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Sample records for biochemistry laboratory medicine

  1. Medical Biochemistry as Subdiscipline of Laboratory Medicine in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovičić, Snežana; Majkić-Singh, Nada

    2017-04-01

    Medical biochemistry is the usual name for clinical biochemistry or clinical chemistry in Serbia, and medical biochemist is the official name for the clinical chemist (or clinical biochemist). This is the largest sub-discipline of the laboratory medicine in Serbia. It includes all aspects of clinical chemistry, and also laboratory hematology with coagulation, immunology, etc. Medical biochemistry laboratories in Serbia and medical biochemists as a profession are part of Health Care System and their activities are regulated through: the Health Care Law and rules issued by the Chamber of Medical Biochemists of Serbia. The first continuous and organized education for Medical Biochemists (Clinical Chemists) in Serbia dates from 1945, when the Department of Medical Biochemistry was established at the Pharmaceutical Faculty in Belgrade. In 1987 at the same Faculty a five years undergraduate study program was established, educating Medical Biochemists under a special program. Since the academic year 2006/2007 the new five year undergraduate (according to Bologna Declaration) and four-year postgraduate program according to EC4 European Syllabus for Postgraduate Training in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine has been established. The Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health accredited these programs. There are four requirements for practicing medical biochemistry in the Health Care System: University Diploma of the Faculty of Pharmacy (Study of Medical Biochemistry), successful completion of the professional exam at the Ministry of Health after completion of one additional year of obligatory practical training in the medical biochemistry laboratories, membership in the Serbian Chamber of Medical Biochemists and licence for skilled work issued by the Serbian Chamber of Medical Biochemists. In order to present laboratory medical biochemistry practice in Serbia this paper will be focused on the following: Serbian national legislation, healthcare services

  2. Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine: national recommendations for venous blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac, Nora; Supak-Smolcić, Vesna; Simundić, Ana-Maria; Celap, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Phlebotomy is one of the most complex medical procedures in the diagnosis, management and treatment of patients in healthcare. Since laboratory test results are the basis for a large proportion (60-80%) of medical decisions, any error in the phlebotomy process could have serious consequences. In order to minimize the possibility of errors, phlebotomy procedures should be standardised, well-documented and written instructions should be available at every workstation. Croatia is one of the few European countries that have national guidelines for phlebotomy, besides the universally used CLSI (Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute) H3-A6 Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture; approved Standard-Sixth Edition (CLSI, 2007) and WHO (World Health Organization) guidelines on drawing blood: best practices in phlebotomy (WHO, 2010). However, the growing body of evidence in importance of preanalytical phase management resulted in a need for evidence based revision and expansion of existing recommendations. The Croatian Society for Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase issued this recommendation. This document is based on the CLSI guideline H3-A6, with significant differences and additional information.

  3. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for use of tumor markers in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Hoffman, Barry R; Chan, Daniel W

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This report presents updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines summarizing quality requirements for the use of tumor markers. METHODS: One subcommittee developed guidelines for analytical quality relevant to serum and tissue-based tumor...... questions to ensure selection of the appropriate test, adherence to good clinical and laboratory practices (e.g., minimization of the risk of incorrect patient and/or specimen identification, tube type, or timing), use of internationally standardized and well-characterized methods, careful adherence...... records. Also mandatory is extensive validation encompassing all stages of analysis before introduction of new technologies such as microarrays and mass spectrometry. Provision of high-quality tumor marker services is facilitated by dialogue involving researchers, diagnostic companies, clinical...

  4. Drug Synthesis and Analysis on a Dime: A Capstone Medicinal Chemistry Experience for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streu, Craig N.; Reif, Randall D.; Neiles, Kelly Y.; Schech, Amanda J.; Mertz, Pamela S.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative, research-based experiences have shown tremendous potential as effective pedagogical approaches. Pharmaceutical development is an exciting field that draws heavily on organic chemistry and biochemistry techniques. A capstone drug synthesis/analysis laboratory is described where biochemistry students synthesize azo-stilbenoid compounds…

  5. Capillary blood sampling: national recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krleza, Jasna Lenicek; Dorotic, Adrijana; Grzunov, Ana; Maradin, Miljenka

    2015-01-01

    Capillary blood sampling is a medical procedure aimed at assisting in patient diagnosis, management and treatment, and is increasingly used worldwide, in part because of the increasing availability of point-of-care testing. It is also frequently used to obtain small blood volumes for laboratory testing because it minimizes pain. The capillary blood sampling procedure can influence the quality of the sample as well as the accuracy of test results, highlighting the need for immediate, widespread standardization. A recent nationwide survey of policies and practices related to capillary blood sampling in medical laboratories in Croatia has shown that capillary sampling procedures are not standardized and that only a small proportion of Croatian laboratories comply with guidelines from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) or the World Health Organization (WHO). The aim of this document is to provide recommendations for capillary blood sampling. This document has been produced by the Working Group for Capillary Blood Sampling within the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine. Our recommendations are based on existing available standards and recommendations (WHO Best Practices in Phlebotomy, CLSI GP42-A6 and CLSI C46-A2), which have been modified based on local logistical, cultural, legal and regulatory requirements. We hope that these recommendations will be a useful contribution to the standardization of capillary blood sampling in Croatia.

  6. Access to scientific information. A national survey of the Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (SIBioC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Ciaccio, Marcello; Giavarina, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Digital libraries are typically used for retrieving and accessing articles in academic journals and repositories. Previous studies have been published about the performance of various biomedical research platforms, but no information is available about access preferences. A six-question survey was designed by the Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (SIBioC) using the platform Google Drive, and made available for 1 month to the members of the society. The information about the survey was published on the website of SIBioC and also disseminated by two sequential newsletters. Overall, 165 replies were collected throughout the 1-month survey availability. The largest number of replies were provided by laboratory professionals working in the national healthcare system (44.2%), followed by those working in private facilities (13.9%), university professors (12.7%) and specialization training staff (12.7%). The majority of responders published zero to one articles per year (55.2%), followed by two to five articles per year (37.6%), whereas only 7.3% published more than five articles per year. A total of 34.5% of the responders consulted biomedical research platforms on weekly basis, followed by 33.9% who did so on daily basis. PubMed/Medline was the most accessed scientific database, followed by Scopus, ISI Web of Science and Google Scholar. The impact factor was the leading reason when selecting which journal to publish in. The most consulted journals in the field of laboratory medicine were Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine and Biochimica Clinica. This survey provides useful indications about the personal inclination towards access to scientific information in our country.

  7. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-10-15

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard - fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline - second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing.

  8. Clinical biochemistry and laboratory medicine in the post-genome era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, Georgi D.

    2001-01-01

    The last decades of the 20th century were a period of outstanding scientific achievements. The most significant discovery was the decoding of the human genome (Venter, J. et al., 2001; Dennis, C. et al., 2001; Baltimore, D., 2001). In this article the present view of the post genomic era is presented. The new analytical methods, such as micro arrays, bio chips, and nano technology, the discovery of SNPs, and the analysis of the proteome will lead to a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited and acquired diseases. Their use in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, and the future of technological innovations are discussed. In the post genomic era the greatest interest will be devoted to the application of these scientific achievements in the diagnosis, prevention and therapy of human diseases. The advances in human genetics that have occurred during the past 20 years have revolutionized our knowledge of the role played by inheritance in health and disease. It is clear that our DNA determines not only single gene disorders but also interacts with environments to predispose individuals to cancer, allergy, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, psychiatric disorders and even to some infectious diseases. The study of longevity and the demonstration of genes favouring a long lifespan suggest that such protective systems exist. The study of genetic polymorphisms has made clear that some alleles have beneficial effects. These discoveries will be of great help in our understanding of the interactions between genetics and environment. Gene array analysis has become the method of choice for identifying genes expressed at different levels in different samples. The mRNA expression profiles of normal and tumor tissues, treated and untreated cell cultures, and developmental stages of an organism can be compared quickly and easily with an appropriate array analysis system. A major task after a genome has been fully sequenced is to understand the functions

  9. Biochemistry: from supermarket to laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    F. R. Freitas-Rego; M. G. Pereira; S. O. Loureiro; M. T. de Santana; R.G. Garrido; F. de S.R.G Garrido

    2007-01-01

    After new campi as Instituto Multidisciplinar em Saúde (IMS/UFBA) startedworking, it was necessary to develop practical classes using domestic reagents atBiochemistry to Pharmacy (IMS078). Firstly, students visited a supermarket to readnutritional information at label and select possible products to be used in class. Moreover,chemical processes and fermentation were discussed as different foods and drinks wereanalysed. Some food were token to laboratories so that biomole cules qualitative ana...

  10. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M.; Duffy, Michael J.; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. METHODS: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites--testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast...... for differential diagnosis of nonseminomatous and seminomatous germ cell tumors. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is not recommended for prostate cancer screening, but may be used for detecting disease recurrence and monitoring therapy. Free PSA measurement data are useful for distinguishing malignant from benign...... prostatic disease when total PSA is cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen is recommended (with some caveats) for prognosis determination, postoperative surveillance, and therapy monitoring in advanced disease. Fecal occult blood testing may be used for screening asymptomatic adults 50...

  11. A Kinetic Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of specific reactions of metabolic pathways to make measurements in the laboratory. Describes an adaptation of an experiment used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories involving the induction of an enzyme in E. coli, as well as its partial purification and characterization. (TW)

  12. Laboratory testing of extravascular body fluids in Croatia: a survey of the Working group for extravascular body fluids of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcinovic, Lara Milevoj; Vogrinc, Zeljka; Kocijan, Irena; Culej, Jelena; Aralica, Merica; Jokic, Anja; Antoncic, Dragana; Bozovic, Marija

    2016-10-15

    We hypothesized that extravascular body fluid (EBF) analysis in Croatia is not harmonized and aimed to investigate preanalytical, analytical and postanalytical procedures used in EBF analysis in order to identify key aspects that should be addressed in future harmonization attempts. An anonymous online survey created to explore laboratory testing of EBF was sent to secondary, tertiary and private health care Medical Biochemistry Laboratories (MBLs) in Croatia. Statements were designed to address preanalytical, analytical and postanalytical procedures of cerebrospinal, pleural, peritoneal (ascites), pericardial, seminal, synovial, amniotic fluid and sweat. Participants were asked to declare the strength of agreement with proposed statements using a Likert scale. Mean scores for corresponding separate statements divided according to health care setting were calculated and compared. The survey response rate was 0.64 (58 / 90). None of the participating private MBLs declared to analyse EBF. We report a mean score of 3.45 obtained for all statements evaluated. Deviations from desirable procedures were demonstrated in all EBF testing phases. Minor differences in procedures used for EBF analysis comparing secondary and tertiary health care MBLs were found. The lowest scores were obtained for statements regarding quality control procedures in EBF analysis, participation in proficiency testing programmes and provision of interpretative comments on EBF's test reports. Although good laboratory EBF practice is present in Croatia, procedures for EBF analysis should be further harmonized to improve the quality of EBF testing and patient safety.

  13. Designing Laboratory Exercises for the Undergraduate Molecular Biology/Biochemistry Student: Techniques and Ethical Implications Involved in Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Hall, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine refers to medical care that involves genetically screening patients for their likelihood to develop various disorders. Commercial genome screening only involves identifying a consumer's genotype for a few single nucleotide polymorphisms. A phenotype (such as an illness) is greatly influenced by three factors: genes, gene…

  14. Preanalytical external quality assessment of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine and CROQALM: finding undetected weak spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac, Nora; Krleza, Jasna Lenicek; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this paper is to present results of first two years of preanalytical external quality assessment (EQA) in Croatia. This paper summarizes results from 6 rounds of preanalytical EQA during 2014-2016 in 161-175 Croatian laboratories (number ranged between cycles). EQA was designed as an online survey of the compliance with National recommendations for phlebotomy (NRP). Forty-seven questions in 5 categories are analyzed (materials and equipment, patient identification, patient preparation, sampling and storage). Additionally, preanalytical cases are presented. Overall performance scores (Question score (Qscore) for compliance with NRP and Case score (Cscore) for preanalytical cases) are calculated for each question/case as a proportion of laboratories with satisfactory procedure (x 100). Qscores and Cscores ≥ 70 were classified as acceptable (maximal score = 100). In investigation of compliance with NRP, acceptable Qscores were obtained for 34/47 questions. The lowest scores were observed for the availability of sterile disposable tourniquets (Qscore = 15) and safe-sharp needles (Qscore = 34), obtaining patients address as an identifier (Qscore = 21), using glycolysis inhibitor tubes for glucose concentration measurement (Qscore = 21) and verification of manufacturers declarations on temperature and time of storage (Qscore = 31). There was no statistically significant difference in overall Qscore according to different categories of phlebotomy procedures (P = 0.284). The results of preanalytical cases showed acceptable Cscore values for all cases (89-96). First two years of preanalytical EQA showed good compliance with the NRP and excellent expertise in resolving complex preanalytical issues. Major critical spots are lack of availability of safe-sharp needles, disposable tourniquets and glucose inhibitor tubes.

  15. Current practice in laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. 
Survey of the Working group for laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Andrea Tešija; Đerek, Lovorka; Kozmar, Ana; Drvar, Vedrana

    2016-10-15

    With the trend of increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, laboratories are faced with exponential growth of the requests for tests relating the diagnosis of these diseases. Unfortunately, the lack of laboratory personnel experienced in this specific discipline of laboratory diagnostic, as well as an unawareness of a method limitation often results in confusion for clinicians. The aim was to gain insight into number and type of Croatian laboratories that perform humoral diagnostics with the final goal to improve and harmonize laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. In order to get insight into current laboratory practice two questionnaires, consisting of 42 questions in total, were created. Surveys were conducted using SurveyMonkey application and were sent to 88 medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia for the first survey. Out of 33 laboratories that declared to perform diagnostic from the scope, 19 were selected for the second survey based on the tests they pleaded to perform. The survey comprised questions regarding autoantibody hallmarks of systemic autoimmune diseases while regarding organ-specific autoimmune diseases was limited to diseases of liver, gastrointestinal and nervous system. Response rate was high with 80 / 88 (91%) laboratories which answered the first questionnaire, and 19 / 19 (1.0) for the second questionnaire. Obtained results of surveys indicate high heterogeneity in the performance of autoantibody testing among laboratories in Croatia. Results indicate the need of creating recommendations and algorithms in order to harmonize the approach to laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia.

  16. The history of creation and study of vitamin D medicines in the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the NAS of Ukraine for 1990-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Lugovska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main results of inventive activity of the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry headed by Dr. L. I. Apukhovska of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the NAS of Ukraine. These researches continued the works initiated by Prof. V. P. Vendt and included development of technologies for the production of highly efficient preparations based on vitamin D3, namely “VIDEIN” in several modified forms (for prevention and treatment of rickets and rickets-like diseases in children, osteopathy of various origins, hypovitaminosis D in pregnant, mineral metabolism disorders, etc, water-soluble vitamin D3 (for prevention and treatment of rickets in children from the first months of life, “KALMIVID” and ”KALMIVID-M” (for treatment of bone tissue diseases associated with mineral metabolism disorders, the pharmaceutical composition “MEBIVID” (for treatment of osteoporosis and diseases associated with reduced bone mineral density and therapeutic vitamin-D3-E protein complex (for regulation of metabolic processes, improvement of structural and functional bone quality as well as structure and function of epiphyseal cartilage. All products are characterized by stability of vitamin D3 molecule, and thus, dosing accuracy and reliability, whilst not containing toxic preservatives and stabilizers. The technologies for production as well as analytical and normative documentations have been developed for all preparations.

  17. The quality and scope of information provided by medical laboratories to patients before laboratory testing: Survey of the Working Group for Patient Preparation of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac, Nora; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Kackov, Sanja; Serdar, Tihana; Dorotic, Adrijana; Fumic, Ksenija; Gudasic-Vrdoljak, Jelena; Klenkar, Kornelija; Sambunjak, Jadranka; Vidranski, Valentina

    2015-10-23

    The aim of this work was to evaluate to what extent the scope and content of information provided to patients is standardized across medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia. Two on-line self-report surveys were sent out: Survey A regarding attitudes on importance of patient preparation and Survey B on the contents of patient preparation instructions. 13/118 laboratories (11%) do not provide written instructions to patients on how to prepare for laboratory testing, and 36 (40%) do not include information about water intake in their instructions. Only half of laboratories provide instructions for prostate-specific antigen (53.8%), female sex hormones (53.7%) and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) (52.5%). Inadequate information about fasting status (55.0%) and 24 hour urine collection (77.9%) were frequent errors with high severity and were associated with the greatest potential to cause patient harm. Laboratory professionals in Croatia have a positive attitude towards the importance of patient preparation for laboratory testing. However, the information for laboratory testing is not standardized and frequently lacks guidance for tests related to TDM, coagulation and endocrinology. This study highlights the need for standardized, updated and evidence-based recommendations for patient preparation in order to minimize the risk for patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Policies and practices in haemostasis testing among laboratories in Croatia: a survey on behalf of a Working Group for Laboratory Coagulation of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronić, Ana; Herak, Desiree Coen; Margetić, Sandra; Milić, Marija

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this survey was to assess current policies and practice in haemostasis testing among both hospital and outpatient laboratories in Republic of Croatia. A questionnaire with seventy questions divided into nine sections was created in May 2015. Participants were asked about their practice related to test request form, sample collection, prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time assays, other individual haemostasis assays, point-of-care testing (POCT), reporting of coagulation tests results and quality assurance of procedures, the personnel and other laboratory resources, as well as on issues related to education and implementation of additional coagulation assays in their laboratory. The survey was administered and data were collected between June and September 2015. A total survey response rate was 104/170 (61.2%). Most respondents were faced with incomplete information on prescribed therapy and diagnosis on the test request or inappropriate samples withdrawn on distant locations, but also do not have protocols for handling samples with high haematocrit values. Reporting of PT-INR and D-dimer results was different between laboratories. Although almost all laboratories developed a critical value reporting system, reporting a value to general practitioners is still a problem. Result on coagulation POCT testing showed that not all devices were supervised by laboratories, which is not in compliance with Croatian Chamber of Medical Biochemistry acts. Obtained results highlighted areas that need improvement and different practice patterns in particular field of haemostasis testing among laboratories. A harmonization of the overall process of haemostasis testing at national level should be considered and undertaken.

  19. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  20. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.

    2015-01-01

    diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... in "omics"; 2. Additional training for the current personnel focused on the new methodologies; 3. Incorporation in the Laboratory of new competencies in data interpretation and counselling; 4. Improving cooperation and collaboration between professionals of different disciplines to integrate information...

  1. A Laboratory Course in Clinical Biochemistry Emphasizing Interest and Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Ten laboratory experiments are described which are used in a successful clinical biochemistry laboratory course (e.g. blood alcohol, glucose tolerance, plasma triglycerides, coronary risk index, gastric analysis, vitamin C and E). Most of the experiments are performed on the students themselves using simple equipment with emphasis on useful…

  2. An "in Silico" DNA Cloning Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced…

  3. Raising environmental awareness through applied biochemistry laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman Ashraf, S

    2013-01-01

    Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that guides students to learn about the applicability of peroxidase enzymes to degrade organic dyes (as model pollutants) in simulated waste water. In addition to showing how enzymes can potentially be used for waste water remediation, various factors than can affect enzyme-based reactions such as pH, temperature, concentration of substrates/enzymes, and denaturants can also be tested. This "applied biotechnology" experiment was successfully implemented in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course to enhance students' learning of environmental issues as well important biochemistry concepts. Student survey confirmed that this laboratory experiment was successful in achieving the objectives of raising environmental awareness in students and illustrating the usefulness of chemistry in solving real-life problems. This experiment can be easily adopted in an introductory biochemistry laboratory course and taught as an inquiry-guided exercise. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. METHODS: Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were cl...

  5. Virtual Laboratories in Chemistry, Biochemistry, & Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Report (state-of-the-art review) from a research and development project on virtual laboratories supported by Markedmodningsfonden (tidl. "Fornyelsesfonden")(2012-2014). http://markedsmodningsfonden.dk/projekt/0/34/495....

  6. Virtual Laboratories in Chemistry, Biochemistry, & Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Report (state-of-the-art review) from a research and development project on virtual laboratories supported by Markedmodningsfonden (tidl. "Fornyelsesfonden")(2012-2014). http://markedsmodningsfonden.dk/projekt/0/34/495.......Report (state-of-the-art review) from a research and development project on virtual laboratories supported by Markedmodningsfonden (tidl. "Fornyelsesfonden")(2012-2014). http://markedsmodningsfonden.dk/projekt/0/34/495....

  7. Raising Environmental Awareness through Applied Biochemistry Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman Ashraf, S.

    2013-01-01

    Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment…

  8. Differentiating Biochemistry Course Laboratories Based on Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2011-01-01

    Content and emphases in undergraduate biochemistry courses can be readily tailored to accommodate the standards of the department in which they are housed, as well as the backgrounds of the students in the courses. A more challenging issue is how to construct laboratory experiences for a class with both chemistry majors, who usually have little or…

  9. Myoglobin structure and function: A multiweek biochemistry laboratory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P; Kirk, Sarah R; Meyer, Scott C; Holman, Karen L McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure, students work with computer modeling and visualization of myoglobin and its homologues, after which they spectroscopically characterize its thermal denaturation. Students also study protein function (ligand binding equilibrium) and are instructed on topics in data analysis (calibration curves, nonlinear vs. linear regression). This upper division biochemistry laboratory project is a challenging and rewarding one that not only exposes students to a wide variety of important biochemical laboratory techniques but also ties those techniques together to work with a single readily available and easily characterized protein, myoglobin. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Effective Laboratory Work in Biochemistry Subject: Students' and Lecturers' Perspective in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Yunita Arian Sani; Senam; Laksono F. X., Endang Widjajanti

    2017-01-01

    Biochemistry subject had problem in learning and teaching, especially in laboratory work. We explored laboratory learning implementation in Biochemistry subject. Participants of this research were 195 students who took biochemistry subject and 4 lecturers of biochemistry in three universities in Indonesia. We obtained data using questionnaires and…

  11. A 13-week research-based biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefurgy, Scott T; Mundorff, Emily C

    2017-09-01

    Here, we present a 13-week research-based biochemistry laboratory curriculum designed to provide the students with the experience of engaging in original research while introducing foundational biochemistry laboratory techniques. The laboratory experience has been developed around the directed evolution of an enzyme chosen by the instructor, with mutations designed by the students. Ideal enzymes for this curriculum are able to be structurally modeled, solubly expressed, and monitored for activity by UV/Vis spectroscopy, and an example curriculum for haloalkane dehalogenase is given. Unique to this curriculum is a successful implementation of saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput screening of enzyme function, along with bioinformatics analysis, homology modeling, structural analysis, protein expression and purification, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and enzyme kinetics. Each of these techniques is carried out using a novel student-designed mutant library or enzyme variant unique to the lab team and, importantly, not described previously in the literature. Use of a well-established set of protocols promotes student data quality. Publication may result from the original student-generated hypotheses and data, either from the class as a whole or individual students that continue their independent projects upon course completion. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):437-448, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Laboratory testing in the emergency department: an Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology (SIBioC and Academy of Emergency Medicine and Care (AcEMC consensus report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lippi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The mainstay of patient-oriented laboratory testing in emergency settings entails selecting number and type of tests according to valid criteria of appropriateness. Since the pattern of urgent tests requesting is variable across different institutions, we designed a joined survey between the Academy of Emergency Medicine and Care (AcEMC and the Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology (SIBioC for reaching tentative consensus about the most informative diagnostic tests in emergency settings. A survey, containing the most commonly performed urgent laboratory tests and the relative clinical indications, was disseminated to eight relevant members of AcEMC and eight relevant members of SIBioC. All contributors were asked to provide numerical scores for the different laboratory parameters, where 1 indicated strongly recommended, 2 recommended in specific circumstances, and 3 strongly discouraged. The mean results of the survey were presented as the mean of responders’ values, and the parameters were finally classified as strongly recommended (mean value, 1.0-1.5, somehow recommended (mean value, 1.5-2.0, discouraged (mean value, 2.0-2.5 and strongly discouraged (mean value, 2.5-3.0. The results of the survey allowed defining a hierarchy of priority, wherein 24 tests were strongly recommended. The use of 5 common tests was instead strongly discouraged. For 16 additional parameters in the list, the consensus ranged between somehow recommended and discouraged. We hope that results presented in this joint AcEMC-SIBioC consensus document may help harmonizing panel of tests and requesting patters in emergency setting, at least at a national level.

  13. A biochemistry laboratory course designed to enhance students autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Laboratory sessions are responsible for promoting instrumentation skills desirable in biochemistry and biochemistry related careers. They are traditionally based on experimental protocols that lead to the expected results, and students usually have not autonomy to plan and execute their experiments. GOALS: This work aimed to enhance a traditional biochemistry lab course, applying pre-lab quizzes on protein biochemistry and lab techniques in order to have students better prepared to plan, execute and interpret experiments. This approach also aims to bring the laboratory sessions into an inquiry-based environment capable to improve students’ independent capabilities in 2 autonomy domains: learning and communication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Online quizzes are delivered one week before each laboratory session, containing questions regarding the experimental techniques and theoretical basis related to them. Laboratory activities are presented in an inquiry-based approach where the first class of each activity is dedicated to plan experiments in order to answer the research questions presented by instructors. Activities are also organized in order to enhance students’ autonomy. The first activity is the simplest and more instructor-controlled and the last one is the most complex and less driven, transferring gradually to students the responsibility for their decisions in laboratory, supporting students’ autonomy. RESULTS: Online quizzes allowed instructors to identify students’ difficulties and to timely intervene. Scientific reports presented by students at the end of each activity showed that they performed better on less driven activities in which autonomy support were more complex than in the instructor controlled activities. CONCLUSIONS: Scientific reports analysis reveals students capabilities related to different scopes of autonomy, such as: discuss different strategies; find multiple solutions to solve problems; make their

  14. Cell complexes of transition metals in biochemistry and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, Ya.Z.; Varzatskij, O.A.; Bubnov, Yu.N.

    2007-01-01

    Basic directions and prospects of use of cell complexes of transition metals in medicine and biochemistry are considered: incapsulation of radioactive metal ions for radiotherapy and diagnostics; preparation of contrast compounds for magnetic resonance tomography, antidotes and pharmaceutical preparation of prolonged effect, preparations for boron-neutron-capture therapy of neoplasms, antioxidants; membrane transport of metal ions; study of interaction of cell metal complexes with nucleic acids; possibility of use of self-assembly of cell complexes for imitation of ligases and use of clathrochelates as linkers; design of inhibitors of viruses for AIDS therapy [ru

  15. Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of the framework for effective control or management of cyst nematodes depends upon the detailed understanding of their biology. This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the biochemistry of cyst nematodes, particularly areas related to lipids, carbohydrates and...

  16. Institutional practices and policies in acid-base testing: a self reported Croatian survey study on behalf of the Croatian society of medical biochemistry and laboratory medicine Working Group for acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this survey study was to assess the current practices and policies in use related to the various steps in the blood gas testing process, across hospital laboratories in Croatia. First questionnaire was sent by email to all medical biochemistry laboratories (N = 104) within general, specialized and clinical hospitals and university hospital centres to identify laboratories which perform blood gas analysis. Second questionnaire with detailed questions about sample collection, analysis and quality control procedures, was sent only to 47 laboratories identified by the first survey. Questionnaire was designed as combination of questions and statements with Likert scale. Third questionnaire was sent to all participating laboratories (N=47) for additional clarification for either indeterminate or unclear answers. Blood gas analysis is performed in 47/104 hospital laboratories in Croatia. In 25/41 (0.61) of the laboratories capillary blood gas sampling is the preferred sample type for adult patient population, whereas arterial blood sample is preferentially used in only 5/44 laboratories (0.11). Blood sampling and sample processing for capillary samples is done almost always by laboratory technicians (36/41 and 37/44, respectively), whereas arterial blood sampling is almost always done by the physician (24/29) and only rarely by a nurse (5/28). Sample acceptance criteria and sample analysis are in accordance with international recommendations for majority of laboratories. 43/44 laboratories participate in the national EQA program. POCT analyzers are installed outside of the laboratory in 20/47 (0.43) institutions. Laboratory staff is responsible for education and training of ward personnel, quality control and instrument maintenance in only 12/22, 11/20 and 9/20 institutions, respectively. Practices related to collection and analysis for blood gases in Croatia are not standardised and vary substantially between laboratories. POCT analyzers are not under the

  17. Known structure, unknown function: An inquiry?based undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W.; Lee, Christopher T.; Dewald, Alison H.; Cline, Matthew A.; McAnany, Charles E.; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry? and research?based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's research expertise and confidence. We have developed a year?long undergraduate biochemistry laboratory curriculum wherein students determine...

  18. Glycobiology, How to Sugar-Coat an Undergraduate Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McReynolds, Katherine D.

    2006-01-01

    A second semester biochemistry laboratory has been implemented as an independent projects course at California State University, Sacramento since 1999. To incorporate aspects of carbohydrate biochemistry, or glycobiology, into our curriculum, projects in lectin isolation and purification were undertaken over the course of two semesters. Through…

  19. Identifying Opportunities for Vertical Integration of Biochemistry and Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelberger, Karen J.; Burke, Rebecca; Haas, Arthur L.; Harenwattananon, Marisa; Simpson, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: Retention of basic science knowledge, as judged by National Board of Medical Examiners' (NBME) data, suffers due to lack of apparent relevance and isolation of instruction from clinical application, especially in biochemistry. However, the literature reveals no systematic process for identifying key biochemical concepts and associated clinical conditions. This study systematically identified difficult biochemical concepts and their common clinical conditions as a critical step towards enhancing relevance and retention of biochemistry.Methods: A multi-step/ multiple stakeholder process was used to: (1) identify important biochemistry concepts; (2) determine students' perceptions of concept difficulty; (3) assess biochemistry faculty, student, and clinical teaching scholars' perceived relevance of identified concepts; and (4) identify associated common clinical conditions for relevant and difficult concepts. Surveys and a modified Delphi process were used to gather data, subsequently analyzed using SPSS for Windows.Results: Sixteen key biochemical concepts were identified. Second year medical students rated 14/16 concepts as extremely difficult while fourth year students rated nine concepts as moderately to extremely difficult. On average, each teaching scholar generated common clinical conditions for 6.2 of the 16 concepts, yielding a set of seven critical concepts and associated clinical conditions.Conclusions: Key stakeholders in the instructional process struggle to identify biochemistry concepts that are critical, difficult to learn and associated with common clinical conditions. However, through a systematic process beginning with identification of concepts and associated clinical conditions, relevance of basic science instruction can be enhanced.

  20. An Experiment Using Sucrose Density Gradients in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Sandra L.; Weiss, Monica

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment to be performed in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory that is based on a gradient centrifugation system employing a simple bench top centrifuge, a freezer, and frozen surcose gradient solution to separate macromolecules and subcellular components. (CW)

  1. Phosphinic acid compounds in biochemistry, biology and medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Collinsová, Michaela; Jiráček, Jiří

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2000), s. 629-647 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/97/0039; GA AV ČR KSK2055603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.909, year: 2000

  2. Evaluating performance in sweat testing in medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aralica, Merica; Krleza, Jasna Lenicek

    2017-02-15

    Sweat test has a diagnostic role in evaluation of cystic fibrosis. Its performance includes sweat stimulation, collection and analysis. All listed may be sources of inconsistencies in everyday practice. The aim of this study was an evaluation of external quality assessment (EQA) of sweat chloride measurement including sweat test performance in medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia. EQA for sweat chloride measurement was provided by Croatian Centre for Quality Assessment in Laboratory Medicine (CROQALM) in five consecutive exercises to medical biochemistry laboratories (MBL) that offered sweat testing. A questionnaire regarding all phases of testing was mailed to involved MBL (N = 10). Survey results were compared to current guidelines for sweat test performance. Reported results of EQA in 2015 exercises showed coefficients of variation (CV) from 28.9%, 29.0% to 35.3%, respectively. An introduction of uniform sweat chloride measurement protocol resulted in CV of 15.5% and 14.7% reported in following two exercises in 2016. All MBL included in this study replied to the questionnaire. Results reported by MBL indicated: lack of patient information policy (7/10), use of unacceptable electrodes (6/9), misuse of minimum of acceptable sweat weight (6/9), lack of internal quality assessment (5/9) and recommended reference ranges (5/9 and 4/9). Agreements to guidelines were found in approach to unsuitable patients (9/10) and sweat collection (8/9). Presented results indicate major weak points of current practice in sweat test performance in Croatian MBL and stress the need for its standardization on a national level.

  3. Known Structure, Unknown Function: An Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W.; Lee, Christopher T.; Dewald, Alison H.; Cline, Matthew A.; McAnany, Charles E.; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry- and research-based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's…

  4. Known structure, unknown function: An inquiry‐based undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W.; Lee, Christopher T.; Dewald, Alison H.; Cline, Matthew A.; McAnany, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry‐ and research‐based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's research expertise and confidence. We have developed a year‐long undergraduate biochemistry laboratory curriculum wherein students determine, via experiment and computation, the function of a protein of known three‐dimensional structure. The first half of the course is inquiry‐based and modular in design; students learn general biochemical techniques while gaining preparation for research experiments in the second semester. Having learned standard biochemical methods in the first semester, students independently pursue their own (original) research projects in the second semester. This new curriculum has yielded an improvement in student performance and confidence as assessed by various metrics. To disseminate teaching resources to students and instructors alike, a freely accessible Biochemistry Laboratory Education resource is available at http://biochemlab.org. © 2015 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 43(4):245–262, 2015. PMID:26148241

  5. Known structure, unknown function: An inquiry-based undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W; Lee, Christopher T; Dewald, Alison H; Cline, Matthew A; McAnany, Charles E; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry- and research-based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's research expertise and confidence. We have developed a year-long undergraduate biochemistry laboratory curriculum wherein students determine, via experiment and computation, the function of a protein of known three-dimensional structure. The first half of the course is inquiry-based and modular in design; students learn general biochemical techniques while gaining preparation for research experiments in the second semester. Having learned standard biochemical methods in the first semester, students independently pursue their own (original) research projects in the second semester. This new curriculum has yielded an improvement in student performance and confidence as assessed by various metrics. To disseminate teaching resources to students and instructors alike, a freely accessible Biochemistry Laboratory Education resource is available at http://biochemlab.org. © 2015 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. A Semester-Long Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Based on "Helicobacter pylori" Urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Kate R.; Dube, Danielle H.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the development of a 13 week project-oriented biochemistry laboratory designed to introduce students to foundational biochemical techniques and then enable students to perform original research projects once they have mastered these techniques. In particular, we describe a semester-long laboratory that focuses on a biomedically…

  7. Green Fluorescent Protein-Focused Bioinformatics Laboratory Experiment Suitable for Undergraduates in Biochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura

    2017-01-01

    An introductory bioinformatics laboratory experiment focused on protein analysis has been developed that is suitable for undergraduate students in introductory biochemistry courses. The laboratory experiment is designed to be potentially used as a "stand-alone" activity in which students are introduced to basic bioinformatics tools and…

  8. A semester-long project-oriented biochemistry laboratory based on Helicobacter pylori urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Kate R; Dube, Danielle H

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the development of a 13 week project-oriented biochemistry laboratory designed to introduce students to foundational biochemical techniques and then enable students to perform original research projects once they have mastered these techniques. In particular, we describe a semester-long laboratory that focuses on a biomedically relevant enzyme--Helicobacter pylori (Hp) urease--the activity of which is absolutely required for the gastric pathogen Hp to colonize the human stomach. Over the course of the semester, students undertake a biochemical purification of Hp urease, assess the success of their purification, and investigate the activity of their purified enzyme. In the final weeks of the semester, students design and implement their own experiments to study Hp urease. This laboratory provides students with an understanding of the importance of biochemistry in human health while empowering them to engage in an active area of research. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Students' Preferred Teaching Techniques for Biochemistry in Biomedicine and Medicine Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Ethel L.B.; Fernandes, Ana Angelica H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the students' preferred teaching techniques, such as traditional blackboard, power-point, or slide-projection, for biochemistry discipline in biomedicine and medicine courses from Sao Paulo State University, UNESP, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Preferences for specific topic and teaching techniques were…

  10. Myoglobin Structure and Function: A Multiweek Biochemistry Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.; Kirk, Sarah R.; Meyer, Scott C.; Holman, Karen L. McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure,…

  11. Identification of the students' critical thinking skills through biochemistry laboratory work report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Yunita Arian Sani; Senam, Laksono, Endang W.

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to (1) identify the critical thinking skills of student based on their ability to set up laboratory work reports, and (2) analyze the implementation of biochemistry laboratory work. The method of quantitative content analysis was employed. Quantitative data were in the form of critical thinking skills through the assessment of students' laboratory work reports and questionnaire data. Hoyo rubric was used to measure critical thinking skills with 10 indicators, namely clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, evidence, reason, depth, breadth, and fairness. The research sample consisted of 105 students (35 male, 70 female) of Mataram University who took a Biochemistry course and 2 lecturers of Biochemistry course. The results showed students' critical thinking skills through laboratory work reports were still weak. Analysis of the questionnaire showed that three indicators become the biggest problems during the laboratory work implementation, namely, lecturers' involved in laboratory work implementation, the integration of laboratory work implementation of learning in the classroom has not been done optimally and laboratory work implementation as an effort to train critical thinking skills is not optimal yet.

  12. Purification and Characterization of Taq Polymerase: A 9-Week Biochemistry Laboratory Project for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Robert M.; Bruno, Mary K.; Farrow, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a 9-week undergraduate laboratory series focused on the purification and characterization of "Thermus aquaticus" DNA polymerase (Taq). Our aim was to provide undergraduate biochemistry students with a full-semester continuing project simulating a research-like experience, while having each week's procedure focus on a single…

  13. Exploring Protein Structure and Dynamics through a Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M.; Ginther, Patrick S.; Douglas, Bonnie B.; Bird, Kelly E.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present a 10-week project-oriented laboratory module designed to provide a course-based undergraduate research experience in biochemistry that emphasizes the importance of biomolecular structure and dynamics in enzyme function. This module explores the impact of mutagenesis on an important active site loop for a biomedically-relevant…

  14. Teaching Protein Purification and Characterization Techniques: A Student-Initiated, Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Gina

    2008-01-01

    This report describes a biochemistry laboratory that is completely project-oriented. Upper-level biology and chemistry majors work in teams to purify a protein of their choice. After the student groups have completed literature searches, ordered reagents, and made buffers they continue to learn basic protein purification and biochemical techniques…

  15. Thermodynamic Exploration of Eosin-Lysozyme Binding: A Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Andrew J.; Hartsell, Lydia R.; Krueger, Brent P.; Pikaart, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a modular pair of experiments for use in the undergraduate physical chemistry and biochemistry laboratories. Both experiments examine the thermodynamics of the binding of a small molecule, eosin Y, to the protein lysozyme. The assay for binding is the quenching of lysozyme fluorescence by eosin through resonant energy transfer. In…

  16. Integrating Bio-Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry into an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by…

  17. From Cookbook to Research: Redesigning an Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd-Kimball, Debra; Miller, Keith R.

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory courses are often designed using step-by-step protocols which encourage students to conduct experiments without thinking about what they are doing or why they are doing it. Such course design limits the growth of our students as scientists and can make it more difficult for a student to transition to the expectations of a research…

  18. A Survey on Faculty Perspectives on the Transition to a Biochemistry Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    It will always remain a goal of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course to engage students hands-on in a wide range of biochemistry laboratory experiences. In 2006, our research group initiated a project for "in silico" prediction of enzyme function based only on the 3D coordinates of the more than 3800 proteins "of unknown…

  19. [Surgical laboratory in pregraduate medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Jurado, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Surgical laboratory in pregraduate students in medicine is beneficial and improves learning processes in cognitive aspects and skills acquisition. It is also an early initiation into scientific research. The laboratory is the introductory pathway into basic concepts of medical science (meaningful learning). It is also where students gain knowledge in procedures and abilities to obtain professional skills, an interactive teacher-student process. Medicine works rapidly to change from an art to a science. This fact compromises all schools and medical faculties to analyze their actual lesson plans. Simulators give students confidence and ability and save time, money and resources, eliminating at the same time the ethical factor of using live animals and the fear of patient safety. Multimedia programs may give a cognitive context evolving logically with an explanation based on written and visual animation followed by a clinical problem and its demonstration in a simulator, all before applying knowledge to the patient.

  20. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  1. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Integrating bio-inorganic and analytical chemistry into an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J; Brewer, Sharon E; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy exercise as part of a five-week long laboratory-based project on the purification of myoglobin from beef. Students were required to prepare samples for chemical analysis, operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, critically evaluate their iron data, and integrate these data into a study of myoglobin. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. Exploring protein structure and dynamics through a project-oriented biochemistry laboratory module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M; Ginther, Patrick S; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Patrick Loria, J

    2017-09-01

    Here, we present a 10-week project-oriented laboratory module designed to provide a course-based undergraduate research experience in biochemistry that emphasizes the importance of biomolecular structure and dynamics in enzyme function. This module explores the impact of mutagenesis on an important active site loop for a biomedically-relevant human enzyme, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Over the course of the semester students guide their own mutant of PTP1B from conception to characterization in a cost-effective manner and gain exposure to fundamental techniques in biochemistry, including site-directed DNA mutagenesis, bacterial recombinant protein expression, affinity column purification, protein quantitation, SDS-PAGE, and enzyme kinetics. This project-based approach allows an instructor to simulate a research setting and prepare students for productive research beyond the classroom. Potential modifications to expand or contract this module are also provided. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):403-410, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Application of indices Cp and Cpk to improve quality control capability in clinical biochemistry laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Wu, Ming-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Ming

    2014-04-30

    The traditional criteria for acceptability of analytic quality may not be objective in clinical laboratories. To establish quality control procedures intended to enhance Westgard multi-rules for improving the quality of clinical biochemistry tests, we applied the Cp and Cpk quality-control indices to monitor tolerance fitting and systematic variation of clinical biochemistry test results. Daily quality-control data of a large Taiwanese hospital in 2009 were analyzed. The test items were selected based on an Olympus biochemistry machine and included serum albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, cholesterol, glucose and potassium levels. Cp and Cpk values were calculated for normal and abnormal levels, respectively. The tolerance range was estimated with data from 50 laboratories using the same instruments and reagents. The results showed a monthly trend of variation for the five items under investigation. The index values of glucose were lower than those of the other items, and their values were usually quality control, but also for revealing inter-laboratory qualitycontrol capability differences.

  5. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting...

  6. Glycated albumin: from biochemistry and laboratory medicine to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozio, Elena; Di Gaetano, Nicola; Findeisen, Peter; Corsi Romanelli, Massimiliano Marco

    2017-03-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge about glycated albumin. We review the changes induced by glycation on the properties of albumin, the pathological implications of high glycated albumin levels, glycated albumin quantification methods, and the use of glycated albumin as a complementary biomarker for diabetes mellitus diagnosis and monitoring and for dealing with long-term complications. The advantages and limits of this biomarker in different clinical settings are also discussed.

  7. [External quality assessment in clinical biochemistry laboratories: pilot study in 11 laboratories of Lomé (Togo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Kafui; Fétéké, Lochina; Assignon, Selom; Dorkenoo, Ameyo; Napo-Koura, Gado

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the performance of a few biochemistry analysis and make recommendations to the place of the stakeholders. It is a cross-sectional study conducted between the October 1(st), 2012 and the July 31, 2013 bearing on the results of 5 common examinations of clinical biochemistry, provided by 11 laboratories volunteers opening in the public and private sectors. These laboratories have analysed during the 3 cycles, 2 levels (medium and high) of serum concentration of urea, glucose, creatinine and serum aminotransferases. The performance of laboratories have been determined from the acceptable limits corresponding to the limits of total errors, defined by the French Society of Clinical Biology (SFBC). A system of internal quality control is implemented by all laboratories and 45% of them participated in international programs of external quality assessment (EQA). The rate of acceptable results for the entire study was of 69%. There was a significant difference (plaboratories engaged in a quality approach and the group with default implementation of the quality approach. Also a significant difference was observed between the laboratories of the central level and those of the peripheral level of our health system (plaboratories remains relatively unsatisfactory. It is important that the Ministry of Health put in place a national program of EQA with mandatory participation.

  8. Identification of Forensic Samples via Mitochondrial DNA in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Julie T.; Pilon, André M.

    2003-04-01

    A recent forensic approach for identification of unknown biological samples is mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify a 440 base pair hypervariable region of human mtDNA from a variety of "crime scene" samples (e.g., teeth, hair, nails, cigarettes, envelope flaps, toothbrushes, and chewing gum). Amplification is verified via agarose gel electrophoresis and then samples are subjected to cycle sequencing. Sequence alignments are made via the program CLUSTAL W, allowing students to compare samples and solve the "crime."

  9. [Blood volume for biochemistry determinations--laboratory needs and everyday practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztefko, Krystyna; Mamica, Katarzyna; Bugajska, Jolanta; Maziarz, Barbara; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2014-01-01

    Blood loss due to diagnostic phlebotomy jest a very serious problem, especially for newborn, infants and critically ill patients on intensive care units. Although single blood loss can be easily tolerated in adults, in small babies and in patients who are frequently monitored based on laboratory tests iatrogenic anaemia can occur. To evaluate the blood volume drawn for routine biochemistry tests in relation to patient age and the number of parameters requested. Blood volume drawn for routine biochemistry measurements from patients hospitalized in University Children's Hospital (N = 2980, children age from one day to 18 years) and in University Hospital (N = 859, adults, aged > 1.8 years) in Cracow has been analyzed. Blood volume was calculated based on regular tube diameter and blood heights in the tube. In case of microvettes the blood volume was 0.2 ml. Statistical analysis has been performed by using PRISM 5.0. The statistical significance was set at p nurses and doctors should include the information about current laboratory automation and methods miniaturization; 2) The amount of blood volume needed by laboratory for the requested number of tests should always be taken into account when diagnostic phlebotomy is necessary.

  10. Business analytics of specialized medical biochemistry laboratory using profit and loss acount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikica Buljanović

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. By measuring the actual effectiveness of a medical biochemistry laboratory’s business operations, we can determine the accounting measure of laboratory’s profitability, where operating expenses of the laboratory are covered by the income generated from the services. A laboratory’s financial report can be based on a profit and loss account, which shows whether or not a business entity, i.e., the laboratory, is making a profit during a particular business period. Methods. Profitability of the Specialized Medical Biochemical Laboratory (Laboratory of the General County Hospital in Našice, Croatia, was determined using the profit and loss account for 2007. Business success was expressed using the accounting measures of marginal contribution, gross income, and operating income, which could show whether or not the laboratory was operating profitably. This procedure allowed us to identify indicators of successful or unsuccessful business operations of the Laboratory. Results. According to the profit and loss account, the operating profit was 719,926 HRK, i.e., the operating margin was 11.7%, indicating that the Laboratory was operating positively. After subtracting all operating expenses per 100 income units, 11.7 units profit remained from the Laboratory’s core business. Conclusion. The Specialized Medical Biochemical Laboratory of the General County Hospital in Našice generated income, i.e., it operated at a profit. The purpose of profit and loss account was to determine the Laboratory operations that had impact on its business effectiveness and could increase the actual profitability. If the laboratory operates at a loss, and no activities are undertaken that would reverse the business toward positive, the analysis may provide information on the cost for the society as a whole of the studied laboratory within the existing healthcare system.

  11. Team-Based Learning, Faculty Research, and Grant Writing Bring Significant Learning Experiences to an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Hedeel Guy; Heyl, Deborah L.; Liggit, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    This biochemistry laboratory course was designed to provide significant learning experiences to expose students to different ways of succeeding as scientists in academia and foster development and improvement of their potential and competency as the next generation of investigators. To meet these goals, the laboratory course employs three…

  12. Bring Your Own Device: A Digital Notebook for Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Using a Free, Cross-Platform Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Aaron R.; Smith-Carpenter, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    The majority of undergraduates own a smartphone, yet fewer than half view it as a valuable learning technology. Consequently, a digital laboratory notebook (DLN) was developed for an upper-division undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course using the free mobile application Evernote. The cloud-based DLN capitalized on the unique features of…

  13. National survey on turnaround time of clinical biochemistry tests in 738 laboratories in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fei, Yang; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Haijian; Wang, Minqi; Chen, Bingquan; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo

    2018-02-01

    This survey was initiated to estimate the current status of turnaround time (TAT) monitoring of clinical biochemistry in China, provide baseline data for establishment of quality specifications and analyze the impact factors of TAT. 738 laboratories were included. Questionnaires involved general information and data of related indicators of TAT during 1 week were provided to participating laboratories. Nine quality indicators were covered, which were medians, 90th and outlier rates of pre-examination, examination, and post-examination TAT. The 25th percentile, median, and 75th percentile of TATs were calculated as optimum, desirable, and minimum quality specifications. Percentages and sigma values were used to describe the outlier rates. Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to identify the potential impacts of TAT. Response rate of this survey was 46.44%. More than 50% of the laboratories indicated they had set up target TATs in three time intervals and monitored TATs generally. The post-examination TAT of most laboratories was 0min, while the pre-examination and examination TAT varied. Sigma values of outlier rates for 45%~60% of laboratories were above 4, while 15%~20% of labs whose sigma values were below 3. Group comparisons suggested nurse or mechanical pipeline transportation, link laboratory information system with hospital information system, and using computer reporting instead of printing report were related to shorter TATs. Despite of the remarkable progresses of TATs in China, there was also room to improve. Laboratories should strengthen the construction of information systems, identify reasons for TAT delay to improve the service quality continuously. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Taking a new biomarker into routine use – A perspective from the routine clinical biochemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Catharine; Hill, Robert; Hortin, Glen L; Thompson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to provide cost-effective healthcare based on “best practice.” Consequently, new biomarkers are only likely to be introduced into routine clinical biochemistry departments if they are supported by a strong evidence base and if the results will improve patient management and outcome. This requires convincing evidence of the benefits of introducing the new test, ideally reflected in fewer hospital admissions, fewer additional investigations and/or fewer clinic visits. Carefully designed audit and cost-benefit studies in relevant patient groups must demonstrate that introducing the biomarker delivers an improved and more effective clinical pathway. From the laboratory perspective, pre-analytical requirements must be thoroughly investigated at an early stage. Good stability of the biomarker in relevant physiological matrices is essential to avoid the need for special processing. Absence of specific timing requirements for sampling and knowledge of the effect of medications that might be used to treat the patients in whom the biomarker will be measured is also highly desirable. Analytically, automation is essential in modern high-throughput clinical laboratories. Assays must therefore be robust, fulfilling standard requirements for linearity on dilution, precision and reproducibility, both within- and between-run. Provision of measurements by a limited number of specialized reference laboratories may be most appropriate, especially when a new biomarker is first introduced into routine practice. PMID:21137030

  15. Proficiency in radiation protection, nuclear medicine and biomedicine in the Faculty of Biochemistry and Pharmaceutics, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, Rosa M.; Caro, Ricardo A.; Rivera, Elena S.

