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Sample records for biochemistry laboratory medicine

  1. Clinical biochemistry and laboratory medicine in the post-genome era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last decades of the 20th century were a period of outstanding scientific achievements. The most significant discovery was the decoding of the human genome (Venter, J. et al., 2001; Dennis, C. et al., 2001; Baltimore, D., 2001). In this article the present view of the post genomic era is presented. The new analytical methods, such as micro arrays, bio chips, and nano technology, the discovery of SNPs, and the analysis of the proteome will lead to a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited and acquired diseases. Their use in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, and the future of technological innovations are discussed. In the post genomic era the greatest interest will be devoted to the application of these scientific achievements in the diagnosis, prevention and therapy of human diseases. The advances in human genetics that have occurred during the past 20 years have revolutionized our knowledge of the role played by inheritance in health and disease. It is clear that our DNA determines not only single gene disorders but also interacts with environments to predispose individuals to cancer, allergy, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, psychiatric disorders and even to some infectious diseases. The study of longevity and the demonstration of genes favouring a long lifespan suggest that such protective systems exist. The study of genetic polymorphisms has made clear that some alleles have beneficial effects. These discoveries will be of great help in our understanding of the interactions between genetics and environment. Gene array analysis has become the method of choice for identifying genes expressed at different levels in different samples. The mRNA expression profiles of normal and tumor tissues, treated and untreated cell cultures, and developmental stages of an organism can be compared quickly and easily with an appropriate array analysis system. A major task after a genome has been fully sequenced is to understand the functions

  2. Biochemistry: from supermarket to laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    F. R. Freitas-Rego; Pereira, M.G.; S. O. Loureiro; M. T. de Santana; R. G. Garrido; F. de S.R.G Garrido

    2007-01-01

    After new campi as Instituto Multidisciplinar em Saúde (IMS/UFBA) startedworking, it was necessary to develop practical classes using domestic reagents atBiochemistry to Pharmacy (IMS078). Firstly, students visited a supermarket to readnutritional information at label and select possible products to be used in class. Moreover,chemical processes and fermentation were discussed as different foods and drinks wereanalysed. Some food were token to laboratories so that biomole cules qualitative ana...

  3. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Duffy, Michael J; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. METHODS: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites--testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast...... prostatic disease when total PSA is advanced disease. Fecal occult blood testing may be used for screening asymptomatic adults 50...... may be used for determining prognosis in lymph node-negative patients. CA15-3/BR27-29 or carcinoembryonic antigen may be used for therapy monitoring in advanced disease. CA125 is recommended (with transvaginal ultrasound) for early detection of ovarian cancer in women at high risk for this disease. CA...

  4. Designing Laboratory Exercises for the Undergraduate Molecular Biology/Biochemistry Student: Techniques and Ethical Implications Involved in Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Hall, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine refers to medical care that involves genetically screening patients for their likelihood to develop various disorders. Commercial genome screening only involves identifying a consumer's genotype for a few single nucleotide polymorphisms. A phenotype (such as an illness) is greatly influenced by three factors: genes, gene…

  5. A Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Paul A.

    1999-08-01

    A project-oriented laboratory course has been designed to introduce students to the study of biochemistry as it is practiced. The course is designed to be a capstone experience for students enrolled in a variety of majors at the Rochester Institute of Technology, including those who enter our new B.S. Biochemistry program. The experiments in this course enable the students to explore the protein chemistry, enzymology, and molecular biology of a single enzyme, threonine dehydrogenase, in a series of integrated experiments. The laboratory incorporates both traditional methods (centrifugation, UV-vis spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and chromatography) and more recent developments in the field (polymerase chain reaction). Students use a small computer network to prepare for experiments (using simulation software developed at RIT), to evaluate data, to access sequence homology databases over the Internet, and to visualize and model proteins and nucleic acids. The change in the biochemistry teaching lab from a sequence of unrelated experiments to an integrated series of experiments is a model that can be readily adapted by other educators, who can change their courses to focus on a single enzyme with which they are most familiar.

  6. Immobilized Lactase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Matthew J.; Bering, C. Larry

    1998-10-01

    Immobilized enzymes have many practical applications. They may be used in clinical, industrial, and biotechnological laboratories and in many clinical diagnostic kits. For educational purposes, use of immobilized enzymes can easily be taught at the undergraduate or even secondary level. We have developed an immobilized enzyme experiment that combines many practical techniques used in the biochemistry laboratory and fits within a three-hour time frame. In this experiment, lactase from over-the-counter tablets for patients with lactose intolerance is immobilized in polyacrylamide, which is then milled into small beads and placed into a chromatography column. A lactose solution is added to the column and the eluant is assayed using the glucose oxidase assay, available as a kit. We have determined the optimal conditions to give the greatest turnover of lactose while allowing the immobilized enzymes to be active for long periods at room temperature.

  7. Immobilized alpha-Galactosidase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulimani, V. H.; Dhananjay, K.

    2007-01-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed to demonstrate the application of immobilized galactosidase in food industry to hydrolyze raffinose family oligosaccharides in soymilk. This laboratory experiment was conducted for postgraduate students of biochemistry and developed for graduate and undergraduate students of biochemistry, biotechnology,…

  8. Re-Attitude of Biochemistry Laboratory Course Contents in Medical, Dentistry and Para-Medical Faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdi Qujeq

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding to development of basic science and new methods in biochemistry in recent years, practical biochemistry contents should be optimized (1. Therefore, re-attitude biochemistry course contents in medical schools has paralleled worldwide trends a moved from current status is needed (2, 3. As reported by investi-gators many medical schools around the world have reformed their medical curriculum in recent years (2. Many authors are convinced that students learn more effectively if the knowledge and skills they acquire are inserted and contextualized in relevant real-life, problem based situations (3. Previous studies demonstrated that biochemistry course content is now incorporated into the clinical beneficial, therefore the evolution of students in many countries has occurred (4. In this respect, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate biochemistry laboratory course contents in medical, dentistry and Para-medicine faculties from view points of the students. This descriptive study was per-formed in years 2010-2013. Questionnaire contained items about appropriateness of biochemistry laboratory contents for students. The first section of questionnaire determines the effectiveness of bioche¬mistry laboratory contents and the factors influence on it. The second section indicates the application of biochemistry laboratory contents, and the third parts of questi¬onnaire demonstrate the laboratory time spent of biochemistry laboratory course contents. For this purpose three faculties were selected. First, Faculty of Medicine (50 medical students, second Faculty of Dentistry (50 dentistry students and third Faculty of Para-medicine (50 laboratory science students were selected. At least 50 students were selected from each faculty and they received a questionnaire. All students were randomly selected to receive a standard questionnaire designed to evaluate their opinions about biochemistry laboratory course contents. The students were asked

  9. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.;

    2015-01-01

    Developments in "omics" are creating a paradigm shift in Laboratory Medicine leading to Personalised Medicine. This allows the increasing in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether Laboratory Medicine is able to implement new...... diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...

  10. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  11. An "in Silico" DNA Cloning Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced…

  12. Application of 15N in biochemistry, agriculture and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compendium on application of 15N in the biosciences comprises 7 chapters. The 1st chapter comprehends introductory remarks on isotopes in general and on nitrogen isotopes in particular. In the 2nd chapter fundamentals of 15N tracer techniques are discussed. The 3rd chapter deals with experiment programs and the evaluation of experiments. The methodology of sample preparation as well as of isotope analysis is treated in chapter 4. The chapters 5 to 7 deal with the application of 15N as tracer in biochemistry, agricultural research and medicine, resp. Relevant literature is added to each chapter

  13. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. METHODS: Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were cl...

  14. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Kathy; Sandwick, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (RpiA) has many features that make it attractive as a focal point of a semester-long, advanced biochemistry laboratory for undergraduate students. The protein can easily and inexpensively be isolated from spinach using traditional purification techniques. Characterization of RpiA enzyme activity can be…

  15. Raising Environmental Awareness through Applied Biochemistry Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman Ashraf, S.

    2013-01-01

    Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment…

  16. Differentiating Biochemistry Course Laboratories Based on Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2011-01-01

    Content and emphases in undergraduate biochemistry courses can be readily tailored to accommodate the standards of the department in which they are housed, as well as the backgrounds of the students in the courses. A more challenging issue is how to construct laboratory experiences for a class with both chemistry majors, who usually have little or…

  17. Virtual Laboratories in Chemistry, Biochemistry, & Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Report (state-of-the-art review) from a research and development project on virtual laboratories supported by Markedmodningsfonden (tidl. "Fornyelsesfonden")(2012-2014). http://markedsmodningsfonden.dk/projekt/0/34/495....

  18. A biochemistry laboratory course designed to enhance students autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Laboratory sessions are responsible for promoting instrumentation skills desirable in biochemistry and biochemistry related careers. They are traditionally based on experimental protocols that lead to the expected results, and students usually have not autonomy to plan and execute their experiments. GOALS: This work aimed to enhance a traditional biochemistry lab course, applying pre-lab quizzes on protein biochemistry and lab techniques in order to have students better prepared to plan, execute and interpret experiments. This approach also aims to bring the laboratory sessions into an inquiry-based environment capable to improve students’ independent capabilities in 2 autonomy domains: learning and communication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Online quizzes are delivered one week before each laboratory session, containing questions regarding the experimental techniques and theoretical basis related to them. Laboratory activities are presented in an inquiry-based approach where the first class of each activity is dedicated to plan experiments in order to answer the research questions presented by instructors. Activities are also organized in order to enhance students’ autonomy. The first activity is the simplest and more instructor-controlled and the last one is the most complex and less driven, transferring gradually to students the responsibility for their decisions in laboratory, supporting students’ autonomy. RESULTS: Online quizzes allowed instructors to identify students’ difficulties and to timely intervene. Scientific reports presented by students at the end of each activity showed that they performed better on less driven activities in which autonomy support were more complex than in the instructor controlled activities. CONCLUSIONS: Scientific reports analysis reveals students capabilities related to different scopes of autonomy, such as: discuss different strategies; find multiple solutions to solve problems; make their

  19. Laboratory medicine education in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Bartlingas, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    In Lithuania there are two types of specialists working in medical laboratories and having a university degree: laboratory medicine physicians and medical biologists. Both types of specialists are officially being recognized and regulated by the Ministry of Health of Lithuania. Laboratory medicine physicians become specialists in laboratory medicine after an accredited 4-year multidisciplinary residency study program in Laboratory Medicine. The residency program curriculum for laboratory m...

  20. What Are the Appropriate Curriculum Contents for Biochemistry Courses in Veterinary Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, A. A. D.; Correia, J. H. R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of the important items that the author's suggest should be included in a biochemistry course given to students in veterinary medicine. Presents a broad range of specific topics in biochemistry and strategies for covering as many topics as possible in one course. (LZ)

  1. 78 FR 4170 - License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO AGENCY... issuance of a license amendment to Materials License No. 24-13365-01 issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry... Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html . From this site, you can access the...

  2. A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

  3. Known Structure, Unknown Function: An Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W.; Lee, Christopher T.; Dewald, Alison H.; Cline, Matthew A.; McAnany, Charles E.; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry- and research-based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's…

  4. A Semester-Long Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Based on "Helicobacter pylori" Urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Kate R.; Dube, Danielle H.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the development of a 13 week project-oriented biochemistry laboratory designed to introduce students to foundational biochemical techniques and then enable students to perform original research projects once they have mastered these techniques. In particular, we describe a semester-long laboratory that focuses on a biomedically…

  5. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  6. Myoglobin Structure and Function: A Multiweek Biochemistry Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.; Kirk, Sarah R.; Meyer, Scott C.; Holman, Karen L. McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure,…

  7. Forensic Analysis of Canine DNA Samples in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Tobin M.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Fekete, Brenda L.; Millard, Julie T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in canine genomics have allowed the development of highly distinguishing methods of analysis for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify hypervariable regions of DNA from dog hair and saliva…

  8. Use of Solid Phase Extraction in the Biochemistry Laboratory to Separate Different Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurkey, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used to demonstrate how various lipids and lipid classes could be separated in a biochemistry laboratory setting. Three different SPE methods were chosen on their ability to separate a lipid mixture, consisting of a combination of a either a fatty acid, a triacylglycerol, a mono- or diacylglycerol, phospholipid,…

  9. Integrating Bio-Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry into an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by…

  10. An SDS-PAGE Examination of Protein Quaternary Structure and Disulfide Bonding for a Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Carla S.; St. Antoine, Caroline C.; Jain, Swapan S.; Bevilacqua, Vicky L. H.

    2005-01-01

    Electrophoresis is a valuable tool for biochemists, yet this technique is often not included in biochemistry laboratory curricula owing to time constraints or lack of equipment. Protein structure is also a topic of interest in many disciplines, yet most undergraduate lab experiments focus only on primary structure. In this experiment, students use…

  11. Known Structure, Unknown Function: An Inquiry-based Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Cynthia; Lee, Christopher T; Dewald, Alison H; Cline, Matthew A; McAnany, Charles E; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry- and research-based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's research expertise and confidence. We have developed a year-long undergraduate biochemistry laboratory curriculum wherein students determine, via experiment and computation, the function of a protein of known three-dimensional structure. The first half of the course is inquiry-based and modular in design; students learn general biochemical techniques while gaining preparation for research experiments in the second semester. Having learned standard biochemical methods in the first semester, students independently pursue their own (original) research projects in the second semester. This new curriculum has yielded an improvement in student performance and confidence as ...

  12. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Brandslund, Ivan;

    2015-01-01

    the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in...

  13. Kinetics of Papain: An Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornely, Kathleen; Crespo, Eric; Earley, Michael; Kloter, Rachel; Levesque, Aime; Pickering, Mary

    1999-05-01

    Enzyme kinetics experiments are popular in the undergraduate laboratory. These experiments have pedagogic value because they reinforce the concepts of Michaelis-Menten kinetics covered in the lecture portion of the course and give students the experience of calculating kinetic constants from data they themselves have generated. In this experiment, we investigate the kinetics of the thiol protease papain. The source of the papain is commercially available papaya latex. A specific substrate, Na-benzoyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA), is used, which takes advantage of the fact that papain interacts with a phenylalanine residue two amino acids away from the peptide bond cleaved. Upon hydrolysis by papain, a bright yellow product is released, p-nitroaniline. This allows the reaction to be monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the rate of formation of the p-nitroaniline product as a function of the increase in absorbance of the solution at the lmax of p-nitroaniline (400 nm) over time at various substrate concentrations. These data are used to plot a Lineweaver-Burk plot from which the vmax and KM are obtained. If time permits, students carry out additional investigations in which e of p-nitroaniline is measured, the enzyme solution protein concentration is measured, the enzyme purity is evaluated by SDS-PAGE, and a pH-rate profile is constructed from experimental data.

  14. Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Jukić, Igor; Zekić, Josip; Vučetić, Vlatko; Franić, Miljenko; Petrovečki, Mladen; Đerek, Lovorka; Unić, Adriana; Marijančević, Domagoj

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Intensive exercising may significantly damage muscles which is reflected in pain, fatigue and the increase of muscle proteins concentrations in blood such are creatinin kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LD), myoglobin (MB) and other biochemical parameters including urea serum concentration (SU). Biochemical markers vary with age, sex, race, muscle mass, physical activity and climate conditions. They also assist us in determining the limit between the capacity for adaptation to ...

  15. Education in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in various European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the complexity and heterogeneity of the educational systems, across Europe, aids in the identification of new initiatives in defining the core competences and skills necessary to practice the profession. Basic education of those who practice laboratory medicine, in European countries, may be in medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry or science. Their postgraduate education may last quite a variable time: from several months to several years, depending on the country. Some countries ha...

  16. Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher P Price

    2004-01-01

    @@ Whilst there have been several definitions of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), the one given by David Sackett is probably the most accurate and well accepted; he stated that "evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients"[1].

  17. [Ageing society and laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, H

    2000-09-01

    An interest in the ageing process has increased greatly with increasing the population of the aged. The goal of this interest is to improve the quality of life(QOL) in the aged. In this paper, the presidential address "Ageing Society and Laboratory Medicine" at the 46th annual meeting of JSCP in Kumamoto'99 was summarized on the important research for ageing in the past decades. The paper presented was age- and gene-related changes, the latent variation of serum constituents and lipids abnormality in the ageing process. Concerning to the definition of reference value of healthy populations and the subjects who had no combined ailments, the reference interval of individuals(intra-personal), followed 5 years categorized by age, sex, and social conditions, gave a narrow range of variation than did a larger mixed populations(inter-personal). The reference intervals set would be a more sensitive reference than is the customary "normal range" for values occurring in inter-personal. Concerning to the study of the relationship between laboratory test and activity of daily living(ADL), the higher serum levels for TP, Alb, Hb, Glu, TC were observed in the higher ADL. The basic research techniques were also evaluated in the paper. The serum lipoperoxides were correlated with serum lipoprotein free radicals which caused atherosclerosis. The higher frequency of cerebral- and myocardial-infarction in the aged were observed in the higher serum LDL-C and lower serum level of arachidonic acid(AA), eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA), and AA/EPA ratio were observed in AMI patients with lower HDL-C groups than the healthy aged. Although Alzheimer(AD)'s disease had a progressive memory loss and immobile dementia and was reported the decrease of acetyltransferase activity in the brain, decrease of serum level of free choline, lyso-phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine(PC) and sphingomyelin(SM)/PC ratio were observed in spite of keeping normal serum level of SM. The decreased serum levels of

  18. Development of a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry/haematology laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, R.; Longmire, W; Galloway, M.; Smellie, W

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry and haematology laboratory. The training programme was developed to document that staff were trained in the full range of laboratory tests that they were expected to perform. This programme subsequently formed the basis for the annual performance review of all staff. All staff successfully completed the first phase of the programme. This allowed laboratory...

  19. [Challenges for pathologists in clinical laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, F

    2001-06-01

    The number of pathologists in hospitals has been increasing and they are responsible for both surgical pathology and clinical laboratory medicine. In the future they will also play important roles in the modernized reform of the central laboratory as it establishes its own importance in improving the quality and safety of medical activities. As a pathologist, the author reports on challenges faced since assuming the present directorship of the department of laboratory medicine in 1995 including (a) establishing a decision-making system in collaboration with technologists, (b) improving expertise in the department through joining a variety of seminars, conferences and research activities, (c) publishing an annual department report, and (d) introducing both internal and external quality assessment. In the future, for young pathologists training in both pathology and laboratory medicine will be essential. PMID:11452548

  20. Development of a Semester-Long, Inquiry-Based Laboratory Course in Upper-Level Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pushpalatha P. N.; Thompson, Martin; Hungwe, Kedmon

    2014-01-01

    A semester-long laboratory course was designed and implemented to familiarize students with modern biochemistry and molecular biology techniques. The designed format involved active student participation, evaluation of data, and critical thinking, and guided students to become independent researchers. The first part of the course focused on…

  1. HPLC of the Polypeptides in a Hydrolyzate of Egg-White Lysozyme. An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, W. S., III; Burns, L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple high-performance liquid chromatography experiment for undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. The experiment illustrates the separation of polypeptides by a step gradient elution using a single pump instrument with no gradient attachments. Discusses instrumentation, analysis, a sample preparation, and results. (CW)

  2. Re-Attitude of Biochemistry Laboratory Course Contents in Medical, Dentistry and Para-Medical Faculties

    OpenAIRE

    Durdi Qujeq; Iman Jahanian; Mohsen Tatar; Naghmeh Abbassi; Korosh Rasolpour

    2014-01-01

    Regarding to development of basic science and new methods in biochemistry in recent years, practical biochemistry contents should be optimized (1). Therefore, re-attitude biochemistry course contents in medical schools has paralleled worldwide trends a moved from current status is needed (2, 3). As reported by investi-gators many medical schools around the world have reformed their medical curriculum in recent years (2). Many authors are convinced that students learn more effectively if the k...

  3. Laboratory medicine in the new healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Simona; Braga, Federica; Panteghini, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The 21st century challenge is to redesign healthcare systems to be safe, efficient, effective, timely, equitable and patient-centred. Although laboratory medicine is integral to many of these objectives involving prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and managing disease of patients, it suffers from poor visibility as a medical discipline and as a profession and fewer rewards for educational efforts when compared to other medical disciplines. Laboratory scientists are often perceived as managing machinery and equipment, but conversely they need to take a position of shared clinical leadership, showing the role of laboratory tests to guarantee optimal care for patients. This is however challenging because of some reluctance by laboratory professionals to involve themselves in test structuring and requesting and in the inspection of work as it arrives because it is assumed that all requests are clinically necessary; there is a poor communication and integration between clinical wards and laboratory; and, importantly, there is the need for an excellent cultural and scientific background of laboratory professionals for implementing outcome research and to act as knowledge managers and skilled clinical consultants. By combining the unique talent of performing quality laboratory assays with knowledge of the pathophysiologic rationale behind the tests, laboratory professionals have the expertise to advise their clinical colleagues in regard to the appropriate test selection and interpretation of laboratory results, thereby creating opportunities to define the added value and the pivotal role of laboratory medicine on healthcare delivery. PMID:26466169

  4. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow′s Doctors" [1] which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates. [2] The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review.

  5. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2007-05-01

    The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow's Doctors"(1) which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates.(2)The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review. PMID:23012147

  6. [Liquid Biopsy and Laboratory Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Koh

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress in cancer biology has revealed the fact that molecular profiles of primary and metastatic cancer are not necessarily the same. Furthermore, evidence of intra-tumor heterogeneity has been disclosed repeatedly. In addition to these, acquiring resistances to chemoradiation therapy is far more rapid than typical predictions. Under these circumstances, physicians are realizing that one biopsy is not enough to predict the direction of cancer progression or extension. Repeated biopsy was proposed in this context. For "re-biopsy", acquiring blood is much easier compared to regular biopsies of acquiring body tissues. Therefore, CTC or Cell-free DNA is one of the hot topics in clinical and molecular diagnostic fields. The term "liquid biopsy" is used to include these two materials. We utilized a CTC isolation device based on microfluidic principles. Procedures for the extraction of DNA from plasma (Cell-free DNA) is also available. Based on this background, we performed a feasibility study of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) by analyzing materials from advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients. We have successfully acquired NGS results using these liquid biopsies. We have also investigated the possibility of storing CTCs by evaluating procedures after cytospin using H1975 cells with various fixation conditions under a DIC microscope examination. Because of the paucity of the number of isolated CTCs, H1975 cells were used for this purpose. After cytospin, 95% ETOH and then -80 degrees C storage provided the best results. Attempts at not only NGS but also storage in this sequence of studies have opened new fields of liquid biopsy in clinical laboratories. PMID:26731900

  7. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: the complete picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Evidence of the acute lack of interchangeable laboratory results and consensus in current practice among clinical laboratories has underpinned greater attention to standardization and harmonization projects. Although the focus is mainly on the standardization of measurement procedures, the scope of harmonization goes beyond method and analytical results: it includes all other aspects of laboratory testing, including terminology and units, report formats, reference intervals and decision limits, as well as test profiles and criteria for the interpretation of results. This review provides further insight on the issue of harmonization in laboratory medicine in view of the urgent need for a complete picture now that old and new drivers are calling for more effective efforts in this field. The main drivers for standardization and harmonization projects are first and foremost patient safety, but also the increasing trends towards consolidation and networking of clinical laboratories, accreditation programs, clinical governance, and advances in Information Technology (IT), including the electronic patient record. The harmonization process, which should be considered a three-tier approach involving local, national and international fronts, must go beyond the harmonization of methods and analytical results to include all other aspects of laboratory testing. A pertinent example of the importance of a complete picture in harmonization programs is given by the National Bone Health Alliance working in the field of bone turnover markers in cooperation with scientific societies including the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC). PMID:23435100

  8. Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in Croatia: regulation of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundic, Ana-Maria; Topic, Elizabeta; Cvoriscec, Dubravka; Cepelak, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity exists across Europe in the definition of the profession of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine and also in academic background of specialists in this discipline. This article provides an overview of the standards of education and training of laboratory professionals and quality regulations in Croatia. Clinical chemistry in Croatia is almost exclusively practiced by medical biochemists. Although term Medical biochemist often relates to medical doctors in other European countries, in Croatia medical biochemists are not medical doctors, but university degree professionals who are qualified scientifically. Practicing the medical biochemistry is regulated by The Health Care Law, The Law of the Medical Biochemistry Profession and The Law of the State and Private Health Insurance. According to the law, only medical biochemists are entitled to run and work in the medical biochemistry laboratory. University degree is earned after the 5 years of the studies. Register for medical biochemists is kept by the Croatian Chamber of Medical Biochemists. Licensing is mandatory, valid for 6 years and regulated by the government (Law on the Health Care, 1993). Vocational training for medical biochemists lasts 44 months and is regulated by the national regulatory document issued by the Ministry of Health. Accreditation is not mandatory and is provided by an independent, non-commercial national accreditation body. The profession has interdisciplinary character and a level of required competence and skills comparable to other European countries. PMID:22141201

  9. Magnetic field-dependent molecular and chemical processes in biochemistry, genetics and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular concept (paradigm) in magnetobiology seems to be most substantiated and significant for explaining the biomedical effects of electromagnetic fields, for the new medical technology of transcranial magnetic stimulation of cognitive activity, for the nuclear magnetic control of biochemical processes and for the search of new magnetic effects in biology and medicine. The key structural element of the concept is a radical ion pair as the receiver of magnetic fields and the source of magnetic effects. The existence of such pairs was recently detected in the two life-supporting processes of paramount importance — in enzymatic ATP and DNA syntheses. The bibliography includes 80 references

  10. Towards quantitative biochemistry: research and reports in biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokholyan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nikolay V DokholyanDepartment of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USASince the mid twentieth century the field of biochemistry has evolved significantly (Figure 1. Advances made in the fields of structural, chemical, and systems biology, physics, and computation have shaped the new field of biochemistry such that the emphasis became the cellular-wide view of molecular life at the atomic scale. The principal paradigm in the field shifted from focusing on a single or a few biological molecules to focusing on their cellular- and intracellular-wide networks. This shift has resulted in more interdisciplinary approaches to biochemical research, which nowadays combines techniques and strategies from a broad range of fields. The evolution of the field of biochemistry resulted in closer connections to other fields, such as medicinal chemistry, physiology, and medicine. Biochemistry is also one of the central components of the emerging translational medicine paradigm.

  11. Nuclear medicine at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory seeks to develop new materials and methods for the investigation of human physiology and disease processes. Some aspects of this research are related to basic research of how radiopharmaceuticals work. Other aspects are directed toward direct applications as diagnostic agents. It is likely that cyclotron-produced positron emitting nuclides will assume greater importance in the next few years. This can be attributed to the ability to label biologically important molecules with high specific activity without affecting biological activity, using /sup 11/C, /sup 13/N, and /sup 15/O. Large quantities of these short-lived nuclides can be administered without excessive radiation dose and newer instrumentation will permit reconstructive axial tomography, providing truly quantitative display of distribution of radioactivity. The /sup 122/Xe-/sup 122/I generator has the potential for looking at rapid dynamic processes. Another generator, the /sup 68/Ge-/sup 68/Ga generator produces a positron emitter for the use of those far removed from cyclotrons. The possibilities for /sup 68/Ga radiopharmaceuticals are as numerous as those for /sup 99m/Tc diagnostic agents.

  12. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.; Brandslund, I.;

    2015-01-01

    the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in...

  13. Comparative efficacy of different schedules of administration of medicinal plants infusion on hematology and serum biochemistry of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid ur Rehman,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The research study was undertaken to investigate the effect of different schedules of administration of medicinal plants infusion of aloe vera gel, barbery, garlic and ginger on hematology and serum biochemistry of broilers chicks. For this purpose 240, day old broilers chick (A purchased were from a local dealer, divided in to four groups A, B, C and D and reared in separate pens for 35 days in an open sided house. These groups were divided into two vaccinated and non-vaccinated sub-groups for the different treatments. Each sub group was carrying three replicate (10 chicks/replicate. Group A was kept as control, while B, C and D were given infusion @ 10 ml/lit of water. The schedule was designated as the group B received infusion at alternate day, group C received infusion on alternate three days in a week and group D received infusion at alternate week. Relevant data was recorded throughout the experiment till the termination of experiment. Significant increase in hemoglobin concentration, PCV and total leukocyte count (TLC was observed in group C. Significant reduction was recorded in ALT and ALP in group B, while AST and serum glucose in group C and increased in serum protein was found in group B. Decreased (p<0.05 total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, VLDL, and increased HDL (p<0.05 were experienced in group B. Comparing the values of risk ratio of, VLDL to HDL, Total cholesterol to HDL and LDL to HDL were found significantly lower in group B, while total cholesterol to VLDL was found significantly lower in group C. It is concluded that schedule on the basis receiving infusion three days in a week is more potent than other schedule of research study.

  14. Laboratory animal medicine — Needs and opportunities for Canadian veterinarians

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Patricia V; Baar, Michael; Olfert, Ernest D.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory animal medicine is a growing field of veterinary practice that emphasizes animal welfare and refinement of research animal care. The Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Medicine/L’association canadienne de la medecine des animaux de laboratoire (CALAM/ACMAL) and the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) provide a framework within which laboratory animal veterinarians practise. Numerous continuing education and post-graduate training opportunities exist in Canada for veterin...

  15. Synthesis, Characterization, and Secondary Structure Determination of a Silk-Inspired, Self-Assembling Peptide: A Laboratory Exercise for Organic and Biochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Tyler J.; Fry, Melany M.; Murphy, Amanda R.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory experiment gives upper-division organic or biochemistry undergraduate students a comprehensive look at the synthesis, chemical characterization, self-assembly, and secondary structure determination of small, N-acylated peptides inspired by the protein structure of silkworm silk. All experiments can be completed in one 4 h lab…

  16. Standardization of Terminology in Laboratory Medicine II

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kap No; Yoon, Jong-Hyun; Min, Won Ki; Lim, Hwan Sub; Song, Junghan; Chae, Seok Lae; Jang, Seongsoo; Ki, Chang-Seok; Bae, Sook Young; Kim, Jang Su; Kwon, Jung-Ah; Lee, Chang Kyu; Yoon, Soo-Young

    2008-01-01

    Standardization of medical terminology is essential in data transmission between health care institutes and in maximizing the benefits of information technology. The purpose of this study was to standardize medical terms for laboratory observations. During the second year of the study, a standard database of concept names for laboratory terms that covered those used in tertiary health care institutes and reference laboratories was developed. The laboratory terms in the Logical Observation Ide...

  17. Analysis of a p53 Mutation Associated with Cancer Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cruz, Isabel; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of a p53 polymorphism associated with cancer susceptibility. First, students collected a drop of peripheral blood cells using a sterile sting and then used FTA cards to extract the genomic DNA. The p53 region is then PCR…

  18. A Static Method as an Alternative to Gel Chromatography: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burum, Alex D.; Splittgerber, Allan G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a static method as an alternative to gel chromatography, which may be used as an undergraduate laboratory experiment. In this method, a constant mass of Sephadex gel is swollen in a series of protein solutions. UV-vis spectrophotometry is used to find a partition coefficient, KD, that indicates the fraction of the interior…

  19. Green, Enzymatic Syntheses of Divanillin and Diapocynin for the Organic, Biochemistry, or Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Rachel T.; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Vosburg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmentally benign chemistry is an increasingly important topic both in the classroom and the laboratory. In this experiment, students synthesize divanillin from vanillin or diapocynin from apocynin, using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in water. The dimerized products form rapidly at ambient temperature and are isolated by…

  20. Comparison of the microbial dynamics and biochemistry of laboratory sourdoughs prepared with grape, apple and yogurt

    OpenAIRE

    Gordún Quiles, Elena; Valle Mendoza, Luis Javier del; Ginovart Gisbert, Marta; Carbó Moliner, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    The microbiological culture-dependent characterization and physicochemical characteristics of laboratory sourdough prepared with grape (GS) were evaluated and compared with apple (AS) and yogurt (YS), which are the usual Spanish sourdough ingredients. Ripe GS took longer than AS and YS to reach the appropriate acidity and achieved lower values of lactic acid

  1. Evaluation of Audiotutorial Lessons in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; McPherson, Charles W.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-five audiotutorial lessons in laboratory animal medicine were evaluated by students enrolled in courses at six schools of veterinary medicine. Results indicate that the lessons are an effective learning resource, that prior knowledge did not significantly influence final test scores, and that subjective qualities did not affect learning.…

  2. The development of MWPC-based systems for imaging X-rays, gamma rays and charged particles in applications in medicine, materials science and biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development is described of several complete MWPC based imaging systems for applications in medicine (a positron camera), industry (a second positron camera), materials science (two 2-d X-ray diffraction systems) and biochemistry (an autoradiography system for 2-d immunoelectrophoresis using a tritium label). A moderately detailed description of two of the systems is given and some special developments in the areas of fast modular electronics for the delay line readout technique and fast imaging data taking are described in more detail. The state of rapid expansion of this area of application of MWPC technology and its relationship to the microprocessor revolution are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Quality Assurance Program for Molecular Medicine Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Sabzavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular diagnostic methods have played and continuing to have a critical role in clinical laboratories in recent years. Therefore, standardization is an evolutionary process that needs to be upgrade with increasing scientific knowledge, improvement of the instruments and techniques. The aim of this study was to design a quality assurance program in order to have similar conditions for all medical laboratories engaging with molecular tests.Methods: We had to design a plan for all four elements; required space conditions, equipments, training, and basic guidelines. Necessary guidelines was prepared and confirmed by the launched specific committee at the Health Reference Laboratory.Results: Several workshops were also held for medical laboratories directors and staffs, quality control manager of molecular companies, directors and nominees from universities. Accreditation of equipments and molecular material was followed parallel with rest of program. Now we are going to accredit medical laboratories and to evaluate the success of the program.Conclusion: Accreditation of medical laboratory will be succeeding if its basic elements are provided in advance. Professional practice guidelines, holding training and performing accreditation the molecular materials and equipments ensured us that laboratories are aware of best practices, proper interpretation, limitations of techniques, and technical issues. Now, active external auditing can improve the applied laboratory conditions toward the defined standard level.

  4. Quality Assurance Program for Molecular Medicine Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    F Sabzavi; M Rafiee; Sohrabi, A.; Nafisi, N; Anjarani, S; P Dahim; S Mirab Samiee; Safadel, N; Hajia, M; B Entekhabi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molecular diagnostic methods have played and continuing to have a critical role in clinical laboratories in recent years. Therefore, standardization is an evolutionary process that needs to be upgrade with increasing scientific knowledge, improvement of the instruments and techniques. The aim of this study was to design a quality assurance program in order to have similar conditions for all medical laboratories engaging with molecular tests.Methods: We had to design a plan for all...

  5. Quality Assurance Program for Molecular Medicine Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Hajia, M; Safadel, N; Samiee, S Mirab; P Dahim; Anjarani, S; Nafisi, N; Sohrabi, A.; M Rafiee; F Sabzavi; B Entekhabi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molecular diagnostic methods have played and continuing to have a critical role in clinical laboratories in recent years. Therefore, standardization is an evolutionary process that needs to be upgrade with increasing scientific knowledge, improvement of the instruments and techniques. The aim of this study was to design a quality assurance program in order to have similar conditions for all medical laboratories engaging with molecular tests. Methods: We had to design a plan for al...

  6. Comparison of the microbial dynamics and biochemistry of laboratory sourdoughs prepared with grape, apple and yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordún, Elena; del Valle, Luis J; Ginovart, Marta; Carbó, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    The microbiological culture-dependent characterization and physicochemical characteristics of laboratory sourdough prepared with grape (GS) were evaluated and compared with apple (AS) and yogurt (YS), which are the usual Spanish sourdough ingredients. Ripe GS took longer than AS and YS to reach the appropriate acidity and achieved lower values of lactic acid. In all sourdoughs, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased during processing and were the dominant microorganisms (>1E+8 CFU/g). GS, as well as AS, had high diversity of LAB species. In ripe YS, Pediococcus pentosaceus was the only species identified; in GS and AS, several Lactobacilli were also found, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, and Lb. sakei; in addition, in GS Weisella cibaria also appeared. Regarding the yeast population, non-Saccharomyces yeasts from GS and AS showed a very high specific population (>1E+7 CFU/g), but this was reduced in ripe sourdough (sourdoughs. Starting ingredients or raw material provided microbiological specificity to sourdoughs, and grape could be considered one of them. PMID:25008077

  7. Biochemistry and metabolism of lake trout: laboratory and field studies on the effects of contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passino, Dora R. May

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of ambient and higher concentrations of PCB's (Aroclor 1254) and DDE in food and water on fry of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Michigan, I measured several biochemical indicators of stress in exposed and unexposed (control) fry. No differences between treatments were observed in oxygen consumption rates or lactate concentrations of unexercised fry, but apparent differences in specific swimming speed and lactate response in fry that swam to exhaustion suggested that exposed fry had lower stamina. Observed differences between biochemical profiles of 1-day-old sac fry reared from eggs originating from lake trout collected off Saugatuck and those originating from eggs of brood stock at the Marquette (Michigan) hatchery may have been caused by organochlorine contamination or by genetic and dietary differences between the parental stocks. Activity of the enzyme allantoinase was measured in juvenile and adult lake trout as an indicator of sublethal effects of Great Lakes contaminants. The 50% inhibition of allantoinase in vitro occurred at 6.0 mg/L Cu++, 6.7 mg/L Cd++, 34 mg/L Hg++, and 52 mg/L Pb++. Allantoinase was not affected by in vitro exposure to PCB's up to 7 μg/g, or DDE or DDT up to 10 μg/g; however, in vivo exposure resulting in 2.6 μg/g PCB's in the whole fish activated allantoinase slightly (10% significance level). Allantoinase activity was negatively correlated with total length for fish from Lake Michigan but not for fish from Lake Superior or from laboratory stocks. Mercury, PCB's, and DDT, possibly acting in combination with each other and with additional contaminants, may be the cause of the negative correlation of allantoinase activity with size in Lake Michigan lake trout.

  8. [Diabetes and clinical laboratory tests: team medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kiyoko

    2011-11-01

    The presentation at this symposium is from the following two perspectives: 1. Indispensability of team medicine for diabetes treatment: Once diabetes has been diagnosed, long-term treatment is essential. Diabetes is often due to a combination of unhealthy lifestyle factors, and treatment therefore requires patients to improve their lifestyles, a certain amount of stoicism also being needed. Patients also have to overcome events in their lives while suffering from diabetes, at the same time as controlling the diabetes, and such events cause stress for the patients, affecting them both psychologically and in terms of lifestyle, so patients' blood sugar levels are disturbed by interactions between stress and lifestyle factors. Medical personnel monitor the progression of numerous diabetic patients, and take different approaches to treatment on the basis of their experience and specialist knowledge. From various perspectives, maintenance of patients' will to continue with treatment is an important aspect of "team medicine". Enabling patients to be treated while feeling themselves to be supported by the treatment team is important, and is linked to empowerment of patients, which is the ultimate objective of the treatment guidelines. 2. Importance of team medicine, illustrated by diabetic nephropathy: If diabetic nephropathy progresses to Stage II or further, deterioration of the patient's condition is unavoidable. Medical personnel often think that the patients also will be concerned about the nephropathy, and will therefore not forget about having been told they have nephropathy. However, it has been found that, when subjective symptoms are absent, patients often do not fully understand the explanation, and forget about the nephropathy. It is therefore essential for medical personnel to appreciate that the risk of nephropathic progression is increased if patients do not remember about having nephropathy. PMID:22352019

  9. CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

  10. Diagnosing sepsis - The role of laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shu-Ling; Miller, Nancy S; Lee, John; Remick, Daniel G

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is the host response to microbial pathogens resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. An accurate and timely diagnosis of sepsis allows prompt and appropriate treatment. This review discusses laboratory testing for sepsis because differentiating systemic inflammation from infection is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently an FDA approved test to aid in the diagnosis of sepsis but with questionable efficacy. However, studies support the use of PCT for antibiotic de-escalation. Serial lactate measurements have been recommended for monitoring treatment efficacy as part of sepsis bundles. The 2016 sepsis consensus definitions include lactate concentrations >2mmol/L (>18mg/dL) as part of the definition of septic shock. Also included in the 2016 definitions are measuring bilirubin and creatinine to determine progression of organ failure indicating worse prognosis. Hematologic parameters, including a simple white blood cell count and differential, are frequently part of the initial sepsis diagnostic protocols. Several new biomarkers have been proposed to diagnose sepsis or to predict mortality, but they currently lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered as stand-alone testing. If sepsis is suspected, new technologies and microbiologic assays allow rapid and specific identification of pathogens. In 2016 there is no single laboratory test that accurately diagnoses sepsis. PMID:27387712

  11. Anatomy of a value proposition for laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P; St John, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    Value is now becoming a key driver in the ongoing development of healthcare delivery; key facets include the identification of what is valuable and how that value can be identified, leveraged, and delivered. The concept of a value proposition is widely used in business but can be used in healthcare as a statement of the benefits, costs and value that an organization can deliver to its customers. The foundation of this statement in laboratory medicine is evidence of clinical and cost effectiveness, not only for the patient, but also for other stakeholders involved in the delivery of healthcare, e.g., the carer, service provider, commissioner, purchaser, and the supplier of the test or device, as well as society as a whole. However the value of any laboratory medicine investigation is only achieved if the output (the test result(s)), is acted upon by the initiator of the investigation. Laboratory medicine is one part of a complex intervention, and so the value proposition should encompass the breadth of that intervention - from addressing the unmet need through the generation of clinical, operational and economic outcomes. A value proposition in laboratory medicine is central to successful innovation and quality improvement in healthcare. PMID:24880041

  12. Evidence Based Medicine Laboratory Tests and Preanalytical Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turhan B et al.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The practice of evidence-based medicine means logical integration of individual clinical experiences with the best available evidences from systematic research. The recent clinical practice tends to apply evidence based procedures instead of individual clinical opinions. True interpretation of laboratory results is important on diagnosis, treatment and follow-up as well as time and cost effectivity. Although clinicians expect decisive and clear results from the laboratory tests, sometimes unexpected results can be seen. Most of these occasions are resulting from demographic properties, obtaining the sample and other external factors rather then laboratory procedures. It is important to know preanalytical variations that affect the laboratory test results to make quick and accurate assessments for the primary care physicians who are getting increasing number of patients. The aim of this review is to introduce a practical source to the primary care physicians by briefing the effects of preanalytical variables on laboratory test results.

