WorldWideScience

Sample records for biochemical ligand binding

  1. LIBRA: LIgand Binding site Recognition Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Le Viet; Caprari, Silvia; Bizai, Massimiliano; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, structural genomics and ab initio molecular modeling activities are leading to the availability of a large number of structural models of proteins whose biochemical function is not known. The aim of this study was the development of a novel software tool that, given a protein's structural model, predicts the presence and identity of active sites and/or ligand binding sites. The algorithm implemented by ligand binding site recognition application (LIBRA) is based on a graph theory approach to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and a collection of known functional sites. The algorithm makes use of two predefined databases for active sites and ligand binding sites, respectively, derived from the Catalytic Site Atlas and the Protein Data Bank. Tests indicate that LIBRA is able to identify the correct binding/active site in 90% of the cases analyzed, 90% of which feature the identified site as ranking first. As far as ligand binding site recognition is concerned, LIBRA outperforms other structure-based ligand binding sites detection tools with which it has been compared. The application, developed in Java SE 7 with a Swing GUI embedding a JMol applet, can be run on any OS equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/LIBRAv1.zip. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  3. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  4. Salt-mediated two-site ligand binding by the cocaine-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Miguel A D; Slavkovic, Sladjana; Churcher, Zachary R; Johnson, Philip E

    2017-02-17

    Multisite ligand binding by proteins is commonly utilized in the regulation of biological systems and exploited in a range of biochemical technologies. Aptamers, although widely utilized in many rationally designed biochemical systems, are rarely capable of multisite ligand binding. The cocaine-binding aptamer is often used for studying and developing sensor and aptamer-based technologies. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that the cocaine-binding aptamer switches from one-site to two-site ligand binding, dependent on NaCl concentration. The high-affinity site functions at all buffer conditions studied, the low-affinity site only at low NaCl concentrations. ITC experiments show the two ligand-binding sites operate independently of one another with different affinities and enthalpies. NMR spectroscopy shows the second binding site is located in stem 2 near the three-way junction. This ability to control ligand binding at the second site by adjusting the concentration of NaCl is rare among aptamers and may prove a useful in biotechnology applications. This work also demonstrates that in vitro selected biomolecules can have functions as complex as those found in nature. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Li+-ligand binding energies and the effect of ligand fluorination on the binding energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2018-02-01

    The Li+-ligand binding energies are computed for seven ligands and their perfluoro analogs using Density Functional Theory. The bonding is mostly electrostatic in origin. Thus the size of the binding energy tends to correlate with the ligand dipole moment, however, the charge-induced dipole contribution can be sufficiently large to affect the dipole-binding energy correlation. The perfluoro species are significantly less strongly bound than their parents, because the electron withdrawing power of the fluorine reduces the ligand dipole moment.

  6. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  7. Integrating structural and mutagenesis data to elucidate GPCR ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Christian; Harpsøe, Kasper; Hauser, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of human membrane proteins, as well as drug targets. A recent boom in GPCR structural biology has provided detailed images of receptor ligand binding sites and interactions on the molecular level. An ever-increasing number of ligands...... elucidate new GPCR ligand binding sites, and ultimately design drugs with tailored pharmacological activity....

  8. A2AR Binding Kinetics in the Ligand Depletion Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Patrick M; Naranjo, Andrea N; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2017-02-01

    Ligand binding plays a fundamental role in stimulating the downstream signaling of membrane receptors. Here, ligand-binding kinetics of the full-length human adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R) reconstituted in detergent micelles were measured using a fluorescently labeled ligand via fluorescence anisotropy. Importantly, to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio, these experiments were conducted in the ligand depletion regime. In the ligand depletion regime, the assumptions used to determine analytical solutions for one-site binding models for either one or two ligands in competition are no longer valid. We therefore implemented a numerical solution approach to analyze kinetic binding data as experimental conditions approach the ligand depletion regime. By comparing the results from the numerical and the analytical solutions, we highlight the ligand-receptor ratios at which the analytical solution begins to lose predictive accuracy. Using the numerical solution approach, we determined the kinetic rate constants of the fluorescent ligand, FITC-APEC, and those for three unlabeled ligands using competitive association experiments. The association and dissociation rate constants of the unlabeled ligands determined from the competitive association experiments were then independently validated using competitive dissociation data. Based on this study, a numerical solution is recommended to determine kinetic ligand-binding parameters for experiments conducted in the ligand-depletion regime.

  9. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2014-12-03

    Background Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. Results In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Conclusions Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  10. Prediction of GPCR-Ligand Binding Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method that predicts binding of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ligands. The proposed method uses hub and cycle structures of ligands and amino acid motif sequences of GPCRs, rather than the 3D structure of a receptor or similarity of receptors or ligands. The experimental results show that these new features can be effective in predicting GPCR-ligand binding (average area under the curve [AUC] of 0.944, because they are thought to include hidden properties of good ligand-receptor binding. Using the proposed method, we were able to identify novel ligand-GPCR bindings, some of which are supported by several studies.

  11. Partial association of restriction polymorphism of the ligand binding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Partial association of restriction polymorphism of the ligand binding domain of human androgen receptor in prostate cancer. ... Background: Human androgen receptor (AR) functions as a steroid-hormone activated transcription factor. The receptor binds to its ligand (testosterone or dihydrotestosterone) and is translocated to ...

  12. Ligand Binding Domain Protein in Tetracycline-Inducible Expression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate tetracycline-inducible expression system for producing clinically usable, highquality liver X receptor ligand-binding domain recombinant protein. Methods: In this study, we have expressed and purified the recombinant liver X receptor β-ligand binding domain proteins in E. coli using a tetracycline ...

  13. PatchSurfers: Two methods for local molecular property-based binding ligand prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Bures, Mark Gregory; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-15

    Protein function prediction is an active area of research in computational biology. Function prediction can help biologists make hypotheses for characterization of genes and help interpret biological assays, and thus is a productive area for collaboration between experimental and computational biologists. Among various function prediction methods, predicting binding ligand molecules for a target protein is an important class because ligand binding events for a protein are usually closely intertwined with the proteins' biological function, and also because predicted binding ligands can often be directly tested by biochemical assays. Binding ligand prediction methods can be classified into two types: those which are based on protein-protein (or pocket-pocket) comparison, and those that compare a target pocket directly to ligands. Recently, our group proposed two computational binding ligand prediction methods, Patch-Surfer, which is a pocket-pocket comparison method, and PL-PatchSurfer, which compares a pocket to ligand molecules. The two programs apply surface patch-based descriptions to calculate similarity or complementarity between molecules. A surface patch is characterized by physicochemical properties such as shape, hydrophobicity, and electrostatic potentials. These properties on the surface are represented using three-dimensional Zernike descriptors (3DZD), which are based on a series expansion of a 3 dimensional function. Utilizing 3DZD for describing the physicochemical properties has two main advantages: (1) rotational invariance and (2) fast comparison. Here, we introduce Patch-Surfer and PL-PatchSurfer with an emphasis on PL-PatchSurfer, which is more recently developed. Illustrative examples of PL-PatchSurfer performance on binding ligand prediction as well as virtual drug screening are also provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates.

  15. Structural parameterization of the binding enthalpy of small ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Irene; Freire, Ernesto

    2002-11-01

    A major goal in ligand and drug design is the optimization of the binding affinity of selected lead molecules. However, the binding affinity is defined by the free energy of binding, which, in turn, is determined by the enthalpy and entropy changes. Because the binding enthalpy is the term that predominantly reflects the strength of the interactions of the ligand with its target relative to those with the solvent, it is desirable to develop ways of predicting enthalpy changes from structural considerations. The application of structure/enthalpy correlations derived from protein stability data has yielded inconsistent results when applied to small ligands of pharmaceutical interest (MW the enthalpy associated with any possible conformational change in the protein or ligand upon binding; and, (3) the enthalpy associated with protonation/deprotonation events, if present. As in the case of protein stability, the intrinsic binding enthalpy scales with changes in solvent accessible surface areas. However, an accurate estimation of the intrinsic binding enthalpy requires explicit consideration of long-lived water molecules at the binding interface. The best statistical structure/enthalpy correlation is obtained when buried water molecules within 5-7 A of the ligand are included in the calculations. For all seven protein systems considered (HIV-1 protease, dihydrodipicolinate reductase, Rnase T1, streptavidin, pp60c-Src SH2 domain, Hsp90 molecular chaperone, and bovine beta-trypsin) the binding enthalpy of 25 small molecular weight peptide and nonpeptide ligands can be accounted for with a standard error of +/-0.3 kcal x mol(-1). Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Biosensors engineered from conditionally stable ligand-binding domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Feng, Justin; Mandell, Daniel J.; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Jester, Benjamin Ward; Tinberg, Christine Elaine

    2017-09-19

    Disclosed is a biosensor engineered to conditionally respond to the presence of specific small molecules, the biosensors including conditionally stable ligand-binding domains (LBDs) which respond to the presence of specific small molecules, wherein readout of binding is provided by reporter genes or transcription factors (TFs) fused to the LBDs.

  17. Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the promiscuous EphA4 receptor reveals two distinct conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, Nikhil; Goldgur, Yehuda; Xu, Kai; Paavilainen, Sari; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Himanen, Juha P. (MSKCC); (Turku)

    2010-09-08

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication. They are divided in two subclasses based on their affinities for each other and on sequence conservation. Receptor-ligand binding within each subclass is fairly promiscuous, while binding cross the subclasses happens rarely. EphA4 is an exception to this general rule, since it has long been known to bind both A- and B-class ephrin ligands but the reason for this exceptional behavior has not been worked out at molecular level. Recent structural and biochemical studies on EphA4 ligand-binding domain alone and in complex with its ligands have addressed this question. However, the published structures of EphA4/ephrin complexes differ considerably from each other and strikingly different explanations for the exceptional promiscuity of EphA4 were proposed. To address these contradictory findings, we have determined a crystal structure of the EphA4 ligand-binding domain at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that the receptor has an unprecedented ability to exist in two very different, well-ordered conformations even in the unbound state. Our results suggest that the ligand promiscuity of the Ephs is directly correlated with the structural flexibility of the ligand-binding surface of the receptor.

  18. Folding energetics of ligand binding proteins. I. Theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösgen, J; Hinz, H J

    2001-03-02

    Heat capacity curves as obtained from differential scanning calorimetry are an outstanding source for molecular information on protein folding and ligand-binding energetics. However, deconvolution of C(p) data of proteins in the presence of ligands can be compromised by indeterminacies concerning the correct choice of the statistical thermodynamic ensemble. By convent, the assumption of constant free ligand concentration has been used to derive formulae for the enthalpy. Unless the ligand occurs at large excess, this assumption is incorrect. Still the relevant ensemble is the grand canonical ensemble. We derive formulae for both constraints, constancy of total or free ligand concentration and illustrate the equations by application to the typical equilibrium Nx N + x D + x. It is demonstrated that as long as the thermodynamic properties of the ligand can be completely corrected for by performing a reference measurement, the grand canonical approach provides the proper and mathematically significantly simpler choice. We demonstrate on the two cases of sequential or independent ligand-binding the fact, that similar binding mechanisms result in different and distinguishable heat capacity equations. Finally, we propose adequate strategies for DSC experiments as well as for obtaining first estimates of the characteristic thermodynamic parameters, which can be used as starting values in a global fit of DSC data. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Rate Constants and Mechanisms of Protein-Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-05-22

    Whereas protein-ligand binding affinities have long-established prominence, binding rate constants and binding mechanisms have gained increasing attention in recent years. Both new computational methods and new experimental techniques have been developed to characterize the latter properties. It is now realized that binding mechanisms, like binding rate constants, can and should be quantitatively determined. In this review, we summarize studies and synthesize ideas on several topics in the hope of providing a coherent picture of and physical insight into binding kinetics. The topics include microscopic formulation of the kinetic problem and its reduction to simple rate equations; computation of binding rate constants; quantitative determination of binding mechanisms; and elucidation of physical factors that control binding rate constants and mechanisms.

  20. A look at ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Drug discovery is a challenging endeavor requiring the interplay of many different research areas. Gathering information on ligand binding thermodynamics may help considerably in reducing the risk within a high uncertainty scenario, allowing early rejection of flawed compounds and pushing forward optimal candidates. In particular, the free energy, the enthalpy, and the entropy of binding provide fundamental information on the intermolecular forces driving such interaction. Areas covered: The authors review the current status and recent developments in the application of ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery. The thermodynamic binding profile (Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding) can be used for lead selection and optimization (binding enthalpy, selectivity, and adaptability). Expert opinion: Binding thermodynamics provides fundamental information on the forces driving the formation of the drug-target complex. It has been widely accepted that binding thermodynamics may be used as a decision criterion along the ligand optimization process in drug discovery and development. In particular, the binding enthalpy may be used as a guide when selecting and optimizing compounds over a set of potential candidates. However, this has been recently called into question by arguing certain difficulties and in the light of certain experimental examples.

  1. β-lactoglobulin's conformational requirements for ligand binding at the calyx and the dimer interphase: a flexible docking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin Domínguez-Ramírez

    Full Text Available β-lactoglobulin (BLG is an abundant milk protein relevant for industry and biotechnology, due significantly to its ability to bind a wide range of polar and apolar ligands. While hydrophobic ligand sites are known, sites for hydrophilic ligands such as the prevalent milk sugar, lactose, remain undetermined. Through the use of molecular docking we first, analyzed the known fatty acid binding sites in order to dissect their atomistic determinants and second, predicted the interaction sites for lactose with monomeric and dimeric BLG. We validated our approach against BLG structures co-crystallized with ligands and report a computational setup with a reduced number of flexible residues that is able to reproduce experimental results with high precision. Blind dockings with and without flexible side chains on BLG showed that: i 13 experimentally-determined ligands fit the calyx requiring minimal movement of up to 7 residues out of the 23 that constitute this binding site. ii Lactose does not bind the calyx despite conformational flexibility, but binds the dimer interface and an alternate Site C. iii Results point to a probable lactolation site in the BLG dimer interface, at K141, consistent with previous biochemical findings. In contrast, no accessible lysines are found near Site C. iv lactose forms hydrogen bonds with residues from both monomers stabilizing the dimer through a claw-like structure. Overall, these results improve our understanding of BLG's binding sites, importantly narrowing down the calyx residues that control ligand binding. Moreover, our results emphasize the importance of the dimer interface as an insufficiently explored, biologically relevant binding site of particular importance for hydrophilic ligands. Furthermore our analyses suggest that BLG is a robust scaffold for multiple ligand-binding, suitable for protein design, and advance our molecular understanding of its ligand sites to a point that allows manipulation to control

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2012-01-01

    The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA) is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM) from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF) based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Long Zhang

    Full Text Available The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  4. Thermodynamics of Ligand Binding to Acyl-Coenzyme A Binding Protein Studied by Titration Calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils Joakim; Sigurskjold, Bent Walther; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  5. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  6. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  7. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  8. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  9. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L. N.; Gustavsson, P. E.; Michael, R.

    2012-01-01

    commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide...... ligand for purification of human IgG. Immobilized on WorkBeads, an agarose-based base matrix from Bio-Works, the ligand has a dynamic binding capacity of up to 48 mg/mL and purifies IgG from harvest cell culture fluid with purities and recovery of >93%. The binding affinity is similar to 10(5) M-1...

  10. GluR2 ligand-binding core complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Lunn, M-L; Liljefors, T

    2002-01-01

    X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-Des-Me-AMPA and in the presence and absence of zinc ions have been determined. (S)-Des-Me-AMPA, which is devoid of a substituent in the 5-position of the isoxazolol ring, only has limited interactions with the partly hydrophobic...

  11. The thermodynamic principles of ligand binding in chromatography and biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    the general thermodynamic principles of ligand binding. Models of the multi-component adsorption in ion-exchange and hydrophobic chromatography, HIC and RPLC, are developed. The parameters in the models have a well-defined physical significance. The models are compared to the Langmuir model...

  12. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  13. Control of estrogen receptor ligand binding by Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliss, A E; Benzeno, S; Rao, J; Caplan, A J

    2000-04-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 interacts with unliganded steroid hormone receptors and regulates their activity. We have analyzed the function of yeast and mammalian Hsp90 in regulating the ability of the human estrogen receptor (ER) to bind ligands in vivo and in vitro. Using the yeast system, we show that the ER expressed in several different hsp82 mutant strains binds reduced amounts of the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol compared to the wild type. This defect in hormone binding occurs without any significant change in the steady state levels of ER protein. To analyze the role of mammalian Hsp90, we synthesized the human ER in rabbit reticulocyte lysates containing geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor. At low concentrations of geldanamycin we observed reduced levels of hormone binding by the ER. At higher concentrations, we found reduced synthesis of the receptor. These data indicate that Hsp90 functions to maintain the ER in a high affinity hormone-binding conformation.

  14. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology of ...

  15. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  16. Sampling protein motion and solvent effect during ligand binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Vittorio; Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; La Motta, Concettina; Sartini, Stefania; Mugnaini, Laura; Da Settimo, Federico; Novellino, Ettore; Parrinello, Michele

    2012-01-01

    An exhaustive description of the molecular recognition mechanism between a ligand and its biological target is of great value because it provides the opportunity for an exogenous control of the related process. Very often this aim can be pursued using high resolution structures of the complex in combination with inexpensive computational protocols such as docking algorithms. Unfortunately, in many other cases a number of factors, like protein flexibility or solvent effects, increase the degree of complexity of ligand/protein interaction and these standard techniques are no longer sufficient to describe the binding event. We have experienced and tested these limits in the present study in which we have developed and revealed the mechanism of binding of a new series of potent inhibitors of Adenosine Deaminase. We have first performed a large number of docking calculations, which unfortunately failed to yield reliable results due to the dynamical character of the enzyme and the complex role of the solvent. Thus, we have stepped up the computational strategy using a protocol based on metadynamics. Our approach has allowed dealing with protein motion and solvation during ligand binding and finally identifying the lowest energy binding modes of the most potent compound of the series, 4-decyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-one. PMID:22238423

  17. Sampling and energy evaluation challenges in ligand binding protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Jr Greisen, Per; Schena, Alberto; Park, Hahnbeom; Johnsson, Kai; Stoddard, Barry L; Baker, David

    2017-12-01

    The steroid hormone 17α-hydroxylprogesterone (17-OHP) is a biomarker for congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hence there is considerable interest in development of sensors for this compound. We used computational protein design to generate protein models with binding sites for 17-OHP containing an extended, nonpolar, shape-complementary binding pocket for the four-ring core of the compound, and hydrogen bonding residues at the base of the pocket to interact with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups at the more polar end of the ligand. Eight of 16 designed proteins experimentally tested bind 17-OHP with micromolar affinity. A co-crystal structure of one of the designs revealed that 17-OHP is rotated 180° around a pseudo-two-fold axis in the compound and displays multiple binding modes within the pocket, while still interacting with all of the designed residues in the engineered site. Subsequent rounds of mutagenesis and binding selection improved the ligand affinity to nanomolar range, while appearing to constrain the ligand to a single bound conformation that maintains the same "flipped" orientation relative to the original design. We trace the discrepancy in the design calculations to two sources: first, a failure to model subtle backbone changes which alter the distribution of sidechain rotameric states and second, an underestimation of the energetic cost of desolvating the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of the ligand. The difference between design model and crystal structure thus arises from both sampling limitations and energy function inaccuracies that are exacerbated by the near two-fold symmetry of the molecule. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  18. ProBiS-ligands: a web server for prediction of ligands by examination of protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Janežič, Dušanka

    2014-07-01

    The ProBiS-ligands web server predicts binding of ligands to a protein structure. Starting with a protein structure or binding site, ProBiS-ligands first identifies template proteins in the Protein Data Bank that share similar binding sites. Based on the superimpositions of the query protein and the similar binding sites found, the server then transposes the ligand structures from those sites to the query protein. Such ligand prediction supports many activities, e.g. drug repurposing. The ProBiS-ligands web server, an extension of the ProBiS web server, is open and free to all users at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/ligands. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Rapid, radiochemical-ligand binding assay for methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caston, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    A radiochemical ligand binding assay for methotrexate is provided. A binder factor comprising a partially purified dihydrofolic acid reductase preparation is employed. The binder factor is conveniently prepared by homogenizing a factor containing animal organ such as liver, and extracting with isotonic saline and ammonium sulfate. A binder cofactor, NADPH 2 , is also employed in the binding reaction. The procedure contemplates both direct and sequential assay techniques, and it is not interfered with by vast excesses of many natural folate derivatives. 12 claims, 6 drawing figures

  20. Energetics of subunit assembly and ligand binding in human hemoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ackers, G K

    1980-01-01

    An extensive and self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties has recently been established for the coupled processes of subunit assembly and ligand binding (oxygen and protons) in human hemoglobin. The resulting thermodynamic values permit a consideration of the possible sources of energetic terms accounting for stability of the tetrameric quaternary structures at different stages of ligation, and of the possible sources of cooperative energy. The analysis indicates that: (a) The change i...

  1. Mathematical model for determining the binding constants between immunoglobulins, bivalent ligands, and monovalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Eric T; Cummings, Linda; Perez-Castillejos, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    This paper analyzes the equilibria between immunoglobulins (R(2)), homo-bifunctional ligands (L(2)), monovalent ligands (I), and their complexes. We present a mathematical model that can be used to estimate the concentration of each species present in a mixture of R(2), L(2), and I, given the initial conditions defining the total concentration of R(2), L(2), I, and four dissociation constants (K(d)(inter), K(d)(intra), K(d)(mono), and α). This model is based on fewer assumptions than previous models and can be used to describe exactly a broad range of experimental conditions. A series of curves illustrates the dependence of the equilibria upon the total concentrations of receptors and ligands, and the dissociation constants. We provide a set of guidelines for the design and analysis of experiments with a focus on estimating the binding constants from experimental binding isotherms. Two analytical equations relate the conditions for maximum aggregation in this system to the binding constants. This model is a tool to quantify the binding of immunoglobulins to antigens and a guide to understanding and predicting the experimental data of assays and techniques that employ immunoglobulins.

  2. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced 155 Eu: 3+ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor

  3. (-)PPAP: a new and selective ligand for sigma binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R A; Battaglia, G; Smith, J D

    1990-11-01

    Most agents employed for the investigation of sigma (sigma) binding sites display relatively low affinity for these sites, bind both at sigma sites and at either phencyclidine (PCP) sites or dopamine receptors with similar affinity, and/or produce some dopaminergic activity in vivo. We describe a new agent, (-)PPAP or R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-n-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, that binds with high affinity and selectivity at sigma (IC50 = 24 nM) versus either PCP sites (IC50 greater than 75,000 nM) or D1 and D2 dopamine receptors (IC50 greater than 5,000 nM). The sigma affinity of this agent is comparable to that of the standard ligands (+)-3-PPP and DTG. Furthermore, although (-)PPAP is structurally related to amphetamine, it neither produces nor antagonizes amphetamine-like stimulus effect in rats trained to discriminate 1 mg/kg of S(+)amphetamine from saline.

  4. Impedance spectroscopy analysis of human odorant binding proteins immobilized on nanopore arrays for biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanli; Zhang, Diming; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Yixuan; Luo, Senbiao; Yao, Yao; Li, Shuang; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-05-15

    Human odorant-binding proteins (hOBPs) not only can bind and transport odorants in the surrounding environment for sensing smells, but also play important roles in transmitting lots of biomolecules in different organs. Utilizing the properties of hOBPs, an electrochemical biosensor with nanopore array was developed to detect specific biomolecular ligands, such as aldehydes and fatty acids. The highly ordered nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide with diameter of 20-40 nm were fabricated with two-step oxidation. Through 2-carboxyethyl phosphonic acid, hOBPs were self-assembled on nanopores as the sensing membrane. With nanopore arrays, the impedance spectra showed quite different electron transfer processes in the frequency spectra, which could be characterized by the electron transfer resistance and electrical resistance of the porous membrane. Under stimulation of biomolecular ligands, series resistance of nanopores and hOBPs increased and showed a concentration-dependence feature, while the electron transfer resistance hardly changed. The nanopore based biosensor could sensitively detect biological ligands of benzaldehyde, docosahexaenoic acid, and lauric acid, which were closely related to or were potential biomarkers for cancers and other serious diseases. Equipped with hOBPs, the sensor exhibited promising potentials both in odorant and biomolecule detection for olfactory biosensing and in disease diagnosis and evaluation for biochemical detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced glycation end product ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products: biochemical characterization and formation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Jessica V; Weldon, Stephen C; Quinn, Douglas; Kiers, Geesje H; DeGroot, Jeroen; TeKoppele, Johan M; Hughes, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate with age and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. AGEs bind cell-surface receptors including the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The dependence of RAGE binding on specific biochemical characteristics of AGEs is currently unknown. Using standardized procedures and a variety of AGE measures, the present study aimed to characterize the AGEs that bind to RAGE and their formation kinetics in vitro. To produce AGEs with varying RAGE binding affinity, bovine serum albumin (BSA) AGEs were prepared with 0.5M glucose, fructose, or ribose at times of incubation from 0 to 12 weeks or for up to 3 days with glycolaldehyde or glyoxylic acid. The AGE-BSAs were characterized for RAGE binding affinity, fluorescence, absorbance, carbonyl content, reactive free amine content, molecular weight, pentosidine content, and N-epsilon-carboxymethyl lysine content. Ribose-AGEs bound RAGE with high affinity within 1 week of incubation in contrast to glucose- and fructose-AGE, which required 12 and 6 weeks, respectively, to generate equivalent RAGE ligands (IC50=0.66, 0.93, and 1.7 microM, respectively). Over time, all of the measured AGE characteristics increased. However, only free amine content robustly correlated with RAGE binding affinity. In addition, detailed protocols for the generation of AGEs that reproducibly bind RAGE with high affinity were developed, which will allow for further study of the RAGE-AGE interaction.

  6. Modeling of ligand binding to dopamine D2 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostopovici-Halip Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminic receptors have been for long time the major targets for developing new small molecules with high affinity and selectivity to treat psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration, drug abuse, and other therapeutic areas. In the absence of a 3D structure for the human D2 dopamine (HDD2 receptor, the efforts for discovery and design of new potential drugs rely on comparative models generation, docking and pharmacophore development studies. To get a better understanding of the HDD2 receptor binding site and the ligand-receptor interactions a homology model of HDD2 receptor based on the X-ray structure of β2-adrenergic receptor has been built and used to dock a set of partial agonists of HDD2 receptor. The main characteristics of the binding mode for the HDD2 partial agonists set are given by the ligand particular folding and a complex network of contacts represented by stacking interactions, salt bridge and hydrogen bond formation. The characterization of the partial agonist binding mode at HDD2 receptor provide the needed information to generate pharmacophore models which represent essential information in the future virtual screening studies in order to identify new potential HDD2 partial agonists.

  7. Observation of Protein Structural Vibrational Mode Sensitivity to Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first measurements of the dependence of large-scale protein intramolecular vibrational modes on ligand binding. These collective vibrational modes in the terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) are of great interest due to their predicted relation to protein function. Our technique, Crystals Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), allows for room temperature, table-top measurements of the optically active intramolecular modes. CATM measurements have revealed surprisingly narrowband features. CATM measurements are performed on single crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as well as CEWL bound to tri-N-acetylglucosamine (CEWL-3NAG) inhibitor. We find narrow band resonances that dramatically shift with binding. Quasiharmonic calculations are performed on CEWL and CEWL-3NAG proteins with CHARMM using normal mode analysis. The expected CATM response of the crystals is then calculated by summing over all protein orientations within the unit cell. We will compare the CATM measurements with the calculated results and discuss the changes which arise with protein-ligand binding. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI 2 grant DBI2959989.

  8. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  9. Computational approaches to modeling receptor flexibility upon ligand binding: Application to interfacially activated enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, R.C.; Sobolev, V.; Ortiz, A.R. .

    1998-01-01

    Receptors generally undergo conformational change upon ligand binding. We describe how fairly simple techniques may be used in docking and design studies to account for some of the changes in the conformations of proteins on ligand binding. Simulations of protein-ligand interactions that give...

  10. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  11. Engineering periplasmic ligand binding proteins as glucose nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance J. Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes affects over 100 million people worldwide. Better methods for monitoring blood glucose levels are needed for improving disease management. Several labs have previously made glucose nanosensors by modifying members of the periplasmic ligand binding protein superfamily. This minireview summarizes recent developments in constructing new versions of these proteins that are responsive within the physiological range of blood glucose levels, employ new reporter groups, and/or are more robust. These experiments are important steps in the development of novel proteins that have the characteristics needed for an implantable glucose nanosensor for diabetes management: specificity for glucose, rapid response, sensitivity within the physiological range of glucose concentrations, reproducibility, and robustness.

  12. Data quality in drug discovery: the role of analytical performance in ligand binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätzig, Hermann; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Steinicke, Franziska; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Baumann, Knut; Exner, Thomas; Böckler, Frank M; El Deeb, Sami

    2015-09-01

    Despite its importance and all the considerable efforts made, the progress in drug discovery is limited. One main reason for this is the partly questionable data quality. Models relating biological activity and structures and in silico predictions rely on precisely and accurately measured binding data. However, these data vary so strongly, such that only variations by orders of magnitude are considered as unreliable. This can certainly be improved considering the high analytical performance in pharmaceutical quality control. Thus the principles, properties and performances of biochemical and cell-based assays are revisited and evaluated. In the part of biochemical assays immunoassays, fluorescence assays, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and affinity capillary electrophoresis are discussed in details, in addition radiation-based ligand binding assays, mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and microscale thermophoresis are briefly evaluated. In addition, general sources of error, such as solvent, dilution, sample pretreatment and the quality of reagents and reference materials are discussed. Biochemical assays can be optimized to provide good accuracy and precision (e.g. percental relative standard deviation data quality are still advancing and will further advance the progress in drug development.

  13. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  14. AutoSite: an automated approach for pseudo-ligands prediction—from ligand-binding sites identification to predicting key ligand atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Sanner, Michel F.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The identification of ligand-binding sites from a protein structure facilitates computational drug design and optimization, and protein function assignment. We introduce AutoSite: an efficient software tool for identifying ligand-binding sites and predicting pseudo ligand corresponding to each binding site identified. Binding sites are reported as clusters of 3D points called fills in which every point is labelled as hydrophobic or as hydrogen bond donor or acceptor. From these fills AutoSite derives feature points: a set of putative positions of hydrophobic-, and hydrogen-bond forming ligand atoms. Results: We show that AutoSite identifies ligand-binding sites with higher accuracy than other leading methods, and produces fills that better matches the ligand shape and properties, than the fills obtained with a software program with similar capabilities, AutoLigand. In addition, we demonstrate that for the Astex Diverse Set, the feature points identify 79% of hydrophobic ligand atoms, and 81% and 62% of the hydrogen acceptor and donor hydrogen ligand atoms interacting with the receptor, and predict 81.2% of water molecules mediating interactions between ligand and receptor. Finally, we illustrate potential uses of the predicted feature points in the context of lead optimization in drug discovery projects. Availability and Implementation: http://adfr.scripps.edu/AutoDockFR/autosite.html Contact: sanner@scripps.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27354702

  15. LIGAND-BINDING SITES ON THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis that remains a serious medical and social health problem. Despite intensive efforts have been made in the past decade, there are no new efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs today, and that need is growing due to the spread of drug-resistant strains of M.tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU, being an important factor of the bacterium viability and virulence, is an attractive target for anti-tuberculosis drugs acting by inhibition of urease activity. However, the commercially available urease inhibitors are toxic and unstable, that prevent their clinical use. Therefore, new more potent anti-tuberculosis drugs inhibiting new targets are urgently needed. A useful tool for the search of novel inhibitors is a computational drug design. The inhibitor design is significantly easier if binding sites on the enzyme are identified in advance. This paper aimed to determine the probable ligand binding sites on the surface of M. tuberculosis urease. Methods. To identify ligand binding sites on MTU surface, сomputational solvent mapping method FTSite was applied by the use of MTU homology model we have built earlier. The method places molecular probes (small organic molecules containing various functional groups on a dense grid defined around the enzyme, and for each probe finds favorable positions. The selected poses are refined by free energy minimization, the low energy conformations are clustered, and the clusters are ranked on the basis of the average free energy. FTSite server outputs the protein residues delineating a binding sites and the probe molecules representing each cluster. To predict allosteric pockets on MTU, AlloPred and AlloSite servers were applied. AlloPred uses the normal mode analysis (NMA and models how the dynamics of a protein would be altered in the presence of a modulator at a specific pocket. Pockets on the enzyme are predicted using the Fpocket

  16. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-12-10

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term "movable type". Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the free

  17. Complex Relationship between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Bessman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR plays pivotal roles in development and is mutated or overexpressed in several cancers. Despite recent advances, the complex allosteric regulation of EGFR remains incompletely understood. Through efforts to understand why the negative cooperativity observed for intact EGFR is lost in studies of its isolated extracellular region (ECR, we uncovered unexpected relationships between ligand binding and receptor dimerization. The two processes appear to compete. Surprisingly, dimerization does not enhance ligand binding (although ligand binding promotes dimerization. We further show that simply forcing EGFR ECRs into preformed dimers without ligand yields ill-defined, heterogeneous structures. Finally, we demonstrate that extracellular EGFR-activating mutations in glioblastoma enhance ligand-binding affinity without directly promoting EGFR dimerization, suggesting that these oncogenic mutations alter the allosteric linkage between dimerization and ligand binding. Our findings have important implications for understanding how EGFR and its relatives are activated by specific ligands and pathological mutations.

  18. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  19. Automated molecular simulation based binding affinity calculator for ligand-bound HIV-1 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, S Kashif; Wright, David; Watson, Simon J; Zasada, Stefan J; Stoica, Ileana; Coveney, Peter V

    2008-09-01

    The successful application of high throughput molecular simulations to determine biochemical properties would be of great importance to the biomedical community if such simulations could be turned around in a clinically relevant timescale. An important example is the determination of antiretroviral inhibitor efficacy against varying strains of HIV through calculation of drug-protein binding affinities. We describe the Binding Affinity Calculator (BAC), a tool for the automated calculation of HIV-1 protease-ligand binding affinities. The tool employs fully atomistic molecular simulations alongside the well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann solvent accessible surface area (MMPBSA) free energy methodology to enable the calculation of the binding free energy of several ligand-protease complexes, including all nine FDA approved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and seven of the natural substrates cleaved by the protease. This enables the efficacy of these inhibitors to be ranked across several mutant strains of the protease relative to the wildtype. BAC is a tool that utilizes the power provided by a computational grid to automate all of the stages required to compute free energies of binding: model preparation, equilibration, simulation, postprocessing, and data-marshaling around the generally widely distributed compute resources utilized. Such automation enables the molecular dynamics methodology to be used in a high throughput manner not achievable by manual methods. This paper describes the architecture and workflow management of BAC and the function of each of its components. Given adequate compute resources, BAC can yield quantitative information regarding drug resistance at the molecular level within 96 h. Such a timescale is of direct clinical relevance and can assist in decision support for the assessment of patient-specific optimal drug treatment and the subsequent response to therapy for any given genotype.

  20. A web server for analysis, comparison and prediction of protein ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-25

    One of the major challenges in the field of system biology is to understand the interaction between a wide range of proteins and ligands. In the past, methods have been developed for predicting binding sites in a protein for a limited number of ligands. In order to address this problem, we developed a web server named 'LPIcom' to facilitate users in understanding protein-ligand interaction. Analysis, comparison and prediction modules are available in the "LPIcom' server to predict protein-ligand interacting residues for 824 ligands. Each ligand must have at least 30 protein binding sites in PDB. Analysis module of the server can identify residues preferred in interaction and binding motif for a given ligand; for example residues glycine, lysine and arginine are preferred in ATP binding sites. Comparison module of the server allows comparing protein-binding sites of multiple ligands to understand the similarity between ligands based on their binding site. This module indicates that ATP, ADP and GTP ligands are in the same cluster and thus their binding sites or interacting residues exhibit a high level of similarity. Propensity-based prediction module has been developed for predicting ligand-interacting residues in a protein for more than 800 ligands. In addition, a number of web-based tools have been integrated to facilitate users in creating web logo and two-sample between ligand interacting and non-interacting residues. In summary, this manuscript presents a web-server for analysis of ligand interacting residue. This server is available for public use from URL http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lpicom .

  1. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-01-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, 3 H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion ( 3 H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that 3 H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin

  2. Ligand-specific conformational changes in the alpha1 glycine receptor ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2009-01-01

    , and by the antagonist, strychnine. Voltage-clamp fluorometry involves labeling introduced cysteines with environmentally sensitive fluorophores and inferring structural rearrangements from ligand-induced fluorescence changes. In the inner beta-sheet, we labeled residues in loop 2 and in binding domain loops D and E....... At each position, strychnine and glycine induced distinct maximal fluorescence responses. The pre-M1 domain responded similarly; at each of four labeled positions glycine produced a strong fluorescence signal, whereas strychnine did not. This suggests that glycine induces conformational changes...... in the inner beta-sheet and pre-M1 domain that may be important for activation, desensitization, or both. In contrast, most labeled residues in loops C and F yielded fluorescence changes identical in magnitude for glycine and strychnine. A notable exception was H201C in loop C. This labeled residue responded...

  3. Structure of REV-ERBβ Ligand-binding Domain Bound to a Porphyrin Antagonist*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta-Camacho, Edna; Banerjee, Subhashis; Hughes, Travis S.; Solt, Laura A.; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors that play important roles in the regulation of circadian physiology, metabolism, and immune function. Although the REV-ERBs were originally characterized as orphan receptors, recent studies have demonstrated that they function as receptors for heme. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) are ligands that bind directly to the REV-ERBs. However, instead of mimicking the agonist action of heme, CoPP and ZnPP function as antagonists of REV-ERB function. This was unexpected because the only distinction between these ligands is the metal ion that is coordinated. To understand the structural basis by which REV-ERBβ can differentiate between a porphyrin agonist and antagonist, we characterized the interaction between REV-ERBβ with heme, CoPP, and ZnPP using biochemical and structural approaches, including x-ray crystallography and NMR. The crystal structure of CoPP-bound REV-ERBβ indicates only minor conformational changes induced by CoPP compared with heme, including the porphyrin ring of CoPP, which adopts a planar conformation as opposed to the puckered conformation observed in the heme-bound REV-ERBβ crystal structure. Thus, subtle changes in the porphyrin metal center and ring conformation may influence the agonist versus antagonist action of porphyrins and when considered with other studies suggest that gas binding to the iron metal center heme may drive alterations in REV-ERB activity. PMID:24872411

  4. A novel signal transduction protein: Combination of solute binding and tandem PAS-like sensor domains in one polypeptide chain: Periplasmic Ligand Binding Protein Dret_0059

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Wilton, R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, M. E. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Endres, M. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Babnigg, G. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Edirisinghe, J. N. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Henry, C. S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Joachimiak, A. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Schiffer, M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Pokkuluri, P. R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-03-06

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of a novel periplasmic ligand-binding protein, Dret_0059, from Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692, an organism isolated from the Salt Lake Retba in Senegal. The structure of the protein consists of a unique combination of a periplasmic solute binding protein (SBP) domain at the N-terminal and a tandem PAS-like sensor domain at the C-terminal region. SBP domains are found ubiquitously and their best known function is in solute transport across membranes. PAS-like sensor domains are commonly found in signal transduction proteins. These domains are widely observed as parts of many protein architectures and complexes but have not been observed previously within the same polypeptide chain. In the structure of Dret_0059, a ketoleucine moiety is bound to the SBP, whereas a cytosine molecule is bound in the distal PAS-like domain of the tandem PAS-like domain. Differential scanning flourimetry support the binding of ligands observed in the crystal structure. There is significant interaction between the SBP and tandem PAS-like domains, and it is possible that the binding of one ligand could have an effect on the binding of the other. We uncovered three other proteins with this structural architecture in the non-redundant sequence data base, and predict that they too bind the same substrates. The genomic context of this protein did not offer any clues for its function. We did not find any biological process in which the two observed ligands are coupled. The protein Dret_0059 could be involved in either signal transduction or solute transport.

  5. How To Deal with Multiple Binding Poses in Alchemical Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  6. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-09

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  7. Quantitative Prediction of Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinities for Influenza, Cholera, and Anthrax Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2018-03-05

    Multivalency achieves strong, yet reversible binding by the simultaneous formation of multiple weak bonds. It is a key interaction principle in biology and promising for the synthesis of high-affinity inhibitors of pathogens. We present a molecular model for the binding affinity of synthetic multivalent ligands onto multivalent receptors consisting of n receptor units arranged on a regular polygon. Ligands consist of a geometrically matching rigid polygonal core to which monovalent ligand units are attached via flexible linker polymers, closely mimicking existing experimental designs. The calculated binding affinities quantitatively agree with experimental studies for cholera toxin ( n = 5) and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) and allow to predict optimal core size and optimal linker length. Maximal binding affinity is achieved for a core that matches the receptor size and for linkers that have an equilibrium end-to-end distance that is slightly longer than the geometric separation between ligand core and receptor sites. Linkers that are longer than optimal are greatly preferable compared to shorter linkers. The angular steric restriction between ligand unit and linker polymer is shown to be a key parameter. We construct an enhancement diagram that quantifies the multivalent binding affinity compared to monovalent ligands. We conclude that multivalent ligands against influenza viral hemagglutinin ( n = 3), cholera toxin ( n = 5), and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) can outperform monovalent ligands only for a monovalent ligand affinity that exceeds a core-size dependent threshold value. Thus, multivalent drug design needs to balance core size, linker length, as well as monovalent ligand unit affinity.

  8. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  9. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of three opioid-nociceptin hybrid peptide ligands reveals substantially differing modes of their actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna I; Borbély, Adina; Magyar, Anna; Taricska, Nóra; Perczel, András; Zsíros, Ottó; Garab, Győző; Szűcs, Edina; Ötvös, Ferenc; Zádor, Ferenc; Balogh, Mihály; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Benyhe, Sándor

    2018-01-01

    In an attempt to design opioid-nociceptin hybrid peptides, three novel bivalent ligands, H-YGGFGGGRYYRIK-NH 2 , H-YGGFRYYRIK-NH 2 and Ac-RYYRIKGGGYGGFL-OH were synthesized and studied by biochemical, pharmacological, biophysical and molecular modelling tools. These chimeric molecules consist of YGGF sequence, a crucial motif in the N-terminus of natural opioid peptides, and Ac-RYYRIK-NH 2, which was isolated from a combinatorial peptide library as an antagonist or partial agonist that inhibits the biological activity of the endogenously occurring heptadecapeptide nociceptin. Solution structures for the peptides were studied by analysing their circular dichroism spectra. Receptor binding affinities were measured by equilibrium competition experiments using four highly selective radioligands. G-protein activating properties of the multitarget peptides were estimated in [ 35 S]GTPγS binding tests. The three compounds were also measured in electrically stimulated mouse vas deferens (MVD) bioassay. H-YGGFGGGRYYRIK-NH 2 (BA55), carrying N-terminal opioid and C-terminal nociceptin-like sequences interconnected with GGG tripeptide spacer displayed a tendency of having either unordered or β-sheet structures, was moderately potent in MVD and possessed a NOP/KOP receptor preference. A similar peptide without spacer H-YGGFRYYRIK-NH 2 (BA62) exhibited the weakest effect in MVD, more α-helical periodicity was present in its structure and it exhibited the most efficacious agonist actions in the G-protein stimulation assays. The third hybrid peptide Ac-RYYRIKGGGYGGFL-OH (BA61) unexpectedly displayed opioid receptor affinities, because the opioid message motif is hidden within the C-terminus. The designed chimeric peptide ligands presented in this study accommodate well into a group of multitarget opioid compounds that include opioid-non-opioid peptide dimer analogues, dual non-peptide dimers and mixed peptide- non-peptide bifunctional ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  10. Involvement of the prostatic steroid-binding protein in the transfer of ligand to the dioxin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderkvist, P; Poellinger, L

    1987-09-01

    The prostatic steroid-binding protein (PSP) represents a highly abundant protein in the rat prostate which binds carcinogens reversibly and with high affinity. The biological role of PSP and the toxicological implications of the carcinogen-protein interaction are unclear. In this report, we have attempted to examine a possible role of PSP in the transfer of ligands to the dioxin receptor. PSP was purified from the rat ventral prostate and labeled in vitro with 2,3,7,8-[3H]tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin). Dioxin-labeled PSP was then incubated with rat liver cytosol in the presence or absence of a 200-fold excess of nonradioactive competitor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran. After 2 h of incubation, a complete in vitro transfer of ligand from PSP to the rat hepatic dioxin receptor was observed, as assessed by velocity sedimentation analysis of specific dioxin binding. These results indicate that a high abundance carcinogen-binding protein, such as PSP, may be of importance in the cellular transfer of dioxin receptor ligands, thereby eliciting a receptor-mediated biochemical and/or toxic response.

  11. Thermodynamic fingerprints of ligand binding to human telomeric G-quadruplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Bon?ina, Matja?; Podlipnik, ?rtomir; Piantanida, Ivo; Eilmes, Julita; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Lah, Jurij

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic studies of ligand binding to human telomere (ht) DNA quadruplexes, as a rule, neglect the involvement of various ht-DNA conformations in the binding process. Therefore, the thermodynamic driving forces and the mechanisms of ht-DNA G-quadruplex-ligand recognition remain poorly understood. In this work we characterize thermodynamically and structurally binding of netropsin (Net), dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene derivatives (DP77, DP78), cationic porphyrin (TMPyP4) and two bisquinolini...

  12. Progress on the application of ligand receptor binding assays in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xue; Qian Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Receptor binding assay is an important drug screening method, which can quickly and inexpensively study the interactions between the targeted receptor and the potential ligands in vitro and provide the information of the relative binding affinity of ligand-receptor. The imaging of many radiopharmaceuticals is based on highly selective radioligand-receptor binding. The technique plays an important role in the design and screening of receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  13. Water networks contribute to enthalpy/entropy compensation in protein-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiten, Benjamin; Lockett, Matthew R; Sherman, Woody; Fujita, Shuji; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Lange, Heiko; Bowers, Carleen M; Heroux, Annie; Krilov, Goran; Whitesides, George M

    2013-10-16

    The mechanism (or mechanisms) of enthalpy-entropy (H/S) compensation in protein-ligand binding remains controversial, and there are still no predictive models (theoretical or experimental) in which hypotheses of ligand binding can be readily tested. Here we describe a particularly well-defined system of protein and ligands--human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) and a series of benzothiazole sulfonamide ligands with different patterns of fluorination--that we use to define enthalpy/entropy (H/S) compensation in this system thermodynamically and structurally. The binding affinities of these ligands (with the exception of one ligand, in which the deviation is understood) to HCA are, despite differences in fluorination pattern, indistinguishable; they nonetheless reflect significant and compensating changes in enthalpy and entropy of binding. Analysis reveals that differences in the structure and thermodynamic properties of the waters surrounding the bound ligands are an important contributor to the observed H/S compensation. These results support the hypothesis that the molecules of water filling the active site of a protein, and surrounding the ligand, are as important as the contact interactions between the protein and the ligand for biomolecular recognition, and in determining the thermodynamics of binding.

  14. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  15. Estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-binding parameters using computational strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deganutti, Giuseppe; Moro, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-protein binding parameters are gaining growing importance as key information to consider in drug discovery. The determination of the molecular structures, using particularly x-ray and NMR techniques, is crucial for understanding how a ligand recognizes its target in the final binding complex. However, for a better understanding of the recognition processes, experimental studies of ligand-protein interactions are needed. Even though several techniques can be used to investigate both thermodynamic and kinetic profiles for a ligand-protein complex, these procedures are very often laborious, time consuming and expensive. In the last 10 years, computational approaches have enormous potential in providing insights into each of the above effects and in parsing their contributions to the changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic binding parameters. The main purpose of this review is to summarize the state of the art of computational strategies for estimating the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of a ligand-protein binding.

  16. Changes in electrostatic surface potential of Na+/K+-ATPase cytoplasmic headpiece induced by cytoplasmic ligand(s) binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Martin; Grycova, Lenka; Lansky, Zdenek; Sklenovsky, Petr; Janovska, Marika; Otyepka, Michal; Teisinger, Jan

    2009-09-16

    A set of single-tryptophan mutants of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isolated, large cytoplasmic loop connecting transmembrane helices M4 and M5 (C45) was prepared to monitor effects of the natural cytoplasmic ligands (i.e., Mg(2+) and/or ATP) binding. We introduced a novel method for the monitoring of the changes in the electrostatic surface potential (ESP) induced by ligand binding, using the quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide or iodide. This approach opens a new way to understanding the interactions within the proteins. Our experiments revealed that the C45 conformation in the presence of the ATP (without magnesium) substantially differed from the conformation in the presence of Mg(2+) or MgATP or in the absence of any ligand not only in the sense of geometry but also in the sense of the ESP. Notably, the set of ESP-sensitive residues was different from the set of geometry-sensitive residues. Moreover, our data indicate that the effect of the ligand binding is not restricted only to the close environment of the binding site and that the information is in fact transmitted also to the distal parts of the molecule. This property could be important for the communication between the cytoplasmic headpiece and the cation binding sites located within the transmembrane domain.

  17. Application of NMR screening techniques for observing ligand binding with a protein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotakahara, Sakurako; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2005-01-01

    Water ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY), saturation transfer difference and NOE pumping NMR techniques were used to identify ligand binding with a receptor. Although these experiments were originally designed to observe ligands in complexes, their application is limited by the affinity of ligands towards target molecules. Here the improved WaterLOGSY pulse sequence was developed by incorporating the double pulsed field gradient spin-echo and gradient-tailored excitation WATERGATE sequences. The efficiency of these ligand-observed NMR screening techniques was investigated using the ribonuclease T1-inhibitor system. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the selenium-binding and reducing site in Arabidopsis thaliana homologue to mammals selenium-binding protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Florie; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Palencia, Andrés; Cobessi, David; Sarret, Géraldine; Zubieta, Chloé; Jourdain, Agnès; Dumas, Renaud; Forge, Vincent; Testemale, Denis; Bourguignon, Jacques; Hugouvieux, Véronique

    2014-11-14

    The function of selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1), present in almost all organisms, has not yet been established. In mammals, SBP1 is known to bind the essential element selenium but the binding site has not been identified. In addition, the SBP family has numerous potential metal-binding sites that may play a role in detoxification pathways in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtSBP1 over-expression increases tolerance to two toxic compounds for plants, selenium and cadmium, often found as soil pollutants. For a better understanding of AtSBP1 function in detoxification mechanisms, we investigated the chelating properties of the protein toward different ligands with a focus on selenium using biochemical and biophysical techniques. Thermal shift assays together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that AtSBP1 binds selenium after incubation with selenite (SeO3(2-)) with a ligand to protein molar ratio of 1:1. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the 1:1 stoichiometry and revealed an unexpectedly large value of binding enthalpy suggesting a covalent bond between selenium and AtSBP1. Titration of reduced Cys residues and comparative mass spectrometry on AtSBP1 and the purified selenium-AtSBP1 complex identified Cys(21) and Cys(22) as being responsible for the binding of one selenium. These results were validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Selenium K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy performed on the selenium-AtSBP1 complex demonstrated that AtSBP1 reduced SeO3(2-) to form a R-S-Se(II)-S-R-type complex. The capacity of AtSBP1 to bind different metals and selenium is discussed with respect to the potential function of AtSBP1 in detoxification mechanisms and selenium metabolism. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Copper binding ligands: production by marine plankton and characterization by ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orians, K.; Ross, A.; Lawrence, M.; Ikonomou, M.

