems. It describes how synthetic biological parts can be used for the synthesis of drug-delivery tools, how synthetic biological devices can facilitate the discovery of novel drugs, and how multicellular synthetic ecosystems can give insight into population dynamics of parasites and hosts. These examples demonstrate how this new discipline could contribute to novel solutions in the biopharmaceutical industry. PMID:23502560

  14. Synthetic cannabimimetic agents metabolized by carboxylesterases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ragnar; Nielsen, Line M; Holm, Niels B;

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabimimetic agents are a large group of diverse compounds which act as agonists at cannabinoid receptors. Since 2004, synthetic cannabinoids have been used recreationally, although several of the compounds have been shown to cause severe toxicity in humans. In this study, the...

  15. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS and...

  16. Opportunities for microfluidic technologies in synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gulati, Shelly; Rouilly, Vincent; Niu, Xize; Chappell, James; Kitney, Richard I.; Edel, Joshua B.; Paul S Freemont; deMello, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce microfluidics technologies as a key foundational technology for synthetic biology experimentation. Recent advances in the field of microfluidics are reviewed and the potential of such a technological platform to support the rapid development of synthetic biology solutions is discussed.

  17. Synthetic Biology in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Lam, C.M.C.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.P.; Suarez Diez, M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology draws on the understanding from genetics, biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and computational sciences to (re-)design and (re-)engineer biological functions. Here we address how synthetic biology can be possibly deployed to promote health and tackle disease. We discuss how

  18. Upgrading protein synthesis for synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    O’Donoghue, Patrick; Ling, Jiqiang; Wang, Yane-Shih; Söll, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Genetic code expansion for synthesis of proteins containing noncanonical amino acids is a rapidly growing field in synthetic biology. Creating optimal orthogonal translation systems will require re-engineering central components of the protein synthesis machinery on the basis of a solid mechanistic biochemical understanding of the synthetic process.

  19. Synthetic aperture radar: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper an introduction to synthetic aperture radar is presented. Synthetic aperture radar is a relatively new remote sensing platform and the technology has matured a lot in the last two decades. This paper introduces the concepts behind SAR principles as well as the major areas where this new technology has shown additional information. (author)

  20. Biocompatibility of various hydoxyapatite scaffolds evaluated by proliferation of rat’s bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad F. Kamal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scaffold (biomaterial biocompatibility test should be performed in vitro prior to in vivo stem cell application in animal or clinical trial. These test consists of direct and indirect toxicity test (MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide]. Those tests were used to identify cell morphological changes, cell-substrate adhesion impairment, and reduction in cell proliferation activity.Methods: The tested scaffolds were hydroxyapatite-calcium sulphate (HA-CaSO4 (scaffold I, nano-particular HA paste (scaffold II, synthetic HA granule (scaffold III, bovine HA granule (scaffold IV, and morsellized bovine xenograft (scaffold V. Direct contact toxicity test and MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] were performed on those groups. In direct contact toxicity test, we put granules of various scaffolds within plates and incubated together with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In MTT assay we included phenol 20 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL group as positive control. Morphology, cell adhesion impairment, and cell growth were monitored daily until day-7. Cells counting in the direct contact toxicity test was conducted on day-7.Results: There were no changes on 24 hours observation after direct contact. On day-7, an impairment of cell adhesion to plastic substrates, changes in cell morphology, and cell death were observed, especially in scaffold I, scaffold II, and scaffold V. In MTT assay, only scaffold I, phenol 20 mg/mL, and phenol 100 mg/mL showed more than 50% inhibition at 24-hour and 7-day-observation. Extracts from scaffold II, III, IV, and V did not affect the viability and proliferation of bone marrow MSCs (inhibition value < 50%. Scaffold II, III, IV and V were proven non-cytotoxic and have good biocompatibility in vitro,  no statistical significant differences were observed among the scaffold groups (p > 0.05.Conclusion: We understand which scaffold was nontoxic or the least toxic to

  1. Development of a curved, stratified, in vitro model to assess ocular biocompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron K Postnikoff

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To further improve in vitro models of the cornea, this study focused on the creation of a three-dimensional, stratified, curved epithelium; and the subsequent characterization and evaluation of its suitability as a model for biocompatibility testing. METHODS: Immortalized human corneal epithelial cells were grown to confluency on curved cellulose filters for seven days, and were then differentiated and stratified using an air-liquid interface for seven days before testing. Varying concentrations of a commercial ophthalmic solution containing benzalkonium chloride (BAK, a known cytotoxic agent, and two relevant ocular surfactants were tested on the model. A whole balafilcon A lens soaked in phosphate buffered saline (BA PBS was also used to assess biocompatibility and verify the validity of the model. Viability assays as well as flow cytometry were performed on the cells to investigate changes in cell death and integrin expression. RESULTS: The reconstructed curved corneal epithelium was composed of 3-5 layers of cells. Increasing concentrations of BAK showed dose-dependent decreased cell viability and increased integrin expression and cell death. No significant change in viability was observed in the presence of the surfactants. As expected, the BA PBS combination appeared to be very biocompatible with no adverse change in cell viability or integrin expression. CONCLUSIONS: The stratified, curved, epithelial model proved to be sensitive to distinct changes in cytotoxicity and is suitable for continued assessment for biocompatibility testing of contact lenses. Our results showed that flow cytometry can provide a quantitative measure of the cell response to biomaterials or cytotoxic compounds for both the supernatant and adherent cell populations. As a specifically designed in vitro model of the corneal epithelium, this quantitative model for biocompatibility at the ocular surface may help improve our understanding of cell