  13. Proficiency in radiation protection, nuclear medicine and biomedicine in the Faculty of Biochemistry and Pharmaceutics, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Capacitacion en proteccion radiologica en medicina y biomedicina en la Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoc, Rosa M.; Caro, Ricardo A.; Rivera, Elena S. [Universidad Buenos Aires (Argentina). Faculdade de Farmacia y Bioquimica. Lab. de Radioisotopos; Menossi, Carlos A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry (Buenos Aires University) offers four annual courses on Methodology of Radioisotopes (which focus on different aspect of the Radiological Protection according to whom they are aimed: 1) Course for students in the Biochemistry Cycle; 2) Course for post-Graduate in Medicine, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists; 3) Course to up-date the knowledge; 4) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine. From 1960, 5000 biochemistry students have approved Methodology of Radioisotopes. The syllabus includes aspect related to the students' future professional activities. Since 1962, 1513 (?) graduates have approved it. Training (222 h) include: dosimetric magnitudes, units, internal and external dosimetry; working conditions, contamination barriers, radioprotection philosophy and principles; limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects, national and international legislation. Uses of commonest isotopes in Nuclear Medicine and Biomedicine are under deep analysis. Since 1992 the graduates who wish to up-date their knowledge can follow this course organized in modules to suit their needs. Since 1997 this course emphasizes the operational aspects such as: columns elution, injection of radioactive drugs to patients, decontamination of areas. The increasing in the application of radioisotopes makes necessary to encourage their use in harmony with the environmental. (author)

  14. Nutritional Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

  15. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: Requests, samples, measurements and reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In laboratory medicine, the terms "standardization" and "harmonization" are frequently used interchangeably as the final goal is the same: the equivalence of measurement results among different routine measurement procedures over time and space according to defined analytical and clinical quality specifications. However, the terms define two distinct, albeit closely linked, concepts based on traceability principles. The word "standardization" is used when results for a measurement are equivalent and traceable to the International System of Units (SI) through a high-order primary reference material and/or a reference measurement procedure (RMP). "Harmonization" is generally used when results are equivalent, but neither a high-order primary reference material nor a reference measurement procedure is available. Harmonization is a fundamental aspect of quality in laboratory medicine as its ultimate goal is to improve patient outcomes through the provision of accurate and actionable laboratory information. Patients, clinicians and other healthcare professionals assume that clinical laboratory tests performed by different laboratories at different times on the same sample and specimen can be compared, and that results can be reliably and consistently interpreted. Unfortunately, this is not necessarily the case, because many laboratory test results are still highly variable and poorly standardized and harmonized. Although the initial focus was mainly on harmonizing and standardizing analytical processes and methods, the scope of harmonization now also includes all other aspects of the total testing process (TTP), such as terminology and units, report formats, reference intervals and decision limits as well as tests and test profiles, requests and criteria for interpretation. Several projects and initiatives aiming to improve standardization and harmonization in the testing process are now underway. Laboratory professionals should therefore step up their efforts to provide

  16. Biochemistry engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This deals with biochemistry engineering with nine chapters. It explains bionics on development and prospect, basics of life science on classification and structure, enzyme and metabolism, fundamentals of chemical engineering on viscosity, shear rate, PFR, CSTR, mixing, dispersion, measurement and response, Enzyme kinetics, competitive inhibition, pH profile, temperature profile, stoichiometry and fermentation kinetics, bio-reactor on Enzyme-reactor and microorganism-reactor, measurement and processing on data acquisition and data processing, separation and purification, waste water treatment and economics of bionics process.

  17. [Laboratory Medicine Learned Through Research on the Pathogenesis of Hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hakuo

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory tests used in clinical practice to assess hypertension include a differential diagnosis, the assessment of complications, and detection of adverse events with medication, which cover a variety of fields of laboratory medicine. I learned laboratory medicine through basic and clinical studies on the pathogenesis of hypertension, and summarized those findings and my interpretations. Basic research using animal models points to a causal role of the central nervous system in essential hypertension; however, since clinical research is technically difficult to perform, this connection has not been confirmed in humans. Recently, renal nerve ablation in humans proved to continuously decrease the blood pressure in the presence of resistant hypertension. Furthermore, when electrical stimulation was continuously applied to the carotid baroreceptor nerve of human adults, their blood pressure lowered. These findings promoted the concept that the central nervous system may actually be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension, which is closely associated with excess sodium intake. We demonstrated that endogenous digitalis plays a key role in hypertension associated with excess sodium intake via sympathetic activation in rats. An increased sodium concentration inside the brain activates epithelial sodium channels and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the brain. Aldosterone releases ouabain from neurons in the paraventricular nucleus in the hypothalamus. Angiotensin II and aldosterone of peripheral origin reach the brain to augment sympathetic outflow. Collectively essential hypertension associated with excess sodium intake and obesity, renovascular hypertension, and primary aldosteronism and pseudoaldosteronism are all suggested to have a common cause originating from the central nervous system. PMID:26524901

  18. Cost challenges for laboratory medicine automation in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Moshen Tanyanyiwa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Automation in laboratory medicine is inevitable and the only way forward especially in Africa where the staff turnover is high due to migration of experienced staff to Europe and America. Described here are the common issues that laboratory Managers and Directors encounter when upgrading, replacing analytical systems as well as daily running of diagnostic laboratories. The rapid advancement driven by the first world where research facilities, resources and expertise are available has seen changes in the both the hardware and software utilised by analyzers every two to three years. The downside is that in the process of replacing/phasing out old analysers, the first world countries in some cases donate them to second and third world countries as refurbished analysers. Problems in obtaining spares ensue since the production of new analysers results in reduced production or even of old spares. Unavailability or delayed availability of spares results in suspension of diagnostic service by the recipient laboratory. In some areas costly modifications to the analysers or the location/building have had to done to suite local (African conditions, hence the need for Laboratory managers to understand fully the analysers’ operational requirements before purchasing or accepting donations

  19. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  20. Chronic Chagas disease: from basics to laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Saravia, Silvia Gilka Munoz; Wallukat, Gerd; Ziebig, Reinhard; Schimke, Ingolf

    2013-02-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is ranked as the most serious parasitic disease in Latin America and has huge potential to become a worldwide problem, due to increasing migration, and international tourism, as well as infectant transfer by blood contact and transfusion, intrauterine transfer, and organ transplantation. Nearly 30% of chronically-infected patients become symptomatic, often with a latency of 10-30 years, developing life-threatening complications. Of those, nearly 90% develop Chagas heart disease, while the others manifest gastrointestinal disease and neuronal disorders. Besides interrupting the infection cycle and chemo therapeutic infectant elimination, starting therapy early in symptomatic patients is important for counteracting the disease. This would be essentially supported by optimized patient management, involving risk assessment, early diagnosis and monitoring of the disease and its treatment. From economic and logistic viewpoints, the tools of laboratory medicine should be especially able to guarantee this. After summarizing the basics of chronic Chagas disease, such as the epidemiological data, the pathogenetic mechanisms thought to drive symptomatic Chagas disease and also treatment options, we present tools of laboratory medicine that address patient diagnosis, risk assessment for becoming symptomatic and guidance, focusing on autoantibody estimation for risk assessment and heart marker measurement for patient guidance. In addition, increases in levels of inflammation and oxidative stress markers in chronic Chagas disease are discussed. PMID:23045386

  1. Application of Sigma Metrics for the Assessment of Quality Assurance in Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory in India: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Bhawna; Goswami, Binita; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Chawla, Ranjna; Mallika, Venkatesan

    2010-01-01

    Ensuring quality of laboratory services is the need of the hour in the field of health care. Keeping in mind the revolution ushered by six sigma concept in corporate world, health care sector may reap the benefits of the same. Six sigma provides a general methodology to describe performance on sigma scale. We aimed to gauge our laboratory performance by sigma metrics. Internal quality control (QC) data was analyzed retrospectively over a period of 6 months from July 2009 to December 2009. Lab...

  2. Application of sigma metrics for the assessment of quality assurance in clinical biochemistry laboratory in India: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhawna; Goswami, Binita; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Chawla, Ranjna; Mallika, Venkatesan

    2011-04-01

    Ensuring quality of laboratory services is the need of the hour in the field of health care. Keeping in mind the revolution ushered by six sigma concept in corporate world, health care sector may reap the benefits of the same. Six sigma provides a general methodology to describe performance on sigma scale. We aimed to gauge our laboratory performance by sigma metrics. Internal quality control (QC) data was analyzed retrospectively over a period of 6 months from July 2009 to December 2009. Laboratory mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation were calculated for all the parameters. Sigma was calculated for both the levels of internal QC. Satisfactory sigma values (>6) were elicited for creatinine, triglycerides, SGOT, CPK-Total and Amylase. Blood urea performed poorly on the sigma scale with sigma six sigma standards for all the analytical processes. PMID:22468038

  3. An inquiry-based biochemistry laboratory structure emphasizing competency in the scientific process: a guided approach with an electronic notebook format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Hall, Mona; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students through their laboratory work at a steady pace that encourages them to focus on quality observations, careful data collection and thought processes surrounding the chemistry involved. It motivates students to work in a collaborative manner with frequent opportunities for feedback, reflection, and modification of their ideas. Each laboratory activity has four stages to keep the students' efforts on track: pre-lab work, an in-lab discussion, in-lab work, and a post-lab assignment. Students are guided at each stage by an instructor created template that directs their learning while giving them the opportunity and flexibility to explore new information, ideas, and questions. These templates are easily transferred into an electronic journal (termed the E-notebook) and form the basic structural framework of the final lab reports the students submit electronically, via a learning management system. The guided-inquiry based approach presented here uses a single laboratory activity for undergraduate Introductory Biochemistry as an example. After implementation of this guided learning approach student surveys reported a higher level of course satisfaction and there was a statistically significant improvement in the quality of the student work. Therefore we firmly believe the described format to be highly effective in promoting student learning and engagement. PMID:24376181

  4. Effects of Various Dental Materials on Alkaline Phosphatase Extracted from Pulp: An Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lorin R.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that demonstrates the effects of various dental materials on a representative enzyme from the pulp is outlined. The experiment encourages students to consider the effects that various restorative materials and techniques might have on enzymes in the living pulp. (Author/MLW)

  5. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  6. Using an ePortfolio system as an electronic laboratory notebook in undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology practical classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jill; Kant, Sashi; Gysbers, Vanessa; Hancock, Dale; Denyer, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Despite many apparent advantages, including security, back-up, remote access, workflow, and data management, the use of electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) in the modern research laboratory is still developing. This presents a challenge to instructors who want to give undergraduate students an introduction to the kinds of data curation and notebook keeping skills that will inevitably be required as ELNs penetrate normal laboratory practice. An additional problem for the teacher is that ELNs do not generally have student-administrative functions and are prohibitively expensive. In this report, we describe the use and impact of an ePortfolio system as a surrogate ELN. Introduction of the system led to several pedagogic outcomes, namely: increased preparedness of students for class, encouragement of creativity and reflection with respect to experimental methods, greatly enhanced engagement between students and tutors, and it gave instructors the ability to scrutinize original data files and monitor student-tutor feedback cycles. However, implementation led to a disruption of tutor workloads and incurred new levels of accountability that threatened to undermine the initiative. Through course evaluations and other reflective processes, we reached an appreciation of how an ELN should be introduced into practical class teaching so that it not only becomes an appropriate aid for teaching the laboratory experience, but also becomes a life-long resource for students. PMID:24376052

  7. Clinical biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  8. Indicadores de sustentabilidade em medicina laboratorial Sustainability indicators in laboratory medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Diório Uliani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta os princípios conceituais sobre desenvolvimento sustentável, sustentabilidade e avalia a evolução e os impactos na economia, no meio ambiente e na sociedade. Discutem-se a aplicabilidade dos conceitos de sustentabilidade empresarial na medicina laboratorial e os desafios inerentes à implantação no laboratório clínico. O impacto dos indicadores de sustentabilidade e seu papel no processo de gestão também são analisados criticamente sob a ótica do balanço socioambiental. O texto apresenta ainda algumas ferramentas para avaliação e interpretação dos indicadores e sua aplicação no processo de análise crítica. Finalmente, o artigo descreve a importância dos indicadores de sustentabilidade na prática do benchmarking e sua aplicabilidade no laboratório clínicoThe article presents the conceptual principles on sustainable development and sustainability. Furthermore, it evaluates the progress and impacts on the economy, environment and society. It discusses the applicability of the concepts of corporate sustainability in laboratory medicine and the challenges of deployment in the clinical laboratory. The impact of sustainability indicators and their role in management are also critically reviewed from the perspective of social and environmental balance. Additionally, the text provides some tools for evaluation and interpretation of indicators and their corresponding application in the critical analysis process. Lastly, the article describes the importance of sustainability indicators in the practice of benchmarking and its applicability in the clinical laboratory

  9. Analysis of Dextromethorphan in Cough Drops and Syrups: A Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Todd M.; Wiseman, Frank L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the quantity of dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DM) in over-the-counter (OTC) cough drops and syrups. This experiment is appropriate for an undergraduate medicinal chemistry laboratory course when studying OTC medicines and active ingredients. Students prepare the cough drops and syrups for analysis,…

  10. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...... than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous...

  11. Biomedical waste in laboratory medicine: Audit and management

    OpenAIRE

    Chitnis V; Vaidya K; Chitnis D

    2005-01-01

    Pathology, microbiology, blood bank and other diagnostic laboratories generate sizable amount of biomedical waste (BMW). The audit of the BMW is required for planning proper strategies. The audit in our laboratory revealed 8 kgs anatomical waste, 600 kgs microbiology waste, 220 kgs waste sharps, 15 kgs soiled waste, 111 kgs solid waste, 480 litres liquid waste along with 33000 litres per month liquid waste generated from labware washing and laboratory cleaning and 162 litres of chemical waste...

  12. Preparation, Purification, and Secondary Structure Determination of Bacillus Circulans Xylanase. A Molecular Laboratory Incorporating Aspects of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Sal; Gentile, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A project module designed for biochemistry or cellular and molecular biology student which involves determining the secondary structure of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under conditions that compromise its stabilizing intramolecular forces is described. The lab model enhanced students knowledge of the…

  13. Reproduction, Physiology and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter focuses on the reproduction, physiology, and biochemistry of the root-knot nematodes. The extensive amount of information on the reproduction and cytogenetics of species of Meloidogyne contrasts with the limited information on physiology, biochemistry, and biochemical pathways. In commo...

  14. Audiotutorial Teaching of Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This audiotutorial course consists of 35 minicourses including biology, husbandry, and diseases of the common laboratory animals. Each minicourse includes an audiocassette tape recording and visual and written materials. The course is available for distribution. (Author/LBH)

  15. [Introduction of quality systems into laboratory medicine: methodological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, G A; Émanuél', A V

    2011-05-01

    The paper considers the problems of introducing the quality management systems (QMS) according to GOST R ISO 9001-2001 in the health care facilities of different forms of property and departmental subordination. It gives examples of successfully putting QMS into practice in the companies that manufacture products for laboratory diagnosis in accordance with the Russian and international standardization principles. Methods are presented for training the staff of the facilities in the QMS principles and making a dialogue between laboratories and customers. PMID:21786620

  16. Biomedical waste in laboratory medicine: Audit and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitnis V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathology, microbiology, blood bank and other diagnostic laboratories generate sizable amount of biomedical waste (BMW. The audit of the BMW is required for planning proper strategies. The audit in our laboratory revealed 8 kgs anatomical waste, 600 kgs microbiology waste, 220 kgs waste sharps, 15 kgs soiled waste, 111 kgs solid waste, 480 litres liquid waste along with 33000 litres per month liquid waste generated from labware washing and laboratory cleaning and 162 litres of chemical waste per month. Section wise details are described in the text. Needle sharps are collected in puncture proof containers and the needles autoclaved before sending to needle pit. The glass forms the major sharp category and is disinfected with hypochlorite before washing/recycling. All microbiology waste along with containers/plates/tubes are autoclaved before recycling/disposal. The problem of formalin fixed anatomical waste as histology specimens is pointed out. The formalin containing tissues cannot be sent for incineration for the fear of toxic gas release and the guidelines by the Biomedical waste rule makers need to be amended for the issue. The discarded/infected blood units in blood bank need to be autoclaved before disposal since chemical treatments are difficult or inefficient. The liquid waste management needs more attention and effluent treatment facility needs to be viewed seriously for hospital in general. The segregation of waste at source is the key step and reduction, reuse and recycling should be considered in proper perspectives.

  17. Discussion on bilingual teaching of Biochemistry in six-year-clinical medicine and English majors%六年制临床医学与英语专业生物化学双语教学探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟静; 孙凌云; 张媛英; 伊淑莹

    2012-01-01

    In order to deepen the medical education reform, improve teaching quality of Biochemistry, we started bilingual teaching in 2003 in 6-year clinical medicine and English speciality, from syllabus design, material selection and preparation, teaching method reform and other aspects of attempt. Through nearly 10 years of trials and efforts, we have made bilingual teaching mode according to the characteristics of students' specialty and professional basis. Sampling survey reveals that the level of students' satisfaction towards bilingual teaching of Biochemistry is 29%, that of general satisfaction is 56%, and of dissatisfaction is 15%. In the evaluation organized by the university for teaching effect, our performance has been increasing year by year.%为了深化医学教育改革,进一步提高生物化学教学质量,我们教学团队从2003年开始在6年制临床医学与英语专业试行双语教学,从教学大纲制定、教材选择与编写、教学方法改革等多方面进行了尝试.通过近10年的尝试和努力,我们根据学生专业特点和专业基础形成了该专业学生的双语教学模式.抽样问卷调查显示学生对生物化学双语教学满意者达29%,基本满意达56%,不满意者为15%.而且在学校组织的教学效果评价中,成绩逐年提高.

  18. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  19. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment Teaching Model of Medical Laboratory Technology%医学检验技术专业生物化学与分子生物学实验教学改革探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁宁; 隋文; 李坤

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry and molecular biology experiment is an importment course in medical laboratory technology profession which in cultivating students' practical and innovative ability has an important role. But current drawbacks of traditional medical education has seriously affected the course of biochemistry and molecular biology experiment. Through the experimental curriculum, assessment methods, opening up laboratory and other aspects of the reform ,building a student-centered interactive multi-level open experimental teaching model, and comprehensively improve the students' innovative ability.%生物化学与分子生物学是医学检验技术专业中的一门重要课程,对培养学生的实践能力和创新能力具有重要作用。当前传统医学教育存在的弊端严重影响了该课程的实验教学。本教研室通过对实验课程、考核方式、开放实验室等方面的改革,构建了以学生为中心的多层次开放互动式实验教学模式,全面提高了学生的创新实践能力。

  20. Molecular biology in medicine: laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, M L

    1996-01-01

    Clinical mycobacteriology has benefited much from the application of molecular biology techniques. Early detection and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are achieved by the combined use of the BACTEC system and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. High-performance liquid chromatography is the other alternative used in some laboratories. Polymerase chain reaction is still a research tool because of its many problems and limitations. Other promising techniques for rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, for example, the serological diagnosis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium tuberculosis Direct Test, DNA hybridization, the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tubes System and the strand displacement amplification system are currently under evaluation. The discovery of drug resistant genes such as katG and apoB has important implications for the development of new tests for the rapid detection of resistance to anti-tuberculous drugs. PMID:8779555

  1. A Streamlined Molecular Biology Module for Undergraduate Biochemistry Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Gregory W.; Chihade, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis and other molecular biology techniques, including plasmid manipulation and restriction analysis, are commonly used tools in the biochemistry research laboratory. In redesigning our biochemistry lab curricula, we sought to integrate these techniques into a term-long, project-based course. In the module presented here,…

  2. An Integrated Visualization and Basic Molecular Modeling Laboratory for First-Year Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D model visualization and basic molecular modeling laboratory suitable for first-year undergraduates studying introductory medicinal chemistry is presented. The 2 h practical is embedded within a series of lectures on drug design, target-drug interactions, enzymes, receptors, nucleic acids, and basic pharmacokinetics. Serving as a teaching aid…

  3. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...

  4. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: Code of Conduct, Version 2--2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 10 years, more than 2000 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). A Code of Conduct was adopted in 2003 and a revised and updated version, taking account particularly of the guidelines of the Conseil Européen des Professions Libérales (CEPLIS) of which EFCC is a member, is presented in this article. The revised version was approved by the EC4 Register Commission and by the EFCC Executive Board in Paris on 6 November, 2008.

  5. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2010-07-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous Guides to the Register have been published, one in 1997 and another in 2003. The third version of the Guide is presented in this article and is based on the experience gained and development of the profession since the last revision. Registration is valid for 5 years and the procedure and criteria for re-registration are presented as an Appendix at the end of the article.

  6. Developing GRADE outcome-based recommendations about diagnostic tests: a key role in laboratory medicine policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Tommaso; Schünemann, Holger J; Plebani, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Harmonisation and risk management policies represent key-issues in modern laboratory medicine as they focus on a more patient-centred delivery of laboratory information based on the recognition of the importance of all steps of the total testing process (TTP) for assuring quality and patient safety. However, a further essential step in project aiming to improve the value of laboratory medicine becomes the assessment of the impact of testing on patient-important outcomes. The grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) evidence to decision (EtD) frameworks may provide a systematic and transparent approach for translating the best clinical evidence available into healthcare decisions and recommendations. GRADE is a tool appropriate not only for evaluating test accuracy but also for clinical impact, such as mortality, morbidity, symptoms, and quality of life and therefore it should be applied to the outcome research in laboratory medicine. The application of GRADE requires the recognition that a recommendation about the use of test results should result from a balance between the desirable and the undesirable consequences, including non-health related consequences such as resource utilisation, feasibility, acceptability, equity and other factors. GRADE EtDs, represents a fundamental step in projects designed to improve care quality. Patient-physician-laboratory feedback can be assured through the GRADE process, where the team developing the recommendations should include the "three-parties" representatives; clinicians, laboratorians and patient/consumers. This ensures that the laboratory-patient interaction should not be a one-way process only (information from laboratory to patient) but a two-way process, incorporating patient expectations and feedback. PMID:26457787

  7. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Standardization in laboratory medicine: Adoption of common reference intervals to the Croatian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegar-Meštrić, Zlata; Perkov, Sonja; Radeljak, Andrea

    2016-03-26

    Considering the fact that the results of laboratory tests provide useful information about the state of health of patients, determination of reference value is considered an intrinsic part in the development of laboratory medicine. There are still huge differences in the analytical methods used as well as in the associated reference intervals which could consequently significantly affect the proper assessment of patient health. In a constant effort to increase the quality of patients' care, there are numerous international initiatives for standardization and/or harmonization of laboratory diagnostics in order to achieve maximum comparability of laboratory test results and improve patient safety. Through the standardization and harmonization processes of analytical methods the ability to create unique reference intervals is achieved. Such reference intervals could be applied globally in all laboratories using methods traceable to the same reference measuring system and analysing the biological samples from the populations with similar socio-demographic and ethnic characteristics. In this review we outlined the results of the harmonization processes in Croatia in the field of population based reference intervals for clinically relevant blood and serum constituents which are in accordance with ongoing activity for worldwide standardization and harmonization based on traceability in laboratory medicine. PMID:27019800

  9. Distance Education as a Tool for Training Veterinarians in Laboratory Animal Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia V. Turner

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization and a trend towards international harmonization of standards for the care and use of animals in research and testing,there is a significant need to assist and support countries to develop training programs for laboratory animal veterinarians. Although formal educational opportunities for training laboratory animal veterinarians exist through well-established specialty colleges of laboratory animal medicine such as ACLAM,ECLAM,JCLAM,and KCLAM or through other professional organisations,such as the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations ( FELASA ),opportunities for participating in these programs are often limited to veterinarians in North America,Western Europe and specific regions of Asia. Creative thinking is required to develop cost-effective,practical,entry-level and advanced continuing education and applied training programs for veterinarians working in the field of laboratory animal medicine around the world.This paper will describe one potential solution for this issue,the use of a distance education program that provides theoretical information in a virtual classroom with applied training modules to deliver knowledge and practical skills to laboratory animal veterinarians.This type of program takes advantage of the online learning environment and can be an effective means to deliver training at the grassroots level to adult learners.

  10. Standardization in laboratory medicine: Adoption of common reference intervals to the Croatian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegar-Meštrić, Zlata; Perkov, Sonja; Radeljak, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Considering the fact that the results of laboratory tests provide useful information about the state of health of patients, determination of reference value is considered an intrinsic part in the development of laboratory medicine. There are still huge differences in the analytical methods used as well as in the associated reference intervals which could consequently significantly affect the proper assessment of patient health. In a constant effort to increase the quality of patients’ care, there are numerous international initiatives for standardization and/or harmonization of laboratory diagnostics in order to achieve maximum comparability of laboratory test results and improve patient safety. Through the standardization and harmonization processes of analytical methods the ability to create unique reference intervals is achieved. Such reference intervals could be applied globally in all laboratories using methods traceable to the same reference measuring system and analysing the biological samples from the populations with similar socio-demographic and ethnic characteristics. In this review we outlined the results of the harmonization processes in Croatia in the field of population based reference intervals for clinically relevant blood and serum constituents which are in accordance with ongoing activity for worldwide standardization and harmonization based on traceability in laboratory medicine. PMID:27019800

  11. The 3rd questionnaire report of safety control on instrument in nuclear medicine laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present 3rd survey was aimed at grasping safety control in nuclear medicine examination and the trend for SPECT usage. Questionnaires were sent to 1238 facilities dealing with nuclear medicine; and 1127 facilities (91.0%) responded. The survey period was three years from April 1, 1989 through March 31, 1992. The following 7 items were surveyed: (1) nuclear medicine personnel, (2) nuclear medicine equipments, (3) accidents occurring in nuclear medicine laboratories, (4) risk factors leading to accidents, (5) countermeasures for improving safety control, (6) major breakdown of the machinery and equipment, and (7) demands for makers. Majority of nuclear medicine personnel were male and were less than 50 years old. The number of SPECT equipments increased from 714 in the previous survey to 968. Accidents (personal injuries) and narrow escape from an accident were seen in 45 and 154 cases. Personal injuries such as falling occurred in 37 patients and 8 nuclear medicine personnel. According to nuclear medicine examinations, SPECT was the most common examination associated with accident and narrow escape cases (86/199). Such cases at the beginning of examination were remarkably decreased, as compared with those in the previous two surveys. Accidents were primarily attributable to careless management by personnel. Breakdown of the machinery and equipment was reported in 207 cases. In Item 5, the following contents were presented: heads for examination, personnel's behavior, education, examination equipments, collimators and others. Finally, contents in Item 7 included: equipment design, heads for examination, maintenance or management, data processing, collimators, examination equipments and others. (N.K.)

  12. Six Sigma as a Quality Management Tool: Evaluation of Performance in Laboratory Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Coskun, Abdurrahman; Unsal, Ibrahim; Serteser, Mustafa; Inal, Tamer

    2010-01-01

    To solve analytical or managerial problems in laboratory medicine and to decrease errors to a negligible level, Six Sigma methodology is the right choice. Some may find this assertion too optimistic. They claim that Six Sigma methodology is suitable for industry, but not for medical purposes. Unfortunately, such claims typically come from people who never practiced Six Sigma methodology in the healthcare sector. As mentioned previously, if we do not measure, we do not know, and if we do not k...

  13. Meeting the Curriculum Needs for Different Career Paths in Laboratory Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Brian R

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of career paths in Laboratory Medicine and several clinical practice models for the discipline. This article summarizes the state of current training at the medical student and residency/post-graduate levels, emphasizing practice in the U.S., and the challenges of education in the discipline to meet the needs of diverse career paths. Data regarding effectiveness of current pedagogical Approaches are discussed along with a brief review of evolving didactic methodologies. The...

  14. Biochemistry Teaching in the Undergraduate Medical Course at Universidade Federalde Viçosa

    OpenAIRE

    L. Moreira Lima; R. Siqueira-Batista; L.A. Santana; Gomes, A. P.; A. M. Pilon; Oliveira, M.G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background:The current competencies and abilities required for the training of medical professionals, recommended by the National Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Medicine (DCN) have initiated discussions about the teaching of biochemistry in medical schools. Objective: This study aimed to describe the rationale of education in the Clinical Laboratory Applieddisciplines – (LAC) I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII – which will be taught from first to eighth period of medical school at U...

  15. [Laboratory medicine in the post-genome era: experiences in Chiba University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumio

    2008-12-01

    Since the completion of the human genome project, there is growing interest in the clinical application of genome sciences. For this purpose, particular attention toward identifying at-risk individuals and understanding the complexities of the testing process are essential. In this article, I describe the importance of clinical genetics and genetic counseling, and explain how and why the division of laboratory medicine is involved in these tasks in Chiba University Hospital. Our genetic counseling team consists of a clinical laboratory physician qualified as a clinical geneticist, medical technologist qualified as a genetic counselor, clinical psychologists, and a medical social worker. We treat more than 100 cases including late-onset, incurable neurological diseases, hereditary tumors, prenatal diagnosis, and chromosomal abnormalities. The sequencing of the human genome has paved the way for comprehensive transcriptome and proteome analyses. Since the detailed understanding of biological processes, both in healthy and pathological states, requires the direct study of relevant proteins, proteomics bridges the gap between the information coded in the genome sequence and cellular behavior. Therefore, proteomics is among the most promising technologies for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Recent advances in sophisticated technologies in proteomics should identify promising ways to discover novel markers in various fields of clinical medicine. In this presentation, I will give a definition of the proteome, and outline the basic methodologies for proteome analyses. I will also present our experiences in identifying novel biomarker candidates in hepatobiliary diseases, and discuss future perspectives of clinical proteomics in laboratory medicine. PMID:19175078

  16. Roles of the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) and International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) in the Global Organization and Support of 3Rs Advances in Laboratory Animal Science

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Clark, Judy MacArthur; Vergara, Patri; Bayne, Kathryn; White, William J.; Kurosawa, Tsutomu Miki; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Baneux, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Practical implementation of the 3Rs at national and regional levels around the world requires long-term commitment, backing, and coordinated efforts by international associations for laboratory animal medicine and science, including the International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) and the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). Together these organizations support the efforts of regional organization and communities of laboratory animal sci...

  17. Indicadores de sustentabilidade em medicina laboratorial Sustainability indicators in laboratory medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Diório Uliani; Evelyn Rodrigues; Valéria Aparecida Faria; Maria Leide de Sena Badaró; Paschoalina Romano; Maria Elizabete Mendes; Nairo Massakazu Sumita

    2011-01-01

    O artigo apresenta os princípios conceituais sobre desenvolvimento sustentável, sustentabilidade e avalia a evolução e os impactos na economia, no meio ambiente e na sociedade. Discutem-se a aplicabilidade dos conceitos de sustentabilidade empresarial na medicina laboratorial e os desafios inerentes à implantação no laboratório clínico. O impacto dos indicadores de sustentabilidade e seu papel no processo de gestão também são analisados criticamente sob a ótica do balanço socioambiental. O te...

  18. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme: A Research-Inspired Methods Optimization Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbur, Jaime F.; Vail, Justin D.; Mitchell, Lindsey N.; Jakeman, David L.; Timmons, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    The development and implementation of research-inspired, discovery-based experiences into science laboratory curricula is a proven strategy for increasing student engagement and ownership of experiments. In the novel laboratory module described herein, students learn to express, purify, and characterize a carbohydrate-active enzyme using modern…

  19. Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate…

  20. Bringing the Excitement and Motivation of Research to Students; Using Inquiry and Research-Based Learning in a Year-Long Biochemistry Laboratory: Part I--Guided Inquiry--Purification and Characterization of a Fusion Protein--Histidine Tag, Malate Dehydrogenase, and Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Kristopher; Smith, Jennifer; Wallert, Mark A.; Provost, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    A successful laboratory experience provides the foundation for student success, creating active participation in the learning process. Here, we describe a new approach that emphasizes research, inquiry and problem solving in a year-long biochemistry experience. The first semester centers on the purification, characterization, and analysis of a…

  1. Evaluation von multimedialen e-Lernkursen zur Vorbereitung auf ein biochemisches Praktikum [Evaluation of multimedia e-Learning preparatory courses for a practial course in Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rost, Birgit; Koolman, Jan

    2009-01-01

    [english] The present study examined whether the application of multimedia learning courses is also suitable for preparing students for practical laboratory courses, both in terms of theory and practice. For this purpose, multimedia e-learning courses were provided and evaluated within the k-MED project. These courses were particularly tailored to the practical training in biochemistry, a mandatory course for third-semester students of medicine and dentistry in Marburg. Two weeks prior to t...

  2. Joint medicine-information and pharmacovigilance services could improve detection and communication about drug-safety problems

    OpenAIRE

    Schjøtt, Jan Didrik

    2014-01-01

    Jan Schjøtt,1–3 Jenny Bergman3 1Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, 2Institute of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, 3Regional Medicines Information and Pharmacovigilance Centre (RELIS Vest), Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway Background: RELIS is a Norwegian network of four regional medicine-information and pharmacovigilance centers where pharmacists and ...

  3. Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

  4. Biochemistry interview transcript 3

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  5. Biochemistry interview transcript 9

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  6. Biochemistry interview transcript 4

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  7. Biochemistry interview transcript 10

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  8. Biochemistry interview transcript 5

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  9. Biochemistry interview transcript 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  10. Biochemistry interview transcript 8

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  11. Biochemistry interview transcript 2

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  12. Biochemistry interview transcript 7

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  13. Biochemistry interview transcript 6

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  14. Case Study of How Turkish University Students Improve Their Biochemistry Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Biochemistry courses have an important place as a common subject in faculties of medicine, food engineering, biology and chemistry. MSLQ, Metacognitive Awareness Inventory and Learning Approach Questionnaire were used. The study also involves repeated observations of the same instructor in a biochemistry class over eight weeks to describe…

  15. Chapter IV: ultrafast biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chergui, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Kjelstrup, S. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Meuwly, M. [Universitaet Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Schuler, B. [University of Zuerich (ETH), Zurich (Switzerland); Thor, J. van [Imperial College London (IC), London (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    The whole report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at the scientific opportunities offered by the institute's SwissFEL X-ray Laser facility. In this sixth part, initial events and fluctuations in biochemical processes at the atomic scale are discussed. Sub-nanosecond processes are fundamental to biochemistry and will be accessible to the ultra-short pulses of the SwissFEL. Time and length scales of biochemical reactions are discussed, as is the photo-initiation of biochemical processes. Time-resolved measurement techniques are looked at. Fluorescence resonant energy transfer is discussed. As an example, the photo cycle of bacteriorhodopsin is examined. The dynamics of protein folding and catalytic action are also looked at. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics is discussed

  16. Training in radioprotection in the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technicians working in Nuclear Medicine Units. Since this course is in a growing demand and an appropriate qualification is required, a new three year lasting degree has been proposed by our laboratory to be offered by the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry. Since 2005, the Pharmacy degree curriculum includes course (6) as an optional subject. During our 47 years teaching experience, more than 95% of registered students have passed their respective exams meeting the respective course standards: students, graduate students and technicians. All the training courses above described are planned keeping in mind the optimization of radiation protection in harmonization with the environment. (author)

  17. Training in radioprotection in the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technicians working in Nuclear Medicine Units. Since this course is in a growing demand and an appropriate qualification is required, a new three year lasting degree has been proposed by our laboratory to be offered by the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry. Since 2005, the Pharmacy degree curriculum includes course (6) as an optional subject. During our 47 years teaching experience, more than 95% of registered students have passed their respective exams meeting the respective course standards: students, graduate students and technicians. All the training courses above described are planned keeping in mind the optimization of radiation protection in harmonization with the environment. (author)

  18. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates. PMID:27509731

  19. Insect Biochemistry Goes to School .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo R. Cunha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many arthropods feed on vertebrate blood and eventually transmit diseases to the human being. Ordinary citizens are continuously exposed to vectors of major diseases and thus prone to contamination. In the present study we have evaluated a new approach regarding the basic biochemistry mechanism that regulates thebiology of Triatominaes, well known as vectors of Chagas Disease. We have used a comic book "Carlos Chagas: 100 years of the discovery of a hero", produced by researchers at our laboratory. The main concepts presented include: neurochemistry of insect olfaction, hemostasis, blood digestion, redox balance to mention some. The material was applied between 60 pupils of theseventh year of elementary school. The work is divided into two phases: an assessment of the concepts that thestudents bring their experiences into the classroom by producing conceptual maps followed by the intervention with the comic and production ofnew conceptual maps under the influence of activity with the material. Analysis of 18conceptual maps obtained from 06 different groups at three different points revealedthat the average score 07 at the beginning of theevaluation went to an average of 45 at the end of the study. This result suggests that a change in the approach of content can give encouragement to students to better develop the theme of contributing to a proper process of conceptual change.

  20. Biochemical Neuroscience Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This biochemistry lab is set up for protein analysis using Western blot, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, and bead-based immunoassays. The...

  1. Inappropriate emergency laboratory test ordering: defensive or peer evidence shared based medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Descovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The laboratory overuse is widely prevalent in hospital practice, mostly in the emergency care. Reasons for excessive and inappropriate test-ordering include defensive behaviour and fear or uncertainty, lack of experience, the misuse of protocols and guidelines, “routine” and local attitudes, inadequate educational feedback and clinician’s unawareness about the cost of examinations and their related implications. AIM OF THE STUDY AND METHODS The primary target of our working group was to reduce inappropriate ordering on a urgent basis test, implementing further examinations not yet previewed in the hospital panel of the available urgencies, according to the evidence based diagnosis concept. The secondary goal was to indicate strategies of re-engineering of the processes, improving turnaround time in the laboratory management of emergencies. After evaluating, as first intervention, the more reliable sources for practice guidelines, systematic reviews and RCTs, the committee further discussed main topics with in-hospital stakeholders, selected from Emergency, Internal Medicine and Surgery Depts. The working group, in many subsequent audits, tried to obtain a systematic feed back with all involved professionals. RESULTS After reviewing literature’s evidence, the board constrained testing options by defining the basic emergency laboratory panel tests (blood type, hemogram, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolarity, CRP, bicarbonate, CPK, creatine phosphokinase-MB, myoglobin, troponin, BNP and NT-proBNP, PT-INR, PTT, D-dimer, beta- HCG, biochemical urinalysis etc.. As final result, the proposed tests reduced the overall number of inappropriate investigations and increased, with newer and updated tests, the available panel for critical patients. DISCUSSION A collegiate review of data reporting, in-hospital deepening of problems and the inter- professional discussion of the evidences

  2. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched...... Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  3. A biochemistry discipline designed for the nutrition course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.G. Bianco

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is widely considered an essential background in a Nutrition Course framework. At theFaculdade de Saude Publica, USP, it is a direct requirement to eight disciplines of the syllabus and anindirect requirement to another nine disciplines. Nevertheless, a previous interview study involvingNutrition students and Nutritionists revealed a contradictory image of Biochemistry. Although stu-dents and Nutritionists admitted the important role played by Biochemistry, most of the respondentsdeclared that they could not foresee any application of Biochemical contents in their professional life.Aiming to change this situation, a deep intervention in the Biochemistry discipline was carried on.The discipline was planned in such a way that all the contents to be taught was directly derived fromsubjects or situations matching the interests of nutrition students. Instead of a classical lecture basedcourse, collaborative learning was the methodological choice, taking advantage of practical activitiesinvolving educational software and laboratory work as well. The course was carried on in 180 hoursand a variety of strategies were employed, especially small group discussion and problem solving. Thestudents were given a booklet containing all the exercises and problems, which acted as course guide.At the end of the course, an evaluation survey was carried out. It is noticeable that, according tostudents answers: 100% agreed that Biochemistry was intimately linked to Nutrition; 83% appreciatedthe didactical methodologies employed; 89% would like to continue studying Biochemistry in a furtherdiscipline; 96% declared that the discipline has raised their interest in Biochemistry. In respect tothe assessment of the students, these results are in accordance with the opinion of teachers and TAsengaged in restructuring Biochemistry courses.