    2003-04-01

    Organic complexation affects the bioavailability and distribution of copper in the surface ocean. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was cultured in the lab and subjected to near-toxic Cu concentrations. Strong Cu-binding ligands were produced under these conditions, as found for other species of Synechococcus. The copper-binding ligand produced had a log K'cond. (log conditional stability constant) of 12.2, similar to the natural ligands found in the surface ocean. The amount of ligand produced was proportional to the amount of copper present. Isolation and concentration of these compounds for characterization by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provides information about the structure of the organic ligands and their metal-ion complexes. Using model ligands, we'll show that ligands can be characterized by ESI-MS and that the location of the copper binding site can be determined in complex molecules. We'll also present results of copper-complexing ligands extracted from the coastal waters of British Columbia. Ligand concentrations are higher at low salinity and in surface waters, indicating that these ligands are produced in surface waters and/or delivered to the region via the Fraser River. Analysis of the extracts with highest UV absorbance identified two Cu2+ ligands of molecular weight 259 and 264. The mass and isotopic distributions are consistent with dipeptides and tripeptides containing two metal-binding amino groups. This result is consistent with the findings of other studies attempting to characterize Cu2+ ligands in seawater. The structure of the identified ligand is similar to that of rhodotorulic acid (a microbial siderophore), glutathione, and phytochelatins, indicating that small peptides and related compounds can act as strong, specific metal chelators in natural waters

  20. Extreme sequence divergence but conserved ligand-binding specificity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic microorganisms evade host immunity through extensive sequence variability in a protein region targeted by protective antibodies. In spite of the sequence variability, a variable region commonly retains an important ligand-binding function, reflected in the presence of a highly conserved sequence motif. Here, we analyze the limits of sequence divergence in a ligand-binding region by characterizing the hypervariable region (HVR of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein. Our studies were focused on HVRs that bind the human complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP, a ligand that confers phagocytosis resistance. A previous comparison of C4BP-binding HVRs identified residue identities that could be part of a binding motif, but the extended analysis reported here shows that no residue identities remain when additional C4BP-binding HVRs are included. Characterization of the HVR in the M22 protein indicated that two relatively conserved Leu residues are essential for C4BP binding, but these residues are probably core residues in a coiled-coil, implying that they do not directly contribute to binding. In contrast, substitution of either of two relatively conserved Glu residues, predicted to be solvent-exposed, had no effect on C4BP binding, although each of these changes had a major effect on the antigenic properties of the HVR. Together, these findings show that HVRs of M proteins have an extraordinary capacity for sequence divergence and antigenic variability while retaining a specific ligand-binding function.

  1. CYP 2D6 Binding Affinity Predictions Using Multiple Ligand and Protein Conformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovorka Perić-Hassler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the large flexibility and malleability of Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs, in silico prediction of CYP binding affinities to drugs and other xenobiotic compounds is a true challenge. In the current work, we use an iterative linear interaction energy (LIE approach to compute CYP binding affinities from molecular dynamics (MD simulation. In order to improve sampling of conformational space, we combine results from simulations starting with different relevant protein-ligand geometries. For calculated binding free energies of a set of thiourea compounds binding to the flexible CYP 2D6 isoform, improved correlation with experiment was obtained by combining results of MD runs starting from distinct protein conformations and ligand-binding orientations. This accuracy was obtained from relatively short MD simulations, which makes our approach computationally attractive for automated calculations of ligand-binding affinities to flexible proteins such as CYPs.

  2. Gentamicin binds to the megalin receptor as a competitive inhibitor using the common ligand binding motif of complement type repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagil, Robert; O'Shea, Charlotte; Nykjær, Anders

    2013-01-01

    megalin and investigated its interaction with gentamicin. Using NMR titration data in HADDOCK, we have generated a three-dimensional model describing the complex between megalin and gentamicin. Gentamicin binds to megalin with low affinity and exploits the common ligand binding motif previously described...... to megalin is highly similar to gentamicin binding to calreticulin. We discuss the impact of this novel insight for the future structure-based design of gentamicin antagonists....

  3. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  4. Ligand binding and thermostability of different allosteric states of the insulin zinc-hexamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B

    2006-01-01

    The influence of ligand binding and conformation state on the thermostability of hexameric zinc-insulin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The insulin hexamer exists in equilibrium between the forms T6, T3R3, and R6. Phenolic ligands induce and stabilize the T3R3- and R6-stat...

  5. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.; (NIH)

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  6. Ligand binding to telomeric G-quadruplex DNA investigated by funnel-metadynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraca, Federica; Amato, Jussara; Ortuso, Francesco; Artese, Anna; Pagano, Bruno; Novellino, Ettore; Alcaro, Stefano; Parrinello, Michele; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2017-03-14

    G-quadruplexes (G4s) are higher-order DNA structures typically present at promoter regions of genes and telomeres. Here, the G4 formation decreases the replicative DNA at each cell cycle, finally leading to apoptosis. The ability to control this mitotic clock, particularly in cancer cells, is fascinating and passes through a rational understanding of the ligand/G4 interaction. We demonstrate that an accurate description of the ligand/G4 binding mechanism is possible using an innovative free-energy method called funnel-metadynamics (FM), which we have recently developed to investigate ligand/protein interaction. Using FM simulations, we have elucidated the binding mechanism of the anticancer alkaloid berberine to the human telomeric G4 ( d [AG 3 (T 2 AG 3 ) 3 ]), computing also the binding free-energy landscape. Two ligand binding modes have been identified as the lowest energy states. Furthermore, we have found prebinding sites, which are preparatory to reach the final binding mode. In our simulations, the ions and the water molecules have been explicitly represented and the energetic contribution of the solvent during ligand binding evaluated. Our theoretical results provide an accurate estimate of the absolute ligand/DNA binding free energy ([Formula: see text] = -10.3 ± 0.5 kcal/mol) that we validated through steady-state fluorescence binding assays. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental value demonstrates that FM is a most powerful method to investigate ligand/DNA interaction and can be a useful tool for the rational design also of G4 ligands.

  7. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  8. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  9. Ligand-receptor binding affinities from saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy: the binding isotherm of STD initial growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Jesús; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Nieto, Pedro M

    2010-07-12

    The direct evaluation of dissociation constants (K(D)) from the variation of saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy values with the receptor-ligand ratio is not feasible due to the complex dependence of STD intensities on the spectral properties of the observed signals. Indirect evaluation, by competition experiments, allows the determination of K(D), as long as a ligand of known affinity is available for the protein under study. Herein, we present a novel protocol based on STD NMR spectroscopy for the direct measurements of receptor-ligand dissociation constants (K(D)) from single-ligand titration experiments. The influence of several experimental factors on STD values has been studied in detail, confirming the marked impact on standard determinations of protein-ligand affinities by STD NMR spectroscopy. These factors, namely, STD saturation time, ligand residence time in the complex, and the intensity of the signal, affect the accumulation of saturation in the free ligand by processes closely related to fast protein-ligand rebinding and longitudinal relaxation of the ligand signals. The proposed method avoids the dependence of the magnitudes of ligand STD signals at a given saturation time on spurious factors by constructing the binding isotherms using the initial growth rates of the STD amplification factors, in a similar way to the use of NOE growing rates to estimate cross relaxation rates for distance evaluations. Herein, it is demonstrated that the effects of these factors are cancelled out by analyzing the protein-ligand association curve using STD values at the limit of zero saturation time, when virtually no ligand rebinding or relaxation takes place. The approach is validated for two well-studied protein-ligand systems: the binding of the saccharides GlcNAc and GlcNAcbeta1,4GlcNAc (chitobiose) to the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) lectin, and the interaction of the amino acid L-tryptophan to bovine serum albumin (BSA). In all cases, the

  10. Ligand binding affinity and changes in the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Aleem; Zhu, Qiaochu; Smith, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    The effect of ligand on the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), a receptor involved in numerous pathological conditions, remains unknown. Single particle tracking experiments that use quantum dots specifically bound to hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged RAGE (HA-RAGE) are reported to elucidate the effect of ligand binding on HA-RAGE diffusion in GM07373 cell membranes. The ligand used in these studies is methylglyoxal modified-bovine serum albumin (MGO-BSA) containing advanced glycation end products modifications. The binding affinity between soluble RAGE and MGO-BSA increases by 1.8 to 9.7-fold as the percent primary amine modification increases from 24 to 74% and with increasing negative charge on the MGO-BSA. Ligand incubation affects the HA-RAGE diffusion coefficient, the radius of confinement, and duration of confinement. There is, however, no correlation between MGO-BSA ligand binding affinity with soluble RAGE and the extent of the changes in HA-RAGE lateral diffusion. The ligand induced changes to HA-RAGE lateral diffusion do not occur when cholesterol is depleted from the cell membrane, indicating the mechanism for ligand-induced changes to HA-RAGE diffusion is cholesterol dependent. The results presented here serve as a first step in unraveling how ligand influences RAGE lateral diffusion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Helical propensity in an intrinsically disordered protein accelerates ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per

    2014-01-01

    domain of the activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors (ACTR) is intrinsically disordered and folds upon binding to the nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) of the CREB binding protein. A number of mutants was designed that selectively perturbs the amount of secondary structure......Many intrinsically disordered proteins fold upon binding to other macromolecules. The secondary structure present in the well-ordered complex is often formed transiently in the unbound state. The consequence of such transient structure for the binding process is, however, not clear. The activation...... the notion of preformed secondary structure as an important determinant for molecular recognition in intrinsically disordered proteins....

  12. Topography for independent binding of alpha-helical and PPII-helical ligands to a peroxisomal SH3 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douangamath, Alice; Filipp, Fabian V.; Klein, André T. J.; Barnett, Phil; Zou, Peijian; Voorn-Brouwer, Tineke; Vega, M. Cristina; Mayans, Olga M.; Sattler, Michael; Distel, Ben; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    While the function of most small signaling domains is confined to binary ligand interactions, the peroxisomal Pex13p SH3 domain has the unique capacity of binding to two different ligands, Pex5p and Pex14p. We have used this domain as a model to decipher its structurally independent ligand binding

  13. Thermodynamic Characterization of New Positive Allosteric Modulators Binding to the Glutamate Receptor A2 Ligand-Binding Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Francotte, Pierre; Goffin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxides. Measurements of ligand binding by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed similar binding affinities for the modulator series at the GluA2 LBD but differences in the thermodynamic driving forces. Binding of 5c (7-F) and 6 (no-F) is enthalpy driven......, and combined with the shorter total simulation time, we found the OSP method to be more effective for this setup. Furthermore, from the molecular dynamics simulations, we extracted the enthalpies and entropies, and along with the ITC data, this suggested that the differences in binding free energies...

  14. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric (NIH)

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  15. The thermodynamic landscape of testosterone binding to cytochrome P450 3A4: ligand binding and spin state equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Arthur G; Campbell, A Patricia; Atkins, William M

    2005-02-01

    Human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 catalyzes the oxygen-dependent metabolism of greater than 60% of known drugs. CYP3A4 binds multiple ligands simultaneously, and this contributes to complex allosteric kinetic behavior. Substrates that bind to this enzyme change the ferric spin state equilibrium of the heme, which can be observed by optical absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The ligand-dependent spin state equilibrium has not been quantitatively understood for any ligands that exhibit multiple binding. The CYP3A4 substrate testosterone (TST) has been shown previously by absorbance spectroscopy to induce spin state changes that are characteristic of a low spin to high spin conversion. Here, EPR was used to examine the equilibrium binding of TST to CYP3A4 at [CYP3A4] > K(D), which allows for characterization of the singly occupied state (i.e., CYP3A4.TST). We also have used absorbance spectroscopy to examine equilibrium binding, where [CYP3A4] equations, and modifications of it, reveals that the first equivalent of TST binds with higher affinity than the second equivalent of TST and its binding is positively cooperative with respect to ligand-dependent spin state conversion. Careful analysis of the EPR and absorbance spectral results suggests that the binding of the second TST induces a shift to the high spin state and thus that the second TST binding causes displacement of the bound water. A model involving six thermodynamic states is presented and this model is related to the turnover of the enzyme.

  16. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud

    2003-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large class of seven transmembrane proteins, which bind selectively agonists or antagonists with important consequences for cellular signaling and function. Comprehension of the molecular details of ligand binding is important for the understanding...

  17. VASP: a volumetric analysis of surface properties yields insights into protein-ligand binding specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Y Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP, a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR-related lipid transfer (START domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity.

  18. Improving the binding capacities of protein A chromatographic materials by means of ligand polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-06-20

    Protein A chromatography is one of the most important techniques used in the purification of monoclonal antibodies. Due to the low dynamic binding capacity of protein A chromatographic materials compared to other stationary phases, protein A chromatography is often discussed to be the bottleneck among current purification processes. Several approaches were tested within this study in order to maximize IgG binding capacities of current acrylamido-based based resins. Genetic engineering techniques were used in order to polymerize one of the IgG binding domains (B-domain) of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) to achieve ligands with an increased length. The solution-binding ratio and the total size of ligand-antibody complexes were used to characterize the interaction potential of novel ligands, revealing a relatively linear dependency between the number of binding domains upon the amount of bound antibody molecules. This relationship was also valid up to a ligand which was comprised of 8 B-domains after attaching them onto acrylamido-based based stationary phases using epoxy coupling techniques. Equilibrium binding capacities of more than 80mghIgGmL(-1) were achieved using the B8 ligand. Furthermore, static binding capacities, especially for smaller ligands comprised of fewer B-domains, were improved up to 87mghIgGmL(-1) using site-specific coupling chemistry, which is an improvement of more than 20% compared to commercially available materials. In order to evaluate pore exclusion effects due to the use of prolonged affinity ligands, prepared materials were characterized regarding their effective intraparticle porosity and breakthrough capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fc-Binding Ligands of Immunoglobulin G: An Overview of High Affinity Proteins and Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weonu Choe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing application of antibodies has inspired the development of several novel methods to isolate and target antibodies using smart biomaterials that mimic the binding of Fc-receptors to antibodies. The Fc-binding domain of antibodies is the primary binding site for e.g., effector proteins and secondary antibodies, whereas antigens bind to the Fab region. Protein A, G, and L, surface proteins expressed by pathogenic bacteria, are well known to bind immunoglobulin and have been widely exploited in antibody purification strategies. Several difficulties are encountered when bacterial proteins are used in antibody research and application. One of the major obstacles hampering the use of bacterial proteins is sample contamination with trace amounts of these proteins, which can invoke an immune response in the host. Many research groups actively develop synthetic ligands that are able to selectively and strongly bind to antibodies. Among the reported ligands, peptides that bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies are attractive tools in antibody research. Besides their use as high affinity ligands in antibody purification chromatography, Fc-binding peptides are applied e.g., to localize antibodies on nanomaterials and to increase the half-life of proteins in serum. In this review, recent developments of Fc-binding peptides are presented and their binding characteristics and diverse applications are discussed.

  20. Further biochemical characterization of Mycobacterium leprae laminin-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.M. Marques

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the alpha2 chain of laminin-2 present on the surface of Schwann cells is involved in the process of attachment of Mycobacterium leprae to these cells. Searching for M. leprae laminin-binding molecules, in a previous study we isolated and characterized the cationic proteins histone-like protein (Hlp and ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 as potential adhesins involved in M. leprae-Schwann cell interaction. Hlp was shown to bind alpha2-laminins and to greatly enhance the attachment of mycobacteria to ST88-14 Schwann cells. In the present study, we investigated the laminin-binding capacity of the ribosomal proteins S4 and S5. The genes coding for these proteins were PCR amplified and their recombinant products were shown to bind alpha2-laminins in overlay assays. However, when tested in ELISA-based assays and in adhesion assays with ST88-14 cells, in contrast to Hlp, S4 and S5 failed to bind laminin and act as adhesins. The laminin-binding property and adhesin capacity of two basic host-derived proteins were also tested, and only histones, but not cytochrome c, were able to increase bacterial attachment to ST88-14 cells. Our data suggest that the alanine/lysine-rich sequences shared by Hlp and eukaryotic H1 histones might be involved in the binding of these cationic proteins to laminin.

  1. Crystallographic study of novel transthyretin ligands exhibiting negative-cooperativity between two thyroxine binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Tomar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transthyretin (TTR is a homotetrameric serum and cerebrospinal fluid protein that transports thyroxine (T4 and retinol by binding to retinol binding protein. Rate-limiting tetramer dissociation and rapid monomer misfolding and disassembly of TTR lead to amyloid fibril formation in different tissues causing various amyloid diseases. Based on the current understanding of the pathogenesis of TTR amyloidosis, it is considered that the inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by stabilization of TTR in native tetrameric form is a viable approach for the treatment of TTR amyloidosis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have examined interactions of the wtTTR with a series of compounds containing various substitutions at biphenyl ether skeleton and a novel compound, previously evaluated for binding and inhibiting tetramer dissociation, by x-ray crystallographic approach. High resolution crystal structures of five ligands in complex with wtTTR provided snapshots of negatively cooperative binding of ligands in two T4 binding sites besides characterizing their binding orientations, conformations, and interactions with binding site residues. In all complexes, the ligand has better fit and more potent interactions in first T4 site i.e. (AC site than the second T4 site (BD site. Together, these results suggest that AC site is a preferred ligand binding site and retention of ordered water molecules between the dimer interfaces further stabilizes the tetramer by bridging a hydrogen bond interaction between Ser117 and its symmetric copy. CONCLUSION: Novel biphenyl ether based compounds exhibit negative-cooperativity while binding to two T4 sites which suggests that binding of only single ligand molecule is sufficient to inhibit the TTR tetramer dissociation.

  2. Biochemical and binding characteristics of boar epididymal fluid proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maňásková-Postlerová, Pavla; Davidová, Nina; Jonáková, Věra

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 879, č. 1 (2011), s. 100-106 ISSN 1570-0232 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/09/1285; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06011; GA ČR(CZ) GD523/08/H064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : epididymal proteins * RP HPLC * biotin-labeled ligands Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.888, year: 2011

  3. Automatic generation of bioinformatics tools for predicting protein-ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Yusuke; Banno, Masaki; Ueki, Kokoro; Saad, Gul; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-03-15

    Predictive tools that model protein-ligand binding on demand are needed to promote ligand research in an innovative drug-design environment. However, it takes considerable time and effort to develop predictive tools that can be applied to individual ligands. An automated production pipeline that can rapidly and efficiently develop user-friendly protein-ligand binding predictive tools would be useful. We developed a system for automatically generating protein-ligand binding predictions. Implementation of this system in a pipeline of Semantic Web technique-based web tools will allow users to specify a ligand and receive the tool within 0.5-1 day. We demonstrated high prediction accuracy for three machine learning algorithms and eight ligands. The source code and web application are freely available for download at http://utprot.net They are implemented in Python and supported on Linux. shimizu@bi.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Automatic generation of bioinformatics tools for predicting protein–ligand binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Masaki; Ueki, Kokoro; Saad, Gul; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Predictive tools that model protein–ligand binding on demand are needed to promote ligand research in an innovative drug-design environment. However, it takes considerable time and effort to develop predictive tools that can be applied to individual ligands. An automated production pipeline that can rapidly and efficiently develop user-friendly protein–ligand binding predictive tools would be useful. Results: We developed a system for automatically generating protein–ligand binding predictions. Implementation of this system in a pipeline of Semantic Web technique-based web tools will allow users to specify a ligand and receive the tool within 0.5–1 day. We demonstrated high prediction accuracy for three machine learning algorithms and eight ligands. Availability and implementation: The source code and web application are freely available for download at http://utprot.net. They are implemented in Python and supported on Linux. Contact: shimizu@bi.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26545824

  5. Binding-Induced Fluorescence of Serotonin Transporter Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, James; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Babinchak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP(+)) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP(+)) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP(+)), has...

  6. Do Fragments and Crystallization Additives Bind Similarly to Drug-like Ligands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drwal, Malgorzata N; Jacquemard, Célien; Perez, Carlos; Desaphy, Jérémy; Kellenberger, Esther

    2017-05-22

    The success of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) hinges upon the optimization of low-molecular-weight compounds (MW additives such as cryoprotectants or buffer components, which are highly abundant in crystal structures, are frequently ignored. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the information present in protein complexes with fragments as well as those with additives and how they relate to the binding modes of their drug-like counterparts. We present a thorough analysis of the binding modes of crystallographic additives, fragments, and drug-like ligands bound to four diverse targets of wide interest in drug discovery and highly represented in the Protein Data Bank: cyclin-dependent kinase 2, β-secretase 1, carbonic anhydrase 2, and trypsin. We identified a total of 630 unique molecules bound to the catalytic binding sites, among them 31 additives, 222 fragments, and 377 drug-like ligands. In general, we observed that, independent of the target, protein-fragment interaction patterns are highly similar to those of drug-like ligands and mostly cover the residues crucial for binding. Crystallographic additives are also able to show conserved binding modes and recover the residues important for binding in some of the cases. Moreover, we show evidence that the information from fragments and drug-like ligands can be applied to rescore docking poses in order to improve the prediction of binding modes.

  7. Radioligand binding assays for high affinity binders in the presence of endogenous ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, H.B. III; McGahan, T.

    1986-01-01

    Endogenous ligands complicate radioligand-binding assays of high-affinity binding proteins by obscuring binding sites or by diluting the labeled ligand. They have developed a mathematical model for such systems where structurally identical radioligand and endogenous ligand can be equilibrated on the binding site and bound radioligand measured. A double-reciprocal plot of bound radioligand, *L/sub B/, versus sample volume, V, yields a straight line. Introduction of scaling factors for sample dilution, F, and total radioligand available, *L/sub T/, produces a plot in which the x-intercept yields the endogenous ligand concentration, [L/sub T/]; the slope is the reciprocal of the binding protein concentration, [P/sub T/] -1 ; and the y-intercept is the fractional saturation of the high-affinity binder, L/sub T//P/sub T/. This type of analysis has been applied to the assay of high-affinity biotin-binding proteins in egg yolk. Its use led to the detection of a second biotin-binding protein which is heat labile. The conceptual approach can be applied to the assay of other high-affinity binders

  8. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Patricia A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I•C base pairs are functional analogs of A•T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  9. FunFOLDQA: a quality assessment tool for protein-ligand binding site residue predictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Roche

    Full Text Available The estimation of prediction quality is important because without quality measures, it is difficult to determine the usefulness of a prediction. Currently, methods for ligand binding site residue predictions are assessed in the function prediction category of the biennial Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP experiment, utilizing the Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC and Binding-site Distance Test (BDT metrics. However, the assessment of ligand binding site predictions using such metrics requires the availability of solved structures with bound ligands. Thus, we have developed a ligand binding site quality assessment tool, FunFOLDQA, which utilizes protein feature analysis to predict ligand binding site quality prior to the experimental solution of the protein structures and their ligand interactions. The FunFOLDQA feature scores were combined using: simple linear combinations, multiple linear regression and a neural network. The neural network produced significantly better results for correlations to both the MCC and BDT scores, according to Kendall's τ, Spearman's ρ and Pearson's r correlation coefficients, when tested on both the CASP8 and CASP9 datasets. The neural network also produced the largest Area Under the Curve score (AUC when Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analysis was undertaken for the CASP8 dataset. Furthermore, the FunFOLDQA algorithm incorporating the neural network, is shown to add value to FunFOLD, when both methods are employed in combination. This results in a statistically significant improvement over all of the best server methods, the FunFOLD method (6.43%, and one of the top manual groups (FN293 tested on the CASP8 dataset. The FunFOLDQA method was also found to be competitive with the top server methods when tested on the CASP9 dataset. To the best of our knowledge, FunFOLDQA is the first attempt to develop a method that can be used to assess ligand binding site

  10. Structural Characterization of Natural Nickel and Copper Binding Ligands along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect

    OpenAIRE

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Till, Claire P.; Ruacho, Angel; Bundy, Randelle M.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McKenna, Amy M.; Barbeau, Katherine A.; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Saito, Mak A.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Organic ligands form strong complexes with many trace elements in seawater. Various metals can compete for the same ligand chelation sites, and the final speciation of bound metals is determined by relative binding affinities, concentrations of binding sites, uncomplexed metal concentrations, and association/dissociation kinetics. Different ligands have a wide range of metal affinities and specificities. However, the chemical composition of these ligands in the marine environment remains poor...

  11. Structural characterization of natural nickel and copper binding ligands along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal transect

    OpenAIRE

    Rene M Boiteau; Rene M Boiteau; Claire P Till; Angel Ruacho; Randelle M Bundy; Nicholas J Hawco; Nicholas J Hawco; Amy M. McKenna; Katherine Barbeau; Kenneth Bruland; Mak Saito; Daniel James Repeta

    2016-01-01

    Organic ligands form strong complexes with many trace elements in seawater. Various metals can compete for the same ligand chelation sites, and the final speciation of bound metals is determined by relative binding affinities, concentrations of binding sites, uncomplexed metal concentrations, and association/dissociation kinetics. Different ligands have a wide range of metal affinities and specificities. However, the chemical composition of these ligands in the marine environment remains poor...

  12. Human PD-1 binds differently to its human ligands: a comprehensive modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viricel, Clement; Ahmed, Marawan; Barakat, Khaled

    2015-04-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a potent inhibitory receptor of T cells which binds to two different ligands, namely PD-L1 and PD-L2, and upon binding, it inhibits T cell activation, differentiation, and proliferation, leading to a state of immune tolerance. Blocking these interactions recently emerged as a 'game changer' approach in immunotherapy. Despite the significant therapeutic potential of targeting the PD-1 pathway, the interaction between human PD-1 and its two human ligands is not fully understood. Current crystal structures describe the interactions of mouse PD-1 with human PD-L1 or mouse PD-L2. However, recent mutational and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses suggest that human PD-1 binds its human ligands differently compared to their mouse counterparts. No detailed model is currently available to consistently fit these data. The lack of these accurate structures constitutes a high barrier against rationally developing more effective and safer agents targeting these interactions. Here we describe for the first time two accurate models for human PD-1 bound to its two human ligands. Our methodology involved combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with protein-protein docking and binding energy analysis to predict the most probable binding conformations for PD1 to its ligands. Our results confirm the available experimental NMR and mutational data and reveal the most accurate atomistic details so far of how human PD-1 binds to human PD-Ls and why the two ligands bind with different affinities to the same receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel trisubstituted acridines as human telomeric quadruplex binding ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ungvarsky, J.; Plšíková, J.; Janovec, J.; Koval, J.; Mikeš, J.; Mikesová, L.; Harvanova, D.; Fedoročko, P.; Kristian, P.; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 57, DEC 2014 (2014), s. 13-29 ISSN 0045-2068 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Braco 19 derivatives * Trisubstituted acridines * DNA binding Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.152, year: 2014

  14. Conformational Changes in Small Ligands Upon Tetanus Toxin Binding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henderson, Terry J; Gitti, Rossitza K

    2008-01-01

    ... A upon binding to tetanus toxin. C13 T1 measurements suggested that to a first approximation, the conformational behavior of doxorubicin in solution appears to be a composite of a rigid aromatic ring system, ring librations...

  15. myo-Inositol and d-Ribose Ligand Discrimination in an ABC Periplasmic Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrou, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) IbpA mediates the uptake of myo-inositol by the IatP-IatA ATP-binding cassette transmembrane transporter. We report a crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus IbpA bound to myo-inositol at 1.45 Å resolution. This constitutes the first structure of a PBP bound to inositol. IbpA adopts a type I PBP fold consisting of two α-β lobes that surround a central hinge. A pocket positioned between the lobes contains the myo-inositol ligand, which binds with submicromolar affinity (0.76 ± 0.08 μM). IbpA is homologous to ribose-binding proteins and binds d-ribose with low affinity (50.8 ± 3.4 μM). On the basis of IbpA and ribose-binding protein structures, we have designed variants of IbpA with inverted binding specificity for myo-inositol and d-ribose. Five mutations in the ligand-binding pocket are sufficient to increase the affinity of IbpA for d-ribose by 10-fold while completely abolishing binding to myo-inositol. Replacement of ibpA with these mutant alleles unable to bind myo-inositol abolishes C. crescentus growth in medium containing myo-inositol as the sole carbon source. Neither deletion of ibpA nor replacement of ibpA with the high-affinity ribose binding allele affected C. crescentus growth on d-ribose as a carbon source, providing evidence that the IatP-IatA transporter is specific for myo-inositol. This study outlines the evolutionary relationship between ribose- and inositol-binding proteins and provides insight into the molecular basis upon which these two related, but functionally distinct, classes of periplasmic proteins specifically bind carbohydrate ligands. PMID:23504019

  16. Exhaustive comparison and classification of ligand-binding surfaces in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yoichi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins function by interacting with other small molecules (ligands). Identification of ligand-binding sites (LBS) in proteins can therefore help to infer their molecular functions. A comprehensive comparison among local structures of LBSs was previously performed, in order to understand their relationships and to classify their structural motifs. However, similar exhaustive comparison among local surfaces of LBSs (patches) has never been performed, due to computational complexity. To e...

  17. Advanced glycation end product ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products: Biochemical characterization and formation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valencia, J.V.; Weldon, S.C.; Quinn, D.; Kiers, G.H.; Groot, J. de; TeKoppele, J.M.; Hughes, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate with age and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. AGEs bind cell-surface receptors including the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The dependence of RAGE binding on specific biochemical characteristics of AGEs is currently unknown.

  18. New insights into the GABAA receptor structure and orthosteric ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Frølund, Bente Flensborg; Bruun, Anne Techau

    2011-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A) Rs) are ligand gated chloride ion channels that mediate overall inhibitory signaling in the CNS. A detailed understanding of their structure is important to gain insights in, e.g., ligand binding and functional properties of this pharmaceutically important target....... Homology modeling is a necessary tool in this regard because experimentally determined structures are lacking. Here we present an exhaustive approach for creating a high quality model of the a(1) ß(2) ¿(2) subtype of the GABA(A) R ligand binding domain, and we demonstrate its usefulness in understanding......, and its stability in molecular dynamics (MD) compared with that of the two homologous crystal structures. We then combined the model with extensive structure-activity relationships available from two homologous series of orthosteric GABA(A) R antagonists to create a detailed hypothesis for their binding...

  19. Computational Approaches to the Chemical Equilibrium Constant in Protein-ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Acosta, Joel José; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    The physiological role played by protein-ligand recognition has motivated the development of several computational approaches to the ligand binding affinity. Some of them, termed rigorous, have a strong theoretical foundation but involve too much computation to be generally useful. Some others alleviate the computational burden by introducing strong approximations and/or empirical calibrations, which also limit their general use. Most importantly, there is no straightforward correlation between the predictive power and the level of approximation introduced. Here, we present a general framework for the quantitative interpretation of protein-ligand binding based on statistical mechanics. Within this framework, we re-derive self-consistently the fundamental equations of some popular approaches to the binding constant and pinpoint the inherent approximations. Our analysis represents a first step towards the development of variants with optimum accuracy/efficiency ratio for each stage of the drug discovery pipeline. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. A Folded Excited State of Ligand-Free Nuclear Coactivator Binding Domain (NCBD) Underlies Plasticity in Ligand Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Andersen, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Lau Dalby

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are renowned for their structural plasticity when they undergo coupled folding and binding to partner proteins. The nuclear coactivator binding domain of CBP is a remarkable example of this adaptability as it folds into two different conformations depending...... experience conformational exchange. The dispersion data can be described by a global two-state exchange process between a ground state and an excited state populated to 8%. The three helices are still folded in the excited state but have a different packing from the ground state; the contact between helices...... with that of NCBD in complex with the ligand IRF-3. The energy landscape of this domain is thus proposed to resemble the fold-switching proteins that have two coexisting native states, which may serve as a starting point for binding via conformational selection....

  2. [Role of histidine in ligand binding ability of hemoglobin gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, T A; Krasnov, P O; Kuzubov, A A; Avramov, P V

    2004-01-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of heme complexes with His, Gly, and Cys residues (Heme-His, Heme-Gly, and Heme-Cys) in the fifth coordination position of the Fe atom and with oxygen and nitrogen oxide molecules in the sixth Fe position were studied by the semiempirical quantum-chemical method PM3. A comparative analysis of internuclear distances showed that the strength of chemical bonding between the ligand molecules (oxygen and nitrogen oxide) is greater for Heme-Cys than for Heme-His and Heme-Gly complexes. Consequently, the strengthening of the chemical bond of the oxygen (or nitrogen oxide) molecule with Heme-Cys substantially weakens the chemical bond in the ligand molecule. The Mulliken population analysis showed that the electronic density of ligand (oxygen or nitrogen oxide) p-orbitals is transferred to the d-orbitals of the Fe atom, whose charge, calculated according to the Mulliken analysis, formally becomes negative. In the Heme-His complex with oxygen, this charge is substantially greater than in the complex with NO, and the oxygen molecule becomes polarized. No oxygen polarization is observed in the Heme-Cys complex, and the electron density (judging from the change in the Fe charge) is transferred to the coordinated sulfur atom. This is also characteristic of Heme-Cys complexes with nitrogen oxide. An analysis of charges on the atoms indicates that the character of chemical bonding of the oxygen molecule in Heme-Cys and Heme-Gly complexes is similar and basically differs from that in the case of the Heme-His complex. The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2004, vol. 30, no. 2; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  3. Dissecting electrostatic screening, specific ion binding, and ligand binding in an energetic model for glycine riboswitch folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian (Stanford)

    2010-09-17

    Riboswitches are gene-regulating RNAs that are usually found in the 5{prime}-untranslated regions of messenger RNA. As the sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA is highly negatively charged, the folding and ligand-binding interactions of riboswitches are strongly dependent on the presence of cations. Using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and hydroxyl radical footprinting, we examined the cation dependence of the different folding stages of the glycine-binding riboswitch from Vibrio cholerae. We found that the partial folding of the tandem aptamer of this riboswitch in the absence of glycine is supported by all tested mono- and divalent ions, suggesting that this transition is mediated by nonspecific electrostatic screening. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations using SAXS-derived low-resolution structural models allowed us to perform an energetic dissection of this process. The results showed that a model with a constant favorable contribution to folding that is opposed by an unfavorable electrostatic term that varies with ion concentration and valency provides a reasonable quantitative description of the observed folding behavior. Glycine binding, on the other hand, requires specific divalent ions binding based on the observation that Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} facilitated glycine binding, whereas other divalent cations did not. The results provide a case study of how ion-dependent electrostatic relaxation, specific ion binding, and ligand binding can be coupled to shape the energetic landscape of a riboswitch and can begin to be quantitatively dissected.

  4. Hydrogen exchange and ligand binding: Ligand-dependent and ligand-independent protection in the Src SH3 domain

    OpenAIRE

    Wildes, David; Marqusee, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange has proven to be a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing high-energy conformations in protein ensembles. Since interactions with ligands can modulate these high-energy conformations, hydrogen exchange appears to be an ideal experimental probe of the physical mechanisms underlying processes like allosteric regulation. The chemical mechanism of hydrogen exchange, however, can complicate such studies. Here, we examine hydrogen exchange rates in a simple...

  5. Partial association of restriction polymorphism of the ligand binding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Hessien

    2015-11-02

    Nov 2, 2015 ... found to restrict the binding of testosterone or DHT to the receptor and subsequently impair AR mediated transactiva- tion. The literature has reported unlimited number of genetic abnormalities in different domains of the AR gene. Most of these genetic abnormalities were detected in prostate cancer.

  6. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  7. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  8. Thermodynamic fingerprints of ligand binding to human telomeric G-quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bončina, Matjaž; Podlipnik, Črtomir; Piantanida, Ivo; Eilmes, Julita; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Lah, Jurij

    2015-12-02

    Thermodynamic studies of ligand binding to human telomere (ht) DNA quadruplexes, as a rule, neglect the involvement of various ht-DNA conformations in the binding process. Therefore, the thermodynamic driving forces and the mechanisms of ht-DNA G-quadruplex-ligand recognition remain poorly understood. In this work we characterize thermodynamically and structurally binding of netropsin (Net), dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene derivatives (DP77, DP78), cationic porphyrin (TMPyP4) and two bisquinolinium ligands (Phen-DC3, 360A-Br) to the ht-DNA fragment (Tel22) AGGG(TTAGGG)3 using isothermal titration calorimetry, CD and fluorescence spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and molecular modeling. By global thermodynamic analysis of experimental data we show that the driving forces characterized by contributions of specific interactions, changes in solvation and conformation differ significantly for binding of ligands with low quadruplex selectivity over duplexes (Net, DP77, DP78, TMPyP4; KTel22 ≈ KdsDNA). These contributions are in accordance with the observed structural features (changes) and suggest that upon binding Net, DP77, DP78 and TMPyP4 select hybrid-1 and/or hybrid-2 conformation while Phen-DC3 and 360A-Br induce the transition of hybrid-1 and hybrid-2 to the structure with characteristics of antiparallel or hybrid-3 type conformation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Competitive association binding kinetic assays: a new tool to detect two different binding orientations of a ligand to its target protein under distinct conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Hans-Joachim; Strasser, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    Within the last years, for several ligands, binding to G protein-coupled receptors or other target proteins, a binding of the ligand in two different orientations is described. One appropriate experimental technique to detect two different binding orientations is the crystallization of the ligand-protein-complex, but crystallization and subsequent X-ray analysis do not belong to the routine methods. By traditional competitive radioligand equilibrium binding assays, it is not possible to detect or to distinguish between two different binding orientations, but there is a possibility to identify two different binding orientations by performing kinetic competitive radioligand-binding assays. To study the limitations of this new technique, the related differential equations were defined and solved numerically for 8 different sets of rate constants, also considering an experimental error up to ~10%. In principal, the kinetic competitive radioligand binding assay is a suitable technique to detect two different ligand binding orientations. However, the present study shows that this is only possible under distinct conditions: (1) the rate constants of dissociation for both binding orientations of the cold ligand should at least be > 10-fold different to each other and (2) the experimental error should be as small as possible. Although there are some limitations for the experimental usability of this method, it is worthwhile to perform kinetic competitive binding assays, especially if there are hints for two binding orientations of a ligand, e.g. based on molecular modelling studies.

  10. Age dependent accumulation patterns of advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE) ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in the liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Chung, Wook-Jin; Oh, Seyeon; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Chang Hu; Hong, Suntaek; Park, Kook Yang; Son, Kuk Hui; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-01-01

    Much evidence indicates receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) related inflammation play essential roles during aging. However, the majority of studies have focused on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and not on other RAGE ligands. In the present study, the authors evaluated whether the accumulation of RAGE ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle during aging. In C57BL/6 N mice aged 12 weeks, 12 months, and 22 months, ligands accumulation, binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands, activated macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 macrophage expression, glyoxalase-1expression, and signal pathways related to inflammation were evaluated. The RAGE ligands age-associated accumulation patterns were found to be organ dependent. Binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands in kidney and liver increased with age, but those in skeletal muscle were unchanged. Infiltration of activated macrophages in kidney and liver increased with age, but infiltration in the skeletal muscle was unchanged. M1 expression increased and M2 and glyoxalase-1 expression decreased with age in kidney and liver, but their expressions in skeletal muscle were not changed. These findings indicate patterns of RAGE ligands accumulation, RAGE/ligands binding intensities, or inflammation markers changes during aging are organs dependent.

  11. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arden Perkins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3ylethyl-9-isopropyl-2- (5-methylpyridin-3-yl-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351. As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand.

  12. A2A adenosine receptor ligand binding and signalling is allosterically modulated by adenosine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Eduard; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Moreno, Estefanía; Barkešová, Jana; Mallol, Josefa; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I

    2011-05-01

    A2ARs (adenosine A2A receptors) are highly enriched in the striatum, which is the main motor control CNS (central nervous system) area. BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer) assays showed that A2AR homomers may act as cell-surface ADA (adenosine deaminase; EC 3.5.4.4)-binding proteins. ADA binding affected the quaternary structure of A2ARs present on the cell surface. ADA binding to adenosine A2ARs increased both agonist and antagonist affinity on ligand binding to striatal membranes where these proteins are co-expressed. ADA also increased receptor-mediated ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) phosphorylation. Collectively, the results of the present study show that ADA, apart from regulating the concentration of extracellular adenosine, may behave as an allosteric modulator that markedly enhances ligand affinity and receptor function. This powerful regulation may have implications for the physiology and pharmacology of neuronal A2ARs.

  13. Steroid signaling: ligand-binding promiscuity, molecular symmetry, and the need for gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, Richard; Kotelevtsev, Yuri

    2014-04-01

    Steroid/sterol-binding receptors and enzymes are remarkably promiscuous in the range of ligands they can bind to and, in the case of enzymes, modify - raising the question of how specific receptor activation is achieved in vivo. Estrogen receptors (ER) are modulated by 27-hydroxycholesterol and 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol (Adiol), in addition to estradiol (E2), and respond to diverse small molecules such as bisphenol A. Steroid-modifying enzymes are also highly promiscuous in ligand binding and metabolism. The specificity problem is compounded by the fact that the steroid core (hydrogenated cyclopentophenanthrene ring system) has several planes of symmetry. Ligand binding can be in symmetrical East-West (rotation) and North-South (inversion) orientations. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) can modify symmetrical 7 and 11, also 3 and 17/20, positions, exemplified here by yeast 3α,20β-HSD and mammalian 11β-HSD and 17β-HSD enzymes. Faced with promiscuity and symmetry, other strategies are clearly necessary to promote signaling selectivity in vivo. Gating regulates hormone access via enzymes that preferentially inactivate (or activate) a subclass of ligands, thereby governing which ligands gain receptor access - exemplified by 11β-HSD gating cortisol access to the mineralocorticoid receptor, and P450 CYP7B1 gating Adiol access to ER. Counter-intuitively, the specificity of steroid/sterol action is achieved not by intrinsic binding selectivity but by the combination of local metabolism and binding affinity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Observation of long-range tertiary interactions during ligand binding by the TPP riboswitch aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesterberg, Van K; Fischer-Hwang, Irena T; Perez, Christian F; Hogan, Daniel W; Block, Steven M

    2015-12-28

    The thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch is a cis-regulatory element in mRNA that modifies gene expression in response to TPP concentration. Its specificity is dependent upon conformational changes that take place within its aptamer domain. Here, the role of tertiary interactions in ligand binding was studied at the single-molecule level by combined force spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), using an optical trap equipped for simultaneous smFRET. The 'Force-FRET' approach directly probes secondary and tertiary structural changes during folding, including events associated with binding. Concurrent transitions observed in smFRET signals and RNA extension revealed differences in helix-arm orientation between two previously-identified ligand-binding states that had been undetectable by spectroscopy alone. Our results show that the weaker binding state is able to bind to TPP, but is unable to form a tertiary docking interaction that completes the binding process. Long-range tertiary interactions stabilize global riboswitch structure and confer increased ligand specificity.

  15. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H.; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline; Cherkasov, Artem; Hammond, Geoffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [ 3 H]5α-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 μM concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost

  16. Ligand binding and micro-switches in 7TM receptor structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    The past couple of years have seen several novel X-ray structures of 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptors in complex with antagonists and even with a peptide fragment of a G protein. These structures demonstrate that the main ligand-binding pocket in 7TM receptors is like a funnel with a partial 'lid...

  17. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  18. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest

  19. Ligand Binding Kinetics of the Quorum Sensing Regulator PqsR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Martin; Hodgkinson, James T.; Gross, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal (PQS) is a quorum sensing molecule that plays an important role in regulating the virulence of this organism. We have purified the ligand binding domain of the receptor PqsRLBD for PQS and have used Förster resonance energy transfer fluorimetry...

  20. The ligand-binding domain of the cell surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ploug, M; Patthy, L

    1991-01-01

    with the internal repeats of u-PAR constitute the extracellular part of Ly-6 antigens and of the squid glycoprotein Sgp-2. Like u-PAR, these proteins are attached to the membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The hydrophilic, ligand-binding u-PAR domain identified in the present study has potential...

  1. Distinct expression and ligand-binding profiles of two constitutively active GPR17 splice variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates, the 7TM receptor GPR17 exists in two isoforms differing only by the length of the N-terminus. Of these, only the short isoform has previously been characterized. Hence, we investigated gene expression and ligand-binding profiles of both splice variants and furthe...

  2. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-01

    The uranyl cation (UO 2 2+ ) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  3. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  4. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  5. Optimizing Stem Length To Improve Ligand Selectivity in a Structure-Switching Cocaine-Binding Aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Miguel A D; Shoara, Aron A; Reinstein, Oren; Abbasi Borhani, Okty; Martin, Taylor R; Johnson, Philip E

    2017-10-27

    Understanding how aptamer structure and function are related is crucial in the design and development of aptamer-based biosensors. We have analyzed a series of cocaine-binding aptamers with different lengths of their stem 1 in order to understand the role that this stem plays in the ligand-induced structure-switching binding mechanism utilized in many of the sensor applications of this aptamer. In the cocaine-binding aptamer, the length of stem 1 controls whether the structure-switching binding mechanism for this aptamer occurs or not. We varied the length of stem 1 from being one to seven base pairs long and found that the structural transition from unfolded to folded in the unbound aptamer is when the aptamer elongates from 3 to 4 base pairs in stem 1. We then used this knowledge to achieve new binding selectivity of this aptamer for quinine over cocaine by using an aptamer with a stem 1 two base pairs long. This selectivity is achieved by means of the greater affinity quinine has for the aptamer compared with cocaine. Quinine provides enough free energy to both fold and bind the 2-base pair-long aptamer while cocaine does not. This tuning of binding selectivity of an aptamer by reducing its stability is likely a general mechanism that could be used to tune aptamer specificity for tighter binding ligands.

  6. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    binding to SRCR domain 3 exhibited effective inhibition of ligand binding. Furthermore, analysis of purified native CD163 revealed that proteolytic cleavage in SRCR domain 3 inactivates ligand binding. Calcium protects against cleavage in this domain. Analysis of the calcium sensitivity of ligand binding...

  7. High resolution crystal structures of unliganded and liganded human liver ACBP reveal a new mode of binding for the acyl-CoA ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskinen, Jukka P; van Aalten, Daan M; Knudsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is essential for the fatty acid metabolism, membrane structure, membrane fusion, and ceramide synthesis. Here high resolution crystal structures of human cytosolic liver ACBP, unliganded and liganded with a physiological ligand, myristoyl-CoA are described. The...

  8. Ligand binding and conformational dynamics in a flavin-based electron-bifurcating enzyme complex revealed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Julius K; Rupprecht, Fiona A; Eisinger, Martin L; Ermler, Ulrich; Langer, Julian D

    2016-12-01

    Flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB) is a novel mechanism of energy coupling used by anaerobic microorganisms to optimize their energy metabolism efficiency. The first high-resolution structure of a complete FBEB enzyme complex, the NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin: NADP + -oxidoreductase (NfnAB) of Thermotoga maritima, was recently solved. However, no experimental evidence for the NADPH-binding site and conformational changes during the FBEB reaction are available. Here we analyzed ligand binding and the conformational dynamics of oxygen-sensitive NfnAB using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass-Spectrometry, including a customized anaerobic workflow. We confirmed the NADH and the previously postulated NADPH-binding site. Furthermore, we observed an NfnA-NfnB rearrangement upon NADPH binding which supports the proposed FBEB mechanism. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Mass spectrometry-based monitoring of millisecond protein–ligand binding dynamics using an automated microfluidic platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Yongzheng; Katipamula, Shanta; Trader, Cameron D.; Orton, Daniel J.; Geng, Tao; Baker, Erin S.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing protein-ligand binding dynamics is crucial for understanding protein function and developing new therapeutic agents. We have developed a novel microfluidic platform that features rapid mixing of protein and ligand solutions, variable incubation times, and on-chip electrospray ionization to perform label-free, solution-based monitoring of protein-ligand binding dynamics. This platform offers many advantages including automated processing, rapid mixing, and low sample consumption.

  10. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  11. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    or interference with conformational properties of the receptor critical for ligand binding. This distinction is central when employing the antibodies as tools in the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of the protein in question. We have studied the effect of monoclonal antibodies against......PA/uPAR complex. The continuous recording of binding and dissociation, obtained in BIA, is central in characterizing these phenomena. The identification of a non-competitive inhibitory mechanism against this receptor reveals the presence of a determinant which influences the binding properties of a remote site...

  12. Misuse of thermodynamics in the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand binding to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethica, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has given a mass of data on the binding of small molecules to proteins and other biopolymers, with particular interest in drug binding to proteins chosen as therapeutic indicators. Interpretation of the enthalpy data usually follows an unsound protocol that uses thermodynamic relations in circumstances where they do not apply. Errors of interpretation include incomplete definitions of ligand binding and equilibrium constants and neglect of the non-ideality of the solutions under study, leading to unreliable estimates of standard free energies and entropies of binding. The mass of reported thermodynamic functions for ligand binding to proteins estimated from ITC enthalpies alone is consequently of uncertain thermodynamic significance and utility. ITC and related experiments to test the protocol assumptions are indicated. A thermodynamic procedure avoiding equilibrium constants or other reaction models and not requiring protein activities is given. The discussion draws attention to the fundamental but neglected relation between the thermodynamic activity and bioactivity of drugs and to the generally unknown thermodynamic status of ligand solutions, which for drugs relates directly to effective therapeutic dosimetry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Two disparate ligand binding sites in the human P2Y1 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Zhang, Kaihua; Kiselev, Evgeny; Crane, Steven; Wang, Jiang; Paoletta, Silvia; Yi, Cuiying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Hong; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-01-01

    In response to adenosine 5′-diphosphate, the P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) facilitates platelet aggregation, and thus serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Here we report the crystal structures of the human P2Y1R in complex with a nucleotide antagonist MRS2500 at 2.7Å resolution, and with a non-nucleotide antagonist BPTU at 2.2Å resolution. The structures reveal two distinct ligand binding sites, providing atomic details of P2Y1R’s unique ligand binding modes. MRS2500 recognizes a binding site within the seven transmembrane bundle of P2Y1R, which, however, is different in shape and location from the nucleotide binding site in previously determined P2Y12R structure. BPTU binds to an allosteric pocket on the external receptor interface with the lipid bilayer, making it the first structurally characterized selective G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand located entirely outside of the helical bundle. These high-resolution insights into P2Y1R should enable discovery of new orthosteric and allosteric antithrombotic drugs with reduced adverse effects. PMID:25822790

  14. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1-30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F' pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate...... that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions.......HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected...