  2. Phase transfer of hydrophobic QDs for water-soluble and biocompatible nature through silanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A facile and novel method has been developed for creating water-soluble and biocompatible CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with a small hydrodynamic diameter (less than 10 nm) via silanization. Highlights: ► A facile and novel method has been developed for creating water-soluble and biocompatible CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with a small hydrodynamic diameter (less than 10 nm). ► The control of ligand exchange plays an important role to retain high fluorescence quantum yields. ► The functional SiO2-coated QDs were conjugated with immunoglobin G antibody by using biotin–streptavidin as linkers. ► The QD phase transfer by silanization is a well-established method for generating biocompatible QDs. -- Abstract: A novel method has been developed for creating water-soluble and biocompatible CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with a small hydrodynamic diameter (less than 10 nm). The silanization of the QDs was carried out by using partially hydrolyzed tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to replace organic ammine or tri-n-octylphosphine oxide on the surface of the QDs. The partially hydrolyzed 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane attached to the hydrolyzed TEOS layer on the QDs prevented the QDs from agglomeration when the QDs were transferred into water. The functional SiO2-coated QDs were conjugated with immunoglobin G antibody by using biotin–streptavidin as linkers. The SiO2-coated QDs exhibited the same absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra as those of initial QDs in organic solvents. The SiO2-coated QDs preserved PL intensities, is colloidally stable over a wide pH range (pH 6–11). Because the mean diameter of amphiphilic polymer-coated QDs was almost 2 times of that of functional SiO2-coated QDs, the QD phase transfer by silanization is a well-established method for generating biocompatible QDs.

  3. Tantalum, Niobium and Titanium Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metals have a wide range of applications in implant and prosthetic materials in dentistry.Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of metals should be improved in order to utilizethem as biomaterials. The aim of this work was to prepare metallic coatings on 316L stainless steel dental implants, to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of the uncoated and metallic coated dentalimplants as an indication of biocompatibility and, to compare the effect of the type of the coatings on biocompatibility.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro evaluation, three types of metallic coatings including tantalum, niobium and titanium coatings were compared using a physical vapor deposition process on 316L stainless steel dental implants. Structural characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were utilized to investigatethe microstructure and morphology of the coatings. Electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed in two types of physiological solutions at 37±1°C in order to determine and compare the corrosioncurrent density and corrosion potential characteristics. The mean values were statistically compared by ANOVA at a 95% level of confidence.Results: the findings showed that all of the three types of metallic coatings had a positive effect on improvement of the corrosion behavior. The coatings could increase the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel and this trend was independent of the type of physiological environment.Conclusion: The biocompatible metallic coatings could decrease the corrosion current density and is a distinct advantage for prevention of ion release. Decreasing ion release can improve the biocompatibility of the dental implant, and consequently can prevent tissue damage, tissue inflammation and irritation, and can also lead to obtaining a desirable histopathological response.

  4. A Critical Perspective on Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Morange

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology emerged around 2000 as a new biological discipline. It shares with systems biology the same modular vision of organisms, but is more concerned with applications than with a better understanding of the functioning of organisms. A herald of this new discipline is Craig Venter who aims to create an artificial microorganism with the minimal genome compatible with life and to implement into it different 'functional modules' to generate new micro-organisms adapted to specific tasks. Synthetic biology is based on the possibilities raised by genetic engineering, but it aims to engineer organisms, and not simply to modify them, mimicking the practice of computer engineers. Three points will be discussed: In what regard does synthetic biology represent a new epistemology of the life sciences? What are the relations between synthetic biology and evolutionary biology? What is the raison d'être of synthetic biology as a discipline independent of nanotechnologies?

  5. Synthetic Landau levels for photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-30

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock–Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen–Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons. PMID:27281214

  6. Synthetic Landau levels for photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock–Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen–Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons.

  7. The major synthetic evolutionary transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Evolution is marked by well-defined events involving profound innovations that are known as ‘major evolutionary transitions'. They involve the integration of autonomous elements into a new, higher-level organization whereby the former isolated units interact in novel ways, losing their original autonomy. All major transitions, which include the origin of life, cells, multicellular systems, societies or language (among other examples), took place millions of years ago. Are these transitions unique, rare events? Have they instead universal traits that make them almost inevitable when the right pieces are in place? Are there general laws of evolutionary innovation? In order to approach this problem under a novel perspective, we argue that a parallel class of evolutionary transitions can be explored involving the use of artificial evolutionary experiments where alternative paths to innovation can be explored. These ‘synthetic’ transitions include, for example, the artificial evolution of multicellular systems or the emergence of language in evolved communicating robots. These alternative scenarios could help us to understand the underlying laws that predate the rise of major innovations and the possibility for general laws of evolved complexity. Several key examples and theoretical approaches are summarized and future challenges are outlined. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The major synthetic evolutionary transitions’. PMID:27431528

  8. Pyrazoloquinazolines: Synthetic strategies and bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mansi; Chauhan, Monika; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Alex, Jimi Marin; Kumar, Raj

    2015-06-01

    Numerous N-heterocycles are indisputably evidenced to exhibit myriad biological activities. In the recent past, attempts made to condense the various heterocycles have resulted in derivatives possessing better bioactivities. Among many such condensed heterocycles, pyrazoloquinazolines have managed to hold the attention of many researchers, owing to the broad spectrum of activities they portray. This review is the first of its kind to congregate the various pyrazoloquinazolines reported until now and categorizes these structurally isomeric classes into eleven different groups based on the fusion pattern of the ring such as [1,5-c], [5,1-b], [4,3-h], etc. Furthermore, this review is a concerted effort to highlight design, synthetic strategies as well as biological activities of each class of this condensed heterocycle. Structure-activity relationship studies and in silico approaches wherever reported have also been discussed. In addition, manuscript also offers scope for design, synthesis and generation of libraries of unreported classes of pyrazoloquinazolines for the biological evaluation. PMID:25438709

  9. A synthetic molecular pentafoil knot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayme, Jean-François; Beves, Jonathon E.; Leigh, David A.; McBurney, Roy T.; Rissanen, Kari; Schultz, David

    2012-01-01

    Knots are being discovered with increasing frequency in both biological and synthetic macromolecules and have been fundamental topological targets for chemical synthesis for the past two decades. Here, we report on the synthesis of the most complex non-DNA molecular knot prepared to date: the self-assembly of five bis-aldehyde and five bis-amine building blocks about five metal cations and one chloride anion to form a 160-atom-loop molecular pentafoil knot (five crossing points). The structure and topology of the knot is established by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography, revealing a symmetrical closed-loop double helicate with the chloride anion held at the centre of the pentafoil knot by ten CH···Cl- hydrogen bonds. The one-pot self-assembly reaction features an exceptional number of different design elements—some well precedented and others less well known within the context of directing the formation of (supra)molecular species. We anticipate that the strategies and tactics used here can be applied to the rational synthesis of other higher-order interlocked molecular architectures.