  4. Improving patient safety in transfusion medicine: contemporary challenges and the roles for bedside and laboratory biovigilance in addressing them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzejewski Jr C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chester Andrzejewski Jr,1 Darlene Cloutier,1 David Unold,2 Richard C Friedberg1 1Transfusion Medicine Services, Department of Pathology, Baystate Medical Center, Baystate Health, Springfield, MA, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Throughout the history of hemotherapy (HT, various challenges and concerns have been encountered in its practical application. When viewed using a prismatic lens of history, recurrent themes regarding adverse HT sequelae separate and become apparent. These can be broadly classified into three categories: infectious, noninfectious, and administrative/logistical. Using the HT care map as a frame of reference along with its associated rites, we examine the contemporary spectrum of HT adverse events and concerns, and some approaches as to how these may be addressed from bedside and laboratory medicine biovigilance perspectives enhancing patient care and blood transfusion safety. Although our vantage point is from an academic community hospital venue, the issues and concerns identified are germane to many if not all transfusion-medicine practice environments. Included among the subjects we explore are patient/specimen identification issues, blood-management initiatives, unrecognized and/or unreported suspected transfusion reactions, transfusion-associated adverse pulmonary sequelae (including transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload, expanded applications of electronic health records and issues regarding their “meaningful use” and interinstitutional “digital compatibilities”, biovigilance integration of electronic data networks within and between health care entities, and anticipated workforce contractions secondary to projected declines in the availability of qualified laboratory professionals. Cooperative initiatives between accreditation and regulatory entities, blood collectors and suppliers, hospital

  5. [A Perspective on Innovation for Efficient Medical Practice in View of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Education and Training in Laboratory Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Continuous advances in medical laboratory technology have driven major changes in the practice of laboratory medicine over the past two decades. The importance of the overall quality of a medical laboratory has been ever-increasing in order to improve and ensure the quality and safety of clinical practice by physicians in any type of medical facility. Laboratory physicians and professional staff should challenge themselves more than ever in various ways to cooperate and contribute with practicing physicians for the appropriate utilization of laboratory testing. This will certainly lead to a decrease in inappropriate or unnecessary laboratory testing, resulting in reducing medical costs. In addition, not only postgraduate, but also undergraduate medical education/training systems must be markedly innovated, considering recent rapid progress in electronic information and communication technologies. PMID:26897851

  6. Participation in college laboratory research apprenticeships among students considering careers in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy A. Andriole

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We sought to determine the prevalence of college laboratory research apprenticeship (CLRA participation among students considering medical careers and to examine the relationship between CLRA participation and medical-school acceptance among students who applied to medical school. Methods: We used multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of: 1 CLRA participation in a national cohort of 2001–2006 Pre-Medical College Admission Test (MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ respondents and 2 among those PMQ respondents who subsequently applied to medical school, medical-school acceptance by June 2013, reporting adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: Of 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample (81.2% of all 262,813 PMQ respondents in 2001–2006, 72,797 (34.1% reported CLRA participation. Each of under-represented minorities in medicine (URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06, Asian/Pacific Islander race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.17–1.22, and high school summer laboratory research apprenticeship (HSLRA participation (aOR: 3.95; 95% CI: 3.84–4.07 predicted a greater likelihood of CLRA participation. Of the 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample, 144,473 (67.7% had applied to medical school and 87,368 (60.5% of 144,473 medical-school applicants had been accepted to medical school. Each of female gender (vs. male, aOR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.16–1.22, URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 3.91; 95% CI: 3.75–4.08, HSLRA participation (aOR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03–1.19, CLRA participation (aOR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.09–1.15, college summer academic enrichment program participation (aOR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.21–1.31, and higher MCAT score (per point increase, aOR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.30–1.31 predicted a greater likelihood of medical-school acceptance. Conclusions: About one-third of all PMQ respondents had participated in CLRAs prior to taking the MCAT, and such participation

  7. Laboratory and field evaluation of medicinal plant extracts against filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Mahesh Kumar, Palanisamy; Amerasan, Duraisamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Vincent, Savariar; Barnard, Donald R

    2012-06-01

    The present study explored the effects of Jatropha curcas, Hyptis suaveolens, Abutilon indicum, and Leucas aspera tested against third instar larvae of filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus. The dried plant materials were powdered by an electrical blender. From each sample, 500 g powder was macerated with 1.5 L of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol 8h, using Soxhlet apparatus, and filtered. The extracts were concentrated at reduced temperature on a rotary evaporator and stored at a temperature of 4°C. The yield of crude extract was 11.4, 12.2, 10.6, and 13.5 g in hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol, respectively. The hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extract of J. curcas with LC(50) values of 230.32, 212.85, 192.07, and 113.23 ppm; H. suaveolens with LC(50) values of 213.09, 217.64, 167.59, and 86.93 ppm; A. indicum with LC(50) values of 204.18, 155.53, 166.32, and 111.58 ppm; and L. aspera with LC(50) values of 152.18, 118.29, 111.43, and 107.73 ppm, respectively, against third instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus. The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. Maximum larvicidal activity was observed in the methanolic extract followed by ethyl acetate, chloroform, and hexane extract. No mortality was observed in the control. The observed mortality were statistically significant at P < 0.05 level. L. aspera showed the highest mortality rate against the mosquito larvae in laboratory and field. The larval density was decreased after the treatment of plant extracts at the breeding sites (sewage water), and hence, these plant extracts of the suitable alternatives of synthetic insecticides for the mosquito vector management. The present results suggest that the medicinal plants extract was an excellent potential for controlling filarial vector, C. quinquefasciatus. PMID:22146997

  8. THE PRESENCE OF BIOCHEMISTRY EXPERIMENTS IN TEXTBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E.S. Rocha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Being present in high school in chemistry and biology disciplines, biochemistry is to explain the chemical and biological reactions in cells. His concepts are seen as abstract and difficult to understand and can be contextualized through experimentation. Experimentation is used in the classroom to allow students to view the applicability of the contents through observation, creating hypotheses, discussion and conclusions. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of experimentation in biochemistry content  in high school books. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this way, it was analyzed the presence of experimental activities in the textbooks approved by the National Textbook Plan 2015 "Biology 1", authored by César da Silva Junior, Sezar Sasson and Nelson Caldini Junior, and in the book " Chemistry - Volume 3 "by Martha Reis. RESULTS: At the end of the unit where the biochemical concepts are covered in the book "Biology 1" is presented an interdisciplinary project called "Enzymes - chemical tools of life" that proposes four experiments on catalase, pH and contact surface enzyme-substrate. They are easy activities to be implemented with affordable materials. Already at the Chemistry book, when addressing the biochemistry there is only one proposal for experimental activity called "Glycolic Extract of milk proteins". In this case, we need materials like food processor and enameled pots, which can hinder your performance in virtual classes, however, the experiment is easy to perform. Both books contain questions after the experimental proposals enhancing the questioning of the activities and understanding the contents addressed. CONCLUSIONS: The present experimental activities in the textbooks are mostly easy to apply and is not required sophisticated equipment of Sciences laboratories. It also allows the contextualization of theory and practice enhancing the process of teaching and learning with the proposals made.

  9. Is laboratory medicine a dying profession? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2010-08-01

    Technological developments and economic drivers have led to major changes in clinical laboratories worldwide, principally represented by an increase in testing productivity and efficiency. Currently, major expectations are entrusted on the introduction of diagnostically more effective tests as well as on translating the "omics" techniques into the clinical practice. However, the increased automation and standardization have far outpaced the laboratory professional involvement in assuring optimal test utilization and interpretation. While productivity of 'commodity' testing increases, the value of laboratory services seems to decrease contextually. This development represents a serious threat for laboratory medicine as an academic discipline not only because the laboratory professionals may lose the direct control of the commodity testing production activities but also because the present evolution exposes a failure of our core clinical activities, that is and remains the translation of laboratory data into valuable information for improving patient's outcomes. At a time when a revolution in healthcare organization is virtually unavoidable in the years ahead, clinical laboratories must proceed from a merely reactive strategy to a more proactive role in patient care. As patient-centered care is increasingly recognized as a primary focus in reorganizing the delivery of healthcare services, integrated practice units organized around the patients' needs and medical conditions are needed. An effective strategy to overcome the current inefficiencies in the delivery of laboratory services should encompass translation into integrated, multidisciplinary care, in which appropriateness in test request and interpretation both play a central role in assuring efficiency and effectiveness. PMID:20538540

  10. Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 4th edition of Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry Edited by Eldor Paul continues in the vein of the 3rd edition by providing an excellent, broad-reaching introduction to soil biology. The new edition improves on the previous by providing extensive supplementary materials, links to outs...

  11. Commentary: Biochemistry Re-Natured

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    In his last commentary on "Biochemistry Denatured," this author dealt with his perception that college students today have spent too little of their childhood years playing outside in nature and as a consequence have not learned basic things about the world from personal experience. This "nature-deficit disorder" removes many opportunities for…

  12. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology investigates the organization, compartmentalization, and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and the pathology associated...

  13. Does breast feeding influence liver biochemistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Ott, Peter; Juul, Anders;

    2003-01-01

    It is assumed that early feeding can affect liver biochemistry because breast-fed infants have a higher risk of hyperbilirubinemia than formula-fed infants. The authors sought to determine how feeding mode affected liver biochemistry in healthy term infants.......It is assumed that early feeding can affect liver biochemistry because breast-fed infants have a higher risk of hyperbilirubinemia than formula-fed infants. The authors sought to determine how feeding mode affected liver biochemistry in healthy term infants....

  14. Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

  15. Gender Performance Differences in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberger, Matthew M.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the historical performance of students at Michigan State University in a two-part biochemistry series Biochem I (n = 5,900) and Biochem II (n = 5,214) for students enrolled from 1997 to 2009. Multiple linear regressions predicted 54.9-87.5% of the variance in student from Biochem I grade and 53.8-76.1% of the variance in…

  16. The risk of accidental incorporation of radioactive substances in medicine and scientific laboratories: Reports, hypothetical situations, emergency measures and precautions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidental incorporations of radioactive substances in medicine and scientific laboratories are possible by inhalation, ingestion, percutaneous resorption and wound contamination. They may involve staff and/or patients. In the staff of laboratories, incorporations by inhalation of I-125 activities up to 7,4 kBq (200 nCi) have been reported for the personnel occupied with iodine labelling. On the contrary, no incorporations were found in labs using ready for use RIA kits. In nuclear medicine, incorporations by inhalation of I-131 activities up to 18,5 kBq (500 nCi) have been reported in the staff of radioiodine therapy units. Sufficient change of room air or the use of ventilation hoods prevents accidental inhalation of radioiodine. In contrast to those relatively unimportant risks, some cases of lethal incorporations by misadministration of radioactive substances to patients have been reported from nuclear medicine. They were caused by mix up or false calibration of therapeutic activities. For routine diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine, extremely conservative risk estimations are given under the assumption that the complete stock of a radiopharmaceutical would have been mis-administered to a single patient. The radiation exposure of critical organs remains limited with an estimated maximum of 4 Gy (400 rad). Only after misadministration of I-131-NaI organ doses up to 10 Gy (1000 rad) may be imaginable. However, this accidental radiation exposure may be reduced by the proposed decorporation procedures. Obviously, such a misadministration must be prevented primarily by appropriate precautions which are discussed as well. (orig.)

  17. Hobby with Biochemistry: Use of active learning methodology in Biochemistry at the Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R.T. Prado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: The learning of Biochemistry is generally considered difficult by the graduates, because studies the molecular level the metabolism of living and it demands a great capacity for abstraction by students. Thus, researchers have tried alternative methods to provid an alternative study method. Materials and methods: 178 students of the School of Medicine, PUC-PR, that course the disciplines of Medical Biochemistry I and II, were divided into 50 groups, each with 3-4 students, and were have to draw up a hobby activity with a specific theme of the Biochemistry. The selected topics were, amino acids and proteins, enzymes, cellular respiration, glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, metabolic integration, dyslipidemia and atherogenesis, pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, mechanisms of diabetes mellitus complications. The hobby activities chosen were direct, duplex, self-defined, cryptogram, bugs game. Both issues such as the type of hobby was drawn between groups. The groups had to: elaborate hobby; presents it to class orally, applying the questions prepared; printing and expose the hobby at the wall in the University; answer an evaluation regarding the preparation of work; and all groups should get together and organize one titled magazine "Hobby with Biochemistry" and deliver it printed. Results and conclusions: According the groups, the greatest difficulty was the adequacy of the questions posed in the required format, once they had only one issue and restricted space for the responses. Furthermore, the formatting was also identified as a point very difficult in activity elaboration. On the topic of learning through the development of work, and/or a new skill groups assigned grades ranging between 7.0 and 10.0 and about 90% of the groups attributed note 10 on satisfaction of seeing the work done and its ability to produce it. According to the results, the activity proved to be

  18. The Physiology and Mechanics of Undulatory Swimming: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Medicinal Leeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The medicinal leech is a useful animal model for investigating undulatory swimming in the classroom. Unlike many swimming organisms, its swimming performance can be quantified without specialized equipment. A large blood meal alters swimming behavior in a way that can be used to generate a discussion of the hydrodynamics of swimming, muscle…

  19. A Two-Week Guided Inquiry Protein Separation and Detection Experiment for Undergraduate Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, James P.; Nolta, Kathleen V.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for teaching protein separation and detection in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course is described. This experiment, performed in two, 4 h laboratory periods, incorporates guided inquiry principles to introduce students to the concepts behind and difficulties of protein purification. After using size-exclusion…

  20. Technical protocol for laboratory tests of transformation of veterinary medicinal products and biocides in liquid manures. Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzig, Robert [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie und Abfallanalytik

    2010-07-15

    The technical protocol under consideration describes a laboratory test method to evaluate the transformation of chemicals in liquid bovine and pig manures under anaerobic conditions and primarily is designed for veterinary medicinal products and biocides. The environmentally relevant entry routes into liquid manures occur via urine and feces of cattle and pigs in stable housings after excretion of veterinary medicinal products as parent compounds or metabolites and after the application of biocides in animal housings. Further entry routes such as solid dung application and direct dung pat deposition by production animals on pasture are not considered by this technical protocol. Thus, this technical protocol focused on the sampling of excrements from cattles and pigs kept in stables and fed under standard nutrition conditions. This approach additionally ensures that excrement samples are operationally free of any contamination by veterinary medicinal products and biocides. After the matrix characterization, reference-manure samples are prepared from the excrement samples by adding tap water to adjust defined dry substance contents typical for bovine or pig manures. This technical protocol comprehends a tiered experimental design in two parts: (a) Sampling of excrements and preparation of reference bovine and pig manures; (b) Testing of anaerobic transformation of chemicals in reference manures.

  1. Biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contributions of the group consist of six reports. The first is concerned with recent developments in the isolation and characterization of subcellular components of mammalian cells: the inhibition by imipramine of digitonin-induced lysis of mitochondrial membranes; age-dependent changes in mitochondrial sedimentability; peroxisomal enzymes; and collaborative studies on near-uv effects on bacterial respiration, radiation effects on mouse heart mitochondria, and toxicity and distribution of liposome-encapsulated drugs. Plant physiology is the theme of the next two reports. The first describes progress in a NASA-supported program on the involvement of organelles, especially dictyosomes, in the georesponse of roots, and the second covers work principally supported by ERDA on the interaction of light and gravity on differential growth of corn roots. Progress in liposome encapsulation of drugs is presented in three contributions. The first deals with studies on the toxicity, distribution, therapeutic action, and mechanism of encapsulated cancer chemotherapeutic agents; the second with morphologic studies, based principally on electron microscopy; and the third with alteration of liposomal surface properties by varying the lipid composition, in order to modify tissue distribution

  2. Insect Biochemistry Goes to School .

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo R. Cunha; Cecília Cudischevitch; Willy Jablonka; Alan de Brito; Mário A. Silva-Neto

    2011-01-01

    Many arthropods feed on vertebrate blood and eventually transmit diseases to the human being. Ordinary citizens are continuously exposed to vectors of major diseases and thus prone to contamination. In the present study we have evaluated a new approach regarding the basic biochemistry mechanism that regulates thebiology of Triatominaes, well known as vectors of Chagas Disease. We have used a comic book "Carlos Chagas: 100 years of the discovery of a hero", produced by researchers at our labor...

  3. Instrumentation of Microscale Techniques for Biochemistry Teaching at FES Zaragoza, UNAM

    OpenAIRE

    Araceli García-del Valle; María Teresa Corona-Ortega; Margarita Cruz-Millán; Antonia Guillermina Rojas-Fernández; Miguel Aguilar-Santelises; Leonor Aguila-Santelises

    2015-01-01

    Biochemistry teaching requires many laboratory sessions where theoretical knowledge may be put on test. At the same time, there is always some risk due to exposure to toxic materials, dangerous chemicals storage and waste disposal. Compliance with new regulations to prevent environmental contamination may also constitute a real hindrance for biochemistry teaching as experimental science. Therefore, we have designed microscale techniques, in order to reduce costs as well as the negative impact...

  4. Organisation arrangements of nuclear medicine services. Planning of installations. Laboratory monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from safety and quality requirements, the organisation of nuclear medicine services, or more generally of installations where nonsealed radioactive sources are used, is governed by profitability and efficiency criteria. In view of the high price of products and apparatus, the equipment must be based on a rationalisation of options guiding the organisation arrangements as a whole. The following items are dealt with in succession: various categories of installations; general planning of equipment; equipment regulations based on a major requirement, the confinement of contamination sources; practical observations concerning administrative and technical questions

  5. Importance of Public-Private Partnerships: Strengthening Laboratory Medicine Systems and Clinical Practice in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Ritu; Gadde, Renuka; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-04-15

    After the launch of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in 2003, it became evident that inadequate laboratory systems and services would severely limit the scale-up of human immunodeficiency virus infection prevention, care, and treatment programs. Thus, the Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Becton, Dickinson and Company developed a public-private partnership (PPP). Between October 2007 and July 2012, the PPP combined the competencies of the public and private sectors to boost sustainable laboratory systems and develop workforce skills in 4 African countries. Key accomplishments of the initiative include measurable and scalable outcomes to strengthen national capacities to build technical skills, develop sample referral networks, map disease prevalence, support evidence-based health programming, and drive continuous quality improvement in laboratories. This report details lessons learned from our experience and a series of recommendations on how to achieve successful PPPs. PMID:27025696

  6. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Feed Additive on Biochemistry, Antioxidantion and Immunity in Guangxi Partridge Chickens%中草药饲料添加剂对广西麻鸡血液生化指标、抗氧化能力及免疫功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛洪伟; 唐燕飞; 韦宗海; 黄何元; 蒋华连

    2012-01-01

    为研究中草药饲料添加剂对广西麻鸡血液生化指标、抗氧化能力和免疫功能的影响,选择1日龄广西麻鸡3000只为试验动物,进行120d的饲养试验。试验鸡群随机分为2组,每组2个重复。对照组饲喂基础饲粮。试验组饲喂基础饲粮+中草药饲料添加剂,并在不同日龄和发病情况下在饲粮中添加不同剂量的中草药饲料添加剂。结果表明,中草药饲料添加剂能显著提高血清中钙、磷的含量,降低血清中胆固醇的含量(P〈0.05);能够提高血清中谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶、超氧化物歧化酶的活性和降低血清中丙二醛的含量(P〈0.05);显著提高血清IgA、IgG、IgM、补体C3和C4的含量(P〈0.05)。说明中草药饲料添加剂能够显著改善广西麻鸡的血液生化指标、提高抗氧化能力和免疫功能。%To investigate the effects of Chinese herbal medicine feed additive on the mechanism of action from antioxidation, immunity and biochemistry of Guangxi partridge chicken without using antibiotics. Three thousand Guangxi partridge chickens were randomly assigned to 2 groups, each group had 2 repeats. Control group was fed with basic diet, while test group was fed with basic diets added Chinese herbal medicine feed additive for 120 days. Test group used Chinese herbal medicine feed additive for prevention and treatment of diseases. The results showed that the methods of test group increased Ca and P in serum significantly(P〈0.05) and decreased Cholesterol(P〈 0.05), significantly increased serum GSH-Px and SOD(P〈0.05), and decreased MDA content(P〈0.05), significantly increased IgA, IgG, IgM, complement C3 and complement C4 contents in serum(P〈0.05). Chinese herbal medicine feed additive can effectively improve immune function enhancing the antioxidant capacity and improving serum biochemistry indices.

  7. Instrumentation of Microscale Techniques for Biochemistry Teaching at FES Zaragoza, UNAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli García-del Valle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry teaching requires many laboratory sessions where theoretical knowledge may be put on test. At the same time, there is always some risk due to exposure to toxic materials, dangerous chemicals storage and waste disposal. Compliance with new regulations to prevent environmental contamination may also constitute a real hindrance for biochemistry teaching as experimental science. Therefore, we have designed microscale techniques, in order to reduce costs as well as the negative impact of laboratory practical sessions due to risk and environmental contamination. To develop microscale techniques does not only mean to reduce equipment size and amount of the reagents that are required for the usual experiments. Microscale techniques serve particularly well as a motivating approach to experimental biochemistry teaching that produces highly motivated students at the same time that requires minor costs, decreases working time, laboratory space, reagents volume and diminishes the generation of dangerous waste. We have demonstrated all these positive effects in biochemistry teaching and prompted the formal implementation of microscale techniques into the formal activities from the Cell and Tissue Biochemistry Laboratory I (BCT-I from the Chemistry, Pharmacy and Biology (QFB curricula at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM. First, we reviewed the BCT-I manual, choosing all the laboratory practices that might be microscaled. Then, we elaborated and validated all necessary protocols to analyse linearity, accuracy and reproducibility of the determinations, demonstrating that microscale techniques allow truthful results, comparable to full scale techniques.

  8. Instructional Software for Biochemistry Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marson Guilherme Andrade

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the world has witnessed a revolution in the expansion and access to knowledge, whi-ch has dramatically changed the relationship between labor and production. According to UNESCO(United Nations Educational, Scientical and Cultural Organization and ILO (International LaborOrganization, in the of information it is fundamental that Higher Education Institutes educate pro-fessionals capable to update their knowledge in the course of professional life. The so-called life-longlearning s pointed out as a request for creating and maintaining jobs, and for supporting the develop-ment of nations as well. In such context, Biochemistry is a eld of knowledge which has outstandinglyexpanded its boundaries. Preparing the next generation of biochemists for the age of informationrequires the development of cognitive skills as an essential educational goal concerning graduationcourses, which have been historically limited to the exposition of contents. The achievement of suchobjective depends on many factors, including the development of suitable instructional materials thatcan improve the teaching and learning experience. This conference deals with the development ofinstructional software at the crossroad of Educational research, Informatics and Biochemistry. Theinvestigative approach leading to the development and improvement of instructional software for Bi-ochemical education will be discussed on the basis of the following issues: i motivating questionsto software development - teaching and learning problems; ii development of digital content: speci-c content, interface and interactivity; iii evaluation of the software s instructional eciency; ivexamples of softwares which have been conceived according to the discussed methodology.

  9. Symposium 19: The contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayardo Baptista Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available K-Education(Portuguese Chair: V. Trindade Bayardo Torres; Clovis Wannmacher; Denise MacedoThe contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching.O ensino de Bioquímica nos últimos 20 anosBayardo B. TorresDepartamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, USP. São Paulo, Brazil.Among the contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP one must recall:1. Winter school for graduate studentsThis course, now at the ninth edition, is intended for students in the final stage of their Masters or PhD in Biochemistry or related areas from any institution of higher education.Modern and important techniques are offered as possible support to help the student’s projects.2. Summer courses for undergraduate studentsThe Department offers every year, since 1999, complementary courses for undergraduate students to extend their knowledge in biochemical subjects not ordinarily treated in introductory courses. Some examples:Plant Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Diseases, Biochemistry of Mind, Biochemistry of Ageing, Cancer Biochemistry, Nutrition and Sports, Biochemistry of Beauty, Biochemistry of the Envenomation Response, etc.3. Summer courses for high school teachers. Some examples:Biochemistry of Nutrition, DNA – Techniques and Applications, Biochemistry in the kitchen.4. Software developmentMany software for biochemistry teaching/learning were developed and are freely available at the Biblioteca Digital de Ciências [http://www.bdc.ib.unicamp.br/bdc/index.php]. Some examples:Oxygen consumption by mitochondria, Muscle contraction, Electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation, Free radicals, Enzyme kinetics, cAMP signalization, Interactive study of protein structure, Leptin, Insulin and Obesity.5. A Biochemistry textbook. 

  10. Serum biochemistry and electrophoretic patterns in the Eurasian Buzzard (Buteo buteo): reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelli, D; Ferrari, V; Franceschini, F; Lai, O; Laricchiuta, P; Zanella, A; Bernardini, D; Romagnoli, S

    2009-07-01

    In avian medicine, hematologic and biochemical laboratory investigations are still in their infancy, because of the difficulty involved in collecting data. This has led to a lack of reference values and a nonstandardized approach to specimens obtained in critical conditions. The Eurasian Buzzard (Buteo buteo) is one of the most common raptors in Italy, yet little is known about the physiologic blood parameters of this species. Serum biochemistry and electrophoretic investigations were performed in 40 healthy Eurasian Buzzards in different Italian wildlife rescue centers waiting to be released after recovering from trauma injuries. Mean values for biochemistry parameters were pancreatic amylase 626.9 IU/l, uric acid 7.5 mg/dl, aspartate aminotransferase 330.9 IU/l, glucose 375.1 mg/dl, lipase 26.3 IU/ l, total protein 38.4 g/l, total bilirubin 0.04 mg/ dl, lactate dehydrogenase 2,008.4 IU/l, creatinine kinase 1,604.1 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase 40.4 IU/l, alkaline phosphatase 89.8 IU/l, magnesium 2.3 mg/dl, calcium 10.2 mg/dl, phosphorus 2.02 mg/dl, cholesterol 192.2 mg/ dl, triglyceride 116.4 mg/dl, albumin 14.5 g/l, creatinine 0.1 mg/dl. Mean electrophoretic values were prealbumin 1.4 g/l, albumin 14.2 g/l, alpha 1 globulin 5.9 g/l, alpha 2 globulin 4.7 g/l, beta globulin 7.5 g/l, gamma globulin 3.6 g/l, albumin/globulins ratio 0.8 g/l. PMID:19617496

  11. Medical and biochemical training in radioprotection at the Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Buenos Aires University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires offers four different coursers on Radioisotope Methodology in which Radiological Protection concepts are given to: 1) biochemistry undergraduates; 2) physicians, biochemists, biologists and chemists; 3) professionals who need to put their theoretical and practical knowledge up-to-date; 4) technicians working at nuclear medicine centers or at biomedicine laboratories. Each course has a different purpose: the first one, which has been given at different levels of the curricula since 1960, is mainly informative; the second one, given during five months from 1962, is formative. 1513 professionals have passed the examinations of this course and asked for the authorization to handle radioactive materials from Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority. Training is theoretical and practical. It includes: dosimetric magnitudes and units, internal and external dosimetry of 125I, 131I, 201TI, 99mTc, 60Co and other isotopes with the intensity required by each professional according to his/her specialty; qualification of areas, working conditions, contamination barriers, shielding; justification, optimization and dose limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects, national and international regulations. The third course, which has been given since 1992, has the aim to being the knowledge of radioprotection up-to-date. The fourth course, which started in 1997, includes mainly operational aspects: columns elution, injection of radioactive drugs to patients, decontamination of areas. Our results are quite satisfactory: 95% of the enrolled students passed the examinations of the respective levels; the requirement is the acquisition of criteria according to their professional/technical responsibility. (author)

  12. Dose constraints to the individual annual doses of exposed workers in nuclear medicine laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study deals with the analysis of dose distribution records of the occupationally exposed workers in the field of nuclear medicine in Greece and the establishment of constraints to their individual annual doses (IAD) within the process of optimization in radiation protection. The exposed workers were grouped according to their specialties (medical doctors, technicians, others), the kind of services provided (diagnosis or diagnosis plus I-131 therapy) and the sector they belonged (public or private). Dose constraints (DC) were set at the level below which the IAD of the 75% of the exposed workers per specialty were included. Our results showed that DC levels were exceeded by the 13% of the exposed workers in the public and the 30% in the private sector respectively. Further investigation indicated that the reasons leading to the exceeding of DCs, may be attributed to the workload of the exposed workers which is greater in the private than in the public sector as well as, to possible difference in the specific tasks of workers between the two sectors. (author)

  13. Generation of data on within-subject biological variation in laboratory medicine: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Federica; Panteghini, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, the study of biological variation of laboratory analytes has received increased attention. The reasons for this interest are related to the potential practical applications of such knowledge. Biological variation data allow the derivation of important parameters for the interpretation and use of laboratory tests, such as the index of individuality for the evaluation of the utility of population reference intervals for the test interpretation, the estimate of significant change in a timed series of results of an individual, the number of specimens required to obtain an accurate estimate of the homeostatic set point of the analyte and analytical performance specifications that assays should fulfill for their application in the clinical setting. It is, therefore, essential to experimentally derive biological variation information in an accurate and reliable way. Currently, a dated guideline for the biological variation data production and a more recent checklist to assist in the correct preparation of publications related to biological variation studies are available. Here, we update and integrate, with examples, the available guideline for biological variation data production to help researchers to comply with the recommendations of the checklist for drafting manuscripts on biological variation. Particularly, we focus on the distribution of the data, an essential aspect to be considered for the derivation of biological variation data. Indeed, the difficulty in deriving reliable estimates of biological variation for those analytes, the measured concentrations of which are not normally distributed, is more and more evident. PMID:26856991

  14. Exposure levels to radiation in a nuclear medicine laboratory: measurements with thermoluminescence dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1996 in the Nuclear medicine Department and another routine and research departments of the National Institute of Medical and Nutrition Sciences (INCMNSZ) are working at least with 12 radioactive sources opened and sealed. However, it was unknown if with the Tl personal dosemeters with lithium fluoride crystals (LiF), could be possible to receive information about the equivalent dose for each radionuclide or if there was some radionuclide that by being low energy emissor or beta energy emissor, it did not represent an ionization power sufficient to excite the crystals of the thermoluminescent dosemeters (DTL). In this work the obtained results with control dosemeters of diverse source opened or sealed are shown, which were put at 1 cm of the LiF crystals during a time exposure 18 hours. Therefore the objective of this work is to verify which sources excite or not to DTL crystals and taking the pertinent safety measures for each radionuclide. The conclusion is that the majority of dosemeters were excited by beta or gamma radiation of the radionuclides and that LiF crystals are able to receive equivalent doses until 1200 mSv, being this a guarantee for the staff, that in an any moment could be exposed to high dose in his working day. Also it was corroborated that the radionuclides more energizer are: iodine-131, iodine-125 and sodium-22 while the phosphorus-32 must be managed with careful, since the exposure to hands can result significant, just like the technetium-99m (99m Tc). (Author)

  15. The effect of complimentary and alternative medicine products on laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, Robert; Dohnal, James C

    2009-02-01

    A multi-billion dollar industry has evolved over the last decade based on herbal product sales with an underlying belief that herbals are natural and therefore safe. The herbal product industry is essentially unregulated and producers are not required to follow good manufacturing practices (GMP). Batch to batch product variation, heavy metal and pesticide contamination, and even therapeutic drug contamination are problematic. Compounding these manufacturing issues are drug to drug and drug to herbal interactions that can cause cytochrome induction or inhibition. It is important for physicians to query their patients on herbal use and educate them on the potential adverse reactions. Herbals have been used for thousands of years and undoubtedly have demonstrated health benefits. However, more research is needed to gain an understanding of the complexity issues from mechanism of action to interference with clinical laboratory testing. PMID:19292027

  16. Searching for Alien Life Having Unearthly Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The search for alien life in the solar system should include exploring unearth-like environments for life having an unearthly biochemistry. We expect alien life to conform to the same basic chemical and ecological constraints as terrestrial life, since inorganic chemistry and the laws of ecosystems appear to be universal. Astrobiologists usually assume alien life will use familiar terrestrial biochemistry and therefore hope to find alien life by searching near water or by supplying hydrocarbons. The assumption that alien life is likely to be based on carbon and water is traditional and plausible. It justifies high priority for missions to search for alien life on Mars and Europa, but it unduly restricts the search for alien life. Terrestrial carbon-water biochemistry is not possible on most of the bodies of our solar system, but all alien life is not necessarily based on terrestrial biochemistry. If alien life has a separate origin from Earth life, and if can survive in an environment extremely different from Earth's, then alien life may have unearthly biochemistry. There may be other solvents than water that support alien life and other elements than carbon that form complex life enabling chain molecules. Rather than making the exploration-restricting assumption that all life requires carbon, water, and terrestrial biochemistry, we should make the exploration-friendly assumption that indigenous, environmentally adapted, alien life forms might flourish using unearthly biochemistry in many places in the solar system. Alien life might be found wherever there is free energy and a physical/chemical system capable of using that energy to build living structures. Alien life may be discovered by the detection of some general non-equilibrium chemistry rather than of terrestrial biochemistry. We should explore all the potential abodes of life in the solar system, including those where life based on terrestrial biochemistry can not exist.

  17. Enigma: A Board Game As A Potential Tool For Biochemistry And Microbiology Learning And Integration

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. S. Alpim; J.B. Santos; J. S. J. Silva; T. D. C. Menezes; Amorim, R.; B. T. C. Ladeia; Marques, H; L.B. Queiroz; M. Gandra

    2009-01-01

    Biochemistry and microbiology is a basic discipline for many gradua tion courses of the biomedical a rea, such as Medicine, Odontology and Biomedicine.  The abstract concepts of these sciences turn out to be a major difficulty for the learning/teaching relation in the classes.  Nevertheless, alternative strategies used inside or outside the classrooms could also make learning results better. In 2008, Odontology students from FTC prepared games based on biochemistry and microbiology and presen...

  18. Self-Reported Emergency Medicine Residency Applicant Attitudes Towards a Procedural Cadaver Laboratory Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman, Lance

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Residency applicants consider a variety of factors when ranking emergency medicine (EM programs for their NRMP match list. A human cadaver emergency procedure lab curriculum is uncommon. We hypothesized that the presence this curriculum would positively impact the ranking of an EM residency program.METHODS: The EM residency at Nebraska Medical Center is an urban, university-based program with a PGY I-III format. Residency applicants during the interview for a position in the PGY I class of 2006 were surveyed by three weekly electronic mailings. The survey was distributed in March 2006 after the final NRMP match results were released. The survey explored learner preferences and methodological commonality of models of emergency procedural training, as well as the impact of a procedural cadaver lab curriculum on residency ranking. ANOVA of ranks was used to compare responses to ranking questions.RESULTS: Of the 73 potential subjects, 54 (74% completed the survey. Respondents ranked methods of procedural instruction from 1 (most preferred or most common technique to 4 (least preferred or least common technique. Response averages and 95% confidence intervals for the preferred means of learning a new procedure are as follows: textbook (3.69; 3.51-3.87, mannequin (2.83; 2.64-3.02, human cadaver (1.93; 1.72-2.14, and living patient (1.56; 1.33-1.79. Response averages for the commonality of means used to teach a new procedure are as follows: human cadaver (3.63; 3.46-3.80, mannequin (2.70; 2.50-2.90, living patient (2.09; 1.85-2.33, and textbook (1.57; 1.32-1.82. When asked if the University of Nebraska Medical Center residency ranked higher in the individual's match list because of its procedural cadaver lab, 14.8% strongly disagreed, 14.8% disagreed, 40.7% were neutral, 14.8% agreed, and 14.8% strongly agreed.CONCLUSION: We conclude that, although cadaveric procedural training is viewed by senior medical student learners as a desirable means

  19. Useful Demonstrations for a Medial Biochemistry Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragatz, Barth H.; Modrak, Gina

    1986-01-01

    Describes six demonstrations used in a medical biochemistry course. These demonstrations focus on: (1) platelet aggregometry; (2) ion-transporting antibiotics; (3) glycosylated hemoglobin; (4) molecular models; (5) serum preparation; and (6) bioluminescence. (JN)

  20. Laboratory evaluation of Indian medicinal plants as repellents against malaria, dengue, and filariasis vector mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Sivakumar, Rajamohan

    2015-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases have an economic impact, including loss in commercial and labor outputs, particularly in countries with tropical and subtropical climates; however, no part of the world is free from vector-borne diseases. Mosquitoes are the carriers of severe and well-known illnesses such as malaria, arboviral encephalitis, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, West Nile virus, and yellow fever. These diseases produce significant morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock around the world. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticides, in the present study, the repellent activity of crude hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, chloroform, and methanol extracts of leaf of Erythrina indica and root of Asparagus racemosus were assayed for their repellency against three important vector mosquitoes, viz., Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The crude extract was applied on a membrane used for membrane feeding of unfed mosquitoes in a 1-ft cage. About 50 unfed 3-4-day-old laboratory-reared pathogen-free strains of A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus were introduced in a 1-ft cage fitted with a membrane with blood for feeding with temperature maintained at 37 °C through circulating water bath maintained at 40-45 °C. Three concentrations (1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mg/cm(2)) of the crude extracts were evaluated. Repellents in E. indica afforded longer protection time against A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus than those in A. racemosus at 5.0 mg/cm(2) concentration, and the mean complete protection time ranged from 120 to 210 min with the different extracts tested. In this observation, these two plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites; also, the repellent activity is dependent on the strength of the plant extracts. These results suggest that the leaf extract of E. indica and root extract of A. racemosus have the potential to

  1. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  2. Virtual Biochemistry – pH effect on enzyme activity

    OpenAIRE

    D.N. Heidrich; R.V. Antônio; M.S.R.B. Figueiredo; J.K. Sugai; J.A.P. Angotti

    2011-01-01

    Protocols of laboratory experiments, followed by teacher's explanation, not always clearly translate to the student the dynamics to beadopted for the implementation of the proposed practice. One of these cases is related to the study of the effect of pH on enzyme activity. For better help the understanding of the technical procedure, a hypermedia was built based on a protocol adopted at the Department of Biochemistry, UFSC. The hypermedia shows how theeffect of variations in pH can be observe...

  3. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael P; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée;

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and...... Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) was established to lead in standardization and harmonization of preanalytical policies and practices at a European level. One of the key activities of the WG-PRE is the organization of the biennial EFLM-BD conference on the preanalytical...... summarises the work that has and will be done in these areas. The goal of this initiative is to ensure the EFLM WG-PRE produces work that meets the needs of the European laboratory medicine community. Progress made in the identified areas will be updated at the next preanalytical phase conference and show...

  4. Preanalytical quality improvement. In pursuit of harmony, on behalf of European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippi, G.; Banfi, G.; Church, S.;

    2015-01-01

    ). Although laboratory medicine seems less vulnerable than other clinical and diagnostic areas, the chance of errors is not negligible and may adversely impact on quality of testing and patient safety. This article, which continues a biennial tradition of collective papers on preanalytical quality improvement......, is aimed to provide further contributions for pursuing quality and harmony in the preanalytical phase, and is a synopsis of lectures of the third European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)-Becton Dickinson (BD) European Conference on Preanalytical Phase meeting entitled......Laboratory diagnostics develop through different phases that span from test ordering (pre-preanalytical phase), collection of diagnostic specimens (preanalytical phase), sample analysis (analytical phase), results reporting (postanalytical phase) and interpretation (post-postanalytical phase...