  15. Ligand Binding Affinities of Arctigenin and Its Demethylated Metabolites to Estrogen Receptor Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Hattori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (−-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (−-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL by Eubacterium (E. sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (−-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (−-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC50 value of (2R,3R-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10−4 M.

  16. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-16

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  17. Secbase: database module to retrieve secondary structure elements with ligand binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Oliver; Cole, Jason; Block, Peter; Klebe, Gerhard

    2009-10-01

    Secbase is presented as a novel extension module of Relibase. It integrates the information about secondary structure elements into the retrieval facilities of Relibase. The data are accessible via the extended Relibase user interface, and integrated retrieval queries can be addressed using an extended version of Reliscript. The primary information about alpha-helices and beta-sheets is used as provided by the PDB. Furthermore, a uniform classification of all turn families, based on recent clustering methods, and a new helix assignment that is based on this turn classification has been included. Algorithms to analyze the geometric features of helices and beta-strands were also implemented. To demonstrate the performance of the Secbase implementation, some application examples are given. They provide new insights into the involvement of secondary structure elements in ligand binding. A survey of water molecules detected next to the N-terminus of helices is analyzed to show their involvement in ligand binding. Additionally, the parallel oriented NH groups at the alpha-helix N-termini provide special binding motifs to bind particular ligand functional groups with two adjacent oxygen atoms, e.g., as found in negatively charged carboxylate or phosphate groups, respectively. The present study also shows that the specific structure of the first turn of alpha-helices provides a suitable explanation for stabilizing charged structures. The magnitude of the overall helix macrodipole seems to have no or only a minor influence on binding. Furthermore, an overview of the involvement of secondary structure elements with the recognition of some important endogenous ligands such as cofactors shows some distinct preference for particular binding motifs and amino acids.

  18. Nuclear receptor ligand-binding domains: reduction of helix H12 dynamics to favour crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahoum, Virginie; Lipski, Alexandra; Quillard, Fabien; Guichou, Jean-François [INSERM, U554, 34090 Montpellier (France); Université de Montpellier, CNRS, UMR5048, Centre de Biochimie Structurale (CBS), 34090 Montpellier (France); Boublik, Yvan [CNRS, UMR5237, Centre de Recherche de Biochimie Macromoléculaire (CRBM), 34293 Montpellier (France); Pérez, Efrèn [Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Química, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Germain, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch CEDEX (France); Lera, Angel R. de [Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Química, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Bourguet, William, E-mail: bourguet@cbs.cnrs.fr [INSERM, U554, 34090 Montpellier (France); Université de Montpellier, CNRS, UMR5048, Centre de Biochimie Structurale (CBS), 34090 Montpellier (France)

    2008-07-01

    Attempts have been made to crystallize the ligand-binding domain of the human retinoid X receptor in complex with a variety of newly synthesized ligands. An inverse correlation was observed between the ‘crystallizability’ and the structural dynamics of the various receptor–ligand complexes. Crystallization trials of the human retinoid X receptor α ligand-binding domain (RXRα LBD) in complex with various ligands have been carried out. Using fluorescence anisotropy, it has been found that when compared with agonists these small-molecule effectors enhance the dynamics of the RXRα LBD C-terminal helix H12. In some cases, the mobility of this helix could be dramatically reduced by the addition of a 13-residue co-activator fragment (CoA). In keeping with these observations, crystals have been obtained of the corresponding ternary RXRα LBD–ligand–CoA complexes. In contrast, attempts to crystallize complexes with a highly mobile H12 remained unsuccessful. These experimental observations substantiate the previously recognized role of co-regulator fragments in facilitating the crystallization of nuclear receptor LBDs.

  19. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene A Morrill

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb; neuroglobin (Ngb; myoglobin (Mb; hemoglobin (Hb subunits Hba(α and Hbb(β] contain either a transmembrane (TM helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba and pore-lining region (Hbb. The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, band 3, which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions. The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane band 3 attachment site. Band 3 contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO movement within the large internal cavities and

  20. Improving the LIE Method for Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Williams E; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Valiente, Pedro A

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we introduced an improved linear interaction energy (LIE) method parameterization for computations of protein–ligand binding free energies. The protocol, coined LIE-D, builds on the linear relationship between the empirical coefficient γ in the standard LIE scheme and the D parameter, introduced in our work. The D-parameter encompasses the balance (difference) between electrostatic (polar) and van der Waals (nonpolar) energies in protein–ligand complexes. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that LIE-D reproduced accurately the absolute binding free energies for our training set of protein–ligand complexes ( = 0.92 kcal/mol, SDerror = 0.66 kcal/mol, R(2) = 0.90, QLOO(2) = 0.89, and sPRESS(LOO) = 1.28 kcal/mol). We also demonstrated LIE-D robustness by predicting accurately the binding free energies for three different protein–ligand systems outside the training data set, where the electrostatic and van der Waals interaction energies were calculated with different force fields.

  1. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H

    2016-01-01

    The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix...... remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain...

  2. Optimizing the protein switch: altering nuclear import and export signals, and ligand binding domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Mudit; Davis, James R.; Kern, Steve E.; Lim, Carol S.

    2007-01-01

    Ligand regulated localization controllable protein constructs were optimized in this study. Several constructs were made from a classical nuclear export signal (HIV-rev, MAPKK, or progesterone receptor) in combination with a SV40 T-antigen type nuclear import signal. Different ligand binding domains (LBDs from glucocorticoid receptor or progesterone receptor) were also tested for their ability to impart control over localization of proteins. This study was designed to create constructs which are cytoplasmic in the absence of ligand and nuclear in the presence of ligand, and also to regulate the amount of protein translocating to the nucleus on ligand induction. The balance between the strengths of import and export signals was critical for overall localization of proteins. The amount of protein entering the nucleus was also affected by the dose of ligand (10-100nM). However, the overall import characteristics were determined by the strengths of localization signals and the inherent localization properties of the LBD used. This study established that the amount of protein present in a particular compartment can be regulated by the use of localization signals of various strengths. These optimized localization controllable protein constructs can be used to correct for diseases due to aberrant localization of proteins. PMID:17574289

  3. Binding of ligands to the catalytic zinc ion in horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, C; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1984-01-01

    The affinity of nitrogen and sulfur ligands for the catalytic zinc ion in horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase has been investigated by their influence on the affinity labeling reaction with iodoacetate. All the nitrogen compounds including ammonia, a primary and a secondary amine, and heterocycles containing a pyridine-type nitrogen with the exception of 2,2-dipyridyl were found to activate the affinity labeling reaction. Activation results from inner-sphere ligand coordination to the catalytic zinc ion. Closely related pyridine compounds gave a regular increase in affinity for the enzyme with increasing basicity, as expected for coordination to a metal ion. The sulfur compounds penicillamine and mercaptoethanol also activated the affinity labeling reaction, but dimercaptopropanol bound very tightly as a bidentate inhibited the reaction. The anions hydrosulfide, diethyldithiocarbamate, and cyanide coordinated to the catalytic zinc ion, whereas azide, thiocyanate, tetrazole, and iodide complexed the anion-binding site. The anionic metal ligands increased the rate of inactivation of the enzyme with iodoacetamide by binding to the catalytic zinc ion, while the binding of iodoacetate to the anion-binding site was prevented.

  4. Conformational dynamics of L-lysine, L-arginine, L-ornithine binding protein reveals ligand-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro

    2011-07-01

    The molecular basis of multiple ligand binding affinity for amino acids in periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) and in the homologous domain for class C G-protein coupled receptors is an unsolved question. Here, using unrestrained molecular dynamic simulations, we studied the ligand binding mechanism present in the L-lysine, L-arginine, L-ornithine binding protein. We developed an analysis based on dihedral angles for the description of the conformational changes upon ligand binding. This analysis has an excellent correlation with each of the two main movements described by principal component analysis (PCA) and it's more convenient than RMSD measurements to describe the differences in the conformational ensembles observed. Furthermore, an analysis of hydrogen bonds showed specific interactions for each ligand studied as well as the ligand interaction with the aromatic residues Tyr-14 and Phe-52. Using uncharged histidine tautomers, these interactions are not observed. On the basis of these results, we propose a model in which hydrogen bond interactions place the ligand in the correct orientation to induce a cation-π interaction with Tyr-14 and Phe-52 thereby stabilizing the closed state. Our results also show that this protein adopts slightly different closed conformations to make available specific hydrogen bond interactions for each ligand thus, allowing a single mechanism to attain multiple ligand specificity. These results shed light on the experimental evidence for ligand-dependent conformational plasticity not explained by the previous crystallographic data. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Reversibly Switchable, pH-Dependent Peptide Ligand Binding via 3,5-Diiodotyrosine Substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Gustafson, Heather H; Pineda, Julio Marco B; Pun, Suzie H

    2018-03-05

    Cell type-specific targeting ligands utilized in drug delivery applications typically recognize receptors that are overexpressed on the cells of interest. Nonetheless, these receptors may also be expressed, to varying extents, on off-target cells, contributing to unintended side effects. For the selectivity profile of targeting ligands in cancer therapy to be improved, stimuli-responsive masking of these ligands with acid-, redox-, or enzyme-cleavable molecules has been reported, whereby the targeting ligands are exposed in specific environments, e.g., acidic tumor hypoxia. One possible drawback of these systems lies in their one-time, permanent trigger, which enables the "demasked" ligands to bind off-target cells if released back into the systemic circulation. A promising strategy to address the aforementioned problem is to design ligands that show selective binding based on ionization state, which may be microenvironment-dependent. In this study, we report a systematic strategy to engineer low pH-selective targeting peptides using an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) as an example. 3,5-Diiodotyrosine mutagenesis into native tyrosine residues of M2pep confers pH-dependent binding behavior specific to acidic environment (pH 6) when the amino acid is protonated into the native tyrosine-like state. At physiological pH of 7.4, the hydroxyl group of 3,5-diiodotyrosine on the peptide is deprotonated leading to interruption of the peptide native binding property. Our engineered pH-responsive M2pep (Ac-Y-Î-Î) binds target M2 macrophages more selectively at pH 6 than at pH 7.4. In addition, 3,5-diiodotyrosine substitutions also improve serum stability of the peptide. Finally, we demonstrate pH-dependent reversibility in target binding via a postbinding peptide elution study. The strategy presented here should be applicable for engineering pH-dependent functionality of other targeting peptides with potential applications in physiology-dependent in vivo targeting

  6. Linking phytoplankton and bacterioplankton community dynamics to iron-binding ligand production in a microcosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogle, S. L.; Bundy, R.; Barbeau, K.

    2016-02-01

    Several significant lines of evidence implicate heterotrophic bacterioplankton as agents of iron cycling and sources of iron-binding ligands in seawater, but direct and mechanistic linkages have mostly remained elusive. Currently, it is unknown how microbial community composition varies during the course of biogenic particle remineralization and how shifts in community structure are related to sources and sinks of Fe-binding ligands. In order to simulate the rise, decline, and ultimate remineralization of a phytoplankton bloom, we followed the production of different classes of Fe-binding ligands as measured by electrochemical techniques, Fe concentrations, and macronutrient concentrations in a series of iron-amended whole seawater incubations over a period of six days during a California Current Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) process cruise. At the termination of the experiment phytoplankton communities were similar across iron treatments, but high iron conditions generated greater phytoplankton biomass and increased nutrient drawdown suggesting that phytoplankton communities were in different phases of bloom development. Strikingly, L1 ligands akin to siderophores in binding strength were only observed in high iron treatments implicating phytoplankton bloom phase as an important control. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene surveys, we observed that the abundance of transiently dominant copiotroph bacteria were strongly correlated with L1 concentrations. However, incubations with similar L1 concentrations and binding strengths produced distinct copiotroph community profiles dominated by a few strains. We suggest that phytoplankton bloom maturity influences algal-associated heterotrophic community succession, and that L1 production is either directly or indirectly tied to the appearance and eventual dominance of rarely abundant copiotroph bacterial strains.

  7. Ligand-induced conformational changes: Improved predictions of ligand binding conformations and affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimurer, T.M.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Iversen, L.F.

    2003-01-01

    A computational docking strategy using multiple conformations of the target protein is discussed and evaluated. A series of low molecular weight, competitive, nonpeptide protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors are considered for which the x-ray crystallographic structures in complex with protein...... tyrosine phosphatase 1 B (PTP1B) are known. To obtain a quantitative measure of the impact of conformational changes induced by the inhibitors, these were docked to the active site region of various structures of PTP1B using the docking program FlexX. Firstly, the inhibitors were docked to a PTP1B crystal...... predicted binding energy and a correct docking mode. Thirdly, to improve the predictability of the docking procedure in the general case, where only a single target protein structure is known, we evaluate an approach which takes possible protein side-chain conformational changes into account. Here, side...

  8. New insights from molecular dynamic simulation studies of the multiple binding modes of a ligand with G-quadruplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin-Qiang; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Tan, Jia-Heng; Luo, Hai-Bin; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2012-12-01

    G-quadruplexes are higher-order DNA and RNA structures formed from guanine-rich sequences. These structures have recently emerged as a new class of potential molecular targets for anticancer drugs. An understanding of the three-dimensional interactions between small molecular ligands and their G-quadruplex targets in solution is crucial for rational drug design and the effective optimization of G-quadruplex ligands. Thus far, rational ligand design has been focused mainly on the G-quartet platform. It should be noted that small molecules can also bind to loop nucleotides, as observed in crystallography studies. Hence, it would be interesting to elucidate the mechanism underlying how ligands in distinct binding modes influence the flexibility of G-quadruplex. In the present study, based on a crystal structure analysis, the models of a tetra-substituted naphthalene diimide ligand bound to a telomeric G-quadruplex with different modes were built and simulated with a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on a series of computational analyses, the structures, dynamics, and interactions of ligand-quadruplex complexes were studied. Our results suggest that the binding of the ligand to the loop is viable in aqueous solutions but dependent on the particular arrangement of the loop. The binding of the ligand to the loop enhances the flexibility of the G-quadruplex, while the binding of the ligand simultaneously to both the quartet and the loop diminishes its flexibility. These results add to our understanding of the effect of a ligand with different binding modes on G-quadruplex flexibility. Such an understanding will aid in the rational design of more selective and effective G-quadruplex binding ligands.

  9. Mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes: the role of the co-ligand in DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wen-Jing; Wang, Xin-Tian; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Tian, He; Song, Xue-Qing; Pan, He-Ting; Qiao, Xin; Xu, Jing-Yuan

    2016-05-31

    Four novel mononuclear Schiff base copper(ii) complexes, namely, [Cu(L)(OAc)]·H2O (), [Cu(HL)(C2O4)(EtOH)]·EtOH (), [Cu(L)(Bza)] () and [Cu(L)(Sal)] () (HL = 1-(((2-((2-hydroxypropyl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)naphthalene-2-ol), Bza = benzoic acid, Sal = salicylic acid), were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Single-crystal diffraction analysis revealed that all the complexes were mononuclear molecules, in which the Schiff base ligand exhibited different coordination modes and conformations. The N-HO and O-HO inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions linked these molecules into multidimensional networks. Their interactions with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV-visible and fluorescence spectrometry, as well as by viscosity measurements. The magnitude of the Kapp values of the four complexes was 10(5), indicating a moderate intercalative binding mode between the complexes and DNA. Electrophoresis results showed that all these complexes induced double strand breaks of pUC19 plasmid DNA in the presence of H2O2 through an oxidative pathway. In addition, the fluorescence spectrum of human serum albumin (HSA) with the complexes suggested that the quenching mechanism of HSA by the complexes was a static process. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of the four complexes against HeLa (human cervical carcinoma) and HepG-2 (human liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cells evaluated by colorimetric cell proliferation assay and clonogenic assay revealed that all four complexes had improved cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Inspiringly, complex , with salicylic acid as the auxiliary ligand, displayed a stronger anticancer activity, suggesting that a synergistic effect of the Schiff base complex and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug may be involved in the cell killing process. The biological features of mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes and how acetic auxiliary

  10. A microscopic insight from conformational thermodynamics to functional ligand binding in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Samapan; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-12-01

    We show that the thermodynamics of metal ion-induced conformational changes aid to understand the functions of protein complexes. This is illustrated in the case of a metalloprotein, alpha-lactalbumin (aLA), a divalent metal ion binding protein. We use the histograms of dihedral angles of the protein, generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, to calculate conformational thermodynamics. The thermodynamically destabilized and disordered residues in different conformational states of a protein are proposed to serve as binding sites for ligands. This is tested for β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) binding to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex, in which the binding residues are known. Among the binding residues, the C-terminal residues like aspartate (D) 116, glutamine (Q) 117, tryptophan (W) 118 and leucine (L) 119 are destabilized and disordered and can dock β4GalT onto Ca(2+)-aLA. No such thermodynamically favourable binding residues can be identified in the case of the Mg(2+)-aLA complex. We apply similar analysis to oleic acid binding and predict that the Ca(2+)-aLA complex can bind to oleic acid through the basic histidine (H) 32 of the A2 helix and the hydrophobic residues, namely, isoleucine (I) 59, W60 and I95, of the interfacial cleft. However, the number of destabilized and disordered residues in Mg(2+)-aLA are few, and hence, the oleic acid binding to Mg(2+)-bound aLA is less stable than that to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex. Our analysis can be generalized to understand the functionality of other ligand bound proteins.

  11. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennick Michael

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75 into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity.

  12. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanodisc-targeted STD NMR reveals atomistic details of ligand binding to lipid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Anthony

    2018-03-14

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR constitutes one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. This is due to its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need for NMR information of the macromolecular target. This technique is most commonly applied to systems involving different types of ligands (e.g. small organic molecules, carbohydrates, or lipids) and a protein as the target, where the latter is selectively saturated. However, only a few examples have been reported where membrane mimetics are the macromolecular binding partners. Here, we have employed STD-NMR to investigate the interactions of the neurotransmitter dopamine to mimetics of lipid bilayers, such as nanodiscs, by saturation of the latter. In particular, the interactions between dopamine and model lipid nanodiscs formed from charged and zwitterionic lipids have been resolved at the atomic level. The results, in agreement with previous isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies, show that dopamine preferential binds to negatively charged model membranes, but also provides detailed atomistic insights into the mode of interaction of dopamine to membrane mimetics. Our findings provide relevant structural information for the design of lipid-based drug carriers of dopamine, structural analogues, and are of generic applicability to other systems. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The ligand-binding domain of the cell surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ploug, M; Patthy, L

    1991-01-01

    The purified urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) was cleaved into two fragments by mild chymotrypsin treatment. The smaller fragment (apparent Mr 16,000) possessed the ligand-binding capability, as shown by chemical cross-linking analysis. This fragment constituted the NH2-terminal...... part of the intact receptor, probably including the whole sequence 1-87, and contained N-linked carbohydrate. After detergent phase separation in the Triton X-114 system, the fragment was present in the water phase where its binding activity could be demonstrated in the absence of the rest...

  15. Diazepam-bound GABAA receptor models identify new benzodiazepine binding-site ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lars; de Graaf, Chris; Sieghart, Werner; Varagic, Zdravko; Mörzinger, Martina; de Esch, Iwan J P; Ecker, Gerhard F; Ernst, Margot

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines exert their anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, muscle-relaxant and sedative-hypnotic properties by allosterically enhancing the action of GABA at GABAA receptors via their benzodiazepine-binding site. Although these drugs have been used clinically since 1960, the molecular basis of this interaction is still not known. By using multiple homology models and an un biased docking protocol, we identified a binding hypothesis for the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine site, which was confirmed by experimental evidence. Moreover, two independent virtual screening approaches based on this structure identified known benzodiazepine-site ligands from different structural classes and predicted potential new ligands for this site. Receptor-binding assays and electrophysiological studies on recombinant receptors confirmed these predictions and thus identified new chemotypes for the benzodiazepine-binding site. Our results support the validity of the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine-binding pocket, demonstrate its suitability for drug discovery and pave the way for structure-based drug design. PMID:22446838

  16. Aqueous and Ethanolic Valeriana officinalis Extracts Change the Binding of Ligands to Glutamate Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mojica, Lisa M.; Cordero-Hernández, José M.; González-Medina, Giselle; Ramos-Vélez, Igmeris; Berríos-Cartagena, Nairimer; Torres-Hernández, Bianca A.; Ortíz, José G.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of two valerian extracts (aqueous and hydroalcoholic) were investigated through [3H]Glutamate ([3H]Glu) and [3H]Fluorowillardine ([3H]FW) receptor binding assays using rat synaptic membranes in presence of different receptor ligands. In addition, the extract stability was monitored spectrophotometrically. Both extracts demonstrated interaction with ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). However, the extracts displayed considerable differences in receptor selectivity. The hydroalcoholic extract selectively interacted with quisqualic acid (QA), group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) ligand, while the aqueous extract did not alter the binding of QA. The stability of the extracts was examined during several weeks. Freshly prepared extract inhibited 38–60% of [3H]FW binding (AMPA). After 10 days, the aqueous extract inhibited 85% of [3H]FW binding while the hydroalcoholic extract markedly potentiated (200%) [3H]FW binding to AMPA receptors. Thus, our results showed that factors such as extraction solvent and extract stability determine the selectivity for glutamate receptor (GluR) interactions. PMID:21151614

  17. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na + , Cl - and K + to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na + . Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na + and Cl - , the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na + binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl - . Cl - enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na + . At concentrations in the range of its K M for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na + -independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [ 3 H]imipramine binding and [ 3 H]serotonin transport

  18. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure.

  19. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  20. Allosteric ligands and their binding sites define γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) mediate rapid inhibitory transmission in the brain. GABA(A)Rs are ligand-gated chloride ion channel proteins and exist in about a dozen or more heteropentameric subtypes exhibiting variable age and brain regional localization and thus participation in differing brain functions and diseases. GABA(A)Rs are also subject to modulation by several chemotypes of allosteric ligands that help define structure and function, including subtype definition. The channel blocker picrotoxin identified a noncompetitive channel blocker site in GABA(A)Rs. This ligand site is located in the transmembrane channel pore, whereas the GABA agonist site is in the extracellular domain at subunit interfaces, a site useful for low energy coupled conformational changes of the functional channel domain. Two classes of pharmacologically important allosteric modulatory ligand binding sites reside in the extracellular domain at modified agonist sites at other subunit interfaces: the benzodiazepine site and the high-affinity, relevant to intoxication, ethanol site. The benzodiazepine site is specific for certain GABA(A)R subtypes, mainly synaptic, while the ethanol site is found at a modified benzodiazepine site on different, extrasynaptic, subtypes. In the transmembrane domain are allosteric modulatory ligand sites for diverse chemotypes of general anesthetics: the volatile and intravenous agents, barbiturates, etomidate, propofol, long-chain alcohols, and neurosteroids. The last are endogenous positive allosteric modulators. X-ray crystal structures of prokaryotic and invertebrate pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, and the mammalian GABA(A)R protein, allow homology modeling of GABA(A)R subtypes with the various ligand sites located to suggest the structure and function of these proteins and their pharmacological modulation. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Serotoninergic receptors in brain tissue: properties and identification of various 3H-ligand binding sites in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysen, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro binding studies to serotoninergic receptors were performed using 3 H-LSD, 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-spiperone. An overwiew is given on findings using these three ligands with respect to the following: localization of specific binding sites, in various animal species, the regional distribution in the brain and periphery, the subcellular and cellular distribution. Properties of the binding sites, influence of the composition of the assay medium, binding kinetic properties, receptor regulation in vivo. Identity of the binding sites, differences between site for various 3 H-ligands, pharmacological specificity of the membranous binding sites, chemical composition of the macromolecular complex constituting the binding site. Function of the receptor. Binding affinities of 44 compounds were measured in binding assays using 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-LSD with rat frontal cortex membrane preparations and using 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-LSD with rat hippocampal membrane preparations

  2. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding site (Site I and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III. In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV. All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate. In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2.

  3. Tritium NMR spectroscopy of ligand binding to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, K.; Williams, P.G.; Pelton, J.G.; Morimoto, H.; Wemmer, D.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-06-04

    Tritium-labeled {alpha}- and {beta}-maltodextrins have been used to study their complexes with maltose-binding protein (MBP), a 40-kDa bacterial protein. Five substrates, from maltose to maltohexaose, were labeled at their reducing ends and their binding studied. Tritium NMR specctroscopy of the labeled sugars showed large upfield chamical shift changes upon binding and strong anomeric specficity. At 10{degrees}C, MBP bound {alpha}-maltose with 2.7 {plus minus} 0.5-fold higher affinity than {beta}-maltose, and, for longer maltodextrins, the ratio of affinities was even larger. The maximum chemical shift change was 2.2 ppm, suggesting that the reducing end of bound {alpha}-maltodextrin makes close contact with an aromatic residue in the MBP-binding site. Experiments with maltotriose (and longer maltodextrins) also revealed the presence of two bound {beta}-maltotriose resonances in rapid exchange. The authors interpret these two resonances as arising from two distinct sugar-protein complexes. In one complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by its reducing end, and, in the other complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by the middle glucose residue(s). This interpretation also suggests how MBP is able to bind both linear and circular maltodextrins.

  4. Tritium NMR spectroscopy of ligand binding to maltose-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehring, K.; Williams, P.G.; Pelton, J.G.; Morimoto, H.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium-labeled α- and β-maltodextrins have been used to study their complexes with maltose-binding protein (MBP), a 40-kDa bacterial protein. Five substrates, from maltose to maltohexaose, were labeled at their reducing ends and their binding studied. Tritium NMR specctroscopy of the labeled sugars showed large upfield chamical shift changes upon binding and strong anomeric specficity. At 10 degrees C, MBP bound α-maltose with 2.7 ± 0.5-fold higher affinity than β-maltose, and, for longer maltodextrins, the ratio of affinities was even larger. The maximum chemical shift change was 2.2 ppm, suggesting that the reducing end of bound α-maltodextrin makes close contact with an aromatic residue in the MBP-binding site. Experiments with maltotriose (and longer maltodextrins) also revealed the presence of two bound β-maltotriose resonances in rapid exchange. The authors interpret these two resonances as arising from two distinct sugar-protein complexes. In one complex, the β-maltodextrin is bound by its reducing end, and, in the other complex, the β-maltodextrin is bound by the middle glucose residue(s). This interpretation also suggests how MBP is able to bind both linear and circular maltodextrins

  5. Improved Prediction of Bovine Leucocyte Antigens (BoLA) Presented Ligands by Use of Mass-Spectrometry-Determined Ligand and in Vitro Binding Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Connelley, Tim; Ternette, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    of the data. We here outline a general pipeline for dealing with this challenge and accurately annotate ligands to the relevant MHC-I molecule they were eluted from by use of GibbsClustering and binding motif information inferred from in silico models. We illustrate the approach here in the context of MHC......, and predictors of peptide-MHC interactions constitute an attractive alternative. Recently, an increasing amount of MHC presented peptides identified by mass spectrometry (MS ligands) has been published. Handling and interpretation of MS ligand data is, in general, challenging due to the polyspecificity nature......-I molecules (BoLA) of cattle. Next, we demonstrate how such annotated BoLA MS ligand data can readily be integrated with in vitro binding affinity data in a prediction model with very high and unprecedented performance for identification of BoLA-I restricted T-cell epitopes. The prediction model is freely...

  6. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics. PMID:26727491

  7. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Szöllősi

    Full Text Available Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics.

  8. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics.

  9. The Role of Water in Protein-Ligand Binding: A Comprehensive Study by Crystallography and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Biela, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of desolvation effects on protein-ligand interactions. In all complex structures with thrombin and pyridine, it is evident that preserving the original solvation state of Asp189 is a crucial and a common feature upon binding of the pyridine inhibitors. However, the associated entropic losses are immense. In two ligand complexes even disordered ligand portions are found in the S1 ...

  10. Investigation of the Copper Binding Site And the Role of Histidine As a Ligand in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.R.; Bencze, K.Z.; Russ, K.A.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, M.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 {angstrom}, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a Cu-O{sub 3}N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  11. Localization of tachykinin binding sites (NK1, NK2, NK3 ligands) in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffroy, M.; Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Besseyre, J.; Bergstroem, L.G.; Glowinski, J.

    1988-03-01

    A comparative autoradiographic analysis of the distribution of tachykinin binding sites was made on brain serial sections using several ligands. (1) /sup 3/H-SP, /sup 125/I-BHSP and /sup 3/H-physalaemin labeled identical binding sites (NK1 type). (2) /sup 3/H-NKB, /sup 125/I-BHE and /sup 3/H-eledoisin also labeled identical sites (NK3 type). (3) /sup 125/I-BHNKA preferentially labeled NK3 binding sites, the distribution of /sup 125/I-BHNKA binding sites being identical to that of /sup 3/H-NKB or /sup 125/I-BHE binding sites. (4) The distributions of /sup 3/H-SP and /sup 3/H-NKB binding sites were markedly different. (5) A very low density of labeling was found with /sup 3/H-NKA or /sup 125/I-NKA, and these binding sites were distributed only in areas rich in either /sup 3/H-SP or /sup 3/H-NKB binding sites. (6) Particular efforts were made to look for the presence of tachykinin binding sites in the substantia nigra, since this structure is particularly rich in SP and NKA and contains functional tachykinin receptors of the NK1 and NK2 types as suggested by physiological studies. Confirming previous reports, low or very low labeling was observed in the substantia nigra with /sup 3/H-SP or /sup 125/I-BHSP and /sup 3/H-NKB or /sup 125/I-BHE. Similar results were found with /sup 3/H-NKA, /sup 125/I-NKA or /sup 125/I-BHNKA. In conclusion, our data do not provide evidence yet for the existence of NK2 binding sites in the rat brain.

  12. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...

  13. A conserved amphipathic ligand binding region influences k-path-dependent activity of cytochrome C oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, Carrie; Buhrow, Leann; Liu, Jian; Kuhn, Leslie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2013-02-26

    A conserved, crystallographically defined bile acid binding site was originally identified in the membrane domain of mammalian and bacterial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). Current studies show other amphipathic molecules including detergents, fatty acids, steroids, and porphyrins bind to this site and affect the already 50% inhibited activity of the E101A mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides CcO as well as altering the activity of wild-type and bovine enzymes. Dodecyl maltoside, Triton X100, C12E8, lysophophatidylcholine, and CHOBIMALT detergents further inhibit RsCcO E101A, with lesser inhibition observed in wild-type. The detergent inhibition is overcome in the presence of micromolar concentrations of steroids and porphyrin analogues including deoxycholate, cholesteryl hemisuccinate, bilirubin, and protoporphyrin IX. In addition to alleviating detergent inhibition, amphipathic carboxylates including arachidonic, docosahexanoic, and phytanic acids stimulate the activity of E101A to wild-type levels by providing the missing carboxyl group. Computational modeling of dodecyl maltoside, bilirubin, and protoporphyrin IX into the conserved steroid site shows energetically favorable binding modes for these ligands and suggests that a groove at the interface of subunit I and II, including the entrance to the K-path and helix VIII of subunit I, mediates the observed competitive ligand interactions involving two overlapping sites. Spectral analysis indicates that ligand binding to this region affects CcO activity by altering the K-path-dependent electron transfer equilibrium between heme a and heme a(3). The high affinity and specificity of a number of compounds for this region, and its conservation and impact on CcO activity, support its physiological significance.

  14. A Conserved Amphipathic Ligand Binding Region Influences K-Path Dependent Activity of Cytochrome c Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, Carrie; Buhrow, Leann; Liu, Jian; Kuhn, Leslie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2013-01-01

    A conserved, crystallographically-defined bile acid binding site was originally identified in the membrane domain of mammalian and bacterial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). Current studies show other amphipathic molecules including detergents, fatty acids, steroids, and porphyrins bind to this site and affect the already 50% inhibited activity of the E101A mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides CcO, as well as altering the activity of wildtype and bovine enzymes. Dodecyl maltoside, Triton X100, C12E8, lysophophatidylcholine and CHOBIMALT detergents further inhibit RsCcO E101A, with lesser inhibition observed in wildtype. The detergent inhibition is overcome in the presence of μM concentrations of steroids and porphyrin analogs including deoxycholate, cholesteryl hemisuccinate, bilirubin, and protoporphyrin IX. In addition to alleviating detergent inhibition, amphipathic carboxylates including arachidonic, docosahexanoic, and phytanic acids stimulate the activity of E101A to wildtype levels by providing the missing carboxyl group. Computational modeling of dodecyl maltoside, bilirubin, and protoporphyrin IX into the conserved steroid site shows energetically favorable binding modes for these ligands and suggests that a groove at the interface of subunit I and II, including the entrance to the K-path and helix VIII of subunit I, mediates the observed competitive ligand interactions involving two overlapping sites. Spectral analysis indicates that ligand binding to this region affects CcO activity by altering the K path dependent electron transfer equilibrium between heme a and heme a3. The high affinity and specificity of a number of compounds for this region, and its conservation and impact on CcO activity, support its physiological significance. PMID:23351100

  15. CARF and WYL domains: ligand-binding regulators of prokaryotic defense systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira eMakarova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems of bacteria and archaea insert fragments of virus or plasmid DNA as spacer sequences into CRISPR repeat loci. Processed transcripts encompassing these spacers guide the cleavage of the cognate foreign DNA or RNA. Most CRISPR-Cas loci, in addition to recognized cas genes, also include genes that are not directly implicated in spacer acquisition, CRISPR transcript processing or interference. Here we comprehensively analyze sequences, structures and genomic neighborhoods of one of the most widespread groups of such genes that encode proteins containing a predicted nucleotide-binding domain with a Rossmann-like fold, which we denote CARF (CRISPR-associated Rossmann fold. Several CARF protein structures have been determined but functional characterization of these proteins is lacking. The CARF domain is most frequently combined with a C-terminal winged helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain and effector domains most of which are predicted to possess DNase or RNase activity. Divergent CARF domains are also found in RtcR proteins, sigma-54 dependent regulators of the rtc RNA repair operon. CARF genes frequently co-occur with those coding for proteins containing the WYL domain with the Sm-like SH3 β-barrel fold, which is also predicted to bind ligands. CRISPR-Cas and possibly other defense systems are predicted to be transcriptionally regulated by multiple ligand-binding proteins containing WYL and CARF domains which sense modified nucleotides and nucleotide derivatives generated during virus infection. We hypothesize that CARF domains also transmit the signal from the bound ligand to the fused effector domains which attack either alien or self nucleic acids, resulting, respectively, in immunity complementing the CRISPR-Cas action or in dormancy/programmed cell death.

  16. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Anand Ravindranath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1 exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2 increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR-AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR, a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1 SEQ17 -a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2 CDK2 -a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we

  17. G-LoSA for Prediction of Protein-Ligand Binding Sites and Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput structure determination and computational protein structure prediction have significantly enriched the universe of protein structure. However, there is still a large gap between the number of available protein structures and that of proteins with annotated function in high accuracy. Computational structure-based protein function prediction has emerged to reduce this knowledge gap. The identification of a ligand binding site and its structure is critical to the determination of a protein's molecular function. We present a computational methodology for predicting small molecule ligand binding site and ligand structure using G-LoSA, our protein local structure alignment and similarity measurement tool. All the computational procedures described here can be easily implemented using G-LoSA Toolkit, a package of standalone software programs and preprocessed PDB structure libraries. G-LoSA and G-LoSA Toolkit are freely available to academic users at http://compbio.lehigh.edu/GLoSA . We also illustrate a case study to show the potential of our template-based approach harnessing G-LoSA for protein function prediction.

  18. Assessing protein-ligand docking for the binding of organometallic compounds to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; Lledós, Agusti; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2014-01-30

    Organometallic compounds are increasingly used as molecular scaffolds in drug development projects; their structural and electronic properties offering novel opportunities in protein-ligand complementarities. Interestingly, while protein-ligand dockings have long become a spearhead in computer assisted drug design, no benchmarking nor optimization have been done for their use with organometallic compounds. Pursuing our efforts to model metal mediated recognition processes, we herein present a systematic study of the capabilities of the program GOLD to predict the interactions of protein with organometallic compounds. The study focuses on inert systems for which no alteration of the first coordination sphere of the metal occurs upon binding. Several scaffolds are used as test systems with different docking schemes and scoring functions. We conclude that ChemScore is the most robust scoring function with ASP and ChemPLP providing with good results too and GoldScore slightly underperforming. This study shows that current state-of-the-art protein-ligand docking techniques are reliable for the docking of inert organometallic compounds binding to protein. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Large-scale binding ligand prediction by improved patch-based method Patch-Surfer2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Xiong, Yi; Kihara, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Ligand binding is a key aspect of the function of many proteins. Thus, binding ligand prediction provides important insight in understanding the biological function of proteins. Binding ligand prediction is also useful for drug design and examining potential drug side effects. We present a computational method named Patch-Surfer2.0, which predicts binding ligands for a protein pocket. By representing and comparing pockets at the level of small local surface patches that characterize physicochemical properties of the local regions, the method can identify binding pockets of the same ligand even if they do not share globally similar shapes. Properties of local patches are represented by an efficient mathematical representation, 3D Zernike Descriptor. Patch-Surfer2.0 has significant technical improvements over our previous prototype, which includes a new feature that captures approximate patch position with a geodesic distance histogram. Moreover, we constructed a large comprehensive database of ligand binding pockets that will be searched against by a query. The benchmark shows better performance of Patch-Surfer2.0 over existing methods. http://kiharalab.org/patchsurfer2.0/ CONTACT: dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Enthused research on DNA-binding and DNA-cleavage aptitude of mixed ligand metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Raman, Natarajan

    2013-08-01

    Five new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized using a Schiff base precursor (obtained by the condensation of N-(4-aminophenyl)acetamide and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde) as main ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand. They have been characterized by microanalytical data, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment values, conductivity and electrochemical measurements. The spectral data reveal that all the complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The high electrical conductance of the complexes supports their electrolytic nature. The monomeric nature of the complexes has been assessed from their magnetic susceptibility values. These complexes are better antimicrobial active agents than the free ligands. DNA (CT) binding properties of these complexes have been explored by UV-Vis., viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry measurements. The oxidative cleavage activity of the complexes has been studied using supercoiled pUC19 DNA by gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that the complexes are good intercalators.

  1. Structural and mechanistic investigations on Salmonella typhimurium acetate kinase (AckA: identification of a putative ligand binding pocket at the dimeric interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittori Sagar

    2012-10-01

    enzymes. Conclusions The biochemical and structural characterization of StAckA reported here provides insights into the biochemical specificity, overall fold, thermal stability, molecular basis of ligand binding and inter-domain motion in AckA family of enzymes. Dramatic conformational differences observed between unliganded and citrate-bound forms of StAckA led to identification of a putative ligand-binding pocket at the dimeric interface of StAckA with implications for enzymatic function.

  2. Improving binding mode and binding affinity predictions of docking by ligand-based search of protein conformations: evaluation in D3R grand challenge 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianjin; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2017-08-01

    The growing number of protein-ligand complex structures, particularly the structures of proteins co-bound with different ligands, in the Protein Data Bank helps us tackle two major challenges in molecular docking studies: the protein flexibility and the scoring function. Here, we introduced a systematic strategy by using the information embedded in the known protein-ligand complex structures to improve both binding mode and binding affinity predictions. Specifically, a ligand similarity calculation method was employed to search a receptor structure with a bound ligand sharing high similarity with the query ligand for the docking use. The strategy was applied to the two datasets (HSP90 and MAP4K4) in recent D3R Grand Challenge 2015. In addition, for the HSP90 dataset, a system-specific scoring function (ITScore2_hsp90) was generated by recalibrating our statistical potential-based scoring function (ITScore2) using the known protein-ligand complex structures and the statistical mechanics-based iterative method. For the HSP90 dataset, better performances were achieved for both binding mode and binding affinity predictions comparing with the original ITScore2 and with ensemble docking. For the MAP4K4 dataset, although there were only eight known protein-ligand complex structures, our docking strategy achieved a comparable performance with ensemble docking. Our method for receptor conformational selection and iterative method for the development of system-specific statistical potential-based scoring functions can be easily applied to other protein targets that have a number of protein-ligand complex structures available to improve predictions on binding.

  3. CADASIL-associated Notch3 mutations have differential effects both on ligand binding and ligand-induced Notch3 receptor signaling through RBP-Jk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nils; Opherk, Christian; Zacherle, Simone; Capell, Anja; Gempel, Petra; Dichgans, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Mutations in the NOTCH3 gene are the cause of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a hereditary angiopathy leading to strokes and dementia. Pathogenic mutations remove or insert cysteine residues within epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats in the extracellular domain of the Notch3 receptor (N3ECD). Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are the predominant site of Notch3 expression in adults. In CADASIL patients, VSMC degenerate and N3ECD is deposited within the vasculature. However, the mechanisms underlying VSMC degeneration and N3ECD accumulation are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the consequences of three pathogenic Notch3 mutations on the biological activity of the receptor by analyzing ligand (Delta-/Jagged-)-induced signaling via RBP-Jk. Two mutations (R133C and C183R) that are located outside the putative ligand binding domain (LBD) of the receptor were found to result in normal Jagged1-induced signaling in A7r5 VSMC, whereas the third mutation (C455R located within the putative LBD) showed strongly reduced signaling activity. Ligand binding assays with soluble Delta1 and Jagged1 revealed that C455R interferes with ligand binding through disruption of the LBD which, as we show here, is located in EGF repeats 10/11 of Notch3. All mutant receptors including Notch3C455R were targeted to the cell surface but showed an elevated ratio between the unprocessed full-length 280-kDa receptor and S1-cleaved receptor fragments. Taken together, these data indicate that CADASIL-associated Notch3 mutations differ with respect to their consequences both on ligand binding and ligand-induced signaling through RBP-Jk, whereas they have similar effects on receptor maturation. Moreover, the data suggest that ligand-induced receptor shedding may not be required for N3ECD deposition in CADASIL. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  5. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  6. Consensus of sample-balanced classifiers for identifying ligand-binding residue by co-evolutionary physicochemical characteristics of amino acids

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is an important mechanism for some proteins to perform their functions, and those binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. So far, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. Due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we constructed several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier was trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers formed a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Experimental results on CASP9 targets demonstrated that our method compared favorably with the state-of-the-art. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  7. Ligand binding phenomena that pertain to the metabolic function of renalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, Brett A; Roman, Joseph V; Hoag, Matthew R; Meneely, Kathleen M; Silvaggi, Nicholas R; Lamb, Audrey L; Moran, Graham R

    2016-12-15

    Renalase catalyzes the oxidation of isomers of β-NAD(P)H that carry the hydride in the 2 or 6 positions of the nicotinamide base to form β-NAD(P) + . This activity is thought to alleviate inhibition of multiple β-NAD(P)-dependent enzymes of primary and secondary metabolism by these isomers. Here we present evidence for a variety of ligand binding phenomena relevant to the function of renalase. We offer evidence of the potential for primary metabolism inhibition with structures of malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase bound to the 6-dihydroNAD isomer. The previously observed preference of renalase from Pseudomonas for NAD-derived substrates over those derived from NADP is accounted for by the structure of the enzyme in complex with NADPH. We also show that nicotinamide nucleosides and mononucleotides reduced in the 2- and 6-positions are renalase substrates, but bind weakly. A seven-fold enhancement of acquisition (k red /K d ) for 6-dihydronicotinamide riboside was observed for human renalase in the presence of ADP. However, generally the addition of complement ligands, AMP for mononucleotide or ADP for nucleoside substrates, did not enhance the reductive half-reaction. Non-substrate nicotinamide nucleosides or nucleotides bind weakly suggesting that only β-NADH and β-NADPH compete with dinucleotide substrates for access to the active site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estrogen receptor determination in endometrial carcinoma: ligand binding assay versus enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1995-01-01

    We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA, and cyto......We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA......, and cytosolic progesterone receptors (PR) measured by LBA were also studied. While ERc concentrations determined by LBA and EIA were highly correlated (r: 0.94), ERc values detected by LBA were approximately twice those found by EIA (median values of ERc: 155 vs. 64 fmol/mg cytosol protein, DCC vs. EIA......). The percentages of ERc positive tumors were 89% by LBA and 77% by EIA. The median fraction of total ER present as ERn was 63%. PR levels correlated positively with ERn concentrations (r: 0.73). We explore possible reasons why greater concentrations of ERc are determined by estradiol binding than by the ER-EIA kit...

  9. Preliminary Molecular Dynamic Simulations of the Estrogen Receptor Alpha Ligand Binding Domain from Antagonist to Apo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian E. Roitberg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors (ER are known as nuclear receptors. They exist in the cytoplasm of human cells and serves as a DNA binding transcription factor that regulates gene expression. However the estrogen receptor also has additional functions independent of DNA binding. The human estrogen receptor comes in two forms, alpha and beta. This work focuses on the alpha form of the estrogen receptor. The ERα is found in breast cancer cells, ovarian stroma cells, endometrium, and the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that exposure to DDE, a metabolite of DDT, and other pesticides causes conformational changes in the estrogen receptor. Before examining these factors, this work examines the protein unfolding from the antagonist form found in the 3ERT PDB crystal structure. The 3ERT PDB crystal structure has the estrogen receptor bound to the cancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The 4-hydroxytamoxifen ligand was extracted before the simulation, resulting in new conformational freedom due to absence of van der Waals contacts between the ligand and the receptor. The conformational changes that result expose the binding clef of the co peptide beside Helix 12 of the receptor forming an apo conformation. Two key conformations in the loops at either end of the H12 are produced resulting in the antagonist to apo conformation transformation. The results were produced over a 42ns Molecular Dynamics simulation using the AMBER FF99SB force field.

  10. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  11. Novel Selective Estrogen Receptor Ligand Conjugates Incorporating Endoxifen-Combretastatin and Cyclofenil-Combretastatin Hybrid Scaffolds: Synthesis and Biochemical Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M. Kelly

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors such as the estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ modulate the effects of the estrogen hormones and are important targets for design of innovative chemotherapeutic agents for diseases such as breast cancer and osteoporosis. Conjugate and bifunctional compounds which incorporate an ER ligand offer a useful method of delivering cytotoxic drugs to tissue sites such as breast cancers which express ERs. A series of novel conjugate molecules incorporating both the ER ligands endoxifen and cyclofenil-endoxifen hybrids covalently linked to the antimitotic and tubulin targeting agent combretastatin A-4 were synthesised and evaluated as ER ligands. A number of these compounds demonstrated pro-apoptotic effects, with potent antiproliferative activity in ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines and low cytotoxicity. These conjugates displayed binding affinity towards ERα and ERβ isoforms at nanomolar concentrations e.g., the cyclofenil-amide compound 13e is a promising lead compound of a clinically relevant ER conjugate with IC50 in MCF-7 cells of 187 nM, and binding affinity to ERα (IC50 = 19 nM and ERβ (IC50 = 229 nM while the endoxifen conjugate 16b demonstrates antiproliferative activity in MCF-7 cells (IC50 = 5.7 nM and binding affinity to ERα (IC50 = 15 nM and ERβ (IC50 = 115 nM. The ER binding effects are rationalised in a molecular modelling study in which the disruption of the ER helix-12 in the presence of compounds 11e, 13e and 16b is presented These conjugate compounds have potential application for further development as antineoplastic agents in the treatment of ER positive breast cancers.

  12. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1) is a novel adiponectin binding protein on cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Nana; Uekita, Hiromi; Kochi, Ikoi; Matsumoto, Akane; Niinaga, Ryu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Kihara, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocyte-derived bioactive molecule with anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties. Although anti-diabetic effects are mostly mediated by the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, the anti-atherogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results: In this study, we identified E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 as a novel APN-binding protein by mass spectrometry analysis of HepG2 cell-derived immunoprecipitant with an anti-APN antibody. Cell adhesion assays using fluorescence-labelled monocyte cell line THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that APN-pre-treated THP-1 cells had reduced binding ability to HUVECs. This APN-mediated suppressive effect on monocyte binding to endothelial cells was partially abrogated by targeting ESL-1 with shRNA in THP-1 cells. In addition, serial mutagenesis analysis disclosed that five extracellular amino acids close to the N-terminus of ESL-1 were essential for binding with APN. Conclusion: Our results highlight the fact that interaction between APN and ESL-1 could provide a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenic properties of APN. - Highlights: • E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 was identified as an adiponectin (APN)-binding protein. • ESL-1 bound to APN at its N-terminal 6th-10th amino acids. • shESL-1 reduced the suppressive effect of APN on adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. • Interaction with ESL may be involved in the anti-atherogenic effects of APN.

  13. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1) is a novel adiponectin binding protein on cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Nana; Uekita, Hiromi; Kochi, Ikoi; Matsumoto, Akane; Niinaga, Ryu [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Division of Health Sciences, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kihara, Shinji, E-mail: skihara@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Division of Health Sciences, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Background: Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocyte-derived bioactive molecule with anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties. Although anti-diabetic effects are mostly mediated by the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, the anti-atherogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results: In this study, we identified E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 as a novel APN-binding protein by mass spectrometry analysis of HepG2 cell-derived immunoprecipitant with an anti-APN antibody. Cell adhesion assays using fluorescence-labelled monocyte cell line THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that APN-pre-treated THP-1 cells had reduced binding ability to HUVECs. This APN-mediated suppressive effect on monocyte binding to endothelial cells was partially abrogated by targeting ESL-1 with shRNA in THP-1 cells. In addition, serial mutagenesis analysis disclosed that five extracellular amino acids close to the N-terminus of ESL-1 were essential for binding with APN. Conclusion: Our results highlight the fact that interaction between APN and ESL-1 could provide a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenic properties of APN. - Highlights: • E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 was identified as an adiponectin (APN)-binding protein. • ESL-1 bound to APN at its N-terminal 6th-10th amino acids. • shESL-1 reduced the suppressive effect of APN on adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. • Interaction with ESL may be involved in the anti-atherogenic effects of APN.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand-induced backbone conformational changes in the binding site of the periplasmic lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ami Y.-C.; Mancera, Ricardo L.