    2001-01-01

    The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry (Buenos Aires University) offers four annual courses on Methodology of Radioisotopes (which focus on different aspect of the Radiological Protection according to whom they are aimed: 1) Course for students in the Biochemistry Cycle; 2) Course for post-Graduate in Medicine, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists; 3) Course to up-date the knowledge; 4) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine. From 1960, 5000 biochemistry students have approved Methodology of Radioisotopes. The syllabus includes aspect related to the students' future professional activities. Since 1962, 1513 (?) graduates have approved it. Training (222 h) include: dosimetric magnitudes, units, internal and external dosimetry; working conditions, contamination barriers, radioprotection philosophy and principles; limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects, national and international legislation. Uses of commonest isotopes in Nuclear Medicine and Biomedicine are under deep analysis. Since 1992 the graduates who wish to up-date their knowledge can follow this course organized in modules to suit their needs. Since 1997 this course emphasizes the operational aspects such as: columns elution, injection of radioactive drugs to patients, decontamination of areas. The increasing in the application of radioisotopes makes necessary to encourage their use in harmony with the environmental. (author)

  16. Development of a Semester-Long, Inquiry-Based Laboratory Course in Upper-Level Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pushpalatha P. N.; Thompson, Martin; Hungwe, Kedmon

    2014-01-01

    A semester-long laboratory course was designed and implemented to familiarize students with modern biochemistry and molecular biology techniques. The designed format involved active student participation, evaluation of data, and critical thinking, and guided students to become independent researchers. The first part of the course focused on…

  17. HPLC of the Polypeptides in a Hydrolyzate of Egg-White Lysozyme. An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, W. S., III; Burns, L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple high-performance liquid chromatography experiment for undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. The experiment illustrates the separation of polypeptides by a step gradient elution using a single pump instrument with no gradient attachments. Discusses instrumentation, analysis, a sample preparation, and results. (CW)

  18. Quality in laboratory medicine: 50years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2017-02-01

    The last 50years have seen substantial changes in the landscape of laboratory medicine: its role in modern medicine is in evolution and the quality of laboratory services is changing. The need to control and improve quality in clinical laboratories has grown hand in hand with the growth in technological developments leading to an impressive reduction of analytical errors over time. An essential cause of this impressive improvement has been the introduction and monitoring of quality indicators (QIs) such as the analytical performance specifications (in particular bias and imprecision) based on well-established goals. The evolving landscape of quality and errors in clinical laboratories moved first from analytical errors to all errors performed within the laboratory walls, subsequently to errors in laboratory medicine (including errors in test requesting and result interpretation), and finally, to a focus on errors more frequently associated with adverse events (laboratory-associated errors). After decades in which clinical laboratories have focused on monitoring and improving internal indicators of analytical quality, efficiency and productivity, it is time to shift toward indicators of total quality, clinical effectiveness and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The UCLA-DOE Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility provides the UCLA biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety...

  20. Vertical Integration of Biochemistry and Clinical Medicine Using a Near-Peer Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallan, Alexander J.; Offner, Gwynneth D.; Symes, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Vertical integration has been extensively implemented across medical school curricula but has not been widely attempted in the field of biochemistry. We describe a novel curricular innovation in which a near-peer learning model was used to implement vertical integration in our medical school biochemistry course. Senior medical students developed…

  1. Raman Investigation of Temperature Profiles of Phospholipid Dispersions in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Norman C.

    2015-06-01

    The temperature dependence of self-assembled, cell-like dispersions of phospholipids is investigated with Raman spectroscopy in the biochemistry laboratory. Vibrational modes in the hydrocarbon interiors of phospholipid bilayers are strongly Raman active, whereas the vibrations of the polar head groups and the water matrix have little Raman activity. From Raman spectra increases in fluidity of the hydrocarbon chains can be monitored with intensity changes as a function of temperature in the CH-stretching region. The experiment uses detection of scattered 1064-nm laser light (Nicolet NXR module) by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Nicolet 6700). A thermoelectric heater-cooler device (Melcor) gives convenient temperature control from 5 to 95°C for samples in melting point capillaries. Use of deuterium oxide instead of water as the matrix avoids some absorption of the exciting laser light and interference with intensity observations in the CH-stretching region. Phospholipids studied range from dimyristoylphosphotidyl choline (C14, transition T = 24°C) to dibehenoylphosphotidyl choline (C22, transition T = 74°C).

  2. Laboratory hemostasis: milestones in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2013-01-01

    Hemostasis is a delicate, dynamic and intricate system, in which pro- and anti-coagulant forces cooperate for either maintaining blood fluidity under normal conditions, or else will prompt blood clot generation to limit the bleeding when the integrity of blood vessels is jeopardized. Excessive prevalence of anticoagulant forces leads to hemorrhage, whereas excessive activation of procoagulant forces triggers excessive coagulation and thrombosis. The hemostasis laboratory performs a variety of first, second and third line tests, and plays a pivotal role in diagnostic and monitoring of most hemostasis disturbances. Since the leading targets of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine include promotion of progress in fundamental and applied research, along with publication of guidelines and recommendations in laboratory diagnostics, this journal is an ideal source of information on current developments in the laboratory technology of hemostasis, and this article is aimed to celebrate some of the most important and popular articles ever published by the journal in the filed of laboratory hemostasis.

  3. Role of laboratory medicine in collaborative healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ian D; Wilkie, Patricia; Hannan, Amir; Beastall, Graham H

    2018-04-09

    Healthcare delivery and responsibility is changing. Patient-centered care is gaining international acceptance with the patient taking greater responsibility for his/her health and sharing decision making for the diagnosis and management of illness. Laboratory medicine must embrace this change and work in a tripartite collaboration with patients and with the clinicians who use clinical laboratory services. Improved communication is the key to participation, including the provision of educational information and support. Knowledge management should be targeted to each stakeholder group. As part of collaborative healthcare clinical laboratory service provision needs to be more flexible and available, with implications for managers who oversee the structure and governance of the service. Increased use of managed point of care testing will be essential. The curriculum content of laboratory medicine training programs will require trainees to undertake practice-based learning that facilitates interaction with patients, clinicians and managers. Continuing professional development for specialists in laboratory medicine should also embrace new sources of information and opportunities for collaborative healthcare.

  4. Spotlight on acupuncture in laboratory animal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magden ER

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth R Magden Department of Veterinary Sciences, Michale E Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA Abstract: Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years, although it is only in the past century that science has worked to unravel the mechanisms behind its use. Literature supporting the efficacious use of acupuncture to treat a variety of conditions has been and continues to be published, including the randomized controlled studies we all appreciate when practicing evidence-based medicine. The use of acupuncture in veterinary medicine has paralleled the trends observed in people, with an increasingly common use to remedy specific medical conditions. These conditions are commonly related to neurological dysfunction or orthopedic pain. Although pain relief is the most common use of acupuncture, numerous other conditions have been shown to improve with this therapy. Laboratory animals are also benefiting from acupuncture. Its use is starting to be incorporated into research settings, although there is still further progress to be made in this field. Acupuncture has been shown to improve clinical conditions and quality of life in laboratory animals, and should be considered as a tool to treat laboratory animals with conditions known to benefit from therapy. Here we review the history, mechanisms of action, and use of acupuncture to treat veterinary patients and laboratory animals. Keywords: acupuncture, laboratory animals, nonhuman primates

  5. Laboratory medicine in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, Wytze P; Zerah, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The profession of laboratory medicine differs between countries within the European Union (EU) in many respects. The objective of professional organizations of the promotion of mutual recognition of specialists within the EU is closely related to the free movement of people. This policy translates to equivalence of standards and harmonization of the training curriculum. The aim of the present study is the description of the organization and practice of laboratory medicine within the countries that constitute the EU. A questionnaire covering many aspects of the profession was sent to delegates of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and Union Européenne de Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) of the 28 EU countries. Results were sent to the delegates for confirmation. Many differences between countries were identified: predominantly medical or scientific professionals; a broad or limited professional field of interest; inclusion of patient treatment; formal or absent recognition; a regulated or absent formal training program; general or minor application of a quality system based on ISO Norms. The harmonization of the postgraduate training of both clinical chemists and of laboratory physicians has been a goal for many years. Differences in the organization of the laboratory professions still exist in the respective countries which all have a long historical development with their own rationality. It is an important challenge to harmonize our profession, and difficult choices will need to be made. Recent developments with respect to the directive on Recognition of Professional Qualifications call for new initiatives to harmonize laboratory medicine both across national borders, and across the borders of scientific and medical professions.

  6. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  7. Selecting clinical quality indicators for laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Julian H

    2012-05-01

    Quality in laboratory medicine is often described as doing the right test at the right time for the right person. Laboratory processes currently operate under the oversight of an accreditation body which gives confidence that the process is good. However, there are aspects of quality that are not measured by these processes. These are largely focused on ensuring that the most clinically appropriate test is performed and interpreted correctly. Clinical quality indicators were selected through a two-phase process. Firstly, a series of focus groups of clinical scientists were held with the aim of developing a list of quality indicators. These were subsequently ranked in order by an expert panel of primary and secondary care physicians. The 10 top indicators included the communication of critical results, comprehensive education to all users and adequate quality assurance for point-of-care testing. Laboratories should ensure their tests are used to national standards, that they have clinical utility, are calibrated to national standards and have long-term stability for chronic disease management. Laboratories should have error logs and demonstrate evidence of measures introduced to reduce chances of similar future errors. Laboratories should make a formal scientific evaluation of analytical quality. This paper describes the process of selection of quality indicators for laboratory medicine that have been validated sequentially by deliverers and users of the service. They now need to be converted into measureable variables related to outcome and validated in practice.

  8. Errors in clinical laboratories or errors in laboratory medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory testing is a highly complex process and, although laboratory services are relatively safe, they are not as safe as they could or should be. Clinical laboratories have long focused their attention on quality control methods and quality assessment programs dealing with analytical aspects of testing. However, a growing body of evidence accumulated in recent decades demonstrates that quality in clinical laboratories cannot be assured by merely focusing on purely analytical aspects. The more recent surveys on errors in laboratory medicine conclude that in the delivery of laboratory testing, mistakes occur more frequently before (pre-analytical) and after (post-analytical) the test has been performed. Most errors are due to pre-analytical factors (46-68.2% of total errors), while a high error rate (18.5-47% of total errors) has also been found in the post-analytical phase. Errors due to analytical problems have been significantly reduced over time, but there is evidence that, particularly for immunoassays, interference may have a serious impact on patients. A description of the most frequent and risky pre-, intra- and post-analytical errors and advice on practical steps for measuring and reducing the risk of errors is therefore given in the present paper. Many mistakes in the Total Testing Process are called "laboratory errors", although these may be due to poor communication, action taken by others involved in the testing process (e.g., physicians, nurses and phlebotomists), or poorly designed processes, all of which are beyond the laboratory's control. Likewise, there is evidence that laboratory information is only partially utilized. A recent document from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) recommends a new, broader definition of the term "laboratory error" and a classification of errors according to different criteria. In a modern approach to total quality, centered on patients' needs and satisfaction, the risk of errors and mistakes

  9. Specimen rejection in laboratory medicine: Necessary for patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Zeliha Gunnur; Pinar, Asli; Akbiyik, Filiz

    2015-01-01

    The emergency laboratory in Hacettepe University Hospitals receives specimens from emergency departments (EDs), inpatient services and intensive care units (ICUs). The samples are accepted according to the rejection criteria of the laboratory. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the sample rejection ratios according to the types of pre-preanalytical errors and collection areas. The samples sent to the emergency laboratory were recorded during 12 months between January to December, 2013 in which 453,171 samples were received and 27,067 specimens were rejected. Rejection ratios was 2.5% for biochemistry tests, 3.2% for complete blood count (CBC), 9.8% for blood gases, 9.2% for urine analysis, 13.3% for coagulation tests, 12.8% for therapeutic drug monitoring, 3.5% for cardiac markers and 12% for hormone tests. The most frequent rejection reasons were fibrin clots (28%) and inadequate volume (9%) for biochemical tests. Clotted samples (35%) and inadequate volume (13%) were the major causes for coagulation tests, blood gas analyses and CBC. The ratio of rejected specimens was higher in the EDs (40%) compared to ICUs (30%) and inpatient services (28%). The highest rejection ratio was observed in neurology ICU (14%) among the ICUs and internal medicine inpatient service (10%) within inpatient clinics. We detected an overall specimen rejection rate of 6% in emergency laboratory. By documentation of rejected samples and periodic training of healthcare personnel, we expect to decrease sample rejection ratios below 2%, improve total quality management of the emergency laboratory and promote patient safety.

  10. Tendências em medicina laboratorial Trends in laboratory medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Aguiar Campana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A patologia clínica/medicina laboratorial é uma especialidade direcionada à realização de exames complementares no auxílio ao diagnóstico, com impacto nos diferentes estágios da cadeia de saúde: prevenção, diagnóstico, prognóstico e acompanhamento terapêutico. Diversos elementos apontam para maior utilização da medicina diagnóstica no futuro. Para discutirmos as principais tendências na medicina laboratorial, descrevemos os fatores que colaboram e são fundamentais para o crescimento desse mercado denominados, neste estudo, drivers de crescimento. As principais tendências que terão forte impacto na medicina laboratorial, e que serão descritas neste artigo, são: ferramentas de gestão, inserção de novos testes no mercado e rol de procedimentos, qualidade dos serviços em medicina diagnóstica, modelos de operação, automação, consolidação e integração, tecnologia da informação, medicina personalizada e genética. Sabemos que a medicina diagnóstica demonstra sua importância ao participar de 70% das decisões clínicas, absorvendo uma pequena parte dos custos em saúde (cerca de 10%. Todas as tendências analisadas neste trabalho apontam para um crescimento na utilização dos exames laboratoriais e também para sua importância na cadeia de saúde. Esse novo posicionamento, somado às novas expectativas de alta resolubilidade, pressiona o mercado e as companhias que o compõem a buscar mudanças e novas estratégias de atuação.Clinical pathology/laboratory medicine, a specialty focused on performing complementary tests to aid diagnosis, has impact upon several stages of health care: prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic management. There are several factors that will foster the use of laboratory medicine in the future. In order to discuss the main trends in laboratory medicine, this article describes the major factors that have promoted growth in this market, which herein are referred to as growth

  11. [Standardization of terminology in laboratory medicine I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soo Young; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Min, Won Ki; Lim, Hwan Sub; Song, Junghan; Chae, Seok Lae; Lee, Chang Kyu; Kwon, Jung Ah; Lee, Kap No

    2007-04-01

    Standardization of medical terminology is essential for data transmission between health-care institutions or clinical laboratories and for maximizing the benefits of information technology. Purpose of our study was to standardize the medical terms used in the clinical laboratory, such as test names, units, terms used in result descriptions, etc. During the first year of the study, we developed a standard database of concept names for laboratory terms, which covered the terms used in government health care centers, their branch offices, and primary health care units. Laboratory terms were collected from the electronic data interchange (EDI) codes from National Health Insurance Corporation (NHIC), Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC) database, community health centers and their branch offices, and clinical laboratories of representative university medical centers. For standard expression, we referred to the English-Korean/ Korean-English medical dictionary of Korean Medical Association and the rules for foreign language translation. Programs for mapping between LOINC DB and EDI code and for translating English to Korean were developed. A Korean standard laboratory terminology database containing six axial concept names such as components, property, time aspect, system (specimen), scale type, and method type was established for 7,508 test observations. Short names and a mapping table for EDI codes and Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) were added. Synonym tables for concept names, words used in the database, and six axial terms were prepared to make it easier to find the standard terminology with common terms used in the field of laboratory medicine. Here we report for the first time a Korean standard laboratory terminology database for test names, result description terms, result units covering most laboratory tests in primary healthcare centers.

  12. Prepare, Do, Review: A skills-based approach for laboratory practical classes in biochemistry and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Peter; Ludwig, Martha; Castelli, Joane; Kirkwood, Paul; Attwood, Paul

    2016-05-06

    A new laboratory practical system is described which is comprised of a number of laboratory practical modules, each based around a particular technique or set of techniques, related to the theory part of the course but not designed to be dependent on it. Each module comprises an online recorded pre-lab lecture, the laboratory practical itself and a post-lab session in which students make oral presentations on different aspects of the practical. Each part of the module is assessed with the aim of providing rapid feedback to staff and students. Each laboratory practical is the responsibility of a single staff member and through this "ownership," continual review and updating is promoted. Examples of changes made by staff to modules as a result of student feedback are detailed. A survey of students who had experienced both the old-style laboratory course and the new one provided evidence of increased satisfaction with the new program. The assessment of acquired shills in the new program showed that it was much more effective than the old course. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:276-287, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Biochemistry and radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza de G, M.

    1989-01-01

    The article reviews the historical development of the nuclear medicine in Colombia and the primordial role of the IAN in this field. The main objective of the Biochemistry and Radiopharmacy Area is go to give technical support for the application of the nuclear energy in the human and veterinary medicine. The department has laboratories for the production of radiopharmaceuticals to be labelled with Tc-99m and quality control of the same human and veterinary RIA. Each one of the laboratories develops its work in three different areas: research and development, production, training and teaching. An actualization of the programs, results and publications are analyzed in this review also. Some of these programs have the support of the IAEA

  14. American journal of biochemistry and biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    .... Areas covered include: general biochemistry, patho-biochemistry, evolutionary biology, structural biology, molecular and cellular biology, molecular medicine, cancer research, virology, immunology, plant molecular biology...

  15. Clinical biochemistry education in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queraltó, J M

    1994-12-31

    Clinical biochemistry in Spain was first established in 1978 as an independent specialty. It is one of several clinical laboratory sciences specialties, together with haematology, microbiology, immunology and general laboratory (Clinical analysis, análisis clinicos). Graduates in Medicine, Pharmacy, Chemistry and Biological Sciences can enter post-graduate training in Clinical Chemistry after a nation-wide examination. Training in an accredited Clinical Chemistry department is 4 years. A national committee for medical and pharmacist specialties advises the government on the number of trainees, program and educational units accreditation criteria. Technical staff includes nurses and specifically trained technologists. Accreditation of laboratories is developed at different regional levels. The Spanish Society for Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology (SECQ), the national representative in the IFCC, has 1600 members, currently publishes a scientific journal (Química Clinica) and a newsletter. It organizes a continuous education program, a quality control program and an annual Congress.

  16. Laboratory Medicine is Faced with the Evolution of Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collinson Paul

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory medicine and clinical medicine are co-dependent components of medicine. Laboratory medicine functions most effectively when focused through a clinical lens. Me dical practice as a whole undergoes change. New drugs, treatments and changes in management strategies are introduced. New techniques, new technologies and new tests are developed. These changes may be either clinically or laboratory initiated, and so their introduction requires dialogue and interaction between clinical and laboratory medicine specialists. Treatment monitoring is integral to laboratory medicine, varying from direct drug measurement to monitoring cholesterol levels in response to treatment. The current trend to »personalised medicine« is an extension of this process with the development of companion diagnostics. Technological innovation forms part of modern laboratory practice. Introduction of new technology both facilitates standard laboratory approaches and permits introduction of new tests and testing strategies previously confined to the research laboratory only. The revolution in cardiac biomarker testing has been largely a laboratory led change. Flexibility in service provision in response to changing clinical practice or evolving technology provides a significant laboratory management challenge in the light of increasing expectations, shifts in population demographics and constraint in resource availability. Laboratory medicine practitioners are adept at meeting these challenges. One thing remains constant, that there will be a constant need laboratory medicine to meet the challenges of novel clinical challenges from infectious diseases to medical conditions developing from lifestyle and longevity.

  17. A Project-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Promoting the Understanding and Uses of Fluorescence Spectroscopy in the Study of Biomolecular Structures and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, Nicholas; Jakubowsk, Henry V.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory project for a first semester biochemistry course is described, which integrates the traditional classroom study of the structure and function of biomolecules with the laboratory study of these molecules using fluorescence spectroscopy. Students are assigned a specific question addressing the stability/function of lipids, proteins, or…

  18. Education in Medical Biochemistry in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkic-Sing, Nada

    2010-06-01

    Medical biochemistry is the usual name for clinical biochemistry or clinical chemistry in Serbia. Medical biochemistry laboratories and medical biochemists as a profession are part of Health Care System and are regulated through: the Health Care Law and rules issued by the Chamber of Medical Biochemists of Serbia. The first continuous and organized education for Medical Biochemists in Serbia dates from 1945, when Department of Medical Biochemistry was established at Pharmaceutical Faculty in Belgrade. In 1987 at the same Faculty a five years undergraduate branch was established, educating Medical Biochemists under a special program. Since 2006 the new five year undergraduate (according to Bologna Declaration) and postgraduate program of four-year specialization according to EC4 European Syllabus for Post-Graduate Training in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine has been established. The Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health accredits the programs. There are four requirements for practicing medical biochemistry in the Health Care System: University Diploma of the Faculty of Pharmacy (Medical Biochemistry), successful completion of the profession exam at the Ministry of Health after completion of one additional year of obligatory practical training in medical laboratories, membership in the Serbian Chamber of Medical Biochemists and licence for skilled work issued by Serbian Chamber of Medical Biochemists.

  19. HEPATOKIN1 is a biochemistry-based model of liver metabolism for applications in medicine and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Bulik, Sascha; Wallach, Iwona; Wünsch, Tilo; König, Matthias; Stockmann, Martin; Meierhofer, David; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2018-06-19

    The epidemic increase of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) requires a deeper understanding of the regulatory circuits controlling the response of liver metabolism to nutritional challenges, medical drugs, and genetic enzyme variants. As in vivo studies of human liver metabolism are encumbered with serious ethical and technical issues, we developed a comprehensive biochemistry-based kinetic model of the central liver metabolism including the regulation of enzyme activities by their reactants, allosteric effectors, and hormone-dependent phosphorylation. The utility of the model for basic research and applications in medicine and pharmacology is illustrated by simulating diurnal variations of the metabolic state of the liver at various perturbations caused by nutritional challenges (alcohol), drugs (valproate), and inherited enzyme disorders (galactosemia). Using proteomics data to scale maximal enzyme activities, the model is used to highlight differences in the metabolic functions of normal hepatocytes and malignant liver cells (adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma).

  20. Magnetic separation: its application in mining, waste purification, medicine, biochemistry and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, M; Hulliger, J

    2017-10-02

    The use of strong magnetic field gradients and high magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets or superconducting coils has found applications in many fields such as mining, solid state chemistry, biochemistry and medical research. Lab scale or industrial implementations involve separation of macro- and nanoparticles, cells, proteins, and macromolecules down to small molecules and ions. Most promising are those attempts where the object to be separated is attached to a strong magnetic nanoparticle. Here, all kinds of specific affinity interactions are used to attach magnetic carrier particles to mainly objects of biological interest. Other attempts use a strong paramagnetic suspension for the separation of purely diamagnetic objects, such as bio-macromolecules or heavy metals. The application of magnetic separation to superconducting inorganic phases is of particular interest in combination with ceramic combinatorial chemistry to generate a library of e.g. cuprate superconductors.

  1. Safety guide for protection in nuclear medicine laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The regulations that must be taken into account during constructing the nuclear medicine laboratories to meet the requirements of radiation protection and the specifications of equipment in the laboratory, quality control, radioactive monitoring, protective procedures, personnel qualifications are given

  2. Laboratory research at the clinical trials of Veterinary medicinal Products

    OpenAIRE

    ZHYLA M.I.

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the importance of laboratory test methods, namely pathomorfological at conduct of clinical trials. The article focuses on complex laboratory diagnostics at determination of clinical condition of animals, safety and efficacy of tested medicinal product.

  3. Practical development of laboratory of biologics technology of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine for the period 1991-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Lugovska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of inventive activity of the Laboratory of Biologics Technology of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NAS of Ukraine, under the leadership of Z.M.Datsenko, Cand.Sc. (Biol., during 1991-2010. The laboratory researchers have developed new technologies for production of medicines of lipid-protein nature, which are based on endogenous complexes of biologically active substances included in the composition of biomembranes of different origin. The researchers have created new technologies for drug PANTOCRINE (for injections and oral administration from antlers of deers and horns of farm animals that have significantly higher biological activity compared with the commercial drug. They have also created new biologically active drugs from antlers with a specific action: HIPPOCAMP, reducing blood pressure in various forms of hypertension, and PANTERON – biological regulator of synthesis of steroid hormones. Further the researchers have developed technologies for obtaining biologically active complexes of various specific action from marine organisms (calamari, clams mussels, shellfish: CALMOFIL and MOLUFIL, therapeutic agents for replacement therapy of surfactant system of the lungs; FILOMEK, the agent for prophylaxis and treatment of a human reproductive system disorders; MOLUSTERON, the glicolipopeptide complex, three individual physiologically active compositions being differentially obtained from the latter: lipopeptide composition – for treatment of hypertension, nucleopeptide one – for treatment of hormonal disorders, and phospholipid – for treatment of lung diseases under the surfactant shortage.

  4. Nuclear medicine at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory seeks to develop new materials and methods for the investigation of human physiology and disease processes. Some aspects of this research are related to basic research of how radiopharmaceuticals work. Other aspects are directed toward direct applications as diagnostic agents. It is likely that cyclotron-produced positron emitting nuclides will assume greater importance in the next few years. This can be attributed to the ability to label biologically important molecules with high specific activity without affecting biological activity, using 11 C, 13 N, and 15 O. Large quantities of these short-lived nuclides can be administered without excessive radiation dose and newer instrumentation will permit reconstructive axial tomography, providing truly quantitative display of distribution of radioactivity. The 122 Xe- 122 I generator has the potential for looking at rapid dynamic processes. Another generator, the 68 Ge- 68 Ga generator produces a positron emitter for the use of those far removed from cyclotrons. The possibilities for 68 Ga radiopharmaceuticals are as numerous as those for /sup 99m/Tc diagnostic agents

  5. EC4 European Syllabus for Post-Graduate Training in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: version 3 - 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerah, Simone; McMurray, Janet; Bousquet, Bernard; Baum, Hannsjorg; Beastall, Graham H; Blaton, Vic; Cals, Marie-Josèphe; Duchassaing, Danielle; Gaudeau-Toussaint, Marie-Françoise; Harmoinen, Aimo; Hoffmann, Hans; Jansen, Rob T; Kenny, Desmond; Kohse, Klaus P; Köller, Ursula; Gobert, Jean-Gérard; Linget, Christine; Lund, Erik; Nubile, Giuseppe; Opp, Matthias; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinon, Georges; Queralto, José M; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Szekeres, Thomas; Vidaud, Michel; Wallinder, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The EC4 Syllabus for Postgraduate Training is the basis for the European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The syllabus: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. The syllabus is not primarily meant to be a training guide, but on the basis of the overview given (common minimal programme), national societies should formulate programmes that indicate where knowledge and experience is needed. The main points of this programme are: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory management; and Quality insurance management. The aim of this version of the syllabus is to be in accordance with the Directive of Professional Qualifications published on 30 September 2005. To prepare the common platforms planned in this directive, the disciplines are divided into four categories: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory

  6. Machine learning in laboratory medicine: waiting for the flood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabitza, Federico; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2018-03-28

    This review focuses on machine learning and on how methods and models combining data analytics and artificial intelligence have been applied to laboratory medicine so far. Although still in its infancy, the potential for applying machine learning to laboratory data for both diagnostic and prognostic purposes deserves more attention by the readership of this journal, as well as by physician-scientists who will want to take advantage of this new computer-based support in pathology and laboratory medicine.

  7. Adding value to laboratory medicine: a professional responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beastall, Graham H

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory medicine is a medical specialty at the centre of healthcare. When used optimally laboratory medicine generates knowledge that can facilitate patient safety, improve patient outcomes, shorten patient journeys and lead to more cost-effective healthcare. Optimal use of laboratory medicine relies on dynamic and authoritative leadership outside as well as inside the laboratory. The first responsibility of the head of a clinical laboratory is to ensure the provision of a high quality service across a wide range of parameters culminating in laboratory accreditation against an international standard, such as ISO 15189. From that essential baseline the leadership of laboratory medicine at local, national and international level needs to 'add value' to ensure the optimal delivery, use, development and evaluation of the services provided for individuals and for groups of patients. A convenient tool to illustrate added value is use of the mnemonic 'SCIENCE'. This tool allows added value to be considered in seven domains: standardisation and harmonisation; clinical effectiveness; innovation; evidence-based practice; novel applications; cost-effectiveness; and education of others. The assessment of added value in laboratory medicine may be considered against a framework that comprises three dimensions: operational efficiency; patient management; and patient behaviours. The profession and the patient will benefit from sharing examples of adding value to laboratory medicine.

  8. A Metabolic Murder Mystery: A Case-Based Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Kauffmann, Andrew D.; Poplawski, Shane G.; Lysiak, Daniel R.; Stewart, Robert J.; Arcadi, Jane K.; Dinan, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    In 1990, a woman was wrongly convicted of poisoning her infant son and was sentenced to life in prison. Her conviction was based on laboratory work that wrongly identified ethylene glycol as present in her son's blood and in the formula he drank prior to his death. The actual cause of the infant's death, a metabolic disease, was eventually…

  9. Green, Enzymatic Syntheses of Divanillin and Diapocynin for the Organic, Biochemistry, or Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Rachel T.; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Vosburg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmentally benign chemistry is an increasingly important topic both in the classroom and the laboratory. In this experiment, students synthesize divanillin from vanillin or diapocynin from apocynin, using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in water. The dimerized products form rapidly at ambient temperature and are isolated by…

  10. Evaluation of an Online Instructional Database Accessed by QR Codes to Support Biochemistry Practical Laboratory Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Tor; Melling, Louise; Shaw, Kirsty J.

    2016-01-01

    An online instructional database containing information on commonly used pieces of laboratory equipment was created. In order to make the database highly accessible and to promote its use, QR codes were utilized. The instructional materials were available anytime and accessed using QR codes located on the equipment itself and within undergraduate…

  11. Analysis of a p53 Mutation Associated with Cancer Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cruz, Isabel; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of a p53 polymorphism associated with cancer susceptibility. First, students collected a drop of peripheral blood cells using a sterile sting and then used FTA cards to extract the genomic DNA. The p53 region is then PCR…

  12. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.; Brandslund, I.

    2015-01-01

    Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting...

  13. Magnetic field-dependent molecular and chemical processes in biochemistry, genetics and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchachenko, A L

    2014-01-01

    The molecular concept (paradigm) in magnetobiology seems to be most substantiated and significant for explaining the biomedical effects of electromagnetic fields, for the new medical technology of transcranial magnetic stimulation of cognitive activity, for the nuclear magnetic control of biochemical processes and for the search of new magnetic effects in biology and medicine. The key structural element of the concept is a radical ion pair as the receiver of magnetic fields and the source of magnetic effects. The existence of such pairs was recently detected in the two life-supporting processes of paramount importance — in enzymatic ATP and DNA syntheses. The bibliography includes 80 references

  14. Waste water management in radiation medicine laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Miaofa

    1990-01-01

    A new building has been used since 1983 in the department of radiation medicine of Suzhou Medical College. Management, processing facilities, monitoring, discharge and treatment of 147 Pm contaminated waste water are reported

  15. Comparison of the microbial dynamics and biochemistry of laboratory sourdoughs prepared with grape, apple and yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordún, Elena; del Valle, Luis J; Ginovart, Marta; Carbó, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    The microbiological culture-dependent characterization and physicochemical characteristics of laboratory sourdough prepared with grape (GS) were evaluated and compared with apple (AS) and yogurt (YS), which are the usual Spanish sourdough ingredients. Ripe GS took longer than AS and YS to reach the appropriate acidity and achieved lower values of lactic acid. In all sourdoughs, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased during processing and were the dominant microorganisms (>1E+8 CFU/g). GS, as well as AS, had high diversity of LAB species. In ripe YS, Pediococcus pentosaceus was the only species identified; in GS and AS, several Lactobacilli were also found, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, and Lb. sakei; in addition, in GS Weisella cibaria also appeared. Regarding the yeast population, non-Saccharomyces yeasts from GS and AS showed a very high specific population (>1E+7 CFU/g), but this was reduced in ripe sourdough (<1E+4 CFU/g). Finally, the Saccharomyces group dominated in all sourdoughs. Starting ingredients or raw material provided microbiological specificity to sourdoughs, and grape could be considered one of them. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Semi-present Approachfor Intern Qualificationin Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory of UFPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Martins

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study has arisenfrom the experience in the discipline “Estágio Curricular" from Biomedicine,  Pharmacy and Laboratory Technique  courses in ULAB/HC/UFPE. The goal of this study wasto use a semi-present environment (50 hours to the qualification of the incoming students in 2011-1. Conventional classes were given through present approaches (theoretical-practical classes and the students were inscribed and trained in the virtual environment to accomplish the distant learning  course: “Capacitaçãodos Estagiários daULAB em Biossegurança e Coleta”, in which classes, debates, links, scientificstudies, tests and videoconferences were available. The presence phase was evaluated by the attendance (assiduity 98%, while the online phase was the result ofthe access reports (6,221, the progress of the exercises (95%, and the final evaluations grades available in thesystem (8.2. Theoretical-practical classes have provided interaction between content/teacher/student.Didactical model, quality contents and multidisciplinary  present approach remarkably contribute to diminish difficulties in using the tools and applications: 80% of students have never taken a distant learning coursebefore; 23% haven’t had a computer; 95% have declared that presential training helped them to conclude the course and 100%have stated non-restricted contents available online have facilitated their access. Current challenges in education is to conciliate technology and learningin favor of ensuring that the students take advantage on their potentialities.

  17. Monitoring and reporting of preanalytical errors in laboratory medicine: the UK situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornes, Michael P; Atherton, Jennifer; Pourmahram, Ghazaleh; Borthwick, Hazel; Kyle, Betty; West, Jamie; Costelloe, Seán J

    2016-03-01

    Most errors in the clinical laboratory occur in the preanalytical phase. This study aimed to comprehensively describe the prevalence and nature of preanalytical quality monitoring practices in UK clinical laboratories. A survey was sent on behalf of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine Preanalytical Working Group (ACB-WG-PA) to all heads of department of clinical laboratories in the UK. The survey captured data on the analytical platform and Laboratory Information Management System in use; which preanalytical errors were recorded and how they were classified and gauged interest in an external quality assurance scheme for preanalytical errors. Of the 157 laboratories asked to participate, responses were received from 104 (66.2%). Laboratory error rates were recorded per number of specimens, rather than per number of requests in 51% of respondents. Aside from serum indices for haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia, which were measured in 80% of laboratories, the most common errors recorded were booking-in errors (70.1%) and sample mislabelling (56.9%) in laboratories who record preanalytical errors. Of the laboratories surveyed, 95.9% expressed an interest in guidance on recording preanalytical error and 91.8% expressed interest in an external quality assurance scheme. This survey observes a wide variation in the definition, repertoire and collection methods for preanalytical errors in the UK. Data indicate there is a lot of interest in improving preanalytical data collection. The ACB-WG-PA aims to produce guidance and support for laboratories to standardize preanalytical data collection and to help establish and validate an external quality assurance scheme for interlaboratory comparison. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Cost challenges for laboratory medicine automation in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Automation in laboratory medicine is inevitable and the only way forward especially in Africa where the staff turnover is high due to migration of experienced staff to Europe and America. Described here are the common issues that laboratory Managers and Directors encounter when upgrading, replacing analytical systems ...

  19. A Survey of Final-year Undergraduate Laboratory Projects in Biochemistry and Related Degrees in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Caroline A.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes undergraduate research projects in biochemistry and related subjects at British universities. Discusses the trend toward students doing less research as part of their undergraduate study. Reasons cited for this trend include increased student numbers and costs. (DDR)

  20. Environmental regulation of plant gene expression: an RT-qPCR laboratory project for an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J; Fisher, Alison J

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the FLOWERING LOCUS C gene, a key regulator of floral timing in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate students in biochemistry or molecular biology courses. The project provides students with hands-on experience with RT-qPCR, the current "gold standard" for gene expression analysis, including detailed data analysis using the common 2-ΔΔCT method. Moreover, it provides a convenient starting point for many inquiry-driven projects addressing diverse questions concerning ecological biochemistry, naturally occurring genetic variation, developmental biology, and the regulation of gene expression in nature. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. From gene to structure: Lactobacillus bulgaricus D-lactate dehydrogenase from yogurt as an integrated curriculum model for undergraduate molecular biology and biochemistry laboratory courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Jeffrey A; Prescott, Noelle A; Lawton, Ping X

    2018-05-01

    We have developed an integrated, project-oriented curriculum for undergraduate molecular biology and biochemistry laboratory courses spanning two semesters that is organized around the ldhA gene from the yogurt-fermenting bacterium Lactobacillus bulgaricus, which encodes the enzyme d-lactate dehydrogenase. The molecular biology module, which consists of nine experiments carried out over eleven sessions, begins with the isolation of genomic DNA from L. bulgaricus in yogurt and guides students through the process of cloning the ldhA gene into a prokaryotic expression vector, followed by mRNA isolation and characterization of recombinant gene expression levels using RT-PCR. The biochemistry module, which consists of nine experiments carried out over eight sessions, begins with overexpression of the cloned ldhA gene and guides students through the process of affinity purification, biochemical characterization of the purified LdhA protein, and analysis of enzyme kinetics using various substrates and an inhibitor, concluding with a guided inquiry investigation of structure-function relationships in the three-dimensional structure of LdhA using molecular visualization software. Students conclude by writing a paper describing their work on the project, formatted as a manuscript to be submitted for publication in a scientific journal. Overall, this curriculum, with its emphasis on experiential learning, provides hands-on training with a variety of common laboratory techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry and builds experience with the process of scientific reasoning, along with reinforcement of essential transferrable skills such as critical thinking, information literacy, and written communication, all within the framework of an extended project having the look and feel of a research experience. © 2018 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(3):270-278, 2018. © 2018 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. The intellectual contribution of laboratory medicine professionals to research papers on laboratory medicine topics published in high-impact general medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Pedro Medina; Nydegger, Urs; Risch, Martin; Risch, Lorenz

    2012-03-01

    An author is generally regarded as an individual "who has made substantial intellectual academic contributions to a published study". However, the extent of the contribution that laboratory medicine professionals have made as authors of research papers in high-impact medical journals remains unclear. From 1 January 2004 to 31 March 2009, 4837 original research articles appeared in the: New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA and BMJ. Using authorship as an indicator of intellectual contribution, we analyzed articles that included laboratory medicine parameters in their titles in an observational cross-sectional study. We also extracted data regarding radiological topics that were published during the same time within the same journals. Out of 481 articles concerning laboratory medicine topics, 380 provided information on the affiliations of the authors. At least one author from an institution within the field of laboratory medicine was listed in 212 articles (55.8%). Out of 3943 co-authors, only 756 (19.2%) were affiliated with laboratory medicine institutions. Authors from laboratory medicine institutions were listed as the first, last or corresponding authors in 99 articles (26.1%). The comparative proportions for author affiliation from 55 radiology articles were significantly higher, as 72.7% (p=0.026) of articles and 24.8% (p=0.001) of authors indicated an affiliation with a radiology institution. Radiology professionals from 72.7% of the articles were listed as either the first, last or corresponding authors (pgeneral medicine journals.

  3. [The role of German official medicines control laboratories in combating counterfeit medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegard, Andrea; Heuermann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    An official medicines control laboratory (OMCL) provides an important contribution to combat counterfeit and illegal medicines. The OMCL supports the competent authorities in controlling the quality of authorised medicinal products in the legal supply chain. For detecting counterfeit medicines in the legal supply chain, a risk-based approach in choice of products is conducted. Furthermore, the OMCL analyses suspicious medicines from the illegal supply chain for any other authority. The chemical analysis of a suspicious sample is needed to identify such a sample as a counterfeit medicine. The analytical results are fundamental for the evaluation of the legal status of the product and for the assessment of it's inherent hazard to public health. The global market of illegal medicines is rapidly changing. Therefore a good national and international working liaison and co-operation between laboratories and authorities is obligatory to protect public health. The OMCL provides important knowledge of new trends in counterfeit and illegal medicines. Hence, it is an essential part in surveillance of medicinal products. The efficient networking enables prompt official interventions. Thus, risks for the public health by substandard medicines were reduced. Beside the chemical analysis, the OMCL can help to raise public awareness about counterfeit and illegal medicines. In Germany, the risk of counterfeit medicines reaching patients through the legal supply chain is still low, but the possibility cannot be ignored.

  4. Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine: Is It Working in Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    The principles of Evidence-Based Medicine have been established for about two decades, with the need for evidence-based clinical practice now being accepted in most health systems around the world. These principles can be employed in laboratory medicine. The key steps in evidence-based practice, namely (i) formulating the question; (ii) searching for evidence; (iii) appraising evidence; (iv) applying evidence; and (v) assessing the experience are all accepted but, as yet, translation into dai...

  5. The future of laboratory medicine - a 2014 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, Larry J; Polsky, Tracey G; Park, Jason Y; Fortina, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the future is a difficult task. Not surprisingly, there are many examples and assumptions that have proved to be wrong. This review surveys the many predictions, beginning in 1887, about the future of laboratory medicine and its sub-specialties such as clinical chemistry and molecular pathology. It provides a commentary on the accuracy of the predictions and offers opinions on emerging technologies, economic factors and social developments that may play a role in shaping the future of laboratory medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Doing that thing that scientists do: A discovery-driven module on protein purification and characterization for the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A; Osmundson, Joseph; Isaacson, Marisa; Herrera, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In traditional introductory biochemistry laboratory classes students learn techniques for protein purification and analysis by following provided, established, step-by-step procedures. Students are exposed to a variety of biochemical techniques but are often not developing procedures or collecting new, original data. In this laboratory module, students develop research skills through work on an original research project and gain confidence in their ability to design and execute an experiment while faculty can enhance their scholarly pursuits through the acquisition of original data in the classroom laboratory. Students are prepared for a 6-8 week discovery-driven project on the purification of the Escherichia coli cytidylate kinase (CMP kinase) through in class problems and other laboratory exercises on bioinformatics and protein structure analysis. After a minimal amount of guidance on how to perform the CMP kinase in vitro enzyme assay, SDS-PAGE, and the basics of protein purification, students, working in groups of three to four, develop a protein purification protocol based on the scientific literature and investigate some aspect of CMP kinase that interests them. Through this process, students learn how to implement a new but perhaps previously worked out procedure to answer their research question. In addition, they learn the importance of keeping a clear and thorough laboratory notebook and how to interpret their data and use that data to inform the next set of experiments. Following this module, students had increased confidence in their ability to do basic biochemistry techniques and reported that the "self-directed" nature of this lab increased their engagement in the project. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Laboratory evaluation of four medicinal plants as protectants against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The petroleum ether extract of four medicinal plants; Aristolochia ringens (Vahl), Allium sativum (L), Ficus exasperata (L) and Garcinia kola (H), were evaluated as grain protectant against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Mots) in the laboratory at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% (w/v) concentrations. Parameters assessed were adult ...

  8. Anatomy of a value proposition for laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P; St John, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    Value is now becoming a key driver in the ongoing development of healthcare delivery; key facets include the identification of what is valuable and how that value can be identified, leveraged, and delivered. The concept of a value proposition is widely used in business but can be used in healthcare as a statement of the benefits, costs and value that an organization can deliver to its customers. The foundation of this statement in laboratory medicine is evidence of clinical and cost effectiveness, not only for the patient, but also for other stakeholders involved in the delivery of healthcare, e.g., the carer, service provider, commissioner, purchaser, and the supplier of the test or device, as well as society as a whole. However the value of any laboratory medicine investigation is only achieved if the output (the test result(s)), is acted upon by the initiator of the investigation. Laboratory medicine is one part of a complex intervention, and so the value proposition should encompass the breadth of that intervention - from addressing the unmet need through the generation of clinical, operational and economic outcomes. A value proposition in laboratory medicine is central to successful innovation and quality improvement in healthcare. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Wanderings in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Peter

    2014-07-11

    My Ph.D. thesis in the laboratory of Severo Ochoa at New York University School of Medicine in 1962 included the determination of the nucleotide compositions of codons specifying amino acids. The experiments were based on the use of random copolyribonucleotides (synthesized by polynucleotide phosphorylase) as messenger RNA in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system. At Yale University, where I joined the faculty, my co-workers and I first studied the mechanisms of protein synthesis. Thereafter, we explored the interferons (IFNs), which were discovered as antiviral defense agents but were revealed to be components of a highly complex multifunctional system. We isolated pure IFNs and characterized IFN-activated genes, the proteins they encode, and their functions. We concentrated on a cluster of IFN-activated genes, the p200 cluster, which arose by repeated gene duplications and which encodes a large family of highly multifunctional proteins. For example, the murine protein p204 can be activated in numerous tissues by distinct transcription factors. It modulates cell proliferation and the differentiation of a variety of tissues by binding to many proteins. p204 also inhibits the activities of wild-type Ras proteins and Ras oncoproteins. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee "New Media" [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the

  11. [Integrated skills laboratory concept for undergraduate training in internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Schilling, T; Nawroth, P; Hensel, M; Ho, A D; Schwenger, V; Zeier, M; Herzog, W; Schellberg, D; Katus, H A; Dengler, T; Stremmel, W; Müller, M; Jünger, J

    2005-05-06

    An amendment to the German medical curriculum in April 2002 will place basic practical skills at the centre of medical training. We report here on the implementation and evaluation of an obligatory, tutor-guided, and integrated skills laboratory concept in the field of internal medicine. To test the effectiveness of a skills laboratory training on OSCE performance a pilot study was carried out. The experimental group, of 77 students, participated in seven sessions of communication training, skills laboratory training, and bedside teaching, each lasting one and a half hours. The control group of 66 students had as many sessions but was only offered bedside-teaching. The evaluation of acceptance of skills' training as well as the related increase in individual competence is on-going (summer term 2004: n = 176 students). The integrated skills laboratory concept was rated at 3.5 (SD = 1.2) on a 5-point scale and was acknowledged as practice-oriented (M = 4.2; SD = 1.0) and relevant for doctors' everyday lives (M = 3.6; SD = 1.1). Increased levels of competence according to individual self-evaluations proved to be highly significant (p<.001), and results of the pilot study showed that the experimental group had a significantly better OSCE performance than the control group (p<.001). This pilot study shows that curriculum changes promoting basic clinical skills are effective and lead to an improved practical education of tomorrow's physicians. The integrated skills laboratory concept is well accepted and leads to a relevant increase in competence in the practice of internal medical. The presented skills laboratory concept in internal medicine is proving to be a viable and efficient learning tool.

  12. Laboratory blood analysis in Strigiformes-Part II: plasma biochemistry reference intervals and agreement between the Abaxis Vetscan V2 and the Roche Cobas c501.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammersbach, Mélanie; Beaufrère, Hugues; Gionet Rollick, Annick; Tully, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Limited plasma biochemical information is available in Strigiformes. Only one study investigated the agreement between a point-of-care with a reference laboratory analyzer for biochemistry variables in birds. The objective was to report reference intervals (RI) for plasma biochemistry variables in Strigiformes, and to assess agreement between the Abaxis Vetscan V2 and Roche Cobas c501. A prospective study was designed to assess plasma biochemistry RI for concentration of calcium, phosphorus, total protein, albumin, globulin, glucose, bilirubin, uric acid, bile acids, sodium, potassium, and chloride, and activities of AST, GGT, CK, amylase, lipase, LDH, and GLDH. In addition, the agreement between the Vetscan and the Cobas in owl species was assessed. A total of 190 individuals were sampled belonging to 12 Strigiformes species including Barn Owls, Barred Owls, Great Horned Owls, Eurasian Eagle Owls, Spectacled Owls, Eastern Screech Owls, Long-Eared Owls, Short-Eared Owls, Great Gray Owls, Snowy Owls, Northern Saw-Whet Owls, and Northern Hawk-Owls. Order-, species-, and method-specific RI were determined on both analyzers. Although Vetscan data were not equivalent to the Cobas, 4 analytes (glucose, AST, CK, and total protein, with correction for bias) were within acceptable agreement, 3 analytes (uric acid, calcium, and phosphorus) were within close agreement, and the remaining analytes were in strong disagreement. Species-specific differences were observed notably for the concentration of glucose in Barn Owls and electrolytes in Northern Saw-Whet Owls. Overall, this study suggests that the Vetscan has acceptable clinical performance in Strigiformes for some analytes and highlights discrepancies for several analytes. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  13. Cost challenges for laboratory medicine automation in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Moshen Tanyanyiwa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Automation in laboratory medicine is inevitable and the only way forward especially in Africa where the staff turnover is high due to migration of experienced staff to Europe and America. Described here are the common issues that laboratory Managers and Directors encounter when upgrading, replacing analytical systems as well as daily running of diagnostic laboratories. The rapid advancement driven by the first world where research facilities, resources and expertise are available has seen changes in the both the hardware and software utilised by analyzers every two to three years. The downside is that in the process of replacing/phasing out old analysers, the first world countries in some cases donate them to second and third world countries as refurbished analysers. Problems in obtaining spares ensue since the production of new analysers results in reduced production or even of old spares. Unavailability or delayed availability of spares results in suspension of diagnostic service by the recipient laboratory. In some areas costly modifications to the analysers or the location/building have had to done to suite local (African conditions, hence the need for Laboratory managers to understand fully the analysers’ operational requirements before purchasing or accepting donations

  14. Nutritional Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

  15. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  16. [Japanese sentinel project and contribution of laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Naoki

    2013-06-01

    Ordinary passive surveillance (generally spontaneous reporting) of adverse effects of medical products is not enough to manage medical risks/safety. The Japanese government, following the "sentinel initiative" by the US government, started the "Japanese sentinel project" as an active surveillance of medical products with the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency(PMDA). Using entire prescription data in the hospital information system, data on laboratory examinations, diagnosis, and therapy specific to an adverse effect are checked by detecting differences between before and after prescription of a specific medical product to extract adverse effects and calculate their correct frequency in the surveillance. The project uses standard masters and protocols to analyze data among medial institutes by installation of the SS-MIX standard storage system. Ten hospitals were selected in 2011 to join the project, and the entire system and network will be implemented in those hospitals and PMDA until 2013 fiscal year. JLAC10 is used in the project as the laboratory examination code of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine. Many incorrect coding and ambiguous coding rules were found by voluntary surveillance of 6 of the 10 hospitals in the project. Thus, the Council on Standardized Master Operation of Clinical Laboratory Examinations will launch in 2013 to improve and maintain JLAC10, which is essential not only for the Japanese sentinel project but also for data utilization by many other projects.