  5. Medical biochemistry in Macedonia: a profession for physicians and natural scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traikovska, S; Dzhekova-Stojkova, S

    2001-06-01

    Medical biochemistry or clinical chemistry in its roots is an interdisciplinary science between natural sciences and medicine. The largest part of medical biochemistry is natural science (chemistry, biochemistry, biology, physics, mathematics), which is very well integrated in deduction of medical problems. Medical biochemistry throughout the world, including Macedonia, should be a professional field open to both physicians and natural scientists, according to its historical development, theoretical characteristics and applied practice. Physicians and natural scientists follow the same route in clinical chemistry during the postgraduate training of specialization in medical biochemistry/clinical chemistry. However, in Macedonia the specialization in medical biochemistry/clinical chemistry is today regulated by law only for physicians and pharmacists. The study of clinical chemistry in Europe has shown its interdisciplinary character. In most European countries different professions, such as physicians, chemists/biochemists, pharmacists, biologists and others could specialize in clinical chemistry. The question for the next generation of specialists in Macedonia is whether to accept the present conditions or to attempt to change the law to include chemists/biochemists and biologists as well. The latter used to be a practice in Macedonia 20 years ago, and still is in many European countries. Such change in law would also result in changes in the postgraduate educational program in medical biochemistry in Macedonia. The new postgraduate program has to follow the European Syllabus, recommended by EC4. To obtain sufficient knowledge in clinical chemistry, the duration of vocational training (undergraduate and postgraduate) for all trainees (physicians, pharmaceutics, chemists/biochemists and biologists) should be 8 years. PMID:11506455

  6. THE BACHELOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Cordeiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The economic and social development of Brazil in the last decade has contributed to the installation of new graduate and undergraduate programs, as are the case with bachelor degrees in Biochemistry at UFV, UFSJ and UEM. These graduates are prepared to work in industry, research institutes and universities in areas of knowledge involving Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This is happening in developed countries since the first half of the last century, surprising and late is the implementation of bachelor of Biochemistry in Brazil. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the Bachelor in Biochemistry in Brazil from the perspective of the main difficulties of implementing and courses maintenance. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a descriptive research with a qualitative approach. Interviews were conducted with undergraduate students, graduates, professors, staff and managers from bachelor degrees in Biochemistry at UFV, UFSJ and UEM. The sampling procedure was non probabilistic for judgment (choice of the subjects involved and interested in the course of biochemistry to undergraduate students, graduates, professors and staff and non probabilistic for convenience to managers. The qualitative assessment to depict the representative keywords was performed using words cloud by WordleTM. RESULTS: The study included 5 managers, 24 professors, 12 staff, 25 undergraduate students, 5 graduates. For the students the main reason for the course selection should be scientific vocation and affinity with chemistry and biology; most cited positive parameters were faculty and great structure, practical classes and broad playing field; most cited negatives were high mandatory disciplines, little student free time and lack of sophisticated equipment. Despite the conception of the programs have happened in different contexts and regions we noted similarities deficiencies and distresses. CONCLUSION: Difficulties must be

  7. The Biochemistry Tetrahedron and the Development of the Taxonomy of Biochemistry External Representations (TOBER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Marcy H.; Raker, Jeffrey R.; Becker, Nicole; Harle, Marissa; Sutcliffe, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Visual literacy, the ability to interpret and create external representations (ERs), is essential to success in biochemistry. Studies have been conducted that describe students' abilities to use and interpret specific types of ERs. However, a framework for describing ERs derived through a naturalistic inquiry of biochemistry classrooms has not…

  8. INTERNET ASSISTED LEARNING OF BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The revolution  in information  technology  has included the INTERNET to the available  resources for biochemical  education.  There  is a great  deal of biochemical  information, and  the  amount is increas- ing rapidly,  indeed  exponentially.  The  aim of this work is to analyze  the  biochemical  issues cellular respiration, photosynthesis and membrane  transport available  in web pages, taking  into account con- tents  quality,  trustworthiness and effectiveness. Firstly  1st secondary level students were inquired by a questionnaire on their use of INTERNET resources.  More then 80 percent of them were regular users. The  results  confirm the  already  known  potential of INTERNET in education.  Fourteen sites  were analyzed  regarding  to contents, presence  of bibliographical, references,  authorship, titles  responsible and adequacy  to the target public.  In relation  to contents, presence of conceptual  errors, illustrations and other  stimulatory elements  were analyzed.  The great  majority  did not mention  bibliographic  ref- erences and target public.  Less than  half divulged responsible  names and/or their  graduation status. Some sites contained critical  conceptual  errors,  as the mention  of, as examples:  during  the cell active transport process, of energy (ATP waste (desperdício by the cell; the yeast is a pluricellular  fungal; and  the  oxygen is essential  for anaerobic  respiration.  However,  one of the  sites,  where  such  errors were found, was the only one to mention  enzymes and regulation  steps of cellular respiration. Half of the sites present identical  texts  and figures. None of the analyzed  sites thus  was considered excellent. Our data  strenghthen the need for rigorous evaluation concerning of scholarly research  of biochemical theme  on the web.INTERNET ASSISTED LEARNING OF  BIOCHEMISTRY

  9. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  10. Extracts from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine. Part-3: Establishing Nuclear Medicine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, consideration was given to the categories of nuclear medicine ranging from simple imaging or in-vitro laboratories, to more complex departments performing a full range of in-vitro and in-vivo procedures that are also involved in advanced clinical services, training programmes, research and development. In developing countries, nuclear medicine historically has often been an offshoot of pathology, radiology or radiotherapy services. These origins are currently changing as less radioimmunoassay is performed and fully-fledged, independent departments of nuclear medicine are being set up. The trend appears to be that all assays (radioassay or ELISA) are done in a biochemistry laboratory whereas nuclear medicine departments are involved largely in diagnostic procedures, radionuclide therapy and non-imaging in-vitro tests. The level of nuclear medicine services is categorized according to three levels of need: Level 1: Only one gamma camera is needed for imaging purposes. The radiopharmaceutical supply, physics and radiation protection services are contracted outside the centre. Other requirements include a receptionist and general secretarial assistance. A single imaging room connected to a shared reporting room should be sufficient, with a staff of one nuclear medicine physician and one technologist, with back-up. This level is appropriate for a small private practice. Level 2: This is suitable for a general hospital where there are multiple imaging rooms where in-vitro and other non-imaging studies would generally be performed as well as radionuclide therapy. Level 3: his is appropriate for an academic institution where there is a need for a comprehensive clinical nuclear medicine service, human resource development and research programmes. Radionuclide therapy for in-patients and outpatients is provided

  11. Effects of intensive mariculture on sediment biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pusceddu, Antonio; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Mirto, Simone;

    2007-01-01

    The exponential growth of off-shore mariculture that has occurred worldwide over the last 10 years has raised concern about the impact of the waste produced by this industry on the ecological integrity of the sea bottom. Investigations into this potential source of impact on the biochemistry of the...... sea floor have provided contrasting results, and no compelling explanations for these discrepancies have been provided to date. To quantify the impact of fish-farm activities on the biochemistry of sediments, we have investigated the quantity and biochemical composition of sediment organic matter in...... regions, with the exception of seagrass sediments in Spain, the biochemistry of the sediments showed significant differences between the control and fish-farm locations. However, the variables explaining the differences observed varied among the regions and between habitats, suggesting idiosyncratic...

  12. Establishment of biosafety management system for medicine teaching laboratory of veterinary medicine%动物医学教学实验室生物安全管理体系的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨萍萍; 崔言顺; 刘美

    2012-01-01

    The laboratory of colleges and unlversities is an important base for experimental teaching and scientific research. The establishment of a biosafety management system for university veterinary medicine laboratory plays a key role in ensuring the teachers' and students' health and life. The potential biosafety problems lied in the university laboratory were analyzed. Based on the management practice for veterinary medicine laboratory, several measures were put forward for the establishment of a biosafety management system including improving safety management rules, strengthening safety consciousness of teachers and students, arranging a rational layout and increasing protection facilities, carrying out safety responsibility system, making emergency plans, etc.%基于多年从事动物医学实验室管理的经验,剖析了高校动物医学教学实验室所存在的生物安全隐患,从健全各项安全管理制度、强化师生安全意识、合理布局加强防护设施、实行安全责任制、制定应急预案等方面提出了构建生物安全管理体系的具体措施.

  13. Comparison Between Different Teaching Methods to Increase Performance of Students in Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mrinal Pal; Subinay Datta; Amit Kumar Pradhan; Kanika Mandi Chowdhuri; Joydeep Ghosh; Rajarshi Rahut

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Medical students during their first year of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) course, find Biochemistry difficult and volatile. In this regard, we studied the feedback from students as well as from teachers about the effectiveness of prevailing teaching aids and methods, so that best teaching aid and method can be adopted to improve their academic performance. METHODS: This study comprises of total 100 students of 1st MBBS course, who have completed the 1st semes...

  14. Laboratory Techniques for the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombaugh, Dorothy

    1972-01-01

    Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

  15. The Relevance of Student Seminars on Clinically Related Subjects in a Biochemistry Course for Medical and Nutrition Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Muniz, Karinne C.; Coutinho, Iracema S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of a system of seminars on clinically related biochemistry topics for undergraduate students in medicine and nutrition at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. During the second semester of 1998 (1998-2), the teaching staff decided to establish new and stricter rules for the seminar method and to…

  16. Historical Perspective on Mitochondrial Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Garone, Caterina

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we trace the origins and follow the development of mitochondrial medicine from the premolecular era (1962-1988) based on clinical clues, muscle morphology, and biochemistry into the molecular era that started in 1988 and is still advancing at a brisk pace. We have tried to stress conceptual advances, such as endosymbiosis,…

  17. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  18. Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the Molecular Diagnosis of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During an Outbreak in Korea in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Hyukmin; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Sinyoung; Seong, Moon Woo; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Mi Na; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-05-01

    For two months between May and July 2015, a nationwide outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) occurred in Korea. On June 3, 2015, the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM) launched a MERS-CoV Laboratory Response Task Force (LR-TF) to facilitate clinical laboratories to set up the diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection. Based on the WHO interim recommendations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of United States guidelines for MERS-CoV laboratory testing, and other available resources, the KSLM MERS-CoV LR-TF provided the first version of the laboratory practice guidelines for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV to the clinical laboratories on June 12, 2015. The guidelines described here are an updated version that includes case definition, indications for testing, specimen type and protocols for specimen collection, specimen packing and transport, specimen handling and nucleic acid extraction, molecular detection of MERS-CoV, interpretation of results and reporting, and laboratory safety. The KSLM guidelines mainly focus on the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV, reflecting the unique situation in Korea and the state of knowledge at the time of publication. PMID:26915607

  19. Rhetorical Structure of Biochemistry Research Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoksilapatham, Budsaba

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a move analysis [Swales, J. (1990). "Genre analysis." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] of 60 biochemistry research articles. First, a corpus was systematically compiled to ensure that it represents core journals in the focused discipline. Then, coding reliability analysis was conducted to demonstrate…

  20. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  1. Jmol-Enhanced Biochemistry Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderholm, Matthew; Reynolds, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    We developed a protein research project for a one-semester biochemistry lecture class to enhance learning and more effectively train students to understand protein structure and function. During this semester-long process, students select a protein with known structure and then research its structure, sequence, and function. This project…

  2. Biochemistry in the idea of graduation students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Escoto et al

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Biochemistry is an interdisciplinary area that allows us to study chemical phenomena in live organisms. That way, its study is of extreme importance, in all levels, to enlarge the comprehension of natural phenomena. However, it is barely explored in the basic education and often fragmented in the higher education, or in graduation degrees that contemplate this area. Especially in the teacher training, where the fragmentation of knowledge can contribute to form wrong concepts. Based on that, this work aims to identify the concept of Biochemistry according to the future teachers of Natural Science. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The work was developed with 3º, 5º and 9º semesters students of the natural science degree on Universidade Federal do Pampa. 50 students, from 18 to 56 years old, were interviewed. The data was obtained through a semi-structured questionnaire. The methodology of categorization and analysis of content with emergent categories of speech was chosen for the analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Initially, 11 categories were chosen by content similarity. In descending order: chemical reactions in organisms, chemistry area, chemistry of life, cell metabolism, the study of living beings, origin of life, biology area, organic balance, chemical-biological study. The reports made possible to identify that most students do understand with clarity the goal of studying biochemistry. Although, we can see that there are some students that fragment the area, what means, they try to discriminate chemistry from biology. This way, they demonstrate a difficulty to comprehend biochemistry as interdisciplinary, what makes it hard to contextualize the built knowledge. It is important to develop strategies to overcome the fragmentation of knowledge, so that biochemistry can be comprehended in its fullness and help on the teaching processes that will be developed by the future teachers.

  3. A Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Course for Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Novell, J. M.; Cid, E.; Gomis, R.; Barbera, A.; Guinovart, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a course for reinforcing the knowledge of biochemistry in secondary school science teachers. The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Barcelona designed a course to bring these teachers up to date with this discipline. In addition to updating their knowledge of biochemistry and molecular…

  4. Television Medical Dramas as Case Studies in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Julie T.

    2009-01-01

    Several case studies from popular television medical dramas are described for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. These cases, which illustrate fundamental principles of biochemistry, are used as the basis for problems that can be discussed further in small groups. Medical cases provide an interesting context for biochemistry with video…

  5. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  6. Society for Vascular Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and find out! Patient Information Pages from Vascular Medicine August 2016 The Vascular Laboratory More info for ... Learn more. Trending Now: Hot Topics in Vascular Medicine Video Series Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) with Drs. Jeffrey ...

  7. [beta]-Lactamases in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Paula; Prudencio, Cristina; Vieira, Monica; Ferraz, Ricardo; Fonte, Rosalia; Silva, Nuno; Coelho, Pedro; Fernandes, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    [beta]-lactamases are hydrolytic enzymes that inactivate the [beta]-lactam ring of antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins. The major diversity of studies carried out until now have mainly focused on the characterization of [beta]-lactamases recovered among clinical isolates of Gram-positive staphylococci and Gram-negative…

  8. Clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of nuclear methods within today's medicine derives decisively from the field of diagnostics. Among the clinical treatment possibilities on the whole, therapy with unsealed radioactive sources is for the time being restricted to few diseases. The use of radioactive labeling in biology, biochemistry and, especially, pharmacology and the rest of fundamental medical research does not belong to the actual specialty of nuclear medicine. Nuclear in-vitro diagnostics, which currently account for about two thirds of all activities in nuclear medicine, are largely excluded from this survey, which is mainly restricted to nuclear diagnostics in vivo. This presentation of nuclear diagnostics in vivo is addressed above all to non-specialists who are to be made familiar with the modern methods of clinical nuclear medicine so that these investigation methods could be more effectively used in future both with qualitative and quantitative regards. (orig./MG)

  9. Pracital examination in biochemistry: topics and procedures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vocke, Nils-Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Under the new revision of the German licensing regulations for physicians ("Approbationsordnung" the rules for the first national examinations (i.e. "Physikum", equivalent to medical school entrance exams have been changed. In addition to the written exam a novel "oral-practical" part is required. Here we describe the implications of this oral-practical exam on the examination procedures in the field of biochemistry/molecular biology. A strategy for its realization is proposed.

  10. THE PRESENCE OF BIOCHEMISTRY EXPERIMENTS IN TEXTBOOKS

    OpenAIRE

    C. E.S. Rocha; M. D. Büttenbender; R. Roehrs

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Being present in high school in chemistry and biology disciplines, biochemistry is to explain the chemical and biological reactions in cells. His concepts are seen as abstract and difficult to understand and can be contextualized through experimentation. Experimentation is used in the classroom to allow students to view the applicability of the contents through observation, creating hypotheses, discussion and conclusions. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pre...

  11. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Surapaneni, Krishna M.; Tekian, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program) to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Methods: Participants were first year medical students (n=150) from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India); they were randomly d...

  12. From the High Energy Physics Laboratory to the hospital -some experiences of the application of MWPC [multiwire proportional counter] technology to medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this talk I wish to briefly review the experience we have obtained at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory over the past decade in the adaptation of MWPC (multiwire proportional counter) technology to diagnostic imaging applications in medicine. A cursory glance at the history of science and technology quickly shows the often intimate and mutually beneficial relationship between ''pure'' science (and scientists) and practical applications. The following talk traces some of the principal features of the situation which have been brought to my attention in the course of the last decade. (author)

  13. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna M. Surapaneni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Methods: Participants were first year medical students (n=150 from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India; they were randomly divided into two groups of 75, one group attending the traditional program, the other the innovative program. Student performance was measured using three written knowledge tests (each with a maximum score of 20. The students also evaluated the relevance of the learning process using a 12-item questionnaire. Results: Students in the innovative program using concept mapping outperformed those in the traditional didactic program (means of 7.13–8.28 vs. 12.33–13.93, p<0.001. The students gave high positive ratings for the innovative course (93–100% agreement. Conclusion: The new concept-mapping program resulted in higher academic performance compared to the traditional course and was perceived favorably by the students. They especially valued the use of concept mapping as learning tools to foster the relevance of biochemistry to clinical practice, and to enhance their reasoning and learning skills, as well as their deeper understanding for biochemistry.

  14. Guidelines for starting a nuclear medicine laboratory. Excerpts from a booklet published by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear medicine department caters to the need of all clinical departments, and, therefore, should be located at a central place. At the same time, because of radiation hazard associated with the use of radionuclides, planning of the departments should be done in such a way that there is no radiation exposure to non-radiation workers and the general public, and also that radiation workers handling radioisotopes receive minimum exposure. When a decision to set up a nuclear medicine department is taken, the authorities are faced with a number of questions regarding the location, planning for the premises, equipment needed, availability of trained medical and paramedical personnel and the procedure for obtaining clearance from various authorities

  15. Establishment of cDNA Microarray Analysis at the Genomic Medicine Research Core Laboratory (GMRCL) of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital .

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-Hao Wang; Yun-Shien Lee; En-Shih Chen; Wei-Hsiang Kong; Lung-Kun Chen; Ding-Wei Hsueh; Min-Li Wei; Hsing-Shih Wang; Ying-Shiung Lee

    2004-01-01

    Background: Advances in molecular and computational biology have led to the developmentof powerful, high-throughput methods for analysis of differential geneexpression, which are opening up new opportunities in genomic medicine.DNA microarray technology has been enthusiastically integrated into basicbiomedical research and will eventually become a molecular monitoring toolfor various clinical courses.Methods: As a core research facility of Chang Gung University (CGU) and ChangGung Memorial Ho...

  16. Poster Display as an Alternative Evaluation Method to Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas P. Rodrigues

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is present in dierent professional under gradation courses in which it seeks to attendseveral objectives. The discipline oered to the students of Biology Science Course at UFES is tra-ditionally organized in a series of lectures to the basic information, a laboratory class related to eachtopic and a three written tests. Our students, as many from other courses, study biochemistry justbecause they have to. The teacher can alter the student behavior by changing the way in which theyexamine them. This work describes and analyses the experience of using poster display as an assess-ment and includes feedback from the students and teachers. At the beginning of the term the activityis explained to the class and groups are formed. They are oriented to search a full research paper, with\\metabolism as a key word. During the students presentation, teachers and graduation studentsevaluate the production of a self-explanatory poster, assurance in the chosen work and involvementof all components of the group. A multiple-choice questionnaire was applied to 15-30 students fromthe ve classes that had already done the activity. The teachers and the graduation students also hadtheir opinions heard. 62.3 % of the students agreed that the activity accomplishes its objective tostimulate the integration of general knowledge and comprehension of a specic scientic work, while itpromotes the practice of presentation at seminars. 62.2 % believed that it allows the learner to showits knowledge in a better way and 51 % of the students were very much motivated within the activity.For 91.2 % of the students, they should choose the article, as it allows a better correlation betweenbiochemistry and personal anities (42.7 %. Also, 98 % believed that the activity should be carriedout in groups, because it allows a deeper discussion (53.6 %, stimulate group activities (20 % orpermits the materials costs division (22 %. Only 1.8 % of the learners thought that the

  17. BIOCHEMISTRY TEACHING WITH VIRTUAL DYNAMIC METABOLIC DIAGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Lazzarotto

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a game like educational software (courseware to study metabolic pathways, calledDiagrama Metabolico Din^amico Virtual (DMDV of Krebs Cycle. The experience acquired teachingwith the logical sequence tray games in the FFFCMPAs Biochemistry Course provides the beddingswith the use of this model as education method. With DMDV, students can assembly the sequenceof reactions that describe the desired metabolic pathway, create situational models which can guidehis/her choices, reduce the subject complexity of the scheme in knowledge construction presentingin a graphical way the current interrelations. Biochemistry teachers can use the present software inclassroom as well as distance classes. This product integrates multimedia resources extensively andis distributed in CD-ROM format. The virtual environment will make possible interaction of thestudent with the environment and with colleagues and teachers, through tools as chats and forum.Experience with the use of this method was carried through with two distinct groups of students.The rst group was composed by 11 students, who were more familiar with the content and answereda specic questionnaire to previously evaluate the software. The second group was formed by 24students regularly registered in the FFFCMPAs Biochemistry Course, who used the software as astudy method. The rst group considered DMDV of easy and pleasant navigation. The knowledgeevaluation of the second group students was made by a written test and the analysis of three conceptualmaps constructed by each one of them: one map before initiating the study with the DMDV, thesecond just after the study and the third one two months later. Every conceptual maps producedafter DMDV method showed an expansion of valid concepts if compared with the rst maps. Simplevisual comparison of maps shows that new elements where added. All students who passed throughthe experiment reached a greater than ve grade in the subjects written

  18. Guidelines for the Design of Biochemistry Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The internet is a means of communication that cannot be disregarded by contemporaryeducational systems. Public and private incentive policies aimed at the application ofdigital devices in the exchange of knowledge in and outside schools have beenimplemented in the last decades. However, risks posed by academic research on line arewidely acknowledged with regard to the quality of information (Lourenço, 2010. One of themain aspects of this issue is the selection of reliable and potentially educational pagesdeveloped for specific target audiences. This study has the objective of providingguidelines for those who intend to develop sites, wiki pages, and educational PBwikisfocused on Biochemistry, or even adapt existing ones. Considering the fact that there is nospecific legislation for the use of the Internet in Brazil, it is necessary to stimulate selfregulationof the sector in order to establish minimum quality standards, safety, andreliability of sites containing information in the educational area. Thus, it is necessary toestablish some parameters to help guiding research for educational purposes on theinternet. To be a potentially didactic Biochemistry page, one must follow this set oforientation: clearly establish the target audience and, then, define the contents the properway. Once the materials have been organized, establish, whenever possible and pertinent,links with references to professional and/ or research home pages, to ProfessionalAssociations in the Biochemistry field, among others. Link the page to an institutionalresearch program, such as International Virtual Education Network, a program developedby the Brazilian Distance Education Department. Finally, it is necessary to provideinteractive possibilities and dynamic images of the biochemical processes studied in classthat will justify and differentiate the page from the many existing ones. Such proceduresare essential to guarantee that online searches made for educational

  19. Penta-coordinate phosphorous compounds and biochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林长学; 韩波; 赵玉芬; 万荣; 李艳梅; 冯亚兵; 成昌梅

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between penta-coordinate phosphorus compounds and biochemistry is briefly reviewed. Some interesting phenomena such as peptide formation, ester formation, ester exchange on phosphorus and N to O migration occur at room temperature when the amino group of amino acid is associated with phosphoryl group. Serine or threonine in conjugate of nucleo-side-amino acid could recognize different nucleobases. N-phosphoryl Histine and Ser-His dipep-tide could cleavage nucleic acid, protein and ester in neutral medium. It is found that the above phenomena all undergo penta-coordinate intermediate of phosphorus atom, which is proposed as the key factor to determine their activities.

  20. Radioactive isotopes in biochemistry (historical essay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume of facts, including little-known biobibliographic data on the the first reserchers who applied the method, are used in the study. The main attention is paid to the use of the method of labelled atoms, when considering intermediate exchange of substances and creating metabolic ways maps (the end of 30-ies - beginning of 50-ies). Using as an example the history of creation of the labelled atom method and its introduction into biochemistry, the problem of the research methods transfer from one branch of science to another is considered

  1. BIOCHEMISTRY OF SOME PERSPECTIVE TABLE GRAPES

    OpenAIRE

    Burlakov M. M.; Rodionova L. Y.; Troshin L. P.; Chausov V. M.

    2015-01-01

    The article contains results of the study of biochemistry of some perspective table grape varieties: Aniuta, Vodograi, Nizina and Jubilee Novocherkasska, yield in 2013 from the Central zone of Krasnodar region. At the time of redy yield the combination of sweetness and acidity of fruits were favorable. The ratio of fructose to glucose was 1.69; 1.36; 2.00; 1.13, respectively, in grapes Aniuta, Vodograi, Nisina, Jubilee Novocherkasska. According to the percentage of fructose in fruit juice var...

  2. Writing throughout the Biochemistry Curriculum: Synergistic Inquiry-Based Writing Projects for Biochemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Pamela; Streu, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a synergistic two-semester writing sequence for biochemistry courses. In the first semester, students select a putative protein and are tasked with researching their protein largely through bioinformatics resources. In the second semester, students develop original ideas and present them in the form of a research grant…

  3. A Changing Research and Publication Landscape for Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Mocz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This introductory editorial hopes to convey three points to its audience. First, it provides an overview of the new, peer-reviewed, open access journal Biochemistry Insights published by Libertas Academica. Second, it summarizes the benefits of open access publishing concepts to the biochemistry community. And third, it takes a brief look at the near future of biochemistry as a fundamental molecular science whose continued advances and latest developments will be the focus of the new journal. Biochemistry Insights looks forward to receiving research articles, review papers, commentaries and letters from all disciplines and specialties of the field.

  4. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  5. Some applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter illustrate the use of radiation chemistry as a tool in investigating biologically important radical reactions, and also outline some studies of models for radiobiological damage. Because aqueous solutions usually offer the most important matrix, an appreciation of the main features of water radiolysis will be essential. Most of the illustrations involve pulse radiolysis, and some familiarity with chemical kinetics is assumed. In addition to these and other chapters in this book, readers find the proceedings of a recent NATO Advanced Study Institute most useful. The authors shall not try to review here all the applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and biology, but they will illustrate, using selected examples, the main principles and practical advantages and problems. Another recent volume covers the main contributions of flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis to the chemistry of biology and medicine, complementing earlier reviews. Papers from symposia on radical processes in radiobiology and carcinogenesis, and on super-oxide dismutases, and proceedings of recent international congresses of radiation research, together with the other publications referred to above will enable the reader to gain a comprehensive overview of the role of radicals in biological processes and the contributions of radiation chemistry

  6. 以检验分析为基础的教学在医学检验专业本科生儿科临床见习的应用%The Application of Analysis of Laboratory Test in Pediatric Clinical Probation Teaching for Undergraduates of Laboratory Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余慕雪; 李易娟; 蒋小云; 庄思齐; 李晓瑜; 岳智慧; 古玉芬

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and investigates the application of analysis of laboratory test in pediatric clinical probation teaching for undergraduates of laboratory medicine in the Department of Pediatrics, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen. The analysis of laboratory test in pediatric clinical probation teaching for undergraduates of laboratory medicine was applied in nephrotic syndrome in children, pediatric anemia and neonatal jaundice teaching. The study discussed that the application of analysis of laboratory test in pediatric clinical probation teaching for undergraduates of laboratory medicine helped laboratory medicine students to strengthen the relation between laboratory medicine and pediatric clinic, to grasp the clinical features and diagnostic strategy of pediatric diseases, to apply laboratory medicine knowledge to clinic. Thus it helped to cultivate laboratory medical personnel of high quality.%中山大学附属第一医院儿科教研室在检验专业本科学生的儿科临床见习教学中,对小儿肾病综合征,小儿贫血、新生儿黄疸的临床见习采用以检验分析为基础的教学方法和调查。探讨了儿科临床见习中以检验分析为基础的教学使医学检验专业学生加强了与儿科临床的联系,有利于其对儿科疾病的临床特征和诊断思路的掌握以及医学检验知识的临床应用,培养了自学能力,有助于培养高素质的医学检验人才。

  7. Advanced Biochemistry Course teach students how to make and criticize science

    OpenAIRE

    A.B. Sé; R. M. Passos; M. Hermes-Lima

    2006-01-01

    In this work we are reporting a course of University of Brasilia called “Topics in Biochemistry”. It is offered to second semester medicine and nutrition students (around 12) who have just finished the Basic Biochemistry Course (BioBio), plus one or two third semester students, who are taking the course for the second time, as “coordinators”. This course is composed of two parallel activities: weekly meetings for scientific discussions and the peer-tutor activity.In  each  meeting,  one  stud...

  8. Chronic Chagas' heart disease: a disease on its way to becoming a worldwide health problem: epidemiology, etiopathology, treatment, pathogenesis and laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Saravia, Silvia Gilka; Haberland, Annekathrin; Wallukat, Gerd; Schimke, Ingolf

    2012-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is ranked as the most serious parasitic disease in Latin America. Nearly 30% of infected patients develop life-threatening complications, and with a latency of 10-30 years, mostly Chagas' heart disease which is currently the major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America, enormously burdening economic resources and dramatically affecting patients' social and labor situations. Because of increasing migration, international tourism and parasite transfer by blood contact, intrauterine transfer and organ transplantation, Chagas' heart disease could potentially become a worldwide problem. To raise awareness of this problem, we reflect on the epidemiology and etiopathology of Chagas' disease, particularly Chagas' heart disease. To counteract Chagas' heart disease, in addition to the general interruption of the infection cycle and chemotherapeutic elimination of the infection agent, early and effective causal or symptomatic therapies would be indispensable. Prerequisites for this are improved knowledge of the pathogenesis and optimized patient management. From economic and logistics viewpoints, this last prerequisite should be performed using laboratory medicine tools. Consequently, we first summarize the mechanisms that have been suggested as driving Chagas' heart disease, mainly those associated with the presence of autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors; secondly, we indicate new treatment strategies involving autoantibody apheresis and in vivo autoantibody neutralization; thirdly, we present laboratory medicine tools such as autoantibody estimation and heart marker measurement, proposed for diagnosis, risk assessment and patient guidance and lastly, we critically reflect upon the increase in inflammation and oxidative stress markers in Chagas' heart disease. PMID:21165698

  9. A National Comparison of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Capstone Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the "American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end,…

  10. News from Online: WWW Sites for Biochemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Barry W.

    2002-05-01

    With so many biochemistry sites to choose from, searching the Web for biochemistry topics is like being a "kid in a candy shop." However, to reap the benefits, you must put in a bit of time and have a bit of patience. Good hunting.

  11. Using Pamphlets to Teach Biochemistry: A Service-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melinda A.; Dunbar, David; Lopatto, David

    2013-01-01

    A service-learning project appropriate for a biochemistry or advanced biochemistry course was designed and implemented. The project involved students partnering with a homeless shelter to design informational pamphlets to be displayed at the shelter for the clients' use. The pamphlet topics were based on diseases studied within the course.…

  12. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  13. Blended Learning in Biochemistry Education: Analysis of Medical Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardenski, Rosilaine de Fatima; de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; Struchiner, Miriam; Giannella, Tais Rabetti

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze first-year UFRJ medical students' perceptions about the implementation of a blended learning (BL) experience in their Biochemistry I course. During the first semester of 2009, three Biochemistry professors used the Constructore course management system to develop virtual learning environments (VLEs) for…

  14. Enhanced Podcasts for Teaching Biochemistry to Veterinary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of biochemistry within medical disciplines presents certain challenges; firstly to relay a large body of complex facts and abstract concepts, and secondly to motivate students that this relatively difficult topic is worth their time to study. Here, nutrient biochemistry was taught within a multidisciplinary module as part of an…

  15. Laboratory and field trial of developing medicinal local Thai plant products against four species of mosquito vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Komalamisra, Narumon; Krisadaphong, Panvipa; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn

    2004-06-01

    Oils of Syzygium aromaticum (clove) and Zanthoxylum limonella (makaen), widely used essential oils for dental caries or flavoring of food in Thailand, were prepared as 10 experimental repellent products in gel or cream form against Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles dirus under laboratory conditions, using the human-arm-in-cage method. Two products that gave the longest-lasting complete protection were selected to examine their repellency against a variety of mosquito species under field conditions. In laboratory tests, 0.1 g of each product was applied to 3x10 cm of exposed area on a volunteer's forearm, while in field trials, 1.0 g was applied to each volunteer's leg (from knee to ankle). In the laboratory, the gel dosage form contained 20% clove oil (Gel B) or 10% clove plus 10% makaen oil mixture (Gel E) were promising plant-based repellents against three mosquito species and gave significantly longer complete protection times of 4-5 hours than all other developing products. Therefore, their efficacy in the field was evaluated. Under field conditions, Gel E showed complete protection for 4 hours and gave 95.7% repellency after 5 hours application, whereas Gel B and 20% deet (di-methyl benzamide) provided only 86.8 and 82.7% repellency after treatment, respectively against Ae. aegypti, daytime-biting mosquitos. For nighttime-biting, the 3 repellents under development yielded equally excellent (average 97.1%) repellency for 5 hours against the predominant Cx. quinquefasciatus and Mansonia uniformis, but they gave 89.0% repellency against Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus. This finding demonstrated the effectiveness of Gel B and Gel E products for possible use by low-income rural communities against various mosquito species. PMID:15691131

  16. Bone Biochemistry on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Heer, Martina; Zwart, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone biochemical measures provide valuable insight into the nature and time course of microgravity effects on bone during space flight, where imaging technology cannot be employed. Increased bone resorption is a hallmark of space flight, while markers of bone formation are typically unchanged or decreased. Recent studies (after the deployment to ISS of the advanced resistive exercise device, ARED), have documented that astronauts with good nutritional intake (e.g., maintenance of body mass), good vitamin D status, and exercise maintained bone mineral density. These data are encouraging, but crewmembers exercising on the ARED do have alterations in bone biochemistry, specifically, bone resorption is still increased above preflight levels, but bone formation is also significantly increased. While this bone remodeling raises questions about the strength of the resulting bone, however documents beneficial effects of nutrition and exercise in counteracting bone loss of space flight.

  17. Biochemistry Teaching Through Food Label Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    N.L. Barbosa; Y.M. Correia; Nascimento, M. M.; H.D. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Traditional classes of Basic Biochemistry often rely on memorization of facts and concepts.  For  this  reason,  many  educators  have  evaluated  new  strategies  and tools  to  enrich  learning  and  motivate  undergraduate  students.  As  a  result  of different  methodologies  used  for  this  purpose,  several  commited  professors  are convinced  that  students  learn  more  effectively  if  the  knowledge  they  acquire  are inserted and contextualized in relevant real-life. This work ...

  18. Evaluation of Educational Media Covering Biochemistry Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima C.A.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: With the increase of Information and Communications Technologies, ithas developed many tools which can be used in the biochemistry teaching, such aswebsites, films, educational software, that enable the visualization of microscopic andsubmicroscopic processes which has a difficult understanding. The use of software can bean integrating part of the teaching learning process, in order to assist or to contribute for abetter construction of knowledge. OBJECTIVES: Identify the educational media availablefor teaching biochemistry and to evaluate, qualitatively, these tools. MATERIAL ANDMETHODS: The educational media were selected through searchers on the web and theywere evaluated by four evaluators, using a specific questionnaire. The form was madeusing quality parameters in the following areas: media technical quality; educationalaspects; content and use; and the use in virtual environments. A scale from 1 to 5, NA (notapplicable were used and yes or no for the binary questions. After, was made theaverages and standard deviations by category and media. RESULTS ANDDISCUSSIONS: Were selected and evaluated 40 educational medias, highlighting thefollowing results in the media technical quality: ease of access, ease of installation andreliability, however, need to improve the interactivity of these media, as well asaccessibility. On the educational aspects issue the highlights are for updated informationand the way they enable the construction of knowledge. When referring to the contentassessed, the item that stood out was the exemption of textual errors. The lowest valuesof the evaluation, overall, gave up the use in virtual environments, indicating the demandfor better integration with these environments. CONCLUSION: Applications reviewsexpressed concern in its construction, with respect to general aspects of quality, however,still demand a greater concern about the interaction with the student, and betteraccessibility and incorporation

  19. Dyslipidemias as generating issue in Biochemistry classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Lima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The traditional didactic model is based on the transmission of the teacher's encyclopedic knowledge. In this model, the teaching of Science aims at the transmission of dominant values, regarded as absolute truths. The teacher is seen is an expert on scientific contents who transmits them to students without motivating them, and without taking into consideration their previous ideas and life experience. This model contributes to the formation of professionals who accept those values uncritically. An effective approach to break up this traditional teaching model in Biochemistry is the use of a generating issue. A Generating Issue is the starting point to the knowledge construction process which, in turn, replaces traditional models. Thus, this study aimed at developing a lesson for a 12th grade class at IF Fluminense on the following content: alcohol, carboxylic acid, ester, and esterification reaction, using dyslipidemias as the Generating Issue. To verify the value of such methodology in Biochemistry classroom, data was collected by applying a questionnaire and images with texts produced by students. In addition, they had a class based on the methodology known as Three Pedagogical Moments, proposed by Delizoicov et al. (2007. Several didactic resources designed by the authors were used, such as slide presentation, tridimensional molecular models, and a roulette game named “Bioquimicados”, based on the Facebook game “Perguntados” ("Trivia Crack". After this, students developed more grounded scientific concepts, making use of terms common in scientific language. This suggests that the use of the Generating Issue in a lesson based on problematization, and supported by a ludic activity, provided a meaningful contribution to improve the students' understanding of the scientific content. This type of non-traditional class promotes greater student motivation, resulting in meaningful learning.

  20. Exploratory analysis of methods for automated classification of laboratory test orders into syndromic groups in veterinary medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C Dórea

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent focus on earlier detection of pathogen introduction in human and animal populations has led to the development of surveillance systems based on automated monitoring of health data. Real- or near real-time monitoring of pre-diagnostic data requires automated classification of records into syndromes--syndromic surveillance--using algorithms that incorporate medical knowledge in a reliable and efficient way, while remaining comprehensible to end users. METHODS: This paper describes the application of two of machine learning (Naïve Bayes and Decision Trees and rule-based methods to extract syndromic information from laboratory test requests submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. RESULTS: High performance (F1-macro = 0.9995 was achieved through the use of a rule-based syndrome classifier, based on rule induction followed by manual modification during the construction phase, which also resulted in clear interpretability of the resulting classification process. An unmodified rule induction algorithm achieved an F(1-micro score of 0.979 though this fell to 0.677 when performance for individual classes was averaged in an unweighted manner (F(1-macro, due to the fact that the algorithm failed to learn 3 of the 16 classes from the training set. Decision Trees showed equal interpretability to the rule-based approaches, but achieved an F(1-micro score of 0.923 (falling to 0.311 when classes are given equal weight. A Naïve Bayes classifier learned all classes and achieved high performance (F(1-micro= 0.994 and F(1-macro = .955, however the classification process is not transparent to the domain experts. CONCLUSION: The use of a manually customised rule set allowed for the development of a system for classification of laboratory tests into syndromic groups with very high performance, and high interpretability by the domain experts. Further research is required to develop internal validation rules in order to establish

  1. ASVCP guidelines: allowable total error guidelines for biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Kendal E; Flatland, Bente; Nabity, Mary; Freeman, Kathleen P

    2013-12-01

    As all laboratory equipment ages and contains components that may degrade with time, initial and periodically scheduled performance assessment is required to verify accurate and precise results over the life of the instrument. As veterinary patients may present to general practitioners and then to referral hospitals (both of which may each perform in-clinic laboratory analyses using different instruments), and given that general practitioners may send samples to reference laboratories, there is a need for comparability of results across instruments and methods. Allowable total error (TEa ) is a simple comparative quality concept used to define acceptable analytical performance. These guidelines are recommendations for determination and interpretation of TEa for commonly measured biochemical analytes in cats, dogs, and horses for equipment commonly used in veterinary diagnostic medicine. TEa values recommended herein are aimed at all veterinary settings, both private in-clinic laboratories using point-of-care analyzers and larger reference laboratories using more complex equipment. They represent the largest TEa possible without generating laboratory variation that would impact clinical decision making. TEa can be used for (1) assessment of an individual instrument's analytical performance, which is of benefit if one uses this information during instrument selection or assessment of in-clinic instrument performance, (2) Quality Control validation, and (3) as a measure of agreement or comparability of results from different laboratories (eg, between the in-clinic analyzer and the reference laboratory). These guidelines define a straightforward approach to assessment of instrument analytical performance. PMID:24320779

  2. Critical review of the clinical relevance of growth hormone and its measurement in the nuclear medicine laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of metabolic and stressful stimuli, both physical and psychologic, produce rapid elevation of plasma growth hormone (GH). In addition, spontaneous elevation of GH occurs during the day, and a rise in GH occurs in association with the initial slow-wave sleep episode at night. Although the identity of the GH releasing factor has not yet been established, a hypothalamic factor inhibiting GH release named somatostatin identified and synthesized. Most, if not all, of the GH rises are mediated by neural mechanisms, and therefore they may be disrupted by many disease processes affecting the pituitary or the hypothalamus. In acromegaly, hypersecretion of GH occurs, and remnants of hypothalamic control can frequently be demonstrated, suggesting a hypothalamic origin for at least some cases. Provocative stimuli commonly used to assess adequacy of GH responses include hypoglycemia, arginine infusion, and exercise. Administration of L-dopa or apomorphine also produces GH elevation, and since these agents may activate specific dopamine mechanisms, they are of particular interest. Two comprehensive commercial kits have been evaluated, and three major defects have been identified. The literature provided in both kits was inadequate. Both kits required an initial dilution without any replication, so that dilution error would be undetected. One of the kits did not provide a full complement of materials. Quantities of HGH antigen and antisera sufficient for large numbers of assays are also available commercially. However, no commercial source was found for control sera containing known quantities of HGH. Individual laboratories to provide their own supply of sera to use for quality control. It is now known that GH exists in multiple forms in plasma and that antisera may differ in ability to bind these forms. It will, therefore, be necessary for laboratories to revalidate the assay if a different antiserum is used. (U.S.)

