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Sample records for biochemical individuality reflected

  1. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach. PMID:26920245

  2. Technologically Reflective Individuals as Enablers of Social Innovation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Christiane; Gassmann, Oliver; van den Hende, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies technologically reflective individuals and demonstrates their ability to develop innovations that benefit society. Technological reflectiveness (TR) is the tendency to think about the societal impact of an innovation, and those who display this capability in public are individuals who participate in online idea competitions focused on technical solutions for social problems (such as General Electric's eco‐challenge, the James Dyson Award, and the BOSCH Technology Horizon Award). However, technologically reflective individuals also reflect in private settings (e.g., when reading news updates), thus requiring a scale to identify them. This paper describes the systematic development of an easy‐to‐administer multi‐item scale to measure an individual's level of TR. Applying the TR scale in an empirical study on a health monitoring system confirmed that individuals' degree of TR relates positively to their ability to generate (1) more new product features and uses, (2) features with higher levels of societal impact, and (3) features that are more elaborated. This scale allows firms seeking to implement co‐creation in their new product development (NPD) process and sustainable solutions to identify such individuals. Thus, this paper indicates that companies wishing to introduce new technological products with a positive societal impact may profit from involving technologically reflective individuals in the NPD process. PMID:27134342

  3. Specific and Individuated Death Reflection Fosters Identity Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Philip J.; Sedikides, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Identity integration is the process wherein a person assimilates multiple or conflicting identities (e.g., beliefs, values, needs) into a coherent, unified self-concept. Three experiments examined whether contemplating mortality in a specific and individuated manner (i.e., via the death reflection manipulation) facilitated outcomes indicative of identity integration. Participants in the death reflection condition (vs. control conditions) considered positive and negative life experiences as equally important in shaping their current identity (Experiment 1), regarded self-serving values and other-serving values as equally important life principles (Experiment 2), and were equally motivated to pursue growth-oriented and security-oriented needs (Experiment 3). Death reflection motivates individuals to integrate conflicting aspects of their identity into a coherent self-concept. Given that identity integration is associated with higher well-being, the findings have implications for understanding the psychological benefits of existential contemplation. PMID:27152863

  4. Transcriptomic, biochemical and individual markers in transplanted Daphnia magna to characterize impacts in the field

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Bruno; Malik, Amrita; Tauler, Romà; Barata, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Daphnia magna individuals were transplanted across 12 sites from three Spanish river basins (Llobregat, Ebro, Jucar) showing different sources of pollution. Gene transcription, feeding and biochemical responses in the field were assessed and compared with those obtained in re-constituted water treatments spiked with organic eluates obtained from water samples collected at the same locations and sampling periods. Up to 166 trace contaminants were detected in water and classified by their mode ...

  5. Self-Reflection, Insight, and Individual Differences in Various Language Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the relationships of self-reflection and insight with individuals' performances on various language tasks. The Self-Reflection and Insight Scale (SRIS; Grant, Franklin, & Langford, 2002) assessed individual differences in three factors: engagement in reflection, need for reflection, and insight. A high need for reflection was…

  6. 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency: Clinical, biochemical, enzymatic and molecular studies in 88 individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünert Sarah C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine metabolism caused by mutations in MCCC1 or MCCC2 encoding the α and β subunit of MCC, respectively. The phenotype is highly variable ranging from acute neonatal onset with fatal outcome to asymptomatic adults. Methods We report clinical, biochemical, enzymatic and mutation data of 88 MCC deficient individuals, 53 identified by newborn screening, 26 diagnosed due to clinical symptoms or positive family history and 9 mothers, identified following the positive newborn screening result of their baby. Results Fifty-seven percent of patients were asymptomatic while 43% showed clinical symptoms, many of which were probably not related to MCC deficiency but due to ascertainment bias. However, 12 patients (5 of 53 identified by newborn screening presented with acute metabolic decompensations. We identified 15 novel MCCC1 and 16 novel MCCC2 mutant alleles. Additionally, we report expression studies on 3 MCCC1 and 8 MCCC2 mutations and show an overview of all 132 MCCC1 and MCCC2 variants known to date. Conclusions Our data confirm that MCC deficiency, despite low penetrance, may lead to a severe clinical phenotype resembling classical organic acidurias. However, neither the genotype nor the biochemical phenotype is helpful in predicting the clinical course.