  17. Using an ePortfolio System as an Electronic Laboratory Notebook in Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Practical Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jill; Kant, Sashi; Gysbers, Vanessa; Hancock, Dale; Denyer, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Despite many apparent advantages, including security, back-up, remote access, workflow, and data management, the use of electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) in the modern research laboratory is still developing. This presents a challenge to instructors who want to give undergraduate students an introduction to the kinds of data curation and…

  18. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl, Susanne J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students, but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the acquisition of knowledge by MC exams.Results: On a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree to 6 (strongly agree, the students in the IC intervention groups could be seen to be much more motivated (5.53 than students in the control group (4.01. Students in the IC intervention groups also recognised the

  19. Laboratory hematology in the history of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2013-01-01

    For the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the journal Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), an historic overview of papers that the journal has published in the field of laboratory hematology (LH) is presented. All past volumes of CCLM were screened for papers on LH and these were categorized. Bibliographic data of these papers were also analyzed. CCLM published in total 387 LH papers. The absolute number of LH papers published annually showed a significant increase over the years since 1985. Also the share of LH papers demonstrated a steady increase (overall mean 5%, but mean 8% over the past 4 years). The most frequent category was coagulation and fibrinolysis (23.5%). Authors from Germany contributed the most LH papers to the journal (22.7%), followed by the Netherlands and Italy (16.3 and 13.2%, respectively). Recent citation data indicated that other publications cited LH review papers much more frequently than other types of papers. The history of the journal reflects the emergence and development of laboratory hematology as a separate discipline of laboratory medicine.

  20. Biochemistry engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ho Nam

    1993-01-01

    This deals with biochemistry engineering with nine chapters. It explains bionics on development and prospect, basics of life science on classification and structure, enzyme and metabolism, fundamentals of chemical engineering on viscosity, shear rate, PFR, CSTR, mixing, dispersion, measurement and response, Enzyme kinetics, competitive inhibition, pH profile, temperature profile, stoichiometry and fermentation kinetics, bio-reactor on Enzyme-reactor and microorganism-reactor, measurement and processing on data acquisition and data processing, separation and purification, waste water treatment and economics of bionics process.

  1. Proficiency in radiation protection, nuclear medicine and biomedicine in the Faculty of Biochemistry and Pharmaceutics, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Capacitacion en proteccion radiologica en medicina y biomedicina en la Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoc, Rosa M.; Caro, Ricardo A.; Rivera, Elena S. [Universidad Buenos Aires (Argentina). Faculdade de Farmacia y Bioquimica. Lab. de Radioisotopos; Menossi, Carlos A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry (Buenos Aires University) offers four annual courses on Methodology of Radioisotopes (which focus on different aspect of the Radiological Protection according to whom they are aimed: 1) Course for students in the Biochemistry Cycle; 2) Course for post-Graduate in Medicine, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists; 3) Course to up-date the knowledge; 4) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine. From 1960, 5000 biochemistry students have approved Methodology of Radioisotopes. The syllabus includes aspect related to the students' future professional activities. Since 1962, 1513 (?) graduates have approved it. Training (222 h) include: dosimetric magnitudes, units, internal and external dosimetry; working conditions, contamination barriers, radioprotection philosophy and principles; limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects, national and international legislation. Uses of commonest isotopes in Nuclear Medicine and Biomedicine are under deep analysis. Since 1992 the graduates who wish to up-date their knowledge can follow this course organized in modules to suit their needs. Since 1997 this course emphasizes the operational aspects such as: columns elution, injection of radioactive drugs to patients, decontamination of areas. The increasing in the application of radioisotopes makes necessary to encourage their use in harmony with the environmental. (author)

  2. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  3. Detection of an ABCA1 Variant Associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta-Herrera, M.; Mosqueda-Romo, N. A.; Hernández-Clemente, F.; Soto-Cruz, I.

    2013-01-01

    We selected diabetes mellitus for this laboratory exercise to provide students with an explicit model for scientific research concerning the association between the R230C polymorphism and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is highly prevalent in the Mexican population. We used a collaborative project-based learning to engage…

  4. [Laboratory medicine in the obligatory postgraduate clinical training system--common clinical training program in the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2003-04-01

    I propose a postgraduate common clinical training program to be provided by the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital. The program has three purposes: first, mastering basic laboratory tests; second, developing the skills necessary to accurately interpret laboratory data; third, learning specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine. For the first purpose, it is important that medical trainees perform testing of their own patients at bedside or in the central clinical laboratory. When testing at the central clinical laboratory, instruction by expert laboratory technicians is helpful. The teaching doctors in the department of laboratory medicine are asked to advise the trainees on the interpretation of data. Consultation will be received via interview or e-mail. In addition, the trainees can participate in various conferences, seminars, and meetings held at the central clinical laboratory. Finally, in order to learn specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine, several special courses lasting a few months will be prepared. I think this program should be closely linked to the training program in internal medicine.

  5. Errors in laboratory medicine: practical lessons to improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howanitz, Peter J

    2005-10-01

    Patient safety is influenced by the frequency and seriousness of errors that occur in the health care system. Error rates in laboratory practices are collected routinely for a variety of performance measures in all clinical pathology laboratories in the United States, but a list of critical performance measures has not yet been recommended. The most extensive databases describing error rates in pathology were developed and are maintained by the College of American Pathologists (CAP). These databases include the CAP's Q-Probes and Q-Tracks programs, which provide information on error rates from more than 130 interlaboratory studies. To define critical performance measures in laboratory medicine, describe error rates of these measures, and provide suggestions to decrease these errors, thereby ultimately improving patient safety. A review of experiences from Q-Probes and Q-Tracks studies supplemented with other studies cited in the literature. Q-Probes studies are carried out as time-limited studies lasting 1 to 4 months and have been conducted since 1989. In contrast, Q-Tracks investigations are ongoing studies performed on a yearly basis and have been conducted only since 1998. Participants from institutions throughout the world simultaneously conducted these studies according to specified scientific designs. The CAP has collected and summarized data for participants about these performance measures, including the significance of errors, the magnitude of error rates, tactics for error reduction, and willingness to implement each of these performance measures. A list of recommended performance measures, the frequency of errors when these performance measures were studied, and suggestions to improve patient safety by reducing these errors. Error rates for preanalytic and postanalytic performance measures were higher than for analytic measures. Eight performance measures were identified, including customer satisfaction, test turnaround times, patient identification

  6. Indicadores de sustentabilidade em medicina laboratorial Sustainability indicators in laboratory medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Diório Uliani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta os princípios conceituais sobre desenvolvimento sustentável, sustentabilidade e avalia a evolução e os impactos na economia, no meio ambiente e na sociedade. Discutem-se a aplicabilidade dos conceitos de sustentabilidade empresarial na medicina laboratorial e os desafios inerentes à implantação no laboratório clínico. O impacto dos indicadores de sustentabilidade e seu papel no processo de gestão também são analisados criticamente sob a ótica do balanço socioambiental. O texto apresenta ainda algumas ferramentas para avaliação e interpretação dos indicadores e sua aplicação no processo de análise crítica. Finalmente, o artigo descreve a importância dos indicadores de sustentabilidade na prática do benchmarking e sua aplicabilidade no laboratório clínicoThe article presents the conceptual principles on sustainable development and sustainability. Furthermore, it evaluates the progress and impacts on the economy, environment and society. It discusses the applicability of the concepts of corporate sustainability in laboratory medicine and the challenges of deployment in the clinical laboratory. The impact of sustainability indicators and their role in management are also critically reviewed from the perspective of social and environmental balance. Additionally, the text provides some tools for evaluation and interpretation of indicators and their corresponding application in the critical analysis process. Lastly, the article describes the importance of sustainability indicators in the practice of benchmarking and its applicability in the clinical laboratory

  7. Influence of the wording of evaluation items on outcome-based evaluation results for large-group teaching in anatomy, biochemistry and legal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Sven; Pyka, Katharina; Mueller, Tjark; von Streinbuechel, Nicole; Raupach, Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Student learning outcome is an important dimension of teaching quality in undergraduate medical education. Measuring an increase in knowledge during teaching requires repetitive objective testing which is usually not feasible. As an alternative, student learning outcome can be calculated from student self-ratings. Comparative self-assessment (CSA) gain reflects the performance difference before and after teaching, adjusted for initial knowledge. It has been shown to be a valid proxy measure of actual learning outcome derived from objective tests. However, student self-ratings are prone to a number of confounding factors. In the context of outcome-based evaluation, the wording of self-rating items is crucial to the validity of evaluation results. This randomized trial assessed whether including qualifiers in these statements impacts on student ratings and CSA gain. First-year medical students self-rated their initial (then-test) and final (post-test) knowledge for lectures in anatomy, biochemistry and legal medicine, respectively, and 659 questionnaires were retrieved. Six-point scales were used for self-ratings with 1 being the most positive option. Qualifier use did not affect then-test ratings but was associated with slightly less favorable post-test ratings. Consecutively, mean CSA gain was smaller for items containing qualifiers than for items lacking qualifiers (50.6±15.0% vs. 56.3±14.6%, p=0.079). The effect was more pronounced (Cohen's d=0.82) for items related to anatomy. In order to increase fairness of outcome-based evaluation and increase the comparability of CSA gain data across subjects, medical educators should agree on a consistent approach (qualifiers for all items or no qualifiers at all) when drafting self-rating statements for outcome-based evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. [AT THE CROSSROADS: THE ROLE OF LABORATORY MEDICINE IN THE PATIENT CARE PROCESS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffen, Yuval; Zaidise, Itzhak

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades, the laboratory medicine profession has undergone significant changes due to both technological developments and economic constraints. Technological innovations support automation, provide faster and more accurate equipment, and allow increased efficiency through the use of commercial test kits. These changes, combined with budgetary constraints, have led to mergers and centralization of medical laboratories to optimize work and cut costs. While this centralization may be a business necessity, it leads to a disconnection between the laboratory and the clinical context. In addition, laboratory tests are treated as a commodity, which places emphasis on price only, rather than quality. In this article, we review the developments and changes that medical laboratories and the laboratory medicine profession have undergone in recent decades. We focus on technological and structural challenges affecting the functioning of medical laboratories and the relations between laboratory workers and medical teams. We then introduce vocational education changes required for the laboratory medicine profession. We propose defining the role of medical laboratory directors in terms of their basic training as medical doctors or doctors of science. We suggest that laboratory employees should become a reliable source of information regarding selection of appropriate test methods, processing data and presenting the results to the medical staff. Laboratory workers must deepen their clinical knowledge and become an integral part of the patient care process, along with medical and nursing staff. Special training programs for medical laboratory workers and directors must be developed in order to match the complex activities currently being conducted in laboratories.

  9. Clinical biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  10. Biomedical waste in laboratory medicine: Audit and management

    OpenAIRE

    Chitnis V; Vaidya K; Chitnis D

    2005-01-01

    Pathology, microbiology, blood bank and other diagnostic laboratories generate sizable amount of biomedical waste (BMW). The audit of the BMW is required for planning proper strategies. The audit in our laboratory revealed 8 kgs anatomical waste, 600 kgs microbiology waste, 220 kgs waste sharps, 15 kgs soiled waste, 111 kgs solid waste, 480 litres liquid waste along with 33000 litres per month liquid waste generated from labware washing and laboratory cleaning and 162 litres of chemical waste...

  11. Report formatting in laboratory medicine - a call for harmony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Graham R D; Legg, Michael

    2018-04-19

    The results of medical laboratory testing are only useful if they lead to appropriate actions by medical practitioners and/or patients. An underappreciated component of the medical testing process is the transfer of the information from the laboratory report into the reader's brain. The format of laboratory reports can be determined by the testing laboratory, which may issue a formatted report, or by electronic systems receiving information from laboratories and controlling the report format. As doctors can receive information from many laboratories, interpreting information from reports in a safe and rapid manner is facilitated by having similar report layouts and formats. Using Australia as an example, there is a wide variation in report formats in spite of a body of work to define standards for reporting. In addition to standardising of report formats, consideration needs to be given to optimisation of report formatting to facilitate rapid and unambiguous reading of the report and also interpretation of the data. Innovative report formats have been developed by some laboratories; however, wide adoption has not followed. The need to balance uniformity of reporting with appropriate innovation is a challenge for safe reporting of laboratory results. This paper discusses the current status and opportunity for improvement in safety and efficiency of the reading of laboratory reports, using current practise and developments in Australia as examples.

  12. Research with radioisotopes in clinical and laboratory medicine: a bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, J.; Van der Walt, L.A.; Malan, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography is restricted mainly to AEC-supported projects which are considered to amply reflect the widespread use of radioisotopes in clinical and laboratory medicine in South Africa and which describe research with radioisotopes of some direct relevance to diagnostic-clinical or laboratory medicine, or both, but excluding therapy with isotopes. General information is given in this review on oncology, endocrinology, metabolism and nutrition, haematology, neurology, angiocardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, gynaecology and obstetrics, nephrology, immunology and transplantation, microbiology and parasitology

  13. Analysis of Dextromethorphan in Cough Drops and Syrups: A Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Todd M.; Wiseman, Frank L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the quantity of dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DM) in over-the-counter (OTC) cough drops and syrups. This experiment is appropriate for an undergraduate medicinal chemistry laboratory course when studying OTC medicines and active ingredients. Students prepare the cough drops and syrups for analysis,…

  14. Cost challenges for laboratory medicine automation in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cqq1a

    2010-09-29

    Sep 29, 2010 ... Described here are the common issues that laboratory Managers and ... in the both the hardware and software utilised by analyzers every two to ... maintain the high quality of results requires automation in order not to ...

  15. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...... than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous...

  16. Development of an in vitro laboratory manual for nuclear medicine technology students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated existing in vitro education materials in qualitative and quantitative parameters that currently exist to educate potential clinicians of nationally accredited nuclear medicine programs. A review of over 300 articles, texts, and manuals pertaining to in vitro nuclear medicine procedures clearly demonstrated that no in vitro laboratory manual for undergraduate students presently exited. Every nuclear medicine program director in the United States was surveyed. They were asked for their overall philosophy in terms of developing an in vitro manual and requested to evaluate the significant of 22 general principles/concepts and 34 specific laboratory testing procedures. From the response to the survey, an in vitro nuclear medicine manual was created and appended to the study. The manual consists of lecture and study material, chapter reviews, and laboratory assignments and exercises

  17. Learning Biochemistry by Chocolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C Guedes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Both sensations and biochemical reactions taken place or promoted during ingestion of chocolate were the motivation for  investigating  the  organic  compounds  present  in  this  source.  Cocoa  and  chocolate  are  composed  by  several substances , among them, aminoacids and alkaloids.The objective of this investigation was to purpose a contextured approach  of  biochemistry  through  the  sensations  and  reactions  involving  aminoacids,  theobromine  and  hormones. Methodology: 1. Theoretical part:  constituted  by theoretical  and tutorial classes  about aminoacids, theobromine and hormones  involved  at  the  metabolism;  2.  Questionary:  ten  questions  based  upon  theoretical  classes,  personal sensations  and  general  aspects  of chocolate;  3.Lecture:  Cientific  articles  searched  in  periodics  by  own  students  as well  as  newspaper  reports;  4.  Experimental:  Laboratory  experiments  including  extraction,  characterization, spectrometric quantification  after  specific reactions  and identification by  Rf  comparison with  standards  on TLC  from cocoa  almonds  and  both  powder  cocoa  and  chocolate.  The  study  was  applied  in  30  students  from  a  chemistry college. Results: The results pointed out to a higher frequency of the students and to a increased interest  from them by   biochemistry  issues  and  cientific  lectures,  as  well  as  a  satisfactory  acquirement  of  theoretical  and  practice knowledge of aminoacids and hormones, spectrometry and chromatography. Conclusion: A contextured approach is quite positive for learning biochemistry to chemists.

  18. Biomedical waste in laboratory medicine: Audit and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitnis V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathology, microbiology, blood bank and other diagnostic laboratories generate sizable amount of biomedical waste (BMW. The audit of the BMW is required for planning proper strategies. The audit in our laboratory revealed 8 kgs anatomical waste, 600 kgs microbiology waste, 220 kgs waste sharps, 15 kgs soiled waste, 111 kgs solid waste, 480 litres liquid waste along with 33000 litres per month liquid waste generated from labware washing and laboratory cleaning and 162 litres of chemical waste per month. Section wise details are described in the text. Needle sharps are collected in puncture proof containers and the needles autoclaved before sending to needle pit. The glass forms the major sharp category and is disinfected with hypochlorite before washing/recycling. All microbiology waste along with containers/plates/tubes are autoclaved before recycling/disposal. The problem of formalin fixed anatomical waste as histology specimens is pointed out. The formalin containing tissues cannot be sent for incineration for the fear of toxic gas release and the guidelines by the Biomedical waste rule makers need to be amended for the issue. The discarded/infected blood units in blood bank need to be autoclaved before disposal since chemical treatments are difficult or inefficient. The liquid waste management needs more attention and effluent treatment facility needs to be viewed seriously for hospital in general. The segregation of waste at source is the key step and reduction, reuse and recycling should be considered in proper perspectives.

  19. Opinion: redefining the role of the physician in laboratory medicine in the context of emerging technologies, personalised medicine and patient autonomy ('4P medicine').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Matthias; Averina, Maria; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Faure, Gilbert; Haushofer, Alexander; Kusec, Vesna; Machado, Augusto; Misbah, Siraj A; Oosterhuis, Wytze; Pulkki, Kari; Twomey, Patrick J; Wieland, Eberhard

    2017-12-22

    The role of clinical pathologists or laboratory-based physicians is being challenged on several fronts-exponential advances in technology, increasing patient autonomy exercised in the right to directly request tests and the use of non-medical specialists as substitutes. In response, clinical pathologists have focused their energies on the pre-analytical and postanalytical phases of Laboratory Medicine thus emphasising their essential role in individualised medical interpretation of complex laboratory results. Across the European Union, the role of medical doctors is enshrined in the Medical Act. This paper highlights the relevance of this act to patient welfare and the need to strengthen training programmes to prevent an erosion in the quality of Laboratory Medicine provided to patients and their physicians. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Atomic spectrometry and trends in clinical laboratory medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Barbosa, Fernando

    2007-09-01

    Increasing numbers of clinical laboratories are transitioning away from flame and electrothermal AAS methods to those based on ICP-MS. Still, for many laboratories, the choice of instrumentation is based upon (a) the element(s) to be determined, (b) the matrix/matrices to be analyzed, and (c) the expected concentration(s) of the analytes in the matrix. Most clinical laboratories specialize in measuring Se, Zn, Cu, and Al in serum, and/or Pb, Cd, Hg, As, and Cr in blood and/or urine, while other trace elements (e.g., Pt, Au etc.) are measured for therapeutic purposes. Quantitative measurement of elemental species is becoming more widely accepted for nutritional and/or toxicological screening purposes, and ICP-MS interfaced with separation techniques, such as liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis, offers the advantage of on-line species determination coupled with very low detection limits. Polyatomic interferences for some key elements such as Se, As, and Cr require instrumentation equipped with dynamic reaction cell or collision cell technologies, or might even necessitate the use of sector field ICP-MS, to assure accurate results. Nonetheless, whatever analytical method is selected for the task, careful consideration must be given both to specimen collection procedures and to the control of pre-analytical variables. Finally, all methods benefit from access to reliable certified reference materials (CRMs). While a variety of reference materials (RMs) are available for trace element measurements in clinical matrices, not all can be classified as CRMs. The major metrological organizations (e.g., NIST, IRMM, NIES) provide a limited number of clinical CRMs, however, secondary reference materials are readily available from commercial organizations and organizers of external quality assessment schemes.

  1. Atomic spectrometry and trends in clinical laboratory medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Barbosa, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Increasing numbers of clinical laboratories are transitioning away from flame and electrothermal AAS methods to those based on ICP-MS. Still, for many laboratories, the choice of instrumentation is based upon (a) the element(s) to be determined, (b) the matrix/matrices to be analyzed, and (c) the expected concentration(s) of the analytes in the matrix. Most clinical laboratories specialize in measuring Se, Zn, Cu, and Al in serum, and/or Pb, Cd, Hg, As, and Cr in blood and/or urine, while other trace elements (e.g., Pt, Au etc.) are measured for therapeutic purposes. Quantitative measurement of elemental species is becoming more widely accepted for nutritional and/or toxicological screening purposes, and ICP-MS interfaced with separation techniques, such as liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis, offers the advantage of on-line species determination coupled with very low detection limits. Polyatomic interferences for some key elements such as Se, As, and Cr require instrumentation equipped with dynamic reaction cell or collision cell technologies, or might even necessitate the use of sector field ICP-MS, to assure accurate results. Nonetheless, whatever analytical method is selected for the task, careful consideration must be given both to specimen collection procedures and to the control of pre-analytical variables. Finally, all methods benefit from access to reliable certified reference materials (CRMs). While a variety of reference materials (RMs) are available for trace element measurements in clinical matrices, not all can be classified as CRMs. The major metrological organizations (e.g., NIST, IRMM, NIES) provide a limited number of clinical CRMs, however, secondary reference materials are readily available from commercial organizations and organizers of external quality assessment schemes

  2. A summary of deliberations on strategic planning for continuous quality improvement in laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybicki, Dana Marie; Shahangian, Shahram; Pollock, Anne M; Raab, Stephen S

    2009-03-01

    On September 24-26, 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened the 2007 Institute on Critical Issues in Health Laboratory Practice: Managing for Better Health to develop an action plan for change for the immediate and long-term future. A wide variety of stakeholders, including pathologists, pathologist extenders, clinicians, and researchers, examined means to improve laboratory service communication, quality parameters, and potential future laboratory contributions to health care. In this summary document, we present the identified gaps, barriers, and proposed action plans for improvement for laboratory medicine in the 6 quality domains identified by the Institute of Medicine: safety, effectiveness, patient centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. Five major recommendations emerged from concluding discussions and included focusing on preanalytic and postanalytic processes as areas of potential quality improvement and recruiting a multidisciplinary group of nonlaboratory stakeholders to work with laboratory personnel to achieve improvement goals.

  3. Managing the patient identification crisis in healthcare and laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Bovo, Chiara; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-07-01

    Identification errors have emerged as critical issues in health care, as testified by the ample scientific literature on this argument. Despite available evidence suggesting that the frequency of misidentification in vitro laboratory diagnostic testing may be relatively low compared to that of other laboratory errors (i.e., usually comprised between 0.01 and 0.1% of all specimens received), the potential adverse consequences remain particularly worrying, wherein 10-20% of these errors not only would translate into serious harm for the patient, but may also erode considerable human and economic resources, so that the entire healthcare system should be re-engineered to act proactively and limiting the burden of this important problem. The most important paradigms for reducing the chance of misidentification in healthcare entail the widespread use of more than two unique patient identifiers, the accurate education and training of healthcare personnel, the delivery of more resources for patient safety (i.e., implementation of safer technological tools), and the use of customized solutions according to local organization and resources. Moreover, after weighing advantages and drawbacks, labeling blood collection tubes before and not after venipuncture may be considered a safer practice for safeguarding patient safety and optimizing phlebotomist's activity. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for graduating medical students: the Canadian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason; Pambrun, Chantale

    2015-05-01

    Physicians in every medical and surgical field must be able to use pathology concepts and skills in their practice: for example, they must order and interpret the correct laboratory tests, they must use their understanding of pathogenesis to diagnose and treat, and they must work with the laboratory to care for their patients. These important concepts and skills may be ignored by medical schools and even national/international organizations setting graduation expectations for medical students. There is an evolving international consensus about the importance of exit competencies for medical school graduates, which define the measurable or observable behaviors each graduate must be able to demonstrate. The Canadian Association of Pathologists (CAP) Education Group set out to establish the basic competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine which should be expected of every medical graduate: not competencies for pathologists, but for medical graduates who intend to enter any residency program. We defined 4 targets for pathology and laboratory medicine exit competencies: that they represent only measurable behaviors, that they be clinically focused, that they be generalizable to every medical graduate, and that the final competency document be user-friendly. A set of competencies was developed iteratively and underwent final revision at the 2012 CAP annual meeting. These competencies were subsequently endorsed by the CAP executive and the Canadian Leadership Council on Laboratory Medicine. This clinically focused consensus document provides the first comprehensive list of exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for undergraduate medical education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bringing the excitement and motivation of research to students; Using inquiry and research-based learning in a year-long biochemistry laboratory : Part II-research-based laboratory-a semester-long research approach using malate dehydrogenase as a research model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Kristopher; Smith, Jennifer; Nichols, Paul; Wallert, Mark A; Provost, Joseph J

    2010-09-01

    Research-based learning in a teaching environment is an effective way to help bring the excitement and experience of independent bench research to a large number of students. The program described here is the second of a two-semester biochemistry laboratory series. Here, students are empowered to design, execute and analyze their own experiments for the entire semester. This style of laboratory replaces a variety of shorter labs in favor of an in depth research-based learning experience. The concept is to allow students to function in independent research groups. The research projects are focused on a series of wild-type and mutant clones of malate dehydrogenase. A common research theme for the laboratory helps instructors administer the course and is key to delivering a research opportunity to a large number of students. The outcome of this research-based learning laboratory results in students who are much more confident and skilled in critical areas in biochemistry and molecular biology. Students with research experience have significantly higher confidence and motivation than those students without a previous research experience. We have also found that all students performed better in advanced courses and in the workplace. Copyright © 2010 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Quality Indicators in Laboratory Medicine: the status of the progress of IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, Laura; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sumarac, Zorica; West, Jamie; Garcia Del Pino Castro, Isabel; Furtado Vieira, Keila; Ivanov, Agnes; Plebani, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The knowledge of error rates is essential in all clinical laboratories as it enables them to accurately identify their risk level, and compare it with those of other laboratories in order to evaluate their performance in relation to the State-of-the-Art (i.e. benchmarking) and define priorities for improvement actions. Although no activity is risk free, it is widely accepted that the risk of error is minimized by the use of Quality Indicators (QIs) managed as a part of laboratory improvement strategy and proven to be suitable monitoring and improvement tools. The purpose of QIs is to keep the error risk at a level that minimizes the likelihood of patients. However, identifying a suitable State-of-the-Art is challenging, because it calls for the knowledge of error rates measured in a variety of laboratories throughout world that differ in their organization and management, context, and the population they serve. Moreover, it also depends on the choice of the events to keep under control and the individual procedure for measurement. Although many laboratory professionals believe that the systemic use of QIs in Laboratory Medicine may be effective in decreasing errors occurring throughout the total testing process (TTP), to improve patient safety as well as to satisfy the requirements of International Standard ISO 15189, they find it difficult to maintain standardized and systematic data collection, and to promote continued high level of interest, commitment and dedication in the entire staff. Although many laboratories worldwide express a willingness to participate to the Model of QIs (MQI) project of IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety", few systematically enter/record their own results and/or use a number of QIs designed to cover all phases of the TTP. Many laboratories justify their inadequate participation in data collection of QIs by claiming that the number of QIs included in the MQI is excessive. However, an analysis of results suggests

  7. Lab Plays Central Role in Groundbreaking National Clinical Trial in Precision Medicine | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Molecular Characterization Laboratory at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research lies at the heart of an ambitious new approach for testing cancer drugs that will use the newest tools of precision medicine to select the best treatme

  8. Error budget calculations in laboratory medicine: linking the concepts of biological variation and allowable medical errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroobants, A. K.; Goldschmidt, H. M. J.; Plebani, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Random, systematic and sporadic errors, which unfortunately are not uncommon in laboratory medicine, can have a considerable impact on the well being of patients. Although somewhat difficult to attain, our main goal should be to prevent all possible errors. A good insight on error-prone

  9. An Integrated Visualization and Basic Molecular Modeling Laboratory for First-Year Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D model visualization and basic molecular modeling laboratory suitable for first-year undergraduates studying introductory medicinal chemistry is presented. The 2 h practical is embedded within a series of lectures on drug design, target-drug interactions, enzymes, receptors, nucleic acids, and basic pharmacokinetics. Serving as a teaching aid…

  10. Problem-based learning in laboratory medicine resident education: a satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiller, Quentin; Solis, Morgane; Velay, Aurélie; Gantner, Pierre; Sueur, Charlotte; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Barth, Heidi; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical knowledge in biology and medicine plays a substantial role in laboratory medicine resident education. In this study, we assessed the contribution of problem-based learning (PBL) to improve the training of laboratory medicine residents during their internship in the department of virology, Strasbourg University Hospital, France. We compared the residents' satisfaction regarding an educational program based on PBL and a program based on lectures and presentations. PBL induced a high level of satisfaction (100%) among residents compared to lectures and presentations (53%). The main advantages of this technique were to create a situational interest regarding virological problems, to boost the residents' motivation and to help them identify the most relevant learning objectives in virology. However, it appears pertinent to educate the residents in appropriate bibliographic research techniques prior to PBL use and to monitor their learning by regular formative assessment sessions.

  11. In memory of Professor Leonor Michaelis in Nagoya: great contributions to biochemistry in Japan in the first half of the 20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Toshiharu Toshi

    2013-09-02

    Leonor Michaelis spent the years of 1922-1926 as Professor of Biochemistry of the Aichi Medical College (now Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University) in Nagoya, Japan. Michaelis succeeded in gathering many bright young biochemists from all over Japan into his laboratory, and made tremendous contributions to the promotion of biochemistry in Japan. Michaelis was invited to many places in Japan to present lectures over those years. Kunio Yagi, who was Professor of Biochemistry at Nagoya University in the second half of the 20th century, succeeded in crystallizing the "Michaelis" enzyme-substrate complex. Historically, Michelis has had an enormous impact on biochemistry in Japan. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  13. The European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine syllabus for postgraduate education and training for Specialists in Laboratory Medicine: version 5 - 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassam, Nuthar; Lake, Jennifer; Dabrowska, Milena; Queralto, Jose; Rizos, Demetrios; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Baum, Hannsjörg; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; O'Mullane, John; Homšak, Evgenija; Charilaou, Charis; Ohlson, Mats; Rako, Ivana; Vitkus, Dalius; Kovac, Gustav; Verschuure, Pauline; Racek, Jaroslav; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Wieringa, Gilbert

    2018-06-05

    Although laboratory medicine practise varies across the European Union's (EU) member states, the extent of overlap in scope is such that a common syllabus describing the education and training associated with high-quality, specialist practise can be identified. In turn, such a syllabus can help define the common set of skills, knowledge and competence in a Common Training Framework (CTF) for non-medical Specialists in Laboratory Medicine under EU Directive 2013/55/EU (The recognition of Professional Qualifications). In meeting the requirements of the directive's CTF patient safety is particularly enhanced when specialists seek to capitalise on opportunities for free professional migration across EU borders. In updating the fourth syllabus, the fifth expands on individual discipline requirements, new analytical techniques and use of statistics. An outline structure for a training programme is proposed together with expected responsibilities of trainees and trainers; reference is provided to a trainee's log book. In updating the syllabus, it continues to support national programmes and the aims of EU Directive 2013/55/EU in providing safeguards to professional mobility across European borders at a time when the demand for highly qualified professionals is increasing in the face of a disparity in their distribution across Europe. In support of achieving a CTF, the syllabus represents EFLM's position statement for the education and training that underpins the framework.

  14. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2010-07-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous Guides to the Register have been published, one in 1997 and another in 2003. The third version of the Guide is presented in this article and is based on the experience gained and development of the profession since the last revision. Registration is valid for 5 years and the procedure and criteria for re-registration are presented as an Appendix at the end of the article.

  15. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: Code of Conduct, Version 2--2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 10 years, more than 2000 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). A Code of Conduct was adopted in 2003 and a revised and updated version, taking account particularly of the guidelines of the Conseil Européen des Professions Libérales (CEPLIS) of which EFCC is a member, is presented in this article. The revised version was approved by the EC4 Register Commission and by the EFCC Executive Board in Paris on 6 November, 2008.

  16. Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate…

  17. Learning needs in clinical biochemistry for doctors in foundation years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khromova, Victoria; Gray, Trevor A

    2008-01-01

    Most medical school curricula have reduced the amount of time available for teaching in pathology despite the fact that junior staff in the early stages of their training were responsible for requesting the majority of pathology tests on acutely ill hospital patients. So, the lack of specific training in this area means that test requesting may be poorly performed and the results ill understood by these staff. This paper describes a questionnaire, which was designed to assist laboratory staff providing targeted teaching in this area. Doctors in Foundation year 1 (F1) and Foundation year 2 (F2) in Sheffield teaching hospitals were given a questionnaire to ascertain how confident they were in requesting and interpreting the results of clinical biochemistry tests. The doctors were also asked about which areas of laboratory medicine they would like to be taught. Responses were received from 82 doctors, about half those in F1 and F2. The survey revealed areas where juniors are less confident in requesting tests and interpreting results. Despite lack of confidence in interpreting the result, 18% were confident about requesting tests. Doctors were also unsure of the effects of common problems like haemolysis on the interpretation of results. More than 70% of the doctors requested specific teaching in these areas. Foundation doctors have learning needs in clinical biochemistry, addressing which would assist them in patient care. While better training in medical school may help in future, there are specific needs for those on the wards now that require targeted teaching.

  18. Developments in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, H.

    1977-01-01

    The article reports on the first international meeting about radiopharmaceutical chemistry in the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Long Island/USA, from 21st to 24th September, 1976. The meeting report is preceded by the explanation of the terms 'radiopharmaceutical chemistry' and 'nuclear medicine' and a brief survey of the history. The interdisciplinary connection of the spheres of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear medicine, and data processing is also briefly shown. This is necessary before radiodiagnosis can be made for a patient. (RB) [de

  19. The 3rd questionnaire report of safety control on instrument in nuclear medicine laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The present 3rd survey was aimed at grasping safety control in nuclear medicine examination and the trend for SPECT usage. Questionnaires were sent to 1238 facilities dealing with nuclear medicine; and 1127 facilities (91.0%) responded. The survey period was three years from April 1, 1989 through March 31, 1992. The following 7 items were surveyed: (1) nuclear medicine personnel, (2) nuclear medicine equipments, (3) accidents occurring in nuclear medicine laboratories, (4) risk factors leading to accidents, (5) countermeasures for improving safety control, (6) major breakdown of the machinery and equipment, and (7) demands for makers. Majority of nuclear medicine personnel were male and were less than 50 years old. The number of SPECT equipments increased from 714 in the previous survey to 968. Accidents (personal injuries) and narrow escape from an accident were seen in 45 and 154 cases. Personal injuries such as falling occurred in 37 patients and 8 nuclear medicine personnel. According to nuclear medicine examinations, SPECT was the most common examination associated with accident and narrow escape cases (86/199). Such cases at the beginning of examination were remarkably decreased, as compared with those in the previous two surveys. Accidents were primarily attributable to careless management by personnel. Breakdown of the machinery and equipment was reported in 207 cases. In Item 5, the following contents were presented: heads for examination, personnel's behavior, education, examination equipments, collimators and others. Finally, contents in Item 7 included: equipment design, heads for examination, maintenance or management, data processing, collimators, examination equipments and others. (N.K.)

  20. Leveraging the real value of laboratory medicine with the value proposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P; John, Andrew St; Christenson, Robert; Scharnhorst, Volker; Oellerich, Michael; Jones, Patricia; Morris, Howard A

    2016-11-01

    Improving quality and patient safety, containing costs and delivering value-for-money are the key drivers of change in the delivery of healthcare and have stimulated a shift from an activity-based service to a service based on patient-outcomes. The delivery of an outcomes-based healthcare agenda requires that the real value of laboratory medicine to all stakeholders be understood, effectively defined and communicated. The value proposition of any product or service is the link between the provider and the needs of the customer describing the utility of the product or service in terms of benefit to the customer. The framework of a value proposition for laboratory medicine provides the core business case that drives key activities in the evolution and maintenance of high quality healthcare from research through to adoption and quality improvement in an established service. The framework of a value proposition for laboratory medicine is described. The content is endorsed by IFCC and WASPaLM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Informatics for the solution of health physics problems in nuclear medicine laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rossi, G.; Montesanti, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    As the use of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' radioisotope studies spreads more and more, many organizational and management problems arise. Hence an exact evaluation of current contamination levels and protection standards is very important for radiation-protection purposes. Environmental and personnel contamination levels in Nuclear Medicine Laboratories were recorded for four years and the results were evaluated by a computer-assisted method which furnished parameters such as the maximum permissible level of radioactivity at different timeintervals. They allow the health physicist to assess laboratory contamination levels as well as to classify radiation workers and places. A continuous 'monitoring' of radiation safety is possible in order to modify worker and/or laboratory classification as soon as possible, in close connection with possible changes in radiation hazards. This computer program applies equally well to other fields involving radioisotope use, such as industry, agriculture, etc. (Author)

  2. [superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy-Based Configurational Analysis of Mono- and Disaccharides and Detection of ß-Glucosidase Activity: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Gopal R.; Lawrence, Barbara A.; Egan, Annie E.

    2015-01-01

    A [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy-based laboratory experiment explores mono- and disaccharide structural chemistry, and the enzyme-substrate specificity of glycosidic bond cleavage by ß-glucosidase towards cellobiose (ß-linked gluco-disaccharide) and maltose (a-linked gluco-disaccharide). Structural differences between cellobiose, maltose, and…

  3. An Inquiry-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Structure Emphasizing Competency in the Scientific Process: A Guided Approach with an Electronic Notebook Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mona L.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students…

  4. Variability of ethics education in laboratory medicine training programs: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, David E; Burtis, Carl A; Gronowski, Ann M; McQueen, Matthew J; Newman, Anthony; Jonsson, Jon J

    2015-03-10

    Ethical considerations are increasingly important in medicine. We aimed to determine the mode and extent of teaching of ethics in training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. We developed an on-line survey of teaching in areas of ethics relevant to laboratory medicine. Reponses were invited from directors of training programs who were recruited via email to leaders of national organizations. The survey was completed by 80 directors from 24 countries who directed 113 programs. The largest numbers of respondents directed postdoctoral training of scientists (42%) or physicians (33%), post-masters degree programs (33%), and PhD programs (29%). Most programs (82%) were 2years or longer in duration. Formal training was offered in research ethics by 39%, medical ethics by 31%, professional ethics by 24% and business ethics by 9%. The number of reported hours of formal training varied widely, e.g., from 0 to >15h/year for research ethics and from 0 to >15h for medical ethics. Ethics training was required and/or tested in 75% of programs that offered training. A majority (54%) of respondents reported plans to add or enhance training in ethics; many indicated a desire for online resources related to ethics, especially resources with self-assessment tools. Formal teaching of ethics is absent from many training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, with heterogeneity in the extent and methods of ethics training among the programs that provide the training. A perceived need exists for online training tools, especially tools with self-assessment components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Laboratory Medicine Best Practice Guideline: Vitamins A, E and the Carotenoids in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Ronda F; Woollard, Gerald A; Hoad, Kirsten E; Walmsley, Trevor A; Johnson, Lambro A; Briscoe, Scott; Koetsier, Sabrina; Harrower, Tamantha; Gill, Janice P

    2014-01-01

    Despite apparent method similarities between laboratories there appear to be confounding factors inhibiting uniform reporting and standardisation of vitamin assays. The Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) Vitamins Working Party, in conjunction with The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs, has formulated a guideline to improve performance, reproducibility and accuracy of fat-soluble vitamin results. The aim of the guideline is to identify critical pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical components of the analysis of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood to promote best practice and harmonisation. This best practice guideline has been developed with reference to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) “Laboratory Medicine Best Practices: Developing an Evidence-Based Review and Evaluation Process”. The CDC document cites an evaluation framework for generating best practice recommendations that are specific to laboratory medicine. These 50 recommendations proposed herein, were generated from a comprehensive literature search and the extensive combined experience of the AACB Vitamins Working Party members. They were formulated based on comparison between an impact assessment rating and strength of evidence and were classified as either: (1) strongly recommend, (2) recommend, (3) no recommendation for or against, or (4) recommend against. These best practice recommendations represent the consensus views, in association with peer reviewed evidence of the AACB Vitamins Working Party, towards best practice for the collection, analysis and interpretation of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood. PMID:25210208

  7. Students' Perception of Self-Efficacy Following Medicinal Chemistry Skills Laboratory Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Roche, Victoria F; Qi, Yongyue

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To analyze student perceptions of self-efficacy in meeting medicinal chemistry course related educational outcomes and skills following a medicinal chemistry skills laboratory. Methods. Four activities were implemented in a pharmacy skills laboratory (PSL) for second-year pharmacy students. Students (n=121) worked individually on exercises for three of the four activities. Pre/post-laboratory surveys on self-efficacy were administered. The McNemar test was performed to evaluate students' self-efficacy above 70% related to course outcomes before and after the exercises in each activity. An independent t test was conducted to compare the mean of students' responses on meeting course outcomes based on the 70% anchor for the perspective confidence on meeting course outcomes. Results. The post-PSL scores on all self-efficacy questions improved. The majority of students reported skill development in all exercises. Students and clinical faculty qualitative responses indicated they felt exercises were effective. Conclusion. A PSL can serve as a valuable opportunity to address course related educational outcomes and specific skill development and can help students assess their self-efficacy in meeting them.

  8. Quality indicators in laboratory medicine: a fundamental tool for quality and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario; Sciacovelli, Laura; Marinova, Mariela; Marcuccitti, Jessica; Chiozza, Maria Laura

    2013-09-01

    The identification of reliable quality indicators (QIs) is a crucial step in enabling users to quantify the quality of laboratory services. The current lack of attention to extra-laboratory factors is in stark contrast with the body of evidence pointing to the multitude of errors that continue to occur in the pre- and post-analytical phases. Different QIs and terminologies are currently used and, therefore, there is the need to harmonize proposed QIs. A model of quality indicators (MQI) has been consensually developed by a group of clinical laboratories according to a project launched by a working group of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC). The model includes 57 QIs related to key processes (35 pre-, 7 intra- and 15 post-analytical phases) and 3 to support processes. The developed MQI and the data collected provide evidence of the feasibility of the project to harmonize currently available QIs, but further efforts should be done to involve more clinical laboratories and to collect a more consistent amount of data. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biochemistry for dietetic students: course content and format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, L H

    1984-12-01

    This article presents the results of a survey of the 251 undergraduate dietetic programs for course content and level of the biochemistry course most frequently used to satisfy competencies in biochemistry under Plan IV of the ADA in 1979-80. It showed that a common core of information was stressed by all biochemistry instructors, but there was great variability in content and level of material covered and the textbook chosen, depending on whether the biochemistry course was offered to dietetic majors only, in classes with other nonchemistry majors, or in classes with chemistry majors. Variability was also seen in the time allotted for biochemistry--39 to 280 hours (total lecture and required laboratory hours); laboratory requirements--only 71%; and departmental affiliation of the instructor--17 different departments, primarily of chemistry (80%), biology (8%), and home economics (4%). Topics given greatest emphasis were descriptive ones, such as definitions, simple structures, and reactions of intermediary metabolism in general terms. Topics given least emphasis were those involving mechanistic and quantitative biochemistry, such as respiratory quotient (RQ), enzyme kinetics, calculations of energy from fat and carbohydrates, and specific structures of vitamins, ketones, and metabolic intermediates. The lack of communication between biochemistry and nutrition instructors and the great differences in the preparation of dietetic majors in biochemistry are sources of concern.

  10. How to design a program of clinical biochemistry, for health technicians in clinical laboratory profile taking into account the new teaching approaches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Moleiro Hernández

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation process of the Licentiate in Health Technology of the profile of Clinical Laboratory is based in the mastery of the essential knowledge that, linked with the performance ways, allow him the solution of the professional problems he faces, as part of the health team of his specialty, so that within his teaching curriculum a group of subjects are included which have a special linking with the labor practice that the students carry out, on the base of a new didactic approach, starting from invariants of didactics as science which energize the teaching-learning process, and taking as base structure the didactic unity, which makes possible that the student consolidates his learning, achieving partial objectives, but around a well defined object of learning.

  11. Assessment of internal and external exposure to ionizing radiation in laboratories of nuclear medicine and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamiak-Ziemba, J.; Doniec, J.; Kocznow, W.; Hawrynski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigations with determination of radioisotopes in urine led to detection of contamination with 99m Tc and radioactive iodine. The measurements and dosimetry of external radiation demonstrated that workers in laboratories of radioisotope diagnosis received a mean annual equivalent doses amounted less than 5% of the permissible dose for persons with occupational exposure. It was also established that external exposure was mainly responsible for this. The data about the levels of internal exposure in laboratories of nuclear medicine and radiotherapy demonstrated that introduction of a permanent central system of control of internal contamination of workers would be useless since the observation of the already accepted principles of radiological protection is sufficient for avoiding contamination. (author)

  12. Country-wide quality control of equipment in Norwegian laboratories performing in vivo nuclear medicine examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skretting, A.; Rootwelt, K.; Berthelsen, T.

    1984-01-01

    The report presents the methods used and the results obtained in quality control tests performd in all Norwegian hospital laboratories performing in vivo nuclear medicine examinations. The tests included activity meters and scintillation cameras. The activity meters were tested by means of calibrated, long-lived radioactive sources. The quality of these instruments were judged to be satisfactory for moderate and high activities, non of them showing a deviation of more than 10% from the calibration value. Deviations were larger at low activities and were for some laboratories unacceptable. The scintillation cameras test included studies of flood field (homogeneity), geometrical resolution and energy resolution, as well as measurements of count rate characteristics and sensitivity. 40% of the cameras were judged to have flood field responses with satisfactory homogeneity, whereas 32% of the cameras had a satisfactory resolution ability. A liver/abdomen phantom test was carried out by the staff of the actual laboratory. This test proved that only 20% of the laboratories had a satisfactory total performance, managing to detect and describe satisfactorily 4 out of 5 simulated defects in the liver phantom. Lack of information density and insufficient number of projections was the main reason for unsatisfactory results with good cameras. It is recommended that quality control equipment as used in the described tests should be made available to Norwegian hospitals for self assessment. Regular quality assurance tests as recommended by the Norwegian Association for Radiation Physics and Norwegian Society of Nuclear Medicine should be implemented in all hospitals. Moreover, a practical training course in quality assurance should be arranged. (RF)

  13. Strategies to define performance specifications in laboratory medicine: 3 years on from the Milan Strategic Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteghini, Mauro; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Jones, Graham; Oosterhuis, Wytze; Plebani, Mario; Sandberg, Sverre

    2017-10-26

    Measurements in clinical laboratories produce results needed in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients. These results are always characterized by some uncertainty. What quality is needed and what measurement errors can be tolerated without jeopardizing patient safety should therefore be defined and specified for each analyte having clinical use. When these specifications are defined, the total examination process will be "fit for purpose" and the laboratory professionals should then set up rules to control the measuring systems to ensure they perform within specifications. The laboratory community has used different models to set performance specifications (PS). Recently, it was felt that there was a need to revisit different models and, at the same time, to emphasize the presuppositions for using the different models. Therefore, in 2014 the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) organized a Strategic Conference in Milan. It was felt that there was a need for more detailed discussions on, for instance, PS for EQAS, which measurands should use which models to set PS and how to set PS for the extra-analytical phases. There was also a need to critically evaluate the quality of data on biological variation studies and further discussing the use of the total error (TE) concept. Consequently, EFLM established five Task Finish Groups (TFGs) to address each of these topics. The TFGs are finishing their activity on 2017 and the content of this paper includes deliverables from these groups.

  14. 50th anniversary of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine--a historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Friedrich; Plebani, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Joachim Brugsch, one of the founders of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) (then Zeitschrift für Klinische Chemie), had the idea to found a journal in the upcoming field of clinical chemistry. He approached Ernst Schütte, who was associated with the De Gruyter publishing house through another journal, to participate, and Schütte thus became the second founder of this Journal. The aim was to create a vehicle allowing the experts to express their opinions and raise their voices more clearly than they could in a journal that publishes only original experimental papers, a laborious and difficult, but important endeavor, as the profession of clinical chemistry was still in the early stages of development at this time. The first issue of this Journal was published in early 1963, and today, we are proud to celebrate the 50th anniversary of CCLM. This review describes the development of this Journal in light of the political situation of the time when it was founded, the situation of the publisher Walter De Gruyter after the erection of the Berlin Wall, and the development of clinical chemistry, and later on, laboratory medicine as a well-acknowledged discipline and profession.