  3. Virtual Biochemistry – pH effect on enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Heidrich

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Protocols of laboratory experiments, followed by teacher's explanation, not always clearly translate to the student the dynamics to beadopted for the implementation of the proposed practice. One of these cases is related to the study of the effect of pH on enzyme activity. For better help the understanding of the technical procedure, a hypermedia was built based on a protocol adopted at the Department of Biochemistry, UFSC. The hypermedia shows how theeffect of variations in pH can be observed  in vitro. Taking as example salivary amylase and the consumption of starch (substrate by means of iodine staining, a set of pH buffers was tested to identify the best pH for this enzyme  activity. This hypermedia as introductory tool for such practice was tested on aNutrition course classroom. Students agree that the hypermedia provided a better understanding of the proposed activities. Teachers also notice a smallerreagents consumption and reduction of the time spent by the students in the achievement of the experiment.

  4. THE CYBERSPACE IN THE CONTINUED CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Martins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The cybernetic spaces simulate the real world with interactive multimedia. This work  has been applied since January, 2007 on the curricular student’s apprenticeship at high school and graduation, in the site “bioq.educacao.biz/ULAB-HC-UFPE”. It has been developed to provide continuity to the technical-scientific learning of students and professionals, and also to improve their human social relations on the  labour  environment.  It’s comprises a virtual space, destined to communication and collective building of knowledge on the clinical biochemistry.   It’s about an interactive environment which allows the users registered as coordinator professor (professional  or the scientist student (trainee,  unlimited access to  posting contents (classes, texts, presentations, animations, consultations, non-synchronic discussions (on orkut, forums, e-mail and synchronic discussions (on chats, videoconferences. After a few live tutorials  about new  input in this environment, and the use of the new learning tool,  the collective building of knowledge on cyberspace begins. As a trainee’s program task, the scientist student would have to build a space of his own, under guidance and supervision of the coordinator teachers.  The cyberspace efficiency was evaluated from reports collected in February, 2008: the adherence to this  work was satisfactory, regarding this period, with 68 registered users, 870 accesses and 52 contents available on the several sections of the virtual laboratory. Our work is still being applied, and new adhesions are  happening everyday. We intend to amplify this cyber environment in order to make it a  permanent  continued education site on the health area.  From interest contracts and common knowledge,  the technological interfaces constitute an interaction, in which everyone is a potential author.  Keywords: Cyberspace, online biochemistry education, continued education.

  5. The semiosis of students’ conceptual understanding of biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Mathiesen, Søren Læssøe; Dahl, Mads Ronald

    2013-01-01

    university teaching including biochemistry teaching (Loertscher, 2011). The study seeks an answer to the problem of emergence in science students acquisition of concepts, not only how students form new sign hierarchies over time, but how say easy concepts suddenly change into a hard concepts(or vice versa...... analogue scales) of biochemical concepts were collected every week during a university semester. Archival data (e.g. biochemistry textbooks), diaries and a qualitative interview were collected with a biochemistry teacher. Methodological challenges are identified in studying conceptual change and the...

  6. Prospects in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear medicine, a sequence of revolutioning research up to the simple and efficient application in routine has always then taken place when in an interdisciplinary teamwork new radiochemical tracers and/or new instrumentation had become available. At present we are at the beginning of a phase that means to be in-vivo-biochemistry, the targets of which are molecular interactions in the form of enzymatic reactions, ligand-receptor interactions or immunological reactions. The possibility to use positron-emitting radionuclides of bioelements in biomolecules or drugs to measure their distribution in the living organism by positron-emission tomography (PET) is gaining admittance into the pretentious themes of main directions of medical research. Diagnostic routine application of biochemically oriented nuclear medicine methods are predominantly expected from the transmission of knowledge in PET research to the larger appliable emission tomography with gamma-emitting tracers (SPECT). (author)

  7. Online Communication Tools in Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ferreira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The  online  communication  tools  enable  new  ways  of  learning, especially  the  forums  in the context of online courses, and the understanding of interactions and collaborations in the  forums  can  improve  them.  The  study  aimed  to  analyze  the  online relationships,  as well  as  obtaining  evidence  of  the  use of  other  learning  tools in  a  biochemistry  subject, focusing on how students use the tool forum and its contribution to learning. The study was  carried  out  from  data  pre  and  post  course  questionnaires  as  well  as  log  of environment  access  and  discussion  forum.  The  forums  have  been  restructured  and systematized  for  analysis  and  creating  discursive  flows  between  statements.  The questionnaires showed the central role of forum and wiki for learning,  the importance of interactions, which was highlighted by the forum analysis. The results indicate that one of the ways to improve online biochemistry teaching is to stimulate interactive activities, participatory  moderation  and  pedagogical  support  by  tutors  and  mentors,  also encouraging  and  creating  strategies  to  collaboration  of  students  to  solve problems  and to collaborative knowledge construction.

  8. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  9. Rapid and Adaptable Measurement of Protein Thermal Stability by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry: Updating a Common Biochemical Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Hoops, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of protein denaturation and protein folding is a common laboratory technique used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring protein thermal stability in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the thermal…

  10. Use of a Laboratory Exercise on Molar Absorptivity to Help Students Understand the Authority of the Primary Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Madhavan; Bailey, Cheryl P.; Markwell, John

    2008-01-01

    To promote understanding of the authority of the primary literature in students taking our biochemistry laboratory courses, a biochemistry laboratory exercise on the determination of an acceptable molar absorptivity value of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) was developed. This made the laboratory course much more relevant by linking to a thematic thread,…

  11. Molecular structure of actinides in biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of internal contamination, drugs used for decorporation are scarce and do not act very specifically. For instance the sole de-corporating drug recommended for plutonium decontamination is a water-soluble ligand named DTPA (Diethylene-Triamino-Pentaacetate). The transport of DTPA to its organ-target and its bio-availability on the spot are not satisfactorily understood. The conventional method to develop new ligands is based on molecular approaches but it is not sufficient. A new method that combines methods from structural biochemistry with methods of bio-inorganic chemistry and with methods from physico-chemistry (particularly X-ray absorption spectroscopy) is so far the best way to understand molecular speciation and to detail the local arrangement of atoms around a cation for instance, which are valuable information to understand the behaviour of a ligand. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy) measurements suggest that during the formation of a complex involving an actinide (An) and a ligand, the inter-atomic distance An-O decreases when the atomic number of the cation increases while it is the reverse in the case of An-N

  12. LLUSTRATION OF AMINO ACIDS REACTIONS AND PROTEINS CHARACTERIZATION FOR EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Parreira

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available New teaching methodologies have been developed to facilitate the learning of biochemistry concepts. A new  approach to Biochemistry  teaching  has become more frequent,  one that does not  require reagents but use photos, videos, softwares etc. Experimental Biochemistry classes, i.e. covering characterization of amino acids and proteins,  might be more productive with the use of complementary didactic material.  Furthermore,  if experiments cannot be implemented, classes may  be well illustrated with complementary didactic material covering from the simplest to the most  complex experiments.  In order to  aid Biochemistry classes without practical experiments, some tests and reactions were documented in our laboratory through digital photos, for  instance: (1 the biuret reaction wherein the blue reagent turns violet in the presence of proteins and changes to pink when combined with short-chain polypeptides; (2 the ninhydrin test used in amino acid analysis of proteins: most of the amino acids are hydrolyzed and react with ninhydrin; when reacting with these free amines, a deep blue or purple color appears; (3 methods for detecting proteins wherein spectrophotometry is used, that deals with the relationship between absorbance, concentration and path length, which constitute the Beer-Lambert Law. A didactic material constituted by texts, schemes and illustrated by photos has been created for each class topic. This material can be used either as a teacher script or in a presentation form to illustrate classes without experimental activities. Financial Support: Pro-Reitoria Graduação-USP, CNPq.

  13. International Environmental Law and Biochemistry: An Innovative Teaching Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candlish, John

    1998-01-01

    Explores the ties between international environmental law and biochemistry with respect to genetically modified organisms, biodiversity, marine pollution, cancer biology, and pesticide contamination of food. Contains 30 references. (DDR)

  14. Teaching human genetics in biochemistry by computer literature searching.

    OpenAIRE

    Proud, V. K.; Schmidt, F J; Johnson, E D; Mitchell, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a new user-intense-learning experience that incorporates the teaching of clinical and research applications of human genetics in biochemistry while training first-year medical students to develop skills in computer access to the literature. Human genetics was incorporated into the biochemistry curriculum by providing each student with experience in on-line literature searching in MEDLINE, using Grateful Med, in order to write an abstract about a specific inherited biochemical diso...

  15. Physical models enhance molecular three-dimensional literacy in an introductory biochemistry course*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jacqueline R; Hagedorn, Eric; Dillenburg, Paul; Patrick, Michael; Herman, Timothy

    2005-03-01

    This article reports the results of a recent study to evaluate the usefulness of physical models of molecular structures as a new tool with which to teach concepts of molecular structure and function. Of seven different learning tools used by students in this introductory biochemistry class, the use of the physical models in a laboratory was rated as most useful. These results suggest that physical models can play an important role in capturing the interest of students in the subject of molecular structure and function. These physical models often stimulate more sophisticated questions in the minds of students, which can then be more appropriately explored using computer visualization tools. PMID:21638554

  16. Geobiochemistry: Placing Biochemistry in Its Geochemical Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E.; Boyer, G. M.; Canovas, P. A., III; Prasad, A.; Dick, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Goals of geobiochemistry include simultaneously evaluating the relative stabilities of microbial cells and minerals, and predicting how the composition of biomolecules can change in response to the progress of geochemical reactions. Recent developments in theoretical geochemistry make it possible to predict standard thermodynamic properties of proteins, nucleotides, lipids, and many metabolites including the constituents of the citric acid cycle, at all temperatures and pressures where life is known to occur, and beyond. Combining these predictions with constraints from geochemical data makes it possible to assess the relative stabilities of biomolecules. Resulting independent predictions of the environmental occurrence of homologous proteins and lipid side-chains can be compared with observations from metagenomic and metalipidomic data to quantify geochemical driving forces that shape the composition of biomolecules. In addition, the energetic costs of generating biomolecules from within a diverse range of habitable environments can be evaluated in terms of prevailing geochemical variables. Comparisons of geochemical bioenergetic calculations across habitats leads to the generalization that the availability of H2 determines the cost of autotrophic biosynthesis relative to the aquatic environment external to microbial cells, and that pH, temperature, pressure, and availability of C, N, P, and S are typically secondary. Increasingly reduced conditions, which are determined by reactions of water with mineral surfaces and mineral assemblages, allow many biosynthetic reactions to shift from costing energy to releasing energy. Protein and lipid synthesis, as well as the reverse citric acid cycle, become energy-releasing processes under these conditions. The resulting energy balances that determine habitability contrast dramatically with assumptions derived from oxic surface conditions, such as those where human biochemistry operates.

  17. Recent advances in the biochemistry of spinosyns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-xue; Xia, Liqiu; Zhang, Youming; Ding, Xuezhi; Zahn, James A

    2009-02-01

    Spinosyn and its analogs, produced by Saccharopolyspora spinosa, are the active ingredients in a family of insect control agents. They are macrolides with a 21-carbon, 12-membered tetracyclic lactones that are attached to two deoxysugars, tri-O-methylrhamnose and forosamine. Labeling studies, analysis of the biosynthetically blocked mutants, and the genetic identification of the spinosyn gene cluster have provided detailed information concerning the mechanism of spinosyn biosynthesis and have enabled combinatorial biosynthesis of a large group of new spinosyns. The following developments have recently impacted the field of spinosyn biology: (1) A second-generation spinosyn called spinetoram (XDE-175) was launched in late 2007; it is a semisynthesized spinosyn derivative produced through the modification of 3'-O-methyl group of rhamnose and the double bond between C5 and C6 of spinosyn J and L. This molecule was shown to have improved insecticidal activity, enhanced duration of control, and an expanded pest spectrum. (2) A new class of spinosyns, the butenyl-spinosyns, was discovered from Saccharopolyspora pogona. The butenyl-spinosyns are similar to spinosyns, but differ in the length of the side chain at C-21. In addition to structural similarities with the spinosyns, the butenyl-spinosyns exhibit a high level of similarity in insecticidal activity to spinetoram. (3) Spinosyn analogs, 21-cyclobutyl-spinosyn A and 21-cyclobutyl-spinosyn D were generated by metabolic engineering of the spinosyn biosynthetic gene cluster. They showed better insecticidal activities against cotton aphid and tobacco budworm than that of spinosyn A and D. Future progress toward the development of more potent spinosad analogs, as well as enhancements in production yields will likely result from these recent advances in the genetics and biochemistry of spinosyns. PMID:19082588

  18. BIOCHEMISTRY OF SOME PERSPECTIVE TABLE GRAPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burlakov M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article contains results of the study of biochemistry of some perspective table grape varieties: Aniuta, Vodograi, Nizina and Jubilee Novocherkasska, yield in 2013 from the Central zone of Krasnodar region. At the time of redy yield the combination of sweetness and acidity of fruits were favorable. The ratio of fructose to glucose was 1.69; 1.36; 2.00; 1.13, respectively, in grapes Aniuta, Vodograi, Nisina, Jubilee Novocherkasska. According to the percentage of fructose in fruit juice varieties Aniuta, Vodograi and Jubilee Novocherkasska close to each other (50.93; 56.14; 51.23%. According to the percentage of glucose similar varieties Aniuta and Nizina (33 - 34.27%, Vodograi and Jubilee Novocherkasska (41.16 - 45.22%. Sort Jubilee Novocherkasska, had content in berries close fructose and glucose. Most of fructose (66.02% in berries variety Nizina. In berries studied cultivars organic acid content was: wine 3128 - 3861, malic 982 - 3753, citric 109 - 317, amber 3 - 115 mg / dm3. The highest concentrations of potassium and sodium cations are presented in berries varieties Aniuta: potassium - 1219 sodium - 35.13 mg / dm3 and cations magnesium and calcium in berries Jubilee Novocherkasska 46.75 and 73.64 mg / dm3. The lowest concentration of potassium and sodium cations observed in grape Vodograi, magnesium - from grape Aniuta, calcium - at grape Nizina. We studied grape bunches are large, not dense, beautiful, berries are large, harmonious taste. Tasting score fresh grapes varieties Aniuta, Vodograi, Nizina, Jubilee Novocherkasska 7.6; 7.4; 7.8; 7.8 points respectively

  19. Using 3DClass To Flip Biochemistry Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The flipped classroom inverts traditional teaching methods, in order to have studentsprepared for topics and techniques covered in the following meeting. This approach wasadopted in a biochemistry course taught to biology freshmen students at the University ofCampinas, using a Virtual Learning Environment called 3DClass. Before each classroomsession, a quiz was delivered covering the following topic and students were allowed totake quizzes as many times as they wanted. This approach was utilized in order to betterprepare students in classes and to perform lab experiments. Every student attempt wasrecorded in a database. Before each classroom session, the instructors were provided witha summary of the class answers, highlighting questions where students had more difficultyand the ones that scored higher. This kind of information was helpful to design activities tocover the topics where students had more difficulties. Based on the 3DClass records thestudents behaviors were mapped, such as students taking the quizzes seriously, studentsguessing, students answering a quiz until scoring 100%, students that continue answeringafter scoring 100% in order to increase their grades, students that never score 100%.However, the most relevant information 3DClass brought us was the possibility to identifystudent’s confidence in their answers, which could be observed by the analysis of theirattempts for each question. If they had made different choices each try, it would haveindicated a low confidence level, while always providing the same answer indicated ahigher confidence level, even whilst picking incorrect answers. This experiment haverevealed that students coming to the classroom better prepared reflected positively on thedeveloped activities, but the number of students taking the quizzes seriously were not asgreat as we had expected, indicating that more actions should be taken to improvestudents engagement with these activities.

  20. Center for Neuroscience & Regenerative Medicine

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the U.S. Department of Defense...

  1. The Biochemistry Over 20 Years In The High School Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E.S. Rocha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available   The Biochemistry Over 20 Years In The High School Textbooks   Rocha, C. E. S.1; Büttenbender, M. D.1; Denardin, E.L.G.2, Roehrs, R.1,2 1Grupo Interdisciplinar de Pesquisa em Práticas de Ensino, UNIPAMPA, RS. 2Laboratório de Estudos Físico Químicos e Produtos Naturais, UNIPAMPA, RS.   INTRODUCTION: Many teachers make use of textbook to lead content in the classroom. The chemistry books introduce concepts that should relate biochemistry to students in schools. It is important that this first contact turns out into an encouraging experience for the students, because once it worked as expected it arouses interest and makes the students see themselves curious to delve into the subject. The research aims to evaluate the presence of related concepts in biochemistry textbooks in chemistry in high school, over 20 years. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In order to perform this study, we analyzed the following content related to biochemistry: proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids in the books "Chemistry - Structure of Matter and Organic Chemistry" of the year 1993 and the book "Chemistry in approach to daily life" of the year 2012 with the purpose of verifying the changes in the content of biochemistry in the last 20 years. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: In the 90s, as used in the book, concepts and explanations are introduced in a very objective approach, making a total of 22 pages. The current largest is 23 pages with experiments and curiosities. Through analysis we found that current textbooks present the same issues related to biochemistry, however, a greater amount of data, bringing students to more examples and applications in everyday life. Today we see that the contents and processes are most exploited and that there is a concern on the importance of the study of issues that relate to biochemistry. CONCLUSIONS: The study of the biochemistry textbooks has been more attractive in recent years, contextualizing content with the daily life of

  2. The Biochemistry Show: a new and fun tool for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H Ono

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional methods to teach biochemistry in most universities are based on the memorization of chemical structures,  biochemical  pathways  and  reagent  names,  which  is  many  times  dismotivating  for  the  students.  We presently describe an innovative, interactive and alternative method for teaching biochemistry to medical and nutrition undergraduate students, called the Biochemistry Show (BioBio Show.The Biobio show is based on active participation of the students. They are divided in groups and the groups face each other. One group faces another one group at a time, in a game based on true or false questions that involve subjects of applied biochemistry (exercise, obesity, diabetes, cholesterol, free radicals, among others. The questions of the Show are previously elaborated by senior students. The Biobio Show has four phases, the first one is a selection exam, and from the second to the fourth phase, eliminatory confrontations happen. On a confrontation, the first group must select a certain quantity of questions for the opponent to answer.  The group who choses the questions must know how to answer and justify the selected questions. This procedure is repeated on all phases of the show. On the last phase, the questions used are taken from an exam previously performed by the students: either the 9-hour biochemistry exam (Sé et al. A 9-hour biochemistry exam. An iron man competition or a good way of evaluating undergraduate students? SBBq 2005, abstract K-6 or the True-or-False exam (TFE (Sé et al. Are tutor-students capable of writing good biochemistry exams? SBBq 2004, abstract K-18. The winner group receives an extra 0,5 point on the final grade. Over 70% of the students informed on a questionnaire that the Biobio Show is a valuable tool for learning biochemistry.    That is a new way to enrich the discussion of biochemistry in the classroom without the students getting bored. Moreover, learning

  3. Nuclear Medicine in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Lele

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available The regular supply of radiopharmaceuticals and radioimmunoassay kits from BARC has been an important factor in the development of nuclear medicine in India. However, a major stumbling block has been the non-availability of suitable instrumentation systems (especially the computer-assisted gamma camera at an affordable price. Two recent developments, viz., the creation of the Board of Radioisotope Technology by the Department of Atomic Energy, and the efforts of Electronic Corporation of India Ltd. to design indigenously a gamma camera with a computer attachment, hold promise for the future healthy and rapid growth of nuclear medicine in the country. Training in nuclear medicine at the post-graduate level is gradually picking up. Nuclear medicine is essentially applied physiology and biochemistry, and provides an orientation, different from those of the anatomist and physiologist. The gamma camera, SPECT and PET enable the study of dynamic metabolic function resolution to spatial and temporal resolutions. Newer developments in tagged monoclonal antibodies hold promise for a better understanding of infectious and inflammatory disease which are a burden in the developing countries.

  4. Application of virtual simulation technology to laboratory medicine%虚拟仿真教学在医学检验技术教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    亓涛; 童晓文; 张继瑜; 李海侠; 裘宇容; 王前; 郑磊

    2015-01-01

    医学虚拟仿真教学环境是虚拟仿真技术和医学教学训练的高级、复杂结合,是信息化教学的高级应用,一直是国内学者关注和研究的热点。根据医学检验的教学特点,南方医科大学医学检验系设计了一套医学虚拟仿真教学环境的架构,建立了虚拟仿真实验教学中心,将各个虚拟仿真软件及工具软件在实验教学中充分应用。实践表明,此仿真教学环境具有安全无风险、高效率、学习体验真实、应用前景广阔等优点。其在一定程度上克服了实践操作条件对课程实施的限制,极大提高了课程教学效果。(中华检验医学杂志,2015,38:716-718)%Medical virtual simulation teaching environment is an advanced and complex combination of virtual simulation technology and medical technology training .As an advanced information technology , it has been attracting the attention of medical education researchers .Based on the characteristics of medical laboratory technology education , the virtual simulation experimental teaching center was established and a framework of the virtual simulation training environment was designed in the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Southern Medical University .Virtual simulation softwares and tool softwares were put into use widely in our experimental teaching .As it turns out, this simulated training environment has many merits such as risk-free safety , great efficiency , genuine learning experience and wide application potential , which partly overcomes the restriction of the teaching process brought by the condition of the practical operation and improves the teaching effect significantly .

  5. FACEBOOK AS A MEDIATION TOOL IN BIOCHEMISTRY DISCIPLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current students generation are daily connected to the Internet, wich encourages the use of mobile tools in education. Many of the students of Biochemistry feel apprehensive about the discipline and the use of facebook may contribute, among other factors, motivating them. Objectives: It was analyzed the use of facebook as a mediator and motivator in the discipline of Biochemistry, basing on socioconstrutivist interventions. Material and methods: This work was developed in the action-research perspective, using the quali-quantitative method. An investigative questionnaire was used, using Likert scale and open questions, to investigate the facebook use, as well as the preferences of students, focusing on Biochemistry group in the Biomedicine course.  The posts were analyzed identifying: frequency of the interaction`s types (post, comment, likes;  interaction's categories (question, answer, motivational; and the content itself of the post. Results: It was highlighted students' interest to search materials, answering questions, and especially seeking information about the discipline. It was emphasized that the group was motivating for learning Biochemistry, encouragement the group to study, with quick and easy access to the professor by chat. Conclusions: The results indicate a preference for students at facebook, with a great motivational potential, is at easy access to colleagues, professor and monitor, or even the ease of obtaining the materials and ask questions in real time, indicating that this tool as a possible way, still little explored, to enhance the teaching of Biochemistry.

  6. [Biochemistry for the benefit of humanity (practical achievements of my scientific work)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huliĭ, M F

    2005-01-01

    Science unites theory and practice, but theory is always in advance. Even our works (mentioned above) which are also important for practice and were awarded the State prizes could not be made without preliminary theoretical investigations. It should be said that our works with elaborated methods of therapy and drugs to treat chronic alcoholism, drug addiction, leucosis are rather of theoretical than of practical importance. Some our works which proved that carbon dioxide is the basis of life are also of especially great theoretical value. The paper deals with the investigations devoted to the problems of biochemistry in cattle breeding (the raising of fat content in milk; elaboration of the efficient method of fodder ensilage; raising of milk yield using the drug "Karboxilin"; development of the methods of isolation of crystalline glucose-oxidase and catalase used for clarifying blood) as well as to the problems of biochemistry in medicine (creation of the drug "Microcid", antileucosis drug "Corectin", drugs "Medichronal" and "Medicit" for treating alcoholism and drug addiction, drug "Namacit" for hindering the organism aging). Great attention is given to the problem of relations between the theoretical conception concerning the importance of CO2 in vital activity of human and animal organism and production of new drugs. PMID:16335264

  7. Veterinary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is presented of the expanding horizons of nuclear medicine, the equipment necessary for a nuclear medicine laboratory is listed, and the value of this relatively new field to the veterinary clinician is indicated. Although clinical applications to veterinary medicine have not kept pace with those of human medicine, many advances have been made, particularly in the use of in vitro techniques. Areas for expanded applications should include competitive protein binding and other in vitro procedures, particularly in connection with metabolic profile studies. Indicated also is more intensive application by the veterinarian of imaging procedures, which have been found to be of such great value to the physician. (U.S.)

  8. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Tools for a Medical Science Based on Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Mohammed Morad; Niels Jorgen Andersen; Joav Merrick

    2004-01-01

    Biomedicine focuses on the biochemistry of the body, while consciousness-based medicine — holistic medicine — focuses on the individual's experiences and conscious whole (Greek: holos, whole). Biomedicine perceives diseases as mechanical errors at the micro level, while consciousness-based medicine perceives diseases as disturbances in attitudes, perceptions, and experiences at the macro level — in the organism as a whole. Thus, consciousness-based medicine is based on the whole individual, w...

  9. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  10. Game Development as Didactic Strategy for Biochemistry Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    G.G. Hornink

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that students and teachers have difficulties in learning and teaching Biochemistry due to its abstract and interconnected contents. This work proposes a didactic strategy in order to facilitate teaching and learning process in Biochemistry. The strategy was implemented with biological science undergraduate students. At first, the students were divided into groups with a specific topic to develop a game. During the semester, problem based learning cases, online activities like...

  11. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific interests of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences have evolved from classical biochemistry, biophysics and physiological chemistry to up-to-date molecular biology. Research interests are focussed on replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA; regulation of gene expression at various levels; biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins; gene sequencing and functional analysis of open reading frames; structure, function and regulation of enzymes; conformation of proteins and peptides; modelling of structures and prediction of functions of proteins; mechanisms of electron transfer in polypeptides

  12. Teaching of biochemistry: analyze of works presented in Congress the Society Brazilian Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - SBBq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Escoto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent decades the strategies to improve science education has grown exponentially. Thus, the scientific production in the area is also growing, with the purpose of identifying parameters and methodologies that contribute to their qualification. The teaching of biochemistry is intimately linked to that context. However, it is still little explored in basic education and with character technicist in higher education. The aim of this study was identify areas that received most attention in the scientific literature about teaching and education in biochemistry that were presented at the Congress of the Brazilian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2004 to 2012. Material and Methods: To conduct the survey were analyzed summaries available on the website of the Brazilian Journal of Education for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology published in the proceedings of the event, where they were encontrados176 summaries. For expression of results was used categorization from the content analysis. Results and Discussion: The results observed to establish nine categories based on the analysis of the titles and content of the work, which, in descending order, were: information and communication technologies, alternative methods teaching and learning, biochemistry in Elementary Education and / or Medium, experiential activities, teacher training, dissemination of science, proposition and evaluation of content and / or science curricular and History and Philosophy. It is noticed that the three most important categories were consolidated along editions. In education, however, there was a significant decrease in the number of abstracts submitted abstracts for the past five years. Conclusions: We conclude that all categories listed seeking alternatives to improve teaching practices and promote education of biochemistry in different contexts.

  13. Haematology and biochemistry values of captive sand cats (Felis margarita) in Al Ain Wildlife Park and Resort, United Arab Emirates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen Chege; Arshad Toosy; Judith Howlett; Ahmed Saker; John Kagira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the haematology and biochemistry values of apparently healthy captive sand cats kept in Al Ain Wildlife Park and Resort, United Arab Emirates, with a view to establishing baseline values.Methods:Blood was collected from the femoral vein using aseptic techniques, kept in a cool box and sent to laboratory for analysis. The blood was analysed for haematological and biochemical values using veterinary hematology and chemistry analysers (ABX ABC Vet, Horiba ABX SAS Montpellier, France). Results: Haematological values were within the normal ranges recorded in domestic cats and there was no statistical difference between values found in males and females. Aspartate aminotransferase values were higher (P0.05) between males and females values.Conclusions:Our results present reference ranges for haematology and biochemistry parameters in captive sand cats. These values will be important for diagnosis of various diseases and monitoring of treatments.

  14. Haematology and biochemistry values of captive sand cats (Felis margarita in Al Ain Wildlife Park and Resort, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chege

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the haematology and biochemistry values of apparently healthy captive sand cats kept in Al Ain Wildlife Park and Resort, United Arab Emirates, with a view to establishing baseline values. Methods: Blood was collected from the femoral vein using aseptic techniques, kept in a cool box and sent to laboratory for analysis. The blood was analysed for haematological and biochemical values using veterinary hematology and chemistry analysers (ABX ABC Vet, Horiba ABX SAS ® Montpellier, France. Results: Haematological values were within the normal ranges recorded in domestic cats and there was no statistical difference between values found in males and females. Aspartate aminotransferase values were higher (P0.05 between males and females values. Conclusions: Our results present reference ranges for haematology and biochemistry parameters in captive sand cats. These values will be important for diagnosis of various diseases and monitoring of treatments.

  15. Intercellular communication, NO and the biology of Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralt Dina

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New multiple categories of health disciplines have become popular in the west and integration between the medicinal approaches has become essential. The hypothesis presented here suggests a novel integrative view that combines Western biochemistry with the Chinese medicinal concept of qi. The core for this hypothesis is that transmission of qi along the meridians is based on informational molecules that travel via an intercellular communication system. Acupuncture at specific points enhances the flow of the signaling molecules through this communication system. Nitric oxide is suggested as a prime candidate for such a signaling molecule in the meridian system. The biochemistry of nitric oxide can shed light on the biology underlying Chinese medicine while Chinese medicinal data can provide a clue to the sought after framework for nitric oxide.

  16. Screening of some Siberian medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kokoška, L.; Polesný, Z.; Rada, V.; Nepovím, Aleš; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 82, - (2002), s. 51-53. ISSN 0378-8741 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/02/0257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : antimicrobial activity * medicinal plants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.188, year: 2002

  17. Biomedical Science, Unit I: Respiration in Health and Medicine. Respiratory Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology; The Behavior of Gases; Introductory Chemistry; and Air Pollution. Laboratory Manual. Revised Version, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    Designed to accompany the student text on respiration, this manual presents instructions on the use of laboratory equipment and presents various experiments dealing with the concepts presented in the text. Thirty-nine laboratory activities are described. Laboratory activities are divided into several parts, each part covering a specific experiment…

  18. The Use of Multiple Tools for Teaching Medical Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Se, Alexandre B.; Passos, Renato M.; Ono, Andre H.; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using…

  19. An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Biochemistry to Biotechnology Specialty Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ou, Ling; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2007-01-01

    The faculty of biochemistry established an integrated teaching strategy for biotechnology specialty students, by intermeshing the case-study method, web-assistant teaching, and improved lecture format with a brief content and multimedia courseware. Teaching practice showed that the integrated teaching strategy could retain the best features of…

  20. Osmotic Stressing, Membrane Leakage, and Fluorescence: An Introductory Biochemistry Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, Kalani J.

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence demonstration is described that incorporates several fundamental aspects of an introductory biochemistry course. A variation of a known leakage assay is utilized to prepare vesicles containing a quenched fluorophore. The vesicles are exposed to several osmotic environments ranging from isotonic to hypotonic. The degree of vesicle…

  1. Assessment of Learning Gains in a Flipped Biochemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojennus, Deanna Dahlke

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom has become an increasingly popular pedagogical approach to teaching and learning. In this study, learning gains were assessed in a flipped biochemistry course and compared to gains in a traditional lecture. Although measured learning gains were not significantly different between the two courses, student perception of…

  2. Biochemistry Instructors' Perceptions of Analogies and Their Classroom Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, MaryKay; Bussey, Thomas J.; Bodner, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemistry education relies heavily on students' abilities to conceptualize abstract cellular and molecular processes, mechanisms, and components. From a constructivist standpoint, students build their understandings of these abstract processes by connecting, expanding, or revising their prior conceptions and experiences. As such, biochemistry…

  3. Uncovering Students' Incorrect Ideas about Foundational Concepts for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafane, Sachel M.; Loertscher, Jennifer; Minderhout, Vicky; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data on how an assessment instrument with a unique structure can be used to identify common incorrect ideas from prior coursework at the beginning of a biochemistry course, and to determine whether these ideas have changed by the end of the course. The twenty-one multiple-choice items address seven different…

  4. Estimating foliar biochemistry from hyperspectral data in mixed forest canopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber Gharib, Silvia; Kneubühler, Mathias; Psomas, Achilleas;

    2008-01-01

    data to estimate the foliar concentration of nitrogen, carbon and water in three mixed forest canopies in Switzerland. With multiple linear regression models, continuum-removed and normalized HyMap spectra were related to foliar biochemistry on an individual tree level. The six spectral wavebands used...

  5. Using Assessment to Improve Learning in the Biochemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, major drivers of undergraduate science education reform including the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) have called on college and university instructors to take a more scientific approach to their teaching. Although many biochemistry instructors are gaining confidence in using…

  6. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  7. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  8. DMPD: Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17502368 Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. de Wee...(.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. PubmedID 17502368 T...itle Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. Authors

  9. Biochemistry Students' Ideas about Shape and Charge in Enzyme-Substrate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry is a visual discipline that requires students to develop an understanding of numerous representations. However, there is very little known about what students actually understand about the representations that are used to communicate ideas in biochemistry. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of multiple…

  10. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  11. Flexible scope for ISO 15189 accreditation: a guidance prepared by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group Accreditation and ISO/CEN standards (WG-A/ISO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Marc H M; Vanstapel, Florent J L A; Kroupis, Christos; Vukasovic, Ines; Boursier, Guilaime; Barrett, Edward; Bernabeu Andreu, Francisco; Brguljan, Pika Meško; Brugnoni, Duilio; Lohmander, Maria; Sprongl, Ludek; Vodnik, Tatjana; Ghita, Irina; Vaubourdolle, Michel; Huisman, Willem

    2015-07-01

    The recent revision of ISO15189 has further strengthened its position as the standard for accreditation for medical laboratories. Both for laboratories and their customers it is important that the scope of such accreditation is clear. Therefore the European co-operation for accreditation (EA) demands that the national bodies responsible for accreditation describe the scope of every laboratory accreditation in a way that leaves no room for doubt about the range of competence of the particular laboratories. According to EA recommendations scopes may be fixed, mentioning every single test that is part of the accreditation, or flexible, mentioning all combinations of medical field, examination type and materials for which the laboratory is competent. Up to now national accreditation bodies perpetuate use of fixed scopes, partly by inertia, partly out of fear that a too flexible scope may lead to over-valuation of the competence of laboratories, most countries only use fixed scopes. The EA however promotes use of flexible scopes, since this allows for more readily innovation, which contributes to quality in laboratory medicine. In this position paper, the Working Group Accreditation and ISO/CEN Standards belonging to the Quality and Regulation Committee of the EFLM recommends using an approach that has led to successful introduction of the flexible scope for ISO15189 accreditation as intended in EA-4/17 in The Netherlands. The approach is risk-based, discipline and competence-based, and focuses on defining a uniform terminology transferable across the borders of scientific disciplines, laboratories and countries. PMID:26055950

  12. Biochemistry on the Media: daily science in audio and video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Melo et al

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry on the Media: daily science in audio and video Melo,B. P1; Henriques, L. R1; Júnior, H. G2; Galvão, G. R2; Costa, M. M2; Silva, A. S3; Costa, M. P3; Barreto, L. P3; Almeida, A. A3; Fontes, P. P3; Meireles, L. M3; Costa, P. A3; Costa, C. B3; Monteiro, L. M. O3 Konig, I. M3; Dias, B. K. M1; Santos, R. C. V1; Bagno, F. F1; Fernandes, L1; Alves, P. R1; Sales, F. M1; Martins, T. C. N1; Moreira, V. J. V1; Marchiori, J. M1; Medeiros, L.4; Leite, J. P. V5; Moraes, G. H. K6.   1 Members of ETP-Biochemistry UFV; 2 Students of program Jovens Talentos para a Ciência UFV; 3 Graduating Students of ETP; 4 Coordinator in Espaço Ciência UFV; 5 Pharmaceutical, professor at Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Department (BBD UFV, ETP’s tutor; 6 Agronomist, professor at BDD, work’s advisor.   INTRODUCTION: The Educational Tutorial Program in Biochemistry (ETP from UFV have worked in qualification of basic science teachers, offering courses about Biochemistry. In courses, was detected the necessity of a personal material to inspire them. To do it, ETP compiled some media spots in a box and have used it in qualification courses. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this work was construct a part of a permanent material to be used in courses to qualifications high school's teachers and evaluate it. METODOLOGY: Applying questionnaires to high school students, ETP's members had detected that these students don't have a solid idea about how is Biochemistry. Thus, themes about common Biochemistry daily things were elected to be transformed in spots to radio and television. Texts about shampoo composition, vegetable’s darkening, bread’s fermentation, etc, were written and a script done by Journalism’s students of Espaço Ciência(*. Finally, the spots were recorded and vehiculated on universitary channel. In 2013, the spots were compiled in a media box. It has been included in a permanent material used in qualification courses. According to ALBAGLI

  13. Conference scene: Summary of the 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories with international participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasevici, Eugen

    2011-10-01

    laboratory diagnostics in hematology, biochemistry, immunology, oncology, microbiology and metabolic diseases. A prominent consideration was given to value added to laboratory medicine in the frame of managed care and quality management. The Conference was accompanied by a laboratory equipment and reagents exhibition with the participation of nine companies, also sponsors of the conference. Three workshops pointed out the presence of the most well known of them: Abbott, Roche and Nobis. PMID:22003916

  14. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  15. Biochemistry and evolutionary biology: Two disciplines that need each other

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Athel Cornish-Bowden; Juli Peretó; María Luz Cárdenas

    2014-03-01

    Biochemical information has been crucial for the development of evolutionary biology. On the one hand, the sequence information now appearing is producing a huge increase in the amount of data available for phylogenetic analysis; on the other hand, and perhaps more fundamentally, it allows understanding of the mechanisms that make evolution possible. Less well recognized, but just as important, understanding evolutionary biology is essential for understanding many details of biochemistry that would otherwise be mysterious, such as why the structures of NAD and other coenzymes are far more complicated than their functions would seem to require. Courses of biochemistry should thus pay attention to the essential role of evolution in selecting the molecules of life.

  16. CLSI-derived hematology and biochemistry reference intervals for healthy adults in eastern and southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Karita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical laboratory reference intervals have not been established in many African countries, and non-local intervals are commonly used in clinical trials to screen and monitor adverse events (AEs among African participants. Using laboratory reference intervals derived from other populations excludes potential trial volunteers in Africa and makes AE assessment challenging. The objective of this study was to establish clinical laboratory reference intervals for 25 hematology, immunology and biochemistry values among healthy African adults typical of those who might join a clinical trial. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Equal proportions of men and women were invited to participate in a cross sectional study at seven clinical centers (Kigali, Rwanda; Masaka and Entebbe, Uganda; two in Nairobi and one in Kilifi, Kenya; and Lusaka, Zambia. All laboratories used hematology, immunology and biochemistry analyzers validated by an independent clinical laboratory. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines were followed to create study consensus intervals. For comparison, AE grading criteria published by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Division of AIDS (DAIDS and other U.S. reference intervals were used. 2,990 potential volunteers were screened, and 2,105 (1,083 men and 1,022 women were included in the analysis. While some significant gender and regional differences were observed, creating consensus African study intervals from the complete data was possible for 18 of the 25 analytes. Compared to reference intervals from the U.S., we found lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, particularly among women, lower white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower amylase. Both genders had elevated eosinophil counts, immunoglobulin G, total and direct bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase, the latter being more pronounced among women. When graded against U.S. -derived DAIDS AE grading criteria

  17. Current research in Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay has been engaged in research in the frontier areas of (i) radiation biology related to tumour therapy and injury caused by free radicals; (ii) molecular basis of diseases of physiological origin; (iii) molecular aspects of chemical carcinogenesis and (iv) structure of genome and genome related functions. The gist of research and development activities carried out in the Division during the last two years are documented

  18. Postprandial biochemistry changes in penguins (Spheniscus demersus) including hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Carolyn; Stremme, Donald W; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2010-06-01

    In a clinical setting, it is important to differentiate abnormal values that may be a normal change resulting from feeding and those that may be disease related. Such postprandial changes have been identified in mammalian and avian species. In the current study, pre- and postvalues for several routine biochemical analytes from penguins (Spheniscus demersus) were examined. Significant increases were found in uric acid, triglycerides, and bile acids (P abnormal biochemistry values in penguins. PMID:20597226

  19. THE USE OF MULTIPLE TOOLS FOR TEACHING MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Sé

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The pros and cons of Problem Based Learning (PBL have been extensivelydiscussed in the literature. We describe PBL-like strategies used at UnB (some ofthem since 1999 that may be useful elsewhere to improve undergraduatebiochemistry teaching with clinical applications. The main activities are: (i aseminar/poster system, (ii a true-or-false applied biochemistry exam (prepared bypeer tutors, (iii a 9-hour-exam on metabolism (based in actual papers, (iv anAdvanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, (v pizza-and-pasta (formetabolism teaching and free radicals (real science for students experiments,(vi the BioBio blog (http://www.biobio-unb.blogspot.com, (vii student lectures onhealth issues directed to the community, and (viii the BioBio Show. The mainobjective of these activities is providing students with a more practical andentertaining approach to biochemistry using philosophic PBL principles such asthe application of basic knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments andscientific discoveries. We also emphasize (a the importance of peer-tutor activityfor optimized learning of students and peer tutors, (b the relevance of a closerinteraction between students and professors, and (c the necessity to initiatestudents precociously in actual basic/medical science and contact with the public.Most activities have been evaluated by the students through written questionnairesand informal conversations, for several semesters, indicating good acceptanceand approval of these methods.