    2008-11-01

    The periplasmic lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAOBP) traps its ligands by a large hinge bending movement between two globular domains. The overall geometry of the binding site remains largely unchanged between the open (unliganded) and closed (liganded) forms, with only a small number of residues exhibiting limited movement of their side chains. However, in the case of the ornithine-bound structure, the backbone peptide bond between Asp11 and Thr12 undergoes a large rotation. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the origin and mechanism of this backbone movement. Simulations allowing flexibility of a limited region and of the whole binding site, with and without bound ligands, suggest that this conformational change is induced by the binding of ornithine, leading to the stabilisation of an energetically favourable alternative conformation.

  15. Structure-based simulations of kinesin motor domain for the study and characterization of its different microtubule and ligand-binding states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun

    2014-03-01

    Kinesins are molecular motors acting as enzyme-based nanomachines that transport intracellular cargo along microtubules (MT). To obtain a detailed structural and energetic picture of the various conformations of the kinesin motor domain, we built atomistic models using available crystal structures, homology modeling and flexible fitting into cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps. These models depict the various biochemical states of the kinesin head, such as - with the neck-linker docked and undocked in the MT-free state, and the different nucleotide (ADP, ATP and APO) bound states in the kinesin-MT complex. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulation techniques and large-scale computational probing of differences in these states, by an exhaustive search of interactions that differ between them, identify key residues in the active site and binding interface, and investigate the binding free-energy between kinesin and MT, and kinesin and ligand to compare with experimentally obtained results.

  16. Structural and biochemical studies on ATP binding and hydrolysis by the Escherichia coli RNA chaperone Hfq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Hämmerle

    Full Text Available In Escherichia coli the RNA chaperone Hfq is involved in riboregulation by assisting base-pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs and mRNA targets. Several structural and biochemical studies revealed RNA binding sites on either surface of the donut shaped Hfq-hexamer. Whereas sRNAs are believed to contact preferentially the YKH motifs present on the proximal site, poly(A(15 and ADP were shown to bind to tripartite binding motifs (ARE circularly positioned on the distal site. Hfq has been reported to bind and to hydrolyze ATP. Here, we present the crystal structure of a C-terminally truncated variant of E. coli Hfq (Hfq(65 in complex with ATP, showing that it binds to the distal R-sites. In addition, we revisited the reported ATPase activity of full length Hfq purified to homogeneity. At variance with previous reports, no ATPase activity was observed for Hfq. In addition, FRET assays neither indicated an impact of ATP on annealing of two model oligoribonucleotides nor did the presence of ATP induce strand displacement. Moreover, ATP did not lead to destabilization of binary and ternary Hfq-RNA complexes, unless a vast stoichiometric excess of ATP was used. Taken together, these studies strongly suggest that ATP is dispensable for and does not interfere with Hfq-mediated RNA transactions.

  17. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    The Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (SERROA) spectra of myoglobin and the myoglobin-azide complex were measured on very dilute samples (100 nM protein) in order to analyze the sensitivity of SERROA spectroscopy when inducing...... upon azide complexation. Application of this method allows for rapid analysis of ligand binding in metalloproteins in dilute aqueous solution and could in the future, when combined with theoretical studies, increase the obtainable structural resolution of proteins beyond that of X-ray analysis....

  18. Domain interplay in the urokinase receptor. Requirement for the third domain in high affinity ligand binding and demonstration of ligand contact sites in distinct receptor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ronne, E; Dano, K

    1996-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a membrane protein comprised of three extracellular domains. In order to study the importance of this domain organization in the ligand-binding process of the receptor we subjected a recombinant, soluble uPAR (suPAR) to specific proteolytic...

  19. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  20. Water Mediated Ligand Functional Group Cooperativity: The Contribution of a Methyl Group to Binding Affinity is Enhanced by a COO− Group Through Changes in the Structure and Thermo dynamics of the Hydration Waters of Ligand-Thermolysin Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-01-01

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2′ pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable...

  1. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  2. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  3. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  4. Conformational changes and ligand recognition of Escherichia coli D-xylose binding protein revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Park, Chankyu

    2010-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transport systems account for most import of necessary nutrients in bacteria. The periplasmic binding component (or an equivalent membrane-anchored protein) is critical to recognizing cognate ligand and directing it to the appropriate membrane permease. Here we report the X...... of the three different forms from the same protein furthermore gives unprecedented details concerning the conformational changes involved in binding protein function. As is typical of the structural family, the protein has two similar globular domains, which are connected by a three-stranded hinge region...... ordered near the ligand. An analysis of the interactions suggests why xylose is the preferred ligand. Furthermore, a comparison with the most closely related proteins in the structural family shows that the conformational changes are distinct in each type of binding protein, which may have implications...

  5. Specific ligand binding domain residues confer low dioxin responsiveness to AHR1β of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, Camila; Holzman, Sarah A; Denison, Michael S; Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Bonati, Laura; Franks, Diana G; Hahn, Mark E; Powell, Wade H

    2013-03-12

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) family protein that mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in vertebrates. Frogs are remarkably insensitive to TCDD, and AHRs from Xenopus laevis bind TCDD with low affinity. We sought to identify structural features of X. laevis AHR1β associated with low TCDD sensitivity. Substitution of the entire ligand binding domain (LBD) with the corresponding sequence from mouse AHR(b-1) dramatically increased TCDD responsiveness in transactivation assays. To identify the amino acid residues responsible, we constructed a comparative model of the AHR1β LBD using homologous domains of PAS proteins HIF2α and ARNT. The model revealed an internal cavity with dimensions similar to those of the putative binding cavity of mouse AHR(b-1), suggesting the importance of side chain interactions over cavity size. Of residues with side chains clearly pointing into the cavity, only two differed from the mouse sequence. When A354, located within a conserved β-strand, was changed to serine, the corresponding mouse residue, the EC50 for TCDD decreased more than 15-fold. When N325 was changed to serine, the EC50 decreased 3-fold. When the mutations were combined, the EC50 decreased from 18.6 to 0.8 nM, the value nearly matching the TCDD sensitivity of mouse AHR. Velocity sedimentation analysis confirmed that mutant frog AHRs exhibited correspondingly increased levels of TCDD binding. We also assayed mutant AHRs for responsiveness to a candidate endogenous ligand, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). Mutations that increased sensitivity to TCDD also increased sensitivity to FICZ. This comparative study represents a novel approach to discerning fundamental information about the structure of AHR and its interactions with biologically important agonists.

  6. Structural characterization of natural nickel and copper binding ligands along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal transect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene M Boiteau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic ligands form strong complexes with many trace elements in seawater. Various metals can compete for the same ligand chelation sites, and the final speciation of bound metals is determined by relative binding affinities, concentrations of binding sites, uncomplexed metal concentrations, and association/dissociation kinetics. Different ligands have a wide range of metal affinities and specificities. However, the chemical composition of these ligands in the marine environment remains poorly constrained, which has hindered progress in modeling marine metal speciation. In this study, we detected and characterized natural ligands that bind copper (Cu and nickel (Ni in the eastern South Pacific Ocean with liquid chromatography tandem inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICPMS, and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS. Dissolved Cu, Ni, and ligand concentrations were highest near the coast. Chromatographically unresolved polar compounds dominated ligands isolated near the coast by solid phase extraction. Offshore, metal and ligand concentrations decreased, but several new ligands appeared. One major ligand was detected that bound both Cu2+ and Ni2+. Based on accurate mass and fragmentation measurements, this compound has a molecular formula of C20H21N4O8S2 + M+ (M = metal isotope and contains several azole-like metal binding groups. Additional lipophilic Ni complexes were also present only in oligotrophic waters, with masses of 649, 698, and 712 m/z (corresponding to the 58Ni metal complex. Molecular formulae of C32H54N3O6S2Ni+ and C33H56N3O6S2Ni+ were determined for two of these compounds. Addition of Cu and Ni to the samples also revealed the presence of additional compounds that can bind both Ni and Cu. Although these specific compounds represent a small fraction of the total dissolved Cu and Ni pool, they highlight the compositional diversity and spatial heterogeneity of marine Ni and Cu ligands, as

  7. Crystal structure and ligand binding properties of the truncated hemoglobin from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Andrea; Kjelgaard, Peter; von Wachenfeldt, Claes; Catacchio, Bruno; Chiancone, Emilia; Boffi, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    A novel truncated hemoglobin has been identified in the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus (Gs-trHb). The protein has been expressed in Escherichia coli, the 3D crystal structure (at 1.5 Angstroms resolution) and the ligand binding properties have been determined. The distal heme pocket displays an array of hydrogen bonding donors to the iron-bound ligands, including Tyr-B10 on one side of the heme pocket and Trp-G8 indole nitrogen on the opposite side. At variance with the highly similar Bacillus subtilis hemoglobin, Gs-trHb is dimeric both in the crystal and in solution and displays several unique structural properties. In the crystal cell, the iron-bound ligand is not homogeneously distributed within each distal site such that oxygen and an acetate anion can be resolved with relative occupancies of 50% each. Accordingly, equilibrium titrations of the oxygenated derivative in solution with acetate anion yield a partially saturated ferric acetate adduct. Moreover, the asymmetric unit contains two subunits and sedimentation velocity ultracentrifugation data confirm that the protein is dimeric.

  8. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  9. LIGSITEcsc: predicting ligand binding sites using the Connolly surface and degree of conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying pockets on protein surfaces is of great importance for many structure-based drug design applications and protein-ligand docking algorithms. Over the last ten years, many geometric methods for the prediction of ligand-binding sites have been developed. Results We present LIGSITEcsc, an extension and implementation of the LIGSITE algorithm. LIGSITEcsc is based on the notion of surface-solvent-surface events and the degree of conservation of the involved surface residues. We compare our algorithm to four other approaches, LIGSITE, CAST, PASS, and SURFNET, and evaluate all on a dataset of 48 unbound/bound structures and 210 bound-structures. LIGSITEcsc performs slightly better than the other tools and achieves a success rate of 71% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion The use of the Connolly surface leads to slight improvements, the prediction re-ranking by conservation to significant improvements of the binding site predictions. A web server for LIGSITEcsc and its source code is available at scoppi.biotec.tu-dresden.de/pocket.

  10. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  11. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1) is a novel adiponectin binding protein on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Nana; Uekita, Hiromi; Kochi, Ikoi; Matsumoto, Akane; Niinaga, Ryu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Kihara, Shinji

    2016-02-05

    Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocyte-derived bioactive molecule with anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties. Although anti-diabetic effects are mostly mediated by the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, the anti-atherogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we identified E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 as a novel APN-binding protein by mass spectrometry analysis of HepG2 cell-derived immunoprecipitant with an anti-APN antibody. Cell adhesion assays using fluorescence-labelled monocyte cell line THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that APN-pre-treated THP-1 cells had reduced binding ability to HUVECs. This APN-mediated suppressive effect on monocyte binding to endothelial cells was partially abrogated by targeting ESL-1 with shRNA in THP-1 cells. In addition, serial mutagenesis analysis disclosed that five extracellular amino acids close to the N-terminus of ESL-1 were essential for binding with APN. Our results highlight the fact that interaction between APN and ESL-1 could provide a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenic properties of APN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity

  13. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  14. Ligand binding in the ferric and ferrous states of Paramecium hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, T K; Weber, R E; Dewilde, S; Wittenberg, J B; Wittenberg, B A; Yamauchi, K; Van Hauwaert, M L; Moens, L; Rousseau, D L

    2000-11-21

    The unicellular protozoan Paramecium caudatum contains a monomeric hemoglobin (Hb) that has only 116 amino acid residues. This Hb shares the simultaneous presence of a distal E7 glutamine and a B10 tyrosine with several invertebrate Hbs. In the study presented here, we have used ligand binding kinetics and resonance Raman spectroscopy to characterize the effect of the distal pocket residues of Paramecium Hb in stabilizing the heme-bound ligands. In the ferric state, the high-spin to low-spin (aquo-hydroxy) transition takes place with a pK(a) of approximately 9.0. The oxygen affinity (P(50) = 0.45 Torr) is similar to that of myoglobin. The oxygen on- and off-rates are also similar to those of sperm whale myoglobin. Resonance Raman data suggest hydrogen bonding stabilization of bound oxygen, evidenced by a relatively low frequency of Fe-OO stretching (563 cm(-1)). We propose that the oxy complex is an equilibrium mixture of a hydrogen-bonded closed structure and an open structure. Oxygen will dissociate preferentially from the open structure, and therefore, the fraction of open structure population controls the rate of oxygen dissociation. In the CO complex, the Fe-CO stretching frequency at 493 cm(-1) suggests an open heme pocket, which is consistent with the higher on- and off-rates for CO relative to those in myoglobin. A high rate of ligand binding is also consistent with the observation of an Fe-histidine stretching frequency at 220 cm(-1), indicating the absence of significant proximal strain. We postulate that the function of Paramecium Hb is to supply oxygen for cellular oxidative processes.

  15. Molecular determinants of ligand binding modes in the histamine H(4) receptor: linking ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models to in silico guided receptor mutagenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istyastono, Enade P; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Lim, Herman D; van de Stolpe, Andrea; Roumen, Luc; Kooistra, Albert J; Vischer, Henry F; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob; de Graaf, Chris

    2011-12-08

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays an important role in inflammation. Similar to the homologous histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R), two acidic residues in the H(4)R binding pocket, D(3.32) and E(5.46), act as essential hydrogen bond acceptors of positively ionizable hydrogen bond donors in H(4)R ligands. Given the symmetric distribution of these complementary pharmacophore features in H(4)R and its ligands, different alternative ligand binding mode hypotheses have been proposed. The current study focuses on the elucidation of the molecular determinants of H(4)R-ligand binding modes by combining (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), protein homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis studies. We have designed and synthesized a series of clobenpropit (N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-S-[3-(4(5)-imidazolyl)propyl]isothiourea) derivatives to investigate H(4)R-ligand interactions and ligand binding orientations. Interestingly, our studies indicate that clobenpropit (2) itself can bind to H(4)R in two distinct binding modes, while the addition of a cyclohexyl group to the clobenpropit isothiourea moiety allows VUF5228 (5) to adopt only one specific binding mode in the H(4)R binding pocket. Our ligand-steered, experimentally supported protein modeling method gives new insights into ligand recognition by H(4)R and can be used as a general approach to elucidate the structure of protein-ligand complexes.

  16. TIRAP, an Adaptor Protein for TLR2/4, Transduces a Signal from RAGE Phosphorylated upon Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Murata, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Ono, Tomoyuki; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Motoyama, Akira; Hibino, Toshihiko; Kataoka, Ken; Huh, Nam-ho

    2011-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of a broad range of inflammatory, degenerative and hyperproliferative diseases. It binds to diverse ligands and activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Despite these pivotal functions, molecular events just downstream of ligand-activated RAGE have been surprisingly unknown. Here we show that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE is phosphorylated at Ser391 by PKCζ upon binding of ligands. TIRAP and MyD88, which are known to be adaptor proteins for Toll-like receptor-2 and -4 (TLR2/4), bound to the phosphorylated RAGE and transduced a signal to downstream molecules. Blocking of the function of TIRAP and MyD88 largely abrogated intracellular signaling from ligand-activated RAGE. Our findings indicate that functional interaction between RAGE and TLRs coordinately regulates inflammation, immune response and other cellular functions. PMID:21829704

  17. Expression and ligand binding of alpha 2 beta 1 integrin on breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, M; Akiyama, S K; Woods, V L; Dickson, R B

    1995-07-01

    We examined the expression and ligand specificity of the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin on human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and a panel of breast carcinoma cell lines in vitro. We found that the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin was universally, but quite variably expressed on these cells by FACS analysis. No significant correlation was observed between its expression and other known cellular phenotypes. Substrate attachment assays using blocking antibodies demonstrated that alpha 2 beta 1 integrin served as a receptor for collagen on HMEC and almost all breast carcinoma cells. However, its contribution to laminin binding of these cells appeared to be related to cellular differentiation as evaluated by sex steroid receptor status and by markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, i.e. loss of E-cadherin and expression of vimentin. Two different populations of non-malignant immortalized HMEC (184A1N4 and MCF-10A) contained cells capable of using alpha 2 beta 1 integrin as a laminin receptor. Breast cancer cell lines positive for estrogen receptor (ER) and E-cadherin (MCF-7, T47D, ZR75-1) could also use alpha 2 beta 1 integrin as a laminin receptor. Conversely, alpha 2 beta 1 integrin appeared to be incapable of binding to laminin or to be a very minor receptor for laminin on metastatic ER-negative breast carcinoma cells that expressed vimentin (MDA-MB 231, MDA-MB 435, and MDA-MB 436). These findings suggest that the ligand specificity of alpha 2 beta 1 integrin, i.e. its function as a laminin receptor, may be regulated during the malignant progression of breast carcinoma cells. A reduced contribution of alpha 2 beta 1 integrin to the cellular laminin binding appears to be associated with an increased malignant phenotype and with an epithelial-mesenchymal transition of breast carcinoma cells.

  18. Ligand binding and signaling of dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR is modulated by the glycosylation of the carbohydrate recognition domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karien Bloem

    Full Text Available C-type lectins are innate receptors expressed on antigen-presenting cells that are involved in the recognition of glycosylated pathogens and self-glycoproteins. Upon ligand binding, internalization and/or signaling often occur. Little is known on the glycan specificity and ligands of the Dendritic Cell Immunoreceptor (DCIR, the only classical C-type lectin that contains an intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM. Here we show that purified DCIR binds the glycan structures Lewis(b and Man3. Interestingly, binding could not be detected when DCIR was expressed on cells. Since DCIR has an N-glycosylation site inside its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD, we investigated the effect of this glycan in ligand recognition. Removing or truncating the glycans present on purified DCIR increased the affinity for DCIR-binding glycans. Nevertheless, altering the glycosylation status of the DCIR expressing cell or mutating the N-glycosylation site of DCIR itself did not increase glycan binding. In contrast, cis and trans interactions with glycans induced DCIR mediated signaling, resulting in a decreased phosphorylation of the ITIM sequence. These results show that glycan binding to DCIR is influenced by the glycosylation of the CRD region in DCIR and that interaction with its ligands result in signaling via its ITIM motif.

  19. Three complement-like repeats compose the complete alpha2-macroglobulin binding site in the second ligand binding cluster of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2006-11-10

    Given the importance of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) as an essential endocytosis and signaling receptor for many protein ligands, and of alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M)-proteinase complexes as one such set of ligands, an understanding of the specificity of their interaction with LRP is an important goal. A starting point is the known role of the 138-residue receptor binding domain (RBD) in binding to LRP. Previous studies have localized high affinity alpha2M binding to the eight complement repeat (CR)-containing cluster 2 of LRP. In the present study we have identified the minimum CR domains that constitute the full binding site for RBD and, hence, for alpha2M on LRP. We report on the ability of the triple construct of CR3-4-5 to bind RBD with an affinity (Kd = 130 nM) the same as for isolated RBD to intact LRP. This Kd is 30-fold smaller than for RBD to CR5-6-7, demonstrating the specificity of the interaction with CR3-4-5. Binding requires previously identified critical lysine residues but is almost pH-independent within the range of pH values encountered between extracellular and internal compartments, consistent with an earlier proposed model of intracellular ligand displacement by intramolecular YWTD domains. The present findings suggest a model to explain the ability of LRP to bind a wide range of structurally unrelated ligands in which a nonspecific ligand interaction with the acidic region present in most CR domains is augmented by interactions with other CR surface residues that are unique to a particular CR cluster.

  20. Can the energy gap in the protein-ligand binding energy landscape be used as a descriptor in virtual ligand screening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsen V Grigoryan

    Full Text Available The ranking of scores of individual chemicals within a large screening library is a crucial step in virtual screening (VS for drug discovery. Previous studies showed that the quality of protein-ligand recognition can be improved using spectrum properties and the shape of the binding energy landscape. Here, we investigate whether the energy gap, defined as the difference between the lowest energy pose generated by a docking experiment and the average energy of all other generated poses and inferred to be a measure of the binding energy landscape sharpness, can improve the separation power between true binders and decoys with respect to the use of the best docking score. We performed retrospective single- and multiple-receptor conformation VS experiments in a diverse benchmark of 40 domains from 38 therapeutically relevant protein targets. Also, we tested the performance of the energy gap on 36 protein targets from the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD. The results indicate that the energy gap outperforms the best docking score in its ability to discriminate between true binders and decoys, and true binders tend to have larger energy gaps than decoys. Furthermore, we used the energy gap as a descriptor to measure the height of the native binding phase and obtained a significant increase in the success rate of near native binding pose identification when the ligand binding conformations within the boundaries of the native binding phase were considered. The performance of the energy gap was also evaluated on an independent test case of VS-identified PKR-like ER-localized eIF2α kinase (PERK inhibitors. We found that the energy gap was superior to the best docking score in its ability to more highly rank active compounds from inactive ones. These results suggest that the energy gap of the protein-ligand binding energy landscape is a valuable descriptor for use in VS.

  1. Genetic and biochemical identification of a novel single-stranded DNA binding complex in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy eStroud

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA binding proteins play an essential role in DNA replication and repair. They use oligosaccharide-binding folds, a five-stranded ß-sheet coiled into a closed barrel, to bind to single-stranded DNA thereby protecting and stabilizing the DNA. In eukaryotes the single-stranded DNA binding protein is known as replication protein A (RPA and consists of three distinct subunits that function as a heterotrimer. The bacterial homolog is termed single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB and functions as a homotetramer. In the archaeon Haloferax volcanii there are three genes encoding homologs of RPA. Two of the rpa genes (rpa1 and rpa3 exist in operons with a novel gene specific to Euryarchaeota, this gene encodes a protein that we have termed rpa-associated protein (RPAP. The rpap genes encode proteins belonging to COG3390 group and feature oligosaccharide-binding folds, suggesting that they might cooperate with RPA in binding to single-stranded DNA. Our genetic analysis showed that rpa1 and rpa3 deletion mutants have differing phenotypes; only ∆rpa3 strains are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents. Deletion of the rpa3-associated gene rpap3 led to similar levels of DNA damage sensitivity, as did deletion of the rpa3 operon, suggesting that RPA3 and RPAP3 function in the same pathway. Protein pull-downs involving recombinant hexahistidine-tagged RPAs showed that RPA3 co-purifies with RPAP3, and RPA1 co-purifies with RPAP1. This indicates that the RPAs interact only with their respective associated proteins; this was corroborated by the inability to construct rpa1 rpap3 and rpa3 rpap1 double mutants. This is the first report investigating the individual function of the archaeal COG3390 RPA-associated proteins. We have shown genetically and biochemically that the RPAPs interact with their respective RPAs, and have uncovered a novel single-stranded DNA binding complex that is unique to Euryarchaeota.

  2. High integrin αVβ6affinity reached by hybrid domain deletion slows ligand-binding on-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianchi; Zhao, Bo; Lin, Fu-Yang; Lu, Chafen; Rogers, Bruce N; Springer, Timothy A

    2018-02-13

    The role of the hybrid domain in integrin affinity regulation is unknown, as is whether the kinetics of ligand binding is modulated by integrin affinity state. Here, we compare cell surface and soluble integrin α V β 6 truncation mutants for ligand-binding affinity, kinetics, and thermodynamics. Removal of the integrin transmembrane/cytoplasmic domains or lower legs has little effect on α V β 6 affinity, in contrast to β 1 integrins. In integrin opening, rearrangement at the interface between the βI and hybrid domains is linked to remodeling at the ligand-binding site at the opposite end of the βI domain, which greatly increases in affinity in the open conformation. The larger size of the βI-hybrid interface in the closed state suggests that the hybrid domain stabilizes closing. In agreement, deletion of the hybrid domain raised affinity by 50-fold. Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry gave similar results and the latter revealed tradeoffs between enthalpy and entropy not apparent from affinity. At extremely high affinity reached in Mn 2+ with hybrid domain truncation, α V β 6 on-rate for both pro-TGF-β1 and fibronectin declined. The results suggest that the open conformation of α V β 6 has lower on-rate than the closed conformation, correlate with constriction of the ligand-binding pocket in open α V β 6 structures, and suggest that the extended-closed conformation is kinetically selected for ligand binding. Subsequent transition to the extended-open conformation is stabilized by its much higher affinity for ligand and would also be stabilized by force exerted across ligand-bound integrins by the actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Identification of Peptidic Antagonists of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 by Scanning the Binding Epitopes of Its Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Lingyu; Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Broussy, Sylvain; Zhang, Tianyu; Ji, Lili; Vidal, Michel; Liu, Wang-Qing

    2017-08-10

    Cancer angiogenesis is mainly initiated by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs). On the basis of the reported crystal structures of three natural ligands (VEGF-A, -B, and PlGF) with the major receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, we scanned receptor-binding epitopes of these ligands by designing linear and cyclic peptides with the aim to disrupt the VEGF-A/VEGFR-1 interaction, which is implicated in cancer development. The ability of peptides to inhibit this interaction was evaluated by an ELISA-based assay. Several peptides, especially those mimicking loop 1 (L1) of these ligands that binds primarily to domain D3 of VEGFRs, have demonstrated higher inhibition for VEGF-A/VEGFR-1 binding. They have also shown inhibitory effects on VEGF-induced tube formation in HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells). These results validate the domain D3 of VEGFRs as an efficient target for the design of VEGFR antagonists.

  4. Computational prediction of binding affinity for CYP1A2-ligand complexes using empirical free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Olsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2010-01-01

    , and methods based on statistical mechanics. In the present investigation, we started from an LIE model to predict the binding free energy of structurally diverse compounds of cytochrome P450 1A2 ligands, one of the important human metabolizing isoforms of the cytochrome P450 family. The data set includes both...... substrates and inhibitors. It appears that the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy becomes negligible in this particular protein and a simple empirical model was derived, based on a training set of eight compounds. The root mean square error for the training set was 3.7 kJ/mol. Subsequent......Predicting binding affinities for receptor-ligand complexes is still one of the challenging processes in computational structure-based ligand design. Many computational methods have been developed to achieve this goal, such as docking and scoring methods, the linear interaction energy (LIE) method...

  5. Cloning, ligand-binding, and temporal expression of ecdysteroid receptors in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Baozhen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae, is a devastating pest of cruciferous crops worldwide, and has developed resistance to a wide range of insecticides, including diacylhydrazine-based ecdysone agonists, a highly selective group of molt-accelerating biopesticides targeting the ecdysone receptors. Result In this study, we cloned and characterized the ecdysone receptors from P. xylostella, including the two isoforms of EcR and a USP. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed striking conservations among insect ecdysone receptors, especially between P. xylostella and other lepidopterans. The binding affinity of ecdysteroids to in vitro-translated receptor proteins indicated that PxEcRB isoform bound specifically to ponasterone A, and the binding affinity was enhanced by co-incubation with PxUSP (Kd =3.0±1.7 nM. In contrast, PxEcRA did not bind to ponasterone A, even in the presence of PxUSP. The expression of PxEcRB were consistently higher than that of PxEcRA across each and every developmental stage, while the pattern of PxUSP expression is more or less ubiquitous. Conclusions Target site insensitivity, in which the altered binding of insecticides (ecdysone agonists to their targets (ecdysone receptors leads to an adaptive response (resistance, is one of the underlying mechanisms of diacylhydrazine resistance. Given the distinct differences at expression level and the ligand-binding capacity, we hypothesis that PxEcRB is the ecdysone receptor that controls the remodeling events during metamorphosis. More importantly, PxEcRB is the potential target site which is modified in the ecdysone agonist-resistant P. xylostella.

  6. Evaluation of Cu(i) binding to the E2 domain of the amyloid precursor protein - a lesson in quantification of metal binding to proteins via ligand competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tessa R; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2018-01-24

    The extracellular domain E2 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) features a His-rich metal-binding site (denoted as the M1 site). In conjunction with surrounding basic residues, the site participates in interactions with components of the extracellular matrix including heparins, a class of negatively charged polysaccharide molecules of varying length. This work studied the chemistry of Cu(i) binding to APP E2 with the probe ligands Bcs, Bca, Fz and Fs. APP E2 forms a stable Cu(i)-mediated ternary complex with each of these anionic ligands. The complex with Bca was selected for isolation and characterization and was demonstrated, by native ESI-MS analysis, to have the stoichiometry E2 : Cu(i) : Bca = 1 : 1 : 1. Formation of these ternary complexes is specific for the APP E2 domain and requires Cu(i) coordination to the M1 site. Mutation of the M1 site was consistent with the His ligands being part of the E2 ligand set. It is likely that interactions between the negatively charged probe ligands and a positively charged patch on the surface of APP E2 are one aspect of the generation of the stable ternary complexes. Their formation prevented meaningful quantification of the affinity of Cu(i) binding to the M1 site with these probe ligands. However, the ternary complexes are disrupted by heparin, allowing reliable determination of a picomolar Cu(i) affinity for the E2/heparin complex with the Fz or Bca probe ligands. This is the first documented example of the formation of stable ternary complexes between a Cu(i) binding protein and a probe ligand. The ready disruption of the complexes by heparin identified clear 'tell-tale' signs for diagnosis of ternary complex formation and allowed a systematic review of conditions and criteria for reliable determination of affinities for metal binding via ligand competition. This study also provides new insights into a potential correlation of APP functions regulated by copper binding and heparin interaction.

  7. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data

  8. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Roitberg, Adrian E.; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-06-01

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data.

  9. PATTERN BASED DETECTION OF POTENTIALLY DRUGGABLE BINDING SITES BY LIGAND SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Pal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an innovative way of finding the potentially druggable sites on a target protein, which can be used for orthosteric and allosteric lead detection in a single virtual screening setup. Druggability estimation for an alternate binding site other than the canonical ligand-binding pocket of an enzyme is rewarding for several inherent benefits. Allostery is a direct and efficient way of regulating biomacromolecule function. The allosteric modulators can fine-tune protein mechanics. Besides, allosteric sites are evolutionarily less conserved/more diverse even in very similarly related proteins, thus, provides high degree of specificity in targeting a particular protein. Therefore, targeting of allosteric sites is gaining attention as an emerging strategy in rational drug design. However, the experimental approaches provide a limited degree of characterization of new allosteric sites. Computational approaches are useful to analyze and select potential allosteric sites for drug discovery. Here, the use of molecular docking, which has become an integral part of the drug discovery process, has been discussed to predict the druggability of novel allosteric sites as well as the active site on target proteins by ligand screening. Genetic algorithm was used for docking and the whole protein was placed in the search space. For each ligand in the library of small molecules, the genetic algorithm was run for multiple times to populate all the druggable sites in the target protein, which was then translated into two dimensional density maps or “patterns”. High density clusters were observed for lead like molecules in these pattern diagrams. Each cluster in such a pattern diagram indicated a plausible binding site and the density gave its druggability score in terms of weighted probabilities. The patterns were filtered to find the leads for each of the druggable sites on the target protein. Such a novel pattern based analysis of the

  10. EMF signals and ion/ligand binding kinetics: prediction of bioeffective waveform parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, A A; Muehsam, D J; Markov, M S; Sisken, B F

    1999-02-01

    The kinetics of an electromagnetic field (EMF) target pathway are used to estimate frequency windows for EMF bioeffects. Ion/ligand binding is characterized via first order kinetics from which a specific electrical impedance can be derived. The resistance/capacitance properties of the binding pathway impedance, determined by the kinetics of the rate-determining step, define the frequency range over which the target pathway is most sensitive to external EMF. Applied signals may thus be configured such that their spectral content closely matches that of the target, using evaluation of the signal to thermal noise ratio to optimize waveform parameters. Using the approach proposed in this study, a pulsed radio frequency (PRF) waveform, currently employed clinically for soft tissue repair, was returned by modulation of burst duration, producing significant bioeffects at substantially reduced signal amplitude. Application is made to Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent myosin phosphorylation, for which the binding time constants may be estimated from reported kinetics, neurite outgrowth from embryonic chick dorsal root explants and bone repair in a fracture model. The results showed that the retuned signal produced increased phosphorylation rates, neurite outgrowth and biomechanical strength that were indistinguishable from those produced by the clinical signal, but with a tenfold reduction in peak signal amplitude, approximately 800-fold reduction in average amplitude and approximately 10(6)-fold reduction in average power.

  11. eMatchSite: sequence order-independent structure alignments of ligand binding pockets in protein models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Brylinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4-9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite.

  12. Binding of canonical Wnt ligands to their receptor complexes occurs in ordered plasma membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Azbazdar, Yagmur; Ng, Xue W; Teh, Cathleen; Simons, Kai; Weidinger, Gilbert; Wohland, Thorsten; Eggeling, Christian; Ozhan, Gunes

    2017-08-01

    While the cytosolic events of Wnt/β-catenin signaling (canonical Wnt signaling) pathway have been widely studied, only little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in Wnt binding to its receptors at the plasma membrane. Here, we reveal the influence of the immediate plasma membrane environment on the canonical Wnt-receptor interaction. While the receptors are distributed both in ordered and disordered environments, Wnt binding to its receptors selectively occurs in more ordered membrane environments which appear to cointernalize with the Wnt-receptor complex. Moreover, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is significantly reduced when the membrane order is disturbed by specific inhibitors of certain lipids that prefer to localize at the ordered environments. Similarly, a reduction in Wnt signaling activity is observed in Niemann-Pick Type C disease cells where trafficking of ordered membrane lipid components to the plasma membrane is genetically impaired. We thus conclude that ordered plasma membrane environments are essential for binding of canonical Wnts to their receptor complexes and downstream signaling activity. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Synthesis and receptor binding affinity of new selective GluR5 ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, L; Johansen, T H; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Two hybrid analogues of the kainic acid receptor agonists, 2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ATPA) and (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid ((2S,4R)-4-Me-Glu), were designed, synthesized, and characterized in radioligand binding assays using cloned ionotropic and metabotropic...... glutamic acid receptors. The (S)-enantiomers of E-4-(2,2-dimethylpropylidene)glutamic acid ((S)-1) and E-4-(3,3-dimethylbutylidene)glutamic acid ((S)-2) were shown to be selective and high affinity GluR5 ligands, with Ki values of 0.024 and 0.39 microM, respectively, compared to Ki values at GluR2 of 3...

  14. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai; (CH-Boston); (DFCI)

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  15. First Principles Calculation of the Reaction Rates for Ligand Binding to Myoglobin: The Cases of NO and CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lábas, Anikó; Menyhárd, Dóra K; Harvey, Jeremy N; Oláh, Julianna

    2017-12-28

    Ligand binding by proteins is among the most fundamental processes in nature. Among these processes the binding of small gas molecules, such as O 2 , CO and NO to heme proteins has traditionally received vivid interest, which was further boosted by their recently recognized significant role in gas sensing in the body. At the heart of the binding of these ligands to the heme group is the spinforbidden reaction between high-spin iron(II) and the ligand yielding a low-spin adduct. We use computational means to address the complete mechanism of CO and NO binding by myoglobin. Considering that it involves several steps occurring on different time scales, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to address the diffusion of the ligand through the enzyme, and DFT calculations in combination with statistical rate calculation to investigate the spin-forbidden reaction. The calculations yielded rate constants in qualitative agreement with experiments and revealed that the bottleneck of NO and CO binding is different; for NO, diffusion was found to be rate-limiting, whereas for CO, the spin-forbidden step is the slowest. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Stereochemistry of charged nitrogen-aromatic interactions and its involvement in ligand-receptor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Marcel L.; Boks, Gertjan J.; Kooijman, Huub; Kanters, Jan A.; Kroon, Jan

    1993-04-01

    Recently, new evidence was found for the involvement of charged nitrogen-aromatic interactions in ligand-receptor binding. In this study we report two favourable orientations of a phenyl ring with respect to a R-N+(CH3)3 group, based on crystal structure statistics from the Cambridge Structural Database. In the first orientation, the phenyl ring is situated in between the substituents at about 4.5 Å from the nitrogen atom, and the ring is approximately oriented on the sphere around the nitrogen atom. In the second orientation, the phenyl ring is situated in the same direction as one of the N-C bonds at about 6.0 Å from the nitrogen atom, and the ring is tilted with respect to the sphere around the nitrogen atom. The same two orientations were also found in the crystal structures of three ligand-receptor complexes, which implies that these orientations probably play a major role in molecular recognition mechanisms.

  17. Binding-Site Compatible Fragment Growing Applied to the Design of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevillard, Florent; Rimmer, Helena; Betti, Cecilia; Pardon, Els; Ballet, Steven; van Hilten, Niek; Steyaert, Jan; Diederich, Wibke E; Kolb, Peter

    2018-02-08

    Fragment-based drug discovery is intimately linked to fragment extension approaches that can be accelerated using software for de novo design. Although computers allow for the facile generation of millions of suggestions, synthetic feasibility is however often neglected. In this study we computationally extended, chemically synthesized, and experimentally assayed new ligands for the β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) by growing fragment-sized ligands. In order to address the synthetic tractability issue, our in silico workflow aims at derivatized products based on robust organic reactions. The study started from the predicted binding modes of five fragments. We suggested a total of eight diverse extensions that were easily synthesized, and further assays showed that four products had an improved affinity (up to 40-fold) compared to their respective initial fragment. The described workflow, which we call "growing via merging" and for which the key tools are available online, can improve early fragment-based drug discovery projects, making it a useful creative tool for medicinal chemists during structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies.

  18. Photolytic degradation of methylmercury enhanced by binding to natural organic ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2010-07-01

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that accumulates in food webs and poses a significant risk to human health. In natural water bodies, methylmercury concentrations remain low due to the degradation of methylmercury into inorganic mercury by sunlight, a process known as photodecomposition. Rates of photodecomposition are relatively rapid in freshwater lakes, and slow in marine waters, but the cause of this difference is not clear. Here, we carry out incubation experiments with artificial freshwater and seawater samples to examine the mechanisms regulating methylmercury photodecomposition. We show that singlet oxygen-a highly reactive form of dissolved oxygen generated by sunlight falling on dissolved organic matter-drives photodecomposition. However, in our experiments the rate of methylmercury degradation depends on the type of methylmercury-binding ligand present in the water. Relatively fast degradation rates (similar to observations in freshwater lakes) were detected when methylmercury species were bound to sulphur-containing ligands such as glutathione and mercaptoacetate. In contrast, methylmercury-chloride complexes, which are the dominant form of methylmercury in marine systems, did not degrade as easily. Our results could help to explain why methylmercury photodecomposition rates are relatively rapid in freshwater lakes and slow in marine waters.

  19. Assaying the binding strength of G-quadruplex ligands using single-molecule TPM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Wei; Chu, Jen-Fei; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fang, Hung-Chih; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-15

    G-quadruplexes are stable secondary structures formed by Hoogsteen base pairing of guanine-rich single-stranded DNA sequences in the presence of monovalent cations (Na(+) or K(+)). Folded G-quadruplex (G4) structures in human telomeres have been proposed as a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we used single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments to assay the binding strength of possible G4 ligands. We found that individual single-stranded DNA molecules containing the human telomeric sequence d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] fluctuated between the folded and the unfolded states in a 10 mM Na(+) solution at 37 °C. The durations of folded and unfolded states were single-exponentially distributed, and in return the folding and unfolding rate constants were 1.68 ± 0.01 and 1.63 ± 0.03 (s(-1)), respectively. In the presence of G4 ligands, such as TMPyP4, DODCI, BMVC, and BMVPA, the unfolding rate constant decreased appreciably. In addition, combining the Cu(2+)-induced G4 unfolding and TPM assay, we showed that BMVC and TMPyP4 are better G4 stabilizers than DODCI. The capability of monitoring the fluctuation between the folded and the unfolded state of G4 DNA in real time allows the determination of both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in a single measurement and offers a simple way to assay binding strength under various conditions. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Complex between α-bungarotoxin and an α7 nicotinic receptor ligand-binding domain chimaera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; Bren, Nina; Cheng, Kevin; Gomoto, Ryan; Chen, Lin; Sine, Steven M.

    2013-09-01

    To identify high-affinity interactions between long-chain α-neurotoxins and nicotinic receptors, we determined the crystal structure of the complex between α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) and a pentameric ligand-binding domain constructed from the human α7 AChR (acetylcholine receptor) and AChBP (acetylcholine-binding protein). The complex buries ~2000 Å2 (1 Å=0.1 nm) of surface area, within which Arg36 and Phe32 from finger II of α-btx form a π-cation stack that aligns edge-to-face with the conserved Tyr184 from loop-C of α7, while Asp30 of α-btx forms a hydrogen bond with the hydroxy group of Tyr184. These inter-residue interactions diverge from those in a 4.2 Å structure of α-ctx (α-cobratoxin) bound to AChBP, but are similar to those in a 1.94 Å structure of α-btx bound to the monomeric α1 extracellular domain, although compared with the monomer-bound complex, the α-btx backbone exhibits a large shift relative to the protein surface. Mutational analyses show that replacing Tyr184 with a threonine residue abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, whereas replacing with a phenylalanine residue maintains high affinity. Comparison of the α-btx complex with that coupled to the agonist epibatidine reveals structural rearrangements within the binding pocket and throughout each subunit. The overall findings highlight structural principles by which α-neurotoxins interact with nicotinic receptors.

  1. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fengli [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States); Luecke, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet (Germany); Baier, Leslie J. [NIDDK, NIH, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch (United States); Sacchettini, James C. [Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hamilton, James A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    1997-04-15

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel {beta}-strands which form two nearly orthogonal {beta}-sheets of five strands each, and two short {alpha}-helices that connect the {beta}-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand.

  2. Signaling-sensitive amino acids surround the allosteric ligand binding site of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinau, Gunnar; Haas, Ann-Karin; Neumann, Susanne; Worth, Catherine L; Hoyer, Inna; Furkert, Jens; Rutz, Claudia; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Schülein, Ralf; Krause, Gerd

    2010-07-01

    The thyrotropin receptor [thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR)], a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is endogenously activated by thyrotropin, which binds to the extracellular region of the receptor. We previously identified a low-molecular-weight (LMW) agonist of the TSHR and predicted its allosteric binding pocket within the receptor's transmembrane domain. Because binding of the LMW agonist probably disrupts interactions or leads to formation of new interactions among amino acid residues surrounding the pocket, we tested whether mutation of residues at these positions would lead to constitutive signaling activity. Guided by molecular modeling, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 24 amino acids in this spatial region, followed by functional characterization of the mutant receptors in terms of expression and signaling, measured as cAMP accumulation. We found that mutations V421I, Y466A, T501A, L587V, M637C, M637W, S641A, Y643F, L645V, and Y667A located in several helices exhibit constitutive activity. Of note is mutation M637W at position 6.48 in transmembrane helix 6, which has a significant effect on the interaction of the receptor with the LMW agonist. In summary, we found that a high proportion of residues in several helices surrounding the allosteric binding site of LMW ligands in the TSHR when mutated lead to constitutively active receptors. Our findings of signaling-sensitive residues in this region of the transmembrane bundle may be of general importance as this domain appears to be evolutionarily retained among GPCRs.

  3. Evaluation of Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography and Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Recovery and Identification of Copper(II)-Binding Ligands in Seawater Using the Model Ligand 8-Hydroxyquinoline

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, Richard L.; Ross, Andrew R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores) have been identified in seawater but the chemical structures of marine Cu-complexing ligands remain unknown. Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) allows Cu ligands to be isolated from bulk dissolved organic...

  4. Evaluation of IMAC and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Recovery and Analysis of Copper-Binding Ligands in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, R. L.; Ross, A.

    2016-02-01

    Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron, copper, and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores) have been identified in seawater and such compounds are known to mediate iron uptake by marine bacteria, thereby influencing biological productivity in the ocean. However, little is known about the origin, structure, or ecological role of marine Cu-binding ligands (chalcophores). Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) allows selective recovery of such compounds from seawater, while electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been used to identify marine siderophores and to characterise Cu ligands in coastal waters. Here, we use model compounds to evaluate a Cu(II)-IMAC/ESI-MS workflow for recovery and analysis of Cu-binding ligands in seawater. One-litre samples of artificial and natural filtered seawater were spiked with model Cu(II) ligands at realistic concentrations and fractionated by IMAC. Retained compounds were eluted by acidification and detected by UV absorption. Linear plots of concentration versus UV chromatographic peak area were obtained for model synthetic and natural organic ligands at concentrations ranging from 5 to 500 nM (r2=0.9988) and 50 and 750 nM (r2=0.9899), respectively, in artificial seawater. Variable though similar results were obtained for oceanic seawater spiked with 5 nM to 1 µM of ligand (r2=0.9893). Chromatographic peak data suggests that natural UV-absorbing Cu ligands are more concentrated in nearshore than in oceanic surface waters, and that these ligands are susceptible to photolysis by artificial sunlight. Eluted IMAC fractions corresponding to UV absorbance peaks were collected and different techniques evaluated for concentration and desalting of the recovered ligands prior to analysis by ESI-MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS data

  5. Exploring the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-4-AHCP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina B; Pickering, Darryl S; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the ionotropic GluR2 ligand-binding core (GluR2-S1S2J) in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-7,8-dihydro-6H-cyclohepta[d]-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-4-AHCP] has been determined, as well as the binding pharmacology of this construct...

  6. Application of high resolution NMR, ESR, and gamma-ray scintillation spectroscopy to the study of ligand binding in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancione, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has been employed to study the nature of the ligand binding site of alpha-1-antitrypsin. Spectra of spin-labeled alpha-1-antitrypsin were recorded at pH's ranging from 2.4 to 12.5. This data demonstrates the tight binding of the spin-label to the protease, and the sensitivity of the bound spin-label to informational changes in the protease inhibitor. A molecular dipstick approach has also been applied to this system and has yielded information on the geometry of the cleft accommodating the spin-label. 160 Terbium(III) exchange experiments have been performed on the acetylcholine receptor protein isolated from Torpedo californica, employing a specially designed flow dialysis apparatus constructed in the laboratory. The apparatus is designed to allow continuous monitoring of 160 Tb(III) gamma-ray emission from the protein compartment of the flow dialysis cell. Nicotinic ligand-induced displacement of 160 Tb(III) from the nicotinic binding site of the receptor was monitored as a funtion of (1) the concentration of nicotinic ligand in the washout buffer, and (2) the nature of the nicotinic ligand in the buffer. Measured 160 Tb(III) exchange half-lives indicate (1) a direct relationship between 160 Tb(III) displacement and nicotinic ligand concentration in the wash-out buffer, and (2) an enhanced 160 Tb(III) displacement for nicotinic agents possessing quaternary ammonium functions

  7. Ligand-induced structural changes in TEM-1 probed by molecular dynamics and relative binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, A C; Martins, J M; Fernandes, R; Moreira, I S

    2013-10-28

    The TEM family of enzymes has had a crucial impact on the pharmaceutical industry due to their important role in antibiotic resistance. Even with the latest technologies in structural biology and genomics, no 3D structure of a TEM-1/antibiotic complex is known previous to acylation. Therefore, the comprehension of their capability in acylate antibiotics is based on the protein macromolecular structure uncomplexed. In this work, molecular docking, molecular dynamic simulations, and relative free energy calculations were applied in order to get a comprehensive and thorough analysis of TEM-1/ampicillin and TEM-1/amoxicillin complexes. We described the complexes and analyzed the effect of ligand binding on the overall structure. We clearly demonstrate that the key residues involved in the stability of the ligand (hot-spots) vary with the nature of the ligand. Structural effects such as (i) the distances between interfacial residues (Ser70-Oγ and Lys73-Nζ, Lys73-Nζ and Ser130-Oγ, and Ser70-Oγ-Ser130-Oγ), (ii) side chain rotamer variation (Tyr105 and Glu240), and (iii) the presence of conserved waters can be also influenced by ligand binding. This study supports the hypothesis that TEM-1 suffers structural modifications upon ligand binding.

  8. Insights into ligand binding to a Glutathione S-transferase from mango: structure, thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Chavira, Ignacio; Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A.; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; García-Orozco, Karina D.; Hernandez-Paredes, Javier; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Stojanoff, Vivian; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Islas-Osuna, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied a mango glutathione S-transferase (GST) (Mangifera indica) bound to glutathione (GSH) and S-hexyl glutathione (GSX). This GST Tau class (MiGSTU) had a molecular mass of 25.5 kDa. MiGSTU Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants were determined for their substrates obtaining a Km, Vmax and kcat for CDNB of 0.792 mM, 80.58 mM·min−1 and 68.49 s−1 respectively and 0.693 mM, 105.32 mM·min−1 and 89.57 s−1, for reduced GSH respectively. MiGSTU had a micromolar affinity towards GSH (5.2 μM) or GSX (7.8 μM). The crystal structure of the MiGSTU in apo or bound to GSH or GSX generated a model that explains the thermodynamic signatures of binding and showed the importance of enthalpic-entropic compensation in ligand binding to Tau-class GST enzymes. PMID:28104507

  9. Predicting binding affinities of protein ligands from three-dimensional models: application to peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Lauemoller, S L; Holm, A

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast free energy scoring function (Fresno) has been developed to predict the binding free energy of peptides to class I major histocompatibility (MHC) proteins. It differs from existing scoring functions mainly by the explicit treatment of ligand desolvation and of unfavorable protein...... coordinates of the MHC-bound peptide have first been determined with an accuracy of about 1-1.5 A. Furthermore, it may be easily recalibrated for any protein-ligand complex.......) and of a series of 16 peptides to H-2K(k). Predictions were more accurate for HLA-A2-binding peptides as the training set had been built from experimentally determined structures. The average error in predicting the binding free energy of the test peptides was 3.1 kJ/mol. For the homology model-derived equation...