  15. Internal Medicine Resident Engagement with a Laboratory Utilization Dashboard: Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, Gregory; Dine, Jessica; Epstein, Andrew; Gitelman, Yevgenly; Leri, Damien; Patel, Miltesh S; Ryskina, Kyra

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure internal medicine resident engagement with an electronic medical record-based dashboard providing feedback on their use of routine laboratory tests relative to service averages. From January 2016 to June 2016, residents were e-mailed a snapshot of their personalized dashboard, a link to the online dashboard, and text summarizing the resident and service utilization averages. We measured resident engagement using e-mail read-receipts and web-based tracking. We also conducted 3 hour-long focus groups with residents. Using grounded theory approach, the transcripts were analyzed for common themes focusing on barriers and facilitators of dashboard use. Among 80 residents, 74% opened the e-mail containing a link to the dashboard and 21% accessed the dashboard itself. We did not observe a statistically significant difference in routine laboratory ordering by dashboard use, although residents who opened the link to the dashboard ordered 0.26 fewer labs per doctor-patient-day than those who did not (95% confidence interval, -0.77 to 0.25; = 0 .31). While they raised several concerns, focus group participants had positive attitudes toward receiving individualized feedback delivered in real time. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. A guide to defining the competence required of a consultant in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beastall, Graham; Kenny, Desmond; Laitinen, Paivi; ten Kate, Joop

    2005-01-01

    A definition has been agreed for the most senior professional (consultant) in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. A model job description for a consultant has been determined, which is intended to act as a toolkit to assist employing authorities and professional bodies to define the role of individual consultant posts. A total of 86 competences for a consultant have been designated and expressed in the form of simple generic proficiency standards. These competences have been allocated to six broad areas: clinical [13]; scientific [15]; technical [12]; communication [12]; management and leadership [20]; professional autonomy and accountability [14]. The competences are intended to be illustrative rather than definitive and to enable the duties of any consultant post to be defined. Assessment of competence is likely to entail consideration of qualifications, registration status, continuing professional development and performance review. The project is intended as a guide to European societies of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. The guide should be capable of local interpretation to encourage a greater degree of commonality in the role of the consultant whilst protecting national identity. The guide should stimulate international understanding and collaboration and contribute to an overall improvement in the quality of practice.

  17. The assessment of pathologists/laboratory medicine physicians through a multisource feedback tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Jocelyn M; Violato, Claudio; Fidler, Herta; Alakija, Pauline

    2009-08-01

    There is increasing interest in ensuring that physicians demonstrate the full range of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. To determine whether it is possible to develop a feasible and reliable multisource feedback instrument for pathologists and laboratory medicine physicians. Surveys with 39, 30, and 22 items were developed to assess individual physicians by 8 peers, 8 referring physicians, and 8 coworkers (eg, technologists, secretaries), respectively, using 5-point scales and an unable-to-assess category. Physicians completed a self-assessment survey. Items addressed key competencies related to clinical competence, collaboration, professionalism, and communication. Data from 101 pathologists and laboratory medicine physicians were analyzed. The mean number of respondents per physician was 7.6, 7.4, and 7.6 for peers, referring physicians, and coworkers, respectively. The reliability of the internal consistency, measured by Cronbach alpha, was > or = .95 for the full scale of all instruments. Analysis indicated that the medical peer, referring physician, and coworker instruments achieved a generalizability coefficient of .78, .81, and .81, respectively. Factor analysis showed 4 factors on the peer questionnaire accounted for 68.8% of the total variance: reports and clinical competency, collaboration, educational leadership, and professional behavior. For the referring physician survey, 3 factors accounted for 66.9% of the variance: professionalism, reports, and clinical competency. Two factors on the coworker questionnaire accounted for 59.9% of the total variance: communication and professionalism. It is feasible to assess this group of physicians using multisource feedback with instruments that are reliable.

  18. Roles of the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) and International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) in the Global Organization and Support of 3Rs Advances in Laboratory Animal Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Clark, Judy MacArthur; Vergara, Patri; Bayne, Kathryn; White, William J; Kurosawa, Tsutomu Miki; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Baneux, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Practical implementation of the 3Rs at national and regional levels around the world requires long-term commitment, backing, and coordinated efforts by international associations for laboratory animal medicine and science, including the International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) and the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). Together these organizations support the efforts of regional organization and communities of laboratory animal science professionals as well as the development of local associations and professional colleges that promote the training and continuing education of research facility personnel and veterinary specialists. The recent formation of a World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Center for Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare emphasizes the need for research into initiatives promoting laboratory animal welfare, particularly in emerging economies and regions with nascent associations of laboratory animal science. PMID:25836964

  19. LABORATORY OF CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY N.V. SKLIFOSOVSKY RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICINE (HISTORY AND PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Godkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Assessment of the immune status of patients with urgent types of pathology in the Institute for Emergency Medicine is performed according to three main objects of research: humoral , phagocytic and lymphocytic components of immune system . This complex allows to fully and adequately evaluate the condition of the immune system of patients at different stages of traumatic disease and after transplantation of organs and tissues , to forecast the probability of septic complications developing, adjust the therapy . During 45 years of work of immunological service formed the algorithm of the adequate immunological screening was formed, number of innovative methods of diagnosis was developed, the ideology of post-test counseling of patients by immunologists was created, mathematical methods of storage, modeling and processing of research results was introduced. Laboratory staff identified a number of medical and social factors in the spread of blood-borne viral infections (HIV, hepatitis B and C. New organizational and economic methods of management team were introduced in the laboratory. The basis of the work is equal integration of scientific and clinical staff of the laboratory

  20. Biochemical Neuroscience Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This biochemistry lab is set up for protein analysis using Western blot, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, and bead-based immunoassays. The...

  1. Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

  2. Environmental Risk Assessment of antimicrobials applied in veterinary medicine-A field study and laboratory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slana, Marko; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2013-01-01

    The fate and environmental risk of antimicrobial compounds of different groups of veterinary medicine pharmaceuticals (VMP's) have been compared. The aim was to demonstrate a correlation between the physical and chemical properties of active compounds and their metabolism in target animals, as well as their fate in the environment. In addition, the importance of techniques for manure management and agricultural practice and their influence on the fate of active compounds is discussed. The selected active compounds are shown to be susceptible to at least one environmental factor (sun, water, bacterial or fungal degradation) to which they are exposed during their life cycle, which contributes to its degradation. Degradation under a number of environmental factors has also to be considered as authentic information additional to that observed in the limited conditions in laboratory studies and in Environmental Risk Assessment calculations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates.

  4. Studies of biochemistry and clinical biochemistry. Studies at sample medical schools in 13 EU countries regarding biochemistry and clinical biochemistry teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Petr; Sebesta, Ivan; Trnkova, Bohuslava; Zima, Tomas

    2008-07-01

    The study summarizes the results obtained during personal visits to 53 medical schools in the 13 original EU countries during 2004--2006. Data from the Czech Republic is shown for comparison. The possibilities of acquiring information from the websites of the medical schools in the local language and English are assessed. The admission process to medical schools and the organization of studies of medicine, dentistry, and non-medical healthcare fields are briefly characterized. Significant attention is paid to the forms of education in biochemistry and clinical (bio)chemistry in the medical study field. The position of these subjects in the studies of dentistry and non-medical healthcare fields is also noted. In addition, the course of subject exams is described. The methods of funding and postgraduate studies at the medical schools are also briefly addressed.

  5. Questionnaire report of safety control on instrument in nuclear medicine laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A questionaire survey concerning the safety of equipment and facilities used in nuclear medicine laboratories was made in order to clarify the incidence of accidents during nuclear medicine testing. The questionaire consists of two parts. One part contains questions regarding the testing personnel, facilities, equipment and maintenance and management of the equipment. The other part deals with accidents that had occurred within the areas under management, potential risks that may cause accidents, measures to improve safety management, troubles with and failure of equipment, and requests and opinions directed to equipment manufactures. It is concluded from results of the survey that to raise the safety of equipment, so-called man-machine interfaces should be improved by increasing the durability of equipment and performance of the personnel operating the equipment while reducing the physical and mental effects on the persons subjected to testing. Systematic educational measures, including lecture meetings and training courses, are required to raise the consciousness of personnel. Such education and training should cover safety handling techniques, including those for checking of equipment and for instructing and helping the persons under testing. (Nogami, K.)

  6. Introduction to clinical pathology: A brief course of laboratory medicine in the field for medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidifar, Navid; Keshtkari, Ali; Dehghani, Mohammadreza; Shokripour, Mansoureh

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Teaching of clinical pathology to medical students has been ignored in many countries such as Iran. We aim to introduce a practical brief course and its proper timing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three groups of medical students from consecutive years of entrance passed a 1.5 working day practical course on the field. Their level of knowledge was assessed by pre- and post-tests. Their idea and satisfaction were gathered by questionnaires. RESULTS: Knowledge of students became significantly higher after the course. Their satisfaction was high. Students in later year of education got significantly higher marks. Most of the students wished such a course should be away from basic sciences period and as near as possible to internship. DISCUSSION: Due to overloaded curriculum of general medicine in Iran, we decided to run a brief practical course of laboratory medicine education for medical students. Although the course was practical, the knowledge of students became higher. Students with more clinical experience and knowledge absorbed more. Being actively involved in the classes lit the enthusiasm of students and made them satisfied with the course. It seemed that the course should be placed in later years of clinical training to get the best uptake and results. PMID:29114552

  7. The Biochemistry of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Samuel; Pines, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we will discuss the biochemistry of mitosis in eukaryotic cells. We will focus on conserved principles that, importantly, are adapted to the biology of the organism. It is vital to bear in mind that the structural requirements for division in a rapidly dividing syncytial Drosophila embryo, for example, are markedly different from those in a unicellular yeast cell. Nevertheless, division in both systems is driven by conserved modules of antagonistic protein kinases and phosphatases, underpinned by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, which create molecular switches to drive each stage of division forward. These conserved control modules combine with the self-organizing properties of the subcellular architecture to meet the specific needs of the cell. Our discussion will draw on discoveries in several model systems that have been important in the long history of research on mitosis, and we will try to point out those principles that appear to apply to all cells, compared with those in which the biochemistry has been specifically adapted in a particular organism. PMID:25663668

  8. Towards European urinalysis guidelines. Introduction of a project under European Confederation of Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, T T; Gant, V A; Fogazzi, G B; Hofmann, W; Hallander, H O; Guder, W G

    2000-07-01

    Improved standardized performance is needed because urinalysis continues to be one of the most frequently requested laboratory tests. Since 1997, the European Confederation of Laboratory Medicine (ECLM) has been supporting an interdisciplinary project aiming to produce European urinalysis guidelines. More than seventy clinical chemists, microbiologists and ward-based clinicians, as well as representatives of manufacturers are taking part. These guidelines aim to improve the quality and consistency of chemical urinalysis, particle counting and bacterial culture by suggesting optimal investigative processes that could be applied in Europe. The approach is based on medical needs for urinalysis. The importance of the pre-analytical stage for total quality is stressed by detailed illustrative advice for specimen collection. Attention is also given to emerging automated technology. For cost containment reasons, both optimum (ideal) procedures and minimum analytical approaches are suggested. Since urinalysis mostly lacks genuine reference methods (primary reference measurement procedures; Level 4), a novel classification of the methods is proposed: comparison measurement procedures (Level 3), quantitative routine procedures (Level 2), and ordinal scale examinations (Level 1). Stepwise strategies are suggested to save costs, applying different rules for general and specific patient populations. New analytical quality specifications have been created. After a consultation period, the final written text will be published in full as a separate document.

  9. Developing and Supporting Students' Autonomy to Plan, Perform, and Interpret Inquiry-Based Biochemistry Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thanuci; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory sessions are designed to develop the experimental skills and the acquaintance with instruments that may contribute to a successful career in Biochemistry and associated fields. This study is a report on improving a traditional Biochemistry course by devising the laboratory sessions as an inquiry-based environment to develop the…

  10. Inappropriate emergency laboratory test ordering: defensive or peer evidence shared based medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Descovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The laboratory overuse is widely prevalent in hospital practice, mostly in the emergency care. Reasons for excessive and inappropriate test-ordering include defensive behaviour and fear or uncertainty, lack of experience, the misuse of protocols and guidelines, “routine” and local attitudes, inadequate educational feedback and clinician’s unawareness about the cost of examinations and their related implications. AIM OF THE STUDY AND METHODS The primary target of our working group was to reduce inappropriate ordering on a urgent basis test, implementing further examinations not yet previewed in the hospital panel of the available urgencies, according to the evidence based diagnosis concept. The secondary goal was to indicate strategies of re-engineering of the processes, improving turnaround time in the laboratory management of emergencies. After evaluating, as first intervention, the more reliable sources for practice guidelines, systematic reviews and RCTs, the committee further discussed main topics with in-hospital stakeholders, selected from Emergency, Internal Medicine and Surgery Depts. The working group, in many subsequent audits, tried to obtain a systematic feed back with all involved professionals. RESULTS After reviewing literature’s evidence, the board constrained testing options by defining the basic emergency laboratory panel tests (blood type, hemogram, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolarity, CRP, bicarbonate, CPK, creatine phosphokinase-MB, myoglobin, troponin, BNP and NT-proBNP, PT-INR, PTT, D-dimer, beta- HCG, biochemical urinalysis etc.. As final result, the proposed tests reduced the overall number of inappropriate investigations and increased, with newer and updated tests, the available panel for critical patients. DISCUSSION A collegiate review of data reporting, in-hospital deepening of problems and the inter- professional discussion of the evidences

  11. Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicines can treat diseases and improve your health. If you are like most people, you need to take medicine at some point in your life. You may need to take medicine every day, or you may only need to ...

  12. [A Perspective on Innovation for Efficient Medical Practice in View of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Education and Training in Laboratory Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Continuous advances in medical laboratory technology have driven major changes in the practice of laboratory medicine over the past two decades. The importance of the overall quality of a medical laboratory has been ever-increasing in order to improve and ensure the quality and safety of clinical practice by physicians in any type of medical facility. Laboratory physicians and professional staff should challenge themselves more than ever in various ways to cooperate and contribute with practicing physicians for the appropriate utilization of laboratory testing. This will certainly lead to a decrease in inappropriate or unnecessary laboratory testing, resulting in reducing medical costs. In addition, not only postgraduate, but also undergraduate medical education/training systems must be markedly innovated, considering recent rapid progress in electronic information and communication technologies.

  13. Chapter IV: ultrafast biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chergui, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Kjelstrup, S. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Meuwly, M. [Universitaet Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Schuler, B. [University of Zuerich (ETH), Zurich (Switzerland); Thor, J. van [Imperial College London (IC), London (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    The whole report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at the scientific opportunities offered by the institute's SwissFEL X-ray Laser facility. In this sixth part, initial events and fluctuations in biochemical processes at the atomic scale are discussed. Sub-nanosecond processes are fundamental to biochemistry and will be accessible to the ultra-short pulses of the SwissFEL. Time and length scales of biochemical reactions are discussed, as is the photo-initiation of biochemical processes. Time-resolved measurement techniques are looked at. Fluorescence resonant energy transfer is discussed. As an example, the photo cycle of bacteriorhodopsin is examined. The dynamics of protein folding and catalytic action are also looked at. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics is discussed

  14. Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Support for the American Expeditionary Forces by the US Army Medical Corps During World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Baskin, Leland B

    2015-09-01

    Historical research on pathology and laboratory medicine services in World War I has been limited. In the Spanish American War, these efforts were primarily focused on tropical diseases. World War I problems that could be addressed by pathology and laboratory medicine were strikingly different because of the new field of clinical pathology. Geographic differences, changing war tactics, and trench warfare created new issues. To describe the scope of pathology and laboratory medicine services in World War I and the value these services brought to the war effort. Available primary and secondary sources related to American Expeditionary Forces' laboratory services were analyzed and contrasted with the British and German approaches. The United States entered the war in April 1917. Colonel Joseph Siler, MD, a career medical officer, was the director, and Colonel Louis B. Wilson, MD, head of pathology at the Mayo Clinic, was appointed assistant director of the US Army Medical Corps Division of Laboratories and Infectious Disease, based in Dijon, France. During the next year, they organized 300 efficient laboratories to support the American Expeditionary Forces. Autopsies were performed to better understand treatment of battlefield injuries, effects of chemical warfare agents, and the influenza pandemic; autopsies also generated teaching specimens for the US Army Medical Museum. Bacteriology services focused on communicable diseases. Laboratory testing for social diseases was very aggressive. Significant advances in blood transfusion techniques, which allowed brief blood storage, occurred during the war but were not primarily overseen by laboratory services. Both Siler and Wilson received Distinguished Service Medals. Wilson's vision for military pathology services helped transform American civilian laboratory services in the 1920s.

  15. Scientific publications in laboratory medicine from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan: A ten-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding-Hua; Cui, Wei; Yao, Yun-Tai; Jiang, Qi-Qi

    2010-10-09

    We investigated scientific publications in laboratory medicine originating from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan over the past 10 years. The information about articles published in the included journals were determined by computer-searching on PubMed and data were extracted independently and analyzed in relation to the number of articles. From 2000 to 2009 there were 1166 articles published in laboratory medicine journals from the major Chinese regions (mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan). This exceeded Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France from 2005 onwards. Also, the number of articles from mainland China exceeded those from Hong Kong and Taiwan from 2004 onwards. The average impact factor (IF) from Hong Kong ranked the first, followed by mainland China, and then Taiwan. Clinica Chimica Acta seems to be the most popular laboratory medicine journal among Chinese authors. Over the past 10 years, Chinese authors have been more and more active in the field of laboratory medicine. Mainland China seems to have caught up to Hong Kong and Taiwan regarding publication of papers in this field. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine (JCTLM): A Global Approach to Promote the Standardisation of Clinical Laboratory Test Results

    OpenAIRE

    Armbruster, David; Miller, Richard R

    2007-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are moving towards global standardisation to produce equivalent test results across space and time. Standardisation allows use of evidence-based medicine, eliminates the need of method-specific reference intervals, decision levels and cut-offs, and can be achieved by application of metrological principles. For example, in vitro diagnostics (IVD) manufacturers can make kit calibrators traceable to internationally recognised reference materials and reference methods.

  17. Improving patient safety in transfusion medicine: contemporary challenges and the roles for bedside and laboratory biovigilance in addressing them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzejewski Jr C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chester Andrzejewski Jr,1 Darlene Cloutier,1 David Unold,2 Richard C Friedberg1 1Transfusion Medicine Services, Department of Pathology, Baystate Medical Center, Baystate Health, Springfield, MA, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Throughout the history of hemotherapy (HT, various challenges and concerns have been encountered in its practical application. When viewed using a prismatic lens of history, recurrent themes regarding adverse HT sequelae separate and become apparent. These can be broadly classified into three categories: infectious, noninfectious, and administrative/logistical. Using the HT care map as a frame of reference along with its associated rites, we examine the contemporary spectrum of HT adverse events and concerns, and some approaches as to how these may be addressed from bedside and laboratory medicine biovigilance perspectives enhancing patient care and blood transfusion safety. Although our vantage point is from an academic community hospital venue, the issues and concerns identified are germane to many if not all transfusion-medicine practice environments. Included among the subjects we explore are patient/specimen identification issues, blood-management initiatives, unrecognized and/or unreported suspected transfusion reactions, transfusion-associated adverse pulmonary sequelae (including transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload, expanded applications of electronic health records and issues regarding their “meaningful use” and interinstitutional “digital compatibilities”, biovigilance integration of electronic data networks within and between health care entities, and anticipated workforce contractions secondary to projected declines in the availability of qualified laboratory professionals. Cooperative initiatives between accreditation and regulatory entities, blood collectors and suppliers, hospital

  18. Quality Indicators in Laboratory Medicine: from theory to practice. Preliminary data from the IFCC Working Group Project "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, Laura; O'Kane, Maurice; Skaik, Younis Abdelwahab; Caciagli, Patrizio; Pellegrini, Cristina; Da Rin, Giorgio; Ivanov, Agnes; Ghys, Timothy; Plebani, Mario

    2011-05-01

    The adoption of Quality Indicators (QIs) has prompted the development of tools to measure and evaluate the quality and effectiveness of laboratory testing, first in the hospital setting and subsequently in ambulatory and other care settings. While Laboratory Medicine has an important role in the delivery of high-quality care, no consensus exists as yet on the use of QIs focussing on all steps of the laboratory total testing process (TTP), and further research in this area is required. In order to reduce errors in laboratory testing, the IFCC Working Group on "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" (WG-LEPS) developed a series of Quality Indicators, specifically designed for clinical laboratories. In the first phase of the project, specific QIs for key processes of the TTP were identified, including all the pre-, intra- and post-analytic steps. The overall aim of the project is to create a common reporting system for clinical laboratories based on standardized data collection, and to define state-of-the-art and Quality Specifications (QSs) for each QI independent of: a) the size of organization and type of activities; b) the complexity of processes undertaken; and c) different degree of knowledge and ability of the staff. The aim of the present paper is to report the results collected from participating laboratories from February 2008 to December 2009 and to identify preliminary QSs. The results demonstrate that a Model of Quality Indicators managed as an External Quality Assurance Program can serve as a tool to monitor and control the pre-, intra- and post-analytical activities. It might also allow clinical laboratories to identify risks that lead to errors resulting in patient harm: identification and design of practices that eliminate medical errors; the sharing of information and education of clinical and laboratory teams on practices that reduce or prevent errors; the monitoring and evaluation of improvement activities.

  19. Case Study of How Turkish University Students Improve Their Biochemistry Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Biochemistry courses have an important place as a common subject in faculties of medicine, food engineering, biology and chemistry. MSLQ, Metacognitive Awareness Inventory and Learning Approach Questionnaire were used. The study also involves repeated observations of the same instructor in a biochemistry class over eight weeks to describe…

  20. Retraction 2 | Shafik | Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Value of co-peptin/ plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 axis in early diagnosis of preterm labor risk among pre-eclamptic Egyptian women. Noha M. Shafik1, Soha S. Zakaria1, Ahmed M. Hagras2 and Ghada M. Abou-Fard3 Departments of Medical Biochemistry1, Gynecology2 and Physiology3, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta ...

  1. Training in radioprotection in the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Elena; Cremaschi, Graciela; Martin, Graciela; Zubillaga, Marcela; Davio, Carlos; Genaro, Ana; Cricco, Graciela; Mohamad, Nora; Bianchin, Ana; Goldman, Cinthia; Salgueiro, Jimena; Klecha, Alicia; Nunez, Mariel; Medina, Vanina; Cocca, Claudia; Leonardi, Natalia; Collia, Nicolas; Gutierrez, Alicia; Massari, Noelia; Bomben, Ana; Bergoc, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    radioprotection for technicians working in Nuclear Medicine Units. Since this course is in a growing demand and an appropriate qualification is required, a new three year lasting degree has been proposed by our laboratory to be offered by the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry. Since 2005, the Pharmacy degree curriculum includes course (6) as an optional subject. During our 47 years teaching experience, more than 95% of registered students have passed their respective exams meeting the respective course standards: students, graduate students and technicians. All the training courses above described are planned keeping in mind the optimization of radiation protection in harmonization with the environment. (author)

  2. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology investigates the organization, compartmentalization, and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and the pathology associated...

  3. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained......BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  4. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched...... Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  5. The management of clinical laboratories in Europe: a FESCC survey. Forum of the European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kieviet, Wim; Blaton, Victor; Kovacs, Gabor L; Palicka, Vladimir; Pulkki, Kari

    2002-03-01

    The professional duties of the specialists in clinical chemistry differ from country to country in Europe. One of the main goals of the Strategic Plan of the Forum of the European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC; IFCC-Europe) is to promote a high scientific and professional standard in the field of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in Europe. This can be stimulated by the knowledge of the local conditions in each country and by striving towards a strong and harmonised position in all the European countries. In order to enhance the knowledge of the managerial situation of the specialists in clinical chemistry in Europe, FESCC launched a survey in September 2000. This survey provides information about the position of the specialists in clinical chemistry in the various disciplines in the medical laboratories and in hospitals, and about the advisory tasks and the managerial education during the post-graduate training in clinical chemistry. Of the 35 FESCC member countries 33 have participated in the survey (94%). The results show a rather heterogeneous situation in Europe caused by the local historical developments, the differences in academic background and the relative numbers of private and physicians' office laboratories. Large differences exist between the European countries in the disciplines of laboratory medicine that are headed by a specialist in clinical chemistry. In the different countries the clinical chemistry laboratories are headed by specialists in clinical chemistry in between 20% and 100% of the laboratories. The haematology, immunology, microbiology, therapeutic drug monitoring, molecular biology and haemostasis laboratories and departments of blood banking are headed by specialists in clinical chemistry in between 0% and 100% of the laboratories. The responsibilities for the various managerial tasks of the specialists in clinical chemistry show no uniformity in Europe. In the majority of the countries the

  6. Participation in college laboratory research apprenticeships among students considering careers in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy A. Andriole

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We sought to determine the prevalence of college laboratory research apprenticeship (CLRA participation among students considering medical careers and to examine the relationship between CLRA participation and medical-school acceptance among students who applied to medical school. Methods: We used multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of: 1 CLRA participation in a national cohort of 2001–2006 Pre-Medical College Admission Test (MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ respondents and 2 among those PMQ respondents who subsequently applied to medical school, medical-school acceptance by June 2013, reporting adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: Of 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample (81.2% of all 262,813 PMQ respondents in 2001–2006, 72,797 (34.1% reported CLRA participation. Each of under-represented minorities in medicine (URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06, Asian/Pacific Islander race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.17–1.22, and high school summer laboratory research apprenticeship (HSLRA participation (aOR: 3.95; 95% CI: 3.84–4.07 predicted a greater likelihood of CLRA participation. Of the 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample, 144,473 (67.7% had applied to medical school and 87,368 (60.5% of 144,473 medical-school applicants had been accepted to medical school. Each of female gender (vs. male, aOR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.16–1.22, URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 3.91; 95% CI: 3.75–4.08, HSLRA participation (aOR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03–1.19, CLRA participation (aOR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.09–1.15, college summer academic enrichment program participation (aOR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.21–1.31, and higher MCAT score (per point increase, aOR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.30–1.31 predicted a greater likelihood of medical-school acceptance. Conclusions: About one-third of all PMQ respondents had participated in CLRAs prior to taking the MCAT, and such participation

  7. Postmortem Biochemistry and Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Flanagan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of postmortem biochemistry and toxicology is either to help establish the cause of death, or to gain information on events immediately before death. If self-poisoning is suspected, the diagnosis may be straightforward and all that could be required is confirmation of the agents involved. However, if the cause of death is not immediately obvious then suspicion of possible poisoning or of conditions such as alcoholic ketoacidosis is of course crucial. On the other hand, it may be important to investigate adherence to prescribed therapy, for example with anticonvulsants or antipsychotics, hence sensitive methods are required. Blood sampling (needle aspiration, peripheral vein, for example femoral, ideally after proximal ligation before opening the body minimizes the risk of sample contamination with, for example, gut contents or urine. Other specimens (stomach contents, urine, liver, vitreous humor may also be valuable and may be needed to corroborate unexpected or unusual findings in the absence of other evidence. The site of sampling should always be recorded. The availability of antemortem specimens should not necessarily preclude postmortem sampling. Appropriate sample preservation, transport, and storage are mandatory. Interpretation of analytical toxicology results must take into account what is known of the pharmacokinetics and toxicology of the agent(s in question, the circumstances under which death occurred including the mechanism of exposure, and other factors such as the stability of the analyte(s and the analytical methods used. It is important to realise that changes may occur in the composition of body fluids, even peripheral blood, after death. Such changes are likely to be greater after attempted resuscitation, and with centrally-acting drugs with large volumes of distribution given chronically, and may perhaps be minimised by prompt refrigeration of the body and performing the autopsy quickly.

  8. A biochemistry discipline designed for the nutrition course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.G. Bianco

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is widely considered an essential background in a Nutrition Course framework. At theFaculdade de Saude Publica, USP, it is a direct requirement to eight disciplines of the syllabus and anindirect requirement to another nine disciplines. Nevertheless, a previous interview study involvingNutrition students and Nutritionists revealed a contradictory image of Biochemistry. Although stu-dents and Nutritionists admitted the important role played by Biochemistry, most of the respondentsdeclared that they could not foresee any application of Biochemical contents in their professional life.Aiming to change this situation, a deep intervention in the Biochemistry discipline was carried on.The discipline was planned in such a way that all the contents to be taught was directly derived fromsubjects or situations matching the interests of nutrition students. Instead of a classical lecture basedcourse, collaborative learning was the methodological choice, taking advantage of practical activitiesinvolving educational software and laboratory work as well. The course was carried on in 180 hoursand a variety of strategies were employed, especially small group discussion and problem solving. Thestudents were given a booklet containing all the exercises and problems, which acted as course guide.At the end of the course, an evaluation survey was carried out. It is noticeable that, according tostudents answers: 100% agreed that Biochemistry was intimately linked to Nutrition; 83% appreciatedthe didactical methodologies employed; 89% would like to continue studying Biochemistry in a furtherdiscipline; 96% declared that the discipline has raised their interest in Biochemistry. In respect tothe assessment of the students, these results are in accordance with the opinion of teachers and TAsengaged in restructuring Biochemistry courses.

  9. Nutritional Biochemistry of Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2000-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is critical for maintenance of crew health during and after extended-duration space flight. The impact of weightlessness on human physiology is profound, with effects on many systems related to nutrition, including bone, muscle, hematology, fluid and electrolyte regulation. Additionally, we have much to learn regarding the impact of weightlessness on absorption, mtabolism , and excretion of nutrients, and this will ultimately determine the nutrient requirements for extended-duration space flight. Existing nutritional requirements for extended-duration space flight have been formulated based on limited flight research, and extrapolation from ground-based research. NASA's Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory is charged with defining the nutritional requirements for space flight. This is accomplished through both operational and research projects. A nutritional status assessment program is included operationally for all International Space Station astronauts. This medical requirement includes biochemical and dietary assessments, and is completed before, during, and after the missions. This program will provide information about crew health and nutritional status, and will also provide assessments of countermeasure efficacy. Ongoing research projects include studies of calcium and bone metabolism, and iron absorption and metabolism. The calcium studies include measurements of endocrine regulation of calcium homeostasis, biochemical marker of bone metabolism, and tracer kinetic studies of calcium movement in the body. These calcium kinetic studies allow for estimation of intestinal absorption, urinary excretion, and perhaps most importantly - deposition and resorption of calcium from bone. The Calcium Kinetics experiment is currently being prepared for flight on the Space Shuttle in 2001, and potentially for subsequent Shuttle and International Space Station missions. The iron study is intended to assess whether iron absorption is down-regulated dUl1ng

  10. Personalized biochemistry and biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroncke, Brett M; Vanoye, Carlos G; Meiler, Jens; George, Alfred L; Sanders, Charles R

    2015-04-28

    Whole human genome sequencing of individuals is becoming rapid and inexpensive, enabling new strategies for using personal genome information to help diagnose, treat, and even prevent human disorders for which genetic variations are causative or are known to be risk factors. Many of the exploding number of newly discovered genetic variations alter the structure, function, dynamics, stability, and/or interactions of specific proteins and RNA molecules. Accordingly, there are a host of opportunities for biochemists and biophysicists to participate in (1) developing tools to allow accurate and sometimes medically actionable assessment of the potential pathogenicity of individual variations and (2) establishing the mechanistic linkage between pathogenic variations and their physiological consequences, providing a rational basis for treatment or preventive care. In this review, we provide an overview of these opportunities and their associated challenges in light of the current status of genomic science and personalized medicine, the latter often termed precision medicine.

  11. Personalized Biochemistry and Biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Whole human genome sequencing of individuals is becoming rapid and inexpensive, enabling new strategies for using personal genome information to help diagnose, treat, and even prevent human disorders for which genetic variations are causative or are known to be risk factors. Many of the exploding number of newly discovered genetic variations alter the structure, function, dynamics, stability, and/or interactions of specific proteins and RNA molecules. Accordingly, there are a host of opportunities for biochemists and biophysicists to participate in (1) developing tools to allow accurate and sometimes medically actionable assessment of the potential pathogenicity of individual variations and (2) establishing the mechanistic linkage between pathogenic variations and their physiological consequences, providing a rational basis for treatment or preventive care. In this review, we provide an overview of these opportunities and their associated challenges in light of the current status of genomic science and personalized medicine, the latter often termed precision medicine. PMID:25856502

  12. Lignin biochemistry and soil N determine crop residue decomposition and soil priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropping history can affect soil properties, including available N, but little is known about the interactive effects of residue biochemistry, temperature and cropping history on residue decomposition. A laboratory incubation examined the role of residue biochemistry and temperature on the decomposi...

  13. 75 FR 8147 - Notice of Consideration of Amendment Request for Decommissioning of Analytical Bio-Chemistry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 030-05154; NRC-2010-0056] Notice of Consideration of Amendment Request for Decommissioning of Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc. Sanitary Lagoon... license amendment to Byproduct Material License No. 24- 13365-01 issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry...

  14. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Henrik L; Larsen, Birger; Ingwersen, Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2008-09-01

    Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched control group from other medical specialities in Denmark. A list of all physicians registered in Denmark (23,127 persons) was drawn from the database "Laeger.dk". Of these, 5,202 were generalists (not included) while 11,691 were from other specialities. Of the 126 specialists from Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained. 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry compared to 51 for the control group. The number of citations per specialist was 1,844 for Clinical Biochemistry compared to 816 for the control group. The top ten H-indices (of which 8 were in Clinical Biochemistry) ranged from 30 to 69. Both the number of papers and the number of citations were higher for Clinical Biochemistry than for the control group. The difference was most pronounced among professors.

  15. Clinical roles in clinical biochemistry: a national survey of practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sirazum M; Williams, Emma L; Barnes, Sophie C; Alaghband-Zadeh, Jamshid; Tan, Tricia M; Cegla, Jaimini

    2017-05-01

    Background Using an online survey, we collected data to present a picture of how clinical authorization is performed in the UK. Methods A 21-question survey was uploaded to www.surveymonkey.com , and responses were invited via the mail base of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The questionnaire examined the intensity and function of the duty biochemist role and how different types of authorization are used to handle and release results. Results Of 70 responses received, 60 were suitable for analysis. Responses were received from every region of the UK. A typical duty biochemist shift started on average at 8:50, and finished at 17:25. The mean duration was 8 h 58 min. Clinical scientists are the most abundantly represented group on duty biochemist rotas. Higher banded clinical scientists and chemical pathologists covered out-of-hours shifts. Results were handled differently depending on the level of abnormality and the requesting area. Normal results tended to be released either directly from the analyser or after technical then autoauthorization (90%). A greater preference for clinical authorization was seen for abnormal and critical results originating from outpatients (49% and 69%, respectively) or general practice (51% and 71%) than for inpatients (33% and 53%) or A&E (25% and 37%). Conclusions The handling and authorization of biochemistry results varies greatly between laboratories. The role is clearly heterogeneous in the UK. Guidance from the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Royal College of Pathologists may help to clarify the essential roles of the duty biochemist.

  16. An Integrated Approach to Teaching Biochemistry for Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Therese I.; Borke, Mitchell L.

    1982-01-01

    A Duquesne course integrating biochemistry lectures, clinical applications lectures, and laboratory sessions has the objectives of (1) making the course more relevant to students' perceived needs; (2) enhancing the learning process; (3) introducing clinical applications early in the students' program; and (4) demonstrating additional…

  17. [The "Instituto de Salud Carlos III" and the public health in Spain. Origin of laboratory medicine and of the central laboratories and research in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nájera Morrondo, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    The "Instituto de Salud Carlos III" is the Central Public Health Laboratory in Spain with an important component of scientific research in health related areas, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, infectious diseases and environmental health. The article describes the development of the Public Health Institutes. arising from the introduction and development of scientific and laboratory based medicine and the introduction of vaccination and sanitation with the control of water and food. At about the same time, the discoveries in microbiology and immunology were produced, being the research activities incardinated with the practical advances in the control of products. To cope with the practical needs, Institutions were created with the responsibility of providing smallpox vaccine but incorporating very soon production of sera and other vaccines and water and sanitation control and foods control. At the same time. colonization of countries specially in Africa, South East Asia and explorations in Central America confront the Europeans with new diseases and the need of laboratories where to study them. These circumstances gave rise to the birth of the Central Public Health Laboratories and the National institutes of Health at the beginning of the XX century in many countries. In Spain, the Spanish Civil War was a breaking point in the development of such an institution that finally was reinvented with the creation of the Instituto de Salud Carlos III, in 1986, incorporating research and epidemiological surveillance and control of diseases and also the responsibilities of the Food and Drug Control, lately separated from it.

  18. The 2013 Discovery Award from the Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine: Selected Discoveries from the Butterfield Laboratory of Oxidative Stress and Its Sequelae in Brain in Cognitive Disorders Exemplified by Alzheimer Disease and Chemotherapy Induced Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D. Allan

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective review on discoveries of the roles of oxidative stress in brain of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD) and animal models thereof as well as brain from animal models of chemotherapy induced cognitive impairment (CICI) results from the author receiving the 2013 Discovery Award from the Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine. The paper reviews our laboratory's discovery of: protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in AD brain regions rich in amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) but not in Aβ-poor cerebellum; redox proteomics as a means to identify oxidatively modified brain proteins in AD and its earlier forms that are consistent with the pathology, biochemistry, and clinical presentation of these disorders; how Aβ in in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies can lead to oxidative modification of key proteins that also are oxidatively modified in AD brain; the role of the single methionine residue of Aβ(1-42) in these processes; and some of the potential mechanisms in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. CICI affects a significant fraction of the 14 million American cancer survivors, and due to diminished cognitive function, reduced quality of life of the persons with CICI (called “chemobrain” by patients) often results. A proposed mechanism for CICI employed the prototypical ROS-generating and non-blood brain barrier (BBB)-penetrating chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (Dox, also called adriamycin, ADR). Because of the quinone moiety within the structure of Dox, this agent undergoes redox cycling to produce superoxide free radical peripherally. This, in turn, leads to oxidative modification of the key plasma protein, Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1). Oxidized ApoA1 leads to elevated peripheral TNFα, a pro-inflammatory cytokine that crosses the BBB to induce oxidative stress in brain parenchyma that affects negatively brain mitochondria. This subsequently leads to apoptotic cell death resulting in CICI. This review outlines aspects of CICI consistent

  19. Medical Biochemistry – Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Cavalcante

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of situations that exemplifies the practical application of the biochemical concepts is one of the main challenges in the development of didactic materials for the teaching of biochemistry. So far, there are a small number of materials, especially in Portuguese language, that present practical situations exemplifying the application of the several biochemical concepts in the area of human health. The Medical Biochemistry-Clinical Cases app/ebook is intended to enable the integrated vision of the basic knowledge in biochemistry and its practical application in day-to-day situations of human health professionals. The biochemical concepts are presented as clinical cases, making possible the exercise of the analytical attitude and decision-making to solve problems based on real situations. The app is available on the internet for free, facilitating both, the access and the use of the material as a supplementary source.

  20. The experimental teaching reform in biochemistry and molecular biology for undergraduate students in Peking University Health Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and participated in some original research work. There is a critical educational need to prepare these students for the increasing accessibility of research experience. The redesigned experimental curriculum of biochemistry and molecular biology was developed to fulfill such a requirement, which keeps two original biochemistry experiments (Gel filtration and Enzyme kinetics) and adds a new two-experiment component called "Analysis of anti-tumor drug induced apoptosis." The additional component, also known as the "project-oriented experiment" or the "comprehensive experiment," consists of Western blotting and a DNA laddering assay to assess the effects of etoposide (VP16) on the apoptosis signaling pathways. This reformed laboratory teaching system aims to enhance the participating students overall understanding of important biological research techniques and the instrumentation involved, and to foster a better understanding of the research process all within a classroom setting. Student feedback indicated that the updated curriculum helped them improve their operational and self-learning capability, and helped to increase their understanding of theoretical knowledge and actual research processes, which laid the groundwork for their future research work. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Mapping the Teaching of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine in the European Union and European Free Trade Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatridou, Despoina; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; De Briyne, Nancy; Saunders, Jimmy; Bravo, Ana

    2018-06-13

    Developing a common market and allowing free movement of goods, services, and people is one of the main objectives of the European Union (EU) and the European Free Trade Area. In the field of scientific research, Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes aims to improve the welfare of laboratory animals by following the principle of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction, and refinement). Each breeder, supplier, and user must appoint a designated veterinarian to advise on the well-being and treatment of the animals. In our report we investigate how the undergraduate veterinary curriculum prepares future veterinarians for the role of designated veterinarian, by analyzing data from 77 European veterinary education establishments. Over 80% of them provide training in laboratory animal science and medicine in their curriculum. All countries in the EU and the European Free Trade Area, having national veterinary schools, include such training in the curriculum of at least one of their establishments. Laboratory animal science and medicine courses can be obligatory or elective and are often part of more than one subject in the veterinary curricula. Post-graduate courses or programs are available at more than 50% of those veterinary schools. Most authorities in the European region consider graduate veterinarians ready to seek the role as designated veterinarian immediately after graduation.

  2. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine: version 4--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Queralto, José; Solnica, Bogdan; Gruson, Damien; Tomberg, Karel; Riittinen, Leena; Baum, Hannsjörg; Brochet, Jean-Philippe; Buhagiar, Gerald; Charilaou, Charis; Grigore, Camelia; Johnsen, Anders H; Kappelmayer, Janos; Majkic-Singh, Nada; Nubile, Giuseppe; O'Mullane, John; Opp, Matthias; Pupure, Silvija; Racek, Jaroslav; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Rogic, Dunja; Špaňár, Július; Štrakl, Greta; Szekeres, Thomas; Tzatchev, Kamen; Vitkus, Dalius; Wallemacq, Pierre; Wallinder, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory medicine's practitioners across the European community include medical, scientific and pharmacy trained specialists whose contributions to health and healthcare is in the application of diagnostic tests for screening and early detection of disease, differential diagnosis, monitoring, management and treatment of patients, and their prognostic assessment. In submitting a revised common syllabus for post-graduate education and training across the 27 member states an expectation is set for harmonised, high quality, safe practice. In this regard an extended 'Core knowledge, skills and competencies' division embracing all laboratory medicine disciplines is described. For the first time the syllabus identifies the competencies required to meet clinical leadership demands for defining, directing and assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services as well as expectations in translating knowledge and skills into ability to practice. In a 'Specialist knowledge' division, the expectations from the individual disciplines of Clinical Chemistry/Immunology, Haematology/Blood Transfusion, Microbiology/ Virology, Genetics and In Vitro Fertilisation are described. Beyond providing a common platform of knowledge, skills and competency, the syllabus supports the aims of the European Commission in providing safeguards to increasing professional mobility across European borders at a time when demand for highly qualified professionals is increasing and the labour force is declining. It continues to act as a guide for the formulation of national programmes supplemented by the needs of individual country priorities.

  3. Consensus Guidelines for Practical Competencies in Anatomic Pathology and Laboratory Medicine for the Undifferentiated Graduating Medical Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magid, Margret S; Shah, Darshana T; Cambor, Carolyn L; Conran, Richard M; Lin, Amy Y; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Pessin, Melissa S; Harris, Ilene B

    2015-01-01

    The practice of pathology is not generally addressed in the undergraduate medical school curriculum. It is desirable to develop practical pathology competencies in the fields of anatomic pathology and laboratory medicine for every graduating medical student to facilitate (1) instruction in effective utilization of these services for optimal patient care, (2) recognition of the role of pathologists and laboratory scientists as consultants, and (3) exposure to the field of pathology as a possible career choice. A national committee was formed, including experts in anatomic pathology and/or laboratory medicine and in medical education. Suggested practical pathology competencies were developed in 9 subspecialty domains based on literature review and committee deliberations. The competencies were distributed in the form of a survey in late 2012 through the first half of 2013 to the medical education community for feedback, which was subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. An approval rate of ≥80% constituted consensus for adoption of a competency, with additional inclusions/modifications considered following committee review of comments. The survey included 79 proposed competencies. There were 265 respondents, the majority being pathologists. Seventy-two percent (57 of 79) of the competencies were approved by ≥80% of respondents. Numerous comments (N = 503) provided a robust resource for qualitative analysis. Following committee review, 71 competencies (including 27 modified and 3 new competencies) were considered to be essential for undifferentiated graduating medical students. Guidelines for practical pathology competencies have been developed, with the hope that they will be implemented in undergraduate medical school curricula.

  4. Commentary: Biochemistry Re-Natured

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    In his last commentary on "Biochemistry Denatured," this author dealt with his perception that college students today have spent too little of their childhood years playing outside in nature and as a consequence have not learned basic things about the world from personal experience. This "nature-deficit disorder" removes many opportunities for…

  5. Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 4th edition of Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry Edited by Eldor Paul continues in the vein of the 3rd edition by providing an excellent, broad-reaching introduction to soil biology. The new edition improves on the previous by providing extensive supplementary materials, links to outs...

  6. Multitracers in chemistry and biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambe, F.

    2000-01-01

    The multitracer technique using heavy-ion reactions has successfully developed in the last decade and is expected to widen its application in chemistry, biochemistry and other fields with technical improvement in future. Several examples of recent application are reviewed and development in the coming century is forecast. (author)

  7. Three-year customer satisfaction survey in laboratory medicine in a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siqi; Duan, Yifei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Yongmei

    2018-04-25

    Customer satisfaction is a key quality indicator of laboratory service. Patients and physicians are the ultimate customers in medical laboratory, and their opinions are essential components in developing a customer-oriented laboratory. A longitudinal investigation of customer satisfaction was conducted through questionnaires. We designed two different questionnaires and selected 1200 customers (600 outpatients and 600 physicians) to assess customer satisfaction every other year from 2012 to 2016. Items with scores satisfaction in 2014 was better, which illustrated our strategy was effective. However, some items remained to be less than 4, so we repeated the survey after modifying questionnaires in 2016. However, the general satisfaction points of the physicians and patients reduced in 2016, which reminded us of some influential factors we had neglected. By using dynamic survey of satisfaction, we can continuously find deficiencies in our laboratory services and take suitable corrective actions, thereby improving our service quality.

  8. The Physiology and Mechanics of Undulatory Swimming: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Medicinal Leeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The medicinal leech is a useful animal model for investigating undulatory swimming in the classroom. Unlike many swimming organisms, its swimming performance can be quantified without specialized equipment. A large blood meal alters swimming behavior in a way that can be used to generate a discussion of the hydrodynamics of swimming, muscle…

  9. The Center for Regenerative Biology and Medicine at Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Polypterus samples respectively. Employing similar biostatistical parameters, we identified 33-shared miRNAs that are highly downregulated during...Wheaton College, Dr. Kenneth Poss from Duke Medical Center and Dr. Jorge Contreras from University of New Jersey School of Medicine and Dentistry

  10. Regenerative Medicine: A Vehicle to Infuse Laboratory-Bench Modules into an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason M.; Guy, Breonte S.; Henderson, Dawn X.; Ebert, C. Edward; Harp, Jill; Markert, Chad D.

    2018-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a novel discipline that both excites undergraduates and may be used as a vehicle to expose students to scientific concepts and opportunities. The goal of this article is to describe the implementation of a National Science Foundation-funded Targeted Infusion Project in which underrepresented minority undergraduates are…

  11. Does breast-feeding influence liver biochemistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M. H.; Ott, P.; Juul, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is assumed that early feeding can affect liver biochemistry because breast-fed infants have a higher risk of hyperbilirubinemia than formula-fed infants. The authors sought to determine how feeding mode affected liver biochemistry in healthy term infants.......It is assumed that early feeding can affect liver biochemistry because breast-fed infants have a higher risk of hyperbilirubinemia than formula-fed infants. The authors sought to determine how feeding mode affected liver biochemistry in healthy term infants....

  12. Approaches to enhance the teaching quality of experimental biochemistry for MBBS students in TSMU, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lijuan; Yi, Shuying; Zhai, Jing; Wang, Zhaojin

    2017-07-08

    With the internationalization of medical education in China, the importance of international students' education in medical schools is also increasing. Except foreign students majoring in Chinese language, English Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBSS) students are the largest group of international students. Based on problems in the teaching process for experimental biochemistry, we designed teaching models adapted to the background of international students and strengthened teachers' teaching ability at Taishan Medical University. Several approaches were used in combination to promote teaching effects and increase the benefit of teaching to teachers. The primary data showed an increased passion for basic medical biochemistry and an improved theoretical background for MBSS students, which will be helpful for their later clinical medicine studies. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):360-364, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Technical protocol for laboratory tests of transformation of veterinary medicinal products and biocides in liquid manures. Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzig, Robert [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie und Abfallanalytik

    2010-07-15

    The technical protocol under consideration describes a laboratory test method to evaluate the transformation of chemicals in liquid bovine and pig manures under anaerobic conditions and primarily is designed for veterinary medicinal products and biocides. The environmentally relevant entry routes into liquid manures occur via urine and feces of cattle and pigs in stable housings after excretion of veterinary medicinal products as parent compounds or metabolites and after the application of biocides in animal housings. Further entry routes such as solid dung application and direct dung pat deposition by production animals on pasture are not considered by this technical protocol. Thus, this technical protocol focused on the sampling of excrements from cattles and pigs kept in stables and fed under standard nutrition conditions. This approach additionally ensures that excrement samples are operationally free of any contamination by veterinary medicinal products and biocides. After the matrix characterization, reference-manure samples are prepared from the excrement samples by adding tap water to adjust defined dry substance contents typical for bovine or pig manures. This technical protocol comprehends a tiered experimental design in two parts: (a) Sampling of excrements and preparation of reference bovine and pig manures; (b) Testing of anaerobic transformation of chemicals in reference manures.