  20. Game Development as Didactic Strategy for Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Hornink

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that students and teachers have difficulties in learning and teaching Biochemistry due to its abstract and interconnected contents. This work proposes a didactic strategy in order to facilitate teaching and learning process in Biochemistry. The strategy was implemented with biological science undergraduate students. At first, the students were divided into groups with a specific topic to develop a game. During the semester, problem based learning cases, online activities like crossword puzzle, essay questions and educational softwares were used to present the content of each topic. The groups were oriented in classroom and online, to choose and organize contents and create ways to approach them in games. At the end of the course the groups played each other games, which were evaluated by teacher and students following some criteria like: creativity, content organization, interdisciplinarity, proposal coherence, instructions clarity, specific content. The game elaboration contributed to the development of social and cognitive functions, such as teamwork and troubleshooting, providing an interesting perspective to the student about knowledge construction process. The strategy showed up students' creativity and ability to reorganize their knowledge to a different education level. In an overview, the results indicate that the proposed didactic strategy is an effective way to enhance learning and to motivate students into Biochemistry topics.

  1. Are tutor-students capable of writing good biochemistry exams?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sé Alexandre B.

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In a previous article we described the relevance of student seminars for the learning process of appliedbiochemistry for medical and nutrition students (Hermes-Lima et al., Biochem. Mol.Biol.Educ. 30:30-34,2002. First semester students of a basic biochemistry course (BioBio are divided in 10 groupsof 5 members, and each group is assigned to a specic topic (diabetes, cholesterol, etc under thesupervision of a tutor-student. The tutors have already coursed BioBio and are currently undertakingan advanced biochemistry course. In order to evaluate the learning of applied biochemistry for BioBiostudents a true or false exam (TFE is performed. This exam is made of 50 questions (5 on eachtopic elaborated by the tutors under the supervision of the teacher. The TFE corresponds to 10percent of the grade of BioBio and focus on clinical and/or applied biochemistry situations. At theend of the exam, BioBio students were asked to share their opinions about TFEs (n = 401, from2001/1 to 2003/2. When asked to give a 0-to-4 score regarding (a the diculty level of the test,(b the technical quality and (c if the exam makes an appropriate evaluation of applied biochemistryknowledge, the scores were 2.9, 3.4 and 2.9, respectively. BioBio students were also asked if they ndvalid to be evaluated by a tutor-made exam and if they would like to participate in the making ofTFEs; 96 and 58 percent answered yes, respectively.In another survey, we interviewed former BioBio students from the 2nd to the 7th semesters (n=95about TFEs (since 1999-1 regarding technical aspects, which included (1 clarity of questions, (2 levelof diculty, (3 clinical application and (4 thinking (as opposed to memorizing abilities demanded;the 0-to-4 scores were 3.1, 2.9, 2.6, and 2.5, respectively. Other four questions were on the validityof tutors writing TFEs and their capacity to perform such a task; the average score was 3.2. Oursurveys show the students good acceptance of the seminar system

  2. GENOMIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence. The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others.There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine. For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc..Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine. For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others.We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the disease

  3. Genomic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence.  The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others. There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine.  For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc.. Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine.  For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others. We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the

  4. Center for Disaster & Humanitarian Assistance Medicine

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM) was formally established at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) by...

  5. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  6. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  7. Social Hygiene and Social Medicine in Interwar Czechoslovakia with the 13th District of the City of Prague as Its Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Mášová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Health services in the newborn Czechoslovak Republic had to cope not only with the consequences of the First World War, but also with the new approaches to health policy. Modern social medicine challenged the conventional model of the so-called “police medicine” – the deep-rooted concept of Public Health in the Middle European countries. The necessity to resolve the contradiction between preventative and curative care led to the conclusion that the form and tasks of health centres, whether ru...

  8. 78 FR 6330 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory medicine practice and specific... laboratory services; revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the...

  9. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a brief history of nuclear medicine in France and describes the recent developments and equipment of the 3 techniques most used in hospital nuclear departments: 1) gamma-camera, 2) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and 3) positron emission computed tomography (PECT). Concerning gamma-camera, a new design is being studied in a collaboration between the Saint-Gobain company and the LETI (a laboratory of Cea). In this innovative design the scintillator and the photomultiplier are replaced by a matrix of semi-conductor detectors based on CdZnTe crystal combined with an adequate electronic equipment. Concerning SPECT, many different techniques and equipment are used. Most improvements handle with the reduction of the survey time for the patient by using several detectors set on a ring around the patient. Concerning PECT, the developments follow 2 parallel ways: first the use of better scintillating materials for detecting 511 KeV photons (BGO: bismuth germanate, BaF2, LSO: lutetium orthosilicate, or GSO: gadolinium orthosilicate), and secondly the use of beta+ decay radionuclides that are more easily integrated in molecules similar to those present in the humane metabolism (18F through the fluorodeoxyglucose molecule). (A.C.)

  10. Comparative analysis of the biochemistry undergraduate courses in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Granjeiro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The economic and social development of Brazil during the recent decades has contributed to the installation of several new undergraduate and graduate study programs, as is the case of the undergraduate biochemistry programs at UFV, UFSJ and UEM. The new biochemical professionals are being prepared to work mainly in Industries, research Institutes, government agencies and Universities in all fields that involve Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative analysis of the courses in Biochemistry in Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Comparative analysis of the course units of the UFV, UFSJ and UEM programs, centered on the curricula contents and organization and on the profiles of the students in terms of parameters such as the number of admissions and the graduation completion rates. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The UFV and UEM programs present a very similar distribution of workload over the biological, exact sciences, humanities, biochemical specialties and technological applications. The UFSJ program presents higher workloads in the areas of biological sciences and technological applications. No significant differences in the distribution of the workloads of mandatory and optional disciplines, complementary activities and supervised activities were detected. Over the past five years there was a decrease in the number of students that abandoned the programs, despite the increased retention time in the three courses. Most graduated students at both UFV and UFSJ continue their academic career toward the Master or Doctor degrees. CONCLUSION: Little difference between the study programs analyzed. This is somewhat surprising if one considers the fact that individual conception of each program was based on different local conditions and needs, which indeed justify small differences. The similarity of the programs, on the other hand, reflects the universality of the biochemical sciences and their broad

  11. Hematological and Biochemistry Profile and Risk Factors Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Guyana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Kurup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the hematological and biochemistry profile of patients with or without HIV-TB at the Georgetown Chest Clinic, Guyana. Methods. An observational, laboratory based study was designed to assess the relationship of PTB and HIV with patients routine biochemical and hematological values. The study was conducted during the period January 2013 to December 2014; a total sample size of 316 patients was enrolled following exclusion and inclusion criteria. Results. Mean age of study population was 40.1 ± 13.8 (95% CI 38.6–41.7 and most were between 40 and 49 age group (27.8%, 95% CI 23.2–33.0. More males were in the study 74.4% (95% CI 69.3–78.8 than females 81% (95% CI 21.1–30.7. 30% (95% CI 25.3–35.3 had a sputum smear grade of 3+ and 62.5% (95% CI 47.0–75.7 showed a CD4 count <200. The study demonstrated significantly low hemoglobin (Hb 91.7% (95% CI 78.2–97.1, low WBC 27.8% (95% CI 15.8–44.0, high indirect bilirubin 7.4% (95% CI 2.1–23.3, ALT 41.8% (95% CI 28.4–56.7, and AST 72.2% (95% CI 57.3–83.3 among TB-HIV patients. Homelessness RR (relative risk 2.2 (95% CI 0.48–12.3, smoking RR 1.09 (95% CI 1.01–1.19, and gender (male RR 1.2 (95% CI 0.61–2.26 were main associated risk factors. Conclusions. There is slight variation among PTB and PTB-HIV coinfected patients in some hematological and biochemistry parameters.

  12. International Symposium on Insect Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We are building on the success of the Sixth Chinese Insect Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Symposium, Beijing, held in 2005. The 2005 symposium saw many Chinese and international authorities share their expertise in a broad range of insect science, including analyses of insect genomes and proteomes, functional gene expression and regulation during development, insect immunity, insect neurobiology, insect-host interactions and insect chemical communication. The coming symposium, which will be held in Shandong University,Jinan, Shandong province, September 19-22, 2007, will offer material along similar lines.

  13. Construction of concept maps as tool for Biochemistry learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lopes de Menezes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of concept maps on the teaching of sciences has been object of worldwide research with different purposes: to detect the previous knowledge of the students on certain topics or to evaluate learning, among others. Based on Ausubel´s cognitive psychology, concept maps assume that the learning is accomplished by assimilation of new concepts and propositions to the students´ cognitive structure, contributing to establish links between the previous and new knowledge. It is especially interesting on the approach of interdisciplinary issues, as many studied in Biochemistry.The relevance of the use of concept maps on biochemistry learning was evaluated on a thirty-hour undergraduation optional course, with interdisciplinary topics, which are not usually included on introductory Biochemistry courses. The course Biochemistry of Animal Venoms was structured in seven module where the biochemical action mechanisms of the venoms of Crotalus sp (south american rattlesnake, Bothrops sp (jararaca, Loxosceles sp (brown spider, Tityus sp (yellow scorpion, Phoneutria sp (armed spider, Apis mellifera (honey bee and Latrodectus sp (black widowwere discussed. The students worked in small groups and, at each module, there were (1 an oriented study, guided by questions, texts and schemes, supervised by the teachers, (2 the construction of individual concept maps, where the local and systemic effects of the venoms should be predicted by their biochemical composition and (3 the construction of a new map by the group, incorporating the information of the individual maps. The difficulty level of these tasks was gradually increased throughout the course, with lesser time to carry out the tasks, lesser assistance during the oriented study and even lesser information on the venom effects.The course assessment was given by the number, quality and correction of the concepts relationship present in the concept maps, through a questionnaire and by the

  14. A guide on instrument of biochemistry and molecular biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is about instrument on biochemistry and molecular biology, which consists of six chapters. It deals with introduction of advanced bio-instrument, common utilization and maintain, explanation of each instrument like capillary electrophoresis, interactive laser cytometer, personal computer and software, an electron microscope and DNA/RNS synthesis instrument, large equipment and special system like information system and network, analysis system for genome and large spectro graph, outside donation, examples for common utilization and appendix on data like application form for use.

  15. Construction of Hypertexts in a Biochemistry Pos- Graduation Discipline

    OpenAIRE

    W. B. Maia; B.S. dos Santos; J. M. Martins; B.C. Araujo; A.A. Pimenta Filho; Araújo, T. G.; Martins, M.C.; C.R.F.C. Mota; A.L. Castro- Neto; V.L.M. Lima,

    2009-01-01

    Virtual reality is an innovating manner of comprehending and acting on how the world is and, also, considered a new way of intellectual exercise.  This work took place in a  biochemistry masters discipline (Advanced Formation in ScientificEducation) and had as its observation context the forum (on-line tool) viability, intending the construction of hypertexts (active  collaborative writing ) by the 15 registered students in the  discipline in 2008. The discipline was available on the web, in ...

  16. Oxidative Damage and Suppression: an Experimental Approach to Teaching Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Isa G. J. de Avellar; Luana T. Dalvi; Lorena M. R. Mascarenhas; Alexandre B. Sé; Marcelo Hermes-Lima

    2005-01-01

    Experimental Biochemistry is a challenging and worthy didactical  task:  a vast field with many different techniques.   Radical mediated biooxidative processes, implied in aging and accompanying various pathologies,  have an enormous  appeal  to public in general and particularly to students in the science field.   The  Fenton  reaction,   first  reported by  the 22-year  old Cambridge  chemistry  undergraduate Henry J. H. Fenton  (Chemical  news vol. 33 page 190, 1876), is a useful in vitro ...

  17. The 1989 progress report: Polytechnic school laboratories' Direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1989 progress report of the laboratories' Direction of the Polytechnic School (France) is presented. The research activities carried out in each laboratory are summarized. Scientific and technical cooperation, financial and employement aspects are included. The main fields of research are: biochemistry, chemistry, reaction mechanisms, organic synthesis, mechanics of solids, meteorology, irradiated solids, optics, physics, biophysics, lasers, mathematics, econometrics, epistemology, management and computer science

  18. The Laboratory Medicine and the care of patients infected by the Ebola virus. Experience in a reference hospital of Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Puntero, Belen; Gomez-Rioja, Ruben; Alcaide, Maria Jose; Oliver, Paloma; Fernandez-Calle, Pilar; Iturzaeta, Jose Manuel; Buno, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in several countries in West Africa was considered by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as a public health emergency of international concern. Healthcare providers must be prepared by organising specific procedures in our hospitals based on recommendations from national and international healthcare organisations. Two aims should be considered: appropriate medical care for patients with suspected or confirmed disease must be ensured, as must measures to prevent transmission to healthcare workers. The clinical laboratory plays an important role and must define and establish its own procedures in accordance with clinicians and integrated into those of the institution, starting with the definition of the organisation model in the laboratory to achieve those goals. In this review we present our experience based on the care of three patients with confirmed cases. We hope it will help other colleagues to plan for Ebola. PMID:26053009

  19. Abstracts of the 27. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting was about biochemistry and molecular biology. It was discussed topics related to bio energetic, channels, transports, biotechnology, metabolism, cellular biology, immunology, toxicology, photobiology and pharmacology

  20. Abstracts of the 26. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting was about biochemistry and molecular biology. It was discussed topics related to bio energetic, channels, transports, biotechnology, metabolism, cellular biology, immunology, toxicology, photobiology and pharmacology

  1. [Research in the PhD Program led by János Fehér between 1993 and 2010 at the Biochemical Research Laboratory, 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázovics, Anna

    2010-11-21

    Author wish to express gratitude to late professor János Fehér for the invitation to participate in "Free Radical and Immunological References of Hepatology" PhD program in 1993 and for providing opportunity to establish a laboratory at the 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University. He established a joint medical and biological research that is continuing unbrokenly. In this research group, between 1993 and 2010, eleven Ph.D. students received their scientific degrees and two candidate dissertations were prepared. Three students are working in this very exciting field even today. Author would like to salute before János Fehér's remembrance by giving a list of results of topics under her leadership. PMID:21071304

  2. Symposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world: Hands-on inquiry-based biochemistry courses for improving scientific literacy of school teachers and students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea T. da Poian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wednesday – August 26th, 2015 - 3:30 to 5:30 pm – Room: Iguaçu II – 5th floorSymposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world Chair: Miguel Castanho, Universidade de Lisboa, PortugalAbstract:In the last decades, Brazil has reached a prominent position in the world rank of scientific production. Despite this progress, the establishment of a scientific culture in Brazilian society is still challenging. Our group has been offering hands-on inquiry-based courses to primary and secondary students, which aim to introduce them to the scientific method and improve their interest in science. More recently, we started new initiatives focused on the improvement of the scientific literacy of school science teachers. Here we describe two intensive short-term courses designed in different formats. One consists in a discipline offered to a Master Program to school science teachers, in which the main objective was to work with core disciplinary concepts through an active teachers engagement in “doing science”. The discipline, named “Energy transformation in the living organisms”, intends to deal with the main Biochemistry subjects that take part of the high-school science curriculum, namely, fermentation, photosynthesis and cellular respiration processes. The other initiative was developed in Urucureá, a small community with about 600 residents, located on the banks of the River Arapiuns, in Amazonia region. We trained the local school teachers to act as tutors in the course offered to 40 students of the community, ages 10 to 17. The theme we chose to address was the properties and effects of snakes´ poisons, since poisoning events are a problem with which the local community frequently deal with. Another important point was that we adapted a number of experiments to make them feasible with very limited laboratory resources. Our results show that the activities that we have developed offer real opportunity of scientific training

  3. A Review of the Biochemistry, Metabolism and Clinical Benefits of Thiamin(e and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick Lonsdale

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamin(e, also known as vitamin B1, is now known to play a fundamental role in energy metabolism. Its discovery followed from the original early research on the ‘anti-beriberi factor’ found in rice polishings. After its synthesis in 1936, it led to many years of research to find its action in treating beriberi, a lethal scourge known for thousands of years, particularly in cultures dependent on rice as a staple. This paper refers to the previously described symptomatology of beriberi, emphasizing that it differs from that in pure, experimentally induced thiamine deficiency in human subjects. Emphasis is placed on some of the more unusual manifestations of thiamine deficiency and its potential role in modern nutrition. Its biochemistry and pathophysiology are discussed and some of the less common conditions associated with thiamine deficiency are reviewed. An understanding of the role of thiamine in modern nutrition is crucial in the rapidly advancing knowledge applicable to Complementary Alternative Medicine. References are given that provide insight into the use of this vitamin in clinical conditions that are not usually associated with nutritional deficiency. The role of allithiamine and its synthetic derivatives is discussed. Thiamine plays a vital role in metabolism of glucose. Thus, emphasis is placed on the fact that ingestion of excessive simple carbohydrates automatically increases the need for this vitamin. This is referred to as high calorie malnutrition.

  4. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article deals with the growth of nuclear medicine in India. Radiopharmaceuticals both in elemental form and radiolabelled compounds became commercially available in India in 1961. Objectives and educational efforts of the Radiation Medicine Centre setup in Bombay are mentioned. In vivo tests of nuclear medicine such as imaging procedures, dynamic studies, dilution studies, thyroid function studies, renal function studies, linear function studies, blood flow, and absorption studies are reported. Techniques of radioimmunoassay are also mentioned. (S.K.K.)

  5. Bioinformatics and genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Han

    2002-01-01

    Bioinformatics is a rapidly emerging field of biomedical research. A flood of large-scale genomic and postgenomic data means that many of the challenges in biomedical research are now challenges in computational science. Clinical informatics has long developed methodologies to improve biomedical research and clinical care by integrating experimental and clinical information systems. The informatics revolution in both bioinformatics and clinical informatics will eventually change the current practice of medicine, including diagnostics, therapeutics, and prognostics. Postgenome informatics, powered by high-throughput technologies and genomic-scale databases, is likely to transform our biomedical understanding forever, in much the same way that biochemistry did a generation ago. This paper describes how these technologies will impact biomedical research and clinical care, emphasizing recent advances in biochip-based functional genomics and proteomics. Basic data preprocessing with normalization and filtering, primary pattern analysis, and machine-learning algorithms are discussed. Use of integrative biochip informatics technologies, including multivariate data projection, gene-metabolic pathway mapping, automated biomolecular annotation, text mining of factual and literature databases, and the integrated management of biomolecular databases, are also discussed. PMID:12544491

  6. Biochemical Pathways: An Atlas of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (edited by Gerhard Michal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voige, Reviewed By William H.

    2000-02-01

    For decades, a wall chart detailing living organisms' metabolic pathways has been a fixture in many classrooms and laboratories where biochemistry is taught. One of the most popular of those charts first appeared 30 years ago. Now its editor, Gerhard Michal, has produced a book that summarizes metabolism (broadly defined) in graphical and textual formats. The book retains the elegance of the chart. Names of molecules are printed in a crisp, easy-to-read font, and structural formulas are shown with exemplary clarity. Color coding serves multiple purposes: to differentiate enzymes, substrates, cofactors, and effector molecules; to indicate in which group or groups of organisms a reaction has been observed; and to distinguish enzymatic reactions from regulatory effects. The primary advantage of presenting this information in book format is immediately apparent. A typical metabolic chart covers about 2 m2; the book has a total surface area nearly 10 times greater. The extra space is used to add explanatory text to the figures and to include many topics not covered by the traditional definition of metabolism. Examples include replication, transcription, translation, reaction mechanisms for proteolytic enzymes, and the role of chaperones in protein folding. Illustrating these topics is not as straightforward as delineating a metabolic pathway, but the author has done an admirable job of designing figures that clarify these and other aspects of biochemistry and complement the accompanying text. A potential deficiency of book format is the inability to clearly show links between different realms of metabolism: carbohydrate and amino acid pathways, for example. The book overcomes this problem in two ways. A diagrammatic overview of metabolism (with references to applicable sections of the book) is printed inside its front cover, and key compounds (pyruvate, for example) have a distinctive green background to provide a visual link between pathways. (The author compares this

  7. COPD Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AerobiKa® Cardiology Medications Anticoagulant Medicine Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions COPD Medications Bronchodilators Anti-Inflammatories Antibiotics Managing Your Medications Devices ...

  8. Recent Advances in Geriatric Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Ansari

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a natural process. In the words of Seneca;“Old age is an incurable disease”, but more recently,Sir James Sterling Ross commented: “You do not healold age. You protect it; you promote it; you extendit” [1]. These are in fact the basic principles ofpreventive medicine. Old age should be regarded as anormal, inevitable biological phenomenon. The studyof the physical and psychological changes which areincident to old age is called gerontology. The care ofthe aged is called clinical gerontology or geriatrics.Another aspect of gerontology is social gerontology which was born on the one hand out of the instincts of humanitarian and social attitudes and on the other out of the problems set by the increasing number of old people[2]. Experimental gerontology is concerned withresearch into the basic biological problems of ageing, into its physiology, biochemistry, pathology and psychology.

  9. Social Hygiene and Social Medicine in Interwar Czechoslovakia with the 13th District of the City of Prague as Its Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mášová, Hana

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Health services in the newborn Czechoslovak Republic had to cope not only with the consequences of the First World War, but also with the new approaches to health policy. Modern social medicine challenged the conventional model of the so-called “police medicine” – the deep-rooted concept of Public Health in the Middle European countries. The necessity to resolve the contradiction between preventative and curative care led to the conclusion that the form and tasks of health centres, whether run by voluntary bodies or by the state/regional authorities, had to be reconsidered. The ambitious goal was to find new and more effective ways to cooperation between the various subjects of health assistance, consultancy, and – eventually - social aid. As an example of such an institution, providing both curative and preventive/consultant service, can be found in one of the most rapidly developing parts of the city of Prague – the new Czechoslovak capital. The “model district” in Prague XIII should have become the location utilizing the latest methods of social hygiene and healthcare organization, an enterprise of coordinated social work and health service. Only in the first years of its existence did it function in accordance with its aims; especially as a teaching arrangement - a tutorial service of the State Health Institute for the education of medical personnel, especially health and social nursing sisters, – and as a source of statistical research. The work of the voluntary organizations and health officers was successfully coordinated. But plans to reorganise the Health Office of the City of Prague, and to extend the system to other districts, faltered and eventually failed. Nevertheless, the principle was kept in mind by the later health care reformers, and survived.

  10. Teaching Arrangements of Carbohydrate Metabolism in Biochemistry Curriculum in Peking University Health Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Ni, Ju-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Biochemistry occupies a unique place in the medical school curricula, but the teaching of biochemistry presents certain challenges. One of these challenges is facilitating students' interest in and mastery of metabolism. The many pathways and modes of regulation can be overwhelming for students to learn and difficult for professors to teach…

  11. Combining Content and Elements of Communication into an Upper-Level Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Carli P.; Pellock, Samuel J.; Cunningham, Rebecca L.; Cox, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes how a science communication module was incorporated into an advanced biochemistry course. Elements of communication were taught synergistically with biochemistry content in this course in an effort to expose students to a variety of effective oral communication strategies. Students were trained to use these established…

  12. An Analysis of the Effectiveness of Analogy Use in College-Level Biochemistry Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, MaryKay; Bodner, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Science instructors and textbook authors often use analogies to help their students use information they already understand to develop an understanding of new concepts. This study reports the results of an analysis of the use of analogies in eight biochemistry textbooks, which included textbooks written for one-semester survey biochemistry courses…

  13. Biochemistry Instructors' Views toward Developing and Assessing Visual Literacy in Their Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemistry instructors are inundated with various representations from which to choose to depict biochemical phenomena. Because of the immense amount of visual know-how needed to be an expert biochemist in the 21st century, there have been calls for instructors to develop biochemistry students' visual literacy. However, visual literacy has…

  14. Experiences from introduction of peer-to-peer teaching methods in Advanced Biochemistry E2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Ditlev; Etzerodt, Michael; Rasmussen, Jan Trige

    2012-01-01

    During the autumn semester 2010, we experimented with a range of active teaching methods on the course, Advanced Biochemistry, at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics.......During the autumn semester 2010, we experimented with a range of active teaching methods on the course, Advanced Biochemistry, at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics....

  15. Biochemistry Students' Ideas about How an Enzyme Interacts with a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-substrate interactions are a fundamental concept of biochemistry that is built upon throughout multiple biochemistry courses. Central to understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is specific knowledge of exactly how an enzyme and substrate interact. Within this narrower topic, students must understand the various binding sites on an…

  16. Vulnerable Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  17. Whither life? Conjectures on the future evolution of biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Jodi L; Finn, Thomas J; Ramirez, Miguel A; Patrick, Wayne M

    2016-08-01

    Life has existed on the Earth for approximately four billion years. The sheer depth of evolutionary time, and the diversity of extant species, makes it tempting to assume that all the key biochemical innovations underpinning life have already happened. But we are only a little over halfway through the trajectory of life on our planet. In this Opinion piece, we argue: (i) that sufficient time remains for the evolution of new processes at the heart of metabolic biochemistry and (ii) that synthetic biology is providing predictive insights into the nature of these innovations. By way of example, we focus on engineered solutions to existing inefficiencies in energy generation, and on the complex, synthetic regulatory circuits that are currently being implemented. PMID:27555646

  18. $^{31}$Mg $\\beta$-NMR applied in chemistry and biochemistry

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnesium ions, Mg$^{2+}$, are essential in biological systems, taking part in practically all phosphate chemistry, in photosynthesis as an integral component of chlorophyll, and they are regulated via transport through selective membrane proteins. Nonetheless, the function of magnesium ions in biochemistry is difficult to characterize, as it is practically invisible to current experimental techniques. With this proposal we aim to advance the use of $^{31}$Mg $\\beta$-NMR to liquid samples, building on the experience from the successful LOI88 “$\\beta$-NMR as a novel technique for biological applications”. Initially a series of experiments will be conducted aiming to characterize the coordination chemistry of Mg$^{2+}$ in ionic liquids (ILs), demonstrating that it is possible within the lifetime of the radioisotope to achieve binding of Mg$^{2+}$ to a molecule dissolved in the IL. ILs are chosen as they display a very low vapor pressure, and are thus straightforwardly compatible with the vacuum requirements...

  19. [Foundation and development of biochemistry at the Imperial Kharkov University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P A; Chernyshenko, A A

    2000-01-01

    The article summarizes the biochemical researches carried out at Kharkiv Imperial University from the middle of XIX century up to the cessation of its existence in 1920 as a result of transformation into the Kharkiv Institute of National Education. Scientific activity at the Chair of Medical Chemistry at Medical Department is described in details. Information on professors who led the chair and their researches are represented. Among them a great attention is spared to the Kharkiv works of such famous scientists as A. Danilevsky and V. Gulevich, who made a great contribution to the development of Russian and world biochemistry. There are also some resordes about researches of biological and physiological chemistry carried out at other chairs of Medical Department and Department of Physics and Mathematics of the Kharkiv University. In particular, the article presents the works of well-known plant physiologists and biochemists prof. V. Palladin and V. Zalessky, and the endocrinological researches led by prof. A. Reprev. PMID:10979572

  20. Breast imaging technology: Imaging biochemistry - applications to breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to investigate breast tumour biochemistry in vivo is reviewed. To this end, results obtained both from patients in vivo and from tumour extracts and model systems are discussed. An association has been observed between transformation and an increase in phosphomonoesters (PMEs) detected in the 31P MRS spectrum, as well as an increase in choline-containing metabolites detected in the 1H spectrum. A decrease in PME content after treatment is associated with response to treatment as assessed by tumour volume. Experiments in model systems aimed at understanding the underlying biochemical processes are presented, as well as data indicating the usefulness of MRS in monitoring the uptake and metabolism of some chemotherapeutic agents

  1. Mechanisms and biochemistry of methano genesis in biogas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternative energy sources should be developed to replace fast depleting fossil fuels. The global energy crisis has generated interest in the use of animal waste as a substitute for fossil fuel. The production of biogas which is a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide and traces of other gases, is a biogical process through which wastes are converted to fuels. Through this process, an energy resource that can be stored and used efficiently is produced and an excellent residue that retains the fertiliser value of the original waste is created. This article discusses the biochemistry involved in the production of biogas by anaerobic fermentation of organic waste materials and also the mechanisms of methano genesis involved

  2. Development of a virtual classroom to teach biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Rodrigues

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowing  the  difficulties to  teach  some biochemistry concepts  because  of their  dynamic  and  spatial characteristics, computers  have been adopted  to help in these  visualizations.  Pictures, three  dimen- sional structures and animations were built and used to display in classes and distributed to students. Behind  these  specific illustrations, an  informatics  environment has  been  developed  to  support bio- chemistry  teaching.    Based  in  free software,  it fits  in  a single CD  that works  independent of any software installed  on the computer, even the operating  system, and is compatible  with most hardware configurations.This technique is called live-CD. It is based on Linux architecture, which is not only free software but also more flexible to be configured.  After some tests with Linux distributions, Slackware has been chosen because of its easy manipulation and  because it makes the  best use of the hardware  allowing to be installed  in old or limited  equipments. It has been configured to make the best optimization of the computer  and have all software needed for most biochemistry classrooms.It  was installed:   an  Internet browser  compatible  with  a 3D molecule visualization plug-in,  text editor,  presentation editor,  picture  editor  and  some didactic  material  specific for biochemistry.  The interface was configured for people with no experience in the Linux environment.The  system  can  also work in an  intranet, where  a computer  would  be operated  by the  teacher and it would have some special control configurations  as: web site access control, power control of the others  machines  and  even an option  that would bring  the  desktop  of other  machine  to the  teacher´s what  allows him to make a straight orientation for a student from his screen.This new system,  which is a common platform  for other

  3. [V.N. Karazin Kharkov National University as the foundation of biochemistry in Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P A

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the data on foundation and development of physiological chemistry (biochemistry) as independent science and education subject in the V. N. Karazin Kharkov National University before and after the organization of the Department of Physiological Chemistry. Studying the chemistry of natural compounds, their qualitative and quantitative content and transformations in living organisms both by foreign and home researchers made the basis for the appearance of physiological chemistry as static biochemistry. The improvement of the investigation methods and further discoveries caused the appearing of new branches--dynamic and functional biochemistry. The attention is paid to the fact that biochemistry arised at the Kharkov University as the education subject (A. I. Khodnev) and then developed as independent science due to efforts of A. Ya. Danilevskiy as well as biochemical school created by him. The Kazan' and Kharkov periods of scientific activity of A.Ya. Danilevskiy are described. The leading role of A. Ya. Danilevskiy in development of the home school of biochemistry is considered. Important role of A. V. Palladin in the foundation of Kharkov biochemists' school and organization of the Scientific-research Institute of Biochemistry in Kharkov is considered as well. It is stated that the Institute of Biochemistry after its arrival to Kiev and joining the Academy of Sciences became the center of Ukrainian biochemistry. The role of A. V. Nagorny and I. N. Bulankin in further development of biochemistry and foundation of a new scientific branch--age-related physiology and biochemistry--at the Kharkov University after its re-organization is discussed. PMID:18030743

  4. Students’ Blogs as a Tool for Learning Clinical Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cubas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available n the past decade, there has been an exponential growth of blogs on biomedical subjects with reliable contents. The potential use of this media as a learning tool has been recently tried in a medical residence at Harvard University, where students had to produce blogs as part of their duties. At Brasília University, a similar experience was tested with freshmen medical and nutrition students taking Basic Biochemistry (BB with the goal of producing blogs on clinical biochemistry (CB topics. In the last 4 teaching-semesters, students' acceptance (n=267 students regarding BB-blogs was evaluated through 6-point Likert questionnaires. 84% of them agreed that the preparation of their blogs was enjoyable and positive for their academic formation (they marked 4 to 6 in the questionnaire. 57% of students (those marking 5-6 believed that the elaboration of blogs boosted their interest for BB/CB. For 56% of students (those marking 5-6, the blogs motivated them to look for extra-class articles on CB. Only 13% of students (those marking 1-3 did not agree that these blogs are relevant learning tools. 38 out of 58 students’ BB-blogs scored 9.0 or above, only 3 scored below 7.9 (out of 10. These results suggest that student blogs have potential to be effective in stimulating CB learning.

  5. 42 CFR 493.1405 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; and (b) The laboratory director must— (1) (i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be... certification; or (2)(i) Be a doctor of medicine, doctor of osteopathy, or doctor of podiatric medicine...

  6. Paternity analysis based on NGM SElect system in the Medical and Forensic Genetics Laboratory, Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Lodz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Markiewicz-Knyziak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of the NGM SElect multiplex kit for paternity testing in the population of central Poland, and compare it with the IDENTIFILER system. The study material consisted of buccal swabs taken from individuals who reported to the Medical and Forensic Genetics Laboratory in Lodz. Samples from 450 trio cases of disputed paternity carried out in 2010–2014 were investigated. Genomic DNA was extracted from buccal swabs collected from 1,350 individuals using the Swab kit (A&A Biotechnology according to the manufacturer’s protocol. DNA amplification was performed using the AmpFℓSTR ® NGM Select TM PCR Amplification Kit (Life Technologies. PCR products were separated by capillary electrophoresis using HID 3500 Genetic Analyzer. In the analyzed cases with paternity confirmation in the NGM SElect system, the maximum value of PI was 3.9 × 10 12 , which corresponds to the probability of paternity W = 99.9999999999%. It was thus significantly higher than analogical parameters obtained in the IDENTIFILER system (PI = 6.0 × 10 10 , W = 99.99999999%. The NGM SElect kit was unable to resolve just one case out of 450, which represents only 0.2% of all analyzed disputed paternity cases. The study showed the SE33 (ACTBP2 locus to have the highest evidence value in paternity analysis out of all investigated autosomal STRs.

  7. Chance and Necessity in Biochemistry: Implications for the Search for Extraterrestrial Biomarkers in Earth-like Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Davila, Alfonso F.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we examine a restricted subset of the question of possible alien biochemistries. That is, we look into how different life might be if it emerged in environments similar to that required for life on Earth. We advocate a principle of chance and necessity in biochemistry. According to this principle, biochemistry is in some fundamental way the sum of two processes: there is an aspect of biochemistry that is an endowment from prebiotic processes, which represents the necessity, plu...

  8. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task of the Expert Committee was to review the technical development and efficacy of nuclear medicine methods and to recommend the best possible means of establishing nuclear medicine services at various levels of medical care in different countries. After reviewing the contributions which nuclear medicine can make, the various types of medical institutions and hospitals in existence, the requirements, organization and funding of nuclear medicine services, and the cost/effectiveness of nuclear medicine, a number of recommendations were made. IAEA and WHO should make information on existing methods of cost/effectiveness analysis widely available; invite governments to include a description of such analysis methods in training programmes of their health officers; assist in the acquisition of the necessary data; and encourage and eventually support actual applications of such analyses to carefully selected nuclear medicine procedures in varying medicosocial environments. They were further recommended to study possible ways of improving reliability and ease of servicing nuclear medicine equipment, and extent of possible local construction; the possibility of making available supplies of matched characterized reagents for radioimmunoassay and related techniques; and to study the advantages of establishing a network of collaborating centres on an international basis

  9. Seed Storage Proteins as a System for Teaching Protein Identification by Mass Spectrometry in Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karl A.; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important tool in studying biological systems. One application is the identification of proteins and peptides by the matching of peptide and peptide fragment masses to the sequences of proteins in protein sequence databases. Often prior protein separation of complex protein mixtures by 2D-PAGE is needed,…

  10. Integrating Responsible Conduct of Research Education into Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Tamara L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a requirement for directed responsible conduct in research (RCR) education has become a priority in the United States and elsewhere. In the US, both the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation require RCR education for all students who are financially supported by federal awards. The guidelines produced by these…

  11. Folk Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CLPPP CAP Healthy Homes Assessment Tools Lead Health Literacy Initiative Refugee Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and ... As blood lead levels increase, so does lead’s effects on health. How to tell if herbal medicines ...

  12. Medicinal Moves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine is becoming a new source of growth in China-Africa trade LIU Tao never expected that his traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) products would be so warmly welcomed at the annual Canton Fair last year.His surprise came after a large number of African businessmen expressed a keen interest in importing the products.That knowledge left a broad smile on his face.

  13. Immunocytochemistry of matrix proteins in calcified tissues: functional biochemistry on section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nanci

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The organic matrix of calcified tissues comprises collagenous and/or noncollagenous matrix proteins (NCPs. Identification and precise mapping of these matrix components is essential for determining their function, formulating coherent hypotheses on their mechanism(s of action, and developing novel therapeutic approaches based on biologics. Fibrillar collagen can be readily identified by its conspicuous structure, however, NCPs, in general, do not individually exhibit characteristic structural features that permit to identify them and morphologically determine their localization. To address this limitation, we have used immunocytochemistry, a form of “biochemistry on section”, to correlate composition with structure. For cytochemical characterizations, including immunolabeling, our laboratory has opted for colloidal gold labelings and pioneered their application to calcified tissues because they yield high spatial resolution and are quantitative. Over the years, this approach has been applied to identify and map various NCPs in bone and teeth and, in this review of our work, we will emphasize some selected studies that highlight it application to also achieve functional information.

  14. Genomics and proteomics in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained from basic science deliver more information about many new molecular structures, which may serve as potential new diagnostic or even therapeutic targets. The selection and evaluation of these targets needs information concerning physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology. These data can be obtained at least in part by nuclear medicine technology. Nuclear medicine procedures can be applied for the assessment of the function and regulation of genes. This can be achieved by use of radiolabeled antisense molecules or reporter gene technology. New therapeutic approaches necessitate biodistribution studies at preclinical stages and methods delivering data about their effectiveness. Finally, procedures from biotechnology such as phagen display may be used for the development of new biomolecules for the isotope-based diagnostics and treatment. (orig.)

  15. The use of software in Biochemistry teaching classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Büttenbender

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The rising of new technologies meant  to improve education could be considered a high advance to pedagogic methodologies. Software is defined as computer programs and may be considered educative when they present a methodology which assists and contextualizes the teaching-learning process. Specifically regarding Biochemistry, a knowledge area which explains physiological and pathological phenomena that occur in human beings, applying the use of software would turn out an easy way to observe suchphenomena. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In order to carry out this work, two free software designed to be used in Biochemistry area and developed at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (“Síntese Proteica” (Protein Synthesisand “A cinética da reação enzimática” (Kinetics of enzymatic reaction, were compared. Interface, how to work contents, advantages and disadvantages in the use of such kind of technology inside classroom were some of the evaluated parameters. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Both programs present a fine graphic design, allowing easy command comprehension. At the beginning the objectives of the programs and the contents they hold are presented, showing also a brief introduction to the topic. The programs also  present instruction manuals that explain how the experiments work. They are small basic and simple programs that run easily where they are placed, not needing internet access after their download. “Kinetics of enzymatic reaction” presented more interactive options than the other, and its operation could be considered more intuitive. CONCLUSION: We considered “Kinetics of enzymatic reaction” a better software,cause it allows the student to observe the experiment and perform the calculationsproposed, improving the learning process in a significantly way. The use ofnew technologies inside classrooms should be encouraged as a way to attractthe attention and interest of students, since they are

  16. Oxidative Damage and Suppression: an Experimental Approach to Teaching Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa G. J. de Avellar

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Biochemistry is a challenging and worthy didactical  task:  a vast field with many different techniques.   Radical mediated biooxidative processes, implied in aging and accompanying various pathologies,  have an enormous  appeal  to public in general and particularly to students in the science field.   The  Fenton  reaction,   first  reported by  the 22-year  old Cambridge  chemistry  undergraduate Henry J. H. Fenton  (Chemical  news vol. 33 page 190, 1876, is a useful in vitro system for generating hydroxyl radicals generally implied in biooxidation.  When coupled with the 2-deoxyribose (DR- thiobarbituric acid (TBA  method,  provides  a most  resourceful  tool for studying  oxidative  processes that may  provide  insights  to  in  vivo  processes.    In  this  communication  a  classical  experiment of quantification of thiobarbituric reactive  substances  (TBARS resulting  from breakage  of DR (5 mM in aqueous buffered media (5mM, pH 7.2 by 0,100 mM H2O2 and ferrous ion (up to 0,150 mM is the base for the demonstration of oxidative damage suppressive ability of known hydroxyl radical quenchers as ethanol,  dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO  and  thiourea (1mM  each.   The  results  of the  experiments, developed  to  be worked  in experimental classes for senior  undergraduate biochemistry students of biomedical  sciences, show a very mild but  consistent  suppressive  capacity  for ethanol  (reduction in2 percent  of TBARS  measured  at  0,150 mM ferrous ion concentration.  Thiourea  and  DMSO show very similar  suppressive  abilities:  reduction  in 19 and  18 percent  in measured  TBARS,  respectively (at  0,150 mM ferrous ion.