  10. Synthetic biology: mapping the scientific landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Oldham

    Full Text Available This article uses data from Thomson Reuters Web of Science to map and analyse the scientific landscape for synthetic biology. The article draws on recent advances in data visualisation and analytics with the aim of informing upcoming international policy debates on the governance of synthetic biology by the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. We use mapping techniques to identify how synthetic biology can best be understood and the range of institutions, researchers and funding agencies involved. Debates under the Convention are likely to focus on a possible moratorium on the field release of synthetic organisms, cells or genomes. Based on the empirical evidence we propose that guidance could be provided to funding agencies to respect the letter and spirit of the Convention on Biological Diversity in making research investments. Building on the recommendations of the United States Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues we demonstrate that it is possible to promote independent and transparent monitoring of developments in synthetic biology using modern information tools. In particular, public and policy understanding and engagement with synthetic biology can be enhanced through the use of online interactive tools. As a step forward in this process we make existing data on the scientific literature on synthetic biology available in an online interactive workbook so that researchers, policy makers and civil society can explore the data and draw conclusions for themselves.

  11. Effects of the Synthetic Neurosteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parésys, Lucie; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Bianchi, Massimiliano; Villey, Isabelle; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most currently available active antidepressant drugs are selective serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. However, as their clinical efficacy is not immediate, long-term administration is often accompanied by substantial side effects, and numerous patients remain non- or partial responders. We have recently found that the synthetic neurosteroid derivative 3β-methoxypregnenolone, which binds to the microtubule-associated protein-2, can provide a novel therapeutic approach in experimental model of depressive disorders in rats. To further validate the antidepressant-like efficacy of 3β-methoxypregnenolone, we investigated effects of a longer treatment (4-week oral administration; 50mg/kg/d) in a nonrodent species, the tree shrew, exposed to psychosocial stress that elicits close-to-human alterations observed in patients with depressive disorders. Methods: During the experimental period, physiological parameters were registered, including core body temperature and electroencephalogram, while animals were videotaped to analyze their avoidance behavior. Morning urine samples were collected for measurements of cortisol and noradrenaline levels. Results: We found that treatment with 3β-methoxypregnenolone abolished stress-triggered avoidance behavior and prevented hormone hypersecretion, hypothermia, and sleep disturbances, further suggesting its antidepressant-like efficacy. Comparative treatment with fluoxetine also prevented some of the physiological alterations, while the hypersecretion of cortisol and sleep disturbances were not or partially restored by fluoxetine, suggesting a better efficacy of 3β-methoxypregnenolone. Alpha-tubulin isoforms were measured in hippocampi: we found that 3β-methoxypregnenolone reversed the specific decrease in acetylation of α-tubulin induced by psychosocial stress, while it did not modify the psychosocial stress-elicited reduction of tyrosinated α-tubulin. Conclusions: Taken together, these data strongly suggest

  12. Fast Parametric Beamformer for Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a real-time delay-and-sum synthetic aperture beamformer. The beamforming delays and apodization coefficients are described parametrically. The image is viewed as a set of independent lines that are defined in 3-D by their origin, direction, and...... implementation of the beamformer is optimized with respect to the architecture of a novel synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS), in which 4 channels are processed by the same set of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA). In synthetic transmit aperture imaging, low-resolution images are formed...

  13. Grand challenges in space synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amor A; Montague, Michael G; Cumbers, John; Hogan, John A; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-12-01

    Space synthetic biology is a branch of biotechnology dedicated to engineering biological systems for space exploration, industry and science. There is significant public and private interest in designing robust and reliable organisms that can assist on long-duration astronaut missions. Recent work has also demonstrated that such synthetic biology is a feasible payload minimization and life support approach as well. This article identifies the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the field of space synthetic biology, while highlighting relevant progress. It also outlines anticipated broader benefits from this field, because space engineering advances will drive technological innovation on Earth. PMID:26631337

  14. A New Absorbable Synthetic Substitute With Biomimetic Design for Dural Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhidong; Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Deng, Kunxue; Liu, Man; Ke, Yiquan; Luo, Chengyi; Yuan, Tun; Ayyad, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Dural repair products are evolving from animal tissue-derived materials to synthetic materials as well as from inert to absorbable features; most of them lack functional and structural characteristics compared with the natural dura mater. In the present study, we evaluated the properties and tissue repair performance of a new dural repair product with biomimetic design. The biomimetic patch exhibits unique three-dimensional nonwoven microfiber structure with good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. The animal study showed that the biomimetic patch and commercially synthetic material group presented new subdural regeneration at 90 days, with low level inflammatory response and minimal to no adhesion formation detected at each stage. In the biological material group, no new subdural regeneration was observed and severe adhesion between the implant and the cortex occurred at each stage. In clinical case study, there was no cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and all the postoperation observations were normal. The biomimetic structure and proper rate of degradation of the new absorbable dura substitute can guide the meaningful reconstruction of the dura mater, which may provide a novel approach for dural defect repair. PMID:26526152

  15. Learning from Synthetic Data Using a Stacked Multichannel Autoencoder

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xi; Fu, Yanwei; Jiang, Shanshan; Sigal, Leonid; Agam, Gady

    2015-01-01

    Learning from synthetic data has many important and practical applications. An example of application is photo-sketch recognition. Using synthetic data is challenging due to the differences in feature distributions between synthetic and real data, a phenomenon we term synthetic gap. In this paper, we investigate and formalize a general framework-Stacked Multichannel Autoencoder (SMCAE) that enables bridging the synthetic gap and learning from synthetic data more efficiently. In particular, we...

  16. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences (AFS), in collaboration with the MIT Space Systems Laboratory (MIT-SSL), proposed the Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) program...

  17. NMR spectroscopy assists synthetic fuels research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cookson, D.J.; Smith, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proved to be a useful and versatile technique for the study of synthetic fuels feedstocks, catalysts, process intermediates and final products. Some applications of the technique to coal and gas conversion research are illustrated and discussed.