  14. A Two-Week Guided Inquiry Protein Separation and Detection Experiment for Undergraduate Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, James P.; Nolta, Kathleen V.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for teaching protein separation and detection in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course is described. This experiment, performed in two, 4 h laboratory periods, incorporates guided inquiry principles to introduce students to the concepts behind and difficulties of protein purification. After using size-exclusion…

  15. Improving pathology and laboratory medicine in low-income and middle-income countries: roadmap to solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Shahin; Cherniak, William; Lawler, Mark; Tan, Soo Yong; El Sadr, Wafaa; Wolf, Nicholas; Silkensen, Shannon; Brand, Nathan; Looi, Lai Meng; Pai, Sanjay A; Wilson, Michael L; Milner, Danny; Flanigan, John; Fleming, Kenneth A

    2018-05-12

    Insufficient awareness of the centrality of pathology and laboratory medicine (PALM) to a functioning health-care system at policy and governmental level, with the resultant inadequate investment, has meant that efforts to enhance PALM in low-income and middle-income countries have been local, fragmented, and mostly unsustainable. Responding to the four major barriers in PALM service delivery that were identified in the first paper of this Series (workforce, infrastructure, education and training, and quality assurance), this second paper identifies potential solutions that can be applied in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). Increasing and retaining a quality PALM workforce requires access to mentorship and continuing professional development, task sharing, and the development of short-term visitor programmes. Opportunities to enhance the training of pathologists and allied PALM personnel by increasing and improving education provision must be explored and implemented. PALM infrastructure must be strengthened by addressing supply chain barriers, and ensuring laboratory information systems are in place. New technologies, including telepathology and point-of-care testing, can have a substantial role in PALM service delivery, if used appropriately. We emphasise the crucial importance of maintaining PALM quality and posit that all laboratories in LMICs should participate in quality assurance and accreditation programmes. A potential role for public-private partnerships in filling PALM services gaps should also be investigated. Finally, to deliver these solutions and ensure equitable access to essential services in LMICs, we propose a PALM package focused on these countries, integrated within a nationally tiered laboratory system, as part of an overarching national laboratory strategic plan. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Organisation arrangements of nuclear medicine services. Planning of installations. Laboratory monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanteur, J.

    1977-01-01

    Apart from safety and quality requirements, the organisation of nuclear medicine services, or more generally of installations where nonsealed radioactive sources are used, is governed by profitability and efficiency criteria. In view of the high price of products and apparatus, the equipment must be based on a rationalisation of options guiding the organisation arrangements as a whole. The following items are dealt with in succession: various categories of installations; general planning of equipment; equipment regulations based on a major requirement, the confinement of contamination sources; practical observations concerning administrative and technical questions

  17. Importance of Public-Private Partnerships: Strengthening Laboratory Medicine Systems and Clinical Practice in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Ritu; Gadde, Renuka; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-04-15

    After the launch of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in 2003, it became evident that inadequate laboratory systems and services would severely limit the scale-up of human immunodeficiency virus infection prevention, care, and treatment programs. Thus, the Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Becton, Dickinson and Company developed a public-private partnership (PPP). Between October 2007 and July 2012, the PPP combined the competencies of the public and private sectors to boost sustainable laboratory systems and develop workforce skills in 4 African countries. Key accomplishments of the initiative include measurable and scalable outcomes to strengthen national capacities to build technical skills, develop sample referral networks, map disease prevalence, support evidence-based health programming, and drive continuous quality improvement in laboratories. This report details lessons learned from our experience and a series of recommendations on how to achieve successful PPPs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The 5th questionnaire report of safety control on instrument in nuclear medicine laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The questionnaire was done every three years from 1986 for the ultimate purpose of safe medical examinations and this 5th one was performed in May, 1998 for the period of April, 1995-March, 1998. Subjects were 1,258 nuclear medicine facilities and answers were obtained in 81.6%. Questionnaire concerned the personnel involved in nuclear medical examinations, instruments, accidents occurred, matters possibly leading to accident, improvement in safety control, serious trouble and breakage of the instrument, request for the instrument manufacturers and so on. Summaries were: numbers of medical radiology technicians were increased, in vitro tests were decreased, SPECT instruments came into wide use, in accident and improvement cases, examination beds were arousing much interest, concerns to examine were further required, communication with the manufacturers was insufficient, and problems for Y2K were pointed out to be resolved. (K.H.)

  19. Biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    The contributions of the group consist of six reports. The first is concerned with recent developments in the isolation and characterization of subcellular components of mammalian cells: the inhibition by imipramine of digitonin-induced lysis of mitochondrial membranes; age-dependent changes in mitochondrial sedimentability; peroxisomal enzymes; and collaborative studies on near-uv effects on bacterial respiration, radiation effects on mouse heart mitochondria, and toxicity and distribution of liposome-encapsulated drugs. Plant physiology is the theme of the next two reports. The first describes progress in a NASA-supported program on the involvement of organelles, especially dictyosomes, in the georesponse of roots, and the second covers work principally supported by ERDA on the interaction of light and gravity on differential growth of corn roots. Progress in liposome encapsulation of drugs is presented in three contributions. The first deals with studies on the toxicity, distribution, therapeutic action, and mechanism of encapsulated cancer chemotherapeutic agents; the second with morphologic studies, based principally on electron microscopy; and the third with alteration of liposomal surface properties by varying the lipid composition, in order to modify tissue distribution

  20. Hobby with Biochemistry: Use of active learning methodology in Biochemistry at the Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R.T. Prado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: The learning of Biochemistry is generally considered difficult by the graduates, because studies the molecular level the metabolism of living and it demands a great capacity for abstraction by students. Thus, researchers have tried alternative methods to provid an alternative study method. Materials and methods: 178 students of the School of Medicine, PUC-PR, that course the disciplines of Medical Biochemistry I and II, were divided into 50 groups, each with 3-4 students, and were have to draw up a hobby activity with a specific theme of the Biochemistry. The selected topics were, amino acids and proteins, enzymes, cellular respiration, glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, metabolic integration, dyslipidemia and atherogenesis, pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, mechanisms of diabetes mellitus complications. The hobby activities chosen were direct, duplex, self-defined, cryptogram, bugs game. Both issues such as the type of hobby was drawn between groups. The groups had to: elaborate hobby; presents it to class orally, applying the questions prepared; printing and expose the hobby at the wall in the University; answer an evaluation regarding the preparation of work; and all groups should get together and organize one titled magazine "Hobby with Biochemistry" and deliver it printed. Results and conclusions: According the groups, the greatest difficulty was the adequacy of the questions posed in the required format, once they had only one issue and restricted space for the responses. Furthermore, the formatting was also identified as a point very difficult in activity elaboration. On the topic of learning through the development of work, and/or a new skill groups assigned grades ranging between 7.0 and 10.0 and about 90% of the groups attributed note 10 on satisfaction of seeing the work done and its ability to produce it. According to the results, the activity proved to be

  1. Factores que pueden influir en el rendimiento académico de estudiantes de Bioquímica que ingresan en el programa de Medicina de la Universidad del Rosario-Colombia Factors that influence the academic performance in Biochemistry students who have started the Medicine program of Rosario University-Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Garzón

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El análisis del rendimiento académico de los estudiantes que ingresan a una institución de educación superior, así como los factores que pueden estar influyendo en él, genera respuestas a los interrogantes que corrientemente se hacen las personas involucradas en los procesos educativos y permite proponer soluciones para mejorar el desempeño de los estudiantes universitarios. Sujetos y métodos. Se determinó la asociación entre el rendimiento académico de los estudiantes en el primer nivel de Bioquímica, con los factores de tipo académico y demográfico; se utilizaron dos métodos de análisis: el primero, numérico, de acuerdo con los promedios de las notas parciales y finales; el segundo, categorizado como éxito (≥ 3,0 o fracaso (Introduction. The analysis of the students' academic achievement in a higher education institution together with the different factors that affect the student's performance generates answers to the questions that the people involved in the teaching process commonly ask themselves. This analysis is therefore, an excellent way to find and propose solutions in order to improve the student's performance. Subjects and methods. The association between the students' academic performance and the academic and demographic factors was determined in the first level of Biochemistry. Two methodologies were used for this purpose. The first one, a numerical analysis based on the partial and final grades, and a second categorical method based on the final success (≥ 3.0 or failure (< 3.0 on the subject. Results. A positive and statistically significant correlation was found when the academic performance in Biochemistry, the general and specific results of the state test (natural sciences and mathematics, the institutional scholarship status and entering the Medicine program without pre-university courses was analyzed. Factors, such as coming from different schools and the city of origin, do not affect

  2. A “Pathology Explanation Clinic (PEC” for Patient-Centered Laboratory Medicine Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Gibson MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This concept paper addresses communication issues arising between physicians and their patients. To facilitate the communication of essential diagnostic pathology information to patients, and address their questions and concerns, we propose that “Pathology Explanation Clinics” be created. The Pathology Explanation Clinics would provide a channel for direct communications between pathologists and patients. Pathologists would receive special training as “Certified Pathologist Navigators” in preparation for this role. The goal of Pathology Explanation Clinics would be to help fill gaps in communication of information contained in laboratory reports to patients, further explain its relevance, and improve patient understanding of the meaning of such information and its impact on their health and health-care choices. Effort would be made to ensure that Certified Pathologist Navigators work within the overall coordination of care by the health-care team.

  3. Paving the way to personalized medicine. Production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  4. Endophytic Fungi of Various Medicinal Plants Collected From Evergreen Forest Baluran National Park and Its Potential as Laboratory Manual for Mycology Course

    OpenAIRE

    Murdiyah, Siti

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic fungi found on a variety of medicinal plants may express particular benefit. These fungi provide an alternative to overcome the progressive microbial resistance and as an effort to combat infectious diseases that became one of the leading causes of mortality. The main objective of this study was to isolate endophytic fungi from leaf samples of five medicinal plants species collected from evergreen forests Baluran National Park and its use as laboratory manual for Micology. Research...

  5. Exposure levels to radiation in a nuclear medicine laboratory: measurements with thermoluminescence dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz J, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1996 in the Nuclear medicine Department and another routine and research departments of the National Institute of Medical and Nutrition Sciences (INCMNSZ) are working at least with 12 radioactive sources opened and sealed. However, it was unknown if with the Tl personal dosemeters with lithium fluoride crystals (LiF), could be possible to receive information about the equivalent dose for each radionuclide or if there was some radionuclide that by being low energy emissor or beta energy emissor, it did not represent an ionization power sufficient to excite the crystals of the thermoluminescent dosemeters (DTL). In this work the obtained results with control dosemeters of diverse source opened or sealed are shown, which were put at 1 cm of the LiF crystals during a time exposure 18 hours. Therefore the objective of this work is to verify which sources excite or not to DTL crystals and taking the pertinent safety measures for each radionuclide. The conclusion is that the majority of dosemeters were excited by beta or gamma radiation of the radionuclides and that LiF crystals are able to receive equivalent doses until 1200 mSv, being this a guarantee for the staff, that in an any moment could be exposed to high dose in his working day. Also it was corroborated that the radionuclides more energizer are: iodine-131, iodine-125 and sodium-22 while the phosphorus-32 must be managed with careful, since the exposure to hands can result significant, just like the technetium-99m ( 99m Tc). (Author)

  6. Current status of verification practices in clinical biochemistry in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rioja, Rubén; Alvarez, Virtudes; Ventura, Montserrat; Alsina, M Jesús; Barba, Núria; Cortés, Mariano; Llopis, María Antonia; Martínez, Cecilia; Ibarz, Mercè

    2013-09-01

    Verification uses logical algorithms to detect potential errors before laboratory results are released to the clinician. Even though verification is one of the main processes in all laboratories, there is a lack of standardization mainly in the algorithms used and the criteria and verification limits applied. A survey in clinical laboratories in Spain was conducted in order to assess the verification process, particularly the use of autoverification. Questionnaires were sent to the laboratories involved in the External Quality Assurance Program organized by the Spanish Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology. Seven common biochemical parameters were included (glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, potassium, calcium, and alanine aminotransferase). Completed questionnaires were received from 85 laboratories. Nearly all the laboratories reported using the following seven verification criteria: internal quality control, instrument warnings, sample deterioration, reference limits, clinical data, concordance between parameters, and verification of results. The use of all verification criteria varied according to the type of verification (automatic, technical, or medical). Verification limits for these parameters are similar to biological reference ranges. Delta Check was used in 24% of laboratories. Most laboratories (64%) reported using autoverification systems. Autoverification use was related to laboratory size, ownership, and type of laboratory information system, but amount of use (percentage of test autoverified) was not related to laboratory size. A total of 36% of Spanish laboratories do not use autoverification, despite the general implementation of laboratory information systems, most of them, with autoverification ability. Criteria and rules for seven routine biochemical tests were obtained.

  7. Teaching Biochemistry to Medical Technology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Silva, Benito; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the biochemistry component of study to become a medical technologist in a Chilean university. Provides details of program structure, course content descriptions, and teaching strategies. (DDR)

  8. [Clinical laboratory medicine: continuous amelioration with a book of objectives and satisfaction survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reix, Nathalie; Agin, Arnaud; Bahram, Seiamak; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Grucker, Daniel; Jaulhac, Benoît; Lepiller, Quentin; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Mauvieux, Laurent; Monier, Laurie; Schramm, Frédéric; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Vallat, Laurent; Ludes, Bertrand; Candolfi, Ermanno; Filisetti, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We report in this publication the use of two educational tools, a questionnaire of satisfaction and a training book, to improve the training of students during their internship in clinical laboratory at the "Pôle de biologie des Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg" in France. First, the ongoing training was assessed by the interns with a questionnaire measuring satisfaction. The analysis of this questionnaire identified four key points to improve: 1) define the teaching objectives, 2) organize the training with a schedule, 3) revise certain teaching methods and 4) ensure better integration of the students in the team of medical biologists. After this assessment, we implemented a training book to answer these four points. Indeed, the training book presents the objectives, the schedule of training, and how to validate the educational objectives. A new assessment was performed again using the same methodology. Results showed an improvement in student satisfaction from 74 to 88 %. The questionnaire of satisfaction and the training book are presented in this article. The aim of the assessment of training combined with the training book is to incite the actors of the training (students and teachers) to continually improve the training. The objectives of the Pôle de Biologie are to obtain an 80 % satisfaction rate during the 6 months trainings and to reduce or eliminate dissatisfaction, and finally to ensure the validation by students of 80 to 100 % of their predetermined objectives.

  9. An alternative perspective on how laboratory medicine can contribute to solve the health care crisis: a model to save costs by acquiring excellence in diagnostic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussap, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The rapid escalation in health care costs has led to the idea to deliver better care at lower costs, reshaping the responsibilities of the health care system to achieve the goal of creating value for the patient. The pressure for fiscal containment and the progressive reduction in available health care resources originated very short term strategies consisting of abrupt reductions in expenditure, specifically in the provision of clinical pathology laboratory medicine services. However, the impact of laboratory test results on diagnostic and therapeutic interventions has increased enormously in the past decade, due to advances in personalized medicine and to the strictly correlated requirement to use new biomarkers with increasing sensitivity and specificity in clinical practice. In order to create savings by delivering better care there is the need to invest financial resources in purchasing high technology and new sophisticated tests and to promote the expertise of clinical pathologists and laboratory medicine professionals. This approach to creating value in patient health care is more productive and sustainable ethically, morally and economically as a long-term strategy. It can be successfully achieved by applying defined rules that make public-private cooperation clearer, skipping incompatible solutions such as transforming clinical laboratories to 'industrially productive premises', outsourcing laboratory medicine services and using central acquisition of diagnostic systems. © 2013.

  10. Self-Reported Emergency Medicine Residency Applicant Attitudes Towards a Procedural Cadaver Laboratory Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman, Lance

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Residency applicants consider a variety of factors when ranking emergency medicine (EM programs for their NRMP match list. A human cadaver emergency procedure lab curriculum is uncommon. We hypothesized that the presence this curriculum would positively impact the ranking of an EM residency program.METHODS: The EM residency at Nebraska Medical Center is an urban, university-based program with a PGY I-III format. Residency applicants during the interview for a position in the PGY I class of 2006 were surveyed by three weekly electronic mailings. The survey was distributed in March 2006 after the final NRMP match results were released. The survey explored learner preferences and methodological commonality of models of emergency procedural training, as well as the impact of a procedural cadaver lab curriculum on residency ranking. ANOVA of ranks was used to compare responses to ranking questions.RESULTS: Of the 73 potential subjects, 54 (74% completed the survey. Respondents ranked methods of procedural instruction from 1 (most preferred or most common technique to 4 (least preferred or least common technique. Response averages and 95% confidence intervals for the preferred means of learning a new procedure are as follows: textbook (3.69; 3.51-3.87, mannequin (2.83; 2.64-3.02, human cadaver (1.93; 1.72-2.14, and living patient (1.56; 1.33-1.79. Response averages for the commonality of means used to teach a new procedure are as follows: human cadaver (3.63; 3.46-3.80, mannequin (2.70; 2.50-2.90, living patient (2.09; 1.85-2.33, and textbook (1.57; 1.32-1.82. When asked if the University of Nebraska Medical Center residency ranked higher in the individual's match list because of its procedural cadaver lab, 14.8% strongly disagreed, 14.8% disagreed, 40.7% were neutral, 14.8% agreed, and 14.8% strongly agreed.CONCLUSION: We conclude that, although cadaveric procedural training is viewed by senior medical student learners as a desirable means

  11. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  12. Correlation of preadmission organic chemistry courses and academic performance in biochemistry at a midwest chiropractic doctoral program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Marc P

    2010-01-01

    Organic chemistry has been shown to correlate with academic success in the preclinical years of medicine, dentistry, and graduate physiology. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between undergraduate organic chemistry grades and first-semester biochemistry grades at a Midwest chiropractic doctoral program. Students enrolled in a first-semester biochemistry course who had completed the prerequisite courses in organic chemistry offered at this same institution were entered into the study. The total grade for each of the three courses was calculated using the midterm and final exam raw scores with a weighting of 50% each. Analysis consisted of obtaining correlation coefficients between the total grades of organic 1 with biochemistry and organic 2 with biochemistry. Using the biochemistry total grade, the students were divided into quartiles and course grades for both organic chemistry 1 and 2 were calculated. For the 109 students in the study, the correlation coefficient between the biochemistry and organic chemistry 1 and biochemistry and organic chemistry 2 courses was r = 0.744 and r = 0.725, respectively. The difference in organic chemistry grades between those in the first and fourth quartiles was 63.2% and 86.9% for organic chemistry 1 (p organic chemistry 2 (p organic chemistry can be used as an indicator of future academic success in a chiropractic biochemistry course. Knowledge of such a relationship could prove useful to identify students who may potentially run into academic difficulty with first-year biochemistry.

  13. Adulteration of proprietary Chinese medicines and health products with undeclared drugs: experience of a tertiary toxicology laboratory in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Chor Kwan; Chen, Sammy Pak Lam; Lee, Hencher Han Chih; Lam, Ying Hoo; Ng, Sau Wah; Chen, Mo Lung; Tang, Magdalene Huen Yin; Chan, Suzanne Suk San; Ng, Candy Wai Yan; Cheung, Jana Wing Lan; Chan, Tina Yee Ching; Lau, Nike Kwai Cheung; Chong, Yeow Kuan; Mak, Tony Wing Lai

    2018-01-01

    Proprietary Chinese medicines (pCMs) and health products, generally believed to be natural and safe, are gaining popularity worldwide. However, the safety of pCMs and health products has been severely compromised by the practice of adulteration. The current study aimed to examine the problem of adulteration of pCMs and health products in Hong Kong. The present study was conducted in a tertiary referral clinical toxicology laboratory in Hong Kong. All cases involving the use of pCMs or health products, which were subsequently confirmed to contain undeclared adulterants, from 2005 to 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 404 cases involving the use of 487 adulterated pCMs or health products with a total of 1234 adulterants were identified. The adulterants consisted of approved drugs, banned drugs, drug analogues and animal thyroid tissue. The six most common categories of adulterants detected were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (17.7%), anorectics (15.3%), corticosteroids (13.8%), diuretics and laxatives (11.4%), oral antidiabetic agents (10.0%) and erectile dysfunction drugs (6.0%). Sibutramine was the most common adulterant (n = 155). The reported sources of these illicit products included over-the-counter drug stores, the internet and Chinese medicine practitioners. A significant proportion of patients (65.1%) had adverse effects attributable to these illicit products, including 14 severe and two fatal cases. Psychosis, iatrogenic Cushing syndrome and hypoglycaemia were the three most frequently encountered adverse effects. Adulteration of pCMs and health products with undeclared drugs poses severe health hazards. Public education and effective regulatory measures are essential to address the problem. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Teaching Biochemistry Online at Oregon State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    A strategy for growing online biochemistry courses is presented based on successes in ecampus at Oregon State University. Four free drawing cards were key to the effort--YouTube videos, iTunes U online free course content, an Open Educational Resource textbook--Biochemistry Free and Easy, and a fun set of educational songs known as the Metabolic…

  15. [Influenza surveillance in nine consecutive seasons, 2003-2012: results from National Influenza Reference Laboratory, Istanbul Faculty Of Medicine, Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay Ciblak, Meral; Kanturvardar Tütenyurd, Melis; Asar, Serkan; Tulunoğlu, Merve; Fındıkçı, Nurcihan; Badur, Selim

    2012-10-01

    Influenza is a public health problem that affects 5-20% of the world population annually causing high morbidity and mortality especially in risk groups. In addition to determining prevention and treatment strategies with vaccines and antivirals, surveillance data plays an important role in combat against influenza. Surveillance provides valuable data on characteristics of influenza activity, on types, sub-types, antigenic properties and antiviral resistance profile of circulating viruses in a given region. The first influenza surveillance was initiated as a pilot study in 2003 by now named National Influenza Reference Laboratory, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine. Surveillance was launched at national level by Ministry of Health in 2004 and two National Influenza Laboratories, one in Istanbul and the other in Ankara, have been conducting surveillance in Turkey. Surveillance data obtained for nine consecutive years, 2003-2012, by National Influenza Reference Laboratory in Istanbul Faculty of Medicine have been summarized in this report. During 2003-2012 influenza surveillance seasons, a total of 11.077 nasal swabs collected in viral transport medium were sent to the National Influenza Reference Laboratory, Istanbul for analysis. Immun-capture ELISA followed by MDCK cell culture was used for detection of influenza viruses before 2009 and real-time RT-PCR was used thereafter. Antigenic characterizations were done by hemagglutination inhibition assay with the reactives supplied by World Health Organization. Analysis of the results showed that influenza B viruses have entered the circulation in 2005-2006 seasons, and have contributed to the epidemics at increasing rates every year except in the 2009 pandemic season. Influenza B Victoria and Yamagata lineages were cocirculating for two seasons. For other seasons either lineage was in circulation. Antigenic characterization revealed that circulating B viruses matched the vaccine composition either partially or totally for only

  16. Propaganda and Philanthropy: The Institute Bento da Rocha Cabral, the Lisbon Site of Biochemistry (1925-1953).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Ana; Amaral, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on the internal organization and dynamics of the Institute Bento da Rocha Cabral (IRC) in Lisbon, a privately-funded institution devoted to biomedical research, from the particular vantage point of its laboratory of biochemistry; in particular, the process through which the institution turned from medically-related to chemically-related research in the period spanning from 1925 to 1953. The history of the IRC raises interesting questions regarding the social politics of science as it materialized the desire of leading physicians of the Faculty of Medicine of Lisbon to create proper physical facilities for medically-related scientific research. We argue that the process which led to the creation of the IRC coincided with the gradual professional and political ascendance of physicians in Portuguese society initiated in the late nineteenth century, and is closely associated with Portuguese republicanism and the process of Lisbon becoming the scientific capital.

  17. Symposium 19: The contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayardo Baptista Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available K-Education(Portuguese Chair: V. Trindade Bayardo Torres; Clovis Wannmacher; Denise MacedoThe contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching.O ensino de Bioquímica nos últimos 20 anosBayardo B. TorresDepartamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, USP. São Paulo, Brazil.Among the contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP one must recall:1. Winter school for graduate studentsThis course, now at the ninth edition, is intended for students in the final stage of their Masters or PhD in Biochemistry or related areas from any institution of higher education.Modern and important techniques are offered as possible support to help the student’s projects.2. Summer courses for undergraduate studentsThe Department offers every year, since 1999, complementary courses for undergraduate students to extend their knowledge in biochemical subjects not ordinarily treated in introductory courses. Some examples:Plant Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Diseases, Biochemistry of Mind, Biochemistry of Ageing, Cancer Biochemistry, Nutrition and Sports, Biochemistry of Beauty, Biochemistry of the Envenomation Response, etc.3. Summer courses for high school teachers. Some examples:Biochemistry of Nutrition, DNA – Techniques and Applications, Biochemistry in the kitchen.4. Software developmentMany software for biochemistry teaching/learning were developed and are freely available at the Biblioteca Digital de Ciências [http://www.bdc.ib.unicamp.br/bdc/index.php]. Some examples:Oxygen consumption by mitochondria, Muscle contraction, Electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation, Free radicals, Enzyme kinetics, cAMP signalization, Interactive study of protein structure, Leptin, Insulin and Obesity.5. A Biochemistry textbook. 

  18. Benefits and Challenges of Developing a Customized Rubric for Curricular Review of a Residency Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    Rigorous curricular review of post-graduate veterinary medical residency programs is in the best interest of program directors in light of the requirements and needs of specialty colleges, graduate school administrations, and other stakeholders including prospective students and employers. Although minimum standards for training are typically provided by specialty colleges, mechanisms for evaluation are left to the discretion of program directors. The paucity of information available describing best practices for curricular assessment of veterinary medical specialty training programs makes resources from other medical fields essential to informing the assessment process. Here we describe the development of a rubric used to evaluate courses in a 3-year American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM)-recognized residency training program culminating in a Master of Science degree. This rubric, based on examples from medical education and other fields of graduate study, provided transparent criteria for evaluation that were consistent with stakeholder needs and institutional initiatives. However, its use caused delays in the curricular review process as two significant obstacles to refinement were brought to light: variation in formal education in curriculum design and significant differences in teaching philosophies among faculty. The evaluation process was able to move forward after institutional resources were used to provide faculty development in curriculum design. The use of a customized rubric is recommended as a best practice for curricular refinement for residency programs because it results in transparency of the review process and can reveal obstacles to change that would otherwise remain unaddressed.

  19. Teaching biochemistry to medical students in Singapore--from organic chemistry to problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, H E

    2005-07-01

    The medical faculty in the National University of Singapore started in 1905 but the Chair in Biochemistry was only established in 1927. For many years the biochemistry course consisted of the teaching of the organic chemistry of substances of physiological importance, nutrition, metabolism and hormones. In 1961, clinical biochemistry was introduced and in the 1980s, genetics and molecular biology were included. By then, most of the organic chemistry content had been removed as greater emphasis was placed on clinical correlation. Laboratory classes consisted of mock glucose tolerance tests and the measurement of various enzymes. By the 1990s, students were no longer interested in such practical classes, so a bold decision was made around 1995 to remove laboratory classes from the curriculum. Unfortunately, this meant that the medical students who might have been interested in laboratory work could no longer do such work. However, the new curriculum in 1999 gave the department an opportunity to offer a laboratory course as an elective for interested students. This new curriculum adopted an integrated approach with Genetics being taught as part of Paediatrics, and a new module (Structural and Cell Biology) comprising aspects of cell biology and biochemistry was introduced. This module is currently taught by staff from Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry. Some biochemistry content is now incorporated into the clinical problem scenarios of problem-based learning such as jaundice, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa, etc. So the evolution of teaching biochemistry to medical students in Singapore has paralleled worldwide trends and moved from the didactic teaching of organic chemistry of biomolecules to problem-based learning using clinical cases.

  20. Defining a roadmap for harmonizing quality indicators in Laboratory Medicine: a consensus statement on behalf of the IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Error and Patient Safety" and EFLM Task and Finish Group "Performance specifications for the extra-analytical phases".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, Laura; Panteghini, Mauro; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sumarac, Zorica; Cadamuro, Janne; Galoro, César Alex De Olivera; Pino Castro, Isabel Garcia Del; Shcolnik, Wilson; Plebani, Mario

    2017-08-28

    The improving quality of laboratory testing requires a deep understanding of the many vulnerable steps involved in the total examination process (TEP), along with the identification of a hierarchy of risks and challenges that need to be addressed. From this perspective, the Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" (WG-LEPS) of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) is focusing its activity on implementation of an efficient tool for obtaining meaningful information on the risk of errors developing throughout the TEP, and for establishing reliable information about error frequencies and their distribution. More recently, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has created the Task and Finish Group "Performance specifications for the extra-analytical phases" (TFG-PSEP) for defining performance specifications for extra-analytical phases. Both the IFCC and EFLM groups are working to provide laboratories with a system to evaluate their performances and recognize the critical aspects where improvement actions are needed. A Consensus Conference was organized in Padova, Italy, in 2016 in order to bring together all the experts and interested parties to achieve a consensus for effective harmonization of quality indicators (QIs). A general agreement was achieved and the main outcomes have been the release of a new version of model of quality indicators (MQI), the approval of a criterion for establishing performance specifications and the definition of the type of information that should be provided within the report to the clinical laboratories participating to the QIs project.

  1. Medical and biochemical training in radioprotection at the Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Buenos Aires University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R.M.; Caro, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires offers four different coursers on Radioisotope Methodology in which Radiological Protection concepts are given to: 1) biochemistry undergraduates; 2) physicians, biochemists, biologists and chemists; 3) professionals who need to put their theoretical and practical knowledge up-to-date; 4) technicians working at nuclear medicine centers or at biomedicine laboratories. Each course has a different purpose: the first one, which has been given at different levels of the curricula since 1960, is mainly informative; the second one, given during five months from 1962, is formative. 1513 professionals have passed the examinations of this course and asked for the authorization to handle radioactive materials from Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority. Training is theoretical and practical. It includes: dosimetric magnitudes and units, internal and external dosimetry of 125 I, 131 I, 201 TI, 99m Tc, 60 Co and other isotopes with the intensity required by each professional according to his/her specialty; qualification of areas, working conditions, contamination barriers, shielding; justification, optimization and dose limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects, national and international regulations. The third course, which has been given since 1992, has the aim to being the knowledge of radioprotection up-to-date. The fourth course, which started in 1997, includes mainly operational aspects: columns elution, injection of radioactive drugs to patients, decontamination of areas. Our results are quite satisfactory: 95% of the enrolled students passed the examinations of the respective levels; the requirement is the acquisition of criteria according to their professional/technical responsibility. (author) [es

  2. Teaching Biochemistry at a Medical Faculty with a Problem-Based Learning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosing, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the differences between classical teaching methods and problem-based learning. Describes the curriculum and problem-based approach of the Faculty of Medicine at the Maastricht University and gives an overview of the implementation of biochemistry in the medical curriculum. Discusses the procedure for student assessment and presents…

  3. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard L; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A; Vemuri, Mohan C; Boucher, Shayne E; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Kerr, Candace

    2013-02-01

    The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard L.; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A.; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Boucher, Shayne E.; Bickenbach, Jackie R.; Kerr, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. Scope of review A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. Major conclusions An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. General significance Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. PMID:22820019

  5. R&D implementation in a department of laboratory medicine and pathology: a systematic review based on pharmaceutical companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feulefack, Joseph; Sergi, Consolato

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review on pharmaceutical companies may be a tool for guiding some procedures of R&D implementation in a department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. The use of pharmaceutical companies for this specific analysis arises from less variability of standards than healthcare facilities. In this qualitative and quantitative analysis, we focused on three useful areas of implementation, including R&D productivity, commercialization strategies, and expenditures determinants of pharmaceutical companies. Studies and reports of online databases from 1965 to 2014 were reviewed according to specific search terms. Initially, 218 articles and reports were found and examined, but only 91 were considered appropriate and used for further analysis.  We identified some suggested implementation strategies relevant for marketing to enhance companies' own R&D strategies; such as reliability of companies on "sourcing-in" R&D facilities and "think-tank" events. Regardless of the study and of the country, cash flow and profitability always positively influenced R&D expenditure, while sales and firm size did not. We consider that handling R&D determinants should require caution. It seems critical that implementation of R&D systems is directly related with productivity, if it reflects dual embodiment of efficiency and effectiveness. Scrutinizing the determinants of R&D expenditures emphasizes significant factors that are worth to highlight when planning an R&D investment strategy. Although there is no receipt fitting every situation, we think that health care plan makers may find relevant data in this systematic review in creating an initial implementation framework.

  6. Laboratory medicine handoff gaps experienced by primary care practices: A report from the shared networks of collaborative ambulatory practices and partners (SNOCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, David R; James, Katherine A; Fernald, Douglas H; Zelie, Claire; Smith, Maxwell L; Raab, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors in laboratory medicine testing are thought to occur in the pre- and postanalytic testing phases, and a large proportion of these errors are secondary to failed handoffs. Because most laboratory tests originate in ambulatory primary care, understanding the gaps in handoff processes within and between laboratories and practices is imperative for patient safety. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand, based on information from primary care practice personnel, the perceived gaps in laboratory processes as a precursor to initiating process improvement activities. A survey was used to assess perceptions of clinicians, staff, and management personnel of gaps in handoffs between primary care practices and laboratories working in 21 Colorado primary care practices. Data were analyzed to determine statistically significant associations between categorical variables. In addition, qualitative analysis of responses to open-ended survey questions was conducted. Primary care practices consistently reported challenges and a desire/need to improve their efforts to systematically track laboratory test status, confirm receipt of laboratory results, and report results to patients. Automated tracking systems existed in roughly 61% of practices, and all but one of those had electronic health record-based tracking systems in place. One fourth of these electronic health record-enabled practices expressed sufficient mistrust in these systems to warrant the concurrent operation of an article-based tracking system as backup. Practices also reported 12 different procedures used to notify patients of test results, varying by test result type. The results highlight the lack of standardization and definition of roles in handoffs in primary care laboratory practices for test ordering, monitoring, and receiving and reporting test results. Results also identify high-priority gaps in processes and the perceptions by practice personnel that practice improvement

  7. In vivo imaging of human biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an extremely powerful method for studying aspects of the biochemistry of defined regions of the human body, literally 'in-vivo' biochemistry. To place this technique in the broader perspective of medical diagnostic methods an introduction is given to some of the more important imaging methods which are already widely used clinically. A brief summary of the most recently developed imaging method, which is based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy, is also included

  8. Endophytic Fungi of Various Medicinal Plants Collected From Evergreen Forest Baluran National Park and Its Potential as Laboratory Manual for Mycology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Murdiyah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic fungi found on a variety of medicinal plants may express particular benefit. These fungi provide an alternative to overcome the progressive microbial resistance and as an effort to combat infectious diseases that became one of the leading causes of mortality. The main objective of this study was to isolate endophytic fungi from leaf samples of five medicinal plants species collected from evergreen forests Baluran National Park and its use as laboratory manual for Micology. Research findings showed there were 3 isolates of endophytic fungi isolated from 2 medicinal plants namely Kesambi (Schleicera oleosa and Ketapang (Terminalia catappa. All three isolates formed sporangiophores as asexual reproductive structures, while the structure of sexual still undiscovered therefore its classification has not been determined. The validity tests also showed that the lab manual is feasible for use with the percentage achievement 85.37% and 88.56%.

  9. Biochemistry of metallocenes. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, M.; Klose, W.

    1977-01-01

    103 Ru labelled 1-Ruthenocenyl-3-phenyl-propen-1-one was administered to mice intropertioneally. The organ distribution was determined in liver, spleen, lung, muscle, blood, kidney and thymus. The highest concentration was found in the thymus-up to 22% of the injected dose/g with corresponding thymus to muscle ration of up to 364 : 1. The consequences for nuclear medicine are discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. A course director's perspectives on problem-based learning curricula in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harold C

    2002-12-01

    Knowledge of the applications of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics in the practice of medicine has been and continues to be a vital part of medical students' and continuing education. The technical background and the rapid expansion of information and new applications have made it an arduous task to learn and teach this material within the already crowded medical school curriculum. Problem-based learning (PBL) formats are rapidly being adopted at all levels of education as not only a major paradigm shift in education but also a solution for the instruction of biochemistry in medical school. Designing an effective biochemistry curriculum with PBL-based or lecture-based formats requires an appreciation for their strengths and weakness. The author's experiences in the Double Helix Curriculum at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry (which employs PBL cases and complementing lectures) has shown that students are excited about learning in the PBL environment and explore in depth ways of integrating biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology into the practice of medicine. At the same time, complementary lectures greatly enhance uniformity in the quality and, importantly, the accuracy of the students' learning.

  11. Polish Code of Ethics of a Medical Laboratory Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elżbieta, Puacz; Waldemar, Glusiec; Barbara, Madej-Czerwonka

    2014-09-01

    Along with the development of medicine, increasingly significant role has been played by the laboratory diagnostics. For over ten years the profession of the medical laboratory specialist has been regarded in Poland as the autonomous medical profession and has enjoyed a status of one of public trust. The process of education of medical laboratory specialists consists of a five-year degree in laboratory medicine, offered at Medical Universities, and of a five-year Vocational Specialization in one of the fields of laboratory medicine such as clinical biochemistry, medical microbiology, medical laboratory toxicology, medical laboratory cytomorphology and medical laboratory transfusiology. An important component of medical laboratory specialists' identity is awareness of inherited ethos obtained from bygone generations of workers in this particular profession and the need to continue its further development. An expression of this awareness is among others Polish Code of Ethics of a Medical Laboratory Specialist (CEMLS) containing a set of values and a moral standpoint characteristic of this type of professional environment. Presenting the ethos of the medical laboratory specialist is a purpose of this article. Authors focus on the role CEMLS plays in areas of professional ethics and law. Next, they reconstruct the Polish model of ethos of medical diagnostic laboratory personnel. An overall picture consists of a presentation of the general moral principles concerning execution of this profession and rules of conduct in relations with the patient, own professional environment and the rest of the society. Polish model of ethical conduct, which is rooted in Hippocratic medical tradition, harmonizes with the ethos of medical laboratory specialists of other European countries and the world.

  12. INTERNET ASSISTED LEARNING OF BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The revolution  in information  technology  has included the INTERNET to the available  resources for biochemical  education.  There  is a great  deal of biochemical  information, and  the  amount is increas- ing rapidly,  indeed  exponentially.  The  aim of this work is to analyze  the  biochemical  issues cellular respiration, photosynthesis and membrane  transport available  in web pages, taking  into account con- tents  quality,  trustworthiness and effectiveness. Firstly  1st secondary level students were inquired by a questionnaire on their use of INTERNET resources.  More then 80 percent of them were regular users. The  results  confirm the  already  known  potential of INTERNET in education.  Fourteen sites  were analyzed  regarding  to contents, presence  of bibliographical, references,  authorship, titles  responsible and adequacy  to the target public.  In relation  to contents, presence of conceptual  errors, illustrations and other  stimulatory elements  were analyzed.  The great  majority  did not mention  bibliographic  ref- erences and target public.  Less than  half divulged responsible  names and/or their  graduation status. Some sites contained critical  conceptual  errors,  as the mention  of, as examples:  during  the cell active transport process, of energy (ATP waste (desperdício by the cell; the yeast is a pluricellular  fungal; and  the  oxygen is essential  for anaerobic  respiration.  However,  one of the  sites,  where  such  errors were found, was the only one to mention  enzymes and regulation  steps of cellular respiration. Half of the sites present identical  texts  and figures. None of the analyzed  sites thus  was considered excellent. Our data  strenghthen the need for rigorous evaluation concerning of scholarly research  of biochemical theme  on the web.INTERNET ASSISTED LEARNING OF  BIOCHEMISTRY

  13. [Standardization in laboratory hematology by participating in external quality assurance programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazor, Aida; Siftar, Zoran; Flegar-Mestrić, Zlata

    2011-09-01

    Since 1985, Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Merkur University Hospital, Zagreb, has been participating in the International External Quality Assessment Scheme for Hematology (IEQAS-H) organized by the World Health Organization (WHO). Owing to very good results, in 1987 the Department received a certificate of participation in this control scheme. Department has been cooperating in the external quality assessment program in laboratory hematology which has been continuously performed in Croatia since 1986 by the Committee for External Quality Assessment Schemes under the auspices of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemists and School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Zagreb. Nowadays, 186 medical biochemical laboratories are included in the National External Quality Assessment program, which is performed three times per year. Our Department has participated in the international projects of the European Committee for External Quality Assurance Programs in Laboratory Medicine (EQALM).

  14. BIOLUMINESCENCE: TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY BEYOND THE UNIVERSITY WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Jesus de Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of video in teaching and learning processes provides a challenging environment, able to stimulate the intellect and facilitate understanding in life science studies. Videos can be of extraordinary importance in education and dissemination of knowledge, contributing to greater learning, but is rarely used and exploited properly, especially for teaching biochemistry. Biochemistry is considered complex because it involves many molecular structures and processes, especially considering the number of events and molecules involved in the metabolism. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to introduce biochemistry for the students of basic education using the theme "Light, Science and Life" in a playful and fun way. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A video about bioluminescence was designed and prepared aiming to use it as a support for learning biochemistry by students of basic education of public schools located in Salvador, Bahia. In order to prepare the video, undergraduate students initially revised the literature in order to acquire proper knowledge, and along with their teacher advisor worked the elaboration of texts, textbook and questionnaire and applied at school. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Analysis the qualitative results of the experiment on the preparation and use of the video about "Bioluminescence" focused mainly on the content of biochemistry linked to theme Light, Science and Life, and demonstrated the importance of such work in the teaching-learning process. The dynamics used allowed greater interaction between students and teacher, and the teaching of biochemistry in a fun way beyond the university walls. CONCLUSION: The teaching through recreational resources, e.g. videos and other educational strategies that foster learning should be encouraged from basic education, always bearing in order to transmit through these teaching methods the main concepts covered in biochemistry.

  15. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael P; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Labor......Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry...... and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) was established to lead in standardization and harmonization of preanalytical policies and practices at a European level. One of the key activities of the WG-PRE is the organization of the biennial EFLM-BD conference on the preanalytical...... summarises the work that has and will be done in these areas. The goal of this initiative is to ensure the EFLM WG-PRE produces work that meets the needs of the European laboratory medicine community. Progress made in the identified areas will be updated at the next preanalytical phase conference and show...

  16. The Biochemistry Tetrahedron and the Development of the Taxonomy of Biochemistry External Representations (TOBER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Marcy H.; Raker, Jeffrey R.; Becker, Nicole; Harle, Marissa; Sutcliffe, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Visual literacy, the ability to interpret and create external representations (ERs), is essential to success in biochemistry. Studies have been conducted that describe students' abilities to use and interpret specific types of ERs. However, a framework for describing ERs derived through a naturalistic inquiry of biochemistry classrooms has not…

  17. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  18. Use of Mushroom Tyrosinase to Introduce Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Kinetics to Biochemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2017-01-01

    An inexpensive enzyme kinetics laboratory exercise for undergraduate biochemistry students is described utilizing tyrosinase from white button mushrooms. The exercise can be completed in one or two three-hour lab sessions. The optimal amounts of enzyme, substrate (catechol), and inhibitor (kojic acid) are first determined, and then kinetic data is…

  19. Radiobiology, biochemistry and radiation biophysics at CYLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, S.

    1998-01-01

    The Cyclotron Laboratory (CYLAB) should fill the gap in the field of nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, basic research, metrology of ionizing radiation, education and implications of accelerator technology existing today in Slovak Republic. The main planned activities of this facility are in the fields of nuclear medicine (production of radioisotopes for Positron Emission Tomography - PET and for oncology) and radiotherapy (neutron capture therapy, fast neutron therapy and proton therapy). The radiobiological and biophysical research will be closely connected with medical applications, particularly with radiotherapy. Problems to be addressed include the determination of the values of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for different types of ionizing radiation involved in the therapy, microdosimetric measurements and calculations, which are indispensable in the calculation of the absorbed dose (lineal and specific energy spectra) at the cellular and macromolecular level. Radiation biophysics and medical physics help in creating therapeutic plans for radiotherapy (NCT and fast neutron therapy). In nuclear medicine, in diagnostic and therapeutical procedures it is necessary to assess the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals and to calculate doses in target and critical organs and to determine whole body burden - effective equivalent dose for newly developed radiopharmaceuticals

  20. International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research (IJMBR) is a peer-reviewed ... useful to researchers in all aspects of Clinical and Basic Medical Sciences including Anatomical Sciences, Biochemistry, Dentistry, Genetics, ...

  1. Medical biochemistry in Macedonia: a profession for physicians and natural scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traikovska, S; Dzhekova-Stojkova, S

    2001-06-01

    Medical biochemistry or clinical chemistry in its roots is an interdisciplinary science between natural sciences and medicine. The largest part of medical biochemistry is natural science (chemistry, biochemistry, biology, physics, mathematics), which is very well integrated in deduction of medical problems. Medical biochemistry throughout the world, including Macedonia, should be a professional field open to both physicians and natural scientists, according to its historical development, theoretical characteristics and applied practice. Physicians and natural scientists follow the same route in clinical chemistry during the postgraduate training of specialization in medical biochemistry/clinical chemistry. However, in Macedonia the specialization in medical biochemistry/clinical chemistry is today regulated by law only for physicians and pharmacists. The study of clinical chemistry in Europe has shown its interdisciplinary character. In most European countries different professions, such as physicians, chemists/biochemists, pharmacists, biologists and others could specialize in clinical chemistry. The question for the next generation of specialists in Macedonia is whether to accept the present conditions or to attempt to change the law to include chemists/biochemists and biologists as well. The latter used to be a practice in Macedonia 20 years ago, and still is in many European countries. Such change in law would also result in changes in the postgraduate educational program in medical biochemistry in Macedonia. The new postgraduate program has to follow the European Syllabus, recommended by EC4. To obtain sufficient knowledge in clinical chemistry, the duration of vocational training (undergraduate and postgraduate) for all trainees (physicians, pharmaceutics, chemists/biochemists and biologists) should be 8 years.

  2. Student Attitudes towards Laboratory Exercises in Medical Biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronholm, Tomas; Hoog, Jan-Olov; Martenson, Dick

    2000-01-01

    Examines student attitudes towards biochemical experiments and their effect on student learning. Finds that biochemical experiments in the medical curriculum are valuable, but efforts should be directed more towards the development of students' attitudes and approaches to the exercise. (Author/CCM)

  3. Effects of intensive mariculture on sediment biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pusceddu, Antonio; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Mirto, Simone

    2007-01-01

    The exponential growth of off-shore mariculture that has occurred worldwide over the last 10 years has raised concern about the impact of the waste produced by this industry on the ecological integrity of the sea bottom. Investigations into this potential source of impact on the biochemistry...... of the sea floor have provided contrasting results, and no compelling explanations for these discrepancies have been provided to date. To quantify the impact of fish-farm activities on the biochemistry of sediments, we have investigated the quantity and biochemical composition of sediment organic matter...... regions, with the exception of seagrass sediments in Spain, the biochemistry of the sediments showed significant differences between the control and fish-farm locations. However, the variables explaining the differences observed varied among the regions and between habitats, suggesting idiosyncratic...

  4. Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study of an Antibiotic-Sensing Noncoding RNA Integrated into a One-Semester Project-Based Biochemistry Lab Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerczei, Timea

    2017-01-01

    A laboratory sequence is described that is suitable for upper-level biochemistry or molecular biology laboratories that combines project-based and traditional laboratory experiments. In the project-based sequence, the individual laboratory experiments are thematically linked and aim to show how a bacterial antibiotic sensing noncoding RNA (the…

  5. Standardization of clinical enzyme analysis using frozen human serum pools with values assigned by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine reference measurement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; Chen, Baorong; Zhang, Rui; Zuo, Chang

    Variation in clinical enzyme analysis, particularly across different measuring systems and laboratories, represents a critical but long-lasting problem in diagnosis. Calibrators with traceability and commutability are imminently needed to harmonize analysis in laboratory medicine. Fresh frozen human serum pools were assigned values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by six laboratories with established International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine reference measurement procedures. These serum pools were then used across 76 laboratories as a calibrator in the analysis of five enzymes. Bias and imprecision in the measurement of the five enzymes tested were significantly reduced by using the value-assigned serum in analytical systems with open and single-point calibration. The median (interquartile range) of the relative biases of ALT, AST, GGT, CK and LDH were 2.0% (0.6-3.4%), 0.8% (-0.8-2.3%), 1.0% (-0.5-2.0%), 0.2% (-0.3-1.0%) and 0.2% (-0.9-1.1%), respectively. Before calibration, the interlaboratory coefficients of variation (CVs) in the analysis of patient serum samples were 8.0-8.2%, 7.3-8.5%, 8.1-8.7%, 5.1-5.9% and 5.8-6.4% for ALT, AST, GGT, CK and LDH, respectively; after calibration, the CVs decreased to 2.7-3.3%, 3.0-3.6%, 1.6-2.1%, 1.8-1.9% and 3.3-3.5%, respectively. The results suggest that the use of fresh frozen serum pools significantly improved the comparability of test results in analytical systems with open and single-point calibration.