  17. CONSTRUCTIVISM APPLIED TO THE DISCIPLINE: A¨ DVANCED EDUCATION ON BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Maia

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Constructivism employs  models  that include  epistemological knowledge  and  strategies to  stimulate and motivate students so that they need to construct their own understanding of any subjetc  concept. Under  this  process,  the  primary  role of teaching  is not  to lecture,  explain,  or otherwise  attempt to´transferk´nowledge, but to create.  This principle was used in the Biochemistry Master Science Program of the  Universidade  Federal  de Pernambuco.  The  model applied  was divided  into  four phases:  (1 acquaintance of the student previous knowledge (using a pre-test; (2 presentation of the knowledge using a Science Teaching  CD-Rom;  (3 submission  of the  learned  content by the  student to teacher critical  analyis  and  (4  application of Interactionism (teacher/student/contents.   Each  phase  was individually  evaluated.  In the  first phase,  the  average  of correct  answers  of the  group  (13 students was 64%, whereas  the  second and  third  phases  presented  61% and  53%, respectively.   These  results reveal  a great  congnitive  unbalance  into  the  group.   They  also showed that the  previous  ideas and hypothesis  of the  students were in conflict  with  the  scientific  concepts.   After  teacher intervention (phase  four  the  group  presented  an increase  in the knowledge (86% of correct  answers.   Based  on these  results  one can conclude  that this  four-phase  model applied  and  based  on Constructivism  for acquiring  knowledge can be useful in Biochemistry  teaching.

  18. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  2. Animal Welfares of Laboratory Non-Human Primates%非人灵长类动物实验中的动物福利

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈乾生

    2003-01-01

    While comparing non-human primates with human beings, it is not hard to conclude certain similarities between these two based on aspects such as morphological anatomy, biochemistry functioning and so on. As a result, nonhuman primates often play an important role in life scientific researches. These primates are always used as "Stand-Ins"for human beings. In the processes of toxicological testing of new drugs, some drugs, especially drugs of genic projects or biological medicines are requiring uses of primates as part of the new drug testing. Therefore, the morality and ethics of using non-human primates have to be emphasised by people. After all, this is one of the issues that concerns with the expectations of meeting the international scientific research standards by our national laboratory animal sciences.In fact, the moral and ethical problems of non-human primates experiments is related to the matters of animal welfares.

  3. Mesopotamian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2007-01-01

    Although the Mesopotamian civilisation is as old as that of Egypt and might even have predated it, we know much less about Mesopotamian medicine, mainly because the cuneiform source material is less well researched. Medical healers existed from the middle of the 3rd millennium. In line with the strong theocratic state culture, healers were closely integrated with the powerful priestly fraternity, and were essentially of three main kinds: barû (seers) who were experts in divination, âshipu (exorcists), and asû (healing priests) who tended directly to the sick. All illness was accepted as sent by gods, demons and other evil spirits, either as retribution for sins or as malevolent visitations. Treatment revolved around identification of the offending supernatural power, appeasement of the angry gods, for example by offering amulets or incantations, exorcism of evil spirits, as well as a measure of empirical therapy aimed against certain recognised symptom complexes. Medical practice was rigidly codified, starting with Hammurabi's Code in the 18th century BC and persisting to the late 1st millennium BC. Works like the so-called Diagnostic Handbook, the Assyrian Herbal and Prescription Texts describe the rationale of Mesopotamian medicine, based predominantly on supernatural concepts, although rudimentary traces of empirical medicine are discernible. There is evidence that Egyptian medicine might have been influenced by Mesopotamian practices, but Greek rational medicine as it evolved in the 5th/4th centuries BC almost certainly had no significant Mesopotamian roots. PMID:17378276

  4. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  5. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  6. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  7. Visual Literacy and Biochemistry Learning: The role of external representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J.S.V. Santos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Visual Literacy can bedefined as people’s ability to understand, use, think, learn and express themselves through external representations (ER in a given subject. This research aims to investigate the development of abilities of ERs reading and interpretation by students from a Biochemistry graduate course of theFederal University of São João Del-Rei. In this way, Visual Literacy level was  assessed using a questionnaire validatedin a previous educational research. This diagnosis questionnaire was elaborated according to six visual abilitiesidentified as essential for the study of the metabolic pathways. The initial statistical analysis of data collectedin this study was carried out using ANOVA method. Results obtained showed that the questionnaire used is adequate for the research and indicated that the level of Visual Literacy related to the metabolic processes increased significantly with the progress of the students in the graduation course. There was also an indication of a possible interference in the student’s performancedetermined by the cutoff punctuation in the university selection process.

  8. Contributions of nuclear magnetic resonance to renal biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    31P NMR as a descriptive technique is of interest to nephrologists. Particular contributions of 31P NMR to our understanding of renal function may be enumerated.: Free metabolite levels are different from those classically accepted; in particular, ADP and Pi are low with implications for the control of renal metabolism and Pi transport, and, via the phosphorylation potential, for Na+ transport. Renal pH is heterogeneous; between cortex, outer medulla, and papilla, and between cell and lumen, a large pH gradient exists. Also, quantitation between cytosol and mitochondrion of the pH gradient is now feasible. In acute renal failure of either ischemic or nonischemic origin, both ATP depletion and acidification of the renal cell result in damage, with increasing evidence for the importance of the latter. Measurements of renal metabolic rate in vivo suggest the existence of a prodromal phase of acute renal failure, which could lead to its detection at an earlier and possibly reversible stage. Human renal cancers show a unique 31P NMR spectrum and a very acidic environment. Cancer chemotherapy may alter this and detection of such changes with NMR offers a method of therapeutic monitoring with significance beyond nephrology. Renal cortex and medulla have a different T1 relaxation time, possibly due to differences in lipid composition. It seems that NMR spectroscopy has much to offer to the future understanding of the relationship between renal biochemistry and function. 56 references

  9. Effects of spaceflight on rat humerus geometry, biomechanics, and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailas, A. C.; Zernicke, R. F.; Grindeland, R. E.; Kaplansky, A.; Durnova, G. N.; Li, K. C.; Martinez, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 12.5-day spaceflight (Cosmos 1887 biosatellite) on the geometric, biomechanical, and biochemical characteristics of humeri of male specific pathogen-free rats were examined. Humeri of age-matched basal control, synchronous control, and vivarium control rats were contrasted with the flight bones to examine the influence of growth and space environment on bone development. Lack of humerus longitudinal growth occurred during the 12.5 days in spaceflight. In addition, the normal mid-diaphysial periosteal appositional growth was affected; compared with their controls, the spaceflight humeri had less cortical cross-sectional area, smaller periosteal circumferences, smaller anterior-posterior periosteal diameters, and smaller second moments of area with respect to the bending and nonbending axes. The flexural rigidity of the flight humeri was comparable to that of the younger basal control rats and significantly less than that of the synchronous and vivarium controls; the elastic moduli of all four groups, nonetheless, were not significantly different. Generally, the matrix biochemistry of the mid-diaphysial cross sections showed no differences among groups. Thus, the spaceflight differences in humeral mechanical strength and flexural rigidity were probably a result of the differences in humeral geometry rather than material properties.

  10. Tryptophan Biochemistry: Structural, Nutritional, Metabolic, and Medical Aspects in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giannaccini, Gino

    2016-01-01

    L-Tryptophan is the unique protein amino acid (AA) bearing an indole ring: its biotransformation in living organisms contributes either to keeping this chemical group in cells and tissues or to breaking it, by generating in both cases a variety of bioactive molecules. Investigations on the biology of Trp highlight the pleiotropic effects of its small derivatives on homeostasis processes. In addition to protein turn-over, in humans the pathways of Trp indole derivatives cover the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/hormone serotonin (5-HT), the pineal gland melatonin (MLT), and the trace amine tryptamine. The breakdown of the Trp indole ring defines instead the "kynurenine shunt" which produces cell-response adapters as L-kynurenine, kynurenic and quinolinic acids, or the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). This review aims therefore at tracing a "map" of the main molecular effectors in human tryptophan (Trp) research, starting from the chemistry of this AA, dealing then with its biosphere distribution and nutritional value for humans, also focusing on some proteins responsible for its tissue-dependent uptake and biotransformation. We will thus underscore the role of Trp biochemistry in the pathogenesis of human complex diseases/syndromes primarily involving the gut, neuroimmunoendocrine/stress responses, and the CNS, supporting the use of -Omics approaches in this field. PMID:26881063

  11. The physical basis of biochemistry the foundations of molecular biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bergethon, Peter R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this book is to provide a unifying approach to the study of biophysical chemistry for the advanced undergraduate who has had a year of physics, organic chem­ istry, calculus, and biology. This book began as a revised edition of Biophysical Chemistry: Molecules to Membranes, which Elizabeth Simons and I coauthored. That short volume was written in an attempt to provide a concise text for a one-semester course in biophysical chemistry at the graduate level. The experience of teaching biophysical chemistry to bi­ ologically oriented students over the last decade has made it clear that the subject requires a more fundamental text that unifies the many threads of modem science: physics, chem­ istry, biology, mathematics, and statistics. This book represents that effort. This volume is not a treatment of modem biophysical chemistry with its rich history and many contro­ versies, although a book on that topic is also needed. The Physical Basis of Biochemistry is an introduction to the philosophy...

  12. Biochemistry - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us Open...e Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Biochemistry - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive ...

  13. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995

  14. Learning Biochemistry through Manga--Helping Students Learn and Remember, and Making Lectures More Exciting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    1999-01-01

    Uses panels taken from manga, Japanese comics and cartoons, to supplement explanations of biochemical terms and topics in biochemistry classes. Results indicate that the use of manga helped students remember what they had learned. (Author/CCM)

  15. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995.

  16. Skylab mobile laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  17. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  18. The pharmaceutical biochemistry group: where pharmaceutical chemistry meets biology and drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Kalia, Yogeshvar; Perozzo, Remo; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Successful drug discovery and development of new therapeutics is a long, expensive multidisciplinary process needing innovation and the integration of smart cutting edge science and technology to overcome the challenges in taking a drug from the bench to the bedside. The research activities of the Pharmaceutical Biochemistry group span the drug discovery and development process, providing an interface that brings together pharmaceutical chemistry, biochemistry, structural biology, computation...

  19. Minimal Impact of Organic Chemistry Prerequisite on Student Performance in Introductory Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Robin; Cotner, Sehoya; Winkel, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Curriculum design assumes that successful completion of prerequisite courses will have a positive impact on student performance in courses that require the prerequisite. We recently had the opportunity to test this assumption concerning the relationship between completion of the organic chemistry prerequisite and performance in introductory biochemistry. We found no statistically significant differences between average biochemistry grades or grade distribution among students with or without t...

  20. Tibetan traditional medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Tibetan medicine companies in T.A.R can manufacture more than 360 Tibetan patent medicines. There are 18 Tibetan medicine factories in Tibet, and total out value exceeds 3 billion yuan. 24 kinds of Tibetan patent medicines have been incorporated into State Fundamental Medicine List, in which 14 Tibetan patent medicines are listed in national protected traditional medicine category.

  1. Technology impact: Potential direction for laboratory medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Tissue Particulate Burden; New Techniques for the Elemental Analysis of the Myocardium: Application to the Study of Ischemia; Current Concepts of X-ray Microanalysis of Frozen Hydrated Tissue; Electron Probe Analysis of Biological Fluids: Possibilities and Limitations; and The Computer in Microbiology: Future Applications in Test Performance and Reporting

  2. PROTEOMICS: AN EVOLVING TECHNOLOGY IN LABORATORY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D J Venter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid developments in both genomics and proteomics will allow scientists to define the molecular pathways in normal and diseased cells. With these models, researchers will have the ability to predict previously unknown interactions and verify such predictions experimentally. Novel proteins, cellular functions, and pathways will also be unravelled. It is hoped that understanding the connections between cellular pathways and the ability to identify their associated biomarkers will greatly reduce the suffering and loss of life due to diseases.

  3. Managing Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other strategies that don’t use medicine have • Call the ADEAR Center toll-free: 1-800-438-4380 been tried. ... dose, patient’s name, dosage frequency, and expiration date. • ... Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center is a service of the National Institute on ...

  4. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  5. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  6. Nuclear Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Belzberg, Allan S.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear medicine utilizes radioisotopes to diagnose and in some cases treat disease. Modern instruments can image their accumulation in an organ and provide quantitative data when indicated. The strength of these procedures is in the unique physiologic information they provide, rather than the presentation of precise anatomic detail.

  7. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains two articles dealing with the radioisotope scintigraphy of myocardium and gullet and forty-one abstracts of papers presented at the seminar ''Twenty-nine Days of Nuclear Medicine'' held in Olomovc, September 29 - October 1, 1992. The contributions, all within the INIS subject scope, are input to INIS. (Z.S.)

  8. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...

  9. Training in radioprotection at undergraduate and postgraduate level at the school of pharmacy and biochemistry, Buenos Aires University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of knowledge in physics studies, medicine, pharmacology, cell biology and other disciplines that take place during the last 60 years is principally due to radioisotopes techniques. For this reason, the importance to teach radioisotopes methodologies at undergraduate and postgraduate levels kept growing. At the same time it was necessary to harmonize the use of these methodologies with environmental preservation. The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires offers four different Courses on Methodology of Radioisotopes in which the Radiological Protection is focalized under different aspects: 1) A Course for students in the Biochemistry Cycle; 2) A Course for post-Graduate in Medicine, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists or other disciplines related to the health. 3) Another one for professionals wishing to up-date their knowledge; and finally, 4) one for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine and/or Biomedicine. The aims for teaching Radiological Protection are different for the four levels; in 1), the subject was done from 1960, (optional or mandatory) and with a arrived number of students. In some aspects the teaching of radioprotection is formative and in others informative, because the approval of the a signature does not habitable to ask from the Nuclear Regulatory Authority the authorization to work with radioactive material; in 2), the Course begun in 1962 and 1520 professionals have approved it. In this case the training in radioprotection aspects is theoretical and practical and very intensive, encompassing: dosimetric magnitudes and units, internal and external dosimetry of 125I, 131I, 201Tl, 99MTc, 60Co and other isotopes, qualification of area, working conditions, contamination barriers, shielding; justification, optimization and dose limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects; national and international legislation. The intensity of the training is in accord with that required by each professional and their speciality

  10. The External Representations in the Teaching and Learning of Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J.S.V. Santos

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual Literacy can be defined as the ability to understand, use, think, learn and express themselves  through  images.  Considering  that  the  use  of  images  is  essential  for Biochemistry teaching and learning, this research aims to investigate the development of abilities  of  reading  and  interpretation  of  images  by  students  from  a  Biochemistry undergraduate course of the Federal University of São João Del-Rei. The Visual Literacy level was assessed using a questionnaire validated in a previous educational research. This diagnosis questionnaire was elaborated according to six visual abilities identified as essential for the study of the metabolic pathways. Results showed that the most of the students  evaluated  presented  difficulties  in  the  Ability  1  (identification  of  chemical reactions. These students were unable to identify the reversibility of chemical reaction. Similarly,  for  the  ability  5  (comprehension  of  dynamic  and  integrated  processes  in metabolic  pathways  was  observed  a  deficiency  in  understanding  of  schematic representations of metabolic cycles (less than 30% of correct answers. However, it was verified  that  to  the  ability  2  (identification  of  substrates  and  products  of  chemical reactions  the  students  demonstrated  satisfactory  performance  (over  50%  of  correct answers.  In  the  other  abilities  evaluated  the  number  of  correct  answers  varied according  to  the  progress  of  students  in  the  course  (30  to  80%  of  correct  answers. These  results  showed  that  the  questionnaire  used  is  an  interesting  tool  for  the investigation, indicating that Visual Literacy level necessary to understand the metabolic processes can be enhanced with the progress of the students along the undergraduate course.

  11. Construction of Hypertexts in a Biochemistry Pos- Graduation Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Maia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality is an innovating manner of comprehending and acting on how the world is and, also, considered a new way of intellectual exercise.  This work took place in a  biochemistry masters discipline (Advanced Formation in ScientificEducation and had as its observation context the forum (on-line tool viability, intending the construction of hypertexts (active  collaborative writing by the 15 registered students in the  discipline in 2008. The discipline was available on the web, in  bioq.educacao.biz , where the students, teachers and monitors couldsubscribe. The virtual space was set with several environments (agenda,classroom, dictionary, email and forum; all of which were used during thediscipline. The forum, called orkuteducation, was destined to the hypertextelaboration, which was focused in three themes: 1º How to work with technology at school;   2º Teaching/learning methods and new information and communication technology; 3º Constructivism. The virtual learning environment had 2,275accesses to its content; being the forum the most visited one, with 1,026.   The built hypertext presented clear ideas about the approached themes, and realized the important role which a qualified teacher plays in the educational process. The new ways of create, organize and interact with information changes the relationship between the subject and the information itself. The hype rtext constitutes "high level computer tools", through which is possible to explore knowledge in a non -linear and interactive way. Hypertext remains a revolutionary concept oforganization and access to information and its generalization impact in society  is not known yet.

  12. THE POTENTIAL OF BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION APPS IN THE FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Oliveira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: Apps can be designed to provide usage data, and most of them do. These data are usually used to map users interests and to deliver more effective ads that are more likely to result in clicks, and sales. We have applied some of these metrics to understand how can it be used to map students’ behavior and to promote a formative assessment using educational software. The purpose of a formative assessment is to monitor student learning to provide ongoing feedback that can be used by instructors and students to improve the teaching and learning process. Thus, this modality aims to help both students and instructors to identify strengths and weaknesses that need to be developed. This study aimed to describe the potential of educational apps in the formative assessment process. Material and Methods: We have implemented assessment tools embedded in three apps (ARMET, The Cell and 3D Class used to teach: 1 Metabolic Pathways; 2 Scale of the cellular structures, and 3 Concepts from techniques used in a Biochemistry Lab course. The implemented tools allow to verify on what issues there were recurring mistakes, the total number of mistakes presented, which questions they most achieved, how long they took to perform the activity and other relevant information. Results and conclusion: Educational apps can provide transparent and coherent evaluation metrics to enable instructors to systematize more consistent criteria and indicators, reducing the subjectivity of the formative assessment process and the time spent for preparation, tabulation and analysis of assessment data. This approach allows instructors to understand better where students struggle, giving to them a more effective feedback. It also helps instructor to plan interventions to help students to perform better and to achieve the learning objectives.

  13. A Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment and Evaluation System for Biotechnology Specialty Students: An Effective Evaluation System to Improve the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suxia; Wu, Haizhen; Zhao, Jian; Ou, Ling; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to achieve high success in knowledge and technique acquisition as a whole, a biochemistry and molecular biology experiment was established for high-grade biotechnology specialty students after they had studied essential theory and received proper technique training. The experiment was based on cloning and expression of alkaline…

  14. Teaching Biochemistry at Lisbon University--Facing the Challenge of the Bologna Declaration in the 25th Anniversary of the Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Freire, Ana Ponces

    2007-01-01

    The biochemistry degree has been taught at Lisbon University for 25 years. Since its creation, the curriculum is characterized for being widely eclectic and multidisciplinary. The adoption of the concepts proposed in Europe by the Declaration of Bologna and incorporation of these ideas at Lisbon University is discussed here for the biochemistry…

  15. Brewing Beer in the Laboratory: Grain Amylases and Yeast's Sweet Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Blake; Deutschman, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Brewing beer provides a straightforward and robust laboratory counterpart to classroom discussions of fermentation, a staple of the biochemistry curriculum. An exercise is described that provides several connections between lecture and laboratory content. Students first extract fermentable carbohydrates from whole grains, then ferment these with…

  16. A Streamlined Western Blot Exercise: An Efficient and Greener Approach in the Laboratory Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Traci L.; Robinson, Rebekah L.; Mojadedi, Wais; Peavy, Lydia; Weiland, Mitch H.

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes…

  17. Developing Technical Writing Skills in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: A Progressive Approach Employing Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragson, Derek E.; Hagen, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Writing formal "journal-style" lab reports is often one of the requirements chemistry and biochemistry students encounter in the physical chemistry laboratory. Helping students improve their technical writing skills is the primary reason this type of writing is a requirement in the physical chemistry laboratory. Developing these skills is an…

  18. Nuclear medicine in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the following main headings: crystal scintillation counting; liquid scintillation counting; activation analysis; the in vitro nuclear medicine laboratory; blood volume in clinical practice B12 and folate deficiency; radionuclide studies associated with abnormalities of iron; basic principles of competitive radioassay; plasma cortisol; radioimmunoassays for T3 and T4; radioimmunoassay of estrogens; determination of androgens in biological fluids; radioimmunoassay of digitalis glycosides; growth hormone; thyrotropin; gonadotropins; radioimmunoassay of gastrin; glucagon; radioisotopic measurements of insulin; radioimmunoassay of the calcium-regulating hormones; the renin-angiotensin system and aldosterone; tumor antigens; fat absorption; protein-losing enteropathy; Australia antigen; bacteriologic cultures and sensitivities; and future pathways

  19. Network medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2008-01-01

    To more effectively target complex diseases like cancer, diabetes and schizophrenia, we may need to rethink our strategies for drug development and the selection of molecular targets for pharmacological treatments. Here, we discuss the potential use of protein signaling networks as the targets...... for new therapeutic intervention. We argue that by targeting the architecture of aberrant signaling networks associated with cancer and other diseases new therapeutic strategies can be implemented. Transforming medicine into a network driven endeavour will require quantitative measurements of cell...... signaling processes; we will describe how this may be performed and combined with new algorithms to predict the trajectories taken by a cellular system either in time or through disease states. We term this approach, network medicine....

  20. Impact of e-resources on learning in biochemistry: first-year medical students’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Joe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background E-learning resources (e-resources have been widely used to facilitate self-directed learning among medical students. The Department of Biochemistry at Christian Medical College (CMC, Vellore, India, has made available e-resources to first-year medical students to supplement conventional lecture-based teaching in the subject. This study was designed to assess students’ perceptions of the impact of these e-resources on various aspects of their learning in biochemistry. Methods Sixty first-year medical students were the subjects of this study. At the end of the one-year course in biochemistry, the students were administered a questionnaire that asked them to assess the impact of the e-resources on various aspects of their learning in biochemistry. Results Ninety-eight percent of students had used the e-resources provided to varying extents. Most of them found the e-resources provided useful and of a high quality. The majority of them used these resources to prepare for periodic formative and final summative assessments in the course. The use of these resources increased steadily as the academic year progressed. Students said that the extent to which they understood the subject (83% and their ability to answer questions in assessments (86% had improved as a result of using these resources. They also said that they found biochemistry interesting (73% and felt motivated to study the subject (59%. Conclusions We found that first-year medical students extensively used the e-resources in biochemistry that were provided. They perceived that these resources had made a positive impact on various aspects of their learning in biochemistry. We conclude that e-resources are a useful supplement to conventional lecture-based teaching in the medical curriculum.

  1. Safe Use of Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Use of Medicines Heath and Aging Safe Use of Medicines Introduction Read this booklet for practical ... Alice talk about medicine safety Related Publications Medicines: Use Them Safely Dietary Supplements Alzheimer's Disease Medications Fact ...

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  3. Medicine partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Partial medication compliance, where patients do not take enough of their prescribed medicine to achieve adequate outcomes, is common. Research using electronic monitoring to assess compliance has shown that people take approximately 75% of doses as prescribed, irrespective of the condition being treated or its severity. Erratic compliance often leads to discontinuation of therapy, as treatment is perceived to be ineffective. Compliance decreases as frequency of dosing increases. Inadequate c...

  4. Personcentreret medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Personcentreret medicin tager udgangspunkt i den person, lægen møder, hvad enten vedkommende er rask eller syg, og bygger på værdier som fortrolighed, kontinuitet, nærvær, tillid og tilgængelighed. Det er patientens dagsorden, der gælder, og lægen kan i fællesskab med patienten (baseret på en...

  5. Haptic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Cindy; Mason, Earl

    2009-01-01

    The paper introduces haptic medicine--healthcare based on loving touch for healing and preventing disease. We describe the effects of loving touch (a square inch of our skin has over 1000 nerves) on the body, brain and mind. We describe two web-based health education and media projects. The first, HYPERLINK "http://www.21stcenturymed.org" www.21stcenturymed.org is a place for health practitioners to start learning about touch and resources. The second project, Humans Without Borders, is a multi-lingual self help education website for everyday people. Teaching materials for these projects are based on our previous work with a form of haptic medicine known as psychophysiophilosophy with patients at Stanford Hospital, Kaiser Permanente and Lucille Packard Children's Hospital. We describe psychophysiophilosophy, relate motherly love to recent discoveries in neurosciences and give hints on ways to increase motherly love in each of us. We present a plan for moving into the future by re-introducing haptic medicine into our daily lives through self-help and as an adjunct for current physician practice. There is an exercise in self-help for the reader and an appendix of recent clinical research with profound benefits on the use of human touch for over 40 conditions. PMID:19745495

  6. Evaluation von multimedialen e-Lernkursen zur Vorbereitung auf ein biochemisches Praktikum [Evaluation of multimedia e-Learning preparatory courses for a practial course in Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rost, Birgit

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] The present study examined whether the application of multimedia learning courses is also suitable for preparing students for practical laboratory courses, both in terms of theory and practice. For this purpose, multimedia e-learning courses were provided and evaluated within the k-MED project. These courses were particularly tailored to the practical training in biochemistry, a mandatory course for third-semester students of medicine and dentistry in Marburg. Two weeks prior to the beginning of the practical course, one-half of the participants received the theoretical e-courses “lipid basics” and “lipid metabolism”, the other half was provided with the e-course “lipid methods”, which contained relevant laboratory techniques and digital guidance to the experiments. All participants were surveyed on user-friendliness and acceptance, and “hard” facts were collected with respect to success in learning for and attendance to the practical course. Assessment grades, test results, user-tracking data for the learning platform, and questionnaires were evaluated. Use of the e-courses led to a significant improvement in the level of achievement in terms of the assessment grades. Certain influencing factors, such as diligence or prior biochemical knowledge, were excluded by covariance analysis. The e-course led to improved levels of achievement in the practical training: groups to whom the methods course was provided made fewer experimental errors and needed less assistance from supervisors. Conclusion: e-learning courses cannot replace practical experience in laboratory courses; they can, however, as this extensive study shows, improve the level of achievement in classes by allowing more efficient preparation. Not only does this save time, but it also saves on expensive materials, relieves the burden on staff, and leads to a general improvement in teaching quality. [german] In der vorliegende Studie wurde untersucht, ob der

  7. SEMINARS ON BIOCHEMISTRY: IS AN EFFECTIVE METHODOLOGY IN THE PROCESS LEARNING/TEACHING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Vasconcelos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction in Biochemistry is a discipline held by the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at UFC. It is offered to the students of the Sciences Centers. The majority of the classes employs as pedagogical tools,theoretical lectures and problem solving activities. To avoid that the learning process is restricted to memorizing, it was elaborated a learning project aiming a better comprehension of the explored content. The methodology included seminars given by the students on subjects analyzed on previous classes.These students were divided in two groups of ten members and each group was assigned to topics of carbohydrates metabolism with the approach on applied Biochemistry. After presentations, a survey was applied revealing that students approved this methodology. The reason given was a better perception of fundamental Biochemistry and its application to their professional field. The evaluation of this methodology was also done based on the grades and it was as follows: in the first evaluation before the seminars, the average score was 4.7 and after, in the second evaluation involving the seminars, the average increased to 7.18. The third and last evaluation without seminars, it was observed a reduction of the average score to 5.63. These results suggest that seminars on Biochemistry were an effective pedagogical methodology in the process of learning/teaching.

  8. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Except for dedicated devices for mobile nuclear cardiology for instance, the market is set on variable angulation dual heads cameras. These cameras are suited for all general applications and their cost effectiveness is optimized. Now, all major companies have such a camera in their of products. But, the big question in nuclear medicine is about the future of coincidence imaging for the monitoring of treatments in oncology. Many companies are focused on WIP assessments to find out the right crustal thickness to perform both high energy FDG procedures and low energy Tc procedures, with the same SPECT camera. The classic thickness is 3/8''. Assessments are made with 1/2'', 5/8'' or 3/4'' crystals. If FDG procedures proved to be of great interest in oncology, it may lead to the design of a dedicated SPECT camera with a 1'' crustal. Due to the short half of FDG, it may be the dawning of slip ring technology. (e.g. Varicam from Elscint). The three small heads camera market seems to be depressed. Will the new three large heads camera unveiled by Picker, reverse that trend? The last important topic in nuclear medicine is the emergence of new flat digital detectors to get rid of the old bulky ones. Digirad is the first company to manufacture a commercial product based on that technology. Bichron, Siemens and General Electric are working on that development, too. But that technology is very expensive and the market for digital detection in nuclear medicine is not as large as the market in digital detection in radiology. (author)

  9. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  10. Pharmacology and biochemistry ofPolygonatum verticillatum:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saboon; Yamin Bibi; Muhammad Arshad; Sidra Sabir; Muhammad Shoaib Amjad; Ejaz Ahmed; Sunbal Khalil Chaudhari

    2016-01-01

    Polygonatum verticillatum (Linn.) All. syn.Convallaria verticillata Linn. is a valuable medicinal plant, distributed in the temperate Himalaya at the elevations 2 400 to 2 800 m. It is a perennial rhizomatous herb and contains various pharmacologically important secondary metabolites among which the most important areα-bulnesene, linalyl acetate, eicosadienoic, pentacosane, piperitone, docasane, diosgenin, santonin and calarene. It also possesses antimalarial, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, lipoxygenase, urease inhibition, diuretic, tracheorelaxant, antidiarrheal, antispasmodic, antinociceptive, antifungal, antibacterial and bronchodilator activities. The plant also got importance in traditional systems of medicine due to its broad therapeutic potential especially of its rhizome. But in the past few years, over exploitation of plant parts caused the decline in the frequency of this species due to which it became threatened, endangered and vulnerable in different parts of the world. So efforts are being made in certain regions of the world for bothex-situ and in-situ conservation. This paper briefly reviewed the botanical, traditional, phytochemical, pharmacological and conservation related aspects of this plant.

  11. Pharmacology and biochemistry of Polygonatum verticillatum: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saboon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polygonatum verticillatum (Linn. All. syn. Convallaria verticillata Linn. is a valuable medicinal plant, distributed in the temperate Himalaya at the elevations 2400 to 2800 m. It is a perennial rhizomatous herb and contains various pharmacologically important secondary metabolites among which the most important are α-bulnesene, linalyl acetate, eicosadienoic, pentacosane, piperitone, docasane, diosgenin, santonin and calarene. It also possesses antimalarial, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, lipoxygenase, urease inhibition, diuretic, tracheorelaxant, antidiarrheal, antispasmodic, antinociceptive, antifungal, antibacterial and bronchodilator activities. The plant also got importance in traditional systems of medicine due to its broad therapeutic potential especially of its rhizome. But in the past few years, over exploitation of plant parts caused the decline in the frequency of this species due to which it became threatened, endangered and vulnerable in different parts of the world. So efforts are being made in certain regions of the world for both ex-situ and in-situ conservation. This paper briefly reviewed the botanical, traditional, phytochemical, pharmacological and conservation related aspects of this plant.

  12. The biochemistry of blister fluid from pediatric burn injuries: proteomics and metabolomics aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Tuo; Broszczak, Daniel A; Broadbent, James A; Cuttle, Leila; Lu, Haitao; Parker, Tony J

    2016-01-01

    Burn injury is a prevalent and traumatic event for pediatric patients. At present, the diagnosis of burn injury severity is subjective and lacks a clinically relevant quantitative measure. This is due in part to a lack of knowledge surrounding the biochemistry of burn injuries and that of blister fluid. A more complete understanding of the blister fluid biochemistry may open new avenues for diagnostic and prognostic development. Burn insult induces a highly complex network of signaling processes and numerous changes within various biochemical systems, which can ultimately be examined using proteome and metabolome measurements. This review reports on the current understanding of burn wound biochemistry and outlines a technical approach for 'omics' profiling of blister fluid from burn wounds of differing severity. PMID:26581649

  13. Guidelines for Educational Research in Biochemistry on Internet Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has been used to support research in different areas, such as practical and educational  research  in  medical  and  biomedical  research.  There  are  several recommended  sites  for  carrying  biomedical  and  medical  research  (BERGER,  2003. Nevertheless,  few  studies  report  on  the  use  of  the  Internet  in  the  teaching  of Biochemistry. Considering the fact that there is no specific legislation for the use of the Internet  in  Brazil,  it  is  necessary  to  stimulate  self-regulation  of  the  sector  in  order  to establish  minimum  quality  standards,  safety,  and  reliability  of  sites  containing information  in  the  educational  area.  This  study  establishes  some  parameters  to  help guiding research for educational purposes on the internet. The following aspects should be  checked:  if  the  site  has  an  editorial  board  responsible  for  content  selection,  and whether  it  is  made  up  of  experts  in  the  area  of  expertise;  if  the  site  releases  updated scientific materials, and provides pedagogical content that fosters teaching and learning such  as  images  that  contribute  to  the  understanding  of  the  content,  educational software,  and  animation;  if  the  site  is  recommended  by  universities,  public  and  private qualified  institutions.  In  addition,  educational  sites  should  present  other  aspects, including transparency (regarding their educational purpose, quality (scientifically based information,  privacy  (related  to  the  user’s  personal  data,  responsibility  and  reliable sources.  Such  procedures  are  necessary  to  guarantee  that  searching  for  educational objectives will provide access to theoretical and pedagogical information quality.

  14. Plasma medicine: an introductory review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M. G.; Kroesen, G.; Morfill, G.; Nosenko, T.; Shimizu, T.; van Dijk, J.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    This introductory review on plasma health care is intended to provide the interested reader with a summary of the current status of this emerging field, its scope, and its broad interdisciplinary approach, ranging from plasma physics, chemistry and technology, to microbiology, biochemistry, biophysics, medicine and hygiene. Apart from the basic plasma processes and the restrictions and requirements set by international health standards, the review focuses on plasma interaction with prokaryotic cells (bacteria), eukaryotic cells (mammalian cells), cell membranes, DNA etc. In so doing, some of the unfamiliar terminology—an unavoidable by-product of interdisciplinary research—is covered and explained. Plasma health care may provide a fast and efficient new path for effective hospital (and other public buildings) hygiene—helping to prevent and contain diseases that are continuously gaining ground as resistance of pathogens to antibiotics grows. The delivery of medically active 'substances' at the molecular or ionic level is another exciting topic of research through effects on cell walls (permeabilization), cell excitation (paracrine action) and the introduction of reactive species into cell cytoplasm. Electric fields, charging of surfaces, current flows etc can also affect tissue in a controlled way. The field is young and hopes are high. It is fitting to cover the beginnings in New Journal of Physics, since it is the physics (and non-equilibrium chemistry) of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas that have made this development of plasma health care possible.

  15. Plasma medicine: an introductory review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This introductory review on plasma health care is intended to provide the interested reader with a summary of the current status of this emerging field, its scope, and its broad interdisciplinary approach, ranging from plasma physics, chemistry and technology, to microbiology, biochemistry, biophysics, medicine and hygiene. Apart from the basic plasma processes and the restrictions and requirements set by international health standards, the review focuses on plasma interaction with prokaryotic cells (bacteria), eukaryotic cells (mammalian cells), cell membranes, DNA etc. In so doing, some of the unfamiliar terminology-an unavoidable by-product of interdisciplinary research-is covered and explained. Plasma health care may provide a fast and efficient new path for effective hospital (and other public buildings) hygiene-helping to prevent and contain diseases that are continuously gaining ground as resistance of pathogens to antibiotics grows. The delivery of medically active 'substances' at the molecular or ionic level is another exciting topic of research through effects on cell walls (permeabilization), cell excitation (paracrine action) and the introduction of reactive species into cell cytoplasm. Electric fields, charging of surfaces, current flows etc can also affect tissue in a controlled way. The field is young and hopes are high. It is fitting to cover the beginnings in New Journal of Physics, since it is the physics (and non-equilibrium chemistry) of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas that have made this development of plasma health care possible.

  16. GLYCOLYSIS ’TRAIL: BIOCHEMISTRY KNOWLEDGE CON STRUCTION THROUGH AN EDUCATIVE GAME

    OpenAIRE

    C. N. Almada; Vasconcelos, M. S.; C. Nunes de Almada; F.W.P. Maia; D. Fernandes de Melo

    2009-01-01

    The study of biochemistry is complex andunatt ractive to the most of the students. Teaching strategies have to be established to stimulate the action of the student and involve  them  in the proposed subjects. For this to happen, the processes and strategies have to be analyzed and developed through cog nition tools. The objective of this work was to create, evaluate and apply an educative game called Glycolysis’ Trail, as a strategy of teaching -learning in the classes of biochemistry. The g...

  17. EDUCACIONAL GAME OF LEARNING AS DIDATIC SUPPORT IN INTRODUCTION TO BIOCHEMISTRY DISCIPLINE

    OpenAIRE

    M.S. Vasconcelos; C. N. Almada; F. Y. M. Sousa; M.R.A. Miranda; D. Fernandes de Melo

    2012-01-01

    The cellular respiration process is a crucial subject in biochemistry learning. The use of ludic tools appears to be a good strategy in education intensifying the teach and learning process. The aim of this work was to create and introduce a game as educational tool helping the students to construct the knowledge.  This work was accomplished in UFC involving three groups of 5 students of Introduction to Biochemistry discipline from Food Engineering course.  It was developed a board game  enti...

  18. Application of liposomes in medicine and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daraee, Hadis; Etemadi, Ali; Kouhi, Mohammad; Alimirzalu, Samira; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes provide an established basis for the sustainable development of different commercial products for treatment of medical diseases by the smart delivery of drugs. The industrial applications include the use of liposomes as drug delivery vehicles in medicine, adjuvants in vaccination, signal enhancers/carriers in medical diagnostics and analytical biochemistry, solubilizers for various ingredients as well as support matrices for various ingredients and penetration enhancers in cosmetics. In this review, we summarize the main applications and liposome-based commercial products that are currently used in the medical field. PMID:25222036

  19. A definição de medicamentos prioritários para o monitoramento da qualidade laboratorial no Brasil: articulação entre a vigilância sanitária e a Política Nacional de Medicamentos Definition of priority medicines for monitoring laboratory quality in Brazil: the interface between health surveillance and the National Drug Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durval Martins Pontes Junior

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A Política Nacional de Medicamentos tem como importante diretriz a qualidade dos medicamentos oferecidos à população. Objetivou-se definir prioridades para análise pelo Programa Nacional de Verificação da Qualidade de Medicamentos. Como critério, utilizou-se a presença do medicamento em, no mínimo, três Programas de Assistência Farmacêutica do Ministério da Saúde. Critérios adicionais foram a presença na Relação Nacional de Medicamentos Essenciais de 2002 (RENAME e a indicação para as vinte principais causas de Anos de Vida Perdidos Ajustados por Incapacidade (DALY. Informações do Ministério da Saúde e legislação foram fontes da pesquisa. Classificaram-se os medicamentos segundo o Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System (ATC da OMS. Nos 13 programas de assistência farmacêutica, existiam 893 produtos classificados em 449 diferentes códigos ATC. Foram considerados prioritários 28 fármacos, 26 constantes na RENAME e 12 indicados nas causas de DALY. Recomenda-se, à Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária e à Secretaria de Ciência, Tecnologia e Insumos Estratégicos, estabelecer estratégia integrada para garantia de qualidade integral desses medicamentos, abrangendo qualidade laboratorial, registro, boas práticas de fabricação e informações para profissionais de saúde e população.A key objective of the Brazilian National Drug Policy is the quality of medicines supplied to the population. This study aimed to set priorities for the analysis of the National Program for Quality Control of Medicines. The main criterion was the drug's presence in at least three Pharmaceutical Care Programs under the Ministry of Health. Additional criteria were presence on the National List of Essential Drugs (RENAME in 2002 and its indication for the 20 main causes of disability-adjusted life years (DALY. The sources were data from the Ministry of Health and related legislation. The drugs were classified

  20. Medicinal cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnion, Bridin

    2015-12-01

    A number of therapeutic uses of cannabis and its derivatives have been postulated from preclinical investigations. Possible clinical indications include spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis, cancer-associated nausea and vomiting, cancer pain and HIV neuropathy. However, evidence is limited, may reflect subjective rather than objective outcomes, and is not conclusive. Controversies lie in how to produce, supply and administer cannabinoid products. Introduction of cannabinoids therapeutically should be supported by a regulatory and educational framework that minimises the risk of harm to patients and the community. The Regulator of Medicinal Cannabis Bill 2014 is under consideration in Australia to address this. Nabiximols is the only cannabinoid on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods at present, although cannabidiol has been recommended for inclusion in Schedule 4. PMID:26843715

  1. Narrativ medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte; Getz, Linn

    2015-01-01

    Dagens allmänmedicin påverkas av ett växande managementtänkandetillsammans med fragmenterande ekonomiska incitament.Vårdens kvaliteter evalueras med nya metoder som ”värdebaseradvård” där värde räknas i kronor och ören. Produktion går före etik,och det intersubjektiva mötet mellan patient och läk...... läkare håller påatt nedvärderas. Perspektiven från narrativ medicin kan bidra tillatt visa vad som står på spel. Vilken blir annars berättelsen omallmänmedicinen?...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... laboratory director under regulations at 42 CFR 493.1415, published March 14, 1990 at 55 FR 9538, on or... laboratory director must— (1)(i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be certified in...