  18. Validation and acceptance of synthetic infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Moira I.; Bernhardt, Mark; Angell, Christopher R.; Hickman, Duncan; Whitehead, Philip; Patel, Dilip

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes the use of an image query database (IQ-DB) tool as a means of implementing a validation strategy for synthetic long-wave infrared images of sea clutter. Specifically it was required to determine the validity of the synthetic imagery for use in developing and testing automatic target detection algorithms. The strategy adopted for exploiting synthetic imagery is outlined and the key issues of validation and acceptance are discussed in detail. A wide range of image metrics has been developed to achieve pre-defined validation criteria. A number of these metrics, which include post processing algorithms, are presented. Furthermore, the IQ-DB provides a robust mechanism for configuration management and control of the large volume of data used. The implementation of the IQ-DB is reviewed in terms of its cardinal point specification and its central role in synthetic imagery validation and EOSS progressive acceptance.

  19. Synthetic Aperture Radar Missions Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the LightSAR project and summarizes actions the agency can undertake to support industry-led efforts to develop an operational synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability in the United States.

  20. Mechanical Strength and Biocompatibility of Ultrafine-Grained Commercial Purity Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Estrin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of grain refinement of commercial purity titanium by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP on its mechanical performance and bone tissue regeneration is reported. In vivo studies conducted on New Zealand white rabbits did not show an enhancement of biocompatibility of ECAP-modified titanium found earlier by in vitro testing. However, the observed combination of outstanding mechanical properties achieved by ECAP without a loss of biocompatibility suggests that this is a very promising processing route to bioimplant manufacturing. The study thus supports the expectation that commercial purity titanium modified by ECAP can be seen as an excellent candidate material for bone implants suitable for replacing conventional titanium alloy implants.

  1. In vitro calcification and in vivo biocompatibility of the cross-linked polypentapeptide of elastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vitro calcifiability and molecular weight dependence of calcification of the polypentapeptide, (L X Val1-L X Pro2-Gly3-L X Val4-Gly5)n, which had been gamma-irradiation cross-linked have been determined when exposed to dialyzates of normal, nonaugmented fetal bovine serum. The material was found to calcify: calcifiability was found to be highly molecular weight dependent and to be most favored when the highest molecular weight polymers (n approximately equal to 240) had been used for cross-linking. The in vivo biocompatibility, biodegradability, and calcifiability of the gamma-irradiation cross-linked polypentapeptide were examined in rabbits in both soft and hard tissue sites. The material was found to be biocompatible irrespective of its physical form and to be biodegradable but with n of 200 or less it was not shown to calcify or ossify in the rabbit tibial nonunion model

  2. [Electrochemical properties of biocompatible material hardness modifications on titanium and steel under mechanical loads].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, W; Walter, U; Holbein, R; Thull, R

    2005-04-01

    Friction corrosion may appear between different implant components or between implant and hard tissue. The sliding micro movements induce fretting wear corrosion and have been recently reported as a cause of joint prostheses failure. A surface coating is desirable, that retains the mechanical properties of the substrate, offers good biocompatibility and improves the fretting corrosion resistance. In this study it could be demonstrated that tantalum and niobium coatings fulfill the requirements. On titanium substrates the coating decreases the abrasion against PMMA, an orthopedic relevant material. Furthermore, in the case of medical steel substrates the biocompatibility and the corrosion properties are improved. The better abrasion-resistance is minimizing the release of allergological critical particles like nickel and chromium. PMID:15884706

  3. Zwitterionic Nanofibers of Super-Glue for Transparent and Biocompatible Multi-Purpose Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Elisa; Heredia-Guerrero, José A.; Bayer, Ilker S.; Ciofani, Gianni; Genchi, Giada G.; Ceseracciu, Luca; Davis, Alexander; Papadopoulou, Evie L.; Barthel, Markus J.; Marini, Lara; Ruffilli, Roberta; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that macrozwitterions of poly(ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate), commonly called Super Glue, can easily assemble into long and well defined fibers by electrospinning. The resulting fibrous networks are thermally treated on glass in order to create transparent coatings whose superficial morphology recalls the organization of the initial electrospun mats. These textured coatings are characterized by low liquid adhesion and anti-staining performance. Furthermore, the low friction coefficient and excellent scratch resistance make them attractive as solid lubricants. The inherent texture of the coatings positively affects their biocompatibility. In fact, they are able to promote the proliferation and differentiation of myoblast stem cells. Optically-transparent and biocompatible coatings that simultaneously possess characteristics of low water contact angle hysteresis, low friction and mechanical robustness can find application in a wide range of technological sectors, from the construction and automotive industries to electronic and biomedical devices.

  4. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended for use as an implantable neurostimulation device. After implantation for 2 and 4 weeks, tissue sections adjacent to the electrodes were obtained for histological analysis. Both types of implants were contained in a thin fibrous encapsulation layer, the thickness of which decreased with time. Although the level of neovascularization around the implants was similar, BDD electrodes elicited significantly thinner fibrous capsules and a milder inflammatory reaction at both time points. These results suggest that BDD films may constitute an appropriate material to support stable performance of implantable neural electrodes over time. PMID:27013949

  5. Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond electrodes for neural interfaces: In vivo biocompatibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María eAlcaide

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended for use as an implantable neurostimulation device. After implantation for 2 and 4 weeks, tissue sections adjacent to the electrodes were obtained for histological analysis. Both types of implants were contained in a thin fibrous encapsulation layer, the thickness of which decreased with time. Although the level of neovascularization around the implants was similar, BDD electrodes elicited significantly thinner fibrous capsules and a milder inflammatory reaction at both time points. These results suggest that BDD films may constitute an appropriate material to support stable performance of implantable neural electrodes over time.