  6. Point-of-care testing (POCT) and evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) - does it leverage any advantage in clinical decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowski, Christopher; Don-Wauchope, Andrew; Gimenez, Nuria; Rodriguez-Capote, Karina; Wils, Julien; Zemlin, Annalise

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is the analysis of patient specimens outside the clinical laboratory, near or at the site of patient care, usually performed by clinical staff without laboratory training, although it also encompasses patient self-monitoring. It is able to provide a rapid result near the patient and which can be acted upon immediately. The key driver is the concept that clinical decision making may be delayed when samples are sent to the clinical laboratory. Balanced against this are considerations of increased costs for purchase and maintenance of equipment, staff training, connectivity to the laboratory information system (LIS), quality control (QC) and external quality assurance (EQA) procedures, all required for accreditation under ISO 22870. The justification for POCT depends upon being able to demonstrate that a more timely result (shorter turnaround times (TATs)) is able to leverage a clinically important advantage in decision making compared with the central laboratory (CL). In the four decades since POCT was adapted for the self-monitoring of blood glucose levels by subjects with diabetes, numerous new POCT methodologies have become available, enabling the clinician to receive results and initiate treatment more rapidly. However, these instruments are often operated by staff not trained in laboratory medicine and hence are prone to errors in the analytical phase (as opposed to laboratory testing where the analytical phase has the least errors). In some environments, particularly remote rural settings, the CL may be at a considerable distance and timely availability of cardiac troponins and other analytes can triage referrals to the main centers, thus avoiding expensive unnecessary patient transportation costs. However, in the Emergency Department, availability of more rapid results with POCT does not always translate into shorter stays due to other barriers to implementation of care. In this review, we apply the principles of evidence

  7. Correlation of Preadmission Organic Chemistry Courses and Academic Performance in Biochemistry at a Midwest Chiropractic Doctoral Program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Marc P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Organic chemistry has been shown to correlate with academic success in the preclinical years of medicine, dentistry, and graduate physiology. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between undergraduate organic chemistry grades and first-semester biochemistry grades at a Midwest chiropractic doctoral program. Methods: Students enrolled in a first-semester biochemistry course who had completed the prerequisite courses in organic chemistry offered at this same institution were entered into the study. The total grade for each of the three courses was calculated using the midterm and final exam raw scores with a weighting of 50% each. Analysis consisted of obtaining correlation coefficients between the total grades of organic 1 with biochemistry and organic 2 with biochemistry. Using the biochemistry total grade, the students were divided into quartiles and course grades for both organic chemistry 1 and 2 were calculated. Results: For the 109 students in the study, the correlation coefficient between the biochemistry and organic chemistry 1 and biochemistry and organic chemistry 2 courses was r = 0.744 and r = 0.725, respectively. The difference in organic chemistry grades between those in the first and fourth quartiles was 63.2% and 86.9% for organic chemistry 1 (p organic chemistry 2 (p organic chemistry can be used as an indicator of future academic success in a chiropractic biochemistry course. Knowledge of such a relationship could prove useful to identify students who may potentially run into academic difficulty with first-year biochemistry PMID:20480012

  8. Uncovering protein–protein interactions through a team-based undergraduate biochemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookmeyer, David L.; Winesett, Emily S.; Kokona, Bashkim; Huff, Adam R.; Aliev, Sabina; Bloch, Noah B.; Bulos, Joshua A.; Evans, Irene L.; Fagre, Christian R.; Godbe, Kerilyn N.; Khromava, Maryna; Konstantinovsky, Daniel M.; Lafrance, Alexander E.; Lamacki, Alexandra J.; Parry, Robert C.; Quinn, Jeanne M.; Thurston, Alana M.; Tsai, Kathleen J. S.; Mollo, Aurelio; Cryle, Max J.; Fairman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    How can we provide fertile ground for students to simultaneously explore a breadth of foundational knowledge, develop cross-disciplinary problem-solving skills, gain resiliency, and learn to work as a member of a team? One way is to integrate original research in the context of an undergraduate biochemistry course. In this Community Page, we discuss the development and execution of an interdisciplinary and cross-departmental undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. We present a template for how a similar course can be replicated at other institutions and provide pedagogical and research results from a sample module in which we challenged our students to study the binding interface between 2 important biosynthetic proteins. Finally, we address the community and invite others to join us in making a larger impact on undergraduate education and the field of biochemistry by coordinating efforts to integrate research and teaching across campuses. PMID:29091712

  9. Comprehensive experiment-clinical biochemistry: determination of blood glucose and triglycerides in normal and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a standard clinical biochemistry exercise. The students are not only exposed to techniques and equipment but are also inspired to think more about the biochemical mechanisms of diseases. When linked with lecture topics about the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, the students obtain a better understanding of the relevance of abnormal metabolism in relation to diseases. Such understanding provides a solid foundation for the medical students' future research and for other clinical applications. © 2014 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education.

  10. Uncovering protein-protein interactions through a team-based undergraduate biochemistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookmeyer, David L; Winesett, Emily S; Kokona, Bashkim; Huff, Adam R; Aliev, Sabina; Bloch, Noah B; Bulos, Joshua A; Evans, Irene L; Fagre, Christian R; Godbe, Kerilyn N; Khromava, Maryna; Konstantinovsky, Daniel M; Lafrance, Alexander E; Lamacki, Alexandra J; Parry, Robert C; Quinn, Jeanne M; Thurston, Alana M; Tsai, Kathleen J S; Mollo, Aurelio; Cryle, Max J; Fairman, Robert; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2017-11-01

    How can we provide fertile ground for students to simultaneously explore a breadth of foundational knowledge, develop cross-disciplinary problem-solving skills, gain resiliency, and learn to work as a member of a team? One way is to integrate original research in the context of an undergraduate biochemistry course. In this Community Page, we discuss the development and execution of an interdisciplinary and cross-departmental undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. We present a template for how a similar course can be replicated at other institutions and provide pedagogical and research results from a sample module in which we challenged our students to study the binding interface between 2 important biosynthetic proteins. Finally, we address the community and invite others to join us in making a larger impact on undergraduate education and the field of biochemistry by coordinating efforts to integrate research and teaching across campuses.

  11. Combining content and elements of communication into an upper-level biochemistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Carli P; Pellock, Samuel J; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Cox, James R

    2014-01-01

    This report describes how a science communication module was incorporated into an advanced biochemistry course. Elements of communication were taught synergistically with biochemistry content in this course in an effort to expose students to a variety of effective oral communication strategies. Students were trained to use these established techniques and incorporated them into various presentations throughout the course. Three students describe their use of specific resources and how the skills learned relate to their future career. The importance and relevance of science communication are receiving unprecedented national attention. The academic scientific community must respond by incorporating more communication-centered instruction and opportunities in the classroom and laboratory. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Uncovering protein-protein interactions through a team-based undergraduate biochemistry course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Cookmeyer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available How can we provide fertile ground for students to simultaneously explore a breadth of foundational knowledge, develop cross-disciplinary problem-solving skills, gain resiliency, and learn to work as a member of a team? One way is to integrate original research in the context of an undergraduate biochemistry course. In this Community Page, we discuss the development and execution of an interdisciplinary and cross-departmental undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. We present a template for how a similar course can be replicated at other institutions and provide pedagogical and research results from a sample module in which we challenged our students to study the binding interface between 2 important biosynthetic proteins. Finally, we address the community and invite others to join us in making a larger impact on undergraduate education and the field of biochemistry by coordinating efforts to integrate research and teaching across campuses.

  13. Symposium 19: The contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista Torres, Bayardo; Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo (USP)

    2014-01-01

    K-Education(Portuguese) Chair: V. Trindade Bayardo Torres; Clovis Wannmacher; Denise MacedoThe contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching.O ensino de Bioquímica nos últimos 20 anosBayardo B. TorresDepartamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, USP. São Paulo, Brazil.Among the contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP one must recall:1. Winter school for graduate studentsThis course, now at the ninth edition, is intended for students in the f...

  14. From the High Energy Physics Laboratory to the hospital -some experiences of the application of MWPC [multiwire proportional counter] technology to medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    In this talk I wish to briefly review the experience we have obtained at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory over the past decade in the adaptation of MWPC (multiwire proportional counter) technology to diagnostic imaging applications in medicine. A cursory glance at the history of science and technology quickly shows the often intimate and mutually beneficial relationship between ''pure'' science (and scientists) and practical applications. The following talk traces some of the principal features of the situation which have been brought to my attention in the course of the last decade. (author)

  15. Large Cancer Drug Trial Helps Move Precision Medicine Toward the Mainstream | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A landmark cancer drug trial is helping set the stage for moving precision medicine into the mainstream of clinical practice, according to a new study. The study, reported in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, validates a procedure used in the dru

  16. Blood biochemistry responses of chickens experimentally infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the blood biochemistry responses of cockerels experimentally infected with a velogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain, KUDU 113. One hundred Isa white cockerels were used for the study. The cockerels were obtained at day-old and randomly divided into groups A- vaccinated and infected, ...

  17. Jmol-Enhanced Biochemistry Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderholm, Matthew; Reynolds, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    We developed a protein research project for a one-semester biochemistry lecture class to enhance learning and more effectively train students to understand protein structure and function. During this semester-long process, students select a protein with known structure and then research its structure, sequence, and function. This project…

  18. Modern trends in biochemistry and biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    On the conference 'Modern trends in biochemistry and biotechnology' several lectures concerned influence of ionizing radiation on the animal cells. Changes in the cell division caused by radiation induced DNA damage were discussed. Application of single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) in assessment of DNA damages was the subject of dedicated session

  19. Haematology, serum biochemistry and growth performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High performing does have the tendency of producing healthy kids with reasonable weight at birth compared to least performing does. A study was conducted to investigate the haematology, serum biochemistry and growth performance of grazing pregnant Kalahari Red does fed concentrate diets at three protein levels.

  20. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  1. There is No Overkill in Biochemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. There is No Overkill in Biochemistry - Har Gobind Khorana, a Pioneer in Membrane Biology. Sadashiva Karnik Sriram Subramaniam. General Article Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp 1157-1164 ...

  2. Perigos e riscos na medicina laboratorial: identificação e avaliação Hazards and risks in laboratory medicine: identification and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Aparecida Faria

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Os perigos no ambiente de trabalho estão relacionados com qualquer tipo de fonte potencialmente danosa, em termos de lesões, ferimentos ou danos para a saúde ou uma combinação desses fatores. Os riscos são consequências dos perigos existentes no laboratório. Os laboratórios clínicos apresentam múltiplos riscos ocupacionais aos trabalhadores, categorizados como riscos biológicos, físicos, químicos, ergonômicos e para ocorrência de acidentes. É importante o laboratório identificar os riscos, avaliar os impactos que podem afetar o negócio e estabelecer critérios de priorização para a tomada de decisões, implementando estratégias e ações preventivas, a fim de evitar a instalação de falhas ou danos potenciais. Este artigo propõe uma sistemática de identificação e avaliação dos perigos e riscos em saúde e segurança ocupacional no laboratório clínico e discute suas aplicações na prática operacional.Workplace hazards are related to any potentially harmful source in terms of lesions, injuries and health damage or a combination of these factors. The risks are consequences of laboratory hazards. Clinical laboratories pose multiple occupational hazards, which are categorized as biological, physical, chemical, ergonomic and accident prone. It is important to identify risks, assess the impacts that may affect the enterprise and establish prioritization criteria for making decisions. Furthermore, it is essential to implement strategies and preventive actions in order to avoid flaws or potential damage. Not only does this article propose a systematic identification and assessment of hazards, health risks and occupational safety within clinical laboratories, but it also discusses their applications in operational practice.

  3. Biochemistry in the idea of graduation students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Escoto et al

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Biochemistry is an interdisciplinary area that allows us to study chemical phenomena in live organisms. That way, its study is of extreme importance, in all levels, to enlarge the comprehension of natural phenomena. However, it is barely explored in the basic education and often fragmented in the higher education, or in graduation degrees that contemplate this area. Especially in the teacher training, where the fragmentation of knowledge can contribute to form wrong concepts. Based on that, this work aims to identify the concept of Biochemistry according to the future teachers of Natural Science. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The work was developed with 3º, 5º and 9º semesters students of the natural science degree on Universidade Federal do Pampa. 50 students, from 18 to 56 years old, were interviewed. The data was obtained through a semi-structured questionnaire. The methodology of categorization and analysis of content with emergent categories of speech was chosen for the analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Initially, 11 categories were chosen by content similarity. In descending order: chemical reactions in organisms, chemistry area, chemistry of life, cell metabolism, the study of living beings, origin of life, biology area, organic balance, chemical-biological study. The reports made possible to identify that most students do understand with clarity the goal of studying biochemistry. Although, we can see that there are some students that fragment the area, what means, they try to discriminate chemistry from biology. This way, they demonstrate a difficulty to comprehend biochemistry as interdisciplinary, what makes it hard to contextualize the built knowledge. It is important to develop strategies to overcome the fragmentation of knowledge, so that biochemistry can be comprehended in its fullness and help on the teaching processes that will be developed by the future teachers.

  4. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  5. Guidelines for starting a nuclear medicine laboratory. Excerpts from a booklet published by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear medicine department caters to the need of all clinical departments, and, therefore, should be located at a central place. At the same time, because of radiation hazard associated with the use of radionuclides, planning of the departments should be done in such a way that there is no radiation exposure to non-radiation workers and the general public, and also that radiation workers handling radioisotopes receive minimum exposure. When a decision to set up a nuclear medicine department is taken, the authorities are faced with a number of questions regarding the location, planning for the premises, equipment needed, availability of trained medical and paramedical personnel and the procedure for obtaining clearance from various authorities

  6. Guidelines for starting a nuclear medicine laboratory. Excerpts from a booklet published by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    A nuclear medicine department caters to the need of all clinical departments, and, therefore, should be located at a central place. At the same time, because of radiation hazard associated with the use of radionuclides, planning of the departments should be done in such a way that there is no radiation exposure to non-radiation workers and the general public, and also that radiation workers handling radioisotopes receive minimum exposure. When a decision to set up a nuclear medicine department is taken, the authorities are faced with a number of questions regarding the location, planning for the premises, equipment needed, availability of trained medical and paramedical personnel and the procedure for obtaining clearance from various authorities

  7. Identification of the Most Commonly Used Laboratory Techniques in Regenerative Medicine: A Roadmap for Developing a Competency Based Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Rego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we are proposing and testing the use of literature reviews as a method to identify essential competencies for specific fields. This has implications in how educators develop and structure both traditional and competency based curricula. Our focus will be on utilizing this method to identify the most relevant and commonly used techniques in the field of regenerative medicine. This publication review method may be used to develop competency based education (CBE programs that focus on commonly utilized skills. CBE is an emerging trend in higher education that will greatly enhance student learning experiences. CBE works by providing students with field specific skills and knowledge; thus, it is imperative for educators to identify the most essential competencies in a given field. Therefore, we reason that a literature review of the techniques performed in studies published in prevalent peer reviewed journals for a given field offers an ideal method to identify and rank competencies that should be delivered to students by a respective curriculum. Here, we reviewed recent articles published on topics in the field of regenerative medicine as a proof of concept for the use of literature reviews as a guide for the development of a regenerative medicine CBE curriculum.

  8. Television Medical Dramas as Case Studies in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Julie T.

    2009-01-01

    Several case studies from popular television medical dramas are described for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. These cases, which illustrate fundamental principles of biochemistry, are used as the basis for problems that can be discussed further in small groups. Medical cases provide an interesting context for biochemistry with video…

  9. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Nuclear Medicine and Application of Nuclear Techniques in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiharto, Kunto

    1996-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques medicine covers not only nuclear medicine and radiology in strict sense but also determination of body mineral content by neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence technique either in vitro or in vivo, application of radioisotopes as tracers in pharmacology and biochemistry, etc. This paper describes the ideal tracer in nuclear medicine, functional and morphological imaging, clinical aspect and radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Nuclear technique offers facilities and chances related to research activities and services in medicine. The development of diagnostic as well as therapeutic methods using monoclonal antibodies labeled with radioisotope will undoubtedly play an important role in the disease control

  11. The Relevance of Student Seminars on Clinically Related Subjects in a Biochemistry Course for Medical and Nutrition Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Muniz, Karinne C.; Coutinho, Iracema S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of a system of seminars on clinically related biochemistry topics for undergraduate students in medicine and nutrition at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. During the second semester of 1998 (1998-2), the teaching staff decided to establish new and stricter rules for the seminar method and to…

  12. Extracts from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine. Part-3: Establishing Nuclear Medicine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the past, consideration was given to the categories of nuclear medicine ranging from simple imaging or in-vitro laboratories, to more complex departments performing a full range of in-vitro and in-vivo procedures that are also involved in advanced clinical services, training programmes, research and development. In developing countries, nuclear medicine historically has often been an offshoot of pathology, radiology or radiotherapy services. These origins are currently changing as less radioimmunoassay is performed and fully-fledged, independent departments of nuclear medicine are being set up. The trend appears to be that all assays (radioassay or ELISA) are done in a biochemistry laboratory whereas nuclear medicine departments are involved largely in diagnostic procedures, radionuclide therapy and non-imaging in-vitro tests. The level of nuclear medicine services is categorized according to three levels of need: Level 1: Only one gamma camera is needed for imaging purposes. The radiopharmaceutical supply, physics and radiation protection services are contracted outside the centre. Other requirements include a receptionist and general secretarial assistance. A single imaging room connected to a shared reporting room should be sufficient, with a staff of one nuclear medicine physician and one technologist, with back-up. This level is appropriate for a small private practice. Level 2: This is suitable for a general hospital where there are multiple imaging rooms where in-vitro and other non-imaging studies would generally be performed as well as radionuclide therapy. Level 3: his is appropriate for an academic institution where there is a need for a comprehensive clinical nuclear medicine service, human resource development and research programmes. Radionuclide therapy for in-patients and outpatients is provided

  13. [Scientific and practical activity of the Department of Muscle Biochemistry of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynogradova, R P; Danilova, V M; Yurasova, S P

    2017-01-01

    The article focuses on scientific and practical activity of the Department of Muscle Biochemistry of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine in the context of its foundation and development. Main findings and practical achievements in the area of muscle biochemistry are summarized and discussed.

  14. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents: Five-Year Experience at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Arvind; Hoda, Syed T; Crawford, James M

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates.

  15. Biochemistry and biology: heart-to-heart to investigate cardiac progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Isotta; Forte, Elvira; Angelini, Francesco; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving field, with promising future developments for effective personalized treatments. Several stem/progenitor cells are candidates for cardiac cell therapy, and emerging evidence suggests how multiple metabolic and biochemical pathways strictly regulate their fate and renewal. In this review, we will explore a selection of areas of common interest for biology and biochemistry concerning stem/progenitor cells, and in particular cardiac progenitor cells. Numerous regulatory mechanisms have been identified that link stem cell signaling and functions to the modulation of metabolic pathways, and vice versa. Pharmacological treatments and culture requirements may be exploited to modulate stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal, possibly boosting their regenerative potential for cell therapy. Mitochondria and their many related metabolites and messengers, such as oxygen, ROS, calcium and glucose, have a crucial role in regulating stem cell fate and the balance of their functions, together with many metabolic enzymes. Furthermore, protein biochemistry and proteomics can provide precious clues on the definition of different progenitor cell populations, their physiology and their autocrine/paracrine regulatory/signaling networks. Interdisciplinary approaches between biology and biochemistry can provide productive insights on stem/progenitor cells, allowing the development of novel strategies and protocols for effective cardiac cell therapy clinical translation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessing Clinical Microbiology Practice Guidelines: American Society for Microbiology Ad Hoc Committee on Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Kirn, Thomas J; Westblade, Lars F; Humphries, Romney

    2017-11-01

    As part of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Committee of the Professional Practice Committee, an ad hoc committee was formed in 2014 to assess guidelines published by the committee using an assessment tool, Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation II (AGREE II). The AGREE II assessment helps reviewers determine whether published guidelines are robust, transparent, and clear in presenting practice recommendations in a standardized manner. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of practice guidelines by ad hoc assessments helps with improving future guidelines through the participation of key stakeholders. This minireview describes the development of the ad hoc committee and results from their review of several ASM best practices guidelines and a non-ASM practice guideline from the Emergency Nurses Association. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Notable Expressions: Transcriptional Regulation from Biochemistry to Immunology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinah Singer, Ph.D., came to NCI in 1975 as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Laboratory of Biochemistry, but soon created a career for herself in the Experimental Immunology Branch. Her interest in how genes are regulated to control biological function led her to focus on major histocompatibility complex class I genes (MHC Class I)—molecules critical to immune system function—as a

  18. Exploratory analysis of methods for automated classification of laboratory test orders into syndromic groups in veterinary medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C Dórea

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent focus on earlier detection of pathogen introduction in human and animal populations has led to the development of surveillance systems based on automated monitoring of health data. Real- or near real-time monitoring of pre-diagnostic data requires automated classification of records into syndromes--syndromic surveillance--using algorithms that incorporate medical knowledge in a reliable and efficient way, while remaining comprehensible to end users. METHODS: This paper describes the application of two of machine learning (Naïve Bayes and Decision Trees and rule-based methods to extract syndromic information from laboratory test requests submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. RESULTS: High performance (F1-macro = 0.9995 was achieved through the use of a rule-based syndrome classifier, based on rule induction followed by manual modification during the construction phase, which also resulted in clear interpretability of the resulting classification process. An unmodified rule induction algorithm achieved an F(1-micro score of 0.979 though this fell to 0.677 when performance for individual classes was averaged in an unweighted manner (F(1-macro, due to the fact that the algorithm failed to learn 3 of the 16 classes from the training set. Decision Trees showed equal interpretability to the rule-based approaches, but achieved an F(1-micro score of 0.923 (falling to 0.311 when classes are given equal weight. A Naïve Bayes classifier learned all classes and achieved high performance (F(1-micro= 0.994 and F(1-macro = .955, however the classification process is not transparent to the domain experts. CONCLUSION: The use of a manually customised rule set allowed for the development of a system for classification of laboratory tests into syndromic groups with very high performance, and high interpretability by the domain experts. Further research is required to develop internal validation rules in order to establish

  19. Writing throughout the biochemistry curriculum: Synergistic inquiry-based writing projects for biochemistry students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Pamela; Streu, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a synergistic two-semester writing sequence for biochemistry courses. In the first semester, students select a putative protein and are tasked with researching their protein largely through bioinformatics resources. In the second semester, students develop original ideas and present them in the form of a research grant proposal. Both projects involve multiple drafts and peer review. The complementarity of the projects increases student exposure to bioinformatics and literature resources, fosters higher-order thinking skills, and develops teamwork and communication skills. Student feedback and responses on perception surveys demonstrated that the students viewed both projects as favorable learning experiences. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Critical review of the clinical relevance of growth hormone and its measurement in the nuclear medicine laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.M.; Kirpalani, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    A wide variety of metabolic and stressful stimuli, both physical and psychologic, produce rapid elevation of plasma growth hormone (GH). In addition, spontaneous elevation of GH occurs during the day, and a rise in GH occurs in association with the initial slow-wave sleep episode at night. Although the identity of the GH releasing factor has not yet been established, a hypothalamic factor inhibiting GH release named somatostatin identified and synthesized. Most, if not all, of the GH rises are mediated by neural mechanisms, and therefore they may be disrupted by many disease processes affecting the pituitary or the hypothalamus. In acromegaly, hypersecretion of GH occurs, and remnants of hypothalamic control can frequently be demonstrated, suggesting a hypothalamic origin for at least some cases. Provocative stimuli commonly used to assess adequacy of GH responses include hypoglycemia, arginine infusion, and exercise. Administration of L-dopa or apomorphine also produces GH elevation, and since these agents may activate specific dopamine mechanisms, they are of particular interest. Two comprehensive commercial kits have been evaluated, and three major defects have been identified. The literature provided in both kits was inadequate. Both kits required an initial dilution without any replication, so that dilution error would be undetected. One of the kits did not provide a full complement of materials. Quantities of HGH antigen and antisera sufficient for large numbers of assays are also available commercially. However, no commercial source was found for control sera containing known quantities of HGH. Individual laboratories to provide their own supply of sera to use for quality control. It is now known that GH exists in multiple forms in plasma and that antisera may differ in ability to bind these forms. It will, therefore, be necessary for laboratories to revalidate the assay if a different antiserum is used. (U.S.)

  1. At crossroads between laboratory disciplines and medical advancements-The Center for Molecular Medicine at the Karolinska University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenius, Lars

    2009-04-01

    The Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM) was conceived and built to respond to the challenges presented by the still common chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, allergy, and alcoholism. The Karolinska University Hospital has a proud history of research with developments such as the pacemaker and the gamma-knife. The nearby Karolinska Institutet has a strong presence internationally on the basic sciences. However, the challenges of the "new biology" and the access to the complete human genome, transcriptome, and proteome raised the need for a new research institute that could meet the experimental requirements for translational research. A Foundation was established in 1994 with the goal to build and govern the new enterprise. After an intense fundraising campaign, building could start and CMM (Fig. 1) was inaugurated in 1997. Through more than 10 years of existence, it has evolved into a multidisciplinary research institute with research in four programs, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Infection and Immunity, Neuropsychiatric Diseases, and Medical Genetics. Performance parameters have been introduced and scientific impact and relevance are followed annually. Transparency and collaboration between groups (now 28 groups with an approximate total of 400 people engaged in research) and leadership training for junior faculty are means to stimulate "centerness".

  2. Poster Display as an Alternative Evaluation Method to Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas P. Rodrigues

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is present in dierent professional under gradation courses in which it seeks to attendseveral objectives. The discipline oered to the students of Biology Science Course at UFES is tra-ditionally organized in a series of lectures to the basic information, a laboratory class related to eachtopic and a three written tests. Our students, as many from other courses, study biochemistry justbecause they have to. The teacher can alter the student behavior by changing the way in which theyexamine them. This work describes and analyses the experience of using poster display as an assess-ment and includes feedback from the students and teachers. At the beginning of the term the activityis explained to the class and groups are formed. They are oriented to search a full research paper, with\\metabolism as a key word. During the students presentation, teachers and graduation studentsevaluate the production of a self-explanatory poster, assurance in the chosen work and involvementof all components of the group. A multiple-choice questionnaire was applied to 15-30 students fromthe ve classes that had already done the activity. The teachers and the graduation students also hadtheir opinions heard. 62.3 % of the students agreed that the activity accomplishes its objective tostimulate the integration of general knowledge and comprehension of a specic scientic work, while itpromotes the practice of presentation at seminars. 62.2 % believed that it allows the learner to showits knowledge in a better way and 51 % of the students were very much motivated within the activity.For 91.2 % of the students, they should choose the article, as it allows a better correlation betweenbiochemistry and personal anities (42.7 %. Also, 98 % believed that the activity should be carriedout in groups, because it allows a deeper discussion (53.6 %, stimulate group activities (20 % orpermits the materials costs division (22 %. Only 1.8 % of the learners thought that the

  3. Symposium 19: Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul: its Role in the Biochemistry Teaching in the Southernmost Brazilian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis M.D. Wannmacher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available K-Education(Portuguese Chair: V. Trindade Bayardo Torres; Clovis Wannmacher; Denise Macedo  Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul: its Role in the Biochemistry Teaching in the Southernmost Brazilian States. Wannmacher, C.M.D. Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.   At present, most Biochemistry teaching in Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina has its origin in the Department of Biochemistry of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. In the 70’s, all the teachers of the Department wrote a book together: “Fundamental Biochemistry”. This book was always used in the classes by groups of students of different careers supervised by the respective teacher. At the same time, this methodology was not used by pharmaceutical teachers, but they recommended the Department’s book to their students. Along the next years, Biochemistry teaching was adapted according to the professional course and to the teacher’s personal characteristics. Today, there are two extremes strategies again: one traditional for the most basic biochemistry student’s formation (including theoretical, laboratorial, seminars and informatics classes and the other, experimental-clinical, for physician’s formation (including seminars of molecular approach to the most prevalent diseases, mainly, those leading to failure of organs/systems and the interaction with patients from HCPA by the interpretation of their biochemical data. On the other hand, the Post Graduation Program, at first, emphasized biochemistry teaching in a traditional form, but gradually changed the emphasis to investigation, and most classes changed to scientific paper reports. To stimulate the teaching formation, two activities were offered to post-graduation students: Biochemistry Teaching Methodology and Teaching Practice in Biochemistry. These activities promote opportunity for the students to

  4. BIOCHEMISTRY TEACHING WITH VIRTUAL DYNAMIC METABOLIC DIAGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Lazzarotto

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a game like educational software (courseware to study metabolic pathways, calledDiagrama Metabolico Din^amico Virtual (DMDV of Krebs Cycle. The experience acquired teachingwith the logical sequence tray games in the FFFCMPAs Biochemistry Course provides the beddingswith the use of this model as education method. With DMDV, students can assembly the sequenceof reactions that describe the desired metabolic pathway, create situational models which can guidehis/her choices, reduce the subject complexity of the scheme in knowledge construction presentingin a graphical way the current interrelations. Biochemistry teachers can use the present software inclassroom as well as distance classes. This product integrates multimedia resources extensively andis distributed in CD-ROM format. The virtual environment will make possible interaction of thestudent with the environment and with colleagues and teachers, through tools as chats and forum.Experience with the use of this method was carried through with two distinct groups of students.The rst group was composed by 11 students, who were more familiar with the content and answereda specic questionnaire to previously evaluate the software. The second group was formed by 24students regularly registered in the FFFCMPAs Biochemistry Course, who used the software as astudy method. The rst group considered DMDV of easy and pleasant navigation. The knowledgeevaluation of the second group students was made by a written test and the analysis of three conceptualmaps constructed by each one of them: one map before initiating the study with the DMDV, thesecond just after the study and the third one two months later. Every conceptual maps producedafter DMDV method showed an expansion of valid concepts if compared with the rst maps. Simplevisual comparison of maps shows that new elements where added. All students who passed throughthe experiment reached a greater than ve grade in the subjects written

  5. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  6. Emergency Medicine Evaluation of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: History, Examination, Imaging and Laboratory Assessment, and Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Long, Drew; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-11-01

    Pneumonia is a common infection, accounting for approximately one million hospitalizations in the United States annually. This potentially life-threatening disease is commonly diagnosed based on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. To investigate emergency medicine evaluation of community-acquired pneumonia including history, physical examination, imaging, and the use of risk scores in patient assessment. Pneumonia is the number one cause of death from infectious disease. The condition is broken into several categories, the most common being community-acquired pneumonia. Diagnosis centers on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. However, all are unreliable when used alone, and misdiagnosis occurs in up to one-third of patients. Chest radiograph has a sensitivity of 46-77%, and biomarkers including white blood cell count, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein provide little benefit in diagnosis. Biomarkers may assist admitting teams, but require further study for use in the emergency department. Ultrasound has shown utility in correctly identifying pneumonia. Clinical gestalt demonstrates greater ability to diagnose pneumonia. Clinical scores including Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI); Confusion, blood Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, age 65 score (CURB-65); and several others may be helpful for disposition, but should supplement, not replace, clinical judgment. Patient socioeconomic status must be considered in disposition decisions. The diagnosis of pneumonia requires clinical gestalt using a combination of history and physical examination. Chest radiograph may be negative, particularly in patients presenting early in disease course and elderly patients. Clinical scores can supplement clinical gestalt and assist in disposition when used appropriately. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Radioactive isotopes in biochemistry (historical essay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanko, M.A.; Shamin, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    A large volume of facts, including little-known biobibliographic data on the the first reserchers who applied the method, are used in the study. The main attention is paid to the use of the method of labelled atoms, when considering intermediate exchange of substances and creating metabolic ways maps (the end of 30-ies - beginning of 50-ies). Using as an example the history of creation of the labelled atom method and its introduction into biochemistry, the problem of the research methods transfer from one branch of science to another is considered

  8. The biochemistry of hematopoietic stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimakis, P; Crisan, M; Dzierzak, E

    2013-02-01

    The cornerstone of the adult hematopoietic system and clinical treatments for blood-related disease is the cohort of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that is harbored in the adult bone marrow microenvironment. Interestingly, this cohort of HSCs is generated only during a short window of developmental time. In mammalian embryos, hematopoietic progenitor and HSC generation occurs within several extra- and intraembryonic microenvironments, most notably from 'hemogenic' endothelial cells lining the major vasculature. HSCs are made through a remarkable transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to a hematopoietic fate that is long-lived and self-renewable. Recent studies are beginning to provide an understanding of the biochemical signaling pathways and transcription factors/complexes that promote their generation. The focus of this review is on the biochemistry behind the generation of these potent long-lived self-renewing stem cells of the blood system. Both the intrinsic (master transcription factors) and extrinsic regulators (morphogens and growth factors) that affect the generation, maintenance and expansion of HSCs in the embryo will be discussed. The generation of HSCs is a stepwise process involving many developmental signaling pathways, morphogens and cytokines. Pivotal hematopoietic transcription factors are required for their generation. Interestingly, whereas these factors are necessary for HSC generation, their expression in adult bone marrow HSCs is oftentimes not required. Thus, the biochemistry and molecular regulation of HSC development in the embryo are overlapping, but differ significantly from the regulation of HSCs in the adult. HSC numbers for clinical use are limiting, and despite much research into the molecular basis of HSC regulation in the adult bone marrow, no panel of growth factors, interleukins and/or morphogens has been found to sufficiently increase the number of these important stem cells. An understanding of the biochemistry of HSC

  9. Wilson and Gisvold's textbook of organic medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Charles Owens; Beale, John Marlowe; Block, John H

    2011-01-01

    ... and chemistry students as well as practicing pharmacists. Fully updated for the Twelfth Edition, the book begins with the fundamental principles of chemistry, biochemistry, and biology that underlie the discipline of medicinal chemistry...

  10. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  11. A Phytase Enzyme-Based Biochemistry Practical Particularly Suited to Students Undertaking Courses in Biotechnology and Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Angela; Casey, Anne; Walsh, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Courses in introductory biochemistry invariably encompass basic principles of enzymology, with reinforcement of lecture-based material in appropriate laboratory practicals. Students undertaking practical classes are more enthusiastic, and generally display improved performance, when the specific experiments undertaken show direct relevance to…

  12. The ability of clinical and laboratory findings to predict in-hospital death in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in an internal and emergency medicine department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Pieralli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare, life-threatening syndrome characterized by microangiopathic anemia, thrombocytopenia, diffuse microvascular thrombosis, and ischemia. It is associated with very low levels of ADAMTS-13. Measurement of ADAMTS-13 levels is used for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, but in every-day clinical practice, this type of analysis is not always readily available. In this retrospective study, we evaluated prognostic value of clinical and laboratory findings in patients with TTP. Materials and methods: We retrospectively investigated patients with clinically diagnosed TTP treated in a unit of Internal and Emergency Medicine (1996-2007. Clinical and laboratory findings were collected and analyzed in order to assess their ability to predict in-hospital death. Results: Twelve patients were identified (mean age 59 + 22 years; 58% were women. Five (42% died during the hospitalization, and the variables significantly associated with this outcome were: a delay between diagnosis and symptom onset (HR 1.36; 95% CI 1.04-1.78; p < 0.05; a higher severity score (HR 1.48; 95%CI 1,23-3.86; p < 0.05; hemodynamic instability with hypotension and/or shock (HR 3.35; 95%CI 3.02-9.26; p < 0.01; a higher schistocyte count on blood smear (HR 1.84; 95%CI 1.04-3.27; p < 0.05; and higher lactate values (HR 1.85; 95%CI 1.08- 3.16; p < 0.05. Conclusions: TTP is a rare and potentially fatal disease with protean manifestations. Delayed diagnosis after symptom onset is a major determinant of poor outcome. Hypotension and shock are also prognostically unfavourable. Laboratory evidence of cardiocirculatory compromise (i.e., elevated lactate levels and extension of the disease process (i.e., schistocyte count > 3 are predictive of in-hospital death, independently of the hemodynamic profile on admission.

  13. Writing throughout the Biochemistry Curriculum: Synergistic Inquiry-Based Writing Projects for Biochemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Pamela; Streu, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a synergistic two-semester writing sequence for biochemistry courses. In the first semester, students select a putative protein and are tasked with researching their protein largely through bioinformatics resources. In the second semester, students develop original ideas and present them in the form of a research grant…

  14. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, Krishna M; Tekian, Ara

    2013-03-05

    Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program) to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Participants were first year medical students (n=150) from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India); they were randomly divided into two groups of 75, one group attending the traditional program, the other the innovative program. Student performance was measured using three written knowledge tests (each with a maximum score of 20). The students also evaluated the relevance of the learning process using a 12-item questionnaire. Students in the innovative program using concept mapping outperformed those in the traditional didactic program (means of 7.13-8.28 vs. 12.33-13.93, pbiochemistry to clinical practice, and to enhance their reasoning and learning skills, as well as their deeper understanding for biochemistry.

  15. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, KrishnaM; Tekian, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program) to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Participants were first year medical students (n=150) from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India); they were randomly divided into two groups of 75, one group attending the traditional program, the other the innovative program. Student performance was measured using three written knowledge tests (each with a maximum score of 20). The students also evaluated the relevance of the learning process using a 12-item questionnaire. Students in the innovative program using concept mapping outperformed those in the traditional didactic program (means of 7.13-8.28 vs. 12.33-13.93, pbiochemistry to clinical practice, and to enhance their reasoning and learning skills, as well as their deeper understanding for biochemistry.

  16. Some applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardman, P.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter illustrate the use of radiation chemistry as a tool in investigating biologically important radical reactions, and also outline some studies of models for radiobiological damage. Because aqueous solutions usually offer the most important matrix, an appreciation of the main features of water radiolysis will be essential. Most of the illustrations involve pulse radiolysis, and some familiarity with chemical kinetics is assumed. In addition to these and other chapters in this book, readers find the proceedings of a recent NATO Advanced Study Institute most useful. The authors shall not try to review here all the applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and biology, but they will illustrate, using selected examples, the main principles and practical advantages and problems. Another recent volume covers the main contributions of flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis to the chemistry of biology and medicine, complementing earlier reviews. Papers from symposia on radical processes in radiobiology and carcinogenesis, and on super-oxide dismutases, and proceedings of recent international congresses of radiation research, together with the other publications referred to above will enable the reader to gain a comprehensive overview of the role of radicals in biological processes and the contributions of radiation chemistry

  17. Compliance of blood sampling procedures with the CLSI H3-A6 guidelines: An observational study by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) working group for the preanalytical phase (WG-PRE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simundic, Ana-Maria; Church, Stephen; Cornes, Michael P.; Grankvist, Kjell; Lippi, Giuseppe; Nybo, Mads; Nikolac, Nora; van Dongen-Lases, Edmee; Eker, Pinar; Kovalevskaya, Svjetlana; Kristensen, Gunn B. B.; Sprongl, Ludek; Sumarac, Zorica

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: An observational study was conducted in 12 European countries by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) to assess the level of compliance with the CLSI H3-A6 guidelines. Methods: A structured

  18. Laboratory and clinical predictors of 30-day survival for patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO): 8-Year experience at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francischetti, Ivo M B; Szymanski, James; Rodriguez, Daniel; Heo, Moonseong; Wolgast, Lucia R

    2017-08-01

    Survival of patients on ECMO has remained stable in every population. Laboratory values predictors of survival are required to improve patient care. Clinical Looking Glass software was used to assess Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) of patients at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center (2007-2014). Our population comprises of 166 adults and was divided in survivors and non-survivors, within 30days. Indications for ECMO were cardiac (65%), respiratory (25%) and infectious diseases (<10%). Eighty six patients (51.8%) survived the procedure. Gender, body weight, ejection fraction, diastolic blood pressure, and socio-economic status did not differ among survivors and non-survivors. In contrast, younger patients (45yo vs 55yo, p=0.0001) and higher systolic blood pressure (115mmHg vs 103mmHg, p=0.025) have favorable outcome. Univariate analysis shows that pre-cannulation values for creatinine (p=0.0003), chloride (p=0.009), bicarbonate (p=0.015) and pH (p=0.03) have prognostic value. Post-cannulation aPTT, pH, platelet and lymphocyte counts also have discriminative power. Notably, multiple logistic regressions for Multivariate Analysis identified chloride (OR 1.07; 95% CI 1.02-1.13; p=0.004), pH (OR 3.35; 95% CI 1.89-5.9; p<0.0001) and aPTT (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.976-0.998; p=0.024) as independent risk factors for 30-day mortality. These results imply that pre-existing renal conditions and hemostatic dysregulation contribute to poor outcome. Finally, patients on VV-ECMO have increase odds of survival (OR 1.88; 95% CI 1.06-3.34; p=0.029). Laboratory markers identified herein may guide the management of patients on ECMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical haematology and biochemistry profiles of cattle naturally infected with Theileria orientalis Ikeda type in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K E; Forsyth, S F; Vaatstra, B L; McFadden, Amj; Pulford, D J; Govindaraju, K; Pomroy, W E

    2018-01-01

    To present the haematology and biochemistry profiles for cattle in New Zealand naturally infected with Theileria orientalis Ikeda type and investigate if the results differed between adult dairy cattle and calves aged cattle which tested positive for T. orientalis Ikeda type by PCR, that were submitted to veterinary laboratories in New Zealand between October 2012 and November 2014. Data sets for haematology and biochemistry results were prepared for adult dairy cattle (n=62 and 28, respectively) and calves aged cattle and calves cattle than for beef or dairy calves, for both haematology (pcattle and calves aged cattle infected with T. orientalis Ikeda type were consistent with extravascular haemolytic anaemia. Adult dairy cattle were more likely to be severely anaemic than calves. There were differences in haematology and biochemistry profiles between adult dairy cattle and calves, but most of these differences likely had a physiological rather than pathological basis. Overall, the haematological changes in calves aged cattle.

  20. Comprehensive Experiment—Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a standard clinical biochemistry exercise. The students are not only exposed to techniques and equipment but are also inspired to think more about the biochemical mechanisms of diseases. When linked with lecture topics about the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, the students obtain a better understanding of the relevance of abnormal metabolism in relation to diseases. Such understanding provides a solid foundation for the medical students' future research and for other clinical applications. PMID:25521692

  1. A ten-week biochemistry lab project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D Scott

    2016-11-12

    This work describes a 10-week laboratory project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase, in which students purify, quantitate, and perform kinetic assays on wild-type and selected mutants of the enzyme. Students also perform plasmid DNA purification, digestion, and gel analysis. In addition to simply learning important techniques, students acquire novel biochemical data in their kinetic analysis of mutant enzymes. The experiments are designed to build on students' work from week to week in a way that requires them to apply quantitative analysis and reasoning skills, reinforcing traditional textbook biochemical concepts. Students are assessed through lab reports focused on journal style writing, quantitative and conceptual question sheets, and traditional exams. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):555-564, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.K.M.; Jardetzky, O.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide an orienting overview of the main directions in which the field of biological application of NMR has developed, the kinds of biochemical or biological questions which can be studied by NMR, and the major specific NMR techniques useful for this purpose. This discussion is preceded by a brief exposition of the elementary concepts of NMR and supplemented by references to the literature that treats each topic in greater depth. Applications of NMR of interest in biochemistry are treated in three major categories: (1) determination of the structure of biologically active compounds - especially new natural products; (2) studies of biochemical reactions, or processes, especially in vivo; and (3) studies of macromolecular structure and dynamics. 122 refs.; 35 figs.; 3 tabs

  3. Using Pamphlets to Teach Biochemistry: A Service-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melinda A.; Dunbar, David; Lopatto, David

    2013-01-01

    A service-learning project appropriate for a biochemistry or advanced biochemistry course was designed and implemented. The project involved students partnering with a homeless shelter to design informational pamphlets to be displayed at the shelter for the clients' use. The pamphlet topics were based on diseases studied within the course.…

  4. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  5. Blended Learning in Biochemistry Education: Analysis of Medical Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardenski, Rosilaine de Fatima; de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; Struchiner, Miriam; Giannella, Tais Rabetti

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze first-year UFRJ medical students' perceptions about the implementation of a blended learning (BL) experience in their Biochemistry I course. During the first semester of 2009, three Biochemistry professors used the Constructore course management system to develop virtual learning environments (VLEs) for…

  6. Enhanced Podcasts for Teaching Biochemistry to Veterinary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of biochemistry within medical disciplines presents certain challenges; firstly to relay a large body of complex facts and abstract concepts, and secondly to motivate students that this relatively difficult topic is worth their time to study. Here, nutrient biochemistry was taught within a multidisciplinary module as part of an…

  7. A National Comparison of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Capstone Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the "American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end,…

  8. Dyslipidemias as generating issue in Biochemistry classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Lima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The traditional didactic model is based on the transmission of the teacher's encyclopedic knowledge. In this model, the teaching of Science aims at the transmission of dominant values, regarded as absolute truths. The teacher is seen is an expert on scientific contents who transmits them to students without motivating them, and without taking into consideration their previous ideas and life experience. This model contributes to the formation of professionals who accept those values uncritically. An effective approach to break up this traditional teaching model in Biochemistry is the use of a generating issue. A Generating Issue is the starting point to the knowledge construction process which, in turn, replaces traditional models. Thus, this study aimed at developing a lesson for a 12th grade class at IF Fluminense on the following content: alcohol, carboxylic acid, ester, and esterification reaction, using dyslipidemias as the Generating Issue. To verify the value of such methodology in Biochemistry classroom, data was collected by applying a questionnaire and images with texts produced by students. In addition, they had a class based on the methodology known as Three Pedagogical Moments, proposed by Delizoicov et al. (2007. Several didactic resources designed by the authors were used, such as slide presentation, tridimensional molecular models, and a roulette game named “Bioquimicados”, based on the Facebook game “Perguntados” ("Trivia Crack". After this, students developed more grounded scientific concepts, making use of terms common in scientific language. This suggests that the use of the Generating Issue in a lesson based on problematization, and supported by a ludic activity, provided a meaningful contribution to improve the students' understanding of the scientific content. This type of non-traditional class promotes greater student motivation, resulting in meaningful learning.

  9. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Kinetics Laboratory: Enhanced Data Analysis and Student-Designed Mini-Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2016-01-01

    A highly instructive, wide-ranging laboratory project in which students study the effects of various parameters on the enzymatic activity of alcohol dehydrogenase has been adapted for the upper-division biochemistry and physical biochemistry laboratory. Our two main goals were to provide enhanced data analysis, featuring nonlinear regression, and…

  10. Skin cancer patients profile at faculty of medicine university of North Sumatera pathology anatomy laboratory and Haji Adam Malik general hospital in the year of 2012-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiring, E. K.; Delyuzar; Soekimin

    2018-03-01

    The most common types of skin cancer found worldwide are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma. In America, about 800,000 people suffer from skin cancer every year and 75% are basal cell carcinoma. According to WHO, around 160,000 people suffer from malignant melanoma every year and 48,000 deaths were reported every year. In Jakarta, in 2000-2009, dr. CiptoMangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM) reported 261 cases of basal cell carcinoma, followed by 69 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 22 cases of malignant melanoma.This study was descriptive study with retrospective design and consecutive sampling method. Data consisted of age, gender, tumor location, occupation and histopathology subtype which were taken from skin cancer patients’ medical record at Faculty of Medicine University of North Sumatera Pathology Anatomy Laboratory and Haji Adam Malik General Hospital Medan in 2012-2015. Data were analyzed using SPSS program and classified based on WHO. From 92 study subjects, squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer which is 59 cases (64.13%), found in 48 women (52.2%), and often found between 45-47 years old (30.4%).

  11. Precision and accuracy control of dose calibrator: CAPINTEC CRC 12 in laboratory for radiopharmacy of Nuclear Medicine Institute of Sucre, Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huanca Sardinas, E; Castro Sacci, O; Torrez Cabero, M; Vasquez Ibanez, M.R; Zambrana Zelada, AJ.

    2013-01-01

    The dose calibrator is one of the indispensable tools in radiopharmacy laboratories of a nuclear medicine department also is mandated to provide accurate readings. A very high doses produce unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient or a very low dose, prolong the acquisition time of the studies affecting the quality of the image. In the present work we did a retrospective analysis of the results of quality checks performed at precision accuracy of the Gauge CRC12 CAPINTEC dose calibrator over a period of 16 years, using sealed certified sources with low power, medium and high: Ba 133 , Cs 137 , Co 60 and Co 57 . The results showed that the lowest standard deviation value was 0.17 for Ba133, relative to Co 57 of 2.97 in the control of accuracy. Accuracy over control values were also lower standard deviation for Ba 133 1.00, relative to Co 57 10.06. Being stated that the CRC12 CAPINTEC activimeter reliability is acceptable during the reporting period and under the conditions indicated. Therefore, we continue to make these quality control procedures and the professional must feel confident that the measurements obtained with it are reliable

  12. HEMATOLOGY, SERUM BIOCHEMISTRY, AND URINALYSIS VALUES IN THE ADULT GIANT PANDA ( AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Caitlin; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Caiwu; Aitken-Palmer, Copper

    2017-12-01

    The giant panda ( Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a high-profile threatened species with individuals in captivity worldwide. As a result of advances in captive animal management and veterinary medicine, the ex situ giant panda population is aging, and improved understanding of age-related changes is necessary. Urine and blood samples were collected in April and July 2015 and analyzed for complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and biochemical and microscopic urine analysis for all individuals sampled ( n = 7, 7-16 yr of age) from giant panda housed at the China Research and Conservation Centre for the Giant Panda in Bifengxia, Sichuan Province, China. Hematology and serum biochemistry values were similar to those previously reported for giant panda aged 2-20 yr and to Species360 (formerly International Species Information System) values. Urine was overall dilute (urine specific gravity range: 1.001-1.021), acellular, and acidic (pH range: 6-7). This is the first report of hematologic and serum biochemistry, with associated urinalysis values, in the giant panda aged 7-16 yr.

  13. Virtual Biochemistry – pH effect on enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Heidrich

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Protocols of laboratory experiments, followed by teacher's explanation, not always clearly translate to the student the dynamics to beadopted for the implementation of the proposed practice. One of these cases is related to the study of the effect of pH on enzyme activity. For better help the understanding of the technical procedure, a hypermedia was built based on a protocol adopted at the Department of Biochemistry, UFSC. The hypermedia shows how theeffect of variations in pH can be observed  in vitro. Taking as example salivary amylase and the consumption of starch (substrate by means of iodine staining, a set of pH buffers was tested to identify the best pH for this enzyme  activity. This hypermedia as introductory tool for such practice was tested on aNutrition course classroom. Students agree that the hypermedia provided a better understanding of the proposed activities. Teachers also notice a smallerreagents consumption and reduction of the time spent by the students in the achievement of the experiment.