  10. The Bet v 1 fold: an ancient, versatile scaffold for binding of large, hydrophobic ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breiteneder Heimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, is a member of the ubiquitous PR-10 family of plant pathogenesis-related proteins. In recent years, a number of diverse plant proteins with low sequence similarity to Bet v 1 was identified. In addition, determination of the Bet v 1 structure revealed the existence of a large superfamily of structurally related proteins. In this study, we aimed to identify and classify all Bet v 1-related structures from the Protein Data Bank and all Bet v 1-related sequences from the Uniprot database. Results Structural comparisons of representative members of already known protein families structurally related to Bet v 1 with all entries of the Protein Data Bank yielded 47 structures with non-identical sequences. They were classified into eleven families, five of which were newly identified and not included in the Structural Classification of Proteins database release 1.71. The taxonomic distribution of these families extracted from the Pfam protein family database showed that members of the polyketide cyclase family and the activator of Hsp90 ATPase homologue 1 family were distributed among all three superkingdoms, while members of some bacterial families were confined to a small number of species. Comparison of ligand binding activities of Bet v 1-like superfamily members revealed that their functions were related to binding and metabolism of large, hydrophobic compounds such as lipids, hormones, and antibiotics. Phylogenetic relationships within the Bet v 1 family, defined as the group of proteins with significant sequence similarity to Bet v 1, were determined by aligning 264 Bet v 1-related sequences. A distance-based phylogenetic tree yielded a classification into 11 subfamilies, nine exclusively containing plant sequences and two subfamilies of bacterial proteins. Plant sequences included the pathogenesis-related proteins 10, the major latex proteins/ripening-related proteins subfamily, and

  11. Circular Dichroism of G-Quadruplex: A Laboratory Experiment for the Study of Topology and Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Josue´; Queiroz, João A.; Cruz, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) has emerged as one of the standard biophysical techniques for the study of guaninequadruplex (G4) folding, cation effect, and ligand binding. The utility of this technique is based on its robustness, ease of use, and requirement of only small quantities of nucleic acid. This experiment is also extendable to the classroom…

  12. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-Affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Ales; Bay, Tina

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screen...

  13. Stereochemical requirements of chitin synthase for ligand binding at the allosteric site for N-acetylglucosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, M; Mayer, C; Rast, D M

    1996-04-15

    The substrate kinetics of chitin synthase (CS) were non-Michaelian, irrespective of the type of enzyme preparation studied (105-S chitosomal CS, and 16-S ex walls), even in the presence of saturating GlcNAc. An unexplained idiosyncrasy of this enzyme, which is likely to be responsible for this phenomenon, is evident from the striking non-linearity of product deposition with time at low substrate or low enzyme concentrations, particularly in the absence of GlcNac. The possibility can be excluded that this non-linearity is due to the formation of soluble by-products or intermediates in the form of chito-oligomers, as shown by HPLC/pulsed amperometric detection analysis. Additional evidence was sought for the tenet that CS is homotropically-heterotropically regulated, at least under steady-state reaction conditions. Substrate kinetic curves established from rate data for the linear reaction phase only were used for modelling. These could be reasonably well parameterised on the basis of the Monod mathematical model for co-operative ligand binding. Within a series of test compounds used to assess the stereochemical conditions of the allosteric site of CS for effector binding, N-acetylglucosaminono-1,5-lactone oxime excelled. Requirements for effector binding are as follows: (a) an aminoglucopyranose skeleton with the amino function acetylated, and (b) a single-bonded oxo-function present at C(1), which is preferentially a hydrogen bond donor, that may be equatorially spaced off, but must not be alpha-anomeric. The implications of these findings for chitin synthesis in vivo are discussed in terms of a mechanistically based fitness of CS to operate efficiently under vastly different combinations of substrate could be coordinately linked to the catabolism of chitin.

  14. A machine learning approach to predicting protein-ligand binding affinity with applications to molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Pedro J; Mitchell, John B O

    2010-05-01

    Accurately predicting the binding affinities of large sets of diverse protein-ligand complexes is an extremely challenging task. The scoring functions that attempt such computational prediction are essential for analysing the outputs of molecular docking, which in turn is an important technique for drug discovery, chemical biology and structural biology. Each scoring function assumes a predetermined theory-inspired functional form for the relationship between the variables that characterize the complex, which also include parameters fitted to experimental or simulation data and its predicted binding affinity. The inherent problem of this rigid approach is that it leads to poor predictivity for those complexes that do not conform to the modelling assumptions. Moreover, resampling strategies, such as cross-validation or bootstrapping, are still not systematically used to guard against the overfitting of calibration data in parameter estimation for scoring functions. We propose a novel scoring function (RF-Score) that circumvents the need for problematic modelling assumptions via non-parametric machine learning. In particular, Random Forest was used to implicitly capture binding effects that are hard to model explicitly. RF-Score is compared with the state of the art on the demanding PDBbind benchmark. Results show that RF-Score is a very competitive scoring function. Importantly, RF-Score's performance was shown to improve dramatically with training set size and hence the future availability of more high-quality structural and interaction data is expected to lead to improved versions of RF-Score. pedro.ballester@ebi.ac.uk; jbom@st-andrews.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor: Molecular Mechanism of Ligand Binding and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Carpenter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs comprise the P1 class of purinergic receptors and belong to the largest family of integral membrane proteins in the human genome, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. ARs are classified into four subtypes, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, which are all activated by extracellular adenosine, and play central roles in a broad range of physiological processes, including sleep regulation, angiogenesis and modulation of the immune system. ARs are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of pathophysiological conditions, including sleep disorders, cancer, and dementia, which has made them important targets for structural biology. Over a decade of research and innovation has culminated with the publication of more than 30 crystal structures of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR, making it one of the best structurally characterized GPCRs at the atomic level. In this review we analyze the structural data reported for A2AR that described for the first time the binding of mode of antagonists, including newly developed drug candidates, synthetic and endogenous agonists, sodium ions and an engineered G protein. These structures have revealed the key conformational changes induced upon agonist and G protein binding that are central to signal transduction by A2AR, and have highlighted both similarities and differences in the activation mechanism of this receptor compared to other class A GPCRs. Finally, comparison of A2AR with the recently solved structures of A1R has provided the first structural insight into the molecular determinants of ligand binding specificity in different AR subtypes.

  16. Convergence of Domain Architecture, Structure, and Ligand Affinity in Animal and Plant RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Manny, Austin; Kolaczkowski, Oralia; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences using phylogenetic methods is a powerful technique for directly examining the evolution of molecular function. Although ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is itself very efficient, downstream functional, and structural studies necessary to characterize when and how changes in molecular function occurred are often costly and time-consuming, currently limiting ASR studies to examining a relatively small number of discrete functional shifts. As a result, we have very little direct information about how molecular function evolves across large protein families. Here we develop an approach combining ASR with structure and function prediction to efficiently examine the evolution of ligand affinity across a large family of double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs) spanning animals and plants. We find that the characteristic domain architecture of DRBs-consisting of 2-3 tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsrms)-arose independently in early animal and plant lineages. The affinity with which individual dsrms bind double-stranded RNA appears to have increased and decreased often across both animal and plant phylogenies, primarily through convergent structural mechanisms involving RNA-contact residues within the β1-β2 loop and a small region of α2. These studies provide some of the first direct information about how protein function evolves across large gene families and suggest that changes in molecular function may occur often and unassociated with major phylogenetic events, such as gene or domain duplications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. The second and fourth cluster of class A cysteine-rich repeats of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein share ligand-binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neels, J. G.; van den Berg, B. M.; Lookene, A.; Olivecrona, G.; Pannekoek, H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is a multifunctional endocytic cell-surface receptor that binds and internalizes a diverse array of ligands. The receptor contains four putative ligand-binding domains, generally referred to as clusters I, II, III, and IV. In this study,

  18. Evaluation of DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, radical scavenging and in vitro cytotoxic activities of ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2,4-dihydroxy benzylidene ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Maruthachalam; Ayyannan, Ganesan; Raja, Gunasekaran; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2016-12-01

    The new ruthenium(II) complexes with hydrazone ligands, 4-Methyl-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(1)), 4-Methoxy-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(2)), 4-Bromo-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(3)), were synthesized and characterized by various spectro analytical techniques. The molecular structures of the ligands were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The DNA binding studies of the ligands and complexes were examined by absorption, fluorescence, viscosity and cyclic voltammetry methods. The results indicated that the ligands and complexes could interact with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. The DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was evaluated by gel electrophoresis assay, which revealed that the complexes are good DNA cleaving agents. The binding interaction of the ligands and complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic method. Antioxidant studies showed that the complexes have a strong radical scavenging properties. Further, the cytotoxic effect of the complexes examined on cancerous cell lines showed that the complexes exhibit significant anticancer activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bio-nanocapsule-based scaffold improves the sensitivity and ligand-binding capacity of mammalian receptors on the sensor chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian receptors are recognized as target molecules for drug discovery, and chemical libraries have been screened for both potential antagonists and agonists mainly by ligand-binding assays using immobilized receptors. A bio-nanocapsule (BNC) of approximately 30 nm that displays a tandem form of the protein A-derived immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc-binding Z domains (denoted as ZZ-BNC) has been developed for both clustering and oriented immobilization of IgGs on the solid phase of immunosensors. In this study, human IgG1 Fc-fused vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor was immobilized through ZZ-BNC on the sensor chip of quartz crystal microbalance (ZZ-BNC-coating). When compared with direct adsorption and protein A-coating, the sensor chip showed higher sensitivity (∽46- and ∽165-fold, respectively) and larger ligand-binding capacity (∽4- and ∽18-fold, respectively). Furthermore, the number of VEGF molecules bound to its receptor increased from 0.20 (direct adsorption) to 2.06 by ZZ-BNC-coating, strongly suggesting that ZZ-BNC reduced the steric hindrance near ligand recognition sites through oriented immobilization. Similarly, the sensitivity and ligand-binding capacity of leptin and prolactin receptors were both enhanced at a level comparable to that observed for the VEGF receptor. Thus, the combination of ZZ-BNC and Fc-fused receptors could significantly improve the function of ligand-binding assays. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H.F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites. PMID:24053696

  1. Residues within the Transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Involved in Ligand Binding and Receptor Activation: Modelling the Ligand-Bound Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopman, K.; Wallis, R.; Robb, G.; Brown, A. J. H.; Wilkinson, G. F.; Timms, D.

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal regions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) bind to the N terminus of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), facilitating interaction of the ligand N terminus with the receptor transmembrane domain. In contrast, the agonist exendin-4 relies less on the transmembrane domain, and truncated antagonist analogs (e.g. exendin 9–39) may interact solely with the receptor N terminus. Here we used mutagenesis to explore the role of residues highly conserved in the predicted transmembrane helices of mammalian GLP-1Rs and conserved in family B G protein coupled receptors in ligand binding and GLP-1R activation. By iteration using information from the mutagenesis, along with the available crystal structure of the receptor N terminus and a model of the active opsin transmembrane domain, we developed a structural receptor model with GLP-1 bound and used this to better understand consequences of mutations. Mutation at Y152 [transmembrane helix (TM) 1], R190 (TM2), Y235 (TM3), H363 (TM6), and E364 (TM6) produced similar reductions in affinity for GLP-1 and exendin 9–39. In contrast, other mutations either preferentially [K197 (TM2), Q234 (TM3), and W284 (extracellular loop 2)] or solely [D198 (TM2) and R310 (TM5)] reduced GLP-1 affinity. Reduced agonist affinity was always associated with reduced potency. However, reductions in potency exceeded reductions in agonist affinity for K197A, W284A, and R310A, while H363A was uncoupled from cAMP generation, highlighting critical roles of these residues in translating binding to activation. Data show important roles in ligand binding and receptor activation of conserved residues within the transmembrane domain of the GLP-1R. The receptor structural model provides insight into the roles of these residues. PMID:21868452

  2. Selectivity in Ligand Binding to Uranyl Compounds: A Synthetic, Structural, Thermodynamic and Computational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-12-06

    The uranyl cation (UO22+) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. We believe that the goal of developing a practical system for uranium separation from seawater will not be attained without new insights into our existing fundamental knowledge of actinide chemistry. We posit that detailed studies of the kinetic and thermodynamic factors that influence interactions between f-elements and ligands with a range of donor atoms is essential to any major advance in this important area. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. We anticipate that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials.

  3. EasyMIFS and SiteHound: a toolkit for the identification of ligand-binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghersi, Dario; Sanchez, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    SiteHound uses Molecular Interaction Fields (MIFs) produced by EasyMIFs to identify protein structure regions that show a high propensity for interaction with ligands. The type of binding site identified depends on the probe atom used in the MIF calculation. The input to EasyMIFs is a PDB file of a protein structure; the output MIF serves as input to SiteHound, which in turn produces a list of putative binding sites. Extensive testing of SiteHound for the detection of binding sites for drug-like molecules and phosphorylated ligands has been carried out. EasyMIFs and SiteHound executables for Linux, Mac OS X, and MS Windows operating systems are freely available for download from http://sitehound.sanchezlab.org/download.html. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Environmental xenobiotics may disrupt normal endocrine function by interfering with the binding of physiological ligands to steroid receptors and binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzo, B J

    1997-01-01

    The disruption of the reproductive system of male and female animals in the wild has been attributed to environmental chemicals (xenobiotics). The effects seen mirror alterations one might anticipate if the steroid hormone-dependent processes that regulate these systems were impaired. To determine whether xenobiotics (present at a concentration of 100 microM) exert their action through steroid-mediated pathways, we examined their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]physiological ligands (present at a concentration of 7 nM) to the androgen and estrogen receptors, rat androgen-binding protein (ABP), and human sex hormone-binding globulin (hSHBG). The gamma- and delta-isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane, congeners of dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT; p,p'-DDT; p,p'-DDE; o,p'-DDT), dieldrin, atrazine, and pentachlorophenol, caused a statistically significant inhibition of specific binding of [3H]5 alpha-DHT to the androgen receptor that ranged from 100% (p,p'-DDE) to 25% (dieldrin). Methoxychlor, o,p'-DDT1, pentachlorophenol, and nonylphenol significantly reduced [3H]17 beta-estradiol binding to the estrogen receptor by 10, 60, 20, and 75%, respectively. The binding of [3H]5 alpha-DHT to ABP was inhibited 70% by the delta-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane, but the gamma-isomer did not reduce binding significantly. Methoxychlor, p,p'-DDT, atrazine, and nonylphenol reduced [3H]5 alpha-DHT binding to ABP by approximately 40%. Nonylphenol reduced the binding of [3H]5 alpha-DHT to hSHBG by 70%. Hexachlorocyclohexane reduced [3H]5 alpha-DHT binding to hSHBG by 20%, but the stereospecific effects observed with ABP did not occur. o,p'-DDT and pentachlorophenol resulted in a statistically significant 20% inhibition of [3H]5 alpha-DHT binding to hSHBG. Some xenobiotics resulted in dissociation of [3H]ligands from their binding proteins that was statistically identical to that caused by the unlabeled natural ligand, whereas others resulted in slower or more rapid dissociation

  5. Trafficking defects and loss of ligand binding are the underlying causes of all reported DDR2 missense mutations found in SMED-SL patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bassam R; Xu, Huifang; Akawi, Nadia A; John, Anne; Karuvantevida, Noushad S; Langer, Ruth; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Leitinger, Birgit

    2010-06-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED) with short limbs and abnormal calcifications (SMED-SL) is a rare, autosomal recessive human growth disorder, characterized by disproportionate short stature, short limbs, short broad fingers, abnormal metaphyses and epiphyses, platyspondyly and premature calcifications. Recently, three missense mutations and one splice-site mutation in the DDR2 gene were identified as causative genetic defects for SMED-SL, but the underlying cellular and biochemical mechanisms were not explored. Here we report a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.337G>A (p.E113K), that causes SMED-SL in two siblings in the United Arab Emirates. Another DDR2 missense mutation, c.2254C>T (p.R752C), matching one of the previously reported SMED-SL mutations, was found in a second affected family. DDR2 is a plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinase that functions as a collagen receptor. We expressed DDR2 constructs with the identified point mutations in human cell lines and evaluated their localization and functional properties. We found that all SMED-SL missense mutants were defective in collagen-induced receptor activation and that the three previously reported mutants (p.T713I, p.I726R and p.R752C) were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The novel mutant (p.E113K), in contrast, trafficked normally, like wild-type DDR2, but failed to bind collagen. This finding is in agreement with our recent structural data identifying Glu113 as an important amino acid in the DDR2 ligand-binding site. Our data thus demonstrate that SMED-SL can result from at least two different loss-of-function mechanisms: namely defects in DDR2 targeting to the plasma membrane or the loss of its ligand-binding activity.

  6. Oxytocin receptor ligand binding in embryonic tissue and postnatal brain development of the C57BL/6J mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eHammock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT has drawn increasing attention as a developmentally relevant neuropeptide given its role in the brain regulation of social behavior. It has been suggested that OXT plays an important role in the infant brain during caregiver attachment in nurturing familial contexts, but there is incomplete experimental evidence. Mouse models of OXT system genes have been particularly informative for the role of the OXT system in social behavior, however, the developing brain areas that could respond to ligand activation of the OXT receptor (OXTR have yet to be identified in this species. Here we report new data revealing dynamic ligand-binding distribution of OXTR in the developing mouse brain. Using male and female C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P 0, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 60 we quantified OXTR ligand binding in several brain areas which changed across development. Further, we describe OXTR ligand binding in select tissues of the near-term whole embryo at E18.5. Together, these data aid in the interpretation of findings in mouse models of the OXT system and generate new testable hypotheses for developmental roles for OXT in mammalian systems. We discuss our findings in the context of developmental disorders (including autism, attachment biology, and infant physiological regulation.

  7. Constraining binding hot spots: NMR and molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for enthalpy-entropy compensation in SH2-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Joshua M; Gorenstein, Nina M; Tian, Jianhua; Martin, Stephen F; Post, Carol Beth

    2010-08-18

    NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to probe the structure and dynamics of complexes of three phosphotyrosine-derived peptides with the Src SH2 domain in an effort to uncover a structural explanation for enthalpy-entropy compensation observed in the binding thermodynamics. The series of phosphotyrosine peptide derivatives comprises the natural pYEEI Src SH2 ligand, a constrained mimic, in which the phosphotyrosine (pY) residue is preorganized in the bound conformation for the purpose of gaining an entropic advantage to binding, and a flexible analogue of the constrained mimic. The expected gain in binding entropy of the constrained mimic was realized; however, a balancing loss in binding enthalpy was also observed that could not be rationalized from the crystallographic structures. We examined protein dynamics to evaluate whether the observed enthalpic penalty might be the result of effects arising from altered motions in the complex. (15)N-relaxation studies and positional fluctuations from molecular dynamics indicate that the main-chain dynamics of the protein show little variation among the three complexes. Root mean squared (rms) coordinate deviations vary by less than 1.5 A for all non-hydrogen atoms for the crystal structures and in the ensemble average structures calculated from the simulations. In contrast to this striking similarity in the structures and dynamics, there are a number of large chemical shift differences from residues across the binding interface, but particularly from key Src SH2 residues that interact with pY, the "hot spot" residue, which contributes about one-half of the binding free energy. Rank-order correlations between chemical shifts and ligand binding enthalpy for several pY-binding residues, coupled with available mutagenesis and calorimetric data, suggest that subtle structural perturbations (enthalpy, leading to the observed enthalpy-entropy compensation. We find no evidence to support the premise

  8. Calreticulin Binds to Fas Ligand and Inhibits Neuronal Cell Apoptosis Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beilei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calreticulin (CRT can bind to Fas ligand (FasL and inhibit Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of Jurkat T cells. However, its effect on neuronal cell apoptosis has not been investigated. Purpose. We aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CRT following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI. Methods. Mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and SH-SY5Y cells subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD were used as models for IRI. The CRT protein level was detected by Western blotting, and mRNA expression of CRT, caspase-3, and caspase-8 was measured by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the localization of CRT and FasL. The interaction of CRT with FasL was verified by coimmunoprecipitation. SH-SY5Y cell viability was determined by MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The measurement of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity was carried out using caspase activity assay kits. Results. After IRI, CRT was upregulated on the neuron surface and bound to FasL, leading to increased viability of OGD-exposed SH-SY5Y cells and decreased activity of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Conclusions. This study for the first time revealed that increased CRT inhibited Fas/FasL-mediated neuronal cell apoptosis during the early stage of ischemic stroke, suggesting it to be a potential protector activated soon after IRI.

  9. Locating binding poses in protein-ligand systems using reconnaissance metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Tribello, Gareth A.; Parrinello, Michele

    2012-01-01

    A molecular dynamics-based protocol is proposed for finding and scoring protein-ligand binding poses. This protocol uses the recently developed reconnaissance metadynamics method, which employs a self-learning algorithm to construct a bias that pushes the system away from the kinetic traps where it would otherwise remain. The exploration of phase space with this algorithm is shown to be roughly six to eight times faster than unbiased molecular dynamics and is only limited by the time taken to diffuse about the surface of the protein. We apply this method to the well-studied trypsin–benzamidine system and show that we are able to refind all the poses obtained from a reference EADock blind docking calculation. These poses can be scored based on the length of time the system remains trapped in the pose. Alternatively, one can perform dimensionality reduction on the output trajectory and obtain a map of phase space that can be used in more expensive free-energy calculations. PMID:22440749

  10. The Greenland shark Somniosus microcephalus-Hemoglobins and ligand-binding properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Russo

    Full Text Available A large amount of data is currently available on the adaptive mechanisms of polar bony fish hemoglobins, but structural information on those of cartilaginous species is scarce. This study presents the first characterisation of the hemoglobin system of one of the longest-living vertebrate species (392 ± 120 years, the Arctic shark Somniosus microcephalus. Three major hemoglobins are found in its red blood cells and are made of two copies of the same α globin combined with two copies of three very similar β subunits. The three hemoglobins show very similar oxygenation and carbonylation properties, which are unaffected by urea, a very important compound in marine elasmobranch physiology. They display identical electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra, indicating that their heme-pocket structures are identical or highly similar. The quaternary transition equilibrium between the relaxed (R and the tense (T states is more dependent on physiological allosteric effectors than in human hemoglobin, as also demonstrated in polar teleost hemoglobins. Similar to other cartilaginous fishes, we found no evidence for functional differentiation among the three isoforms. The very similar ligand-binding properties suggest that regulatory control of O2 transport may be at the cellular level and that it may involve changes in the cellular concentrations of allosteric effectors and/or variations of other systemic factors. The hemoglobins of this polar shark have evolved adaptive decreases in O2 affinity in comparison to temperate sharks.

  11. SVM prediction of ligand-binding sites in bacterial lipoproteins employing shape and physio-chemical descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Kiran; Prabhakar, Prashant; Jayaraman, V K

    2012-11-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins play critical roles in various physiological processes including the maintenance of pathogenicity and numbers of them are being considered as potential candidates for generating novel vaccines. In this work, we put forth an algorithm to identify and predict ligand-binding sites in bacterial lipoproteins. The method uses three types of pocket descriptors, namely fpocket descriptors, 3D Zernike descriptors and shell descriptors, and combines them with Support Vector Machine (SVM) method for the classification. The three types of descriptors represent shape-based properties of the pocket as well as its local physio-chemical features. All three types of descriptors, along with their hybrid combinations are evaluated with SVM and to improve classification performance, WEKA-InfoGain feature selection is applied. Results obtained in the study show that the classifier successfully differentiates between ligand-binding and non-binding pockets. For the combination of three types of descriptors, 10 fold cross-validation accuracy of 86.83% is obtained for training while the selected model achieved test Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.534. Individually or in combination with new and existing methods, our model can be a very useful tool for the prediction of potential ligand-binding sites in bacterial lipoproteins.

  12. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J; Poulsen, F M

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein a...

  13. Molecular recognition of poly(A) by small ligands: an alternative method of analysis reveals nanomolar, cooperative and shape-selective binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkol, Ozgül Persil; Hud, Nicholas V

    2009-02-01

    A few drug-like molecules have recently been found to bind poly(A) and induce a stable secondary structure (T(m) approximately 60 degrees C), even though this RNA homopolymer is single-stranded in the absence of a ligand. Here, we report results from experiments specifically designed to explore the association of small molecules with poly(A). We demonstrate that coralyne, the first small molecule discovered to bind poly(dA), binds with unexpectedly high affinity (K(a) >10(7) M(-1)), and that the crescent shape of coralyne appears necessary for poly(A) binding. We also show that the binding of similar ligands to poly(A) can be highly cooperative. For one particular ligand, at least six ligand molecules are required to stabilize the poly(A) self-structure at room temperature. This highly cooperative binding produces very sharp transitions between unstructured and structured poly(A) as a function of ligand concentration. Given the fact that junctions between Watson-Crick and A.A duplexes are tolerated, we propose that poly(A) sequence elements and appropriate ligands could be used to reversibly drive transitions in DNA and RNA-based molecular structures by simply diluting/concentrating a sample about the poly(A)-ligand 'critical concentration'. The ligands described here may also find biological or medicinal applications, owing to the 3'-polyadenylation of mRNA in living cells.

  14. Detection of protein-ligand NOEs with small, weakly binding ligands by combined relaxation and diffusion filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponstingl, Hannes; Otting, Gottfried

    1997-01-01

    The use of a diffusion filter is proposed to suppress the NMR signals of small organic compounds in the presence of macromolecules.Combined with a spin-echo relaxation filter, the diffusion filter enables the selective and simultaneous detection of intermolecular solvent-protein NOEs in a straightforward two-dimensional NOESY experiment. Using the intermolecular NOEs observed between N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and hen egg-white lysozyme in an aqueous solution containing 2 M DMF, the binding of DMF at the specificity-determining substrate binding site C of the enzyme was modelled

  15. An efficient use of the WATERGATE W5 sequence for observing a ligand binding with a protein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, Kazuo; Shimotakahara, Sakurako; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2008-09-01

    An efficient pulse sequence for observing a ligand binding with a receptor has been developed by incorporating the WATERGATE W5 sequence. In the conventional water ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY) techniques, the water resonance is selectively excited using, e.g. the double-pulsed field gradient spin-echo (DPFGSE) sequence at the initial portion of pulse sequence. In the current version, the modified WATERGATE W5 sequence is incorporated at the initial portion of the pulse sequence, and the resonance at the water frequency can be selectively reserved by the modified WATERGATE W5 sequence. The efficiency of ligand-observed NMR screening techniques has been demonstrated using the human serum albumin (HSA)-tryptophan complex. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Engineering of novel Staphylococcal Protein A ligands to enable milder elution pH and high dynamic binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Timothy M; Palmgren, Ronnie; Forss, Annika; Vasic, Jelena; Fonseca, Mariko; Thompson, Christopher; Wang, William K; Wang, Xiangyang; Hunter, Alan K

    2014-10-03

    We describe novel Staphylococcal Protein A ligands that enable milder elution pH for use in affinity chromatography. The change in elution pH is the result of point mutations to the protein sequence. Two novel ligands are investigated in this study. The first, designated Z(H18S)4, represents a histidine to serine substitution single mutation. The second, designated Z(H18S, N28A)4, is a double mutant comprising histidine to serine and asparagine to alanine mutations. Both are compared against the unmutated sequence, designated Z4, which is currently utilized in a commercially available Protein A stationary phase for the purification of molecules containing Fc domains. The ligands are coupled to a chromatography support matrix and tested against a panel of antibodies and an Fc fusion protein for elution pH, dynamic binding capacity, step-wise elution, and capture from clarified culture media. Results demonstrate that the novel ligands result in milder elution pH, on average >0.5 pH units, when tested in a pH gradient. For step-wise elution at pH 4.0, the Z(H18S, N28A)4 ligand showed on average a greater than 30% increase in yield compared to Z4. Importantly, for the antibodies tested the mutations did not result in a decrease in dynamic binding capacity or other desirable attributes such as selectivity. A potential application of the novel ligands is shown with a pH sensitive molecule prone to aggregation under acidic conditions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Unique structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand binding domain mediate its binding specificity as revealed by X-ray crystallography, NMR and MD simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelu Huan

    Full Text Available The 16 EphA and EphB receptors represent the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their interactions with 9 ephrin-A and ephrin-B ligands initiate bidirectional signals controlling many physiological and pathological processes. Most interactions occur between receptor and ephrins of the same class, and only EphA4 can bind all A and B ephrins. To understand the structural and dynamic principles that enable Eph receptors to utilize the same jellyroll β-sandwich fold to bind ephrins, the VAPB-MSP domain, peptides and small molecules, we have used crystallography, NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations to determine the first structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand-binding domain (LBD, which only binds ephrin-A ligands. Unexpectedly, despite being unbound, the high affinity ephrin-binding pocket of EphA5 resembles that of other Eph receptors bound to ephrins, with a helical conformation over the J-K loop and an open pocket. The openness of the pocket is further supported by NMR hydrogen/deuterium exchange data and MD simulations. Additionally, the EphA5 LBD undergoes significant picosecond-nanosecond conformational exchanges over the loops, as revealed by NMR and MD simulations, but lacks global conformational exchanges on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. This is markedly different from the EphA4 LBD, which shares 74% sequence identity and 87% homology. Consequently, the unbound EphA5 LBD appears to comprise an ensemble of open conformations that have only small variations over the loops and appear ready to bind ephrin-A ligands. These findings show how two proteins with high sequence homology and structural similarity are still able to achieve distinctive binding specificities through different dynamics, which may represent a general mechanism whereby the same protein fold can serve for different functions. Our findings also suggest that a promising strategy to design agonists/antagonists with high affinity and selectivity

  18. Molecular Determinants for Ligand Binding at Serotonin 5-HT2Aand 5-HT2CGPCRs: Experimental Affinity Results Analyzed by Molecular Modeling and Ligand Docking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Canal, Clinton E; Booth, Raymond G

    2012-12-15

    Ligands that activate the serotonin 5-HT 2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) may be therapeutic for psychoses, addiction, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Ligands that are antagonists at the closely related 5-HT 2A GPCR also may treat neuropsychiatric disorders; in contrast, 5-HT 2A activation may cause hallucinations. 5-HT 2C -specific agonist drug design is challenging because 5-HT 2 GPCRs share 80% transmembrane (TM) homology, same second messenger signaling, and no crystal structures are reported. To help delineate molecular determinants underlying differential binding and activation of 5-HT 2 GPCRs, 5-HT 2A , and 5-HT 2C homology models were built from the β 2 -adrenergic GPCR crystal structure and equilibrated in a lipid phosphatidyl choline bilayer performing molecular dynamics simulations. Ligand docking studies at the 5-HT 2 receptor models were conducted with the (2 R , 4 S )- and (2 S , 4 R )-enantiomers of the novel 5-HT 2C agonist/5-HT 2A/2B antagonist trans -4-phenyl- N,N -dimethyl-2-aminotetralin (PAT) and its 4'-chlorophenyl congners. Results indicate PAT-5-HT 2 molecular interactions especially in TM domain V are important for the (2 R , 4 S ) enantiomer, whereas, TM domain VI and VII interactions are more important for the (2 S , 4 R ) enantiomer.

  19. A Critical Review of Validation, Blind Testing, and Real- World Use of Alchemical Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Robert; Wang, Lingle; Mobley, David L; Friesner, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is among the most fundamental phenomena underlying all molecular biology, and a greater ability to more accurately and robustly predict the binding free energy of a small molecule ligand for its cognate protein is expected to have vast consequences for improving the efficiency of pharmaceutical drug discovery. We briefly reviewed a number of scientific and technical advances that have enabled alchemical free energy calculations to recently emerge as a preferred approach, and critically considered proper validation and effective use of these techniques. In particular, we characterized a selection bias effect which may be important in prospective free energy calculations, and introduced a strategy to improve the accuracy of the free energy predictions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. PK of immunoconjugate anticancer agent CMD-193 in rats: ligand-binding assay approach to determine in vivo immunoconjugate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azher; Gorovits, Boris; Leal, Mauricio; Fluhler, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a new generation of anticancer therapeutics. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a methodology that can be used to assess the stability of the ADCs by using the PK data obtained by ligand-binding assays that measure various components of ADCs. The ligand-binding assays format of different components of ADCs provided unique valuable PK information. The mathematical manipulation of the bioanalytical data provided an insight into the in vivo integrity, indicating that the loading of the calicheamicin on the G193 antibody declines in an apparent slow first-order process. This report demonstrates the value of analyzing various components of the ADC and their PK profiles to better understand the disposition and in vivo stability of ADCs.

  1. Ligand size is a major determinant of specificity in periplasmic oxyanion-binding proteins: the 1.2 A resolution crystal structure of Azotobacter vinelandii ModA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D M; Williams, C E; Mitchenall, L A; Pau, R N

    1998-12-15

    . Periplasmic receptors constitute a diverse class of binding proteins that differ widely in size, sequence and ligand specificity. Nevertheless, almost all of them display a common beta/alpha folding motif and have similar tertiary structures consisting of two globular domains. The ligand is bound at the bottom of a deep cleft, which lies at the interface between these two domains. The oxyanion-binding proteins are notable in that they can discriminate between very similar ligands. . Azotobacter vinelandii is unusual in that it possesses two periplasmic molybdate-binding proteins. The crystal structure of one of these with bound ligand has been determined at 1.2 A resolution. It superficially resembles the structure of sulphate-binding protein (SBP) from Salmonella typhimurium and uses a similar constellation of hydrogen-bonding interactions to bind its ligand. However, the detailed interactions are distinct from those of SBP and the more closely related molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli. . Despite differences in the residues involved in binding, the volumes of the binding pockets in the A. vinelandii and E. coli molybdate-binding proteins are similar and are significantly larger than that of SBP. We conclude that the discrimination between molybdate and sulphate shown by these binding proteins is largely dependent upon small differences in the sizes of these two oxyanions.

  2. Insights to ligand binding to the monoamine transporters—from homology modeling to LeuBAT and dDAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Grouleff, Julie; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of drug binding to the human biogenic amine transporters (BATs) is essential to explain the mechanism of action of these pharmaceuticals but more importantly to be able to develop new and improved compounds to be used in the treatment of depression or drug addiction. Until recently no high resolution structure was available of the BATs and homology modeling was a necessity. Various studies have revealed experimentally validated binding modes of numerous ligands to the BATs using homology modeling. Here we examine and discuss the similarities between the binding models of substrates, antidepressants, psychostimulants, and mazindol in homology models of the human BATs and the recently published crystal structures of the Drosophila dopamine transporter and the engineered protein, LeuBAT. The comparison reveals that careful computational modeling combined with experimental data can be utilized to predict binding of molecules to proteins that agree very well with crystal structures. PMID:26441663

  3. Insights to ligand binding to the monoamine transporters – from homology modeling to LeuBAT and dDAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi eKoldsø

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of drug binding to the human biogenic amine transporters is essential to explain the mechanism of action of these pharmaceuticals but more importantly to be able to develop new and improved compounds to be used in the treatment of depression or drug addiction. Until recently no high resolution structure was available of the biogenic amine transporters and homology modeling was a necessity. Various studies have revealed experimentally validated binding modes of numerous ligands to the biogenic amine transporters using homology modeling. Here we examine and discuss the similarities between the binding models of substrates, antidepressants, psychostimulants and anti-abuse drugs in homology models of the human biogenic amine transporters and the recently published crystal structures of the drosophila dopamine transporter and the engineered protein, LeuBAT. The comparison reveals that careful computational modeling combined with experimental data can be utilized to predict binding of molecules to proteins that agree very well with crystal structures.

  4. The thermodynamic signature of ligand binding to histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolases is most sensitive to the flexibility in the L2-loop lining the active site pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyners, Christian; Krämer, Andreas; Yildiz, Özkan; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of the thermodynamic driving forces of ligand-protein binding has been suggested to be a key component for the selection and optimization of active compounds into drug candidates. The binding enthalpy as deduced from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is usually interpreted assuming single-step binding of a ligand to one conformation of the target protein. Although successful in many cases, these assumptions are oversimplified approximations of the reality with flexible proteins and complicated binding mechanism in many if not most cases. The relationship between protein flexibility and thermodynamic signature of ligand binding is largely understudied. Directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics and ITC methods were combined to dissect the influence of loop flexibility on the thermodynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to histone deacetylase (HDAC)-like amidohydrolases. The general ligand-protein binding mechanism comprises an energetically demanding gate opening step followed by physical binding. Increased flexibility of the L2-loop in HDAC-like amidohydrolases facilitates access of ligands to the binding pocket resulting in predominantly enthalpy-driven complex formation. The study provides evidence for the great importance of flexibility adjacent to the active site channel for the mechanism and observed thermodynamic driving forces of molecular recognition in HDAC like enzymes. The flexibility or malleability in regions adjacent to binding pockets should be given more attention when designing better drug candidates. The presented case study also suggests that the observed binding enthalpy of protein-ligand systems should be interpreted with caution, since more complicated binding mechanisms may obscure the significance regarding potential drug likeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: A general theory corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    Adhesion processes of biological membranes that enclose cells and cellular organelles are essential for immune responses, tissue formation, and signaling. These processes depend sensitively on the binding constant K2D of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, which is difficult to measure in the "two-dimensional" (2D) membrane environment of the proteins. An important problem therefore is to relate K2D to the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in three dimensions (3D). In this article, we present a general theory for the binding constants K2D and K3D of rather stiff proteins whose main degrees of freedom are translation and rotation, along membranes and around anchor points "in 2D," or unconstrained "in 3D." The theory generalizes previous results by describing how K2D depends both on the average separation and thermal nanoscale roughness of the apposing membranes, and on the length and anchoring flexibility of the receptors and ligands. Our theoretical results for the ratio K2D/K3D of the binding constants agree with detailed results from Monte Carlo simulations without any data fitting, which indicates that the theory captures the essential features of the "dimensionality reduction" due to membrane anchoring. In our Monte Carlo simulations, we consider a novel coarse-grained model of biomembrane adhesion in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic surfaces, and the receptors and ligands as anchored molecules that diffuse continuously along the membranes and rotate at their anchor points.

  6. Design of sequence-specific DNA binding ligands that use a two-stranded peptide motif for DNA sequence recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, V A; Grokhovsky, S L; Surovaya, A N; Leinsoo, T A; Sidorova NYu; Zasedatelev, A S; Zhuze, A L; Strahan, G A; Shafer, R H; Gursky, G V

    1996-08-01

    The design and DNA binding activity of beta-structure-forming peptides and netropsin-peptide conjugates are reported. It is found that a pair of peptides-S,S'-bis(Lys-Gly-Val-Cys-Val-NH-NH-Dns)-bridged by an S-S bond binds at least 10 times more strongly to poly(dG).poly(dC) than to poly(dA).poly(dT). This peptide can also discriminate between 5'-GpG-3' and 5'-GpC-3' steps in the DNA minor groove. Based on these observations, new synthetic ligands, bis-netropsins, were constructed in which two netropsin-like fragments were attached by means of short linkers to a pair of peptides-Gly-Cys-Gly- or Val-Cys-Val-bridged by S-S bonds. These compounds possess a composite binding specificity: the peptide chains recognize 5'-GpG-3' steps on DNA, whereas the netropsin-like fragments bind preferentially to runs of 4 AT base pairs. Our data indicate that combining the AT-base-pair specific properties of the netropsin-type structure with the 5'-GpG-3'-specific properties of certain oligopeptides offers a new approach to the synthesis of ligands capable of recognizing mixed sequences of AT- and GC-base pairs in the DNA minor groove. These compounds are potential models for DNA-binding domains in proteins which specifically recognize base pair sequences in the minor groove of DNA.

  7. Structural characterization of binding mode of smoking cessation drugs to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors through study of ligand complexes with acetylcholine-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucktooa, Prakash; Haseler, Claire A; van Elk, René; Smit, August B; Gallagher, Timothy; Sixma, Titia K

    2012-07-06

    Smoking cessation is an important aim in public health worldwide as tobacco smoking causes many preventable deaths. Addiction to tobacco smoking results from the binding of nicotine to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain, in particular the α4β2 receptor. One way to aid smoking cessation is by the use of nicotine replacement therapies or partial nAChR agonists like cytisine or varenicline. Here we present the co-crystal structures of cytisine and varenicline in complex with Aplysia californica acetylcholine-binding protein and use these as models to investigate binding of these ligands binding to nAChRs. This analysis of the binding properties of these two partial agonists provides insight into differences with nicotine binding to nAChRs. A mutational analysis reveals that the residues conveying subtype selectivity in nAChRs reside on the binding site complementary face and include features extending beyond the first shell of contacting residues.

  8. DNA binding and gel electrophoresis studies of a copper (II) complex containing mixed aliphatic and aromatic dinitrogen ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Darabi, Farivash; Maghsudi, Maryam; Kashanian, Soheila

    2010-06-01

    The interaction of a novel mixed ligand copper (II) complex, [Cu(N-N)(L)(EtOH)](NO(3))(2) . 2H(2)O, in which N-N indicates 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and L indicates N,N-dimethyltrimethylenediamine with calf thymus DNA was investigated by absorption, circular dichroism, voltammetric, and viscosimetric techniques. The absorption spectra of the complex with calf thymus DNA showed a marked hypochromism in the pi --> pi* and metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions, with no obvious red shift attributed to a partial intercalation. The intrinsic binding constant (K(b)) was determined as 2 x 10(5) M(-1). There was slight to appreciable changes in the relative viscosity of DNA, which is consistent with enhanced hydrophobic interaction of the methyl-substituted phen ring and partial intercalation mode of binding. Electrochemical studies showed a decrease in the peak current, which is ascribed to the strong binding between Cu (II) complex and DNA. The fluorescence spectral characteristics showed that the Cu (II) complex is able to displace the methylene blue bound to DNA, but not as complete as intercalative molecules. It is remarkable that this mixed ligand complex, in contrast to [Cu(2,9-dmp)(2)](+) (2,9-dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline), which fails to cleave DNA, has ability to cleave the supercoiled plasmid DNA.

  9. Spectroscopic and Computational Investigations of Ligand Binding to IspH: Discovery of Non-diphosphate Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dowd, Bing [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 South Mathews Avenue Urbana IL 61801 USA; Williams, Sarah [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla CA 92093 USA; Wang, Hongxin [Department of Chemistry, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue Davis CA 95616 USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley CA 94720 USA; No, Joo Hwan [Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, Urbana, IL (United States); Rao, Guodong [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 South Mathews Avenue Urbana IL 61801 USA; Wang, Weixue [Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, Urbana, IL (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla CA 92093 USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla CA 92093 USA; National Biomedical Computation Resource, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla CA 92093 USA; Cramer, Stephen P. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue Davis CA 95616 USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Oldfield, Eric [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 South Mathews Avenue Urbana IL 61801 USA

    2017-04-07

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis is an important area for anti-infective drug development. One isoprenoid target described is (E)-1-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl 4-diphosphate (HMBPP) reductase (IspH), which forms isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate from HMBPP in a 2H + /2e - reduction. IspH contains a 4 Fe-4 S cluster, and in this work, we first investigated how small molecules bound to the cluster by using HYSCORE and NRVS spectroscopies. The results of these, as well as other structural and spectroscopic investigations, led to the conclusion that, in most cases, ligands bound to IspH 4 Fe-4 S clusters by η 1 coordination, forming tetrahedral geometries at the unique fourth Fe, ligand side chains preventing further ligand (e.g., H 2 O, O 2 ) binding. Based on these ideas, we used in silico methods to find drug-like inhibitors that might occupy the HMBPP substrate binding pocket and bind to Fe, leading to the discovery of a barbituric acid analogue with a K i value of ≈500 nm against Pseudomonas aeruginosa IspH.

  10. Periodic Trends in the Binding of a Phosphine-Tethered Ketone Ligand to Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Dide G A; van Wiggen, Maxime A C; Kwakernaak, Joost; Lutz, Martin; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M; Moret, Marc-Etienne

    2018-04-06

    π-Coordinating ligands are commonly found in intermediate structures in homogeneous catalysis, and are gaining interest as supporting ligands for the development of cooperative catalysts. Herein, we systematically investigate the binding of the ketone group, a strongly accepting π ligand, to mid-to-late metals of the first transition series. To this end, the coordination of 2,2'-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzophenone ( Ph dpbp), which features a ketone moiety flanked by two strongly binding P-donor groups, to Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu was explored. The ketone moiety does not bind to the metal in M II complexes, whereas M I complexes (Fe, Co, Ni) adopt an η 2 (C,O) coordination. A structural and computational investigation of periodic trends in this series was performed. These data suggest that the coordination of the ketone to M I can mostly be described by the resonance extremes of the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model, that is, the π complex and the metallaoxacycle extreme, with a possible minor contribution from a ketyl radical resonance structure in the case of the iron complex. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Actinide Binding by Kläui Ligands: REDOX Speciation and Sorption on an Extraction Chromatography Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2008-12-01

    The sorption of Eu(III) and actinide ions in various oxidation states from nitric acid solutions by an extraction chromatography resin containing 1 wt% of the Kläui ligand Cp*Co[P(O)(OR)2]3– [Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, R = –CH2 CH2CH3] on Amberlite® XAD-7HP was examined. At 0.3 M HNO3 and a metal-to-ligand ratio of 0.07, the relative affinity of the resin for the ions investigated followed the order: tetravalent >> hexavalent > trivalent > pentavalent; however, the relative affinity for the trivalent and hexavalent ions can be reversed, depending on the extent of ligand loading and the nitric acid concentration. The sorption of the tetravalent ions was exceptionally strong in the entire range of nitric acid concentration examined (0.2 to 8 M HNO3). Resin samples loaded with various actinide ions were examined spectrophotometrically. No Np(V) and Pu(III) species were identified on the resin; rather, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) reactions occurred during equilibration, resulting in their complete conversion to M(IV) species bound by the Kläui ligand. Similarly, the sorption behavior of Pu(VI) and Np(VI) was complicated by their reduction to M(IV) upon sorption. The observed REDOX processes were apparently driven by the extremely high affinity of the Kläui ligand for the tetravalent ions. The acid-base properties of the methyl derivative of the Kläui ligand were investigated in aqueous solution, and its pKa was found to be highly dependent upon the solution ionic strength. The binding constants of this ligand with various actinide ions measured in a mixed methanol/carbon tetrachloride solvent exhibited qualitative agreement with the sorption selectivity trends.

  12. Roles of N- and C-terminal domains in the ligand-binding properties of cytoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Shumpei; Tsujino, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Taku; Torii, Ryo; Sawai, Hitomi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Oohora, Koji; Hayashi, Takashi; Uno, Tadayuki

    2018-02-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a member of the hexacoordinated globin protein family and is expressed ubiquitously in rat and human tissues. Although Cygb is reportedly upregulated under hypoxic conditions both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a physiological function to protect cells under hypoxic/ischemic conditions by scavenging reactive oxygen species or by signal transduction, the mechanisms associated with this function have not been fully elucidated. Recent studies comparing Cygbs among several species suggest that mammalian Cygbs show a distinctly longer C-terminal domain potentially involved in unique physiological functions. In this study, we prepared human Cygb mutants (ΔC, ΔN, and ΔNC) with either one or both terminal domains truncated and investigated the enzymatic functions and structural features by spectroscopic methods. Evaluation of the superoxide-scavenging activity between Cygb variants showed that the ΔC and ΔNC mutants exhibited slightly higher activity involving superoxide scavenging as compared with wild-type Cygb. Subsequent experiments involving ligand titration, flash photolysis, and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies suggested that the truncation of the C- and N-terminal domains resulted in less effective to dissociation constants and binding rates for carbon monoxide, respectively. Furthermore, structural stability was assessed by guanidine hydrochloride and revealed that the C-terminal domain might play a vital role in improving structure, whereas the N-terminal domain did not exert a similar effect. These findings indicated that long terminal domains could be important not only in regulating enzymatic activity but also for structural stability, and that the domains might be relevant to other hypothesized physiological functions for Cygb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and anticancer activity of mixed ligand ruthenium(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilewska, Agnieszka; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    In order to obtain a potential chemotherapeutic which is not affected on the normal BALB/3T3 cell line, a new arene ruthenium(II) complex {[RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]PF6}2 · H2O has been synthesized by a direct reaction of precursor, [{(η6-p-cymene)Ru(μ-Cl)}2Cl2], with N,N-chelating ligand (L1 - 2,2‧-bis(4,5-dimethylimidazole). The compound has been fully characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, IR, UV-Vis and 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopies. X-ray analysis have confirmed that the compound crystallized in the monoclinic group Cc as an inversion twin. The asymmetric unit contains two symmetrically independent cationic complexes [RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]+ whose charge is balanced by two PF6- counterions. The shape of each cationic coordination polyhedral can be described as a distorted dodecahedron and shows a typical piano-stool geometry. In addition, an analysis of the crystal structure and the Hirshfeld surface analysis were used to detect and visualize important hydrogen bonds and intermolecular interaction. Moreover, the antiproliferative behavior of the obtained complex was assayed against three human cells: MV-4-11, LoVo, MCF-7 and BALB/3T3 - normal mice fibroblast cells. To predict a binding mode, a potential interaction of ruthenium complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been explored using UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD).

  14. Gene encoding erythrocyte binding ligand linked to blood stage multiplication rate phenotype in Plasmodium yoelii yoelii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Culleton, Richard L; Cheesman, Sandra J; Carter, Richard

    2009-04-28

    Variation in the multiplication rate of blood stage malaria parasites is often positively correlated with the severity of the disease they cause. The rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii yoelii has strains with marked differences in multiplication rate and pathogenicity in the blood. We have used genetic analysis by linkage group selection (LGS) to identify genes that determine differences in multiplication rate. Genetic crosses were generated between genetically unrelated, fast- (17XYM) and slowly multiplying (33XC) clones of P. y. yoelii. The uncloned progenies of these crosses were placed under multiplication rate selection in blood infections in mice. The selected progenies were screened for reduction in intensity of quantitative genetic markers of the slowly multiplying parent. A small number of strongly selected markers formed a linkage group on P. y. yoelii chromosome 13. Of these, that most strongly selected marked the gene encoding the P. yoelii erythrocyte binding ligand (pyebl), which has been independently identified by Otsuki and colleagues [Otsuki H, et al. (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:10.1073/pnas.0811313106] as a major determinant of virulence in these parasites. In an analysis of a previous genetic cross in P. y. yoelii, pyebl alleles of fast- and slowly multiplying parents segregated with the fast and slow multiplication rate phenotype in the cloned recombinant progeny, implying the involvement of the pyebl locus in determining the multiplication rate. Our genome-wide LGS analysis also indicated effects of at least 1 other locus on multiplication rate, as did the findings of Otsuki and colleagues on virulence in P. y. yoelii.