  6. Biocompatibility of supercritical CO2-treated titanium implants in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C M; Kang, Q K; Wahl, C; Jimenez, A; Laberge, M; Drews, M; Matthews, M A; An, Y H

    2006-04-01

    Supercritical phase CO2 is a promising method for sterilizing implantable devices and tissue grafts. The goal of this study is to evaluate the biocompatibility of titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. At 5 weeks post implantation titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 produce a soft tissue reaction that is comparable to other methods of sterilization (steam autoclave, ultraviolet light radiation, ethylene oxide gas, and radio-frequency glow-discharge), as indicated by the thickness and density of the foreign body capsule, although there were some differences on the capillary density. Overall the soft tissue response to the implants was similar among all methods of sterilization, indicating supercritical phase CO2 treatment did not compromise the biocompatibility of the titanium implant. PMID:16705612

  7. High hardness in the biocompatible intermetallic compound β-Ti3Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanidze, Eteri; Besara, Tiglet; Ozaydin, M Fevsi; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Wang, Jiakui K; Radhakrishnan, Sruthi; Mani, Sendurai; Xin, Yan; Han, Ke; Liang, Hong; Siegrist, Theo; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Morosan, E

    2016-07-01

    The search for new hard materials is often challenging, but strongly motivated by the vast application potential such materials hold. Ti3Au exhibits high hardness values (about four times those of pure Ti and most steel alloys), reduced coefficient of friction and wear rates, and biocompatibility, all of which are optimal traits for orthopedic, dental, and prosthetic applications. In addition, the ability of this compound to adhere to ceramic parts can reduce both the weight and the cost of medical components. The fourfold increase in the hardness of Ti3Au compared to other Ti-Au alloys and compounds can be attributed to the elevated valence electron density, the reduced bond length, and the pseudogap formation. Understanding the origin of hardness in this intermetallic compound provides an avenue toward designing superior biocompatible, hard materials. PMID:27453942

  8. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P.

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended for use as an implantable neurostimulation device. After implantation for 2 and 4 weeks, tissue sections adjacent to the electrodes were obtained for histological analysis. Both types of implants were contained in a thin fibrous encapsulation layer, the thickness of which decreased with time. Although the level of neovascularization around the implants was similar, BDD electrodes elicited significantly thinner fibrous capsules and a milder inflammatory reaction at both time points. These results suggest that BDD films may constitute an appropriate material to support stable performance of implantable neural electrodes over time. PMID:27013949

  9. High hardness in the biocompatible intermetallic compound β-Ti3Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanidze, Eteri; Besara, Tiglet; Ozaydin, M. Fevsi; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Wang, Jiakui K.; Radhakrishnan, Sruthi; Mani, Sendurai; Xin, Yan; Han, Ke; Liang, Hong; Siegrist, Theo; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Morosan, E.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new hard materials is often challenging, but strongly motivated by the vast application potential such materials hold. Ti3Au exhibits high hardness values (about four times those of pure Ti and most steel alloys), reduced coefficient of friction and wear rates, and biocompatibility, all of which are optimal traits for orthopedic, dental, and prosthetic applications. In addition, the ability of this compound to adhere to ceramic parts can reduce both the weight and the cost of medical components. The fourfold increase in the hardness of Ti3Au compared to other Ti–Au alloys and compounds can be attributed to the elevated valence electron density, the reduced bond length, and the pseudogap formation. Understanding the origin of hardness in this intermetallic compound provides an avenue toward designing superior biocompatible, hard materials.

  10. Wettability and biocompatibility of nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon films: Effect of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon films have been applied in biomedical fields as potential biocompatible materials with wettability that can be adjusted by doping with other elements, including F, Si, Ti, O and N. In this study, nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:N) films were deposited by PIII-D using C2H2 + N2 gas mixtures. The biocompatibility and anti-thrombotic properties of the films were assessed in vitro. The surface morphology and surface wettability of the films were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a contact angle method. The results show no cytotoxicity for all films, and films with appropriate nitrogen doping possess much better endothelial cell growth and anti-thrombotic properties

  11. Study on Chemical Cross-linking Modification of Hyaluronan and the Biocompatibility of its Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guo-ying; LIU Xin; GU Han-qing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Prepare cross-linked HA gels with higher mechanical stability,lower degradation velocity and desirable biocompatibility,so as to extend the usage of HA.Method: 1.Test molecular weight of HA (MrHA) by viscosimetry;2.Prepare cross-linked HA gels by DVS,GTA,DEC;3.Discuss the cross-linking and degradation procedure;4,evaluate the biocompatibility of the best HA gels.Results: The mechanical stability and durability to degradation of HA-DVS gels are superior to those of other gels,and when HA :DVS = 40:1 (g/g),at 35℃ and in 0.2M NaOH solution,the HA-DVS gel shows the best mechanical stability,and its cytotoxicity reaches class I,hemolysis ratio is lower than 5 %.Conclusion:Our HADVS gel can be used to prepare biologic scaffolds.

  12. MeV ion beam lithography of biocompatible halogenated Parylenes using aperture masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Norarat, Rattanaporn; Roccio, Marta; Jeanneret, Patrick; Guibert, Edouard; Bergamin, Maxime; Fiorucci, Gianni; Homsy, Alexandra; Laux, Edith; Keppner, Herbert; Senn, Pascal

    2015-07-01

    Parylenes are poly(p-xylylene) polymers that are widely used as moisture barriers and in biomedicine because of their good biocompatibility. We have investigated MeV ion beam lithography using 16O+ ions for writing defined patterns in Parylene-C, which is evaluated as a coating material for the Cochlear Implant (CI) electrode array, a neuroprosthesis to treat some forms of deafness. Parylene-C and -F on silicon and glass substrates as well as 50 μm thick PTFE were irradiated to different fluences (1 ×1013 - 1 ×1016 1 MeV 16O+ ions cm-2) through aperture masks under high vacuum and a low pressure (PTFE but with a ∼25× smaller removal rate. Biocompatibility tests showed no difference in cell adhesion between irradiated and unirradiated areas or ion fluence dependence. Coating the Parylene surface with an adhesion-promoting protein mixture had a much greater effect on cell proliferation.