  3. International Journal of Herbal Medicine (IJHM): A New Open-Access International Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    It is with pleasure that we introduce the first issue of online journal “International Journal of Herbal Medicine (IHJM)” a bimonthly publication of AkiNik Publications. The Journal is peer-reviewed, broad-spectrum and committed to the promotion of research and dissemination of knowledge in Phytochemistry, Pharmacognosy, Essential oil chemistry, Natural product chemistry, Botany, Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Marine research and related multidiscipline. IJHM also provides an advanced internati...

  4. Vitamin D, Essential Minerals, and Toxic Elements: Exploring Interactions between Nutrients and Toxicants in Clinical Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.; Genuis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical medicine, increasing attention is being directed towards the important areas of nutritional biochemistry and toxicant bioaccumulation as they relate to human health and chronic disease. Optimal nutritional status, including healthy levels of vitamin D and essential minerals, is requisite for proper physiological function; conversely, accrual of toxic elements has the potential to impair normal physiology. It is evident that vitamin D intake can facilitate the absorption and assimi...

  5. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell-Tofte JI; Mølgaard P; Winther K

    2012-01-01

    Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (t...

  6. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell-Tofte, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insuli...

  7. Novel type of red-shifted chlorophyll a antenna complex from Chromera velia: II. Biochemistry and spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bína, David; Gardian, Zdenko; Herbstová, Miroslava; Kotabová, Eva; Koník, P.; Litvín, Radek; Prášil, Ondřej; Tichý, Josef; Vácha, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1837, č. 6 (2014), s. 802-810. ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chromera velia * red-shifted chlorophyll * Chlorophyll fluorescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; CE - Biochemistry (MBU-M) Impact factor: 5.353, year: 2014

  8. Students' Ability to Organize Biochemical and Biochemistry-Related Terms Correlates with Their Performance in a Biochemical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    Organization is believed to be related to understanding and memory. Whether this belief was applicable in biochemical education was examined about two years after students had experienced biochemistry classes in their first year. The ability of organizing information in biochemistry was judged from the number of correct links of 886 biochemical…

  9. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  10. Reactivity I: A Foundation-Level Course for Both Majors and Nonmajors in Integrated Organic, Inorganic, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; McIntee, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    A foundation level course is presented that integrates aspects of organic, inorganic and biochemistry in the context of reactivity. The course was designed to serve majors in chemistry and other sciences (biochemistry, biology, nutrition), as well as nursing and pre-health professions students. Themes of the course were designed to highlight a…

  11. Diverse Assessment and Active Student Engagement Sustain Deep Learning: A Comparative Study of Outcomes in Two Parallel Introductory Biochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Samantha J.; Chan, Cecilia W. L.; Tanner, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence for a relationship between courses that emphasize student engagement and achievement of student deep learning, there is a paucity of quantitative comparative studies in a biochemistry and molecular biology context. Here, we present a pedagogical study in two contrasting parallel biochemistry introductory…

  12. Alternative production of medicinal plants as a tool for saving biodiversity - example of .I.Panax ginseng./I. C.A. Meyer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, Tomáš; Langhansová, Lenka

    Bangalore: Century Foundation, 2003, s. 81. [Global Summit on Medicinal Plants . Mauritius (MU), 25.09.2003-30.09.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : bioreactors * production * .I.Panax ginseng./I. Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  13. The new world of medicine: prospecting for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Vay Liang W; Champaneria, Manish C

    2002-09-20

    Throughout past millennia, human beings have shared the common goal of improving health for longevity. However, different cultures around the world have developed their own approaches to achieve this goal. Various traditions have emerged, rendering distinct medical systems such as Ayurveda, Yoga, Chinese-Japanese medicine, shamanism, and Native American healing. Traditional medicine involves a holistic approach to the human body to integrate healing with culture, environment, and tradition. Modern allopathic medicine originated from Greco-Roman Medicine and Northern European traditions and is built on the science of anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry and the structure-function relationship between cells, tissues, and organs. This foundation focuses on diagnosis, treatment, and cure for acute illnesses via potent pharmaceutical drugs, surgery, radiation, and other treatment modalities. Within this past century, we have doubled the life-span of human beings. Genomic medicine, including stem cell research, cloning, and gene therapy, will increase our capability to treat even more diseases. In the new millennium, we face more chronic illnesses related to aging, environment, and lifestyle, such as cancer, diabetes. osteoporosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, health care providers face the challenge of prospecting for health and disease prevention. Modern science and medical advancements provide the rationale for the integration of various traditional healing techniques, which have been termed Alternative and Complementary Medicine, to promote healing, health, and longevity. Advances in medicine must include the holistic approach of traditional medicine to face the current challenges in health care. Therefore, the New World of Medicine must fuse the antiquity of ancient healing with the innovations of modern medicine to increase life-expectancy and improve quality of life throughout the world. PMID:12426761

  14. Abstracts of the 30. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects concerning biochemistry and molecular biology of either animals, plants and microorganisms are studied. Topics such as cell membrane structures (including receptors), enzymatic assays, biological pathways, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions are focused. The use of radiolabelled compounds (radioassay, radioreceptor assay) and nuclear magnetic resonance are the most applied techniques

  15. Abstracts of the 29. annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects concerning biochemistry and molecular biology of either animals (including man), plants and microorganisms are studied. Topics such as cell membrane structures (including receptors), enzymatic assays, biological pathways, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions are focused. The use of radiolabelled compounds (radioassay, radioenzymatic assay, radioreceptor assay and nuclear magnetic resonance are the most applied techniques

  16. Book Review: "The Rhizosphere: Biochemistry and Organic Substances at the Soil-Plant Interface, Second Edition"

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complexity of the biological, chemical, and physical interactions occurring in the volume of soil surrounding the root of a growing plant dictates that a multidisciplinary approach must be taken to improve our understanding of this rhizosphere. Hence, "The Rhizosphere: Biochemistry and Organic S...

  17. Reversible Ligand Binding Reactions: Why Do Biochemistry Students Have Trouble Connecting the Dots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Duane W.; Thompson, Scott E.; Saxon, S. Robin

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive chemical behavior is essential for an organism's function and survival, and it is no surprise that biological systems are capable of responding both rapidly and selectively to chemical changes in the environment. To elucidate an organism's biochemistry, its chemical reactions need to be characterized in ways that reflect the normal…

  18. Sustaining Change in Upper Level Courses: Peer-Led Workshops in Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Terry; Roth, Vicki; Kampmeier, Jack A.

    2008-01-01

    Our peer-led collaborative learning groups, called Workshops, have now had extended success in two upper-level courses in chemistry and biochemistry. These Workshops are in turn supported by a third upper-level course for training peer-leaders. Our data confirm that the initial positive results from the introduction of Workshops in organic…

  19. Filtrates & Residues: Hemoglobinometry--A Biochemistry Experiment that Utilizes the Principles of Transition Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Vincenzo; Rieck, John Paul

    1987-01-01

    Describes a chemistry experiment dealing with hemoglobinometry that can apply to transition metal chemistry, colorimetry, and biochemistry. Provides a detailed description of the experimental procedure, including discussions of the preparation of the cyanide reagent, colorimetric measurements, and waste disposal and treatment. (TW)

  20. What Skills Should Students of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Programs Have upon Graduation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold B.; Benore, Marilee A.; Sumter, Takita F.; Caldwell, Benjamin D.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) students should demonstrate proficiency in the foundational concepts of the discipline and possess the skills needed to practice as professionals. To ascertain the skills that should be required, groups of BMB educators met in several focused workshops to discuss the expectations with the ultimate goal of…

  1. A Proposal for Teaching Undergraduate Chemistry Students Carbohydrate Biochemistry by Problem-Based Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Angela C. M.; Rocha, Joao B. T.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching elementary biochemistry to undergraduate students. The activity was based on "the foods we eat." It was used to engage students' curiosity and to initiate learning about a subject that could be used by the future teachers in the high school. The experimental…

  2. Bioorganic chemistry research in the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry - medical aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holý, Antonín

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 10, Supplement (2004), s. 107. ISSN 1075-2617. [ International /3./ and European Peptide Symposium /28./. 05.09.2004-10.09.2004, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : bioorganic chemistry research * medical aspects Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  3. Tagging and Purifying Proteins to Teach Molecular Biology and Advanced Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Lopilato, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Two distinct courses, "Molecular Biology" taught by the Biology Department and "Advanced Biochemistry" taught by the Chemistry Department, complement each other and, when taught in a coordinated and integrated way, can enhance student learning and understanding of complex material. "Molecular Biology" is a comprehensive lecture-based course with a…

  4. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  5. Using Adobe Flash Animations of Electron Transport Chain to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash…

  6. Foundational Concepts and Underlying Theories for Majors in "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, John T.; Baird, Teaster, Jr.; Cox, Michael M.; Fox, Kristin M.; Knight, Jennifer; Sears, Duane; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members and science educators from around the country that focused on identifying: 1) core principles of biochemistry and molecular biology, 2) essential concepts and underlying theories from physics, chemistry, and mathematics, and 3)…

  7. A Statistical Analysis of College Biochemistry Textbooks in China: The Statuses on the Publishing and Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Wang, Qinwen; Yang, Jie; Li, Jingqiu; Guo, Junming; Gong, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the statuses on the publishing and usage of college biochemistry textbooks in China. A textbook database was constructed and the statistical analysis was adopted to evaluate the textbooks. The results showed that there were 945 (~57%) books for theory teaching, 379 (~23%) books for experiment teaching and 331 (~20%)…

  8. Need Assessment of Enhancing the Weightage of Applied Biochemistry in the Undergraduate Curriculum at MGIMS, Sevagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja; Vagha, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    In order to review the need assessment of enhancing the weightage of Applied Biochemistry in the undergraduate curriculum at Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences (MGIMS), Sevagram, a validated questionnaire was sent to 453 participants which include 387 undergraduate students, 11 interns, 23 postgraduate students, and 32 faculty members. A…

  9. Essential Concepts and Underlying Theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics for "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry,…

  10. A Guide to Using Case-Based Learning in Biochemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulak, Verena; Newton, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate that the majority of students in undergraduate biochemistry take a surface approach to learning, associated with rote memorization of material, rather than a deep approach, which implies higher cognitive processing. This behavior relates to poorer outcomes, including impaired course performance and reduced knowledge retention. The…

  11. Biochemistry, proteomics, and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper; Thelen, Jay J.; Møller, Ian Max

    2013-01-01

    functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification of...

  12. Motivating Active Learning of Biochemistry through Artistic Representation of Scientific Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Carola

    2013-01-01

    First-year students often feel discouraged, especially with courses that require complex thinking and involve establishing relations between different subjects such as biochemistry. It has been proposed that student-centred pedagogy can achieve motivation and improve learning. In this context, this case study reports the use of art as a strategy…

  13. The Views of Undergraduates about Problem-Based Learning Applications in a Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayyildiz, Yildizay

    2015-01-01

    The effect of problem-based learning (PBL) applications in an undergraduate biochemistry course on students' interest in this course was investigated through four modules during one semester. Students' views about active learning and improvement in social skills were also collected and evaluated. We conducted the study with 36 senior students from…

  14. The Concept Lens Diagram: A New Mechanism for Presenting Biochemistry Content in Terms of "Big Ideas"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Susan L.; Smith, Christopher A.; Gillam, Elizabeth M. A.; Wright, Tony

    2011-01-01

    A strong, recent movement in tertiary education is the development of conceptual, or "big idea" teaching. The emphasis in course design is now on promoting key understandings, core competencies, and an understanding of connections between different fields. In biochemistry teaching, this radical shift from the content-based tradition is being…

  15. Teaching of Biochemistry in Medical School: A Well-Trodden Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Michael B.; Stagnaro-Green, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Biochemistry and molecular biology occupy a unique place in the medical school curriculum. They are frequently studied prior to medical school and are fundamental to the teaching of biomedical sciences in undergraduate medical education. These two circumstances, and the trend toward increased integration among the disciplines, have led to…

  16. Medicines by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Search the NIGMS Website Search the NIGMS Website NIGMS Home Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Medicines By Design Medicines By Design Spotlight Nature's Medicine Cabinet A ...

  17. Use Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription ... all the medicines, vitamins, minerals, and herbs you use. Share this information with your doctor. Store your ...

  18. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  19. What Is Nuclear Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that is used to diagnose and treat diseases in a safe and painless way. Nuclear medicine procedures permit the determination of medical information ...

  20. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  1. Preventing HIV with Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) Preventing HIV with medicine Get medicine right after you ... during sex. Return to top More information on Preventing HIV with medicine Explore other publications and websites ...

  2. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  3. Overview of accelerators in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerators used for medicine include synchrotrons, cyclotrons, betatrons, microtrons, and electron, proton, and light ion linacs. Some accelerators which were formerly found only at physics laboratories are now being considered for use in hospital-based treatment and diagnostic facilities. This paper presents typical operating parameters for medical accelerators and gives specific examples of clinical applications for each type of accelerator, with emphasis on recent developments in the field

  4. Evaluation of Student-made Blogs in Basicand Advanced Biochemistry Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cubas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results of the experience of student-made clinical biochemistry blogs were reported at SBBq-2010 (abstract K-5. Herein, five teaching-semesters and the opinion of former students were evaluated. Since the teaching-semester of 2008-1, Basic Biochemistry (BioBio students should prepare blog-assignments on clinical issues. Students' acceptance was evaluated through 6-point Likert-type questionnaires. Positive responses were those marking 4 to 6. A total of 348 BioBio students from five teaching-semesters answered the questionnaire; 77% of them agreed that preparing blogs was enjoyable, having a positive effect on their formation. Moreover, 81% of students agreed that BioBio blogs are relevant learning tools and 78% believedthat BioBio blogs boosted interest for biochemistry. Moreover, students' acceptance 1 year after taking BioBio was evaluated. Students (n=50 were dividedin (i those who had attended BioBio only, and (ii those who had also taken Advanced Biochemistry, together with blog tutoring. In the first group, 72% agreed that the information acquired during blog elaboration was useful atthe time of interview; 76% judged that blog elaboration boosted interest for the discipline. For thosein the second group evaluations were 100% and 82%, respectively. Results show maintenance of acceptance over 1 year and effective interest for blog-assignment for thosein basic and advanced biochemistry classes.

  5. Medicines for osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With ...

  6. Nuclear medicine statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical description of medical and biologic phenomena is proliferating. Laboratory studies on patients now yield measurements of at least a dozen indices, each with its own normal limits. Within nuclear medicine, numerical analysis as well as numerical measurement and the use of computers are becoming more common. While the digital computer has proved to be a valuable tool for measurment and analysis of imaging and radioimmunoassay data, it has created more work in that users now ask for more detailed calculations and for indices that measure the reliability of quantified observations. The following material is presented with the intention of providing a straight-forward methodology to determine values for some useful parameters and to estimate the errors involved. The process used is that of asking relevant questions and then providing answers by illustrations. It is hoped that this will help the reader avoid an error of the third kind, that is, the error of statistical misrepresentation or inadvertent deception. This occurs most frequently in cases where the right answer is found to the wrong question. The purposes of this chapter are: (1) to provide some relevant statistical theory, using a terminology suitable for the nuclear medicine field; (2) to demonstrate the application of a number of statistical methods to the kinds of data commonly encountered in nuclear medicine; (3) to provide a framework to assist the experimenter in choosing the method and the questions most suitable for the experiment at hand; and (4) to present a simple approach for a quantitative quality control program for scintillation cameras and other radiation detectors

  7. Sulphur biochemistry in agricultural managed soils using 34S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To gain a better understanding of sulphur transformation within soil, stable sulphur and oxygen isotopes were used. Four soils with different histories of fertilizing were studied under field conditions to observe the influence of fertilizing on the isotopic composition of different sulphur forms in soils. In laboratory experiments the behaviour of these soils observed under sulphur deficiency and sulphate fertilization conditions was investigated. The natural sulphur isotopic composition of inorganic sulphate in the four soils shows a difference with respect to organic sulphur in soil and precipitation sulphate which is attributed to fractionation during transformation processes. Mineralization was recognized as a biochemical process which affects the 18O content of sulphate. The irrigation experiment showed that sulphate is mineralized at different rates, depending upon the content of soil organic matter (SOM). Whereas in soils with high SOM mineralization is the predominant mechanism, in soils with low SOM sulphate can be immobilized. (author). 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Biomedical Science, Unit IV: The Nervous System in Health and Medicine. The Nervous System; Disorders of the Brain and Nervous System; Application of Computer Science to Diagnosis; Drugs and Pharmacology; The Human Senses; Electricity. Laboratory Manual. Revised Version, 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    Designed to accompany the student text on the nervous system, this manual presents laboratory activities dealing with concepts presented in the text. Thirty-seven activities are described. Four supplementary activities dealing with concepts in electricity are also included. Laboratory activities are divided into several parts, each part covering a…

  9. Vegetation Biochemistry: What Can Imaging Spectrometry Tell Us About Canopies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Wessman, Carol

    1991-01-01

    Changes in ecosystem processes such as productivity and decomposition may be expressed in the canopy foliar chemistry resulting from altered carbon allocation patterns, metabolic processes and nutrient availability. Understanding carbon balance on land over large regions requires quantitative determination of leaf constituents such as lignin and total nitrogen from remote sensing imaging systems. Results from spectral reflectance measurements of stacked leaves in the laboratory show that spectrum matching techniques are applicable to the derivation of the equivalent liquid water thickness in plants as well as to the extraction of dry leaf matter reflectance spectra from spectra of green leaves. The residual spectra derived by subtracting water spectra from the spectra of green leaves shows a feature at 1.72 micrometers that can be related to the lignin content of the leaves. Oak leaves have a deeper residual absorption feature than do cotton leaves which is consistent with their relative lignin content. Similar results are achieved when deriving the residuals from images taken over areas of grass and pine trees. Imaging spectrometry provides promise in developing images of various foliar biochemical constituents.

  10. Dictionary of radiation protection, radiobiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection, including aspects of radiobiology, nuclear medicine, and nuclear legislation, has an important role within nuclear research and the use of radioactive materials. Radiation protection comprises all measures and efforts to prevent the unwanted distribution and negative influence of ionizing radiation, especially where the human organism and the living environment are involved. The increasing role of radiation protection is reflected by the foundation of institutes in all industrial countries to control such radiant energy and prevent radiation damage. Nowadays ionizing radiation is employed on a large scale for basic investigations in biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics, in soil tests, fertilization problems and pest control in agriculture, as well as for medicinal diagnoses and therapy. This dictionary is a thematic enlargement of the four-language 'Dictionary of Nuclear Engineering', compiled by the same author. It comprises about 12,000 terms in each language. (orig.)

  11. Mass spectrometry. [in organic ion and biorganic chemistry and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Cox, R. E.; Derrick, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the present status of mass spectrometry in the light of pertinent recent publications spanning the period from December 1971 to January 1974. Following an initial survey of techniques, instruments, and computer applications, a sharp distinction is made between the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions and analytical applications in biorganic chemistry and medicine. The emphasis is on the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions at the expense of inorganic, organometallic, and surface ion chemistry. Biochemistry and medicine are chosen because of their contemporary importance and because of the stupendous contributions of mass spectroscopy to these fields in the past two years. In the review of gas-phase organic ion chemistry, special attention is given to studies making significant contributions to the understanding of ion chemistry.

  12. METABOLIC WAR: A VARIATION FOR METABOLIC BIOCHEMISTRY LEARNING OF A WORLDLY KNOWN BOARD GAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Anjos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical careers are highly wished by young students in Brazil. Although future jobs,  academic knowledge and higher earnings  are tempting reasons for this life choice, few of them are aware  of  the difficult path through the  basic classes. Advanced and specific disciplines  are easier to associate with the professional career itself, but few students can identify the importance  of the basic knowledge for their future work. Biochemistry is one of the most difficult  disciplines  for Brazilian students, probably due to the level of abstraction needed to fully learn and understand the topics. Some recent experimental tools, such as bioinformatics, are now helping students with the learning process, providing visual data for understanding biomolecule structure.  In addition to this, biochemical reactions  could be even tougher because of the many variables involved.  To facilitate the learning process for metabolic biochemistry, we created a game based on the board game WAR®,  using Photoshop software. Named Metabolic War, it keeps the same basic rules of WAR®, but with some minor changes. The continents are metabolic pathways (citric acid cycle, glycolysis, beta-oxidation, etc and the countries are metabolic intermediates. Similarly to the original game, players must conquer an objective (one or more metabolic pathways by dominating intermediates. But the desired intermediate must be a possible product from an intermediate the player already owns. This  and other  games were produced by Biomedicine  undergraduate  students  in Metabolic Biochemistry classes. It was presented to other students, who tested and acknowledged it as a great help in understanding metabolic biochemistry,  giving a great understanding of integrative metabolism. Keywords: game; Biochemistry; Metabolic Biochemistry learning; science learning; playful learning.

  13. University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory accident in 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 4 February 1971, a 32-year-old research technologist performing seed irradiated experiments at the University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory was exposed to a Cobalt 60 source of 7700 curies for 40 seconds. Details of the accident, dose estimates from dosimetry studies, and acute biological clinical findings are discussed. Follow-up clinical data on the hematopoietic system, biochemistry, fingers, and blood counts are discussed

  14. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  15. Simple Laboratory Exercise for Induction of Beta-Mannanase from "Aspergillus niger"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulimani, V. H.; Naganagouda, K.

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed for Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Microbiology, and Food Technology students of undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The experiment shows the advantages of using agricultural waste, copra mannan as potent inducer of [beta]-mannanase. The students were able to compare the enzyme induction by commercial…

  16. Purification and Characterization of Enzymes from Yeast: An Extended Undergraduate Laboratory Sequence for Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.; McIntyre, Neil R.; Thompson, Marleesa

    2013-01-01

    Providing a project-based experience in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory class can be complex with large class sizes and limited resources. We have designed a 6-week curriculum during which students purify and characterize the enzymes invertase and phosphatase from bakers yeast. Purification is performed in two stages via ethanol…

  17. Sleep Medicine Textbook

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetti, Claudio; Dogas, Zoran; Peigneux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The Sleep Medicine Textbook provides comprehensive, all-in-one educational material (550 pages) structured around the Catalogue of knowledge and skills for sleep medicine (Penzel et al. 2014, Journal of Sleep Research). Written by experts in the field and published by the ESRS, it provides an European approach to sleep medicine education, and represents the knowledge-base for the ESRS-endorsed sleep medicine examinations.The book is available at http://www.esrs.eu/esrs/sleep-medicine-textbook...

  18. Nuclear medicine quality assurance program in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two steps program has been implemented: the first one is the quality control of the equipment and the second one the development of standard procedures for clinical studies of patients. A training program for doctors and technicians of the nuclear medicine laboratories was carried out. Workshops on instrumentation and quality assurance in nuclear medicine have been organized in several parts of the country. A joint program of the CNEA and the University of Buenos Aires has trained medical physicists. A method has been established to evaluate the capability of the laboratories to produce high quality images and to follow up the implementation of the quality control program

  19. Technical and didactic problems of virtual lab exercises in biochemistry and biotechnology education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Skriver, Karen; Dandanell, Gert

    methods. With web technologies we can now design exercises for remote or virtual labs, but we should not expect to improve student learning simply by recreating old didactic problems in new media. Unfortunately studies of the efficiency of different lab types (hands-on, virtual, and remote labs) suffer...... from a lack of conceptual analysis of what actually constitutes virtual labs. A clarification of these conceptual issues is suggested as part of a Danish research and development project on virtual lab exercises in biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology education. The main outcome...... of this clarification is that specific didactic problems of biochemistry education can now be addressed through the design of exercises in the virtual lab environment....

  20. Haematology and Plasma Biochemistry of Wild Black Flying-Foxes, (Pteropus alecto in Queensland, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee McMichael

    Full Text Available This paper establishes reference ranges for hematologic and plasma biochemistry values in wild Black flying-foxes (Pteropus alecto captured in South East Queensland, Australia. Values were found to be consistent with those of other Pteropus species. Four hundred and forty-seven animals were sampled over 12 months and significant differences were found between age, sex, reproductive and body condition cohorts in the sample population. Mean values for each cohort fell within the determined normal adult reference range, with the exception of elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase in juvenile animals. Hematologic and biochemistry parameters of injured animals showed little or no deviation from the normal reference values for minor injuries, while two animals with more severe injury or abscessation showed leucocytosis, anaemia, thrombocytosis, hyperglobulinemia and hypoalbuminemia.

  1. A SOFTWARE TO PROMOTE INTERACTIVE TEACHING OF WATER PROPERTIES IN BIOCHEMISTRY CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    O.M.M. Lapouble; C.E.R. Veloso; G.R. Neves; Castro, M. S.; W. Fontes

    2005-01-01

    The improvement and  development of new tools in design and  informatics  helped the  creation  of biochemistry teaching  material. Many molecules, metabolic  pathways, reactions,  and interactions are best  explained  and  understood when  shown  in three  dimensions  and  allowing interactivity.  Water is, usually,  the first topic to be presented  during  basic biochemistry courses.  Importance, properties, ionization,  pH, buffering and  titration curves,  are frequently  presented  subje...

  2. Design and develop second life virtual lab for biochemistry blended teaching and learning based on constructivism

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Liang; 叶亮

    2013-01-01

    Department of Biochemistry in HKU has been planning to implement virtual lab blended learning solution into their experiment related courses. Based on selected case, the study investigated whether the virtual lab would arouse more learning interests and improve the learning gains for students. Also, the study concluded some useful suggestions for virtual lab blended learning and generalized a few guidelines for instructional design on virtual lab. The study adopted mixed research methods ...

  3. Evaluation of effectiveness of computer assisted learning in biochemistry for first year medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Wilma Delphine Silvia, C. R.; H. Ravish; Suresh, D. R.; Roopa Kulkarni; Manjunath, S; Anitha D’Souza; H. Ramya Udupa; S. Jayashree; Smitha, P.; Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Significance of computer assisted learning (CAL) programme is to complement existing undergraduate teaching methods is yet to be explored. Aim: This experimental pilot study was undertaken to assess the utility of CAL programme for first year medical students in learning medical biochemistry. Materials & Method: This prospective study included first year medical students divided into 3 groups comprised of 50 students each. CAL programme was conducted on 3 days in a month for 5 con...

  4. The effect of dietary phytase on broiler performance and digestive, bone, and blood biochemistry characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    JPL de Sousa; LFT Albino; RGMV Vaz; KF Rodrigues; GF Da Silva; LN Renno; VRSM Barros; IN Kaneko

    2015-01-01

    The dietary inclusion of phytase increases nutrient and energy bioavailability for broilers. The effect of phytase increases nutrients and energy bioavailability for either the objective of this experiment was to evaluate the influence of nutrient and energy reduction in diets supplemented with phytase on the performance, gastrointestinal pH, organ and bone composition, and blood biochemistry of broilers between eight and 21 days of age. In the study, 1.120 male Cobb 500(r) broilers, with 161...

  5. Zinc Biochemistry: From a Single Zinc Enzyme to a Key Element of Life12

    OpenAIRE

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The nutritional essentiality of zinc for the growth of living organisms had been recognized long before zinc biochemistry began with the discovery of zinc in carbonic anhydrase in 1939. Painstaking analytical work then demonstrated the presence of zinc as a catalytic and structural cofactor in a few hundred enzymes. In the 1980s, the field again gained momentum with the new principle of “zinc finger” proteins, in which zinc has structural functions in domains that interact with other biomolec...

  6. A Linguistic Comparison of Letters of Recommendation for Male and Female Chemistry and Biochemistry Job Applicants

    OpenAIRE

    Schmader, Toni; Whitehead, Jessica; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2007-01-01

    Letters of recommendation are central to the hiring process. However, gender stereotypes could bias how recommenders describe female compared to male applicants. In the current study, text analysis software was used to examine 886 letters of recommendation written on behalf of 235 male and 42 female applicants for either a chemistry or biochemistry faculty position at a large U.S. research university. Results revealed more similarities than differences in letters written for male and female c...

  7. BIOCHEMISTRYGUIDE: A GUIDE TO STUDY BIOCHEMISTRY IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L.C. Zago

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The new generation has grown driven by the digital technologies. Nowadays, the access to information has extended to the mobile technologies, like cell phones and tablets, increasing the technological resources for use in education. Educational institutions are opening more and more space to technologies, which have a new teaching, and learning methodology. The internet is an inexhaustible source of knowledge. With so much available material, the student finds difficulties in choosing the best source to study. Develop a cell phone app that works as a biochemistry study guide, providing materials from safe source and easy access. The app was developed at the website "Factory of apps", for free, and available for all the operational systems (Android, IOS, windows, enabling the download in any device. Were inserted in it materials like: summaries of the main subjects dealt in the discipline with clear and objective language, scientific articles to complementary reading, video-classes and exercises. Offering fast and practical access to the material, facilitating the process of studying and learning. The student does not have to let his mobile phone in preference of studying and does not find difficulties to filter available information in the internet. After the app's use, was applied a questionnaire to the participating students for this tool's assessment, such as layout, quality of the available material, access facilities. All the participants have approved the listed aspects and have said that the use of the tool can help at the biochemistry study, by the reliable material and by being available in a mobile device providing quick and immediate access, at any time in the palm of the hand. The use of this tool can be applied in the classroom to help the professor in getting materials and to help the students by its practicality.Acknowledgements: CnpQ, Unipampa. Keywords: App, BiochemistryGuide, Biochemistry

  8. Cooperative learning combined with short periods of lecturing: A good alternative in teaching biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Santander, Ana

    2008-01-01

    The informal activities of cooperative learning and short periods of lecturing has been combined and used in the university teaching of biochemistry as part of the first year course of Optics and Optometry in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006. The lessons were previously elaborated by the teacher and included all that is necessary to understand the topic (text, figures, graphics, diagrams, pictures, etc.). Additionally, a questionnaire was prepared for every chapter. All lessons cont...

  9. What Skills Should Students of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Programs Have Upon Graduation?

    OpenAIRE

    White, Harold B; Benore, Marilee A.; Sumter, Takita F.; Caldwell, Benjamin D.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) students should demonstrate proficiency in the foundational concepts of the discipline and possess the skills needed to practice as professionals. To ascertain the skills that should be required, groups of BMB educators met in several focused workshops to discuss the expectations with the ultimate goal of clearly articulating the skills required. The results of these discussions highlight the critical importance of experimental, mathematical, and inter...

  10. Most fortificated nutraceutical vitamins: standpoint from biochemistry, functionality, utilization strategies and medical genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Tokusoglu, Ozlem; Muezzinoglu, Talha

    2015-01-01

    Nutraceutical vitamins are micronutrients of foods and beverages that play an essential role in food science and technology. Most fortificated vitamin A, E, D and folic acid as antioxidative defence system components and that of with gene regulation functions have been considered. Up-to-date scientific overview of the biochemistry, functionality, utilization strategies and human genomics of above-mentioned most fortificated nutraceutical vitamins were emphasized

  11. Polish Academy of Sciences. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presented research activities of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, in 1998-1999. Research interests focus on: replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA, regulation of gene expression, biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins, gene sequencing and functional gene analysis, structure and function of enzymes, conformation of proteins and peptides, modeling of structures and prediction of function of proteins

  12. BIOCHEMISTRY APPROACH IN BOOKS APPROVED BY THE NATIONAL BOOK TEACHING PROGRAM 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E.S. Rocha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Collections of textbooks are distributed every three years to basic education schools and represent a source of knowledge to students and a reference to the pedagogical work of teachers. Biochemistry is an area that studies the chemical processes occurring in living organisms, with their concepts present in both chemistry textbooks as in biology. It is necessary that the present approach in these books are interesting to students, to recognize the importance of understanding these processes. OBJECTIVES: To analyze as it has been crafted in biochemistry textbooks high school approved by PNLD 2015. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated how the biochemical area-related content are described in the book "Bio - Volume 1", authored by Sonia Lopes and Sergio Rosso, and in the book "Chemistry - Volume 3" by Martha Reis with regard to clarity of concepts, context, illustrations and interdisciplinarity. RESULTS: Both books have chapters devoted especially to describe on this area, with plenty of catchy titles, but one in the first year and the other in the final year of high school. In biology textbook chapter called "The chemistry of life" brings in its approach clear and succinct concepts, contextualizes the issues on current information of figures and tables, features lots of illustrations that range from photographs to represent chemical structures and is mainly interdisciplinary in test questions. In chemistry textbook chapter "Introduction to Biochemistry" shows clear and detailed concepts, contextualizes with curiosities and everyday issues of students, has auxiliary illustrations in understanding and is interdisciplinary. CONCLUSIONS: We realize that there is a gap between the disciplines to work biochemistry during high school, but the form of presentation used for books is clear and present use of languages in the daily lives of students, making learning interesting and attractive.

  13. Attitudes toward plagiarism among pharmacy and medical biochemistry students – cross-sectional survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Pupovac, Vanja; Bilic-Zulle, Lidija; Mavrinac, Martina; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Plagiarism is one of the most frequent and serious forms of misconduct in academic environment. The cross-sectional survey study was done with aim to explore the attitudes toward plagiarism. Materials and methods: First year students of Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, Croatia (N = 146) were anonymously tested using Attitude toward Plagiarism (ATP) questionnaire. The questionnaire is composed of 29 statements on a 5 point Likert scale, (1 - ...

  14. A proposal of collaborative education for biochemistry and cell biology teaching

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Souza-Júnior; Silva, A.P.; Silva, T. A.; G. P.V. Andrade

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Currently students grow up in a world of digital tools that allow you to connect instantly with the world. At the same time, teachers face several challenges to increase student interest and learning efficiency. One such challenge is the pedagogical commitment of the density of biochemistry and cell biology contents, producing a conflict scenario, between meeting content and maintain the class quality. OBJECTIVES: From this perspective, this study aimed to evaluate the learning ...

  15. REGULATION OF L-VALINE BIOSYNTHESIS IN CORYNEBACTERIUM GLUTAMICUM - ASPECTS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Ilze Deniņa

    2010-01-01

    ANNOTATION This study investigates the optimum cellular physiology and intracellular biochemistry to achieve L-valine overproduction by Corynebacterium glutamicum recombinant strains. A transition in the bacterial growth rate to below maximum was found to be an optimum parameter of cellular physiology to increase L-valine synthesis rate by C. glutamicum during batch and fed-batch cultivations. The increase in acetohydroxyacid synthase activity was the determinant for the ...

  16. Summary report of a workshop on research opportunities in plant biochemistry, December 11--13, 1992, Kona, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    A DOE-sponsored workshop was held December 11--13, 1992 in Kona, Hawaii to discuss those aspects of fundamental research in plant biochemistry deemed essential to provide the basic information base necessary for exploiting plant biotechnology to meet future societal needs. Twenty nine scientists, with interests representing many of the various areas of plant biochemistry, participated. The workshop was intended to define in both broad and specific terms the current state of knowledge in the general area of metabolic biochemistry, and to identify those areas that afford unusual opportunity or that are relatively underdeveloped in comparison with other areas of plant biology. Participants provided critiques of the state of knowledge of the major areas of metabolic biochemistry in relation to a series of questions that are presented herein.

  17. Studies on the life span, reproduction, tissue biochemistry and diesel oil toxicity in the estuarine cladocera Diaphanosoma celebensis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhuKonkar, S.R.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    , neonate production, tissue biochemistry and toxicity of diesel oil have been described in the paper. Variations were observed in the life span and rate of neonate production between individuals of the 1 st and 2 nd generations. Both were found...

  18. Radiochemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. A joint venture with chemistry, nuclear engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missouri University, a recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy Radiochemistry Education Award Program (REAP) grant in 1999, has significantly expanded its education and research mission in radiochemistry. While MU had a viable radiochemistry program through existing faculty expertise and the utilization of the Missouri University Research Reactor, the REAP award allowed MU to leverage its resources in significantly expanding capabilities in radiochemistry. Specifically, the grant enabled the: (1) hiring of a new faculty member in actinide radiochemistry (Dr. Paul Duval); (2) support of six graduate students in radiochemistry; (3) purchase of new radiochemistry laboratory equipment; (4) more extensive collaboration with DOE scientists through interactions with faculty and graduate students, and (5) revised radiochemical curriculum (joint courses across disciplines and new courses in actinide chemistry). The most significant impact of this award has been in encouraging interdisciplinary education and research. The proposal was initiated by a joint effort between Nuclear Engineering and Chemistry, but also included faculty in biochemistry, radiology, and molecular biology. Specific outcomes of the REAP grant thus far are: (1) increased educational and research capabilities in actinide chemistry (faculty hire and equipment acquisition); (2) increased integration of biochemistry and radiochemistry (e.g., radiochemical analysis of uranium speciation in biological systems); (3) stronger interdisciplinary integration of molecular biology and radiochemical sciences (alpha-emitters for treating cancer); (4) new and more extensive interactions with national laboratory facilities (e.g., student internships at LANL and LLBL, faculty and lab scientist exchange visits, analytical measurements and collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source), and (7) new research funding opportunities based on REAP partnership. (author)

  19. Trends in the use of stable isotopes in biochemistry and pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent trends in the use of the stable isotopes 13C, 15N and 18O in biochemistry and pharmacology are reviewed with emphasis on the studies that have employed nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as analytical techniques. Pharmacological studies with drugs and other compounds labelled with stable isotopes have developed in parallel with the rapid progress in the enhancement of sensitivity and selectivity of gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analyses, and have been directed largely to an evaluation of pharmako-kinetics and drug metabolic pathways. In these studies, illustrated with selected samples, isotopically labelled compounds have been used to advantage as internal standards for the mass spectrometric analyses and as in vivo tracers for metabolites. In the broader discipline of biochemistry, stable isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds have been used increasingly in conjuction with both nmr spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in tracer and structural studies. The more recent trends in the use of stable isotopes in these biochemical studies are discussed in the context of the improvements in analytical techniques. Specific examples will be drawn from investigations of the biosynthesis of natural products by micro-organisms; the protein, fat and carbohydrate fluxes in humans; and the structure and function of enzymes, membranes and other macro-molecular assemblages. The potential for the future development of stable isotopes in biochemistry and pharmacology are considered briefly, together with some of the problems that must be solved if their considerable potential is to be realized. (author)

  20. The Proteomics Stock Market Project. A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration in Biochemistry and Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Heath; Cox, James R.

    2004-04-01

    Students taking courses in different disciplines can work together to add unique elements to their educational experience. A model for this type of pedagogical approach has been established in the Proteomics Stock Market Project, a collaborative effort between instructors and students in the Department of Chemistry and Department of Management, Marketing, and Business Administration at Murray State University. Stage I involved biochemistry students investigating the topic of proteomics and choosing companies for potential investment based only on scientific investigation. Marketing and management students completed Stage II and provided an investment analysis on the companies selected in Stage I. In Stage III, the biochemistry students focused on a particular company and investigated a protein-based therapeutic product. Blackboard software was utilized in each stage of the project to facilitate the exchange of information and electronic documents. This project was designed to give biochemistry students an appreciation for the emerging field of proteomics and the marketing and management students a flavor for real-world applications of business principles. During the project, students were exposed to ideas and concepts not typically covered in their courses. With this involvement, the students had the opportunity to gain a broader perspective of course content compared to a more traditional curriculum.