  15. Structural ordering of disordered ligand-binding loops of biotin protein ligase into active conformations as a consequence of dehydration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, a dreaded pathogen, has a unique cell envelope composed of high fatty acid content that plays a crucial role in its pathogenesis. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase (ACC, an important enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction of fatty acid biosynthesis, is biotinylated by biotin acetyl-CoA carboxylase ligase (BirA. The ligand-binding loops in all known apo BirAs to date are disordered and attain an ordered structure only after undergoing a conformational change upon ligand-binding. Here, we report that dehydration of Mtb-BirA crystals traps both the apo and active conformations in its asymmetric unit, and for the first time provides structural evidence of such transformation. Recombinant Mtb-BirA was crystallized at room temperature, and diffraction data was collected at 295 K as well as at 120 K. Transfer of crystals to paraffin and paratone-N oil (cryoprotectants prior to flash-freezing induced lattice shrinkage and enhancement in the resolution of the X-ray diffraction data. Intriguingly, the crystal lattice rearrangement due to shrinkage in the dehydrated Mtb-BirA crystals ensued structural order of otherwise flexible ligand-binding loops L4 and L8 in apo BirA. In addition, crystal dehydration resulted in a shift of approximately 3.5 A in the flexible loop L6, a proline-rich loop unique to Mtb complex as well as around the L11 region. The shift in loop L11 in the C-terminal domain on dehydration emulates the action responsible for the complex formation with its protein ligand biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP domain of ACCA3. This is contrary to the involvement of loop L14 observed in Pyrococcus horikoshii BirA-BCCP complex. Another interesting feature that emerges from this dehydrated structure is that the two subunits A and B, though related by a noncrystallographic twofold symmetry, assemble into an asymmetric dimer representing the ligand-bound and ligand-free states of the protein, respectively. In

  16. Structural analysis of prolyl oligopeptidases using molecular docking and dynamics: insights into conformational changes and ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kaushik

    Full Text Available Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP is considered as an important pharmaceutical target for the treatment of numerous diseases. Despite enormous studies on various aspects of POPs structure and function still some of the questions are intriguing like conformational dynamics of the protein and interplay between ligand entry/egress. Here, we have used molecular modeling and docking based approaches to unravel questions like differences in ligand binding affinities in three POP species (porcine, human and A. thaliana. Despite high sequence and structural similarity, they possess different affinities for the ligands. Interestingly, human POP was found to be more specific, selective and incapable of binding to a few planar ligands which showed extrapolation of porcine POP in human context is more complicated. Possible routes for substrate entry and product egress were also investigated by detailed analyses of molecular dynamics (MD simulations for the three proteins. Trajectory analysis of bound and unbound forms of three species showed differences in conformational dynamics, especially variations in β-propeller pore size, which was found to be hidden by five lysine residues present on blades one and seven. During simulation, β-propeller pore size was increased by ∼2 Å in porcine ligand-bound form which might act as a passage for smaller product movement as free energy barrier was reduced, while there were no significant changes in human and A. thaliana POPs. We also suggest that these differences in pore size could lead to fundamental differences in mode of product egress among three species. This analysis also showed some functionally important residues which can be used further for in vitro mutagenesis and inhibitor design. This study can help us in better understanding of the etiology of POPs in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Synthesis and thermal studies of tetraaza macrocylic ligand and its transition metal complexes. DNA binding affinity of copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, M; Mashaly, Mahmoud M; Eid, Mohamed F; Fouad, R

    2011-09-01

    A Tetraaza Macrocylic Ligand (H2L) and its complexes, [Cd(H2L)(OH2)2](NO3)(2)·1/2OH2 (I), [Co(H2L)(OH2)](NO3)(2)·1/2OH2 (II), [Cu(H2L)(NO3)2]·3/2OH2 (III) and [Ni(H2L)(NO3)(OH2)]NO3·OH2 (IV), have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductivity, 1H NMR, UV-vis, FT-IR and mass spectroscopy. All results confirm that the prepared compounds have 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry, octahedral configuration and the ligand behaves as a neutral tetradendate towards the metal ions. [CdL(OH2)2] (V), [CoL(OH2)2] (VI), [CuL(OH2)2] (VII) and [Ni(H2L)(NO3)2] (VIII) were synthesized pyrolytically in solid state from corresponding compounds (I-IV). Analytical results of complexes (V-VIII) show that the ligand behaves either as a neutral tetradendate or dianionic tetradentate ligand towards the metal ions. The binding of H2L and its copper complex (III) to DNA has been investigated by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The experiments indicate that H2L and its copper complex (III) can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The H2L and its copper complex (III) exhibited anti-tumor activity against Ehrlich Acites Carcinoma (E.A.C) at the concentration of 100 μg/ml. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Binding mode analyses of NAP derivatives as mu opioid receptor selective ligands through docking studies and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqun; Zaidi, Saheem A; Zhang, Yan

    2017-04-15

    Mu opioid receptor selective antagonists are highly desirable because of their utility as pharmacological probes for receptor characterization and functional studies. Furthermore, the mu opioid receptors act as an important target in drug abuse and addiction treatment. Previously, we reported NAP as a novel lead compound with high selectivity and affinity towards the mu opioid receptor. Based on NAP, we have synthesized its derivatives and further characterized their binding affinities and selectivity towards the receptor. NMP and NGP were identified as the two most selective MOR ligands among NAP derivatives. In the present study, molecular modeling methods were applied to assess the dual binding modes of NAP derivatives, particularly on NMP and NGP, in three opioid receptors, in order to analyze the effects of structural modifications on the pyridyl ring of NAP on the binding affinity and selectivity. The results indicated that the steric hindrance, electrostatic, and hydrophobic effects caused by the substituents on the pyridyl ring of NAP contributed complimentarily on the binding affinity and selectivity of NAP derivatives to three opioid receptors. Analyses of these contributions provided insights on future design of more potent and selective mu opioid receptor ligands. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. DNA binding and biological activity of mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II, Ni(II and Co(II with quinolones and N donor ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M M Akram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  AbstractMixed ligand complexes of  Cu(II, Ni(II and Co(II have been synthesized by using levofloxacin and bipyridyl and characterized using spectral and analytical techniques. The binding behavior of the Ni(II and Cu(II complexes with herring sperm DNA(Hs-DNA were determined using electronic absorption titration, viscometric measurements and cyclic voltammetry measurements. The binding constant calculated  for Cu(II and Ni(II complexes are 2.0 x 104 and 4.0 x 104 M-1 respectively. Detailed analysis reveals that these metal complexes interact with DNA through intercalative binding mode. The nuclease activity of  Cu(II and Ni(II complexes with ct-DNA was carried out using agarose gel electrophoresis technique. The antioxidant activities for the synthesized complexes have been tested and the antibacterial activity for Ni(II complex was also checked.Key words: Intercalation, hypochromism, red shift and  peak potential.

  20. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  1. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) ligand binding potential of several major flame retardants, their metabolites, and chemical mixtures in house dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F; Ferguson, P Lee; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear receptor. Our goal was to determine the PPARγ ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPARγ ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPARγ. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPARγ ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 μM. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3-16% increase in PPARγ binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPARγ ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPARγ binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects.

  2. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Functional glass slides for in vitro evaluation of interactions between osteosarcoma TE85 cells and mineral-binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jie; Chen, Julia; Klapperich, Catherine M.; Eng, Vincent; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2004-07-20

    Primary amine-functionalized glass slides obtained through a multi-step plasma treatment were conjugated with anionic amino acids that are frequently found as mineral binding elements in acidic extracellular matrix components of natural bone. The modified glass surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. Human osteosarcoma TE85 cells were cultured on these functionalized slides and analyses on both protein and gene expression levels were performed to probe the ''biocompatibility'' of the surface ligands. Cell attachment and proliferation on anionic surfaces were either better than or comparable to those of cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The modified glass surfaces promoted the expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase activity and ECM proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin under differentiation culture conditions. Transcript analysis using gene chip microarrays confirmed that culturing TE85 cells on anionic surfaces did not activate apoptotic pathways. Collectively, these results suggest that the potential mineral-binding anionic ligands examined here do not exert significant adverse effects on the expression of important osteogenic markers of TE85 cells. This work paves the way for the incorporation of these ligands into 3-dimensional artificial bone-like scaffolds.

  4. Functional clues from the crystal structure of an orphan periplasmic ligand-binding protein from Treponema pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Liu, Wei Z; Tomchick, Diana R; Norgard, Michael V

    2017-04-01

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection of major global importance. Other closely related subspecies of Treponema also are the etiological agents of the endemic treponematoses, such as yaws, pinta, and bejel. The inability of T. pallidum and its close relatives to be cultured in vitro has prompted efforts to characterize T. pallidum's proteins structurally and biophysically, particularly those potentially relevant to treponemal membrane biology, with the goal of possibly revealing the functions of those proteins. This report describes the structure of the treponemal protein Tp0737; this polypeptide has a fold characteristic of a class of periplasmic ligand-binding proteins associated with ABC-type transporters. Although no ligand for the protein was observed in electron-density maps, and thus the nature of the native ligand remains obscure, the structural data described herein provide a foundation for further efforts to elucidate the ligand and thus the function of this protein in T. pallidum. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  5. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  6. Structural basis for PPAR partial or full activation revealed by a novel ligand binding mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Davide; Cerchia, Carmen; Montanari, Roberta; Loiodice, Fulvio; Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Cervoni, Laura; Pochetti, Giorgio; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of the metabolic homeostasis and therefore represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases. The development of more balanced drugs interacting with PPARs, devoid of the side-effects showed by the currently marketed PPARγ full agonists, is considered the major challenge for the pharmaceutical companies. Here we present a structure-based virtual screening approach that let us identify a novel PPAR pan-agonist with a very attractive activity profile and its crystal structure in the complex with PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. In PPARα this ligand occupies a new pocket whose filling is allowed by the ligand-induced switching of the F273 side chain from a closed to an open conformation. The comparison between this pocket and the corresponding cavity in PPARγ provides a rationale for the different activation of the ligand towards PPARα and PPARγ, suggesting a novel basis for ligand design.

  7. A chemometric analysis of ligand-induced changes in intrinsic fluorescence of folate binding protein indicates a link between altered conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne W; Holm, Jan; Hansen, Steen Ingemann

    2009-01-01

    Ligand binding alters the conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics of bovine folate binding protein (FBP). For the purpose of achieving further information we analyzed ligand (folate and methotrexate)-induced changes in the fluorescence landscape of FBP. Fluorescence excitation...... of folate accords fairly well with the disappearance of strongly hydrophobic tryptophan residues from the solvent-exposed surface of FBP. The PARAFAC has thus proven useful to establish a hitherto unexplained link between parallel changes in conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics...... of FBP induced by folate binding. Parameters for ligand binding derived from PARAFAC analysis of the fluorescence data were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those obtained from binding of radiofolate to FBP. Herein, methotrexate exhibited a higher affinity for FBP than in competition...

  8. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politi, Regina [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  9. Rational Design of Thermodynamic and Kinetic Binding Profiles by Optimizing Surface Water Networks Coating Protein-Bound Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, Stefan G; Cramer, Jonathan; Betz, Michael; Fridh, Veronica; Karlsson, Robert; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2016-12-08

    A previously studied congeneric series of thermolysin inhibitors addressing the solvent-accessible S 2 ' pocket with different hydrophobic substituents showed modulations of the surface water layers coating the protein-bound inhibitors. Increasing stabilization of water molecules resulted in an enthalpically more favorable binding signature, overall enhancing affinity. Based on this observation, we optimized the series by designing tailored P 2 ' substituents to improve and further stabilize the surface water network. MD simulations were applied to predict the putative water pattern around the bound ligands. Subsequently, the inhibitors were synthesized and characterized by high-resolution crystallography, microcalorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance. One of the designed inhibitors established the most pronounced water network of all inhibitors tested so far, composed of several fused water polygons, and showed 50-fold affinity enhancement with respect to the original methylated parent ligand. Notably, the inhibitor forming the most perfect water network also showed significantly prolonged residence time compared to the other tested inhibitors.

  10. Statistical Mechanics of Ligand-Receptor Noncovalent Association, Revisited: Binding Site and Standard State Volumes in Modern Alchemical Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procacci, Piero; Chelli, Riccardo

    2017-05-09

    The present paper is intended to be a comprehensive assessment and rationalization, from a statistical mechanics perspective, of existing alchemical theories for binding free energy calculations of ligand-receptor systems. In detail, the statistical mechanics foundation of noncovalent interactions in ligand-receptor systems is revisited, providing a unifying treatment that encompasses the most important variants in the alchemical approaches from the seminal double annihilation method [ Jorgensen et al. J. Chem. Phys. 1988 ; 89 , 3742 ] to the double decoupling method [ Gilson et al. Biophys. J. 1997 ; 72 , 1047 ] and the Deng and Roux alchemical theory [ Deng and Roux J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2006 ; 2 , 1255 ]. Connections and differences between the various alchemical approaches are highlighted and discussed.

  11. Ligand binding study of human PEBP1/RKIP: interaction with nucleotides and Raf-1 peptides evidenced by NMR and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurette Tavel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1 also known as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP, affects various cellular processes, and is implicated in metastasis formation and Alzheimer's disease. Human PEBP1 has also been shown to inhibit the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Numerous reports concern various mammalian PEBP1 binding ligands. However, since PEBP1 proteins from many different species were investigated, drawing general conclusions regarding human PEBP1 binding properties is rather difficult. Moreover, the binding site of Raf-1 on hPEBP1 is still unknown. METHODS/FINDINGS: In the present study, we investigated human PEBP1 by NMR to determine the binding site of four different ligands: GTP, FMN, and one Raf-1 peptide in tri-phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms. The study was carried out by NMR in near physiological conditions, allowing for the identification of the binding site and the determination of the affinity constants K(D for different ligands. Native mass spectrometry was used as an alternative method for measuring K(D values. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates and/or confirms the binding of hPEBP1 to the four studied ligands. All of them bind to the same region centered on the conserved ligand-binding pocket of hPEBP1. Although the affinities for GTP and FMN decrease as pH, salt concentration and temperature increase from pH 6.5/NaCl 0 mM/20°C to pH 7.5/NaCl 100 mM/30°C, both ligands clearly do bind under conditions similar to what is found in cells regarding pH, salt concentration and temperature. In addition, our work confirms that residues in the vicinity of the pocket rather than those within the pocket seem to be required for interaction with Raf-1.

  12. Biochemical investigation of yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline: DNA binding and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-03-05

    Characterization of the interaction between yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand, [Y(phen)2Cl(OH2)3]Cl2⋅H2O, and DNA has been carried out by UV absorption, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements in order to investigate binding mode. The experimental results indicate that the yttrium(III) complex binds to DNA and absorption is decreasing in charge transfer band with the increase in amount of DNA. The binding constant (Kb) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The results of interaction mechanism studies, suggested that groove binding plays a major role in the binding of the complex and DNA. The activity of yttrium(III) complex against some bacteria was tested and antimicrobial screening tests shown growth inhibitory activity in the presence of yttrium(III) complex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The interrelationship between ligand binding and thermal unfolding of the folate binding protein. The role of self-association and pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Babol, Linnea N.; Markova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    increased concentration-dependent self-association of FBP into stable multimers of holo-FBP. DSC of 3.3μM holo-FBP showed Tm (76°C) and molar enthalpy (146kcalM(-1)) values increasing to 78°C and 163kcalM(-1) at 10μM holo-FBP, while those of apo-FBP were 55°C and 105kcalM(-1). Besides ligand binding......-wise rise in temperature to 78°C≈Tm. Stable holo-FBP multimers may protect naturally occurring labile folates against decomposition or bacterial utilization. DSC established an interrelationship between diminished folate binding at pH5, especially in NaCl-free buffers, and low thermostability. Positively...

  14. A non-radioactive ligand-binding assay for detection of cyanobacterial anatoxins using Torpedo electrocyte membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Herdman, Michael; Rippka, Rosmarie; Ledreux, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole; Nghiêm, Hoàng-Oanh

    2008-07-01

    Anatoxin-a (ANTX) and homoanatoxin-a (HANTX), neurotoxins exclusively produced by cyanobacteria (LD(50) 200-250 microg kg(-1), i.p. mouse), are agonists of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to which they tightly bind. We have exploited the high affinity of these neurotoxins for the nicotinic receptors to develop a non-radioactive ligand-binding assay using Torpedo electrocyte membranes and biotinylated alpha-bungarotoxin (Biotin-BgTx) as tracer for detection of this class of toxins. The affinity of the Torpedo nAChRs for Biotin-BgTx was determined by chemiluminescence (K(d)=1.2 x 10(-8)M Biotin-BgTx) or color development (K(d)=3.5 x 10(-8)M Biotin-BgTx). Binding of ANTX or HANTX to the nAChRs competitively inhibits the binding of Biotin-BgTx to the receptors in a concentration-dependent manner (chemiluminescence: IC(50): 6.2 x 10(-8)M ANTX; color development: IC(50): 1.7 x 10(-8)M ANTX). The proposed method was validated by HPLC/MS with detection in the single ion recording mode. The non-radioactive ligand receptor-binding assay was successfully applied to the analysis of extracts prepared from cyanobacteria in culture and from natural habitats, as well as from aqueous samples. This method is suitable for ANTX and HANTX early survey of environmental samples since it requires minimal manipulations, is highly sensitive and gives consistent signal-to-noise ratios.

  15. Functional analysis of the citrate activator CitO from Enterococcus faecalis implicates a divalent metal in ligand binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor S. Blancato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The regulator of citrate metabolism, CitO, from Enterococcus faecalis belongs to the FCD family within the GntR superfamily. In the presence of citrate, CitO binds to cis-acting sequences located upstream of the cit promoters inducing the expression of genes involved in citrate utilization. The quantification of the molecular binding affinities, performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, indicated that CitO has a high affinity for citrate (KD= 1.2±0.2 µM, while it did not recognize other metabolic intermediates. Based on a structural model of CitO where a putative small molecule and a metal binding site were identified, it was hypothesized that the metal ion is required for citrate binding. In agreement with this model, citrate binding to CitO sharply decreased when the protein was incubated with EDTA. This effect was reverted by the addition of Ni2+, and Zn2+ to a lesser extent. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and it was found that changes to alanine in residues Arg97 and His191 resulted in decreased binding affinities for citrate, as determined by EMSA and ITC. Further assays using lacZ fusions confirmed that these residues in CitO are involved in sensing citrate in vivo. These results indicate that the molecular modifications induced by a ligand and a metal binding in the C-terminal domain of CitO are required for optimal DNA binding activity, and consequently, transcriptional activation.

  16. Molecular Hybridization of Potent and Selective γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) Ligands: Design, Synthesis, Binding Studies, and Molecular Modeling of Novel 3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic Acid (HOCPCA) and trans-γ-Hydroxycrotonic Acid (T-HCA) Analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Jensen, Claus Hatt; Bavo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a neuroactive substance with specific high-affinity binding sites. To facilitate target identification and ligand optimization, we herein report a comprehensive structure–affinity relationship study for novel ligands targeting these binding sites. A molecular hybrid...... important for high-affinity binding, with high predictive validity. These findings will be valuable in the further processes of both target characterization and ligand identification for the high-affinity GHB binding sites....

  17. Identification of oleamide in Guatteria recurvisepala by LC/MS-based Plasmodium falciparum thioredoxin reductase ligand binding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munigunti, Ranjith; Nelson, Nicholas; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Gupta, Mahabir P; Brun, Reto; Calderón, Angela I

    2011-10-01

    Our current research on applications of mass spectrometry to natural product drug discovery against malaria aims to screen plant extracts for new ligands to Plasmodium falciparum thioredoxin reductase (PfTrxR) followed by their identification and structure elucidation. PfTrxR is involved in the antioxidant defense and redox regulation of the parasite and is validated as a promising target for therapeutic intervention against malaria. In the present study, detannified methanol extracts from Guatteria recurvisepala, Licania kallunkiae, and Topobea watsonii were screened for ligands to PfTrxR using ultrafiltration and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based binding experiments. The PfTrxR ligand identified in the extract of Guatteria recurvisepala displayed a relative binding affinity of 3.5-fold when incubated with 1 μM PfTrxR. The ligand corresponding to the protonated molecule m/z 282.2792 [M+ H]+ was eluted at a retention time of 17.95 min in a 20-min gradient of 95% B consisting of (A) 0.1%formic acid in 95% H₂O-5% ACN, and (B) 0.1% formic acid in 95% ACN-5% H₂O in an LC-QTOF-MS.Tandem MS of the protonated molecule m/z 282.2792 [M + H]+, C₁₈H₃₆NO (DBE: 2; error: 1.13 ppm) resulted in two daughter ions m/z 265.2516[M + H-NH₃]+ (DBE: 3; error: 0.35 ppm) and m/z 247.2405 [M + H-NH₃-H₂O] +, (DBE: 4; error:2.26 ppm). The PfTrxR ligand was identified as oleamide and confirmed by comparison of the retention time, molecular formula, accurate mass,and double bond equivalence with the standard oleamide. This is the first report on the identification of oleamide as a PfTrxR ligand from Guatteria recurvisepala R. E. Fr. and the corresponding in vitro activity against P. falciparum strain K1 (IC₅₀ 4.29 μg/mL). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Comparison of the Efficiency of the LIE and MM/GBSA Methods to Calculate Ligand-Binding Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Samuel; Ryde, Ulf

    2011-11-08

    We have evaluated the efficiency of two popular end-point methods to calculate ligand-binding free energies, LIE (linear interaction energy) and MM/GBSA (molecular mechanics with generalized Born surface-area solvation), i.e. the computational effort needed to obtain estimates of a similar precision. As a test case, we use the binding of seven biotin analogues to avidin. The energy terms used by MM/GBSA and LIE exhibit a similar correlation time (∼5 ps), and the equilibration time seems also to be similar, although it varies much between the various ligands. The results show that the LIE method is more effective than MM/GBSA, by a factor of 2-7 for a truncated spherical system with a radius of 26 Å and by a factor of 1.0-2.4 for the full avidin tetramer (radius 47 Å). The reason for this is the cost for the MM/GBSA entropy calculations, which more than compensates for the extra simulation of the free ligand in LIE. On the other hand, LIE requires that the protein is neutralized, whereas MM/GBSA has no such requirements. Our results indicate that both the truncation and neutralization of the proteins may slow the convergence and emphasize small differences in the calculations, e.g., differences between the four subunits in avidin. Moreover, LIE cannot take advantage of the fact that avidin is a tetramer. For this test case, LIE gives poor results with the standard parametrization, but after optimizing the scaling factor of the van der Waals terms, reasonable binding affinities can be obtained, although MM/GBSA still gives a significantly better predictive index and correlation to the experimental affinities.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  20. New silver(I) complex with diazafluorene based ligand: Synthesis, characterization, investigation of in vitro DNA binding and antimicrobial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Elaheh; Rezvani, Ali Reza

    2017-07-01

    A novel diazafluorene based complex with silver, [Ag(dian)2 ] NO3 , where dian is N-(4,5-diazafluoren-9-ylidene)aniline, has been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1HNMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. In order to explore the relationship between the structure and biological properties, DNA binding propensity and in vitro antibacterial property have also been studied. The mode of DNA-complex interaction has been investigated by electronic absorption titration, luminescence titration, competitive binding experiment, effect of ionic strength, thermodynamic studies, viscometric evaluation, circular dichroism spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The results reveal that the complex binds to CT-DNA in a moderate intercalation capability with the partial insertion of a planar dian ligand between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA with binding constant (Kb) of 2.4 × 105 M-1. The viscosities and CD spectra of the DNA provide strong evidence for the intercalation. An in vitro antibacterial efficacy of the Ag(I) complex on a series of Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) indicates that the complex exhibits a marked antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the complex indicate that it exhibits much higher antibacterial effect on standard bacterial strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus than those of silver nitrate, silver sulfadiazine. The bacterial inhibitions of the silver(I) complex are closely agreed to its DNA binding affinities.

  1. Exploration of electrostatic interaction in the hydrophobic pocket of lysozyme: Importance of ligand-induced perturbation of the secondary structure on the mode of binding of exogenous ligand and possible consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous ligand binding can be adequate to alter the secondary structure of biomolecules besides other external stimuli. In such cases, structural alterations can complicate on the nature of interaction with the exogenous molecules. In order to accommodate the exogenous ligand, the biomolecule has to unfold resulting in a considerable change to its properties. If the bound ligand can be unbound, the biomolecule gets the opportunity to refold back and return to its native state. Keeping this in mind, we have purposely investigated the interaction of tartrazine (TZ), a well abundant azo food colorant, with two homologous lysozymes, namely, human lysozyme (HLZ) and chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWLZ) in physiological pH condition. The binding of TZ with lysozymes has been identified to accompany a ligand-induced secondary structure alteration as indicated by the circular dichroism spectra, and the reduction of α-helical content is more with HLZ than CEWLZ. Interestingly, the binding is identified to occur in the electronic ground state of TZ with lysozyme in its hydrophobic cavity, containing excess of positive charge, predominantly via electrostatic interaction. With increase of salinity of the medium the protein tends to refold back due to wakening of electrostatic forces and consequent reduction of strength of ligand interaction and unbinding. The entropy enthalpy compensation (EEC) has been probed to understand the binding features and it is found that CEWLZ-TZ shows better compensation than HLZ-TZ complex. This is presumably due to the fact that with CEWLZ the binding does not accompany substantial change in the protein secondary structure and hence ineffective to scramble the EEC. The present study initiates the importance of ligand-perturbed structural alteration of biomolecule in controlling the thermodynamics of binding. If there is a considerable alteration of the protein secondary structure due to binding, it is indicative that such changes should bring in

  2. Calculation of relative free energies for ligand-protein binding, solvation, and conformational transitions using the GROMOS software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Christ, Clara D; Hansen, Halvor S; Hünenberger, Philippe H; Oostenbrink, Chris; Steiner, Denise; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-11-24

    The calculation of the relative free energies of ligand-protein binding, of solvation for different compounds, and of different conformational states of a polypeptide is of considerable interest in the design or selection of potential enzyme inhibitors. Since such processes in aqueous solution generally comprise energetic and entropic contributions from many molecular configurations, adequate sampling of the relevant parts of configurational space is required and can be achieved through molecular dynamics simulations. Various techniques to obtain converged ensemble averages and their implementation in the GROMOS software for biomolecular simulation are discussed, and examples of their application to biomolecules in aqueous solution are given. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. The effect of glycation on bovine serum albumin conformation and ligand binding properties with regard to gliclazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurawska-Płaksej, Ewa; Rorbach-Dolata, Anna; Wiglusz, Katarzyna; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    Albumin, the major serum protein, plays a variety of functions, including binding and transporting endogenous and exogenous ligands. Its molecular structure is sensitive to different environmental modifiers, among which glucose is one of the most significant. In vivo albumin glycation occurs under physiological conditions, but it is increased in diabetes. Since bovine serum albumin (BSA) may serve as a model protein in in vitro experiments, we aimed to investigate the impact of glucose-mediated BSA glycation on the binding capacity towards gliclazide, as well as the ability of this drug to prevent glycation of the BSA molecule. To reflect normo- and hyperglycemia, the conditions of the glycation process were established. Structural changes of albumin after interaction with gliclazide (0-14 μM) were determined using fluorescence quenching and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Moreover, thermodynamic parameters as well as energy transfer parameters were determined. Calculated Stern-Volmer quenching constants, as well as binding constants for the BSA-gliclazide complex, were lower for the glycated form of albumin than for the unmodified protein. The largest, over 2-fold, decrease in values of binding parameters was observed for the sample with 30 mM of glucose, reflecting the poorly controlled diabetic state, which indicates that the degree of glycation had a critical influence on binding with gliclazide. In contrast to significant changes in the tertiary structure of BSA upon binding with gliclazide, only slight changes in the secondary structure were observed, which was reflected by about a 3% decrease of the α-helix content of glycated BSA (regardless of glucose concentration) in comparison to unmodified BSA. The presence of gliclazide during glycation did not affect its progress. The results of this study indicate that glycation significantly changed the binding ability of BSA towards gliclazide and the scale of these changes depended on glucose concentration. It

  4. The structure of a mixed GluR2 ligand-binding core dimer in complex with (S)-glutamate and the antagonist (S)-NS1209

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, Christina; Pickering, Darryl S; Mirza, Osman

    2006-01-01

    of this novel class of antagonists. We present here the first X-ray structure of a mixed GluR2 ligand-binding core dimer, with the high-affinity antagonist (S)-8-methyl-5-(4-(N,N-dimethylsulfamoyl)phenyl)-6,7,8,9,-tetrahydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-h]-isoquinoline-2,3-dione-3-O-(4-hydroxybutyrate-2-yl)oxime [(S)-NS1209......] in one protomer and the endogenous ligand (S)-glutamate in the other. (S)-NS1209 stabilises an even more open conformation of the D1 and D2 domains of the ligand-binding core than that of the apo structure due to steric hindrance. This is the first time ligand-induced hyperextension of the binding...... domains has been observed. (S)-NS1209 adopts a novel binding mode, including hydrogen bonding to Tyr450 and Gly451 of D1. Parts of (S)-NS1209 occupy new areas of the GluR2 ligand-binding cleft, and bind near residues that are not conserved among receptor subtypes. The affinities of (RS)-NS1209 at the Glu...

  5. Deciphering the kinetic binding mechanism of dimeric ligands using a potent plasma-stable dimeric inhibitor of postsynaptic density protein-95 as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Gottschalk, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Dimeric ligands can be potent inhibitors of protein-protein or enzyme-substrate interactions. They have increased affinity and specificity toward their targets due to their ability to bind two binding sites simultaneously and are therefore attractive in drug design. However, few studies have...... addressed the kinetic mechanism of interaction of such bivalent ligands. We have investigated the binding interaction of a recently identified potent plasma-stable dimeric pentapeptide and PDZ1-2 of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) using protein engineering in combination with fluorescence...

  6. Identification of amino acid residues in the ligand-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor causing the species-specific response to omeprazole: possible determinants for binding putative endogenous ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Ohsako, Seiichiroh; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Yagi, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Omeprazole (OME) induces the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as CYP1A1, via activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) both in vivo and in vitro. However, the precise mechanism of OME-mediated AhR activation is still under investigation. While elucidating species-specific susceptibility to dioxin, we found that OME-mediated AhR activation was mammalian species specific. Moreover, we previously reported that OME has inhibitory activity toward CYP1A1 enzymes. From these observations, we speculated that OME-mediated AhR target gene transcription is due to AhR activation by increasing amounts of putative AhR ligands in serum by inhibition of CYP1A1 activity. We compared the amino acid sequences of OME-sensitive rabbit AhR and nonsensitive mouse AhR to identify the residues responsible for the species-specific response. Chimeric AhRs were constructed by exchanging domains between mouse and rabbit AhRs to define the region required for the response to OME. OME-mediated transactivation was observed only with the chimeric AhR that included the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the rabbit AhR. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed three amino acids (M328, T353, and F367) in the rabbit AhR that were responsible for OME-mediated transactivation. Replacing these residues with those of the mouse AhR abolished the response of the rabbit AhR. In contrast, substitutions of these amino acids with those of the rabbit AhR altered nonsensitive mouse AhR to become sensitive to OME. These results suggest that OME-mediated AhR activation requires a specific structure within LBD that is probably essential for binding with enigmatic endogenous ligands.

  7. Backbone chemical shifts assignments, secondary structure, and ligand binding of a family GH-19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Shoko; Nagata, Takuya; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Taira, Toki; Nishimura, Shigenori; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2012-10-01

    Family GH19 chitinases have been recognized as important in the plant defense against fungal pathogens. However, their substrate-recognition mechanism is still unknown. We report here the first resonance assignment of NMR spectrum of a GH19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum (BcChi-A). The backbone signals were nearly completely assigned, and the secondary structure was estimated based on the chemical shift values. The addition of the chitin dimer to the enzyme solution perturbed the chemical shifts of HSQC resonances of the amino acid residues forming the putative substrate-binding cleft. Further NMR analysis of the ligand binding to BcChi-A will improve understanding of the substrate-recognition mechanism of GH-19 enzymes.

  8. Mutations that silence constitutive signaling activity in the allosteric ligand-binding site of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ann-Karin; Kleinau, Gunnar; Hoyer, Inna; Neumann, Susanne; Furkert, Jens; Rutz, Claudia; Schülein, Ralf; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Krause, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) exhibits elevated cAMP signaling in the basal state and becomes fully activated by thyrotropin. Previously we presented evidence that small-molecule ligands act allosterically within the transmembrane region in contrast to the orthosteric extracellular hormone-binding sites. Our goal in this study was to identify positions that surround the allosteric pocket and that are sensitive for inactivation of TSHR. Homology modeling combined with site-directed mutagenesis and functional characterization revealed seven mutants located in the allosteric binding site that led to a decrease of basal cAMP signaling activity. The majority of these silencing mutations, which constrain the TSHR in an inactive conformation, are found in two clusters when mapped onto the 3D structural model. We suggest that the amino acid positions identified herein are indicating locations where small-molecule antagonists, both neutral antagonists and inverse agonists, might interfere with active TSHR conformations.

  9. Rhenium complexes of chromophore-appended dipicolylamine ligands: syntheses, spectroscopic properties, DNA binding and X-ray crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullice, L.A.; Buurma, N.J.; Pope, S.J.A.; Laye, R.H.; Harding, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    The syntheses of two chromophore-appended dipicolylamine-derived ligands and their reactivity with penta-carbonyl-chloro-rhenium have been studied. The resultant complexes each possess the fac-Re(CO) 3 core. The ligands L 1 1-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-pyrene and L 2 2-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-quinoxaline were isolated via a one-pot reductive amination in moderate yield. The corresponding rhenium complexes were isolated in good yields and characterised by 1 H NMR, MS, IR and UV-Vis studies. X-Ray crystallographic data were obtained for fac-{Re(CO) 3 (L 1 )}(BF 4 ), C 34 H 26 BF 4 N 4 O 3 Re: monoclinic, P2(1)/c, a 18.327(2) Angstroms, α = 90.00 degrees, b 14.1537(14) Angstroms, β96.263(6) degrees, c = 23.511(3) Angstroms, γ 90.00 Angstroms, 6062.4(11) (Angstroms) 3 , Z=8. The luminescence properties of the ligands and complexes were also investigated, with the emission attributed to the appended chromophore in each case. Isothermal titration calorimetry suggests that fac-{Re(CO) 3 (L 1 )}(BF 4 ) self-aggregates cooperatively in aqueous solution, probably forming micelle-like aggregates with a cmc of 0.18 mM. Investigations into the DNA-binding properties of fac-{Re(CO) 3 (L 1 )}(BF 4 ) were undertaken and revealed that fac-{Re(CO) 3 (L 1 )}(BF 4 ) binding to fish sperm DNA (binding constant 1.5 ± 0.2 * 10 5 M -1 , binding site size 3.2 ± 0.3 base pairs) is accompanied by changes in the UV-Vis spectrum as typically observed for pyrene-based intercalators while the calorimetrically determined binding enthalpy (-14 ± 2 kcal mol -1 ) also agrees favourably with values as typically found for intercalators. (authors)

  10. NMR Studies of Ligand Binding to P450eryF Provides Insight into the Mechanism of Cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur G.,Roberts; M. Dolores,Díaz; Jed N.,Lampe; Laura M.,Shireman; Jeffrey S.,Grinstead; Michael J.,Dabrowski; Josh T.,Pearson; Michael K.,Bowman; William M.,Atkins; A. Patricia,Campbell

    2006-02-01

    Cytochrome P450's (P450's) catalyze the oxidative metabolism of most drugs and toxins. Although extensive studies have proven that some P450's demonstrate both homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity toward a number of substrates, the mechanistic and molecular details of P450 allostery are still not well-established. Here, we use UV/vis and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques to study the mechanism and thermodynamics of the binding of two 9-aminophenanthrene (9-AP) and testosterone (TST) molecules to the erythromycin-metabolizing bacterial P450eryF. UV/vis absorbance spectra of P450eryF demonstrated that binding occurs with apparent negative homotropic cooperativity for TST and positive homotropic cooperativity for 9-AP with Hill-equation-derived dissociation constants of KS = 4 and 200 μM, respectively. The broadening and shifting observed in the 2D-{1H,15N}-HSQC-monitored titrations of 15N-Phe-labeled P450eryF with 9-AP and TST indicated binding on intermediate and fast chemical exhange time scales, respectively, which was consistent with the Hill-equation-derived KS values for these two ligands. Regardless of the type of spectral perturbation observed (broadening for 9-AP and shifting for TST), the 15N-Phe NMR resonances most affected were the same in each titration, suggesting that the two ligands ''contact'' the same phenylalanines within the active site of P450eryF. This finding is in agreement with X-ray crystal structures of bound P450eryF showing different ligands occupying similar active-site niches. Complex spectral behavior was additionally observed for a small collection of resonances in the TST titration, interpreted as multiple binding modes for the low-affinity TST molecule or multiple TST-bound P450eryF conformational substates. A structural and energetic model is

  11. NMR Studies of Ligand Binding to P450eryF Provides Insight into the Mechanism of Cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Arthur G.; Diaz, Maria D.; Lampe, Jed N.; Shireman, Laura; Grinstead, Jeffrey S.; Dabrowski, Michael J.; Pearson, Josh T.; Bowman, Michael K.; Atkins, William M.; Campbell, Ann P.

    2006-02-14

    Cytochrome P450’s (P450’s) catalyze the oxidative metabolism of most drugs and toxins. Although extensive studies have proven that some P450’s demonstrate both homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity toward a number of substrates, the mechanistic and molecular details of P450 allostery are still not well-established. Here, we use UV/vis and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques to study the mechanism and thermodynamics of the binding of two 9-aminophenanthrene (9-AP) and testosterone (TST) molecules to the erythromycin-metabolizing bacterial P450eryF. UV/vis absorbance spectra of P450eryF demonstrated that binding occurs with apparent negative homotropic cooperativity for TST and positive homotropic cooperativity for 9-AP with Hill-equation-derived dissociation constants of KS ) 4 and 200 íM, respectively. The broadening and shifting observed in the 2D-{1H,15N}-HSQC-monitored titrations of 15N-Phe-labeled P450eryF with 9-AP and TST indicated binding on intermediate and fast chemical exhange time scales, respectively, which was consistent with the Hillequation- derived KS values for these two ligands. Regardless of the type of spectral perturbation observed (broadening for 9-AP and shifting for TST), the 15N-Phe NMR resonances most affected were the same in each titration, suggesting that the two ligands “contact” the same phenylalanines within the active site of P450eryF. This finding is in agreement with X-ray crystal structures of bound P450eryF showing different ligands occupying similar active-site niches. Complex spectral behavior was additionally observed for a small collection of resonances in the TST titration, interpreted as multiple binding modes for the lowaffinity TST molecule or multiple TST-bound P450eryF conformational substates. A structural and energetic model is presented that combines the energetics and structural aspects of 9-AP and TST binding derived from these observations.

  12. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R.; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant K2D and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between K2D and the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D). PMID:27294442

  13. Fe-Binding Dissolved Organic Ligands in the Oxic and Suboxic Waters of the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L.J.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Bown, J.; Margolin, A.R.; Laan, P.; De Baar, H.J.W.

    2016-01-01

    In the oxygen-rich layer of the Black Sea, above the permanent halocline, the Fe and nitrate concentrations are low where fluorescence is relatively high, indicating uptake by phytoplankton. In this study we used ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-aCSV), using

  14. Binding Mode Prediction of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2C Receptor Ligands by Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Asif; Nagarajan, Shanthi; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Cho, Yong Seo; Pae, Ae Nim

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 2C (5-HT 2C ) receptor belongs to class A amine subfamily of Gprotein- coupled receptor (GPCR) super family and its ligands has therapeutic promise as anti-depressant and -obesity agents. So far, bovine rhodopsin from class A opsin subfamily was the mostly used X-ray crystal template to model this receptor. Here, we explained homology model using beta 2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), the model was energetically minimized and validated by flexible ligand docking with known agonists and antagonists. In the active site Asp134, Ser138 of transmembrane 3 (TM3), Arg195 of extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) and Tyr358 of TM7 were found as important residues to interact with agonists. In addition to these, V208 of ECL2 and N351 of TM7 was found to interact with antagonists. Several conserved residues including Trp324, Phe327 and Phe328 were also found to contribute hydrophobic interaction. The predicted ligand binding mode is in good agreement with published mutagenesis and homology model data. This new template derived homology model can be useful for further virtual screening based lead identification

  15. Binding Mode Prediction of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2C Receptor Ligands by Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Asif; Nagarajan, Shanthi; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Cho, Yong Seo; Pae, Ae Nim [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 2C (5-HT{sub 2C}) receptor belongs to class A amine subfamily of Gprotein- coupled receptor (GPCR) super family and its ligands has therapeutic promise as anti-depressant and -obesity agents. So far, bovine rhodopsin from class A opsin subfamily was the mostly used X-ray crystal template to model this receptor. Here, we explained homology model using beta 2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), the model was energetically minimized and validated by flexible ligand docking with known agonists and antagonists. In the active site Asp134, Ser138 of transmembrane 3 (TM3), Arg195 of extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) and Tyr358 of TM7 were found as important residues to interact with agonists. In addition to these, V208 of ECL2 and N351 of TM7 was found to interact with antagonists. Several conserved residues including Trp324, Phe327 and Phe328 were also found to contribute hydrophobic interaction. The predicted ligand binding mode is in good agreement with published mutagenesis and homology model data. This new template derived homology model can be useful for further virtual screening based lead identification.

  16. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or interfer...

  17. Binding of Small-Molecule Ligands to Proteins: “What You See” Is Not Always “What You Get”

    OpenAIRE

    Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    We review insights from computational studies of affinities of ligands binding to proteins. The power of structural biology is in translating knowledge of protein structures into insights about their forces, binding, and mechanisms. However, the complementary power of computer modeling is in showing “the rest of the story” (i.e., how motions and ensembles and alternative conformers and the entropies and forces that cannot be seen in single molecular structures also contribute to binding affin...

  18. Synchronized cell attachment triggered by photo-activatable adhesive ligands allows QCM-based detection of early integrin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturri, Jagoba; García-Fernández, Luis; Reuning, Ute; García, Andrés J; del Campo, Aránzazu; Salierno, Marcelo J

    2015-03-31

    The Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was applied to monitor and quantify integrin-RGD recognition during the early stages of cell adhesion. Using QCM-D crystals modified with a photo-activatable RGD peptide, the time point of presentation of adhesive ligand at the surface of the QCM-D crystal could be accurately controlled. This allowed temporal resolution of early integrin-RGD binding and the subsequent cell spreading process, and their separate detection by QCM-D. The specificity of the integrin-RGD binding event was corroborated by performing the experiments in the presence of soluble cyclicRGD as a competitor, and cytochalasin D as inhibitor of cell spreading. Larger frequency change in the QCM-D signal was observed for cells with larger spread area, and for cells overexpressing integrin αvβ3 upon stable transfection. This strategy enables quantification of integrin activity which, in turn, may allow discrimination among different cell types displaying distinct integrin subtypes and expression levels thereof. On the basis of these findings, we believe the strategy can be extended to other photoactivatable ligands to characterize cell membrane receptors activity, a relevant issue for cancer diagnosis (and prognosis) as other several pathologies.

  19. Synchronized cell attachment triggered by photo-activatable adhesive ligands allows QCM-based detection of early integrin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturri, Jagoba; García-Fernández, Luis; Reuning, Ute; García, Andrés J.; Campo, Aránzazu del; Salierno, Marcelo J.

    2015-01-01

    The Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was applied to monitor and quantify integrin-RGD recognition during the early stages of cell adhesion. Using QCM-D crystals modified with a photo-activatable RGD peptide, the time point of presentation of adhesive ligand at the surface of the QCM-D crystal could be accurately controlled. This allowed temporal resolution of early integrin-RGD binding and the subsequent cell spreading process, and their separate detection by QCM-D. The specificity of the integrin-RGD binding event was corroborated by performing the experiments in the presence of soluble cyclicRGD as a competitor, and cytochalasin D as inhibitor of cell spreading. Larger frequency change in the QCM-D signal was observed for cells with larger spread area, and for cells overexpressing integrin αvβ3 upon stable transfection. This strategy enables quantification of integrin activity which, in turn, may allow discrimination among different cell types displaying distinct integrin subtypes and expression levels thereof. On the basis of these findings, we believe the strategy can be extended to other photoactivatable ligands to characterize cell membrane receptors activity, a relevant issue for cancer diagnosis (and prognosis) as other several pathologies. PMID:25825012

  20. The caa(3) terminal oxidase of Bacillus stearothermophilus - Transient spectroscopy of electron transfer and ligand binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffre, A; DItri, E; Giannini, S; Brunori, M; UbbinkKok, T; Konings, WN; Antonini, G

    1996-01-01

    The thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus possesses a caa(3)-type terminal oxidase, which was previously purified (De Vrij, W., Heyne, R. I. HL, and Konings, W. N. (1989) Ear. J. Biochem. 178, 763-770). We have carried out extensive kinetic experiments on the purified enzyme by

  1. Examination of the ligand-binding and enzymatic properties of a bilin-binding protein from the poisonous caterpillar Lonomia obliqua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B G Veiga

    Full Text Available The bilin-binding proteins (BBP from lepidopteran insects are members of the lipocalin family of proteins and play a special role in pigmentation through the binding of biliverdin IXγ. Lopap, a BBP-like protein from the venom of the toxic caterpillar Lonomia obliqua has been reported to act as a serine protease that activates the coagulation proenzyme prothrombin. Here we show that BBPLo, a variant of lopap from the same organism binds biliverdin IXγ, forming a complex that is spectrally identical with previously described BBP proteins. Although BBPLo is nearly identical in sequence to lopap, no prothrombinase activity was detected in our recombinant preparations using reconstituted systems containing coagulation factors Xa and Va, as well as anionic phospholipids. In addition to biliverdin, BBPLo was found to form a 1:1 complex with heme prompting us to examine whether the unusual biliverdin IXγ ligand of BBPs forms as a result of oxidation of bound heme in situ rather than by a conventional heme oxygenase. Using ascorbate or a NADPH(+-ferredoxin reductase-ferredoxin system as a source of reducing equivalents, spectral changes are seen that suggest an initial reduction of heme to the Fe(II state and formation of an oxyferrous complex. The complex then disappears and a product identified as a 5-coordinate carbonyl complex of verdoheme, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of biliverdin, is formed. However, further reaction to form biliverdin was not observed, making it unlikely that biliverdin IXγ is formed by this pathway.

  2. Conformational changes and allosteric communications in human serum albumin due to ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahalawat, Navjeet; Murarka, Rajesh K

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that knowledge of structure alone is not sufficient to understand the fundamental mechanism of biomolecular recognition. Information of dynamics is necessary to describe motions involving relevant conformational states of functional importance. We carried out principal component analysis (PCA) of structural ensemble, derived from 84 crystal structures of human serum albumin (HSA) with different ligands and/or different conditions, to identify the functionally important collective motions, and compared with the motions along the low-frequency modes obtained from normal mode analysis of the elastic network model (ENM) of unliganded HSA. Significant overlap is observed in the collective motions derived from PCA and ENM. PCA and ENM analysis revealed that ligand selects the most favored conformation from accessible equilibrium structures of unliganded HSA. Further, we analyzed dynamic network obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of unliganded HSA and fatty acids- bound HSA. Our results show that fatty acids-bound HSA has more robust community network with several routes to communicate among different parts of the protein. Critical nodes (residues) identified from dynamic network analysis are in good agreement with allosteric residues obtained from sequence-based statistical coupling analysis method. This work underscores the importance of intrinsic structural dynamics of proteins in ligand recognition and can be utilized for the development of novel drugs with optimum activity.

  3. Influence of ligand binding on structure and thermostability of human alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, V. Jr.; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Pazderka, T.; Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Řeha, David; Baumruk, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2016), s. 70-79 ISSN 0952-3499 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : orosomucoid * binding site * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.175, year: 2016

  4. Calculation of Absolute Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity Using Path and Endpoint Approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Michael S; Olson, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    .... The results of this approach agree well with experimentally observed binding affinities. Also assessed is a commonly used approximate endpoint approach, which separately estimates enthalpy, solvation free energy, and entropy...

  5. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.

    2016-11-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.

  6. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the α subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K d of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site

  7. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  8. Binding interaction of phosphorus heterocycles with bovine serum albumin: A biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Roy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA and phosphorus heterocycles (PHs was studied using multi-spectroscopic techniques. The results indicated the high binding affinity of PHs to BSA as it quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. The experimental data suggested the fluorescence quenching mechanism between PHs and BSA as a dynamic quenching. From the UV–vis studies, the apparent association constant (Kapp was found to be 9.25×102, 1.27×104 and 9.01×102 L/mol for the interaction of BSA with PH-1, PH-2 and PH-3 respectively. According to the Förster's non-radiation energy transfer (FRET theory, the binding distances between BSA and PHs were calculated. The binding distances (r of PH-1, PH-2 and PH-3 were found to be 2.86, 3.03, and 5.12 nm, respectively, indicating energy transfer occurs between BSA and PHs. The binding constants of the PHs obtained from the fluorescence quenching data were found to be decreased with increase of temperature. The negative values of the thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔS and ΔG at different temperatures revealed that the binding process is spontaneous; hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interaction were the main force to stabilize the complex. The microenvironment of the protein-binding site was studied by synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD techniques and data indicated that the conformation of BSA changed in the presence of PHs. Finally, we studied the BSA-PHs docking using Autodock and results suggest that PHs is located in the cleft between the domains of BSA.

  9. Biochemical profiling of histone binding selectivity of the yeast bromodomain family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that molecular interactions between site-specific chemical modifications such as acetylation and methylation on DNA-packing histones and conserved structural modules present in transcriptional proteins are closely associated with chromatin structural changes and gene activation. Unlike methyl-lysine that can interact with different protein modules including chromodomains, Tudor and MBT domains, as well as PHD fingers, acetyl-lysine (Kac is known thus far to be recognized only by bromodomains. While histone lysine acetylation plays a crucial role in regulation of chromatin-mediated gene transcription, a high degree of sequence variation of the acetyl-lysine binding site in the bromodomains has limited our understanding of histone binding selectivity of the bromodomain family. Here, we report a systematic family-wide analysis of 14 yeast bromodomains binding to 32 lysine-acetylated peptides derived from known major acetylation sites in four core histones that are conserved in eukaryotes.The histone binding selectivity of purified recombinant yeast bromodomains was assessed by using the native core histones in an overlay assay, as well as N-terminally biotinylated lysine-acetylated histone peptides spotted on streptavidin-coated nitrocellulose membrane in a dot blot assay. NMR binding analysis further validated the interactions between histones and selected bromodomain. Structural models of all yeast bromodomains were built using comparative modeling to provide insights into the molecular basis of their histone binding selectivity.Our study reveals that while not all members of the bromodomain family are privileged to interact with acetylated-lysine, identifiable sequence features from those that bind histone emerge. These include an asparagine residue at the C-terminus of the third helix in the 4-helix bundle, negatively charged residues around the ZA loop, and preponderance of aromatic amino acid residues in the binding pocket

  10. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is the macrophage receptor for endocytosis of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. The extracellular region consisting of nine scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains also circulates in plasma as a soluble protein. By ligand binding analysis of a broad spectrum of soluble CD163...... truncation variants, the amino-terminal third of the SRCR region was shown to be crucial for the binding of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. By Western blotting of the CD163 variants, a panel of ten monoclonal antibodies was mapped to SRCR domains 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 9, respectively. Only the two antibodies...... to CD163 demonstrated that optimal ligand binding requires physiological plasma calcium concentrations, and an immediate ligand release occurs at the low calcium concentrations measured in acidifying endosomes. In conclusion, SRCR domain 3 of CD163 is an exposed domain and a critical determinant...