  13. Surface Treatments and Functional Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement and Bacterial Adhesion Reduction in Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mandracci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of dental implants is a key process in the production of these medical devices, and especially titanium implants used in the dental practice are commonly subjected to surface modification processes before their clinical use. A wide range of treatments, such as sand blasting, acid etching, plasma etching, plasma spray deposition, sputtering deposition and cathodic arc deposition, have been studied over the years in order to improve the performance of dental implants. Improving or accelerating the osseointegration process is usually the main goal of these surface processes, but the improvement of biocompatibility and the prevention of bacterial adhesion are also of considerable importance. In this review, we report on the research of the recent years in the field of surface treatments and coatings deposition for the improvement of dental implants performance, with a main focus on the osseointegration acceleration, the reduction of bacterial adhesion and the improvement of biocompatibility.

  14. Zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets: a biocompatible nanomaterial for drug delivery to cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vipin; Diaz, Agustin; Clearfield, Abraham; Batteas, James D.; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets (NPs), and their use in drug delivery. ZrP and doxorubicin-intercalated ZrP (DOX:ZrP) NPs were characterized by using X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Transmission Electron Micrography (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Biocompatibility of ZrP NPs was evaluated in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293), breast cancer (MCF-7), metastatic breast cancer (MDA-MB-231), ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3), resistant cancer (NCI-RES/ADR) cells and mouse macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell lines. Hemocompatibility of ZrP NPs was evaluated with human red blood cells. Simulated body fluid (SBF) of pH 7.4 was used to determine the in vitro release of doxorubicin from DOX:ZrP NPs. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity studies of DOX:ZrP NPs were determined in MDA-MB-231. The ZrP nanomaterial can be prepared in the 100-200 nm size range with a platelet-like shape. The ZrP NPs themselves are biocompatible, hemocompatible and showed no toxicity to the macrophage cells. ZrP NPs can intercalate high loads (35% w/w) of doxorubicin between their layers. The release of DOX was sustained for about 2 weeks. DOX:ZrP NPs showed higher cellular uptake and increased cytotoxicity than free DOX in MDA-MB-231 cells. ZrP NPs are highly biocompatible, can intercalate large amounts of drugs and sustain the release of drugs. ZrP NPs improved the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of DOX to MDA-MB-231 cells. ZrP NPs are promising nanocarriers for drug delivery in cancer therapy.The objective of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets (NPs), and their use in drug delivery. ZrP and doxorubicin-intercalated ZrP (DOX:ZrP) NPs were characterized by using X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Transmission Electron Micrography (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM

  15. Biocompatible Single-Crystal Selenium Nanobelt Based Nanodevice as a Temperature-Tunable Photosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshan Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium materials are widely used in photoelectrical devices, owing to their unique semiconductive properties. Single-crystal selenium nanobelts with large specific surface area, fine photoconductivity, and biocompatibility provide potential applications in biomedical nanodevices, such as implantable artificial retina and rapid photon detector/stimulator for optogenetics. Here, we present a selenium nanobelt based nanodevice, which is fabricated with single Se nanobelt. This device shows a rapid photo response, different sensitivities to visible light of variable wave length, and temperature-tunable property. The biocompatibility of the Se nanobelts was proved by MTT test using two cell lines. Our investigation introduced a photosensor that will be important for multiple potential applications in human visual system, photocells in energy or MEMS, and temperature-tunable photoelectrical device for optogenetics research.

  16. Modulating Antimicrobial Activity and Mammalian Cell Biocompatibility with Glucosamine-Functionalized Star Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edgar H H; Khin, Mya Mya; Ravikumar, Vikashini; Si, Zhangyong; Rice, Scott A; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-03-14

    The development of novel reagents and antibiotics for combating multidrug resistance bacteria has received significant attention in recent years. In this study, new antimicrobial star polymers (14-26 nm in diameter) that consist of mixtures of polylysine and glycopolymer arms were developed and were shown to possess antimicrobial efficacy toward Gram positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) (with MIC values as low as 16 μg mL(-1)) while being non-hemolytic (HC50 > 10 000 μg mL(-1)) and exhibit excellent mammalian cell biocompatibility. Structure function analysis indicated that the antimicrobial activity and mammalian cell biocompatibility of the star nanoparticles could be optimized by modifying the molar ratio of polylysine to glycopolymers arms. The technology described herein thus represents an innovative approach that could be used to fight deadly infectious diseases. PMID:26859230

  17. Reinforcement of polyetheretherketone polymer with titanium for improved mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun-Do; Park, Hui-Sun; Kang, Min-Ho; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Estrin, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Blends of ductile Ti metal with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) polymer were studied with regard to their mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility. PEEK/Ti composites with various Ti contents, ranging from 0 vol % to 60 vol %, were produced by compression molding at 370°C. In all composites produced, regardless of the initial Ti content, Ti particles were well distributed in the PEEK matrix. Addition of Ti led to a significant increase in mechanical properties of PEEK. Specifically, an increase in Ti content enhanced compressive strength and stiffness, while preserving ductile fracture behavior. In addition, the use of Ti for reinforcement of PEEK provided the composites with improved in vitro biocompatibility in terms of the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. PMID:25677541

  18. Building Biocompatible Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering of the Brain and Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B. Bjugstad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering strategies employing biomaterials have made great progress in the last few decades. However, the tissues of the brain and spinal cord pose unique challenges due to a separate immune system and their nature as soft tissue. Because of this, neural tissue engineering for the brain and spinal cord may require re-establishing biocompatibility and functionality of biomaterials that have previously been successful for tissue engineering in the body. The goal of this review is to briefly describe the distinctive properties of the central nervous system, specifically the neuroimmune response, and to describe the factors which contribute to building polymer hydrogels compatible with this tissue. These factors include polymer chemistry, polymerization and degradation, and the physical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel. By understanding the necessities in making hydrogels biocompatible with tissue of the brain and spinal cord, tissue engineers can then functionalize these materials for repairing and replacing tissue in the central nervous system.