  7. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  8. HERITABLE VARIATION FOR AGGRESSION AS A REFLECTION OF INDIVIDUAL COPING STRATEGIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BENUS, RF; BOHUS, B; KOOLHAAS, JM; VANOORTMERSSEN, GA

    1991-01-01

    Evidence is presented in rodents, that individual differences in aggression reflect heritable, fundamentally different, but equally valuable alternative strategies to cope with environmental demands. Generally, aggressive individuals show an active response to aversive situations. In a social settin

  9. The Effects of Ethanol on the Morphological and Biochemical Properties of Individual Human Red Blood Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Yun Lee

    Full Text Available Here, we report the results of a study on the effects of ethanol exposure on human red blood cells (RBCs using quantitative phase imaging techniques at the level of individual cells. Three-dimensional refractive index tomograms and dynamic membrane fluctuations of RBCs were measured using common-path diffraction optical tomography, from which morphological (volume, surface area, and sphericity; biochemical (hemoglobin (Hb concentration and Hb content; and biomechanical (membrane fluctuation parameters were retrieved at various concentrations of ethanol. RBCs exposed to the ethanol concentration of 0.1 and 0.3% v/v exhibited cell sphericities higher than those of normal cells. However, mean surface area and sphericity of RBCs in a lethal alcoholic condition (0.5% v/v are not statistically different with those of healthy RBCs. Meanwhile, significant decreases of Hb content and concentration in RBC cytoplasm at the lethal condition were observed. Furthermore, dynamic fluctuation of RBC membranes increased significantly upon ethanol treatments, indicating ethanol-induced membrane fluidization.

  10. Learning-related human brain activations reflecting individual finances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Philippe N; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T; Schultz, Wolfram

    2007-04-01

    A basic tenet of microeconomics suggests that the subjective value of financial gains decreases with increasing assets of individuals ("marginal utility"). Using concepts from learning theory and microeconomics, we assessed the capacity of financial rewards to elicit behavioral and neuronal changes during reward-predictive learning in participants with different financial backgrounds. Behavioral learning speed during both acquisition and extinction correlated negatively with the assets of the participants, irrespective of education and age. Correspondingly, response changes in midbrain and striatum measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging were slower during both acquisition and extinction with increasing assets and income of the participants. By contrast, asymptotic magnitudes of behavioral and neuronal responses after learning were unrelated to personal finances. The inverse relationship of behavioral and neuronal learning speed with personal finances is compatible with the general concept of decreasing marginal utility with increasing wealth. PMID:17408585

  11. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2015-02-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise bout of matched intensity and duration. Rats and humans ran on a treadmill at 86% of maximal velocity until exhaustion. Pre and post exercise we measured 30 blood chemistry parameters, which evaluate iron status, lipid profile, glucose regulation, protein metabolism, liver, and renal function. ANOVA indicated that almost all biochemical parameters followed a similar alteration pattern post exercise in rats and humans. In fact, there were only 2/30 significant species × exercise interactions (in testosterone and globulins), indicating different responses to exercise between rats and humans. On the contrary, the main effect of exercise was significant in 15/30 parameters and marginally nonsignificant in other two parameters (copper, P = 0.060 and apolipoprotein B, P = 0.058). Our major finding is that the rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in those basic blood biochemical parameters reported here. The physiological resemblance of rat and human blood responses after exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill indicates that the use of blood chemistry in rats for exercise physiology research is justified. PMID:25677548

  12. Patterns of theta oscillation reflect the neural basis of individual differences in epistemic motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussel, Patrick; Ulrich, Natalie; Allen, John J B; Osinsky, Roman; Hewig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Theta oscillations in the EEG have been shown to reflect ongoing cognitive processes related to mental effort. Here, we show that the pattern of theta oscillation in response to varying cognitive demands reflects stable individual differences in the personality trait epistemic motivation: Individuals with high levels of epistemic motivation recruit relatively more cognitive resources in response to situations possessing high, compared to low, cognitive demand; individuals with low levels do not show such a specific response. Our results provide direct evidence for the theory of the construct need for cognition and add to our understanding of the neural processes underlying theta oscillations. More generally, we provide an explanation how individual differences in personality traits might be represented on a neural level. PMID:27380648