  11. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi in a ligand-dependent manner in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S; Færgeman, Nils J; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2008-01-01

    showed that ACBP targeted to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and Golgi in a ligand-binding-dependent manner. A variant Y28F/K32A-FACI-50, which is unable to bind acyl-CoA, did no longer show association with the ER and became segregated from the Golgi, as analysed by intensity correlation calculations....... Depletion of fatty acids from cells by addition of FAFBSA (fatty-acid-free BSA) significantly decreased FACI-50 association with the Golgi, whereas fatty acid overloading increased Golgi association, strongly supporting that ACBP associates with the Golgi in a ligand-dependent manner. FRAP (fluorescence...... recovery after photobleaching) showed that the fatty-acid-induced targeting of FACI-50 to the Golgi resulted in a 5-fold reduction in FACI-50 mobility. We suggest that ACBP is targeted to the ER and Golgi in a ligand-binding-dependent manner in living cells and propose that ACBP may be involved...

  12. Antibody-drug conjugate bioanalysis using LB-LC-MS/MS hybrid assays: strategies, methodology and correlation to ligand-binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Gu, Huidong; Liu, Ang; Kozhich, Alexander; Rangan, Vangipuram; Myler, Heather; Luo, Linlin; Wong, Richard; Sun, Huadong; Wang, Bonnie; Vezina, Heather E; Deshpande, Shrikant; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zheng; Olah, Timothy V; Aubry, Anne-Francoise; Arnold, Mark E; Pillutla, Renuka; DeSilva, Binodh

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex drug constructs with multiple species in the heterogeneous mixture that contribute to their efficacy and toxicity. The bioanalysis of ADCs involves multiple assays and analytical platforms. A series of ligand binding and LC-MS/MS (LB-LC-MS/MS) hybrid assays, through different combinations of anti-idiotype (anti-Id), anti-payload, or generic capture reagents, and cathepsin-B or trypsin enzyme digestion, were developed and evaluated for the analysis of conjugated-payload as well as for species traditionally measured by ligand-binding assays, total-antibody and conjugated-antibody. Hybrid assays are complementary or viable alternatives to ligand-binding assay for ADC bioanalysis and PK/PD modeling. The fit-for-purpose choice of analytes, assays and platforms and an integrated strategy from Discovery to Development for ADC PK and bioanalysis are recommended.

  13. Combined Approach of Patch-Surfer and PL-PatchSurfer for Protein-Ligand Binding Prediction in CSAR 2013 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Shin, Woong-Hee; Kim, Hyungrae; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-06-27

    The Community Structure-Activity Resource (CSAR) benchmark exercise provides a unique opportunity for researchers to objectively evaluate the performance of protein-ligand docking methods. Patch-Surfer and PL-PatchSurfer, molecular surface-based methods for predicting binding ligands of proteins developed in our group, were tested on both CSAR 2013 and 2014 benchmark exercises in combination with an empirical scoring function-based method, AutoDock, while we only participated in CSAR 2013 using Patch-Surfer. The prediction results for Phase 1 task in CSAR 2013 showed that Patch-Surfer was able to rank all the four designed binding proteins within top ranks, outperforming AutoDock Vina. In Phase 2 of 2013, PL-PatchSurfer correctly selected the correct ligand pose for two target proteins. PL-PatchSurfer performed reasonably well in ranking ligands according to their binding affinity and in selecting near-native ligand poses in 2013 Phase 3 and 2014 Phase 1, respectively, although AutoDock Vina showed better performance. Lastly, in the 2014 Phase 2 exercise, the PL-PatchSurfer scores computed for ligands to target protein pairs correlated well with their pIC50 values, which was better or comparable to results by other participants. Overall, our methods showed fairly good performance in CSAR 2013 and 2014. Unique characteristics of the methods are discussed in comparison with AutoDock.

  14. The penicillin-binding protein 4 of Escherichia coli : primary structure, biochemical and genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mottl, Harald

    1992-01-01

    De ß-lactam antibiotica ("de penicillines") zijn zowel in medisch als ecomisch opzicht de belangrijkste groep antibiotica: De werking van deze antibiotica berust op verstoring van de synthese van de bacteriele celwand. De doeleiwitten van deze antibiotica worden penicillin-binding proteins, kortweg

  15. Water Mediated Ligand Functional Group Cooperativity: The Contribution of a Methyl Group to Binding Affinity is Enhanced by a COO− Group Through Changes in the Structure and Thermo dynamics of the Hydration Waters of Ligand-Thermolysin Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-01-01

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2′ pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable. Dissection of these differential thermodynamic parameters, X-ray crystallography, and density-functional theory calculations suggest that these cooperativities are caused by variations in the thermodynamics of the complex hydration shell changes accompanying the H→Me replacement. Specifically, the COO− reduces both the enthalpic penalty and the entropic advantage of displacing water molecules from the S2′ pocket, and causes a subsequent acquisition of a more enthalpically, less entropically, favorable water network. This study contributes to understanding the important role water plays in ligand-protein binding. PMID:22894131

  16. Water mediated ligand functional group cooperativity: the contribution of a methyl group to binding affinity is enhanced by a COO(-) group through changes in the structure and thermodynamics of the hydration waters of ligand-thermolysin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-10-11

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2' pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable. Dissection of these differential thermodynamic parameters, X-ray crystallography, and density-functional theory calculations suggest that these cooperativities are caused by variations in the thermodynamics of the complex hydration shell changes accompanying the H→Me replacement. Specifically, the COO(-) reduces both the enthalpic penalty and the entropic advantage of displacing water molecules from the S2' pocket and causes a subsequent acquisition of a more enthalpically, less entropically, favorable water network. This study contributes to understanding the important role water plays in ligand-protein binding.

  17. Using physics-based pose predictions and free energy perturbation calculations to predict binding poses and relative binding affinities for FXR ligands in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christina; Vasilakaki, Sofia; Dellis, Dimitris; Cournia, Zoe

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design has become an integral part of drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, and is nowadays extensively used in the lead identification and lead optimization phases. The drug design data resource (D3R) organizes challenges against blinded experimental data to prospectively test computational methodologies as an opportunity for improved methods and algorithms to emerge. We participated in Grand Challenge 2 to predict the crystallographic poses of 36 Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-bound ligands and the relative binding affinities for two designated subsets of 18 and 15 FXR-bound ligands. Here, we present our methodology for pose and affinity predictions and its evaluation after the release of the experimental data. For predicting the crystallographic poses, we used docking and physics-based pose prediction methods guided by the binding poses of native ligands. For FXR ligands with known chemotypes in the PDB, we accurately predicted their binding modes, while for those with unknown chemotypes the predictions were more challenging. Our group ranked #1st (based on the median RMSD) out of 46 groups, which submitted complete entries for the binding pose prediction challenge. For the relative binding affinity prediction challenge, we performed free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. FEP/MD calculations displayed a high success rate in identifying compounds with better or worse binding affinity than the reference (parent) compound. Our studies suggest that when ligands with chemical precedent are available in the literature, binding pose predictions using docking and physics-based methods are reliable; however, predictions are challenging for ligands with completely unknown chemotypes. We also show that FEP/MD calculations hold predictive value and can nowadays be used in a high throughput mode in a lead optimization project provided that crystal structures of

  18. Using physics-based pose predictions and free energy perturbation calculations to predict binding poses and relative binding affinities for FXR ligands in the D3R Grand Challenge 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christina; Vasilakaki, Sofia; Dellis, Dimitris; Cournia, Zoe

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design has become an integral part of drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, and is nowadays extensively used in the lead identification and lead optimization phases. The drug design data resource (D3R) organizes challenges against blinded experimental data to prospectively test computational methodologies as an opportunity for improved methods and algorithms to emerge. We participated in Grand Challenge 2 to predict the crystallographic poses of 36 Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-bound ligands and the relative binding affinities for two designated subsets of 18 and 15 FXR-bound ligands. Here, we present our methodology for pose and affinity predictions and its evaluation after the release of the experimental data. For predicting the crystallographic poses, we used docking and physics-based pose prediction methods guided by the binding poses of native ligands. For FXR ligands with known chemotypes in the PDB, we accurately predicted their binding modes, while for those with unknown chemotypes the predictions were more challenging. Our group ranked #1st (based on the median RMSD) out of 46 groups, which submitted complete entries for the binding pose prediction challenge. For the relative binding affinity prediction challenge, we performed free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. FEP/MD calculations displayed a high success rate in identifying compounds with better or worse binding affinity than the reference (parent) compound. Our studies suggest that when ligands with chemical precedent are available in the literature, binding pose predictions using docking and physics-based methods are reliable; however, predictions are challenging for ligands with completely unknown chemotypes. We also show that FEP/MD calculations hold predictive value and can nowadays be used in a high throughput mode in a lead optimization project provided that crystal structures of

  19. Evaluation of immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for recovery and identification of copper(II-binding ligands in seawater using the model ligand 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Nixon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron (Fe, copper (Cu, and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores have been identified in seawater but the chemical structures of marine Cu-complexing ligands remain unknown. Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC allows Cu ligands to be isolated from bulk dissolved organic matter (DOM in seawater and separated into fractions which can be characterized independently using electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. Attempts have been made to combine IMAC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS to characterize marine Cu ligands, but results have proven inconclusive due to the lack of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS data to confirm ligand recovery. We used 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ, a well-characterized model ligand that forms strong 1:2 metal:ligand complexes with Cu2+ at pH 8 (log β2 = 18.3, to evaluate Cu(II-IMAC and ESI-MS/MS for recovery and identification of copper(II-complexing ligands in seawater. One-litre samples of 0.45µm-filtered surface seawater were spiked with 8-HQ at low concentrations (up to 100 nM and fractionated by IMAC. Fractions eluted with acidified artificial seawater were desalted and re-suspended in methanol via solid-phase extraction (SPE to obtain extracts suitable for ESI-MS analysis. Recovery of 8-HQ by Cu(II-IMAC was confirmed unambiguously by MS/MS and found to average 81% based upon accurate quantitation via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM. Cu(II-IMAC fractionation of unspiked seawater using multiple UV detection wavelengths suggests an optimal fraction size of 2 mL for isolating and analyzing Cu ligands with similar properties.

  20. The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand PK11195 binds with high affinity to the acute phase reactant α1-acid glycoprotein: implications for the use of the ligand as a CNS inflammatory marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockhart, Andrew; Davis, Bill; Matthews, Julian C.; Rahmoune, Hassan; Hong, Guizhu; Gee, Antony; Earnshaw, David; Brown, John

    2003-01-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand PK11195 has been used as an in vivo marker of neuroinflammation in positron emission tomography studies in man. One of the methodological issues surrounding the use of the ligand in these studies is the highly variable kinetic behavior of [ 11 C]PK11195 in plasma. We therefore undertook a study to measure the binding of [ 3 H]PK11195 to whole human blood and found a low level of binding to blood cells but extensive binding to plasma proteins. Binding assays using [ 3 H]PK11195 and purified human plasma proteins demonstrated a strong binding to α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and a much weaker interaction with albumin. Immunodepletion of AGP from plasma resulted in the loss of plasma [ 3 H]PK11195 binding demonstrating: (i) the specificity of the interaction and (ii) that AGP is the major plasma protein to which PK11195 binds with high affinity. PK11195 was able to displace fluorescein-dexamethasone from AGP with IC 50 of 11 C]PK11195 to the brain parenchyma in diseases with blood brain barrier breakdown. Finally, local synthesis of AGP at the site of brain injury may contribute the pattern of [ 11 C]PK11195 binding observed in neuroinflammatory diseases

  1. Three-dimensional structure of the ligand-binding core of GluR2 in complex with the agonist (S)-ATPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, Marie-Louise; Hogner, Anders; Stensbøl, Tine B

    2003-01-01

    Two X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid ((S)-ATPA) have been determined with and without Zn(2+) ions. (S)-ATPA induces a domain closure of ca. 21 degrees compared to the apo form. The tert-butyl moiety...... of (S)-ATPA is buried in a partially hydrophobic pocket and forces the ligand into the glutamate-like binding mode. The structures provide new insight into the molecular basis of agonist selectivity between AMPA and kainate receptors....

  2. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) drug discovery: Biochemical toolbox to develop NRF2 activators by reversible binding of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Alberto; Missineo, Antonino; Gallo, Mariana; Cerretani, Mauro; Fezzardi, Paola; Tomei, Licia; Cicero, Daniel Oscar; Altamura, Sergio; Santoprete, Alessia; Ingenito, Raffaele; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Pacifici, Robert; Dominguez, Celia; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Harper, Steven; Toledo-Sherman, Leticia; Park, Larry C

    2017-10-01

    Mechanisms that activate innate antioxidant responses, as a way to mitigate oxidative stress at the site of action, hold much therapeutic potential in diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease, where the use of antioxidants as monotherapy has not yielded positive results. The nuclear factor NRF2 is a transcription factor whose activity upregulates the expression of cell detoxifying enzymes in response to oxidative stress. NRF2 levels are modulated by KEAP1, a sensor of oxidative stress. KEAP1 binds NRF2 and facilitates its ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Recently, compounds that reversibly disrupt the NRF2-KEAP1 interaction have been described, opening the field to a new era of safer NRF2 activators. This paper describes a set of new, robust and informative biochemical assays that enable the selection and optimization of non-covalent KEAP1 binders. These include a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) primary assay with high modularity and robustness, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based KEAP1 direct binding assay that enables the quantification and analysis of full kinetic binding parameters and finally a 1 H- 15 N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR assay suited to study the interaction surface of KEAP1 with residue-specific information to validate the interaction of ligands in the KEAP1 binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ontko, Alyn [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a 13C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  4. Characterisation of the zebrafish serotonin transporter functionally links TM10 to the ligand binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kasper; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wiborg, Ove

    2008-01-01

    and [(3)H]-escitalopram binding in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney cells; HEK-293-MSR. Residues responsible for altered affinities inhibitors were pinpointed by generating cross-species chimeras and subsequent point mutations by site directed mutagenesis. drSERT has a higher affinity...

  5. Ligand specificity of pheromone-binding proteins of the processionary moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, J; Prestwich, G D; Guerrero, A

    1995-12-01

    Photoaffinity labeling of proteins extracted from sensory hairs and antennal branches of the processionary moth Thaumetopoea pityocampa with a tritium-labeled diazoacetate analogue of the sex pheromone (Z)-13-hexadecen-11-ynyl acetate revealed a 15-kDa pheromone-binding protein in male moth sensory hairs (SH-15). A different 15-kDa protein in male antennal branches (B-15) was not photolabeled. All extracts except male sensory hairs showed a photolabeled 20-kDa protein; a photolabeled male 30-kDa protein in the branches (B-30) was also observed. The 20-kDa proteins in the sensory hairs (SH-20) and branches (B-20) showed differing affinities for the photoaffinity analogues; moreover, SH-15 exhibits higher affinity for the natural pheromone, (Z)-13-hexadecen-11-ynyl acetate, than for its alcohol metabolite and other analogues in competitive displacement experiments. The affinity shown by the pheromone-binding protein for the metabolic product suggests that the alcohol may be also transported by the binding protein. Interestingly, a shift in labeling from SH-15 to SH-20 was produced in the presence of an excess of the natural pheromone, its alcohol and other analogues. The binding showed little discrimination among structurally similar analogues of the pheromone, while saturated and aromatic molecules showed little affinity for the proteins of either sensory hairs or antennal branches.

  6. Design and synthesis of bombykol analogues for probing pheromone-binding protein–ligand interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mansurova, M.; Klusák, Vojtěch; Nešněrová, P.; Muck, A.; Doubský, J.; Svatoš, Aleš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2009), s. 1069-1076 ISSN 0040-4020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bombykol * pheromone * binding protein * nanoLC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.219, year: 2009

  7. Identification of glycosaminoglycan binding regions in the Plasmodium falciparum encoded placental sequestration ligand, VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resende, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten A.; Dahlbaeck, Madeleine

    2008-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes binding the placental receptor chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). This results in accumulation of parasites in the placenta with severe clinical consequences for the mother and her unborn child. Women become resistan...

  8. Mineral-binding milk proteins and peptides; occurrence, biochemical and technological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegarud, G E; Langsrud, T; Svenning, C

    2000-11-01

    Minerals and trace elements in cow's milk occur as inorganic ions and salts or form complexes with proteins and peptides, carbohydrates, fats and small molecules. The main mineral binder or chelators of calcium are the caseins, alphas1-casein, alphas2-casein, beta-casein and kappa-casein, but also whey proteins and lactoferrin bind specific minerals like calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, sodium and potassium. Less documented is the binding of trace elements. Peptides obtained by in vitro or in vivo hydrolysis act as mineral trappers through specific and non-specific binding sites. They may then function as carriers, chelators, of various minerals and thus enhance or inhibit bioavailability. Peptides from milk proteins have found interesting new applications in the food industry as products with improved functionality or as ingredients of dietary products, or used in pharmaceutical industry. Fortification of foods with minerals in a low concentration has for a long time been used in some countries to overcome mineral deficiency, which is an increasing problem in humans. These types of foods are being used to create a new generation of super foods in the industry today.

  9. Probing force-induced unfolding intermediates of a single staphylococcal nuclease molecule and the effect of ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Murayama, Yoshihiro; Katano, Atsuto; Maki, Kosuke; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques have given experimental access to unfolding intermediates of proteins that are inaccessible in conventional experiments. A detailed characterization of the intermediates is a challenging problem that provides new possibilities for directly probing the energy landscape of proteins. We investigated single-molecule mechanical unfolding of a small globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), using atomic force microscopy. The unfolding trajectories of the protein displayed sub-molecular and stochastic behavior with typical lengths corresponding to the size of the unfolded substructures. Our results support the view that the single protein unfolds along multiple pathways as suggested in recent theoretical studies. Moreover, we found the drastic change, caused by the ligand and inhibitor bindings, in the mechanical unfolding dynamics

  10. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  11. Dithiol amino acids can structurally shape and enhance the ligand-binding properties of polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyu; Gopalakrishnan, Ranganath; Schaer, Tifany; Marger, Fabrice; Hovius, Ruud; Bertrand, Daniel; Pojer, Florence; Heinis, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The disulfide bonds that form between two cysteine residues are important in defining and rigidifying the structures of proteins and peptides. In polypeptides containing multiple cysteine residues, disulfide isomerization can lead to multiple products with different biological activities. Here, we describe the development of a dithiol amino acid (Dtaa) that can form two disulfide bridges at a single amino acid site. Application of Dtaas to a serine protease inhibitor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitor that contain disulfide constraints enhanced their inhibitory activities 40- and 7.6-fold, respectively. X-ray crystallographic and NMR structure analysis show that the peptide ligands containing Dtaas have retained their native tertiary structures. We furthermore show that replacement of two cysteines by Dtaas can avoid the formation of disulfide bond isomers. With these properties, Dtaas are likely to have broad application in the rational design or directed evolution of peptides and proteins with high activity and stability.

  12. Dithiol amino acids can structurally shape and enhance the ligand-binding properties of polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyu; Gopalakrishnan, Ranganath; Schaer, Tifany; Marger, Fabrice; Hovius, Ruud; Bertrand, Daniel; Pojer, Florence; Heinis, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The disulfide bonds that form between two cysteine residues are important in defining and rigidifying the structures of proteins and peptides. In polypeptides containing multiple cysteine residues, disulfide isomerization can lead to multiple products with different biological activities. Here, we describe the development of a dithiol amino acid (Dtaa) that can form two disulfide bridges at a single amino acid site. Application of Dtaas to a serine protease inhibitor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitor that contain disulfide constraints enhanced their inhibitory activities 40- and 7.6-fold, respectively. X-ray crystallographic and NMR structure analysis show that the peptide ligands containing Dtaas have retained their native tertiary structures. We furthermore show that replacement of two cysteines by Dtaas can avoid the formation of disulfide bond isomers. With these properties, Dtaas are likely to have broad application in the rational design or directed evolution of peptides and proteins with high activity and stability.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage studies of mixed-ligand copper (II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sunita

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New two copper complexes of type [Cu(Bzimpy(LH2O]SO4 (where L = 2,2′ bipyridine (bpy, and ethylene diamine (en, Bzimpy = 2,6-bis(benzimidazole-2ylpyridine have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. Based on elemental and spectral studies six coordinated geometries were assigned to the two complexes. DNA-binding properties of these metal complexes were investigated using absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and thermal denaturation methods. Experimental studies suggest that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation. These complexes also promote the cleavage of plasmid pBR322, in the presence of H2O2.

  14. Cyclic perylene diimide: Selective ligand for tetraplex DNA binding over double stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasimalla, Suresh; Sato, Shinobu; Takenaka, Fuminori; Kurose, Yui; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2017-12-15

    Synthesized cyclic perylene diimide, cPDI, showed the binding constant of 6.3 × 10 6  M -1 with binding number of n = 2 with TA-core as a tetraplex DNA in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 7.4) containing 100 mM KCl using Schatchard analysis and showed a higher preference for tetraplex DNA than for double stranded DNA with over 10 3 times. CD spectra showed that TA-core induced its antiparallel conformation upon addition of cPDI in the absence or presence of K + or Na + ions. The cPDI inhibits the telomerase activity with IC 50 of 0.3 µM using TRAP assay which is potential anti-cancer drug with low side effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GPR17: Molecular modeling and dynamics studies of the 3-D structure and purinergic ligand binding features in comparison with P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranghino Graziella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR17 is a G-protein-coupled receptor located at intermediate phylogenetic position between two distinct receptor families: the P2Y and CysLT receptors for extracellular nucleotides and cysteinyl-LTs, respectively. We previously showed that GPR17 can indeed respond to both classes of endogenous ligands and to synthetic compounds active at the above receptor families, thus representing the first fully characterized non-peptide "hybrid" GPCR. In a rat brain focal ischemia model, the selective in vivo knock down of GPR17 by anti-sense technology or P2Y/CysLT antagonists reduced progression of ischemic damage, thus highlighting GPR17 as a novel therapeutic target for stroke. Elucidation of the structure of GPR17 and of ligand binding mechanisms are the necessary steps to obtain selective and potent drugs for this new potential target. On this basis, a 3-D molecular model of GPR17 embedded in a solvated phospholipid bilayer and refined by molecular dynamics simulations has been the first aim of this study. To explore the binding mode of the "purinergic" component of the receptor, the endogenous agonist UDP and two P2Y receptor antagonists demonstrated to be active on GPR17 (MRS2179 and cangrelor were then modeled on the receptor. Results Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that GPR17 nucleotide binding pocket is similar to that described for the other P2Y receptors, although only one of the three basic residues that have been typically involved in ligand recognition is conserved (Arg255. The binding pocket is enclosed between the helical bundle and covered at the top by EL2. Driving interactions are H-bonds and salt bridges between the 6.55 and 6.52 residues and the phosphate moieties of the ligands. An "accessory" binding site in a region formed by the EL2, EL3 and the Nt was also found. Conclusion Nucleotide binding to GPR17 occurs on the same receptor regions identified for already known P2Y receptors. Agonist

  16. Genetic and Biochemical Identification of a Novel Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Complex in Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Amy; Liddell, Susan; Allers, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins play an essential role in DNA replication and repair. They use oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB)-folds, a five-stranded β-sheet coiled into a closed barrel, to bind to ssDNA thereby protecting and stabilizing the DNA. In eukaryotes the ssDNA-binding protein (SSB) is known as replication protein A (RPA) and consists of three distinct subunits that function as a heterotrimer. The bacterial homolog is termed SSB and functions as a homotetramer. In the archaeon Haloferax volcanii there are three genes encoding homologs of RPA. Two of the rpa genes (rpa1 and rpa3) exist in operons with a novel gene specific to Euryarchaeota; this gene encodes a protein that we have termed RPA-associated protein (rpap). The rpap genes encode proteins belonging to COG3390 group and feature OB-folds, suggesting that they might cooperate with RPA in binding to ssDNA. Our genetic analysis showed that rpa1 and rpa3 deletion mutants have differing phenotypes; only Δrpa3 strains are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents. Deletion of the rpa3-associated gene rpap3 led to similar levels of DNA damage sensitivity, as did deletion of the rpa3 operon, suggesting that RPA3 and RPAP3 function in the same pathway. Protein pull-downs involving recombinant hexahistidine-tagged RPAs showed that RPA3 co-purifies with RPAP3, and RPA1 co-purifies with RPAP1. This indicates that the RPAs interact only with their respective associated proteins; this was corroborated by the inability to construct rpa1 rpap3 and rpa3 rpap1 double mutants. This is the first report investigating the individual function of the archaeal COG3390 RPA-associated proteins (RPAPs). We have shown genetically and biochemically that the RPAPs interact with their respective RPAs, and have uncovered a novel single-stranded DNA-binding complex that is unique to Euryarchaeota.

  17. Design of a potent CD1d-binding NKT cell ligand as a vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Fujio, Masakazu; Imamura, Masakazu; Wu, Douglass; Vasan, Sandhya; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ho, David D; Tsuji, Moriya

    2010-07-20

    The glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) has been shown to bind CD1d molecules to activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, and subsequently induce activation of various immune-competent cells, including dendritic cells, thereby providing a significant adjuvant effect for various vaccines. However, in phase I clinical trials, alpha-GalCer was shown to display only marginal biological activity. In our search for a glycolipid that can exert more potent stimulatory activity against iNKT cells and dendritic cells and produce an adjuvant effect superior to alpha-GalCer, we performed step-wise screening assays on a focused library of 25 alpha-GalCer analogues. Assays included quantification of the magnitude of stimulatory activity against human iNKT cells in vitro, binding affinity to human and murine CD1d molecules, and binding affinity to the invariant t cell receptor of human iNKT cells. Through this rigorous and iterative screening process, we have identified a lead candidate glycolipid, 7DW8-5, that exhibits a superior adjuvant effect than alpha-GalCer on HIV and malaria vaccines in mice.

  18. A study of the molecular mechanism of binding kinetics and long residence times of human CCR5 receptor small molecule allosteric ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, David C; Beavis, Paul; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Zheng, Yue; Lee, Ina; Gee, Peter; Deval, Jerome; Rotstein, David M; Dioszegi, Marianna; Ravendran, Palani; Zhang, Jun; Sankuratri, Surya; Kondru, Rama; Vauquelin, Georges

    2014-07-01

    The human CCR5 receptor is a co-receptor for HIV-1 infection and a target for anti-viral therapy. A greater understanding of the binding kinetics of small molecule allosteric ligand interactions with CCR5 will lead to a better understanding of the binding process and may help discover new molecules that avoid resistance. Using [(3) H] maraviroc as a radioligand, a number of different binding protocols were employed in conjunction with simulations to determine rate constants, kinetic mechanism and mutant kinetic fingerprints for wild-type and mutant human CCR5 with maraviroc, aplaviroc and vicriviroc. Kinetic characterization of maraviroc binding to the wild-type CCR5 was consistent with a two-step kinetic mechanism that involved an initial receptor-ligand complex (RA), which transitioned to a more stable complex, R'A, with at least a 13-fold increase in affinity. The dissociation rate from R'A, k-2 , was 1.2 × 10(-3) min(-1) . The maraviroc time-dependent transition was influenced by F85L, W86A, Y108A, I198A and Y251A mutations of CCR5. The interaction between maraviroc and CCR5 proceeded according to a multi-step kinetic mechanism, whereby initial mass action binding and later reorganizations of the initial maraviroc-receptor complex lead to a complex with longer residence time. Site-directed mutagenesis identified a kinetic fingerprint of residues that affected the binding kinetics, leading to the conclusion that allosteric ligand binding to CCR5 involved the rearrangement of the binding site in a manner specific to each allosteric ligand. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L. (GSKNC); (GSK)

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  20. Retrospective Validation of a Structure-Based Virtual Screening Protocol to Identify Ligands for Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Its Application to Identify the Alpha-Mangostin Binding Pose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Setiawati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The publicly available enhanced data of ligands and decoys for estrogen receptor alpha (ERα which were recently published has made the retrospective validation of a structure-based virtual screening (SBVS protocol to identify ligands for ERα possible. In this article, we present the retrospective validation of an SBVS protocol using PLANTS molecular docking software version 1.2 (PLANTS1.2 as the backbone software. The protocol shows better enrichment factor at 1% false positives (EF1% value and the Area Under Curve (AUC value of the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC compared to the original published protocol. Moreover, in all 1000 iterative attempts the protocol could reproduce the co-crystal pose of 4-hydroxitamoxifen in ERα binding pocket. It shows that the protocol is not only able to identify potent ligands for ERα but also able to be employed in examining binding pose of known ligand. Thence, the protocol was successfully employed to examine the binding poses of α-mangostin, an ERα ligand found in the Garcinia mangostana, L. pericarp.

  1. Full domain closure of the ligand-binding core of the ionotropic glutamate receptor iGluR5 induced by the high affinity agonist dysiherbaine and the functional antagonist 8,9-dideoxyneodysiherbaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Lash, L Leanne; Naur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing structural model for ligand activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors posits that agonist efficacy arises from the stability and magnitude of induced domain closure in the ligand-binding core structure. Here we describe an exception to the correlation between ligand efficacy and...

  2. Functional significance of the oligomeric structure of the Na,K-pump from radiation inactivation and ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norby, J.G.; Jensen, J.

    1991-01-01

    The present article is concerned with the oligomeric structure and function of the Na,K-pump (Na,K-ATPase). The questions we have addressed, using radiation inactivation and target size analysis as well as ligand binding, are whether the minimal structural unit and the functional unit have more than one molecule of the catalytic subunit, alpha. The authors first discuss the fundamentals of the radiation inactivation method and emphasize the necessity for rigorous internal standardization with enzymes of known molecular mass. They then demonstrate that the radiation inactivation of Na,K-ATPase is a stepwise process which leads to intermediary fragments of the alpha-subunit with partial catalytic activity. From the target size analysis it is most likely that the membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase is structurally organized as a diprotomer containing two alpha-subunits. Determination of ADP- and ouabain-binding site stoichiometry favors a theory with one substrate site per (alpha beta) 2. 47 references

  3. Comparison of competitive ligand-binding assay and bioassay formats for the measurement of neutralizing antibodies to protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Deborah; Baltrukonis, Daniel; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Delaria, Kathy; Gunn, George R; Lowe, John; Maia, Mauricio; Wong, Teresa

    2011-01-25

    Administration of biological therapeutic proteins can lead to unwanted immunogenicity in recipients of these products. The assessment and characterization of such immune reactions can be helpful to better understand their clinical relevance and how they relate to patient safety and therefore, have become an integral part of a product development program for biological therapeutics. Testing for anti-drug antibodies (ADA) to biological/biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins generally follows a tiered approach. Samples are initially screened for binding antibodies; presumptive positives are then confirmed in a confirmatory assay; subsequently, confirmed-positive samples may be further characterized by titration and with a neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay. Regulatory guidances on immunogenicity state that assessing the neutralizing capacity of antibodies should preferably be done using functional bioassays, while recognizing that competitive ligand-binding (CLB) assays may be substituted when neutralizing bioassays are inadequate or not feasible. This manuscript describes case studies from four companies in which CLB assays and functional bioassays were compared for their ability to detect neutralizing ADA against a variety of biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins. Our findings indicate that CLB assays are comparable to bioassays for the detection of NAbs, in some cases offering better detection sensitivity, lower variability, and less matrix interference. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Design of a potent CD1d-binding NKT cell ligand as a vaccine adjuvant

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiangming; Fujio, Masakazu; Imamura, Masakazu; Wu, Douglass; Vasan, Sandhya; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ho, David D.; Tsuji, Moriya

    2010-01-01

    The glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to bind CD1d molecules to activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, and subsequently induce activation of various immune-competent cells, including dendritic cells, thereby providing a significant adjuvant effect for various vaccines. However, in phase I clinical trials, α-GalCer was shown to display only marginal biological activity. In our search for a glycolipid that can exert more potent stimulatory activity against iNK...

  5. Structural insights into a novel interkingdom signaling circuit by cartography of the ligand-binding sites of the homologous quorum sensing LuxR-family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Degrassi, Giuliano; Venturi, Vittorio; Lamba, Doriano

    2013-10-15

    Recent studies have identified a novel interkingdom signaling circuit, via plant signaling molecules, and a bacterial sub-family of LuxR proteins, bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Indeed pivotal plant-bacteria interactions are regulated by the so called Plant Associated Bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo regulators that, although closely related to the quorum sensing (QS) LuxR family, do not bind or respond to canonical quorum sensing N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), but only to specific host plant signal molecules. The large body of structural data available for several members of the QS LuxR family complexed with different classes of ligands (AHLs and other compounds), has been exploited to dissect the cartography of their regulatory domains through structure-based multiple sequence alignments, structural superimposition and a comparative analysis of the contact residues involved in ligand binding. In the absence of experimentally determined structures of members of the PAB LuxR solos subfamily, an homology model of its prototype OryR is presented, aiming to elucidate the architecture of its ligand-binding site. The obtained model, in combination with the cartography of the regulatory domains of the homologous QS LuxRs, provides novel insights into the 3D structure of its ligand-binding site and unveils the probable molecular determinants responsible for differences in selectivity towards specific host plant signal molecules, rather than to canonical QS compounds.

  6. A critical look at the calculation of the binding characteristics and concentration of iron complexing ligands in seawater with suggested improvements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L.J.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Thuróczy, C.-E.; Maas, L.R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental context
    The low concentration of iron in the oceans limits growth of phytoplankton. Dissolved organic molecules, called ligands, naturally present in seawater, bind iron thereby increasing its solubility and, consequently, its availability for biological uptake by phytoplankton. The

  7. Unusual estrogen-binding liver protein: additional data on the structural determinants of androgenic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.N.; Shchelkunova, T.A.; Rozen, V.B.

    1986-01-01

    The relative competitive activity of a number of androstane derivatives was determined according to the 50% displacement of [ 3 H] estradiol from complexes with an unusual estrogen-binding protein (UEBP) of the liver of male rats. It was shown that: (1) the bulk of the energy of the bond of the steroid to protein is due to hydrophobic interactions; (2) the real ability to form specific complexes with the UEBP at androgen concentrations close to the physiological is determined by the 17β-hydroxyl and is enhanced by the 3α- or 2α-hydroxy group; (3) the 3- and 17-keto groups weaken the interaction of androgens with the UEBP; (4) cis-coupling of the A and B rings in the molecule of androgens does not prevent the binding of the steroids to protein. These data substantially refine the concepts of the mechanisms of the interaction of androgens with the UEBP and may promote an elucidation of the physiological function of this protein

  8. An in vitro biotic ligand model (BLM) for silver binding to cultured gill epithelia of freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bingsheng; Nichols, Joel; Playle, Richard C.; Wood, Chris M.

    2005-01-01

    'Reconstructed' gill epithelia on filter supports were grown in primary culture from dispersed gill cells of freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This preparation contains both pavement cells and chloride cells, and after 7-9 days in culture, permits exposure of the apical surface to true freshwater while maintaining blood-like culture media on the basolateral surface, and exhibits a stable transepithelial resistance (TER) and transepithelial potential (TEP) under these conditions. These epithelia were used to develop a possible in vitro version of the biotic ligand model (BLM) for silver; the in vivo BLM uses short-term gill binding of the metal to predict acute silver toxicity as a function of freshwater chemistry. Radio-labeled silver ( 110m Ag as AgNO 3 ) was placed on the apical side (freshwater), and the appearance of 110m Ag in the epithelia (binding) and in the basolateral media (flux) over 3 h were monitored. Silver binding (greater than the approximate range 0-100 μg l -1 ) and silver flux were concentration-dependent with a 50% saturation point (apparent K d ) value of about 10 μg l -1 or 10 -7 M, very close to the 96-h LC50 in vivo in the same water chemistry. There were no adverse effects of silver on TER, TEP, or Na + , K + -ATPase activity, though the latter declined over longer exposures, as in vivo. Silver flux over 3 h was small ( + and dissolved organic carbon (humic acid) concentrations, increased by elevations in freshwater Cl - and reductions in pH, and insensitive to elevations in Ca 2+ . With the exception of the pH response, these effects were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to in vivo BLM responses. The results suggest that an in vitro BLM approach may provide a simple and cost-effective way for evaluating the protective effects of site-specific waters

  9. Performance of HADDOCK and a simple contact-based protein-ligand binding affinity predictor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Koukos, Panagiotis I.; Citro, Nevia; Trellet, Mikael E.; Rodrigues, J. P. G. L. M.; Moreira, Irina S.; Roel-Touris, Jorge; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Geng, Cunliang; Schaarschmidt, Jörg; Xue, Li C.; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, A. M. J. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the performance of HADDOCK, our information-driven docking software, in the second edition of the D3R Grand Challenge. In this blind experiment, participants were requested to predict the structures and binding affinities of complexes between the Farnesoid X nuclear receptor and 102 different ligands. The models obtained in Stage1 with HADDOCK and ligand-specific protocol show an average ligand RMSD of 5.1 Å from the crystal structure. Only 6/35 targets were within 2.5 Å RMSD from the reference, which prompted us to investigate the limiting factors and revise our protocol for Stage2. The choice of the receptor conformation appeared to have the strongest influence on the results. Our Stage2 models were of higher quality (13 out of 35 were within 2.5 Å), with an average RMSD of 4.1 Å. The docking protocol was applied to all 102 ligands to generate poses for binding affinity prediction. We developed a modified version of our contact-based binding affinity predictor PRODIGY, using the number of interatomic contacts classified by their type and the intermolecular electrostatic energy. This simple structure-based binding affinity predictor shows a Kendall's Tau correlation of 0.37 in ranking the ligands (7th best out of 77 methods, 5th/25 groups). Those results were obtained from the average prediction over the top10 poses, irrespective of their similarity/correctness, underscoring the robustness of our simple predictor. This results in an enrichment factor of 2.5 compared to a random predictor for ranking ligands within the top 25%, making it a promising approach to identify lead compounds in virtual screening.

  10. Polymorphisms at the Ligand Binding Site of the Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Osteomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Gezen Ak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphisms have been suggested as possible determinants of bone mineral density (BMD and calcium metabolism. In this study, our aim was to determine whether there is an association between VDR gene polymorphism and osteomalacia or not. We determined ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene in 24 patients with osteomalacia and 25 age-matched healthy controls. Serum calcium, phosphorus, ALP, PTH, 25OHD levels were also examined. We used PCR and RFLP methods to test for an association between osteomalacia and polymorphisms within, intron 8 and exon 9 of the VDR gene. When the control and patients were compared for their ApaI and TaqI genotypes there was no relationship between VDR gene allelic polymorphisms and osteomalacia. Whereas a nearly significant difference for A allele was found in the allellic distribution of the patients (p = 0.08. Also no association between biochemical data and VDR gene polymorphisms was observed.

  11. Structural combination of established 5-HT(2A) receptor ligands: new aspects of the binding mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Vasko; Herth, Matthias M; Santini, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    MH.MZ, MDL 100907, and altanserin are structurally similar 4-benzoyl-piperidine derivatives and are well accommodated to receptor interaction models. We combined structural elements of different high-affinity and selective 5-HT(2A) antagonists, as MH.MZ, altanserin, and SR 46349B, to improve......) with a moderate affinity toward the 5-HT(2A) receptor (K(i) = 57 nm). The remarkably reduced affinity of other compounds (4a), (4b), and (4c) (K(i) = 411, 360 and 356 nm respectively) indicates that MH.MZ can only bind to the 5-HT(2A) receptor with the p-fluorophenylethyl residue in a sterically restricted...

  12. Biochemical and structural features of extracellular vesicle-binding RNA aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazuyoshi; Zhao, Jing; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Miyagishi, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are particles in mammalian body fluids that have attracted considerable attention as biomarkers for various diseases. In the present study, the authors isolated RNA aptamers with an affinity for extracellular vesicles from two library pools that encoded randomized sequences of different lengths. After the several rounds of selection, two conserved motifs are identified in the sequences that are obtained by next-generation sequencing. Most of the sequences were predicted to adopt a secondary structure that consisted of a non-conserved stem structure and a conserved loop sequence. Two minimal similar sequences are synthesized and confirmed the ability of these sequences to bind to extracellular vesicles. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and melting temperature analysis demonstrated that the aptamers were able to form a G-quadruplex structure in their loop regions and these structures were stabilized by potassium ions. Consistent with these structural data, the affinity of each aptamer for extracellular vesicles was dependent on potassium ions. The aptamers that were identified may be useful molecular tools for the development of diagnostic methods that utilize body fluids, such as blood, saliva and urine. PMID:28584632

  13. Mechanistic Inferences from the Binding of Ligands to LpxC, A Metal-Dependent Deacetylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennadios,H.; Whittington, D.; Li, X.; Fierke, C.; Christianson, D.

    2006-01-01

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 Angstroms resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A.

  14. Mechanistic inferences from the binding of ligands to LpxC, a metal-dependent deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennadios, Heather A; Whittington, Douglas A; Li, Xuechen; Fierke, Carol A; Christianson, David W

    2006-07-04

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 A resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A.

  15. Changes of creatine kinase structure upon ligand binding as seen by small-angle scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Michael; Kriechbaum, Manfred; Laggner, Peter; Wallimann, Theo

    1996-09-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to investigate structural changes upon binding of individual substrates or a transition state analogue complex (TSAC), consisting of Mg-ADP, creatine and KNO 3 to creatine kinase isoenzymes (dimeric M-CK and octameric Mi-CK) and monomeric arginine kinase (AK). Considerable changes in the shape and the size of the molecules occurred upon binding of Mg-ATP and TSAC, whereas creatine alone had only a small effect. In Mi-CK, the radius of gyration was reduced from 55.6 Å (free enzyme) to 48.9 Å (enzyme + Mg-ATP) and to 48.2 Å (enzyme + TSAC). The experiments performed with M-CK showed similar changes from 28.0 Å (free enzyme) to 25.6 Å (enzyme + Mg-ATP) and to 25.5 Å (enzyme + TSAC). Creatine alone did not lead to significant changes in the radii of gyration, nor did free ATP or ADP. AK showed the same behaviour: a change of the radius of gyration from 21.5 Å (free enzyme) to 19.7 Å (enzyme + MG-ATP), whereas with arginine alone only a minor change could be observed. The primary change in structure as seen with monomeric AK seems to be a magnesium-nucleotide induced domain movement relative to each other, whereas the effect of substrate may be of local order only. In creatine kinase, however, further movements must be involved in the large conformational change.

  16. Pyranose dehydrogenase ligand promiscuity: a generalized approach to simulate monosaccharide solvation, binding, and product formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M H Graf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The flavoenzyme pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH from the litter decomposing fungus Agaricus meleagris oxidizes many different carbohydrates occurring during lignin degradation. This promiscuous substrate specificity makes PDH a promising catalyst for bioelectrochemical applications. A generalized approach to simulate all 32 possible aldohexopyranoses in the course of one or a few molecular dynamics (MD simulations is reported. Free energy calculations according to the one-step perturbation (OSP method revealed the solvation free energies (ΔGsolv of all 32 aldohexopyranoses in water, which have not yet been reported in the literature. The free energy difference between β- and α-anomers (ΔGβ-α of all d-stereoisomers in water were compared to experimental values with a good agreement. Moreover, the free-energy differences (ΔG of the 32 stereoisomers bound to PDH in two different poses were calculated from MD simulations. The relative binding free energies (ΔΔGbind were calculated and, where available, compared to experimental values, approximated from Km values. The agreement was very good for one of the poses, in which the sugars are positioned in the active site for oxidation at C1 or C2. Distance analysis between hydrogens of the monosaccharide and the reactive N5-atom of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD revealed that oxidation is possible at HC1 or HC2 for pose A, and at HC3 or HC4 for pose B. Experimentally detected oxidation products could be rationalized for the majority of monosaccharides by combining ΔΔGbind and a reweighted distance analysis. Furthermore, several oxidation products were predicted for sugars that have not yet been tested experimentally, directing further analyses. This study rationalizes the relationship between binding free energies and substrate promiscuity in PDH, providing novel insights for its applicability in bioelectrochemistry. The results suggest that a similar approach could be applied to study

  17. Mechanistic Inferences from the Binding of Ligands to LpxC, A Metal-Dependent Deacetylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennadios, H.; Whittington, D.; Li, X.; Fierke, C.; Christianson, D.

    2006-01-01

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 Angstroms resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A

  18. Interaction of the phosphorylated DNA-binding domain in nuclear receptor CAR with its ligand-binding domain regulates CAR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Min, Jungki; Sobhany, Mack; Pedersen, Lars C; Mutoh, Shingo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2018-01-05

    The nuclear protein constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or NR1I3) regulates several liver functions such as drug and energy metabolism and cell growth or death, which are often involved in the development of diseases such as diabetes and hepatocellular carcinoma. CAR undergoes a conversion from inactive homodimers to active heterodimers with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), and phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) at Thr-38 in CAR regulates this conversion. Here, we uncovered the molecular mechanism by which this phosphorylation regulates the intramolecular interaction between CAR's DBD and ligand-binding domain (LBD), enabling the homodimer-heterodimer conversion. Phosphomimetic substitution of Thr-38 with Asp increased co-immunoprecipitation of the CAR DBD with CAR LBD in Huh-7 cells. Isothermal titration calorimetry assays also revealed that recombinant CAR DBD-T38D, but not nonphosphorylated CAR DBD, bound the CAR LBD peptide. This DBD-LBD interaction masked CAR's dimer interface, preventing CAR homodimer formation. Of note, EGF signaling weakened the interaction of CAR DBD T38D with CAR LBD, converting CAR to the homodimer form. The DBD-T38D-LBD interaction also prevented CAR from forming a heterodimer with RXRα. However, this interaction opened up a CAR surface, allowing interaction with protein phosphatase 2A. Thr-38 dephosphorylation then dissociated the DBD-LBD interaction, allowing CAR heterodimer formation with RXRα. We conclude that the intramolecular interaction of phosphorylated DBD with the LBD enables CAR to adapt a transient monomer configuration that can be converted to either the inactive homodimer or the active heterodimer.

  19. Autoradiographic localization of benzomorphan binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crain, B.J.; Kwenjen Chang; McNamara, J.O.; Valdes, F.

    1985-07-17

    The benzomorphan subpopulation of opiate binding sites was labeled by (TH)diprenorphine in the presence of unlabeled ligands selected to quench and delta opiate binding sites. The distribution of benzomorphan binding sites was then localized autoradiographically. The distribution differs from the distributions of , delta and kappa opiate binding and is quite similar to the distribution of US -endorphin immunoreactivity. These observations support the hypothesis, based on biochemical studies in brain membranes, that benzomorphan binding sites may represent the ligand recognition sites of putative epsilon receptors. (Auth.). 34 refs.; 3 figs.

  20. Effects of protein-protein interactions and ligand binding on the ion permeation in KCNQ1 potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalily Hasani, Horia; Ganesan, Aravindhan; Ahmed, Marawan; Barakat, Khaled H

    2018-01-01

    The voltage-gated KCNQ1 potassium ion channel interacts with the type I transmembrane protein minK (KCNE1) to generate the slow delayed rectifier (IKs) current in the heart. Mutations in these transmembrane proteins have been linked with several heart-related issues, including long QT syndromes (LQTS), congenital atrial fibrillation, and short QT syndrome. Off-target interactions of several drugs with that of KCNQ1/KCNE1 ion channel complex have been known to cause fatal cardiac irregularities. Thus, KCNQ1/KCNE1 remains an important avenue for drug-design and discovery research. In this work, we present the structural and mechanistic details of potassium ion permeation through an open KCNQ1 structural model using the combined molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss the processes and key residues involved in the permeation of a potassium ion through the KCNQ1 ion channel, and how the ion permeation is affected by (i) the KCNQ1-KCNE1 interactions and (ii) the binding of chromanol 293B ligand and its derivatives into the complex. The results reveal that interactions between KCNQ1 with KCNE1 causes a pore constriction in the former, which in-turn forms small energetic barriers in the ion-permeation pathway. These findings correlate with the previous experimental reports that interactions of KCNE1 dramatically slows the activation of KCNQ1. Upon ligand-binding onto the complex, the energy-barriers along ion permeation path are more pronounced, as expected, therefore, requiring higher force in our steered-MD simulations. Nevertheless, pulling the ion when a weak blocker is bound to the channel does not necessitate high force in SMD. This indicates that our SMD simulations have been able to discern between strong and week blockers and reveal their influence on potassium ion permeation. The findings presented here will have some implications in understanding the potential off-target interactions of the drugs with the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel

  1. Differential Effects of Structural Modifications on the Competition of Chalcones for the PIB Amyloid Imaging Ligand-Binding Site in Alzheimer's Disease Brain and Synthetic Aβ Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso, Marina Y; McCarty, Katie; Head, Elizabeth; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; LeVine, Harry

    2016-02-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex brain disorder that still remains ill defined. In order to understand the significance of binding of different clinical in vivo imaging ligands to the polymorphic pathological features of AD brain, the molecular characteristics of the ligand interacting with its specific binding site need to be defined. Herein, we observed that tritiated Pittsburgh Compound B ((3)H-PIB) can be displaced from synthetic Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) fibrils and from the PIB binding complex purified from human AD brain (ADPBC) by molecules containing a chalcone structural scaffold. We evaluated how substitution on the chalcone scaffold alters its ability to displace (3)H-PIB from the synthetic fibrils and ADPBC. By comparing unsubstituted core chalcone scaffolds along with the effects of bromine and methyl substitution at various positions, we found that attaching a hydroxyl group on the ring adjacent to the carbonyl group (ring I) of the parent member of the chalcone family generally improved the binding affinity of chalcones toward ADPBC and synthetic fibrils F40 and F42. Furthermore, any substitution on ring I at the ortho-position of the carbonyl group greatly decreases the binding affinity of the chalcones, potentially as a result of steric hindrance. Together with the finding that neither our chalcones nor PIB interact with the Congo Red/X-34 binding site, these molecules provide new tools to selectively probe the PIB binding site that is found in human AD brain, but not in brains of AD pathology animal models. Our chalcone derivatives also provide important information on the effects of fibril polymorphism on ligand binding.