  14. Collaborating with Undergraduates To Contribute to Biochemistry Community Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kathryn L; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Medema, Marnix H; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2018-01-30

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) have gained traction as effective ways to expand the impact of undergraduate research while fulfilling pedagogical goals. In this Perspective, we present innovative ways to incorporate fundamental benefits and principles of CUREs into a classroom environment through information/technology-based research projects that lead to student-generated contributions to digital community resources (CoRes). These projects represent an attractive class of CUREs because they are less resource-intensive than laboratory-based CUREs, and the projects align with the expectations of today's students to create rapid and publicly accessible contributions to society. We provide a detailed discussion of two example types of CoRe projects that can be implemented in courses to impact research and education at the chemistry-biology interface: bioinformatics annotations and development of educational tools. Finally, we present current resources available for faculty interested in incorporating CUREs or CoRe projects into their pedagogical practices. In sharing these stories and resources, we hope to lower the barrier for widespread adoption of CURE and CoRe approaches and generate discussions about how to utilize the classroom experience to make a positive impact on our students and the future of the field of biochemistry.

  15. Training on Radioisotopes Techniques and Radioprotection Aspects at The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R. M.; Rivera, E. S.; Bomba, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation sources and radioisotopes in Argentina takes place at more than 1700 facilities, which operate in Nuclear Medicine, in telecobaltherapy, in Industry, in Biochemistry, and in research. All of these centers have one or more professional trained in the specific field of radioprotection and they have been authorized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. At the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University, Argentina, we consider of great interest to teach radioisotopes methodology at different levels, to harmonize the use of these methodologies with environmental preservation and to provide education and training on radioprotection. Currently, the school offers five different courses in all of which the radioprotection is one of the most important subjects: 1) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for students at the undergraduate level, in the Biochemistry Career (140 hrs). Since 1960, more than 6000 students have passed their examinations. 2) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for post-Graduates in Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists or other related disciplines. 3) Course for Graduates in Medicine. Since 1962, the School delivers every year these two courses. Their syllabus (212 hrs) dedicates a 50% of the time schedule to subjects related to radioprotection aspects. More than 1800 professional have passed their examinations, many of them from different Latin American countries. 4) Up-date on Methodology of Radioisotopes (100 hrs) a course delivered since 1992 for professionals wishing to up-date their knowledge. 5) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine (more than 200 hrs). At present, this course is the basic level of the Technicians in Nuclear Medicine Career. At the present paper it will be presented statistics regarding the different courses and the experience that has been gathered for the last 40 years organizing courses and carrying out research activity on radiobiology, radioimmunoanalysis

  16. Training on radioisotopes techniques and radioprotection aspects at the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R.M.; Rivera, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation sources and radioisotopes in Argentina takes place at more than 1700 facilities, which operate in Nuclear Medicine, in Telecobaltherapy, in Industry, in Biochemistry, and in Research. All of these centers have one or more professional trained in the specific field of radioprotection and they have been authorized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. At the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University, Argentina, we consider of great interest to teach radioisotopes methodology at different levels, to harmonize the use of these methodologies with environmental preservation and to provide education and training on radioprotection. Currently, the school offers five different courses in all of which the radioprotection is one of the most important subjects: 1) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for students at the undergraduate level, in the Biochemistry Career (140 hs). Since 1960, more than 6000 students have passed their examinations. 2) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for post-Graduates in Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists or other related disciplines. 3) Course for Graduates in Medicine. Since 1962, the School delivers every year these two courses. Their syllabus (212 hs) dedicates a 50% of the time schedule to subjects related to radioprotection aspects. More than 1800 professional have passed their examinations, many of them from different Latin American countries. 4) Up-date on Methodology of Radioisotopes (100 hs) a course delivered since 1992 for professionals wishing to up-date their knowledge. 5) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine (more than 200 hs). At present, this course is the basic level of the Technicians in Nuclear Medicine Career. At the present paper it will be presented statistics regarding the different courses and the experience that has been gathered for the last 40 years organizing courses and carrying out research activity on radiobiology, radioimmunoanalysis, radioreceptors

  17. THE CYBERSPACE IN THE CONTINUED CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Martins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The cybernetic spaces simulate the real world with interactive multimedia. This work  has been applied since January, 2007 on the curricular student’s apprenticeship at high school and graduation, in the site “bioq.educacao.biz/ULAB-HC-UFPE”. It has been developed to provide continuity to the technical-scientific learning of students and professionals, and also to improve their human social relations on the  labour  environment.  It’s comprises a virtual space, destined to communication and collective building of knowledge on the clinical biochemistry.   It’s about an interactive environment which allows the users registered as coordinator professor (professional  or the scientist student (trainee,  unlimited access to  posting contents (classes, texts, presentations, animations, consultations, non-synchronic discussions (on orkut, forums, e-mail and synchronic discussions (on chats, videoconferences. After a few live tutorials  about new  input in this environment, and the use of the new learning tool,  the collective building of knowledge on cyberspace begins. As a trainee’s program task, the scientist student would have to build a space of his own, under guidance and supervision of the coordinator teachers.  The cyberspace efficiency was evaluated from reports collected in February, 2008: the adherence to this  work was satisfactory, regarding this period, with 68 registered users, 870 accesses and 52 contents available on the several sections of the virtual laboratory. Our work is still being applied, and new adhesions are  happening everyday. We intend to amplify this cyber environment in order to make it a  permanent  continued education site on the health area.  From interest contracts and common knowledge,  the technological interfaces constitute an interaction, in which everyone is a potential author.  Keywords: Cyberspace, online biochemistry education, continued education.

  18. Online Communication Tools in Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ferreira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The  online  communication  tools  enable  new  ways  of  learning, especially  the  forums  in the context of online courses, and the understanding of interactions and collaborations in the  forums  can  improve  them.  The  study  aimed  to  analyze  the  online relationships,  as well  as  obtaining  evidence  of  the  use of  other  learning  tools in  a  biochemistry  subject, focusing on how students use the tool forum and its contribution to learning. The study was  carried  out  from  data  pre  and  post  course  questionnaires  as  well  as  log  of environment  access  and  discussion  forum.  The  forums  have  been  restructured  and systematized  for  analysis  and  creating  discursive  flows  between  statements.  The questionnaires showed the central role of forum and wiki for learning,  the importance of interactions, which was highlighted by the forum analysis. The results indicate that one of the ways to improve online biochemistry teaching is to stimulate interactive activities, participatory  moderation  and  pedagogical  support  by  tutors  and  mentors,  also encouraging  and  creating  strategies  to  collaboration  of  students  to  solve problems  and to collaborative knowledge construction.

  19. Agreement of serum potassium measured by blood gas and biochemistry analyzer in patients with moderate to severe hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikgoz, Seyyid Bilal; Genc, Ahmet Bilal; Sipahi, Savas; Yildirim, Mehmet; Cinemre, Behice; Tamer, Ali; Solak, Yalcin

    2016-05-01

    Several studies investigated the agreement between central laboratory biochemistry analyzers and blood gas analyzers for potassium measurements. However, data are scarce when the potassium level is moderate to severely high. We aimed to evaluate the agreement between central laboratory biochemistry analyzers and blood gas analyzer in terms of serum potassium level measurement because differences in potassium at this level translate into very different clinical actions. This was a retrospective medical record review study in which patients who presented to the emergency department and had serum potassium levels ≥6mmol/L were included. Patients who did not have simultaneous potassium measurement by blood gas analyzer were excluded. We included all patients meeting potassium criteria irrespective of their underlying disease or comorbidities. We evaluated agreement between the measurement methods with Pearson correlation, Bland-Altman plot, and Sign test. A total of 118 blood sample pairs were included. The mean serum potassium level measured by biochemistry analyzer was 6.78±0.79mmol/L, whereas it was 6.16±0.86mmol/L by blood gas analyzer (Pbiochemistry analyzer. The mean difference between the methods was 0.62±0.43mmol/L. In patients with moderate to severe hyperkalemia, blood gas analyzer and biochemistry analyzer gives significantly different serum potassium results which may be clinically important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimal Learning for Efficient Experimentation in Nanotechnology and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0018 Optimal Learning for Efficient Experimentation in Nanotechnology, Biochemistry Warren Powell TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON... Biochemistry 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0200 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Warren Powell 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e...scientists. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Biochemistry 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF 19a.  NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Warren

  1. Virtual Practice of Biochemistry: Ascendant Chromatography on Paper of Amino acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromatography is a method used for analyses of mixture components based on different criteria: adsorbility, solubility, molecular mass, ionic charge and affinity. It is an important subject of Biochemistry. This work reports the development and the validation of a software that simulated a laboratory activity named Ascendant Chromatography on Paper of Aminoacids. The organization and the multimedia material collection were done during the 2008/2 semester. The most representative images were inserted into the learning object. The tool used for the software development was Adobe® Flash® CS3. The first application of this object was in Biochemistry I (Pharmacy-UFRGS in 2009/1. Using this experience, a new version was developed which was tested by the students of the same subject in 2009/2. After a 50-minute class (theoretical-practical, the students of both semesters were divided in two groups. Group I answered a questionnaire about chromatography basic concepts and after used the software. Group II was submitted to an inverse protocol. The groups also evaluated the technical aspects of the software animation/simulation and the activity carried out. Associating both applications results (2009/1 and 2009/2, the present learning object can be valid as a support for practical teaching of basic biochemistry.

  2. Haematology and Clinical Biochemistry Findings Associated with Equine Diseases - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyinyechukwu A. AGINA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The course and outcome of a disease process is dependent upon factors such as the disease-causing agent and its cell tropism, defense mechanisms of the host, genetic resistance of the species or breed affected, as well as the age, nutritional status and hormonal levels of the affected animal. When haematology, clinical biochemistry and cytology test results are combined with other laboratory procedures, complete physical examination and also with the history of the patient, a veterinarian is well armed to arrive at a definitive diagnosis, make a certain prognosis (good, poor or guarded and can also make a concluding statement on the efficacy of the instituted therapy. In clinical biochemistry, demonstration of specific enzyme activity and concentration of analytes in serum/plasma facilitates the disease diagnosis. Also, evaluation of haematology, clinical biochemistry and diagnostic cytology tests can help establish the presence or absence of diseases of internal organs, and by serial performance of these tests, may help to determine whether a disease process remains static, progressive or regressive. This review therefore provides the haematological, serum biochemical and cytological characteristics of diseases caused by the main bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, helminths, arthropods, nutritional deficiencies, endocrine disturbances, neoplasm, allergy, toxins (phytoxins and zootoxins and inorganic poisons in horses.

  3. Preclinical good laboratory practice-compliant safety study to evaluate biodistribution and tumorigenicity of a cartilage advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zscharnack, Matthias; Krause, Christoph; Aust, Gabriela; Thümmler, Christian; Peinemann, Frank; Keller, Thomas; Smink, Jeske J; Holland, Heidrun; Somerson, Jeremy S; Knauer, Jens; Schulz, Ronny M; Lehmann, Jörg

    2015-05-20

    The clinical development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), a new class of drugs, requires initial safety studies that deviate from standard non-clinical safety protocols. The study provides a strategy to address the safety aspects of biodistribution and tumorigenicity of ATMPs under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions avoiding cell product manipulation. Moreover, the strategy was applied on a human ATMP for cartilage repair. The testing strategy addresses biodistribution and tumorigenicity using a multi-step analysis without any cell manipulation to exclude changes of test item characteristics. As a safeguard measurement for meeting regulatory expectations, the project design and goals were discussed continuously with the regulatory authority using a staggered scientific advice concept. Subsequently, the strategy was applied to co.don chondrosphere® (huChon spheroid), a tissue-engineered matrix-free ATMP of human normal chondrocytes. In both the biodistribution and tumorigenicity studies, huChon spheroids were implanted subcutaneously into 40 immunodeficient mice. Biodistribution was studied 1 month after implantation. A skin disc containing the huChon spheroid, two surrounding skin rings and selected organs were analyzed by validated, gender-specific, highly-sensitive triplex qPCR and by immunohistochemistry (IHC). No human DNA was detected in distant skin rings and analyzed organs. IHC revealed no direct or indirect indications of cell migration. Tumorigenicity was assessed 6 months after huChon spheroid implantation by palpation, macroscopic inspection, histology and IHC. No mice from the huChon spheroid group developed a tumor at the implantation site. In two mice, benign tumors were detected that were negative for HLA-ABC, suggesting that they were of spontaneous murine origin. In summary, the presented strategy using a multi-step analysis was confirmed to be suitable for safety studies of ATMPs.

  4. Computational Biochemistry-Enzyme Mechanisms Explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culka, Martin; Gisdon, Florian J; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Understanding enzyme mechanisms is a major task to achieve in order to comprehend how living cells work. Recent advances in biomolecular research provide huge amount of data on enzyme kinetics and structure. The analysis of diverse experimental results and their combination into an overall picture is, however, often challenging. Microscopic details of the enzymatic processes are often anticipated based on several hints from macroscopic experimental data. Computational biochemistry aims at creation of a computational model of an enzyme in order to explain microscopic details of the catalytic process and reproduce or predict macroscopic experimental findings. Results of such computations are in part complementary to experimental data and provide an explanation of a biochemical process at the microscopic level. In order to evaluate the mechanism of an enzyme, a structural model is constructed which can be analyzed by several theoretical approaches. Several simulation methods can and should be combined to get a reliable picture of the process of interest. Furthermore, abstract models of biological systems can be constructed combining computational and experimental data. In this review, we discuss structural computational models of enzymatic systems. We first discuss various models to simulate enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, we review various approaches how to characterize the enzyme mechanism both qualitatively and quantitatively using different modeling approaches. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative application of sigma metrics in medical biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sunil Kumar; Ray, Lopamudra

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory errors are result of a poorly designed quality system in the laboratory. Six Sigma is an error reduction methodology that has been successfully applied at Motorola and General Electric. Sigma (σ) is the mathematical symbol for standard deviation (SD). Sigma methodology can be applied wherever an outcome of a process has to be measured. A poor outcome is counted as an error or defect. This is quantified as defects per million (DPM). A six sigma process is one in which 99.999666% of the products manufactured are statistically expected to be free of defects. Six sigma concentrates, on regulating a process to 6 SDs, represents 3.4 DPM (defects per million) opportunities. It can be inferred that as sigma increases, the consistency and steadiness of the test improves, thereby reducing the operating costs. We aimed to gauge performance of our laboratory parameters by sigma metrics. Evaluation of sigma metrics in interpretation of parameter performance in clinical biochemistry. The six month internal QC (October 2012 to march 2013) and EQAS (external quality assurance scheme) were extracted for the parameters-Glucose, Urea, Creatinine, Total Bilirubin, Total Protein, Albumin, Uric acid, Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Chloride, SGOT, SGPT and ALP. Coefficient of variance (CV) were calculated from internal QC for these parameters. Percentage bias for these parameters was calculated from the EQAS. Total allowable errors were followed as per Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) guidelines. Sigma metrics were calculated from CV, percentage bias and total allowable error for the above mentioned parameters. For parameters - Total bilirubin, uric acid, SGOT, SGPT and ALP, the sigma values were found to be more than 6. For parameters - glucose, Creatinine, triglycerides, urea, the sigma values were found to be between 3 to 6. For parameters - total protein, albumin, cholesterol and chloride, the sigma values were found to be less than 3. ALP was the best

  6. LLUSTRATION OF AMINO ACIDS REACTIONS AND PROTEINS CHARACTERIZATION FOR EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Parreira

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available New teaching methodologies have been developed to facilitate the learning of biochemistry concepts. A new  approach to Biochemistry  teaching  has become more frequent,  one that does not  require reagents but use photos, videos, softwares etc. Experimental Biochemistry classes, i.e. covering characterization of amino acids and proteins,  might be more productive with the use of complementary didactic material.  Furthermore,  if experiments cannot be implemented, classes may  be well illustrated with complementary didactic material covering from the simplest to the most  complex experiments.  In order to  aid Biochemistry classes without practical experiments, some tests and reactions were documented in our laboratory through digital photos, for  instance: (1 the biuret reaction wherein the blue reagent turns violet in the presence of proteins and changes to pink when combined with short-chain polypeptides; (2 the ninhydrin test used in amino acid analysis of proteins: most of the amino acids are hydrolyzed and react with ninhydrin; when reacting with these free amines, a deep blue or purple color appears; (3 methods for detecting proteins wherein spectrophotometry is used, that deals with the relationship between absorbance, concentration and path length, which constitute the Beer-Lambert Law. A didactic material constituted by texts, schemes and illustrated by photos has been created for each class topic. This material can be used either as a teacher script or in a presentation form to illustrate classes without experimental activities. Financial Support: Pro-Reitoria Graduação-USP, CNPq.

  7. The importance of having a flexible scope ISO 15189 accreditation and quality specifications based on biological variation – the case of validation of the biochemistry analyzer Dimension Vista

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Calle, Pilar; Pelaz, Sandra; Oliver, Paloma; Alcaide, Maria Jose; Gomez-Rioja, Ruben; Buno, Antonio; Iturzaeta, Jose Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Technological innovation requires the laboratories to ensure that modifications or incorporations of new techniques do not alter the quality of their results. In an ISO 15189 accredited laboratory, flexible scope accreditation facilitates the inclusion of these changes prior to accreditation body evaluation. A strategy to perform the validation of a biochemistry analyzer in an accredited laboratory having a flexible scope is shown. Materials and methods: A validation procedur...

  8. Planning an objective and need based curriculum: the logistics with reference to the undergraduate medical education in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ramesh; Gopal, Niranjan; Srinivasan, A R; Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu

    2013-03-01

    The medical education is recently being transformed into several domains in order to adapt to the need and the value based academics which is required for the quality doctors who serve the community. Presently, the biochemistry curricula for the graduate students of medicine have been questioned by as many experts, because of their multiple lacunae. In this review, we would like to highlight the scenario which is related to the existing biochemistry curricula for graduate medical students, which have been followed in several medical schools and universities and we also hope to share our ideas for implementing objective and pragmatic curricula. Evidence based research, wherein the articles which are related to innovative teaching-learning tools are collected and the pros and cons which are related to the different methods analyzed in biochemistry point of view. Rapid changes in the content of the curriculum may not be required, but a gradual introduction of the novel approach and the methods of teaching biochemistry can be adopted into the curriculum.

  9. Biochemistry graduate student selected to meet with Nobel Laureates

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2006-01-01

    January Haile of Athens, Tenn., a Ph.D. student in biochemistry at Virginia Tech has been selected by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to attend a meeting of Nobel Laureates in Lindau, Germany, in June.

  10. Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - Vol 32, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. ... Therapeutic Impacts of Almond Oil and Olive Oil on Cholesterol Dynamics and ... Multidrug Resistance Proteins in Pancreatic Carcinoma · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  11. Can biochemistry drive drug discovery beyond simple potency measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chène, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Among the fields of expertise required to develop drugs successfully, biochemistry holds a key position in drug discovery at the interface between chemistry, structural biology and cell biology. However, taking the example of protein kinases, it appears that biochemical assays are mostly used in the pharmaceutical industry to measure compound potency and/or selectivity. This limited use of biochemistry is surprising, given that detailed biochemical analyses are commonly used in academia to unravel molecular recognition processes. In this article, I show that biochemistry can provide invaluable information on the dynamics and energetics of compound-target interactions that cannot be obtained on the basis of potency measurements and structural data. Therefore, an extensive use of biochemistry in drug discovery could facilitate the identification and/or development of new drugs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lactation performance and serum biochemistry of dairy cows fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum biochemistry concentrations (serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, total protein, and cortisol and insulin concentration) and blood hematology (red blood cell, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and percentage neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, basophiles, eosinophils and ratio of neutrophils to ...

  13. Personalized System of Instruction (Keller Method) for Medical School Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Robert A.; Shapiro, David M.

    1973-01-01

    The Keller Method requires abolishing lectures as a vehicle of information transfer in favor of a study guide and breaking the biochemistry course into a number of units each to be mastered at the student's own pace. (Editor)

  14. Assessment of learning gains in a flipped biochemistry classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojennus, Deanna Dahlke

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom has become an increasingly popular pedagogical approach to teaching and learning. In this study, learning gains were assessed in a flipped biochemistry course and compared to gains in a traditional lecture. Although measured learning gains were not significantly different between the two courses, student perception of learning gains did differ and indicates a higher level of satisfaction with the flipped lecture format. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. THE USE OF MULTIPLE TOOLS FOR TEACHING MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sé, A.B.; Oxyradical Research Group, CEL, UnB; FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil.; Passos, R.M.; Oxyradical Research Group, CEL, UnB; 2FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil.; Rochadel, A.D; FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil; Ono, A.H.; FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil; Hermes-Lima, M.; Oxyradical Research Group, CEL, UnB

    2007-01-01

    The pros and cons of Problem Based Learning (PBL) have been extensivelydiscussed in the literature. We describe PBL-like strategies used at UnB (some ofthem since 1999) that may be useful elsewhere to improve undergraduatebiochemistry teaching with clinical applications. The main activities are: (i) aseminar/poster system, (ii) a true-or-false applied biochemistry exam (prepared bypeer tutors), (iii) a 9-hour-exam on metabolism (based in actual papers), (iv) anAdvanced Biochemistry course (di...

  16. Can Polyphosphate Biochemistry Affect Biological Apatite Saturation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelon, S. J.; Matsuura, N.; Gorelikov, I.; Wynnyckyj, C.; Grynpas, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important and limiting element for life. One strategy for storing ortho phosphates (Pi) is polymerization. Polymerized Pi's (polyphosphates: (PO3-)n: polyPs) serve as a Pi bank, as well as a catiion chelator, energy source, & regulator of responses to stresses in the stationary phase of culture growth and development1. PolyP biochemistry has been investigated in yeasts, bacteria & plants2. Bigeochemical cycling of P includes the condensation of Pi into pyro (P2O7-4), & polyPs, & the release of Pi from these compounds by the hydrolytic degradation of Pi from phosphomonoester bonds. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is one of the predominate enzymes for regenerating Pi in aquatic systems3, & it cleaves Pi from polyPs. ALP is also the enzyme associated with apatite biomineralization in vertebrates4. PolyP was proposed to be the ALP substrate in bone mineralization5. Where calcium ions are plentiful in many aquatic environments, there is no requirement for aquatic life to generate Ca-stores. However, terrestrial vertebrates benefit from a bioavailable Ca-store such as apatite. The Pi storage strategy of polymerizing PO4-3 into polyPs dovetails well with Ca-banking, as polyPs sequester Ca, forming a neutral calcium polyphosphate (Ca-polyP: (Ca(PO3)2)n) complex. This neutral complex represents a high total [Ca+2] & [PO4-3], without the threat of inadvertent apatite precipitation, as the free [Ca+2] & [PO4-3], and therefore apatite saturation, are zero. Recent identification of polyP in regions of bone resorption & calcifying cartilage5 suggests that vertebrates may use polyP chemistry to bank Ca+2 and PO4-3. In vitro experiments with nanoparticulate Ca-polyP & ALP were undertaken to determine if carbonated apatite could precipitate from 1M Ca-polyP in Pi-free “physiological fluid” (0.1 M NaCl, 2 mM Ca+2, 0.8 mM Mg+2, pH ~8.0 ±0.5, 37 °C), as this is estimated to generate the [Ca+2] & [PO4-3] required to form the apatite content of bone tissue

  17. Using 3DClass To Flip Biochemistry Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The flipped classroom inverts traditional teaching methods, in order to have studentsprepared for topics and techniques covered in the following meeting. This approach wasadopted in a biochemistry course taught to biology freshmen students at the University ofCampinas, using a Virtual Learning Environment called 3DClass. Before each classroomsession, a quiz was delivered covering the following topic and students were allowed totake quizzes as many times as they wanted. This approach was utilized in order to betterprepare students in classes and to perform lab experiments. Every student attempt wasrecorded in a database. Before each classroom session, the instructors were provided witha summary of the class answers, highlighting questions where students had more difficultyand the ones that scored higher. This kind of information was helpful to design activities tocover the topics where students had more difficulties. Based on the 3DClass records thestudents behaviors were mapped, such as students taking the quizzes seriously, studentsguessing, students answering a quiz until scoring 100%, students that continue answeringafter scoring 100% in order to increase their grades, students that never score 100%.However, the most relevant information 3DClass brought us was the possibility to identifystudent’s confidence in their answers, which could be observed by the analysis of theirattempts for each question. If they had made different choices each try, it would haveindicated a low confidence level, while always providing the same answer indicated ahigher confidence level, even whilst picking incorrect answers. This experiment haverevealed that students coming to the classroom better prepared reflected positively on thedeveloped activities, but the number of students taking the quizzes seriously were not asgreat as we had expected, indicating that more actions should be taken to improvestudents engagement with these activities.

  18. Collective Construction of Knowledge in Clinical Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Barreto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The collective construction of knowledge occurs by the convergence of ideas and semantic. This paper was made for a graduation discipline, in 2009-2, with 240students who were separated into 4 groups: morning period (M1,M2 and night period (N1,N2. This study aims the collective construction of a abstract-manual of clinical biochemistry tests, due the difficulty in comprehension of certain concepts by the students; it intends to help them in the process of knowledge acquirement. The constructivist approach was adopted and the matters of the discipline were available in a “Student Group e-mail account”, a functional communication tool. The instructions were reachable on the web. M1,M2 and N1 made one part of the study at the first period. N2 did not conclude the study at the same time period of the other groups; therefore they received a new responsibility: they were supposed to conclude and correct the manual and its application which included 90 different kinds of labor exams. A textbook has been defined containing illustrative pictures of blood collection and biosecurity. Three banners were exposed inside the hall of the institution. Collective work is important for the effective arrangement in health area. In the process of teaching/learning, the teacher must proceed on practices and methodologies aiming the development of the student competences and skills which represent its professional identity.

  19. Medicinal gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.; Cottrill, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A major use of gold compounds in the pharmaceutical industry is for anti-arthritic agents. The disease itself is not understood and little is known about the way in which the drugs act, but detailed pictures of the distribution of gold in the body are available, and some of the relevant biochemistry is beginning to emerge. The purpose of this article is to give a survey of the types of compounds presently employed in medicine, of the distribution of gold in the body which results from their use, and of some relevant chemistry. Emphasis is placed on results obtained in the last few years

  20. The Biochemistry Over 20 Years In The High School Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E.S. Rocha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available   The Biochemistry Over 20 Years In The High School Textbooks   Rocha, C. E. S.1; Büttenbender, M. D.1; Denardin, E.L.G.2, Roehrs, R.1,2 1Grupo Interdisciplinar de Pesquisa em Práticas de Ensino, UNIPAMPA, RS. 2Laboratório de Estudos Físico Químicos e Produtos Naturais, UNIPAMPA, RS.   INTRODUCTION: Many teachers make use of textbook to lead content in the classroom. The chemistry books introduce concepts that should relate biochemistry to students in schools. It is important that this first contact turns out into an encouraging experience for the students, because once it worked as expected it arouses interest and makes the students see themselves curious to delve into the subject. The research aims to evaluate the presence of related concepts in biochemistry textbooks in chemistry in high school, over 20 years. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In order to perform this study, we analyzed the following content related to biochemistry: proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids in the books "Chemistry - Structure of Matter and Organic Chemistry" of the year 1993 and the book "Chemistry in approach to daily life" of the year 2012 with the purpose of verifying the changes in the content of biochemistry in the last 20 years. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: In the 90s, as used in the book, concepts and explanations are introduced in a very objective approach, making a total of 22 pages. The current largest is 23 pages with experiments and curiosities. Through analysis we found that current textbooks present the same issues related to biochemistry, however, a greater amount of data, bringing students to more examples and applications in everyday life. Today we see that the contents and processes are most exploited and that there is a concern on the importance of the study of issues that relate to biochemistry. CONCLUSIONS: The study of the biochemistry textbooks has been more attractive in recent years, contextualizing content with the daily life of

  1. The Biochemistry Show: a new and fun tool for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H Ono

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional methods to teach biochemistry in most universities are based on the memorization of chemical structures,  biochemical  pathways  and  reagent  names,  which  is  many  times  dismotivating  for  the  students.  We presently describe an innovative, interactive and alternative method for teaching biochemistry to medical and nutrition undergraduate students, called the Biochemistry Show (BioBio Show.The Biobio show is based on active participation of the students. They are divided in groups and the groups face each other. One group faces another one group at a time, in a game based on true or false questions that involve subjects of applied biochemistry (exercise, obesity, diabetes, cholesterol, free radicals, among others. The questions of the Show are previously elaborated by senior students. The Biobio Show has four phases, the first one is a selection exam, and from the second to the fourth phase, eliminatory confrontations happen. On a confrontation, the first group must select a certain quantity of questions for the opponent to answer.  The group who choses the questions must know how to answer and justify the selected questions. This procedure is repeated on all phases of the show. On the last phase, the questions used are taken from an exam previously performed by the students: either the 9-hour biochemistry exam (Sé et al. A 9-hour biochemistry exam. An iron man competition or a good way of evaluating undergraduate students? SBBq 2005, abstract K-6 or the True-or-False exam (TFE (Sé et al. Are tutor-students capable of writing good biochemistry exams? SBBq 2004, abstract K-18. The winner group receives an extra 0,5 point on the final grade. Over 70% of the students informed on a questionnaire that the Biobio Show is a valuable tool for learning biochemistry.    That is a new way to enrich the discussion of biochemistry in the classroom without the students getting bored. Moreover, learning

  2. Applications of synchrotron radiation in biology and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khole, V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the important role of synchrotron radiation in dealing with problems in various branches of biology and medicine, viz. molecular biology, molecular biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology, X-ray microscopy, molecular surgery, medical diagnostics (angiography, X-ray radiography, forensic medicine, element analysis), environmental biology, pollution control and photobiology. (author). 15 refs., 9 figs

  3. The Use of Orientation/Decision/Do/Discuss/Reflect (OD3R) Method to Increase Critical Thinking Skill and Practical Skill in Biochemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Yunita Arian Sani; Senam, Senam; Laksono, Endang W.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed an OD3R method that can be applied on Biochemistry learning. This OD3R consists of 5 phases: orientation, decision, do, discuss, and reflect to connect lessons in the class with practice in the laboratory. Implementation of OD3R method was done in 2 universities in Yogyakarta to increase critical thinking skill and practical…

  4. Are biochemistry interpretative comments helpful? Results of a general practitioner and nurse practitioner survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Ian M

    2008-01-01

    Adding or incorporating clinical interpretative comments on biochemistry results is widespread in UK laboratories; although this consumes considerable human resource, there is still little evidence to suggest that it is either effective or appreciated by our clinical colleagues. I therefore decided to survey our local general practitioners (GPs) and nurse practitioners to analyse whether they found biochemistry comments on reports helpful. A simple questionnaire was designed and sent to 159 GPs and 81 nurse practitioners asking them whether they found this activity useful for the limited range of test groups that we routinely comment on and also whether they would like to see commenting on more groups of tests. Overall, 49.6% of questionnaires were returned. Of these, there was overwhelming support for commenting on reports and 77% would like to see comments on a greater range of tests. Although adding clinical interpretative comments is very time-consuming for senior laboratory staff, there is overwhelming support of this activity among our GPs and nurse practitioner users; therefore, our local policy of routinely adding clinical comments will remain for the foreseeable future.

  5. FACEBOOK AS A MEDIATION TOOL IN BIOCHEMISTRY DISCIPLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current students generation are daily connected to the Internet, wich encourages the use of mobile tools in education. Many of the students of Biochemistry feel apprehensive about the discipline and the use of facebook may contribute, among other factors, motivating them. Objectives: It was analyzed the use of facebook as a mediator and motivator in the discipline of Biochemistry, basing on socioconstrutivist interventions. Material and methods: This work was developed in the action-research perspective, using the quali-quantitative method. An investigative questionnaire was used, using Likert scale and open questions, to investigate the facebook use, as well as the preferences of students, focusing on Biochemistry group in the Biomedicine course.  The posts were analyzed identifying: frequency of the interaction`s types (post, comment, likes;  interaction's categories (question, answer, motivational; and the content itself of the post. Results: It was highlighted students' interest to search materials, answering questions, and especially seeking information about the discipline. It was emphasized that the group was motivating for learning Biochemistry, encouragement the group to study, with quick and easy access to the professor by chat. Conclusions: The results indicate a preference for students at facebook, with a great motivational potential, is at easy access to colleagues, professor and monitor, or even the ease of obtaining the materials and ask questions in real time, indicating that this tool as a possible way, still little explored, to enhance the teaching of Biochemistry.

  6. Lawrence and his laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellbron, J.L.; Seidel, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The birthplace of nuclear chemistry and nuclear medicine is the subject of this study of the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, where Ernest Lawrence used local and national technological, economic, and manpower resources to build the cyclotron

  7. Center for Neuroscience & Regenerative Medicine

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the U.S. Department of Defense...

  8. Prospects in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pink, V.; Johannsen, B.; Muenze, R.

    1990-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, a sequence of revolutioning research up to the simple and efficient application in routine has always then taken place when in an interdisciplinary teamwork new radiochemical tracers and/or new instrumentation had become available. At present we are at the beginning of a phase that means to be in-vivo-biochemistry, the targets of which are molecular interactions in the form of enzymatic reactions, ligand-receptor interactions or immunological reactions. The possibility to use positron-emitting radionuclides of bioelements in biomolecules or drugs to measure their distribution in the living organism by positron-emission tomography (PET) is gaining admittance into the pretentious themes of main directions of medical research. Diagnostic routine application of biochemically oriented nuclear medicine methods are predominantly expected from the transmission of knowledge in PET research to the larger appliable emission tomography with gamma-emitting tracers (SPECT). (author)

  9. Current quality assurance concepts and considerations for quality control of in-clinic biochemistry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Sally; Harr, K E; Rishniw, Mark; Pion, Paul

    2013-01-15

    Quality assurance is an implied concept inherent in every consumer's purchase of a product or service. In laboratory testing, quality assurance encompasses preanalytic (sampling, transport, and handling prior to testing), analytic (measurement), and postanalytic (reporting and interpretation) factors. Quality-assurance programs require that procedures are in place to detect errors in all 3 components and that the procedures are characterized by both documentation and correction of errors. There are regulatory bodies that provide mandatory standards for and regulation of human medical laboratories. No such regulations exist for veterinary laboratory testing. The American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards Committee was formed in 1996 in response to concerns of ASVCP members about quality assurance and quality control in laboratories performing veterinary testing. Guidelines for veterinary laboratory testing have been developed by the ASVCP. The purpose of this report was to provide an overview of selected quality-assurance concepts and to provide recommendations for quality control for in-clinic biochemistry testing in general veterinary practice.

  10. Sample collections from healthy volunteers for biological variation estimates' update: a new project undertaken by the Working Group on Biological Variation established by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carobene, Anna; Strollo, Marta; Jonker, Niels; Barla, Gerhard; Bartlett, William A; Sandberg, Sverre; Sylte, Marit Sverresdotter; Røraas, Thomas; Sølvik, Una Ørvim; Fernandez-Calle, Pilar; Díaz-Garzón, Jorge; Tosato, Francesca; Plebani, Mario; Coşkun, Abdurrahman; Serteser, Mustafa; Unsal, Ibrahim; Ceriotti, Ferruccio

    2016-10-01

    Biological variation (BV) data have many fundamental applications in laboratory medicine. At the 1st Strategic Conference of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) the reliability and limitations of current BV data were discussed. The EFLM Working Group on Biological Variation is working to increase the quality of BV data by developing a European project to establish a biobank of samples from healthy subjects to be used to produce high quality BV data. The project involved six European laboratories (Milan, Italy; Bergen, Norway; Madrid, Spain; Padua, Italy; Istanbul, Turkey; Assen, The Netherlands). Blood samples were collected from 97 volunteers (44 men, aged 20-60 years; 43 women, aged 20-50 years; 10 women, aged 55-69 years). Initial subject inclusion required that participants completed an enrolment questionnaire to verify their health status. The volunteers provided blood specimens once per week for 10 weeks. A short questionnaire was completed and some laboratory tests were performed at each sampling consisting of blood collected under controlled conditions to provide serum, K2EDTA-plasma and citrated-plasma samples. Samples from six out of the 97 enroled subjects were discarded as a consequence of abnormal laboratory measurements. A biobank of 18,000 aliquots was established consisting of 120 aliquots of serum, 40 of EDTA-plasma, and 40 of citrated-plasma from each subject. The samples were stored at -80 °C. A biobank of well-characterised samples collected under controlled conditions has been established delivering a European resource to enable production of contemporary BV data.

  11. Long story short: an introduction to the short-term and long-term Six Sigma quality and its importance in the laboratory medicine for the management of extra-analytical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ialongo, Cristiano; Bernardini, Sergio

    2018-06-18

    There is a compelling need for quality tools that enable effective control of the extra-analytical phase. In this regard, Six Sigma seems to offer a valid methodological and conceptual opportunity, and in recent times, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine has adopted it for indicating the performance requirements for non-analytical laboratory processes. However, the Six Sigma implies a distinction between short-term and long-term quality that is based on the dynamics of the processes. These concepts are still not widespread and applied in the field of laboratory medicine although they are of fundamental importance to exploit the full potential of this methodology. This paper reviews the Six Sigma quality concepts and shows how they originated from Shewhart's control charts, in respect of which they are not an alternative but a completion. It also discusses the dynamic nature of process and how it arises, concerning particularly the long-term dynamic mean variation, and explains why this leads to the fundamental distinction of quality we previously mentioned.

  12. My Lifelong Passion for Biochemistry and Anaerobic Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thauer, Rudolf Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Early parental influence led me first to medical school, but after developing a passion for biochemistry and sensing the need for a deeper foundation, I changed to chemistry. During breaks between semesters, I worked in various biochemistry labs to acquire a feeling for the different areas of investigation. The scientific puzzle that fascinated me most was the metabolism of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium kluyveri, which I took on in 1965 in Karl Decker's lab in Freiburg, Germany. I quickly realized that little was known about the biochemistry of strict anaerobes such as clostridia, methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate-reducing bacteria and that these were ideal model organisms to study fundamental questions of energy conservation, CO2 fixation, and the evolution of metabolic pathways. My passion for anaerobes was born then and is unabated even after 50 years of study.

  13. Blended learning in biochemistry education: analysis of medical students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Wardenski, Rosilaine; de Espíndola, Marina Bazzo; Struchiner, Miriam; Giannella, Taís Rabetti

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze first-year UFRJ medical students' perceptions about the implementation of a blended learning (BL) experience in their Biochemistry I course. During the first semester of 2009, three Biochemistry professors used the Constructore course management system to develop virtual learning environments (VLEs) for complementing course Modules I, II, and IV, using different resources and activities. Forty-nine students (46%) took part in the study. Results show that, in general, students gave positive evaluations to their experiences with BL, indicating that the VLEs have not only motivated but also facilitated learning. Most of the students reported that access to resources in the three modules provided a more in-depth approach to Biochemistry education and greater study autonomy. Students suggested that the VLEs could be better used for promoting greater communication among participants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Using augmented reality to teach and learn biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Garzón, Juan Carlos; Magrini, Marcio Luiz; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Understanding metabolism and metabolic pathways constitutes one of the central aims for students of biological sciences. Learning metabolic pathways should be focused on the understanding of general concepts and core principles. New technologies such Augmented Reality (AR) have shown potential to improve assimilation of biochemistry abstract concepts because students can manipulate 3D molecules in real time. Here we describe an application named Augmented Reality Metabolic Pathways (ARMET), which allowed students to visualize the 3D molecular structure of substrates and products, thus perceiving changes in each molecule. The structural modification of molecules shows students the flow and exchange of compounds and energy through metabolism. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):417-420, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Evaluation of locally established reference intervals for hematology and biochemistry parameters in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, Collins; Oyaro, Boaz; Odipo, Richard; Otieno, Fredrick; Alemnji, George; Williamson, John; Zeh, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Important differences have been demonstrated in laboratory parameters from healthy persons in different geographical regions and populations, mostly driven by a combination of genetic, demographic, nutritional, and environmental factors. Despite this, European and North American derived laboratory reference intervals are used in African countries for patient management, clinical trial eligibility, and toxicity determination; which can result in misclassification of healthy persons as having laboratory abnormalities. An observational prospective cohort study known as the Kisumu Incidence Cohort Study (KICoS) was conducted to estimate the incidence of HIV seroconversion and identify determinants of successful recruitment and retention in preparation for an HIV vaccine/prevention trial among young adults and adolescents in western Kenya. Laboratory values generated from the KICoS were compared to published region-specific reference intervals and the 2004 NIH DAIDS toxicity tables used for the trial. About 1106 participants were screened for the KICoS between January 2007 and June 2010. Nine hundred and fifty-three participants aged 16 to 34 years, HIV-seronegative, clinically healthy, and non-pregnant were selected for this analysis. Median and 95% reference intervals were calculated for hematological and biochemistry parameters. When compared with both published region-specific reference values and the 2004 NIH DAIDS toxicity table, it was shown that the use of locally established reference intervals would have resulted in fewer participants classified as having abnormal hematological or biochemistry values compared to US derived reference intervals from DAIDS (10% classified as abnormal by local parameters vs. >40% by US DAIDS). Blood urea nitrogen was most often out of range if US based intervals were used: 83% by US based reference intervals. Differences in reference intervals for hematological and biochemical parameters between western and African populations

  16. Submarine Medicine Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Submarine Medicine Team conducts basic and applied research on biomedical aspects of submarine and diving environments. It focuses on ways to optimize the health...

  17. The use of multiple tools for teaching medical biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sé, Alexandre B; Passos, Renato M; Ono, André H; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2008-03-01

    In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using topics of applied biochemistry); 2) a true/false applied biochemistry exam (written by peer tutors); 3) a 9-h exam on metabolism (based in real publications); 4) the Advanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, where students learn how to read and criticize real medical papers); 5) experiments about nutrition and metabolism, using students as volunteers, and about free radicals (real science for students); 6) the BioBio blog (taking advantage of the "web age," this enhances out of class exchanges of information between the professor, students, and peer tutors); 7) student lectures on public health issues and metabolic disorders directed to the community and lay people; and 8) the BioBio quiz show. The main objective of these activities is to provide students with a more practical and interesting approach to biochemistry, such as the application of theoretical knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments, media information, and scientific discoveries). In addition, we emphasize the importance of peer tutor activities for optimized learning of both students and peer tutors, the importance of a closer interaction between students and teaching staff, and the necessity to initiate students precociously in two broad fields of medical activity: "real" basic science and contact with the public (also helping students--future doctors and nutritionists--to be able to communicate with lay people). Most activities were evaluated by the students through written questionnaires and informal conversations, along various semesters, indicating good acceptance and approval of these methods. Good student scores in the

  18. Conference scene: Summary of the 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories with international participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasevici, Eugen

    2011-10-01

    laboratory diagnostics in hematology, biochemistry, immunology, oncology, microbiology and metabolic diseases. A prominent consideration was given to value added to laboratory medicine in the frame of managed care and quality management. The Conference was accompanied by a laboratory equipment and reagents exhibition with the participation of nine companies, also sponsors of the conference. Three workshops pointed out the presence of the most well known of them: Abbott, Roche and Nobis.

  19. Effectiveness of Preanalytic Practices on Contamination and Diagnostic Accuracy of Urine Cultures: a Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, Jacob; Leibach, Elizabeth K.; Weissfeld, Alice S.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Sautter, Robert L.; Baselski, Vickie; Rodahl, Debra; Peterson, Edward J.; Cornish, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background. Urinary tract infection (UTI) in the United States is the most common bacterial infection, and urine cultures often make up the largest portion of workload for a hospital-based microbiology laboratory. Appropriately managing the factors affecting the preanalytic phase of urine culture contributes significantly to the generation of meaningful culture results that ultimately affect patient diagnosis and management. Urine culture contamination can be reduced with proper techniques for urine collection, preservation, storage, and transport, the major factors affecting the preanalytic phase of urine culture. Objectives. The purposes of this review were to identify and evaluate preanalytic practices associated with urine specimens and to assess their impact on the accuracy of urine culture microbiology. Specific practices included collection methods for men, women, and children; preservation of urine samples in boric acid solutions; and the effect of refrigeration on stored urine. Practice efficacy and effectiveness were measured by two parameters: reduction of urine culture contamination and increased accuracy of patient diagnosis. The CDC Laboratory Medicine Best Practices (LMBP) initiative's systematic review method for assessment of quality improvement (QI) practices was employed. Results were then translated into evidence-based practice guidelines. Search strategy. A search of three electronic bibliographic databases (PubMed, SCOPUS, and CINAHL), as well as hand searching of bibliographies from relevant information sources, for English-language articles published between 1965 and 2014 was conducted. Selection criteria. The search contained the following medical subject headings and key text words: urinary tract infections, UTI, urine/analysis, urine/microbiology, urinalysis, specimen handling, preservation, biological, preservation, boric acid, boric acid/borate, refrigeration, storage, time factors, transportation, transport time, time delay

  20. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Scientific interests of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences have evolved from classical biochemistry, biophysics and physiological chemistry to up-to-date molecular biology. Research interests are focussed on replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA; regulation of gene expression at various levels; biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins; gene sequencing and functional analysis of open reading frames; structure, function and regulation of enzymes; conformation of proteins and peptides; modelling of structures and prediction of functions of proteins; mechanisms of electron transfer in polypeptides

  1. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Scientific interests of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences have evolved from classical biochemistry, biophysics and physiological chemistry to up-to-date molecular biology. Research interests are focussed on replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA; regulation of gene expression at various levels; biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins; gene sequencing and functional analysis of open reading frames; structure, function and regulation of enzymes; conformation of proteins and peptides; modelling of structures and prediction of functions of proteins; mechanisms of electron transfer in polypeptides.

  2. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  3. Preanalytical errors in medical laboratories: a review of the available methodologies of data collection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jamie; Atherton, Jennifer; Costelloe, Seán J; Pourmahram, Ghazaleh; Stretton, Adam; Cornes, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Preanalytical errors have previously been shown to contribute a significant proportion of errors in laboratory processes and contribute to a number of patient safety risks. Accreditation against ISO 15189:2012 requires that laboratory Quality Management Systems consider the impact of preanalytical processes in areas such as the identification and control of non-conformances, continual improvement, internal audit and quality indicators. Previous studies have shown that there is a wide variation in the definition, repertoire and collection methods for preanalytical quality indicators. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry Working Group on Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety has defined a number of quality indicators for the preanalytical stage, and the adoption of harmonized definitions will support interlaboratory comparisons and continual improvement. There are a variety of data collection methods, including audit, manual recording processes, incident reporting mechanisms and laboratory information systems. Quality management processes such as benchmarking, statistical process control, Pareto analysis and failure mode and effect analysis can be used to review data and should be incorporated into clinical governance mechanisms. In this paper, The Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine PreAnalytical Specialist Interest Group review the various data collection methods available. Our recommendation is the use of the laboratory information management systems as a recording mechanism for preanalytical errors as this provides the easiest and most standardized mechanism of data capture.

  4. DDInnere als Ebook-Programmpaket für Innere Medizin mit den Modulen Diagnosen, Leitsymptome und Laborwerte / DDInnere as interactive ebook package for internal medicine featuring diagnoses, symptoms and laboratory values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weylandt , Karsten-H.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DDInnere is a symptom-based compendium of internal medicine and consists of three separate ebooks for diagnoses, symptoms and laboratory values for handheld computers and smartphones. Our programs aim to provide medical knowledge at the point of care. This is also achieved by use of the well established Mobipocket Reader, which is the runtime environment not only for our programs but as well for medical ebooks from other providers (http://www.mobipocket.de. Future aims include a more detailed understanding of the role of these applications in medical care and an even better integration of our solutions into clinical processes.

  5. Improving quality in the preanalytical phase through innovation, on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    process remain, especially in the preanalytical phase ranging from test ordering to obtaining and managing the biological specimens. The Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE) of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has planned many activities aimed...... at mitigating the vulnerability of the preanalytical phase, including the organization of three European meetings in the past 7 years. Hence, this collective article follows the previous three opinion papers that were published by the EFLM WGPRE on the same topic, and brings together the summaries...

  6. Teaching structure: student use of software tools for understanding macromolecular structure in an undergraduate biochemistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Sheila S; O'Hara, Patricia B; Williamson, Patrick L; Springer, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of structural representation tools into both laboratory and homework activities. First, early in the course we introduce the use of readily available open-source software for visualizing protein structure, coincident with modules on amino acid and peptide bond properties. Second, we use these same software tools in lectures and incorporate images and other structure representations in homework tasks. Third, we require a capstone project in which teams of students examine a protein-nucleic acid complex and then use the software tools to illustrate for their classmates the salient features of the structure, relating how the structure helps explain biological function. To ensure engagement with a range of software and database features, we generated a detailed template file that can be used to explore any structure, and that guides students through specific applications of many of the software tools. In presentations, students demonstrate that they are successfully interpreting structural information, and using representations to illustrate particular points relevant to function. Thus, over the semester students integrate information about structural features of biological macromolecules into the larger discussion of the chemical basis of function. Together these assignments provide an accessible introduction to structural representation tools, allowing students to add these methods to their biochemical toolboxes early in their scientific development. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Use of Case-Based or Hands-On Laboratory Exercises with Physiology Lectures Improves Knowledge Retention, but Veterinary Medicine Students Prefer Case-Based Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, Renee M.; Cupp, Andrea S.; Wood, Jennifer R.

    2018-01-01

    Didactic lectures are prevalent in physiology courses within veterinary medicine programs, but more active learning methods have also been utilized. Our goal was to identify the most appropriate learning method to augment the lecture component of our physiology course. We hypothesized that case-based learning would be well received by students and…

  8. Teaching of biochemistry: analyze of works presented in Congress the Society Brazilian Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - SBBq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Escoto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent decades the strategies to improve science education has grown exponentially. Thus, the scientific production in the area is also growing, with the purpose of identifying parameters and methodologies that contribute to their qualification. The teaching of biochemistry is intimately linked to that context. However, it is still little explored in basic education and with character technicist in higher education. The aim of this study was identify areas that received most attention in the scientific literature about teaching and education in biochemistry that were presented at the Congress of the Brazilian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2004 to 2012. Material and Methods: To conduct the survey were analyzed summaries available on the website of the Brazilian Journal of Education for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology published in the proceedings of the event, where they were encontrados176 summaries. For expression of results was used categorization from the content analysis. Results and Discussion: The results observed to establish nine categories based on the analysis of the titles and content of the work, which, in descending order, were: information and communication technologies, alternative methods teaching and learning, biochemistry in Elementary Education and / or Medium, experiential activities, teacher training, dissemination of science, proposition and evaluation of content and / or science curricular and History and Philosophy. It is noticed that the three most important categories were consolidated along editions. In education, however, there was a significant decrease in the number of abstracts submitted abstracts for the past five years. Conclusions: We conclude that all categories listed seeking alternatives to improve teaching practices and promote education of biochemistry in different contexts.