  13. Evidence of Reflective Thinking across the Curriculum: College Experience versus Individual Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Carol Springer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how individual and course-level variables across the curriculum at a four-year college (college here refers to a higher education institution that offers undergraduate education but not graduate degrees) in the southeastern US impacted student reflective thinking as measured by Kember and colleagues' [2000. Development of a…

  14. Reflections on Individual Psychotherapy with University Students: What Seems to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Rolffs; Talley, Joseph E.; Cooper, Stacie L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors offer reflections on what seems to work in individual psychotherapy with university students. Discussion centers around the topics of triage and disposition, referral, crisis intervention, stress management, open-ended psychotherapy, extratherapeutic factors, and the psychotherapy relationship. These observations are not intended to be…

  15. Understanding the Friendship Processes of Individuals with Asperger's Syndrome: A Phenomenological Study of Reflective College Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kammie Bohlken

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study shed light on the reflective college experiences of 11 individuals with Asperger's Syndrome and High Functioning Autism from a competence rather than a deficit model of disability (Biklen, 2005). Using Goleman's model of Social Intelligence (2006) as a theoretical framework, the cognitive, behavioral, and affective…

  16. Characterisation of the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of individual material fractions in Danish source-separated organic household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naroznova, Irina; Møller, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    composition in Denmark (untreated) was calculated, and the BMP contribution of the individual material fractions was then evaluated. Material fractions of the two general waste types, defined as "food waste" and "fibre-rich waste," were found to be anaerobically degradable with considerable BMP. Material......This study is dedicated to characterising the chemical composition and biochemical methane potential (BMP) of individual material fractions in untreated Danish source-separated organic household waste (SSOHW). First, data on SSOHW in different countries, available in the literature, were evaluated......) and material degradability (BMP from laboratory incubation tests divided by TBMP) were expressed. Moreover, the degradability of lignocellulose biofibres (the share of volatile lignocellulose biofibre solids degraded in laboratory incubation tests) was calculated. Finally, BMP for average SSOHW...

  17. Raman Spectroscopic Analysis of Biochemical Changes in Individual Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins in the Pre- and Postprandial State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Motton, D; Rutledge, J; Keim, N; Huser, T

    2004-09-13

    Individual triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TGRL) particles derived from human volunteers are non-destructively analyzed by laser tweezers Raman microspectroscopy and information on their composition and distribution is obtained. The Raman signature of single optically trapped very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), a subclass of TGRL, which play an important role in cardiovascular disease, exhibits distinct peaks associated with molecular vibrations of fatty acids, proteins, lipids, and structural rearrangements of lipids. Our analysis of pre- and postprandial VLDL exhibits the signature of biochemical changes in individual lipoprotein particles following the consumption of meals. Interaction of VLDL with endothelium leads to the breakdown of complex triacylglycerols and the formation of a highly ordered core of free saturated fatty acids in the particle. A particle distribution analysis reveals trends in the degree to which this process has occurred in particles at different times during the postprandial period. Differences in particle distributions based on the different ratios of polyunsaturated to saturated fats in the consumed meals are also easily discerned. Individual lipoprotein particles hydrolyzed in-vitro through addition of lipoprotein lipase (LpL) exhibit strikingly similar changes in their Raman spectra. These results demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring the dynamics of lipid metabolism of individual TGRL particles as they interact with LpL in the endothelial cell wall using Raman spectroscopy.