  19. Biocompatible surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanotags for in vivo cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Animesh; Jana, Santanu; Das, Raj Kumar; Chang, Young Tae

    2014-03-01

    The advancement of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is significantly increasing as an ultra-sensitive sensing technology in biomedical research. In this review, we focus on the most recent developments of biocompatible nanoprobes for cancer research. First, we discuss coating approaches to enhance the biocompatibility of SERS substrate and Raman reporters. Furthermore, interesting ligands such as antibodies, aptamers and polypeptides are attached to the surface of nanotags for targeting the cancerous cells in vitro. The unique multiplexing capabilities of the SERS technique have been applied for simultaneous multiple target recognition. Finally, these noninvasive, ultrasensitive tools are mostly highlighted for in vivo tumor detection. Potential application of SERS nanotags in therapeutic study and the possibility of SERS nanotags in biomedical applications are outlined briefly in this review. PMID:24746194

  20. Mesoporous and biocompatible surface active silica aerogel synthesis using choline formate ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, Kamal Mohamed Seeni; Sankar, Rajavelu Murali; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation and characterization of mesoporous and biocompatible transparent silica aerogel by the sol-gel polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate using ionic liquid. Choline cation based ionic liquid allows the silica framework to form in a non collapsing environment and controls the pore size of the gel. FT-IR spectra reveal the interaction of ionic liquid with surface -OH of the gel. DSC thermogram giving the evidence of confinement of ionic liquid within the silica matrix, which helps to avoid the shrinkage of the gel during the aging process. Nitrogen sorption measurements of gel prepared with ionic liquid exhibit a low surface area of 100.53 m2/g and high average pore size of 3.74 nm. MTT assay proves the biocompatibility and cell viability of the prepared gels. This new nanoporous silica material can be applied to immobilize biological molecules, which may retain their stability over a longer period. PMID:21565470

  1. In-situ biopreparation of biocompatible bacterial cellulose/graphene oxide composites pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenkun; Li, Wei; He, Yi; Duan, Tao

    2015-05-01

    In the present work, a composite material formed by bacterial cellulose (BC) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and characterized. GO was added in the bacteria culture media and then the bacteria was inoculated. The BC/GO pellets composite was prepared into the bacteria culture media and vibrated in Erlenmeyer flask. Characterization of the BC/GO composite showed GO nanosheets embedded in the nanofibers network of BC. The experiments in this study demonstrated BC and GO effectively interacted by hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assays showed the material had a better biocompatibility than the counterparts and promoted the cell proliferation excellently. The biocompatibility of BC/GO has the potential to be used for drug delivery.

  2. Chitin and carbon nanotube composites as biocompatible scaffolds for neuron growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nandita; Chen, Jinhu; Koziol, Krzysztof K.; Hallam, Keith R.; Janas, Dawid; Patil, Avinash J.; Strachan, Ally; G. Hanley, Jonathan; Rahatekar, Sameer S.

    2016-04-01

    The design of biocompatible implants for neuron repair/regeneration ideally requires high cell adhesion as well as good electrical conductivity. Here, we have shown that plasma-treated chitin carbon nanotube composite scaffolds show very good neuron adhesion as well as support of synaptic function of neurons. The addition of carbon nanotubes to a chitin biopolymer improved the electrical conductivity and the assisted oxygen plasma treatment introduced more oxygen species onto the chitin nanotube scaffold surface. Neuron viability experiments showed excellent neuron attachment onto plasma-treated chitin nanotube composite scaffolds. The support of synaptic function was evident on chitin/nanotube composites, as confirmed by PSD-95 staining. The biocompatible and electrically-conducting chitin nanotube composite scaffold prepared in this study can be used for in vitro tissue engineering of neurons and, potentially, as an implantable electrode for stimulation and repair of neurons.

  3. A study on the characterisation and biostability of used and virgin dialysis membranes and biocompatibility of the composite biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    alumina exists only in the form of corundum. As the amount of zircon increased, mullite formations became visible on the particle boundaries. Animal studies revealed that these ceramic composites do not have any adverse effect on the tissues investigated histologically. Herein it is postulated that composite systems consisting of basic polymers either, polysulfone or cellulose, and additives (ceramic) may improve the biostability and biocompatibility of the membranes used for hemodialysis or their respective degraded products as explained to different degrees after use, or may serve as new biomaterials. Hence, this study is partly aiming at improving the quality of membranes and formation of new biomaterials for biomedical applications. In future polymers mentioned such as cellulosic or synthetic ones reinforced with ceramics may create new benefits in the area of nephrology, whereas alumina-zircon reinforced by polymers may do the same in dentistry and orthopedics. Copyright (2001) The Australian Ceramic Society

  4. Innovative synthetic rubbers via ruthenium catalyst systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tuba, Robert; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The trans-polypentenamer has unique relevance among the synthetic rubbers since it has similar phys. properties to the natural rubber. The polypentenamer additives have propitious effect on the tire properties and have been studied extensively for this application. Polypentenamer synthetic rubber was synthesized by ringopening metathesis polymn. (ROMP) using ruthenium catalyst systems. It was found that the cyclopentene conversion does not depend on the catalyst activity and catal...

  5. Next-Generation Synthetic Gene Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Timothy K.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; James J Collins

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology is focused on the rational construction of biological systems based on engineering principles. During the field’s first decade of development, significant progress has been made in designing biological parts and assembling them into genetic circuits to achieve basic functionalities. These circuits have been used to construct proof-of-principle systems with promising results in industrial and medical applications. However, advances in synthetic biology have been limited by a ...

  6. Automatic Design of Digital Synthetic Gene Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Marchisio, Mario A.; Jörg Stelling

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Synthetic Biology is a novel discipline that aims at the construction of new biological systems able to perform specific tasks. Following the example of electrical engineering, most of the synthetic systems so far realized look like circuits where smaller DNA-encoded components are interconnected by the exchange of different kinds of molecules. According to this modular approach, we developed, in a previous work, a tool for the visual design of new genetic circuits whose compon...

  7. Light-Controlled Synthetic Gene Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Laura; Deiters, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Highly complex synthetic gene circuits have been engineered in living organisms to develop systems with new biological properties. A precise trigger to activate or deactivate these complex systems is desired in order to tightly control different parts of a synthetic or natural network. Light represents an excellent tool to achieve this goal as it can be regulated in timing, location, intensity, and wavelength, which allows for precise spatiotemporal control over genetic circuits. Recently, li...

  8. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H

    2016-08-27

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synthetic biology, focusing on standardization of data on biosynthetic pathways and gene clusters, as well as the role of standardization in the process of biosynthetic gene cluster engineering. PMID:27313083

  9. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H.