  2. An Extended Surface Loop on Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 Governs Ligand Binding Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Parker

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of globally prevalent diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated host cell invasion strategy that relies on a parasite-host cell junction anchored by interactions between apical membrane antigens (AMAs on the parasite surface and rhoptry neck 2 (RON2 proteins discharged from the parasite and embedded in the host cell membrane. Key to formation of the AMA1-RON2 complex is displacement of an extended surface loop on AMA1 called the DII loop. While conformational flexibility of the DII loop is required to expose the mature RON2 binding groove, a definitive role of this substructure has not been elucidated. To establish a role of the DII loop in Toxoplasma gondii AMA1, we engineered a form of the protein where the mobile portion of the loop was replaced with a short Gly-Ser linker (TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements with a panel of RON2 peptides revealed an influential role for the DII loop in governing selectivity. Most notably, an Eimeria tenella RON2 (EtRON2 peptide that showed only weak binding to TgAMA1 bound with high affinity to TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. To define the molecular basis for the differential binding, we determined the crystal structure of TgAMA1ΔDIIloop in complex with the EtRON2 peptide. When analyzed in the context of existing AMA1-RON2 structures, spatially distinct anchor points in the AMA1 groove were identified that, when engaged, appear to provide the necessary traction to outcompete the DII loop. Collectively, these data support a model where the AMA1 DII loop serves as a structural gatekeeper to selectively filter out ligands otherwise capable of binding with high affinity in the AMA1 apical groove. These data also highlight the importance of considering the functional implications of the DII loop in the ongoing development of therapeutic intervention strategies targeting the AMA1-RON

  3. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus: identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hao; Zarlenga, Dante S; Sestak, Karol; Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-01

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and characterized in more depth. A phage-based immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA) capable of differentiating TGEV from other coronaviruses was developed using one phage, phTGEV-M7, as antigen. When the phage-ELISA was compared to conventional antibody-based ELISA for detecting infections, phage-ELISA exhibited greater sensitivity. A chemically synthesized, TGEV-M7 peptide (pepTGEV-M7; HALTPIKYIPPG) was evaluated for antiviral activity. Plaque-reduction assays revealed that pepTGEV-M7 was able to prevent TGEV infection in vitro (p<0.01) following pretreatment of the virus with the peptide. Indirect immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR confirmed the inhibitory effects of the peptide. These results indicate that pepTGEV-M7 might be utilized for virus-specific diagnostics and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. COMPARATIVE MODELLING AND LIGAND BINDING SITE PREDICTION OF A FAMILY 43 GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASE FROM Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 showed close evolutionary relation with carbohydrate binding family 6 proteins from C. cellulolyticum, C. papyrosolvens, C. cellulyticum, and A. cellulyticum. Comparative modeling of CtGH43 was performed based on crystal structures with PDB IDs 3C7F, 1YIF, 1YRZ, 2EXH and 1WL7. The structure having lowest MODELLER objective function was selected. The three-dimensional structure revealed typical 5-fold beta–propeller architecture. Energy minimization and validation of predicted model with VERIFY 3D indicated acceptability of the proposed atomic structure. The Ramachandran plot analysis by RAMPAGE confirmed that family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 contains little or negligible segments of helices. It also showed that out of 301 residues, 267 (89.3% were in most favoured region, 23 (7.7% were in allowed region and 9 (3.0% were in outlier region. IUPred analysis of CtGH43 showed no disordered region. Active site analysis showed presence of two Asp and one Glu, assumed to form a catalytic triad. This study gives us information about three-dimensional structure and reaffirms the fact that it has the similar core 5-fold beta–propeller architecture and so probably has the same inverting mechanism of action with the formation of above mentioned catalytic triad for catalysis of polysaccharides.

  5. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  6. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  7. L-Asp is a useful tool in the purification of the ionotropic glutamate receptor A2 ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Christian; Frydenvang, Karla; Ceravalls de Rabassa, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In purification of the ionotropic glutamate receptor A2 (GluA2) ligand-binding domain (LBD), L-Glu supplemented buffers have previously been used for protein stabilization during the procedure. This sometimes hampers structural studies of low affinity ligands because L-Glu is difficult to displace...... crystallized as a mixed dimer with L-Glu present in one subunit while neither L-Asp nor L-Glu were found in the other subunit. Thus, residual L-Glu is still present from the expression. On the other hand, only L-Asp was found at the binding site when using 50 mM or 250 mM L-Asp for crystallization. The binding...... mode observed for L-Asp at the GluA2 LBD is very similar to that described for L-Glu. Taken together, we have shown that L-Asp can be used instead of L-Glu for ligand-dependent stabilization of the GluA2 LBD during purification. This will enable structural studies of low affinity ligands for lead...

  8. Colloidal nanoparticle size control: experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of the ligand-metal binding role in controlling the nucleation and growth kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Saeed; Li, Wenhui; Thompson, Coogan; Ivanov, Sergei; Seifert, Soenke; Lee, Byeongdu; Kovarik, Libor; Karim, Ayman M

    2017-09-21

    Despite the major advancements in colloidal metal nanoparticles synthesis, a quantitative mechanistic treatment of the ligand's role in controlling their size remains elusive. We report a methodology that combines in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and kinetic modeling to quantitatively capture the role of ligand-metal binding (with the metal precursor and the nanoparticle surface) in controlling the synthesis kinetics. We demonstrate that accurate extraction of the kinetic rate constants requires using both, the size and number of particles obtained from in situ SAXS to decouple the contributions of particle nucleation and growth to the total metal reduction. Using Pd acetate and trioctylphosphine in different solvents, our results reveal that the binding of ligands with both the metal precursor and nanoparticle surface play a key role in controlling the rates of nucleation and growth and consequently the final size. We show that the solvent can affect the metal-ligand binding and consequently ligand coverage on the nanoparticles surface which has a strong effect on the growth rate and final size (1.4 nm in toluene and 4.3 nm in pyridine). The proposed kinetic model quantitatively predicts the effects of varying the metal concentration and ligand/metal ratio on nanoparticle size for our work and literature reports. More importantly, we demonstrate that the final size is exclusively determined by the nucleation and growth kinetics at early times and not how they change with time. Specifically, the nanoparticle size in this work and many literature reports can be predicted using a single, model independent kinetic descriptor, (growth-to-nucleation rate ratio) 1/3 , despite the different metals and synthetic conditions. The proposed model and kinetic descriptor could serve as powerful tools for the design of colloidal nanoparticles with specific sizes.

  9. Synthesis, spectral, dna binding and cleavage properties of ruthenium(II Schiff base complexes containing PPh3/AsPh3 as co-ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiyaraj Subbaiyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dihydroxybenzaldehyde Schiff base ligands (L1-L3 and its ruthenium(II complexes, have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR, mass spectra, UV-vis and IR spectra. The binding of ruthenium(II complexes have been investigated by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The experiment reveals that all the compounds can bind to DNA through an electrostatic mode and intrinsic binding constant (Kb has been estimated under similar set of experimental conditions. Absorption spectral study indicate that the ruthenium(II complexes has intrinsic binding constant in the range of 1.6-8.6 X 104 M-1. The complex [Ru(CO(PPh32(L3] bind more strongly than that of the other complexes. In addition, DNA cleavage property were tested for all ruthenium(II complexes.

  10. Saturation-Transfer Difference (STD) NMR: A Simple and Fast Method for Ligand Screening and Characterization of Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Aldino; Manso, Joao; Nobrega, Franklin L.; Cabrita, Eurico J.

    2011-01-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR has emerged as one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. The success of this technique is a consequence of its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need of processing NMR information about the receptor…

  11. Ligand binding modulates the structural dynamics and activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator: A possible mechanism of plasminogen activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kromann-Hansen

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of trypsin-like serine proteases is in many cases regulated by conformational changes initiated by binding of physiological modulators to exosites located distantly from the active site. A trypsin-like serine protease of particular interest is urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, which is involved in extracellular tissue remodeling processes. Herein, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS to study regulation of activity in the catalytic domain of the murine version of uPA (muPA by two muPA specific monoclonal antibodies. Using a truncated muPA variant (muPA16-243, containing the catalytic domain only, we show that the two monoclonal antibodies, despite binding to an overlapping epitope in the 37s and 70s loops of muPA16-243, stabilize distinct muPA16-243 conformations. Whereas the inhibitory antibody, mU1 was found to increase the conformational flexibility of muPA16-243, the stimulatory antibody, mU3, decreased muPA16-243 conformational flexibility. Furthermore, the HDXMS data unveil the existence of a pathway connecting the 70s loop to the active site region. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we further identify the 70s loop as an important exosite for the activation of the physiological uPA substrate plasminogen. Thus, the data presented here reveal important information about dynamics in uPA by demonstrating how various ligands can modulate uPA activity by mediating long-range conformational changes. Moreover, the results provide a possible mechanism of plasminogen activation.

  12. The ligand binding domain of GCNF is not required for repression of pluripotency genes in mouse fetal ovarian germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Okumura

    Full Text Available In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog. Interestingly, these genes are repressed at different developmental timepoints in germ and somatic cells. Ovarian germ cells maintain their expression until about embryonic day (E 14.5, whereas somatic cells silence them much earlier, at about E8.0. In both somatic cells and embryonic stem cells, silencing of Oct4 and Nanog requires the nuclear receptor GCNF. However, expression of the Gcnf gene has not been investigated in fetal ovarian germ cells, and whether it is required for silencing Oct4 and Nanog in that context is not known. Here we demonstrate that Gcnf is expressed in fetal ovarian germ cells, peaking at E14.5, when Oct4 and Nanog are silenced. However, conditional ablation of the ligand-binding domain of Gcnf using a ubiquitous, tamoxifen-inducible Cre indicates that Gcnf is not required for the down-regulation of pluripotency genes in fetal ovarian germ cells, nor is it required for initiation of meiosis and oogenesis. These results suggest that the silencing of Oct4 and Nanog in germ cells occurs via a different mechanism from that operating in somatic cells during gastrulation.

  13. Response and binding elements for ligand-dependent positive transcription factors integrate positive and negative regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, M.G.; Glass, C.K.; Adler, S.; Crenshaw, E.B. III; He, X.; Lira, S.A.; Elsholtz, H.P.; Mangalam, H.J.; Holloway, J.M.; Nelson, C.; Albert, V.R.; Ingraham, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate, regulated initiation of mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II is dependent on the actions of a variety of positive and negative trans-acting factors that bind cis-acting promoter and enhancer elements. These transcription factors may exert their actions in a tissue-specific manner or function under control of plasma membrane or intracellular ligand-dependent receptors. A major goal in the authors' laboratory has been to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the serial activation of hormone-encoding genes in the pituitary during development and the positive and negative regulation of their transcription. The anterior pituitary gland contains phenotypically distinct cell types, each of which expresses unique trophic hormones: adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone/luteinizing hormone. The structurally related prolactin and growth hormone genes are expressed in lactotrophs and somatotrophs, respectively, with their expression virtually limited to the pituitary gland. The reported transient coexpression of these two structurally related neuroendocrine genes raises the possibility that the prolactin and growth hormone genes are developmentally controlled by a common factor(s)

  14. Calculations for Adjusting Endogenous Biomarker Levels During Analytical Recovery Assessments for Ligand-Binding Assay Bioanalytical Method Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, John F; Evans, Cindy L; Saxena, Manju; Lopez, Adriana E

    2015-07-01

    It is often necessary to adjust for detectable endogenous biomarker levels in spiked validation samples (VS) and in selectivity determinations during bioanalytical method validation for ligand-binding assays (LBA) with a matrix like normal human serum (NHS). Described herein are case studies of biomarker analyses using multiplex LBA which highlight the challenges associated with such adjustments when calculating percent analytical recovery (%AR). The LBA test methods were the Meso Scale Discovery V-PLEX® proinflammatory and cytokine panels with NHS as test matrix. The NHS matrix blank exhibited varied endogenous content of the 20 individual cytokines before spiking, ranging from undetectable to readily quantifiable. Addition and subtraction methods for adjusting endogenous cytokine levels in %AR calculations are both used in the bioanalytical field. The two methods were compared in %AR calculations following spiking and analysis of VS for cytokines having detectable endogenous levels in NHS. Calculations for %AR obtained by subtracting quantifiable endogenous biomarker concentrations from the respective total analytical VS values yielded reproducible and credible conclusions. The addition method, in contrast, yielded %AR conclusions that were frequently unreliable and discordant with values obtained with the subtraction adjustment method. It is shown that subtraction of assay signal attributable to matrix is a feasible alternative when endogenous biomarkers levels are below the limit of quantitation, but above the limit of detection. These analyses confirm that the subtraction method is preferable over that using addition to adjust for detectable endogenous biomarker levels when calculating %AR for biomarker LBA.

  15. Development and utilization of a fluorescence-based receptor-binding assay for the site 5 voltage-sensitive sodium channel ligands brevetoxin and ciguatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jennifer R; Jacocks, Henry M; Niven, Susan C; Poli, Mark A; Baden, Daniel G; Bourdelais, Andrea J

    2014-01-01

    Brevetoxins are a family of ladder-frame polyether toxins produced during blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. Consumption of fish exposed to K. brevis blooms can lead to the development of neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The toxic effects of brevetoxins are due to activation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) in cell membranes. Binding of toxins has historically been measured using a radioligand competition assay that is fraught with difficulty. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence-based binding assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Several fluorophores were conjugated to polyether brevetoxin-2 and used as the labeled ligand. Brevetoxin analogs were able to compete for binding with the fluorescent ligands. This assay was qualified against the standard radioligand receptor assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Furthermore, the fluorescence-based assay was used to determine relative concentrations of toxins in raw extracts of K. brevis culture, and to determine ciguatoxin affinity to site 5 of VSSCs. The fluorescence-based assay was quicker, safer, and far less expensive. As such, this assay can be used to replace the current radioligand assay and will be a vital tool for future experiments examining the binding affinity of various ligands for site 5 on sodium channels.

  16. Neurological impairment in experimental antiphospholipid syndrome is associated with increased ligand binding to hippocampal and cortical serotonergic 5-HT1A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Katzav, Aviva; Grimm, Christina; Chapman, Joab; Sommer, Clemens J

    2013-04-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease where the presence of high titers of circulating autoantibodies causes thrombosis with consecutive infarcts. In experimental APS (eAPS), a mouse model of APS, behavioral abnormalities develop in the absence of vessel occlusion or infarcts. Using brain hemispheres of control and eAPS mice with documented neurological and cognitive deficits, we checked for lymphocytic infiltration, activation of glia and macrophages, as well as alterations of ligand binding densities of various neurotransmitter receptors to unravel the molecular basis of this abnormal behavior. Lymphocytic infiltrates were immunohistochemically characterized using antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8 and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), respectively. GFAP, Iba1 and CD68-immunohistochemistry was performed, to check for activation of astrocytes, microglia and macrophages. Ligand binding densities of NMDA, AMPA, GABAA and 5-HT1A receptors were analyzed by in vitro receptor autoradiography. No significant inflammatory reaction occurred in eAPS mice. There was neither activation of astrocytes or microglia nor accumulation of macrophages. Binding values of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors were largely unchanged. However, ligand binding densities of the modulatory serotonergic 5-HT1A receptors in the hippocampus and in the primary somatosensory cortex of eAPS mice were significantly upregulated which is suggested to induce the behavioral abnormalities observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Two functional reticulocyte binding-like (RBL) invasion ligands of zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi exhibit differential adhesion to monkey and human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenya, Amma A; Tran, Tuan M; Meyer, Esmeralda Vs; Barnwell, John W; Galinski, Mary R

    2012-07-06

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a monkey malaria species that is becoming a serious public health concern infecting hundreds and perhaps thousands of humans in Southeast Asia. Invasion of erythrocytes by merozoites entails a cascade of molecular interactions. One step involves the adhesion of Plasmodium reticulocyte binding-like (RBL) proteins. Plasmodium knowlesi merozoites express only two RBL invasion ligands, known as Normocyte Binding Proteins (PkNBPXa and PkNBPXb). Overlapping N-terminal regions of PkNBPXa and PkNBPXb were expressed in COS7 cells and tested for surface expression and adhesion to rhesus monkey erythrocytes. Subsequent tests to study specific receptor ligand interactions included adhesion to a panel of human and non-human primate erythrocytes, enzymatic treatment, and site directed mutagenesis. An N-terminal cysteine-rich region of PkNBPXb (PkNBPXb-II) exhibited specific adhesion to rhesus monkey erythrocytes. Mutation of four of five cysteines in PkNBPXb-II interfered with its surface expression on COS7 cells, suggesting disulphide bond conformation is critical for intracellular trafficking. Binding of PkNBPXb-II was abolished when rhesus erythrocytes were pre-treated with chymotrypsin, but not trypsin or neuraminidase. PkNBPXb-II also bound other Old World monkey species and gibbon erythrocytes. However, erythrocytes from other primate species including humans did not bind to PkNBPXb-II or native PkNBPXb. Importantly, unlike PkNBPXb, PkNBPXa bound human erythrocytes, and this binding was independent of the Duffy blood group determinant. The data reported here begins to clarify the functional domains of the P. knowlesi RBLs. A binding domain has been identified and characterized in PkNBPXb. Notably, this study demonstrates that unlike PkNBPXb, PkNBPXa can bind to human erythrocytes, suggesting that PkNBPXa may function as a ligand to enable the invasion of P. knowlesi merozoites into human cells.

  18. Two functional reticulocyte binding-like (RBL invasion ligands of zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi exhibit differential adhesion to monkey and human erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenya Amma A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium knowlesi is a monkey malaria species that is becoming a serious public health concern infecting hundreds and perhaps thousands of humans in Southeast Asia. Invasion of erythrocytes by merozoites entails a cascade of molecular interactions. One step involves the adhesion of Plasmodium reticulocyte binding-like (RBL proteins. Plasmodium knowlesi merozoites express only two RBL invasion ligands, known as Normocyte Binding Proteins (PkNBPXa and PkNBPXb. Methods Overlapping N-terminal regions of PkNBPXa and PkNBPXb were expressed in COS7 cells and tested for surface expression and adhesion to rhesus monkey erythrocytes. Subsequent tests to study specific receptor ligand interactions included adhesion to a panel of human and non-human primate erythrocytes, enzymatic treatment, and site directed mutagenesis. Results An N-terminal cysteine-rich region of PkNBPXb (PkNBPXb-II exhibited specific adhesion to rhesus monkey erythrocytes. Mutation of four of five cysteines in PkNBPXb-II interfered with its surface expression on COS7 cells, suggesting disulphide bond conformation is critical for intracellular trafficking. Binding of PkNBPXb-II was abolished when rhesus erythrocytes were pre-treated with chymotrypsin, but not trypsin or neuraminidase. PkNBPXb-II also bound other Old World monkey species and gibbon erythrocytes. However, erythrocytes from other primate species including humans did not bind to PkNBPXb-II or native PkNBPXb. Importantly, unlike PkNBPXb, PkNBPXa bound human erythrocytes, and this binding was independent of the Duffy blood group determinant. Conclusions The data reported here begins to clarify the functional domains of the P. knowlesi RBLs. A binding domain has been identified and characterized in PkNBPXb. Notably, this study demonstrates that unlike PkNBPXb, PkNBPXa can bind to human erythrocytes, suggesting that PkNBPXa may function as a ligand to enable the invasion of P. knowlesi merozoites into

  19. Identification in the mu-opioid receptor of cysteine residues responsible for inactivation of ligand binding by thiol alkylating and reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibelet, G; Capeyrou, R; Dietrich, G; Emorine, L J

    1997-05-19

    Inactivation by thiol reducing and alkylating agents of ligand binding to the human mu-opioid receptor was examined. Dithiothreitol reduced the number of [3H]diprenorphine binding sites. Replacement by seryl residues of either C142 or C219 in extracellular loops 1 and 2 of the mu receptor resulted in a complete loss of opioid binding. A disulfide bound linking C142 to C219 may thus be essential to maintain a functional conformation of the receptor. We also demonstrated that inactivation of ligand binding upon alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide occurred at two sites. Alteration of the more sensitive (IC50 = 20 microM) did not modify antagonists binding but decreased agonist affinity almost 10-fold. Modification of the less reactive site (IC50 = 2 mM) decreased the number of both agonist and antagonist binding sites. The alkylation site of higher sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide was shown by mutagenesis experiments to be constituted of both C81 and C332 in transmembrane domains 1 and 7 of the mu-opioid receptor.

  20. The effect of metal and substituent on DNA binding, cleavage activity, and cytotoxicity of new synthesized Schiff base ligands and Zn(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Zahra; Nasrollahi, Neda

    2017-11-01

    New water soluble Schiff base ligands [N,Nʹ-bis{5-[(triphenylphosphonium percholorate)-methyl]salicylidine}-1,3-diamino-2-propanol] (L1) and [N,Nʹ-bis(salicylidine)-1,3-diamino-2-propanol] (L2) and zinc (II) complex of L1: [N,Nʹ-bis{5-[(triphenylphosphonium percholorate)-methyl]salicylidine}-1,3-diamino-2-propanol]Zn(II) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1HNMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In vitro DNA binding of the compounds were investigated by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, cyclic voltammetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and gel electrophoresis. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of metal and substituent on DNA binding, cleavage activity and cytotoxicity of new synthesized Schiff base ligands and Zn(II) complex. The order of DNA binding affinity (Kb) calculated from the absorption spectroscopy was: ZnL1 > L2 > L1. Molecular docking studies explore more details on the mode of binding and binding energies. Although the compounds revealed strong DNA binding affinity but electrophoresis studies don't show any effects on the DNA structure and single or double strand breaks. The cytotoxicity experiments against human Hepatoma (HepG2) showed the order: L1 > ZnL1 > L2.

  1. Impact of wall shear stress and ligand avidity on binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles to murine tumor endothelium under flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryschich, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial phenotype of tumor blood vessels differs from the liver and forms an important base for endothelium-specific targeting by antibody-coated nanoparticles. Although differences of shear stress and ligand avidity can modulate the nanoparticle binding to endothelium, these mechanisms are still poorly studied. This study analyzed the binding of antibody-coated nanoparticles to tumor and liver endothelium under controlled flow conditions and verified this binding in tumor models in vivo. Binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles, but not of antibody was significantly reduced under increased wall shear stress and the degree of nanoparticle binding correlated with the avidity of the coating. The intravascular wall shear stress favors nanoparticle binding at the site of higher avidity of endothelial epitope which additionally promotes the selectivity to tumor endothelium. After intravenous application in vivo, pegylated self-coated nanoparticles showed specific binding to tumor endothelium, whereas the nanoparticle binding to the liver endothelium was very low. This study provides a rationale that selective binding of mAb-coated nanoparticles to tumor endothelium is achieved by two factors: higher expression of endothelial epitope and higher nanoparticle shearing from liver endothelium. The combination of endothelial marker targeting and the use of shear stress-controlled nanoparticle capture can be used for selective intratumoral drug delivery. PMID:26503468

  2. Mutational analysis of vaccinia virus E3 protein: the biological functions do not correlate with its biochemical capacity to bind double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueck, Kevin J; Hu, YuanShen Sandy; Chen, Peter; Deschambault, Yvon; Lee, Jocelyn; Varga, Jessie; Cao, Jingxin

    2015-05-01

    Vaccinia E3 protein has the biochemical capacity of binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The best characterized biological functions of the E3 protein include its host range function, suppression of cytokine expression, and inhibition of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activity. Currently, the role of the dsRNA binding capacity in the biological functions of the E3 protein is not clear. To further understand the mechanism of the E3 protein biological functions, we performed alanine scanning of the entire dsRNA binding domain of the E3 protein to examine the link between its biochemical capacity of dsRNA binding and biological functions. Of the 115 mutants examined, 20 were defective in dsRNA binding. Although the majority of the mutants defective in dsRNA binding also showed defective replication in HeLa cells, nine mutants (I105A, Y125A, E138A, F148A, F159A, K171A, L182A, L183A, and I187/188A) retained the host range function to various degrees. Further examination of a set of representative E3L mutants showed that residues essential for dsRNA binding are not essential for the biological functions of E3 protein, such as inhibition of protein kinase R (PKR) activation, suppression of cytokine expression, and apoptosis. Thus, data described in this communication strongly indicate the E3 protein performs its biological functions via a novel mechanism which does not correlate with its dsRNA binding activity. dsRNAs produced during virus replication are important pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for inducing antiviral immune responses. One of the strategies used by many viruses to counteract such antiviral immune responses is achieved by producing dsRNA binding proteins, such as poxvirus E3 family proteins, influenza virus NS1, and Ebola virus V35 proteins. The most widely accepted model for the biological functions of this class of viral dsRNA binding proteins is that they bind to and sequester viral dsRNA PAMPs; thus, they suppress the related

  3. Sensing Conformational Changes in DNA upon Ligand Binding Using QCM-D. Polyamine Condensation and Rad51 Extension of DNA Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Lu

    2014-10-16

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Biosensors, in which binding of ligands is detected through changes in the optical or electrochemical properties of a DNA layer confined to the sensor surface, are important tools for investigating DNA interactions. Here, we investigate if conformational changes induced in surface-attached DNA molecules upon ligand binding can be monitored by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique. DNA duplexes containing 59-184 base pairs were formed on QCM-D crystals by stepwise assembly of synthetic oligonucleotides of designed base sequences. The DNA films were exposed to the cationic polyamines spermidine and spermine, known to condense DNA molecules in bulk experiments, or to the recombination protein Rad51, known to extend the DNA helix. The binding and dissociation of the ligands to the DNA films were monitored in real time by measurements of the shifts in resonance frequency (Δf) and in dissipation (ΔD). The QCM-D data were analyzed using a Voigt-based model for the viscoelastic properties of polymer films in order to evaluate how the ligands affect thickness and shear viscosity of the DNA layer. Binding of spermine shrinks all DNA layers and increases their viscosity in a reversible fashion, and so does spermidine, but to a smaller extent, in agreement with its lower positive charge. SPR was used to measure the amount of bound polyamines, and when combined with QCM-D, the data indicate that the layer condensation leads to a small release of water from the highly hydrated DNA films. The binding of Rad51 increases the effective layer thickness of a 59bp film, more than expected from the know 50% DNA helix extension. The combined results provide guidelines for a QCM-D biosensor based on ligand-induced structural changes in DNA films. The QCM-D approach provides high discrimination between ligands affecting the thickness and the structural properties of the DNA layer differently. The reversibility of the film

  4. Sensing conformational changes in DNA upon ligand binding using QCM-D. Polyamine condensation and Rad51 extension of DNA layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu; Frykholm, Karolin; Fornander, Louise H; Svedhem, Sofia; Westerlund, Fredrik; Akerman, Björn

    2014-10-16

    Biosensors, in which binding of ligands is detected through changes in the optical or electrochemical properties of a DNA layer confined to the sensor surface, are important tools for investigating DNA interactions. Here, we investigate if conformational changes induced in surface-attached DNA molecules upon ligand binding can be monitored by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique. DNA duplexes containing 59-184 base pairs were formed on QCM-D crystals by stepwise assembly of synthetic oligonucleotides of designed base sequences. The DNA films were exposed to the cationic polyamines spermidine and spermine, known to condense DNA molecules in bulk experiments, or to the recombination protein Rad51, known to extend the DNA helix. The binding and dissociation of the ligands to the DNA films were monitored in real time by measurements of the shifts in resonance frequency (Δf) and in dissipation (ΔD). The QCM-D data were analyzed using a Voigt-based model for the viscoelastic properties of polymer films in order to evaluate how the ligands affect thickness and shear viscosity of the DNA layer. Binding of spermine shrinks all DNA layers and increases their viscosity in a reversible fashion, and so does spermidine, but to a smaller extent, in agreement with its lower positive charge. SPR was used to measure the amount of bound polyamines, and when combined with QCM-D, the data indicate that the layer condensation leads to a small release of water from the highly hydrated DNA films. The binding of Rad51 increases the effective layer thickness of a 59 bp film, more than expected from the know 50% DNA helix extension. The combined results provide guidelines for a QCM-D biosensor based on ligand-induced structural changes in DNA films. The QCM-D approach provides high discrimination between ligands affecting the thickness and the structural properties of the DNA layer differently. The reversibility of the film deformation allows comparative

  5. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding domain of the Pseudomonas putida chemoreceptor McpS in complex with malate and succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavira, J. A.; Lacal, J.; Ramos, J. L.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Krell, T.; Pineda-Molina, E.

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization of the ligand-binding domain of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) are transmembrane proteins that sense changes in environmental signals, generating a chemotactic response and regulating other cellular processes. MCPs are composed of two main domains: a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a cytosolic signalling domain (CSD). Here, the crystallization of the LBD of the chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. McpS-LBD is responsible for sensing most of the TCA-cycle intermediates in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. McpS-LBD was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with two of its natural ligands (malate and succinate). Crystals were obtained by both the counter-diffusion and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion techniques after pre-incubation of McpS-LBD with the ligands. The crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group C2, with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at the ESRF synchrotron X-ray source to resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9 Å for the malate and succinate complexes, respectively

  6. Computational study of pH-dependent oligomerization and ligand binding in Alt a 1, a highly allergenic protein with a unique fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Arandia, María; Bretones, Jorge; Gómez-Casado, Cristina; Cubells, Nuria; Díaz-Perales, Araceli; Pacios, Luis F

    2016-05-01

    Alt a 1 is a highly allergenic protein from Alternaria fungi responsible for several respiratory diseases. Its crystal structure revealed a unique β-barrel fold that defines a new family exclusive to fungi and forms a symmetrical dimer in a butterfly-like shape as well as tetramers. Its biological function is as yet unknown but its localization in cell wall of Alternaria spores and its interactions in the onset of allergy reactions point to a function to transport ligands. However, at odds with binding features in β-barrel proteins, monomeric Alt a 1 seems unable to harbor ligands because the barrel is too narrow. Tetrameric Alt a 1 is able to bind the flavonoid quercetin, yet the stability of the aggregate and the own ligand binding are pH-dependent. At pH 6.5, which Alt a 1 would meet when secreted by spores in bronchial epithelium, tetramer-quercetin complex is stable. At pH 5.5, which Alt a 1 would meet in apoplast when infecting plants, the complex breaks down. By means of a combined computational study that includes docking calculations, empirical pKa estimates, Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic potentials, and Molecular Dynamics simulations, we identified a putative binding site at the dimeric interface between subunits in tetramer. We propose an explanation on the pH-dependence of both oligomerization states and protein-ligand affinity of Alt a 1 in terms of electrostatic variations associated to distinct protonation states at different pHs. The uniqueness of this singular protein can thus be tracked in the combination of all these features.

  7. Solubilization of rat brain phencyclidine receptors in an active binding form that is sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambar, I; Kloog, Y; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-07-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) receptors were successfully solubilized from rat forebrain membranes with 1% sodium cholate. Approximately 58% of the initial protein and 20-30% of the high-affinity PCP binding sites were solubilized. The high affinity toward PCP-like drugs, the stereo-selectivity of the sites, and the sensitivity to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor ligands were preserved. Binding of the potent PCP receptor ligand N-[3H][1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl] piperidine ([3H]TCP) to the soluble receptors was saturable (KD = 35 nM), and PCP-like drugs inhibited [3H]TCP binding in a rank order of potency close to that observed for the membrane-bound receptors; the most potent inhibitors were TCP (Ki = 31 nM) and the anticonvulsant MK-801 (Ki = 50 nM). The NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid inhibited binding of [3H]TCP to the soluble receptors; glutamate or NMDA diminished this inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, the results indicate that the soluble PCP receptor preparation contains the glutamate recognition sites and may represent a single receptor complex for PCP and NMDA, as suggested by electrophysiological data. The successful solubilization of the PCP receptors in an active binding form should now facilitate their purification.

  8. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  9. Formation of Mixed-Ligand Complexes of Pd2+ with Nucleoside 5'-Monophosphates and Some Metal-Ion-Binding Nucleoside Surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Golubev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Formation of mixed-ligand Pd2+ complexes between canonical nucleoside 5'-monophosphates and five metal-ion-binding nucleoside analogs has been studied by 1H-NMR spectroscopy to test the ability of these nucleoside surrogates to discriminate between unmodified nucleobases by Pd2+-mediated base pairing. The nucleoside analogs studied included 2,6-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl-, 2,6-bis(1-methylhydrazinyl- and 6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl-substituted 9-(β-d-ribofuranosylpurines 1–3, and 2,4-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl- and 2,4-bis(1-methylhydrazinyl-substituted 5-(β-d-ribofuranosyl-pyrimidines 4–5. Among these, the purine derivatives 1-3 bound Pd2+ much more tightly than the pyrimidine derivatives 4, 5 despite apparently similar structures of the potential coordination sites. Compounds 1 and 2 formed markedly stable mixed-ligand Pd2+ complexes with UMP and GMP, UMP binding favored by 1 and GMP by 2. With 3, formation of mixed-ligand complexes was retarded by binding of two molecules of 3 to Pd2+.

  10. Novel short-chain analogues of somatostatin as ligands for Cu(II) ions. Role of the metal ion binding on the spatial structure of the ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Marek; Czyżnikowska, Żaneta; Brasuń, Justyna

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we present the studies on coordination abilities of two short-chain analogues of somatostatin with free N-terminal and protected amino group towards copper (II) ions. The octreotide is the most popular analogue of the somatostatin (peptide hormone) used in medicine. Somatostatin analogues are used in diagnosis and treatment of the neuroendocrine tumors. Both analyzed analogues are characterized by the presence of two His instead of Cys residues in characteristic fragment of native peptide. We characterize coordination abilities of the ligands using potentiometric and spectroscopic methods. His-analogues of somatostatin are effective ligands for copper (II) ions. Both peptides are able to form the complexes with the cyclic structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Deciphering ligand specificity of a Clostridium thermocellum family 35 carbohydrate binding module (CtCBM35 for gluco- and galacto- substituted mannans and its calcium induced stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabinda Ghosh

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of CBM35 from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM35 in polysaccharide recognition. CtCBM35 was cloned into pET28a (+ vector with an engineered His6 tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 cells. A homogenous 15 kDa protein was purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography (IMAC. Ligand binding analysis of CtCBM35 was carried out by affinity electrophoresis using various soluble ligands. CtCBM35 showed a manno-configured ligand specific binding displaying significant association with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 14.3×10(4 M(-1, carob galactomannan (Ka = 12.4×10(4 M(-1 and negligible association (Ka = 12 µM(-1 with insoluble mannan. Binding of CtCBM35 with polysaccharides which was calcium dependent exhibited two fold higher association in presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ion with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 41×10(4 M(-1 and carob galactomannan (Ka = 30×10(4 M(-1. The polysaccharide binding was further investigated by fluorescence spectrophotometric studies. On binding with carob galactomannan and konjac glucomannan the conformation of CtCBM35 changed significantly with regular 21 nm peak shifts towards lower quantum yield. The degree of association (K a with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan, 14.3×10(4 M(-1 and 11.4×10(4 M(-1, respectively, corroborated the findings from affinity electrophoresis. The association of CtCBM35with konjac glucomannan led to higher free energy of binding (ΔG -25 kJ mole(-1 as compared to carob galactomannan (ΔG -22 kJ mole(-1. On binding CtCBM35 with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan the hydrodynamic radius (RH as analysed by dynamic light scattering (DLS study, increased to 8 nm and 6 nm, respectively, from 4.25 nm in absence of ligand. The presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ions imparted stiffer orientation of CtCBM35 particles with increased RH of 4.52 nm. Due to such stiffer orientation CtCBM35 became more thermostable and its melting temperature was

  12. A biochemical mechanism for resistance of intervertebral discs to metastatic cancer: Fas ligand produced by disc cells induces apoptotic cell death of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Beom; Lee, Jin-Kyung; Cho, Sung-Tae; Park, Eun-Young; Riew, K Daniel

    2007-09-01

    Metastatic spinal cancer is characterized by the maintenance of normal disc structure until the vertebral body is severely destroyed by cancer cells. Anatomic features of the discs have been thought to be the main factor which confer the discs their resistance to metastatic cancer. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism to prevent or attenuate the local infiltration of cancer cells into the discs. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Fas ligand (FasL) produced by disc cells can kill Fas-bearing breast cancer cells by Fas and FasL interaction. Two human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) were obtained and cultured (1 x 10(6) cells/well), and the expression of Fas was investigated by western blot analysis. Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated and cultured, and the presence of FasL was quantified in the supernatants of three different numbers of annulus fibrosus cells (1x, 2x, and 4 x 10(6) cells/well) by ELISA assay. The MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were cultured with supernatants of annulus fibrosus cells for 48 h. As controls, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were also cultured by themselves for 48 h. Finally, we determined and quantified the apoptosis rates of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells by Annexin V-FITC and PI and TUNEL at 48 h, respectively. The expression of Fas was identified in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. The mean concentrations of FasL in supernatants of annulus fibrosus cells (1x, 2x, and 4 x 10(6) cells/well) were 10.8, 29.6, and 56.4 pg/mL, respectively. After treatment with the supernatant of three different numbers of annulus fibrosus cells, the mean apoptosis rate of MCF-7 cancer cells was increased (2.8%, P cancer cells was also increased (5.7%, P cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that Fas-bearing cancer cells undergo apoptosis by FasL produced by disc cells, which may be considered as a potential biochemical explanation for the disc's resistance to metastatic cancer.

  13. The ligand specificities of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I receptor reside in different regions of a common binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, T.; Andersen, A.S.; Wiberg, F.C.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Schaeffer, L.; Balschmidt, P.; Moller, K.B.; Moller, N.P.H. (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1991-05-15

    To identify the region(s) of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor responsible for ligand specificity (high-affinity binding), expression vectors encoding soluble chimeric insulin/IGF-I receptors were prepared. The chimeric receptors were expressed in mammalian cells and partially purified. Binding studies revealed that a construct comprising an IGF-I receptor in which the 68 N-terminal amino acids of the insulin receptor {alpha}-subunit had replaced the equivalent IGF-I receptor segment displayed a markedly increased affinity for insulin. In contrast, the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence is not critical for high-affinity IGF-I binding. It is shown that part of the cysteine-rich domain determines IGF-I specificity. The authors have previously shown that exchanging exons 1, 2, and 3 of the insulin receptor with the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence results in loss of high affinity for insulin and gain of high affinity for IGF-I. Consequently, it is suggested that the ligand specificities of the two receptors (i.e., the sequences that discriminate between insulin and IGF-I) reside in different regions of a binding site with common features present in both receptors.

  14. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations for protein-ligand complexes: free energies of binding of water molecules in influenza neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Shaw, Katherine E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2015-01-22

    The applicability of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for the calculation of absolute binding free energies of conserved water molecules in protein/ligand complexes is demonstrated. Here, we apply QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations to investigate binding of water molecules to influenza neuraminidase. We investigate five different complexes, including those with the drugs oseltamivir and peramivir. We investigate water molecules in two different environments, one more hydrophobic and one hydrophilic. We calculate the free-energy change for perturbation of a QM to MM representation of the bound water molecule. The calculations are performed at the BLYP/aVDZ (QM) and TIP4P (MM) levels of theory, which we have previously demonstrated to be consistent with one another for QM/MM modeling. The results show that the QM to MM perturbation is significant in both environments (greater than 1 kcal mol(-1)) and larger in the more hydrophilic site. Comparison with the same perturbation in bulk water shows that this makes a contribution to binding. The results quantify how electronic polarization differences in different environments affect binding affinity and also demonstrate that extensive, converged QM/MM free-energy simulations, with good levels of QM theory, are now practical for protein/ligand complexes.

  15. Environment of copper in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin probed by binding of exogenous ligands to Met121X (X = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, or Asp) mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonander, N; Karlsson, B G; Vänngård, T

    1996-02-20

    The binding of small exogenous ligands to mutants of the blue copper protein azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, altered in the axial position, Met121X (X = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, or Asp), has been studied with optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The results show that small molecules can enter the pocket left by the side chain of Met121. For azide, the dissociation constants are Leu > Val > Ala, reflecting the increasing space available. The Gly and Asp mutants bind azide less strongly than the Ala mutant, due to competition with water (Gly) and the polar side chain (Asp). Similar trends are found for thiocyanate. Cyanide binds equally well to the Ala and Val mutants. A number of other small potential ligands were tried. Alcohols do not affect room-temperature optical spectra, but at low temperatures, the EPR spectrum is stellacyanin-like, indicative of a weak axial interaction. Ligands binding with a carboxyl group or nitrogen (e.g. acetate or azide) convert the metal center to a form intermediate between regular types 1 and 2, presumably by pulling the copper ion out of the trigonal plane formed by Cys(S) and two His(N). Cyanide interacts strongly as shown by the hyperfine coupling to the 13C nucleus. With increasing strength of the axial interaction, the two major bands in the visible region (600 and 400-500 nm) shift in parallel to higher energy, and at the same time, the strength of the latter transition increases at the expense of the former. This demonstrates that these transitions have a common origin, namely S-to-Cu charge transfer transition.

  16. Synthesis of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of acyclic Schiff's base ligands: Spectral, structural, electrochemical, antibacterial, DNA binding and cleavage activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Kang, Sung Kwon; Kim, Young-Inn; Ganesan, Vengatesan

    2014-03-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes (1&2) of ligands L1 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl)piperazine] or L2 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl) piperazine] have been synthesized and characterised. The single crystal X-ray study had shown that ligands L1 and L2 crystallize in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. The mononuclear copper(II) complexes show one quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near cathodic region (-0.77 to -0.85 V) in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. Binding interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) investigated by absorption studies and fluorescence spectral studies show good binding affinity to CT DNA, which imply both the copper(II) complexes can strongly interact with DNA efficiently. The copper(II) complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as reducing agent through a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The Schiff bases and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities which indicates that the complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands.

  17. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand C-11-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Sijbesma, Jurgen W.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; de Jong, Johan R.; de Vries, Erik F.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; van Waarde, Aren

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined

  18. Synthesis, structure information, DNA/BSA binding affinity and in vitro cytotoxic studies of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes containing a phenylalanine derivative and diimine co-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaraj, B; Balakrishnan, C; Neelakantan, M A

    2016-07-01

    Binary [Cu(PAIC)(H2O)2]·H2O (1) and mixed ligand [Cu(PAIC)(L)]·2H2O complexes, where PAIC=phenylalanine imidazole carboxylic acid, L=diimine coligands [2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (2) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3)] have been synthesized and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. The X-ray structure of [Cu(PAIC)(phen)]·2H2O (3) shows a N4O coordination with square pyramidal geometry around the copper (II) atom. The spin Hamiltonian parameters calculated for the complexes account for the distorted square planar structure and rules out the possibility of a trigonal bipyramidal structure. Interaction of the complexes (1-3) with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was studied by using different techniques (absorption titration, fluorescence quenching and thermal melting) and the studies suggest that these complexes bind to CT DNA through intercalation. The DNA-binding affinity of the complexes has further been explained by DFT computational results. Binding activity of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the complexes can strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. DNA cleavage experiments using plasmid DNA pUC 19 show that the complexes exhibit efficient chemical nuclease activity even in the absence of any external additives. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against human normal cell line (HBL 100) and human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) shows that metal complexation of the ligands results in a significant enhancement in the cell death of MCF-7. Finally, docking studies on DNA and protein binding interactions were performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantified Binding Scale of Competing Ligands at the Surface of Gold Nanoparticles: The Role of Entropy and Intermolecular Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Claire; Ribot, François; Peiretti, Leonardo F; Quaino, Paola; Tielens, Frederik; Sanchez, Clément; Chanéac, Corinne; Portehault, David

    2017-05-01

    A basic understanding of the driving forces for the formation of multiligand coronas or self-assembled monolayers over metal nanoparticles is mandatory to control and predict the properties of ligand-protected nanoparticles. Herein, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and advanced density functional theory (DFT) modeling are combined to highlight the key parameters defining the efficiency of ligand exchange on dispersed gold nanoparticles. The compositions of the surface and of the liquid reaction medium are quantitatively correlated for bifunctional gold nanoparticles protected by a range of competing thiols, including an alkylthiol, arylthiols of varying chain length, thiols functionalized by ethyleneglycol units, and amide groups. These partitions are used to build scales that quantify the ability of a ligand to exchange dodecanethiol. Such scales can be used to target a specific surface composition by choosing the right exchange conditions (ligand ratio, concentrations, and particle size). In the specific case of arylthiols, the exchange ability scale is exploited with the help of DFT modeling to unveil the roles of intermolecular forces and entropic effects in driving ligand exchange. It is finally suggested that similar considerations may apply to other ligands and to direct biligand synthesis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. D3R Grand Challenge 2: blind prediction of protein-ligand poses, affinity rankings, and relative binding free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieb, Zied; Liu, Shuai; Gathiaka, Symon; Chiu, Michael; Yang, Huanwang; Shao, Chenghua; Feher, Victoria A.; Walters, W. Patrick; Kuhn, Bernd; Rudolph, Markus G.; Burley, Stephen K.; Gilson, Michael K.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) ran Grand Challenge 2 (GC2) from September 2016 through February 2017. This challenge was based on a dataset of structures and affinities for the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), contributed by F. Hoffmann-La Roche. The dataset contained 102 IC50 values, spanning six orders of magnitude, and 36 high-resolution co-crystal structures with representatives of four major ligand classes. Strong global participation was evident, with 49 participants submitting 262 prediction submission packages in total. Procedurally, GC2 mimicked Grand Challenge 2015 (GC2015), with a Stage 1 subchallenge testing ligand pose prediction methods and ranking and scoring methods, and a Stage 2 subchallenge testing only ligand ranking and scoring methods after the release of all blinded co-crystal structures. Two smaller curated sets of 18 and 15 ligands were developed to test alchemical free energy methods. This overview summarizes all aspects of GC2, including the dataset details, challenge procedures, and participant results. We also consider implications for progress in the field, while highlighting methodological areas that merit continued development. Similar to GC2015, the outcome of GC2 underscores the pressing need for methods development in pose prediction, particularly for ligand scaffolds not currently represented in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.pdb.org), and in affinity ranking and scoring of bound ligands.

  1. DNA cleavage at the AP site via β-elimination mediated by the AP site-binding ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yukiko S; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2016-02-15

    DNA is continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous factors such as oxidation and alkylation. In the base excision repair pathway, the damaged nucleobases are removed by DNA N-glycosylase to form the abasic sites (AP sites). The alkylating antitumor agent exhibits cytotoxicity through the formation of the AP site. Therefore blockage or modulation of the AP site repair pathway may enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. In this study, we have examined the effects of the nucleobase-polyamine conjugated ligands (G-, A-, C- and T-ligands) on the cleavage of the AP site. The G- and A-ligands cleaved DNA at the AP site by promoting β-elimination in a non-selective manner by the G-ligand, and in a selective manner for the opposing dT by the A-ligand. These results suggest that the nucleobase-polyamine conjugate ligands may have the potential for enhancement of the cytotoxicities of the AP site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Extensive rigid analogue design maps the binding conformation of potent N-benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A serotonin receptor agonist ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncosa, Jose I; Hansen, Martin; Bonner, Lisa A; Cueva, Juan Pablo; Maglathlin, Rebecca; McCorvy, John D; Marona-Lewicka, Danuta; Lill, Markus A; Nichols, David E

    2013-01-16

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT(2A) agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT(2A) over the 5-HT(2C) receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist ligand currently known.

  3. Unusual mode of protein binding by a cytotoxic π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound containing an O,S-chelating ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Jana; Görls, Helmar; Häfner, Norman; Ferraro, Giarita; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Weigand, Wolfgang; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-08-02

    A new pseudo-octahedral π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound, containing an O,S-bidentate ligand (compound 1) and showing significant cytotoxic activity in vitro, was synthesized and characterized. In solution stability and interaction with the model protein bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Its crystal structure and that of the adduct formed upon reaction with RNase A were obtained by X-ray crystallography. The comparison between the structure of purified compound 1 and that of the fragment bound to RNase A reveals an unusual mode of protein binding that includes ligand exchange and alteration of coordination sphere geometry.

  4. Development of Plate Reader and On-Line Microfluidic Screening to Identify Ligands of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine Binding Protein in Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka A. Otvos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which is expressed in the nervous system. Its antagonists are used clinically for treatment of postoperative- and radiotherapy-induced emesis and irritable bowel syndrome. In order to better understand the structure and function of the 5-HT3 receptor, and to allow for compound screening at this receptor, recently a serotonin binding protein (5HTBP was engineered with the Acetylcholine Binding Protein as template. In this study, a fluorescence enhancement assay for 5HTBP ligands was developed in plate-reader format and subsequently used in an on-line microfluidic format. Both assay types were validated using an existing radioligand binding assay. The on-line microfluidic assay was coupled to HPLC via a post-column split which allowed parallel coupling to a mass spectrometer to collect MS data. This high-resolution screening (HRS system is well suitable for compound mixture analysis. As a proof of principle, the venoms of Dendroapsis polylepis, Pseudonaja affinis and Pseudonaja inframacula snakes were screened and the accurate masses of the found bioactives were established. To demonstrate the subsequent workflow towards structural identification of bioactive proteins and peptides, the partial amino acid sequence of one of the bioactives from the Pseudonaja affinis venom was determined using a bottom-up proteomics approach.

  5. Development of a nano-SiO2based enzyme-linked ligand binding assay for the determination of ibuprofen in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Long; Xie, Jing; Li, Xing-De; Ding, Li-Sheng; Liang, Jian; Luo, Pei; Qing, Lin-Sen

    2017-05-15

    The application domains of classic enzyme-linked ligand binding assay (ELBA) is relatively narrow due to the high cost and hardly available binding receptor. In here, we described for the first time the possibility of developing a new ELBA based on silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO 2 ) to assess the ibuprofen in human urine. Nano-SiO 2 with a large surface area was introduced as stationary phase to improve the analytical performance. In the experiment, a competitively binding procedure with human serum albumin (HSA) was performed between the ibuprofen presented in sample and horseradish peroxidase labeled ibuprofen (HRP-ibuprofen) subsequently added. After centrifugal separation, the HRP/ibuprofen/nano-SiO 2 composite catalyzed the substrate solution (TMB/H 2 O 2 ) with a color change from colorless to yellow for quantitative measurement via an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. As a validation of the new principle, the developed nano-ELBA method was app