  9. Techniques in cancer research: a laboratory manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, M.G.; Seshadri, R.; Mulherkar, R.; Mukhopadhyaya, R.

    1995-01-01

    Cancer Research Institute (CRI) works on all facets of cancer using the latest biomedical tools. For this purpose, it has established modern laboratories in different branches of cancer biology such as cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, chemical and viral oncogenesis, genetics of cancer including genetic engineering, tissue culture, cancer chemotherapy, neurooncology and comparative oncology. This manual describes the protocols used in these laboratories. There is also a chapter on handling and care of laboratory animals, an essential component of any modern cancer biology laboratory. It is hoped that the manual will be useful to biomedical laboratories, specially those interested in cancer research. refs., tabs., figs

  10. Haematology, serum biochemistry and organ weight changes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 50-60g were randomly allocated to five dietary treatments in a completely randomized design to investigate the haematology, serum biochemistry and organ weight changes on diets containing processed dehulled jack bean. Four diets containing 10% crude protein were formulated ...

  11. Haematology and serum biochemistry of laying hens fed red pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hematology and serum biochemistry of ISA brown laying hens fed red pepper (Capsicum annum. L.) as feed additive in their diet was studied. Sixty (60) laying birds (in their 32nd week) were randomly allotted to four different dietary treatments with graded levels of red pepper (Capsicum annum. L.) as additive.

  12. Imaging spectroscopy of foliar biochemistry in forestry environments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote sensing estimates of leaf biochemicals provide valuable information on ecosystem functioning, vitality and state at local to global spatial scales. This paper aims to give an overview of the state of the art of foliar biochemistry assessment in general and, where possible, attention is given to: (1) Eucalyptus forest ...

  13. Blood and serum biochemistry of omentopexed West African Dwarf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the blood and serum biochemistry following peritoneum sutured and not sutured techniques of laparotomy sutures in omentopexed WAD goats. Twentyfive male WAD goats were randomly divided into 5 groups (A – E). In group A, peritoneum was not sutured, while in group B, the peritoneum was ...

  14. Aspects of the serum biochemistry, carcass quality and organoleptic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of feeding alkaline treated date pits (TDP) on serum biochemistry, carcass quality and organoleptic characteristics were investigated in 396 commercial broiler chicks of the Hybro strain. The values of glucose, albumin, protein, calcium, pH and GPT and GOT showed no significance difference when compared ...

  15. Semen quality, biochemistry and mineral content of five strains of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to evaluate the genetic effect on semen quality, biochemistry and mineral content of three strains of Nigerian indigenous and two exotic cocks. One hundred (100) adult local breeding cocks comprising 20 normal, 20 frizzle and 20 naked necks, 20 dominant black and 20 dominant blue feather were ...

  16. Assessment of Learning Gains in a Flipped Biochemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojennus, Deanna Dahlke

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom has become an increasingly popular pedagogical approach to teaching and learning. In this study, learning gains were assessed in a flipped biochemistry course and compared to gains in a traditional lecture. Although measured learning gains were not significantly different between the two courses, student perception of…

  17. Using Augmented Reality to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Garzón, Juan Carlos; Magrini, Marcio Luiz; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding metabolism and metabolic pathways constitutes one of the central aims for students of biological sciences. Learning metabolic pathways should be focused on the understanding of general concepts and core principles. New technologies such Augmented Reality (AR) have shown potential to improve assimilation of biochemistry abstract…

  18. Biochemistry Instructors' Perceptions of Analogies and Their Classroom Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, MaryKay; Bussey, Thomas J.; Bodner, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemistry education relies heavily on students' abilities to conceptualize abstract cellular and molecular processes, mechanisms, and components. From a constructivist standpoint, students build their understandings of these abstract processes by connecting, expanding, or revising their prior conceptions and experiences. As such, biochemistry…

  19. Estimating foliar biochemistry from hyperspectral data in mixed forest canopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber Gharib, Silvia; Kneubühler, Mathias; Psomas, Achilleas

    2008-01-01

    data to estimate the foliar concentration of nitrogen, carbon and water in three mixed forest canopies in Switzerland. With multiple linear regression models, continuum-removed and normalized HyMap spectra were related to foliar biochemistry on an individual tree level. The six spectral wavebands used...

  20. Undergraduate Performance in Solving Ill-Defined Biochemistry Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensibaugh, Cheryl A.; Madrid, Nathaniel J.; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Anderson, William L.; Osgood, Marcy P.

    2017-01-01

    With growing interest in promoting skills related to the scientific process, we studied performance in solving ill-defined problems demonstrated by graduating biochemistry majors at a public, minority-serving university. As adoption of techniques for facilitating the attainment of higher-order learning objectives broadens, so too does the need to…

  1. The Use of Multiple Tools for Teaching Medical Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Se, Alexandre B.; Passos, Renato M.; Ono, Andre H.; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using…

  2. Using Assessment to Improve Learning in the Biochemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, major drivers of undergraduate science education reform including the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) have called on college and university instructors to take a more scientific approach to their teaching. Although many biochemistry instructors are gaining confidence in using…

  3. The New Biochemistry: Blending the Traditional with the Other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Rodney

    2000-01-01

    Points out the difficulties in designing and presenting a modern chemistry course with an overabundance of topics to cover in a limited amount of class time. Presents a model syllabi for biochemistry majors and the shorter survey course for non-majors, usually consisting of health professionals and biological science majors. (Contains 24…

  4. Blog Construction as an Effective Tool in Biochemistry Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas Rolim, Estêvão; Martins de Oliveira, Julia; Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Garcia Caldas, Natasha; Fernandes Lobo, Felipe; André Polli, Démerson; Campos, Élida G.; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    To boost active learning in undergraduate students, they were given the task of preparing blogs on topics of clinical biochemistry. This "experiment" lasted for 12 teaching-semesters (from 2008 to 2013), and included a survey on the blogs' usefulness at the end of each semester. The survey (applied in the 2008-2010 period) used a…

  5. Ethnobotany, biochemistry and pharmacology of Minthostachys (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Lebuhn, A N

    2008-08-13

    The South American mint genus Minthostachys is of great importance in the Andes as a medicinal, aromatic, culinary and commercial essential oil plant. After decades of taxonomic confusion and virtual indeterminability of specimens, new systematic and taxonomic work has been conducted in recent years. The present paper attempts to summarize the state of knowledge about Minthostachys with a focus on ethnobotany, analyses of essential oil content and pharmacology, to identify the currently accepted species names for the plants examined in these previous studies, and to assess where additional research is needed. All available studies on Minthostachys were obtained and evaluated. Herbaria were contacted to identify voucher specimens cited in the respective publications. The great majority of published studies was conducted on a single species, Argentinean Minthostachys verticillata. In contrast, the most widely distributed and well-known species (Minthostachys mollis) as well as several locally important and intensively used species (e.g., Minthostachys acutifolia) have received disproportionately little attention, and virtually nothing is known about the local endemics among the 17 species currently recognized. In many cases, however, it is difficult to relate the results to taxonomic entities due to the lack of voucher specimens. Future research efforts should especially be directed at studying the chemistry and potential for use of several common but so far neglected species of the central and northern Andes, at disentangling environmental and genetic influences on essential oil composition, at prerequisites for cultivation, and at the pharmacological basis of the most important traditional uses. Because of the morphological complexity of the genus, future researchers are urged to deposit voucher specimens of the plants used in their studies to facilitate species identification and to make the results more comparable and reproducible.

  6. An interactive computer lab of the galvanic cell for students in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrand, Emma; Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Friedman, Ran

    2018-01-01

    We describe an interactive module that can be used to teach basic concepts in electrochemistry and thermodynamics to first year natural science students. The module is used together with an experimental laboratory and improves the students' understanding of thermodynamic quantities such as Δ r G, Δ r H, and Δ r S that are calculated but not directly measured in the lab. We also discuss how new technologies can substitute some parts of experimental chemistry courses, and improve accessibility to course material. Cloud computing platforms such as CoCalc facilitate the distribution of computer codes and allow students to access and apply interactive course tools beyond the course's scope. Despite some limitations imposed by cloud computing, the students appreciated the approach and the enhanced opportunities to discuss study questions with their classmates and instructor as facilitated by the interactive tools. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(1):58-65, 2018. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Differences in serum biochemistry between breast-fed and formula-fed infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzee-Chung Wu

    2011-11-01

    Conclusion: Different sources of nutrition may result in different metabolic responses; these differences are reflected by different serum biochemistries. The reference values for serum biochemistry levels also differ according to the infant’s postnatal age.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine. Present applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    At the workshop on nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine held at Saclay, the following topics were presented: physical principles of NMR; NMR spectroscopy signal to noise ratio; principles of NMR imaging; methods of NMR imaging; image options in NMR; biological significance of contrast in proton NMR imaging; measurement and significance of relaxation times in cancers; NMR contrast agents; NMR for in-vivo biochemistry; potential effects and hazards of NMR applications in Medicine; difficulties of NMR implantation in Hospitals; NMR imaging of brain tumors and diseases of the spinal cord; NMR and Nuclear Medicine in brain diseases [fr

  9. Order of blood draw: Opinion Paper by the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornes, Michael; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée; Grankvist, Kjell; Ibarz, Mercedes; Kristensen, Gunn; Lippi, Giuseppe; Nybo, Mads; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2017-01-01

    It has been well reported over recent years that most errors within the total testing process occur in the pre-analytical phase (46%-68.2%), an area that is usually outside of the direct control of the laboratory and which includes sample collection (phlebotomy). National and international (WHO,

  10. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornes, Michael P.; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée; Grankvist, Kjell; Guimarães, João T.; Ibarz, Mercedes; Kovalevskaya, Svetlana; Kristensen, Gunn Bb; Lippi, Giuseppe; Nybo, Mads; Sprongl, Ludek; Sumarac, Zorica; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and

  11. Standardization of collection requirements for fasting samples: for the Working Group on Preanalytical Phase (WG-PA) of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundic, A M; Cornes, M; Grankvist, K; Lippi, G; Nybo, M

    2014-05-15

    Standardized protocols for patient preparation for laboratory testing are currently lacking. Moreover, a great heterogeneity exists in the definitions of "fasting" currently being used among healthcare workers and in the literature. Marked metabolic and hormonal changes occur after food ingestion, mainly due to the absorption of fluids, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and other food constituents. This postprandial response varies markedly in response to numerous factors, such as eating behavior, food composition, fasting duration, time of the day, chronic and acute smoking, coffee and alcohol consumption. It is therefore crucial to minimize the total variability by controlling as many of these modifying factors as possible. Control of the abovementioned effects on postprandial response can only be achieved by standardizing the way patients are prepared for laboratory testing, i.e. by defining the fasting duration, as well as what is and what is not allowed (e.g., coffee, tea, smoking, water) during the period of fasting prior to sample collection. The aim of this article is to describe the range of effects of different approaches to fasting on laboratory tests, and to provide a framework for the harmonization of definitions for fasting requirements for laboratory tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biochemistry Students' Ideas about Shape and Charge in Enzyme-Substrate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry is a visual discipline that requires students to develop an understanding of numerous representations. However, there is very little known about what students actually understand about the representations that are used to communicate ideas in biochemistry. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of multiple…

  13. Biochemistry - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tests. Data file File name: open_tggates_biochemistry.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-...tggates/LATEST/open_tggates_biochemistry.zip File size: 666 KB Simple search URL ...http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/open_tggates_biochemistry#en Data acquisition method - Data analy

  14. Veterinary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallfelz, F.A.; Comar, C.L.; Wentworth, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the expanding horizons of nuclear medicine, the equipment necessary for a nuclear medicine laboratory is listed, and the value of this relatively new field to the veterinary clinician is indicated. Although clinical applications to veterinary medicine have not kept pace with those of human medicine, many advances have been made, particularly in the use of in vitro techniques. Areas for expanded applications should include competitive protein binding and other in vitro procedures, particularly in connection with metabolic profile studies. Indicated also is more intensive application by the veterinarian of imaging procedures, which have been found to be of such great value to the physician. (U.S.)

  15. The Effect of Pneumatic Tube Systems on the Hemolysis of Biochemistry Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakirca, Gokhan; Erdal, Huseyin

    2017-05-01

    Pneumatic tube systems (PTSs) are widely used in many hospitals because they lead to reduced turnaround times and cost efficiency. However, PTSs may affect the quality of the blood samples transported to the laboratory. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the PTS used in our hospital on the hemolysis of the biochemical blood samples transported to the laboratory. A total of 148 samples were manually transported to the laboratory by hospital staff, 148 samples were transported with the PTS, and 113 were transported with the PTS without use of sponge-rubber inserts (PTSws). Hemolysis rates and the levels of biochemical analytes for the different transportation methods were compared. No significant difference was found between the samples transported manually and with the PTS with regard to hemolysis rate and the levels of biochemical analytes. However, the samples transported with the PTSws showed a significant difference compared with the samples transported manually and with the PTS with regard to hemolysis rate and potassium and lactate dehydrogenase levels. The percentages of the samples that exceeded the permissible threshold for the hemolysis among the samples transported manually, with the PTS, and with the PTSws were 10%, 8%, and 47%, respectively. A PTS can be used safely for transporting biochemistry blood samples to the laboratory. However, a sponge-rubber insert that holds sample tubes must be used with the PTS to prevent the hemolysis of blood samples. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Herbal medicine for the management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and associated oligo/amenorrhoea and hyperandrogenism; a review of the laboratory evidence for effects with corroborative clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentz, Susan; Abbott, Jason Anthony; Smith, Caroline Anne; Bensoussan, Alan

    2014-12-18

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prevalent, complex endocrine disorder characterised by polycystic ovaries, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism leading to symptoms of irregular menstrual cycles, hirsutism, acne and infertility. Evidence based medical management emphasises a multidisciplinary approach for PCOS, as conventional pharmaceutical treatment addresses single symptoms, may be contra-indicated, is often associated with side effects and not effective in some cases. In addition women with PCOS have expressed a strong desire for alternative treatments. This review examines the reproductive endocrine effects in PCOS for an alternative treatment, herbal medicine. The aim of this review was to identify consistent evidence from both pre-clinical and clinical research, to add to the evidence base for herbal medicine in PCOS (and associated oligo/amenorrhoea and hyperandrogenism) and to inform herbal selection in the provision clinical care for these common conditions. We undertook two searches of the scientific literature. The first search sought pre-clinical studies which explained the reproductive endocrine effects of whole herbal extracts in oligo/amenorrhoea, hyperandrogenism and PCOS. Herbal medicines from the first search informed key words for the second search. The second search sought clinical studies, which corroborated laboratory findings. Subjects included women with PCOS, menstrual irregularities and hyperandrogenism. A total of 33 studies were included in this review. Eighteen pre-clinical studies reported mechanisms of effect and fifteen clinical studies corroborated pre-clinical findings, including eight randomised controlled trials, and 762 women with menstrual irregularities, hyperandrogenism and/or PCOS. Interventions included herbal extracts of Vitex agnus-castus, Cimicifuga racemosa, Tribulus terrestris, Glycyrrhiza spp., Paeonia lactiflora and Cinnamomum cassia. Endocrine outcomes included reduced luteinising hormone (LH), prolactin

  17. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  18. Preparative Protein Production from Inclusion Bodies and Crystallization: A Seven-Week Biochemistry Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Megan J.; Snyder, W. Kalani; Westerman, Shelley; McFarland, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe how to produce and purify proteins from E. coli inclusion bodies by adapting versatile, preparative-scale techniques to the undergraduate laboratory schedule. This seven-week sequence of experiments fits into an annual cycle of research activity in biochemistry courses. Recombinant proteins are expressed as inclusion bodies, which are collected, washed, then solubilized in urea. Stepwise dialysis to dilute urea over the course of a week produces refolded protein. Column chromatography is used to purify protein into fractions, which are then analyzed with gel electrophoresis and concentration assays. Students culminate the project by designing crystallization trials in sitting-drop trays. Student evaluation of the experience has been positive, listing 5–12 new techniques learned, which are transferrable to graduate research in academia and industry. PMID:21691428

  19. Methods of albumin estimation in clinical biochemistry: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2017-06-01

    Estimation of serum and urinary albumin is routinely performed in clinical biochemistry laboratories. In the past, precipitation-based methods were popular for estimation of human serum albumin (HSA). Currently, dye-binding or immunochemical methods are widely practiced. Each of these methods has its limitations. Research endeavors to overcome such limitations are on-going. The current trends in methodological aspects of albumin estimation guiding the field have not been reviewed. Therefore, it is the need of the hour to review several aspects of albumin estimation. The present review focuses on the modern trends of research from a conceptual point of view and gives an overview of recent developments to offer the readers a comprehensive understanding of the subject. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Demystifying the Biochemistry: Theoretical Concepts and Practical Activities for High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Bard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The education goes through a crisis in their teaching-learning process, due to the fact that their contents are developed out of context, merely theoretical activities. Several scholars warn about the importance of working with experiential activities to enhance and stimulate student learning, seeking a more meaningful than we have seen in recent times. The objectives of this work are installation of a laboratory for teaching science in public school, ISEPAM, at North of Rio de Janeiro, formation of multipliers agents and promoting a Scientific Week/Exhibition involving all school community. MATERIALS AND METHODS:First, we perform the spatial organization of the laboratory, including purchase of materials/equipment. In a second step, experimental activities involving identification of Macromolecules in foods were prepared and tested. From this, we promote short courses in biochemistry for teachers to forming multiplier agents. As a conclusion of the activities of this project a Scientific Week/Exhibition was promoted in school. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Practical classes on fermentation, identification of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates were performed by teachers and students from ISEPAM. We observed in the biochemistry course which the participants have established relationships between theory and practice and also they showed interest in the insertion of experiments in their work routine.. Regarding the Scientific Week/Exhibition, students of elementary and high school participated. They were encouraged and integrated with experiment activities and thereby new talents for scientific and technological interest were identified. CONCLUSION: It was observed that the experimental activities become more attractive and challenging the search for knowledge.

  1. How to Search for Life by the Detection of Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, C. P.; Davila, A.; Sun, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    We consider how to search for life by the detection of biochemistry in three relevance case: 1) in samples returned to Earth, 2) In situ in the organic rich plume of Enceladus, and 3) On Mars, following the discovery of organics. A search for organic biomarkers can address several questions including: 1) Evidence for present or past life, 2) Evidence for a second genesis of life, 3) Hazard assessment for human explorers and sample return and 4) Detection of bioload from Earth. Some useful analogs for the search for organic biomarkers on other worlds include 1) Ancient Earth sediment record, an example of a poorly preserved ancient biochemistry, 2) Modern environments including anoxic Antarctic sediments 3)Extreme cold desert surfaces in the High Antarctic Dry Valleys 4) Extremely dry soils such as the Atacama Desert 5) Evaporites. Sample preparation is a key issue, often unappreciated in past. Illustrated by the interference of perchlorate with organic detection on Viking and SAM.

  2. Current research in Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarachand, U.; Singh, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay has been engaged in research in the frontier areas of (i) radiation biology related to tumour therapy and injury caused by free radicals; (ii) molecular basis of diseases of physiological origin; (iii) molecular aspects of chemical carcinogenesis and (iv) structure of genome and genome related functions. The gist of research and development activities carried out in the Division during the last two years are documented

  3. Current research in Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarachand, U; Singh, B B [eds.; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Div.

    1996-12-31

    The Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay has been engaged in research in the frontier areas of (i) radiation biology related to tumour therapy and injury caused by free radicals; (ii) molecular basis of diseases of physiological origin; (iii) molecular aspects of chemical carcinogenesis and (iv) structure of genome and genome related functions. The gist of research and development activities carried out in the Division during the last two years are documented.

  4. Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine. Part 3: Technical Validation of Immunohistochemistry (IHC) Assays in Clinical IHC Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakovic, Emina E; Cheung, Carol C; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Dietel, Manfred; Francis, Glenn D; Gilks, C Blake; Hall, Jacqueline A; Hornick, Jason L; Ibrahim, Merdol; Marchetti, Antonio; Miller, Keith; van Krieken, J Han; Nielsen, Soren; Swanson, Paul E; Vyberg, Mogens; Zhou, Xiaoge; Taylor, Clive R

    2017-03-01

    Validation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays is a subject that is of great importance to clinical practice as well as basic research and clinical trials. When applied to clinical practice and focused on patient safety, validation of IHC assays creates objective evidence that IHC assays used for patient care are "fit-for-purpose." Validation of IHC assays needs to be properly informed by and modeled to assess the purpose of the IHC assay, which will further determine what sphere of validation is required, as well as the scope, type, and tier of technical validation. These concepts will be defined in this review, part 3 of the 4-part series "Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine."

  5. Game Development as Didactic Strategy for Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Hornink

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that students and teachers have difficulties in learning and teaching Biochemistry due to its abstract and interconnected contents. This work proposes a didactic strategy in order to facilitate teaching and learning process in Biochemistry. The strategy was implemented with biological science undergraduate students. At first, the students were divided into groups with a specific topic to develop a game. During the semester, problem based learning cases, online activities like crossword puzzle, essay questions and educational softwares were used to present the content of each topic. The groups were oriented in classroom and online, to choose and organize contents and create ways to approach them in games. At the end of the course the groups played each other games, which were evaluated by teacher and students following some criteria like: creativity, content organization, interdisciplinarity, proposal coherence, instructions clarity, specific content. The game elaboration contributed to the development of social and cognitive functions, such as teamwork and troubleshooting, providing an interesting perspective to the student about knowledge construction process. The strategy showed up students' creativity and ability to reorganize their knowledge to a different education level. In an overview, the results indicate that the proposed didactic strategy is an effective way to enhance learning and to motivate students into Biochemistry topics.

  6. THE USE OF MULTIPLE TOOLS FOR TEACHING MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Sé

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The pros and cons of Problem Based Learning (PBL have been extensivelydiscussed in the literature. We describe PBL-like strategies used at UnB (some ofthem since 1999 that may be useful elsewhere to improve undergraduatebiochemistry teaching with clinical applications. The main activities are: (i aseminar/poster system, (ii a true-or-false applied biochemistry exam (prepared bypeer tutors, (iii a 9-hour-exam on metabolism (based in actual papers, (iv anAdvanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, (v pizza-and-pasta (formetabolism teaching and free radicals (real science for students experiments,(vi the BioBio blog (http://www.biobio-unb.blogspot.com, (vii student lectures onhealth issues directed to the community, and (viii the BioBio Show. The mainobjective of these activities is providing students with a more practical andentertaining approach to biochemistry using philosophic PBL principles such asthe application of basic knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments andscientific discoveries. We also emphasize (a the importance of peer-tutor activityfor optimized learning of students and peer tutors, (b the relevance of a closerinteraction between students and professors, and (c the necessity to initiatestudents precociously in actual basic/medical science and contact with the public.Most activities have been evaluated by the students through written questionnairesand informal conversations, for several semesters, indicating good acceptanceand approval of these methods.

  7. Lecture-free biochemistry: A Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minderhout, Vicky; Loertscher, Jennifer

    2007-05-01

    Biochemistry courses at Seattle University have been taught exclusively using process oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL) without any traditional lecture component since 1997. In these courses, students participate in a structured learning environment, which includes a preparatory assignment, an in-class activity, and a follow-up skill exercise. Instructor-designed learning activities provide the content of the course while the cooperative learning structure provides the content-free procedures that promote development of critical process skills needed for learning. This format enables students to initially explore a topic independently, work together in groups to construct and refine knowledge, and eventually develop deep understanding of the essential concepts. These stages of exploration and concept development form the foundation for application to high level biochemical problems. At the end of this course, most students report feeling confident in their knowledge of biochemistry and report substantial gains in independence, critical thinking, and respect for others. Copyright © 2007 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. 77 FR 41188 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... to general issues related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory medicine... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical... patient-centeredness of laboratory services; revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories...

  9. Advanced Biochemistry Course teach students how to make and criticize science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B Sé

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we are reporting a course of University of Brasilia called “Topics in Biochemistry”. It is offered to second semester medicine and nutrition students (around 12 who have just finished the Basic Biochemistry Course (BioBio, plus one or two third semester students, who are taking the course for the second time, as “coordinators”. This course is composed of two parallel activities: weekly meetings for scientific discussions and the peer-tutor activity.In  each  meeting,  one  student  presents  an  article.  The  topics  are  mostly  on  metabolic  biochemistry,  but  can  range from  animal  adaptability  to  Alzheimer  Disease.  The  requisite  is  that  the  article  was  published  in  a  recognized international journal (as Nature, American Journal of Physiology, New England Journal of Medicine and is adequate for group discussion. The emphasis of the discussion is greater on the methodology of science, instead of on specific details  about  particular  subjects.  What  did  the  authors  want  to  prove?  How  did  they  do  it?  Were  the  conclusions valid?  What  were  the  experimental  errors  and  omissions?  How  could  it  be  a  better  article?  Also,  it’s  a  good opportunity  to discuss statistics, methodology, and to exercise  the sense of criticism. Overall, the objective  of these discussions is to teach students how to make science and criticize science. The second attribution of the course is the peer-tutor activity. Each student is responsible for tutoring a BioBio group on a seminar/poster presentation (Hermes-Lima et al., Biochem.  Mol.Biol.Educ. 30: 30-34,2002  and is responsible for evaluating their group, always supervised by the coordinating professor. Moreover, they must elaborate a “true or false” exam (Sé et al. Are tutor-students capable of writing good biochemistry exams? SBBq 2004, abstract K-18

  10. Journal of Medical Laboratory Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Medical Laboratory Science is a Quarterly Publication of the Association of Medical Laboratory Scientists of Nigeria. It Publishes Original Research and Review Articles in All Fields of Biomedical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Covering Medical Microbiology, Medical Parasitology, Clinical Chemistry, ...

  11. Are tutor-students capable of writing good biochemistry exams?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sé Alexandre B.

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In a previous article we described the relevance of student seminars for the learning process of appliedbiochemistry for medical and nutrition students (Hermes-Lima et al., Biochem. Mol.Biol.Educ. 30:30-34,2002. First semester students of a basic biochemistry course (BioBio are divided in 10 groupsof 5 members, and each group is assigned to a specic topic (diabetes, cholesterol, etc under thesupervision of a tutor-student. The tutors have already coursed BioBio and are currently undertakingan advanced biochemistry course. In order to evaluate the learning of applied biochemistry for BioBiostudents a true or false exam (TFE is performed. This exam is made of 50 questions (5 on eachtopic elaborated by the tutors under the supervision of the teacher. The TFE corresponds to 10percent of the grade of BioBio and focus on clinical and/or applied biochemistry situations. At theend of the exam, BioBio students were asked to share their opinions about TFEs (n = 401, from2001/1 to 2003/2. When asked to give a 0-to-4 score regarding (a the diculty level of the test,(b the technical quality and (c if the exam makes an appropriate evaluation of applied biochemistryknowledge, the scores were 2.9, 3.4 and 2.9, respectively. BioBio students were also asked if they ndvalid to be evaluated by a tutor-made exam and if they would like to participate in the making ofTFEs; 96 and 58 percent answered yes, respectively.In another survey, we interviewed former BioBio students from the 2nd to the 7th semesters (n=95about TFEs (since 1999-1 regarding technical aspects, which included (1 clarity of questions, (2 levelof diculty, (3 clinical application and (4 thinking (as opposed to memorizing abilities demanded;the 0-to-4 scores were 3.1, 2.9, 2.6, and 2.5, respectively. Other four questions were on the validityof tutors writing TFEs and their capacity to perform such a task; the average score was 3.2. Oursurveys show the students good acceptance of the seminar system

  12. The Kjeldahl method as a primary reference procedure for total protein in certified reference materials used in clinical chemistry. I. A review of Kjeldahl methods adopted by laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromý, Vratislav; Vinklárková, Bára; Šprongl, Luděk; Bittová, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    We found previously that albumin-calibrated total protein in certified reference materials causes unacceptable positive bias in analysis of human sera. The simplest way to cure this defect is the use of human-based serum/plasma standards calibrated by the Kjeldahl method. Such standards, commutative with serum samples, will compensate for bias caused by lipids and bilirubin in most human sera. To find a suitable primary reference procedure for total protein in reference materials, we reviewed Kjeldahl methods adopted by laboratory medicine. We found two methods recommended for total protein in human samples: an indirect analysis based on total Kjeldahl nitrogen corrected for its nonprotein nitrogen and a direct analysis made on isolated protein precipitates. The methods found will be assessed in a subsequent article.

  13. [Research in the PhD Program led by János Fehér between 1993 and 2010 at the Biochemical Research Laboratory, 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázovics, Anna

    2010-11-21

    Author wish to express gratitude to late professor János Fehér for the invitation to participate in "Free Radical and Immunological References of Hepatology" PhD program in 1993 and for providing opportunity to establish a laboratory at the 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University. He established a joint medical and biological research that is continuing unbrokenly. In this research group, between 1993 and 2010, eleven Ph.D. students received their scientific degrees and two candidate dissertations were prepared. Three students are working in this very exciting field even today. Author would like to salute before János Fehér's remembrance by giving a list of results of topics under her leadership.

  14. New trends and possibilities in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.A.E.; Csernay, L.

    1988-01-01

    The abstracts of this book mainly deal with the results of scientific work in diagnostic nuclear medicine, radiobiology, dosimetry, medical physics, radiopharmacology and biochemistry. Clinical and experimental data are presented within the fields of endocrinology, cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, neurology, nephrology, osteology, hematology and oncology (- even including diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of labelled monoclonal antibodies). Basic information about instrumentation (PET, SPECT, NMR), artificial intelligence and qualitiy control is given. Separate abstracts are prepared for 189 papers. (TRV) With 363 figs., 143 tabs

  15. Training needs for chemists in nuclear medicine research and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The field Nuclear Medicine has expanded rapidly over the last two decades. Individuals with training in radiochemistry are needed in industry, medical centers and hospitals. Although basic training in organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry or pharmacy are required, radiochemistry knowledge is essential for all these individuals. Opportunities and training requirements in these areas will be discussed. (author) 7 refs.; 5 tabs

  16. Screening of some Siberian medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kokoška, L.; Polesný, Z.; Rada, V.; Nepovím, Aleš; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 82, - (2002), s. 51-53 ISSN 0378-8741 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/02/0257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : antimicrobial activity * medicinal plants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.188, year: 2002

  17. Social Hygiene and Social Medicine in Interwar Czechoslovakia with the 13th District of the City of Prague as Its Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mášová, Hana

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Health services in the newborn Czechoslovak Republic had to cope not only with the consequences of the First World War, but also with the new approaches to health policy. Modern social medicine challenged the conventional model of the so-called “police medicine” – the deep-rooted concept of Public Health in the Middle European countries. The necessity to resolve the contradiction between preventative and curative care led to the conclusion that the form and tasks of health centres, whether run by voluntary bodies or by the state/regional authorities, had to be reconsidered. The ambitious goal was to find new and more effective ways to cooperation between the various subjects of health assistance, consultancy, and – eventually - social aid. As an example of such an institution, providing both curative and preventive/consultant service, can be found in one of the most rapidly developing parts of the city of Prague – the new Czechoslovak capital. The “model district” in Prague XIII should have become the location utilizing the latest methods of social hygiene and healthcare organization, an enterprise of coordinated social work and health service. Only in the first years of its existence did it function in accordance with its aims; especially as a teaching arrangement - a tutorial service of the State Health Institute for the education of medical personnel, especially health and social nursing sisters, – and as a source of statistical research. The work of the voluntary organizations and health officers was successfully coordinated. But plans to reorganise the Health Office of the City of Prague, and to extend the system to other districts, faltered and eventually failed. Nevertheless, the principle was kept in mind by the later health care reformers, and survived.

  18. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  19. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  20. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  1. Paternity analysis based on NGM SElect system in the Medical and Forensic Genetics Laboratory, Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Lodz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Markiewicz-Knyziak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of the NGM SElect multiplex kit for paternity testing in the population of central Poland, and compare it with the IDENTIFILER system. The study material consisted of buccal swabs taken from individuals who reported to the Medical and Forensic Genetics Laboratory in Lodz. Samples from 450 trio cases of disputed paternity carried out in 2010–2014 were investigated. Genomic DNA was extracted from buccal swabs collected from 1,350 individuals using the Swab kit (A&A Biotechnology according to the manufacturer’s protocol. DNA amplification was performed using the AmpFℓSTR ® NGM Select TM PCR Amplification Kit (Life Technologies. PCR products were separated by capillary electrophoresis using HID 3500 Genetic Analyzer. In the analyzed cases with paternity confirmation in the NGM SElect system, the maximum value of PI was 3.9 × 10 12 , which corresponds to the probability of paternity W = 99.9999999999%. It was thus significantly higher than analogical parameters obtained in the IDENTIFILER system (PI = 6.0 × 10 10 , W = 99.99999999%. The NGM SElect kit was unable to resolve just one case out of 450, which represents only 0.2% of all analyzed disputed paternity cases. The study showed the SE33 (ACTBP2 locus to have the highest evidence value in paternity analysis out of all investigated autosomal STRs.

  2. Hematology and biochemistry of aging-evidence of "anemia of the elderly" in old dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radakovich, Lauren B; Pannone, Stephen C; Truelove, Matthew P; Olver, Christine S; Santangelo, Kelly S

    2017-03-01

    Effects of aging on hematologic and biochemical variables are well described in people. Anemia of the elderly is attributed to iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, chronic kidney disease, myelodysplasia, or idiopathic causes. Limited studies have examined these variables in aging dogs, but they have typically examined single breeds in research settings. The objective of this study was to identify differences in CBC and biochemistry values between adult and aged dogs of many breeds. Dogs presenting for wellness examinations and minor dental/elective surgeries that were otherwise clinically healthy were retrospectively identified. Dogs were categorized by age: adult (1-7.9 years), senior (8-11.9 years), and geriatric (12+ years). Standard CBC and biochemistry data were collated. Asian breeds, Greyhounds, and dogs with data indicating overt underlying disease were excluded. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups with statistical significance set at P ≤ .05. Hematocrit, MCV, and serum iron decreased with age, indicating possible iron-restricted erythropoiesis (IRE), due to iron deficiency or low-grade chronic inflammation. Total proteins, globulins, and platelet counts increased with age while albumin decreased, suggesting low-grade inflammation. Urea was increased in older dogs without a concurrent increase in creatinine, which points toward gastrointestinal bleeding or dehydration. Clinically healthy, aging dogs have changes in laboratory variables that indicate altered physiologies compared to younger adult animals, including evidence of IRE, inflammation, and potential gastrointestinal bleeding, suggesting a similar trend to that of elderly human beings. Future studies will examine markers of iron metabolism and inflammation in aging dogs. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  3. Hematological and Biochemistry Profile and Risk Factors Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Guyana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Kurup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the hematological and biochemistry profile of patients with or without HIV-TB at the Georgetown Chest Clinic, Guyana. Methods. An observational, laboratory based study was designed to assess the relationship of PTB and HIV with patients routine biochemical and hematological values. The study was conducted during the period January 2013 to December 2014; a total sample size of 316 patients was enrolled following exclusion and inclusion criteria. Results. Mean age of study population was 40.1 ± 13.8 (95% CI 38.6–41.7 and most were between 40 and 49 age group (27.8%, 95% CI 23.2–33.0. More males were in the study 74.4% (95% CI 69.3–78.8 than females 81% (95% CI 21.1–30.7. 30% (95% CI 25.3–35.3 had a sputum smear grade of 3+ and 62.5% (95% CI 47.0–75.7 showed a CD4 count <200. The study demonstrated significantly low hemoglobin (Hb 91.7% (95% CI 78.2–97.1, low WBC 27.8% (95% CI 15.8–44.0, high indirect bilirubin 7.4% (95% CI 2.1–23.3, ALT 41.8% (95% CI 28.4–56.7, and AST 72.2% (95% CI 57.3–83.3 among TB-HIV patients. Homelessness RR (relative risk 2.2 (95% CI 0.48–12.3, smoking RR 1.09 (95% CI 1.01–1.19, and gender (male RR 1.2 (95% CI 0.61–2.26 were main associated risk factors. Conclusions. There is slight variation among PTB and PTB-HIV coinfected patients in some hematological and biochemistry parameters.

  4. TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY USING EDUCATIONAL GAMES AND GAMIFICATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Rafael de Oliveira Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biotechnology is a new bachelor degree in UFPA, and has been stablished with excellency in the state of Pará. However, there is the need to promote comprehension and learning in Biochemistry, as well as interdisciplinarity, that is an essential part of biotechnology. OBJECTIVES:  To increase learning and interdisciplinarity, educational games were used as tools. The students were instigated to develop educational games in different topics of energy metabolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The games were developed to be used in any teaching environment, since they were made with low-cost and accessible materials. This strategy was applied in three semesters in different Biochemistry classes, between 2012 and 2014. The best games in each class were used in following semesters. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Since the first semester, the failing rates dropped 15% compared to the previous semester, in which educational games were not used. An increase in learning (by observation could be noticed, including comprehension of metabolic pathways and their conections. Twenty games were developed in three semesters, and four of them are still being improved and used in other classes. The participant students answered a questionnaire, in which 47% defined the games as “Relaxing and Instigating”, 33% said the games “Accomplished their didactic and educational role” and 54% said they would recommend the use of these games as a reviewing activity. At the moment, another approach is being used to teach Biochemistry – Gamification, which uses elements found in games, as conflict, cooperation, rules and fun, to improve students’ motivation and engagement. CONCLUSION: As a partial result, there was greater in-class interest and engagement, better comprehension of the course content and the activities gave the students the opportunity to work in groups, to think critically about the themes and to develop opinions based on interdisciplinar and formal

  5. A national comparison of biochemistry and molecular biology capstone experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end, ASBMB conducted a series of regional workshops to build a BMB Concept Inventory containing validated assessment tools, based on foundational and discipline-specific knowledge and essential skills, for the community to use. A culminating activity, which integrates the educational experience, is often part of undergraduate molecular life science programs. These "capstone" experiences are commonly defined as an attempt to measure student ability to synthesize and integrate acquired knowledge. However, the format, implementation, and approach to outcome assessment of these experiences are quite varied across the nation. Here we report the results of a nation-wide survey on BMB capstone experiences and discuss this in the context of published reports about capstones and the findings of the workshops driving the development of the BMB Concept Inventory. Both the survey results and the published reports reveal that, although capstone practices do vary, certain formats for the experience are used more frequently and similarities in learning objectives were identified. The use of rubrics to measure student learning is also regularly reported, but details about these assessment instruments are sparse in the literature and were not a focus of our survey. Finally, we outline commonalities in the current practice of capstones and suggest the next steps needed to elucidate best practices. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Comparative analysis of the biochemistry undergraduate courses in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Granjeiro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The economic and social development of Brazil during the recent decades has contributed to the installation of several new undergraduate and graduate study programs, as is the case of the undergraduate biochemistry programs at UFV, UFSJ and UEM. The new biochemical professionals are being prepared to work mainly in Industries, research Institutes, government agencies and Universities in all fields that involve Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative analysis of the courses in Biochemistry in Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Comparative analysis of the course units of the UFV, UFSJ and UEM programs, centered on the curricula contents and organization and on the profiles of the students in terms of parameters such as the number of admissions and the graduation completion rates. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The UFV and UEM programs present a very similar distribution of workload over the biological, exact sciences, humanities, biochemical specialties and technological applications. The UFSJ program presents higher workloads in the areas of biological sciences and technological applications. No significant differences in the distribution of the workloads of mandatory and optional disciplines, complementary activities and supervised activities were detected. Over the past five years there was a decrease in the number of students that abandoned the programs, despite the increased retention time in the three courses. Most graduated students at both UFV and UFSJ continue their academic career toward the Master or Doctor degrees. CONCLUSION: Little difference between the study programs analyzed. This is somewhat surprising if one considers the fact that individual conception of each program was based on different local conditions and needs, which indeed justify small differences. The similarity of the programs, on the other hand, reflects the universality of the biochemical sciences and their broad

  7. The applied biochemistry of PEDF and implications for tissue homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROADHEAD, MATTHEW L.; BECERRA, S. PATRICIA; CHOONG, PETER F. M.; DASS, CRISPIN R.

    2012-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is an endogenously produced glycoprotein with a spectrum of biological roles across diverse pathologies. Recent research has focused on the biochemical properties of PEDF and its associated receptors. This review discusses the recent developments in PEDF biochemistry and how this new knowledge will help progress our understanding of PEDF as a molecular mediator for anti-angiogenesis and -tumorigenesis. Additionally, pathophysiological roles for PEDF in healing and tissue homeostasis are being revealed and our enhanced understanding of the interactions between PEDF and its receptors may yet prove useful in propelling PEDF towards clinical application. PMID:20166889

  8. Effect of irradiation on biochemistry properties of shrimp allergen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Kefei; Gao Meixu; Li Chunhong; Li Shurong; Pan Jiarong

    2007-01-01

    Study on the effects of 60 Co γ-rays irradiation at the dose of 0,3,5,7,10 kGy on shrimp allergen biochemistry properties was conducted. The results indicated that the allergen protein molecule can be broken down to smaller molecules or coagulated to larger molecules by irradiation. The hydrophobicity and turbidity of irradiated allergen increased with the increase of absorbed dose. The results also show that allergen solution is more sensitive to irradiation than allergen in solid state or in the whole shrimp. (authors)

  9. Hartmut Lichtenthaler: an authority on chloroplast structure and isoprenoid biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Govindjee

    2016-05-01

    We pay tribute to Hartmut Lichtenthaler for making important contributions to the field of photosynthesis research. He was recently recognized for ground-breaking discoveries in chloroplast structure and isoprenoid biochemistry by the Rebeiz Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR; http://vlpbp.org/ ), receiving a 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award for Photosynthesis. The ceremony, held in Champaign, Illinois, was attended by many prominent researchers in the photosynthesis field. We provide below a brief note on his education, and then describe some of the areas in which Hartmut Lichtenthaler has been a pioneer.

  10. Construction of concept maps as tool for Biochemistry learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lopes de Menezes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of concept maps on the teaching of sciences has been object of worldwide research with different purposes: to detect the previous knowledge of the students on certain topics or to evaluate learning, among others. Based on Ausubel´s cognitive psychology, concept maps assume that the learning is accomplished by assimilation of new concepts and propositions to the students´ cognitive structure, contributing to establish links between the previous and new knowledge. It is especially interesting on the approach of interdisciplinary issues, as many studied in Biochemistry.The relevance of the use of concept maps on biochemistry learning was evaluated on a thirty-hour undergraduation optional course, with interdisciplinary topics, which are not usually included on introductory Biochemistry courses. The course Biochemistry of Animal Venoms was structured in seven module where the biochemical action mechanisms of the venoms of Crotalus sp (south american rattlesnake, Bothrops sp (jararaca, Loxosceles sp (brown spider, Tityus sp (yellow scorpion, Phoneutria sp (armed spider, Apis mellifera (honey bee and Latrodectus sp (black widowwere discussed. The students worked in small groups and, at each module, there were (1 an oriented study, guided by questions, texts and schemes, supervised by the teachers, (2 the construction of individual concept maps, where the local and systemic effects of the venoms should be predicted by their biochemical composition and (3 the construction of a new map by the group, incorporating the information of the individual maps. The difficulty level of these tasks was gradually increased throughout the course, with lesser time to carry out the tasks, lesser assistance during the oriented study and even lesser information on the venom effects.The course assessment was given by the number, quality and correction of the concepts relationship present in the concept maps, through a questionnaire and by the

  11. Construction of Hypertexts in a Biochemistry Pos- Graduation Discipline

    OpenAIRE

    W.B. Maia; B.S. dos Santos; J.M. Martins; B.C. Araujo; A.A. Pimenta Filho; T.G. Araújo; M.C. Martins; C.R.F.C. Mota; A.L. Castro- Neto; V.L.M. Lima,

    2009-01-01

    Virtual reality is an innovating manner of comprehending and acting on how the world is and, also, considered a new way of intellectual exercise.  This work took place in a  biochemistry masters discipline (Advanced Formation in ScientificEducation) and had as its observation context the forum (on-line tool) viability, intending the construction of hypertexts (active  collaborative writing ) by the 15 registered students in the  discipline in 2008. The discipline was available on the web, in ...

  12. Are tutor-students capable of writing good biochemistry exams?

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre B., Sé; Depto. Biologia Celular, UnB, Brasília, DF, 70910-900; Passos, Renato M.; Depto. Biologia Celular, UnB, Brasília, DF, 70910-900; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Depto. Biologia Celular, UnB, Brasília, DF, 70910-900

    2004-01-01

    In a previous article we described the relevance of student seminars for the learning process of appliedbiochemistry for medical and nutrition students (Hermes-Lima et al., Biochem. Mol.Biol.Educ. 30:30-34,2002). First semester students of a basic biochemistry course (BioBio) are divided in 10 groupsof 5 members, and each group is assigned to a specic topic (diabetes, cholesterol, etc) under thesupervision of a tutor-student. The tutors have already coursed BioBio and are currently undertakin...

  13. A guide on instrument of biochemistry and molecular biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This book is about instrument on biochemistry and molecular biology, which consists of six chapters. It deals with introduction of advanced bio-instrument, common utilization and maintain, explanation of each instrument like capillary electrophoresis, interactive laser cytometer, personal computer and software, an electron microscope and DNA/RNS synthesis instrument, large equipment and special system like information system and network, analysis system for genome and large spectro graph, outside donation, examples for common utilization and appendix on data like application form for use.

  14. CUREs in biochemistry-where we are and where we should go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jessica K; Eckdahl, Todd T; Hecht, David A; Killion, Patrick J; Latzer, Joachim; Mans, Tamara L; Provost, Joseph J; Rakus, John F; Siebrasse, Erica A; Ellis Bell, J

    2017-01-02

    Integration of research experience into classroom is an important and vital experience for all undergraduates. These course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) have grown from independent instructor lead projects to large consortium driven experiences. The impact and importance of CUREs on students at all levels in biochemistry was the focus of a National Science Foundation funded think tank. The state of biochemistry CUREs and suggestions for moving biochemistry forward as well as a practical guide (supplementary material) are reported here. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):7-12, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Bisubstrate Kinetics of Glutathione S-Transferase: A Colorimetric Experiment for the Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Lazaros; Scinto, Krystal V.; Strada, Monica I.; Alper, Benjamin J.

    2018-01-01

    Most biochemical transformations involve more than one substrate. Bisubstrate enzymes catalyze multiple chemical reactions in living systems and include members of the transferase, oxidoreductase, and ligase enzyme classes. Working knowledge of bisubstrate enzyme kinetic models is thus of clear importance to the practicing biochemist. However,…

  16. 78 FR 4170 - License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... clay layer. Since the mean concentration of the effluent discharge area of the sanitary lagoon is well... authorize the release of the licensee's sanitary lagoon and the surrounding effluent discharge area for... the west side of the site and comprised approximately 28 acres. The licensee's sanitary lagoon was...

  17. Integrating Responsible Conduct of Research Education into Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Tamara L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a requirement for directed responsible conduct in research (RCR) education has become a priority in the United States and elsewhere. In the US, both the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation require RCR education for all students who are financially supported by federal awards. The guidelines produced by these…

  18. Seed Storage Proteins as a System for Teaching Protein Identification by Mass Spectrometry in Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karl A.; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important tool in studying biological systems. One application is the identification of proteins and peptides by the matching of peptide and peptide fragment masses to the sequences of proteins in protein sequence databases. Often prior protein separation of complex protein mixtures by 2D-PAGE is needed,…

  19. Symposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world: Hands-on inquiry-based biochemistry courses for improving scientific literacy of school teachers and students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea T. da Poian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wednesday – August 26th, 2015 - 3:30 to 5:30 pm – Room: Iguaçu II – 5th floorSymposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world Chair: Miguel Castanho, Universidade de Lisboa, PortugalAbstract:In the last decades, Brazil has reached a prominent position in the world rank of scientific production. Despite this progress, the establishment of a scientific culture in Brazilian society is still challenging. Our group has been offering hands-on inquiry-based courses to primary and secondary students, which aim to introduce them to the scientific method and improve their interest in science. More recently, we started new initiatives focused on the improvement of the scientific literacy of school science teachers. Here we describe two intensive short-term courses designed in different formats. One consists in a discipline offered to a Master Program to school science teachers, in which the main objective was to work with core disciplinary concepts through an active teachers engagement in “doing science”. The discipline, named “Energy transformation in the living organisms”, intends to deal with the main Biochemistry subjects that take part of the high-school science curriculum, namely, fermentation, photosynthesis and cellular respiration processes. The other initiative was developed in Urucureá, a small community with about 600 residents, located on the banks of the River Arapiuns, in Amazonia region. We trained the local school teachers to act as tutors in the course offered to 40 students of the community, ages 10 to 17. The theme we chose to address was the properties and effects of snakes´ poisons, since poisoning events are a problem with which the local community frequently deal with. Another important point was that we adapted a number of experiments to make them feasible with very limited laboratory resources. Our results show that the activities that we have developed offer real opportunity of scientific training

  20. CUREs in biochemistry?where we are and where we should go

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Jessica K.; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Hecht, David A.; Killion, Patrick J.; Latzer, Joachim; Mans, Tamara L.; Provost, Joseph J.; Rakus, John F.; Siebrasse, Erica A.; Ellis Bell, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Integration of research experience into classroom is an important and vital experience for all undergraduates. These course?based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) have grown from independent instructor lead projects to large consortium driven experiences. The impact and importance of CUREs on students at all levels in biochemistry was the focus of a National Science Foundation funded think tank. The state of biochemistry CUREs and suggestions for moving biochemistry forward...