    2016-01-01

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synthetic biology, focusing on standardization of data on biosynthetic pathways and gene clusters, as well as the role of standardization in the process of biosynthetic gene cluster engineering.

  10. Ionoluminescence of diamond, synthetic diamond and simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionoluminescence (IL) spectra of diamond (natural samples and synthetic CVD) and its more common synthetic simulates such as sapphire, spinel, cubic zirconia, strontium titanate and yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG: Er) will be discussed here in order to support some criteria that will allow to distinguish between them. While diamond shows emission bands due to nitrogen defects, simulants feature d-transition metals and rare earths such as Cr3+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Ti3+ and Er3+ emissions

  11. Synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles with tunable susceptibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wei; Wilson, Robert J.; Earhart, Christopher M.; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    High-moment monodisperse disk-shaped Co–Fe magnetic nanoparticles, stable in aqueous solution, were physically fabricated by using nanoimprinted templates and vacuum deposition techniques. These multilayer synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles exhibit nearly zero magnetic remanence and coercivity, and susceptibilities which can be tuned by exploiting interlayer magnetic interactions. In addition, a low cost method of scaling up the production of sub-100 nm synthetic antiferromagnetic nano...

  12. Structural Antitumoral Activity Relationships of Synthetic Chalcones

    OpenAIRE

    Cesar Echeverria; Juan Francisco Santibañez; Oscar Donoso-Tauda; Escobar, Carlos A.; Rodrigo Ramirez-Tagle

    2009-01-01

    Relationships between the structural characteristic of synthetic chalcones and their antitumoral activity were studied. Treatment of HepG2 cells for 24 h with synthetic 2’-hydroxychalcones resulted in apoptosis induction and dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The calculated reactivity indexes and the adiabatic electron affinities using the DFT method including solvent effects, suggest a structure-activity relationship between the Chalcones structure and the apoptosis in Hep...

  13. Topics and Applications in Synthetic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Loong, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    Releasing synthetic data in place of observed values is a method of statistical disclosure control for the public dissemination of survey data collected by national statistical agencies. The overall goal is to limit the risk of disclosure of survey respondents' identities or sensitive attributes, but simultaneously retain enough detail in the synthetic data to preserve the inferential conclusions drawn on the target population, in potential future legitimate statistical analyses. This thesis ...

  14. Chiral magnetic effect by synthetic gauge fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hayata, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical generation of the chiral chemical potential in a Weyl metal constructed from a three-dimensional optical lattice and subject to synthetic gauge fields. By numerically solving the Boltzmann equation with the Berry curvature in the presence of parallel synthetic electric and magnetic fields, we find that the spectral flow and the ensuing chiral magnetic current emerge. We show that the spectral flow and the chiral chemical potential can be probed by time-of-flight imaging.

  15. Utilizing synthetic leasing for midstream assets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current rules applicable to conventional leasing for midstream assets were summarized and the growth of 'synthetic leasing' in Canada was discussed. A synthetic lease is a financing arrangement that is treated as an operating lease for accounting purposes and as a loan for tax purposes. This paper outlines the Canadian leasing environment and explains the difference between a sale versus a lease, capital cost allowance, leveraged leasing, 'available for use' rules, as well as the rules for leasing property

  16. Synthetic Aperture Techniques for Sonar Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, S&#;rgio Rui; Cunha, S&#;rgio; Matos, An&#;bal; Cruz, Nuno

    2009-01-01

    As demonstrated, synthetic aperture sonar is a technique that enables attainment of high quality, high resolution underwater images. Autonomous surface vehicles provides several advantages for synthetic aperture imagery. Not only it is possible to control the boat motion in this way, it is also possible to obtain navigation measurements with precisions in the order of the wavelength used in high resolution sonar systems. Furthermore unsupervised surveillance applications that combine the high...

  17. An autonomous boat based Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Rui Silva; Sergio Cunha; Anibal Matos; Nuno Cruz

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) system being developed at the University of Porto to be used in a small autonomous boat for the survey of shallow water environments, such as rivers, deltas, estuaries and dams. Its purpose is to obtain high resolution echo reflectivity maps through synthetic aperture techniques, taking advantage of the high precision navigation system of the boat. In the future the production of bottom tomography maps is also considered through the use of...

  18. Grand challenges in space synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes, Amor A.; Montague, Michael G.; Cumbers, John; Hogan, John A.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Space synthetic biology is a branch of biotechnology dedicated to engineering biological systems for space exploration, industry and science. There is significant public and private interest in designing robust and reliable organisms that can assist on long-duration astronaut missions. Recent work has also demonstrated that such synthetic biology is a feasible payload minimization and life support approach as well. This article identifies the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the...

  19. Synthetic routes for hydroxyapatite powder production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papargyris, A.D.; Botis, A.I.; Papargyri, S.A. [School of Applied Sciences, Nea Ktiria (Greece). Materials Technology Lab.

    2002-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been used extensively for clinical applications as implants and coatings for many years due to its unique chemical composition and excellent biocompatibility with natural bones. Preparation of nanosized HA is an interesting target for technologies that involve restorative biomaterials with HA to mimic the sizes present in the human body. From the properties it is evident that K{sub IC} of HA is lower than that of human bone and so its medical use is limited to low loaded implants. (orig.)

  20. Osseointegration and biocompatibility of different metal implants - a comparative experimental investigation in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Plecko Michael; Sievert Christine; Andermatt Daniel; Frigg Robert; Kronen Peter; Klein Karina; Stübinger Stefan; Nuss Katja; Bürki Alexander; Ferguson Stephen; Stoeckle Ulrich; von Rechenberg Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In the present study, 4 different metallic implant materials, either partly coated or polished, were tested for their osseointegration and biocompatibility in a pelvic implantation model in sheep. Methods Materials to be evaluated were: Cobalt-Chrome (CC), Cobalt-Chrome/Titanium coating (CCTC), Cobalt-Chrome/Zirconium/Titanium coating (CCZTC), Pure Titanium Standard (PTST), Steel, TAN Standard (TANST) and TAN new finish (TANNEW). Surgery was performed on 7 sheep, with 18 i...