  18. A study of changes in apparent ionospheric reflection height within individual lightning flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somu, Vijaya B.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Haddad, Michael A.; Cummer, Steven A.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric reflection heights estimated using the zero-to-zero and peak-to-peak methods to measure skywave delay relative to the ground wave were compared for 108 first and 124 subsequent strokes at distances greater than 100 km. For either metric there was a considerable decrease in average reflection height for subsequent strokes relative to first strokes. We showed that the observed difference cannot be explained by the difference in frequency content of first and subsequent return-stroke currents. Apparent changes in reflection height (estimated using the peak-to-peak method) within individual flashes for 54 daytime and 11 nighttime events at distances ranging from 50 km to 330 km were compared, and significant differences were found. For daytime conditions, the majority of the flashes showed either decrease (57%) or non-monotonic variation (39%) in reflection height with respect to the immediately preceding stroke. With respect to the first stroke, 91% of the flashes showed monotonic decrease in height. For nighttime flashes, patterns in reflection height changes with respect to the immediately preceding stroke were as follows: 46% no change, 27% monotonic decrease, and 27% non-monotonic variation. When changes were measured with respect to the first stroke, 54% of nighttime flashes showed monotonic decrease and 46% no change. Ionospheric reflection height tends to increase with return-stroke peak current. The observed daytime effects can be explained by (a) the dependence of EMP penetration depth on source intensity, which decreases with stroke order, (b) additional ionization associated with elves, or (c) combination of (a) and (b) above.

  19. Utilization of a biochemical kit for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP in the saliva of periodontal disease individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaila Baroni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontal disease (PD is a chronic inflammatory process that occurs in response to infection from bacteria in dental plaque. PD affects and destroys the periodontal tissues causing teeth loss. It is also associated to systemic diseases. C-reactive protein (CRP is a protein produced by the liver and released into the blood during the acute phase of inflammation. Therefore, CRP is very used as a marker for inflammation process. Studies on the presence of CRP in the saliva of the subjects with PD do not exist. Objective: The aim of this study was to test a biochemical kit for CRP detection in blood plasma to monitor CRP in saliva of PD subjects. Material and methods: Saliva was collected from 40 individuals, both sexes, from 20-45 years-old, divided into two groups: Test Group – PD subjects (TG; n = 20 and Control Group (CG n = 20, without PD. The following salivary parameters were analysed: buffer capacity (BC, salivary flow (SF, pH, urea, total proteins, and CRP. Results: pH, SF and BC values were considered normal in both groups. The urea concentration was higher in TG (27.4 mg/dl ± 10.03 than CG (22.9 mg/dl ± 8.3. However, the concentration of total proteins was higher in CG (201.2 ± 100 mg/dl than TG (155.0 ± 95 mg/dl. CRP was detected in 11 PD subjects and in eight subjects without PD. Conclusion: There were no significant differences between the two groups in relation to SF, pH and BC. However, in PD subjects’ saliva, urea values increased and total proteins decreased. The biochemical kit detected CRP in subjects’ saliva of both groups.

  20. Does feather corticosterone reflect individual quality or external stress in arctic-nesting migratory birds?

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    Pierre Legagneux

    Full Text Available The effects of environmental perturbations or stressors on individual states can be carried over to subsequent life stages and ultimately affect survival and reproduction. The concentration of corticosterone (CORT in feathers is an integrated measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity during the molting period, providing information on the total baseline and stress-induced CORT secreted during the period of feather growth. Common eiders and greater snow geese replace all flight feathers once a year during the pre-basic molt, which occurs following breeding. Thus, CORT contained in feathers of pre-breeding individuals sampled in spring reflects the total CORT secreted during the previous molting event, which may provide insight into the magnitude or extent of stress experienced during this time period. We used data from multiple recaptures to disentangle the contribution of individual quality vs. external factors (i.e., breeding investment or environmental conditions on feather CORT in arctic-nesting waterfowl. Our results revealed no repeatability of feather CORT within individuals of either species. In common eiders, feather CORT was not affected by prior reproductive investment, nor by pre-breeding (spring body condition prior to the molting period. Individual feather CORT greatly varied according to the year, and August-September temperatures explained most of the annual variation in feather CORT. Understanding mechanisms that affect energetic costs and stress responses during molting will require further studies either using long-term data or experiments. Although our study period encompassed only five years, it nonetheless provides evidence that CORT measured in feathers likely reflects responses to environmental conditions experienced by birds during molt, and could be used as a metric to study carry-over effects.

  1. Characterisation of the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of individual material fractions in Danish source-separated organic household waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroznova, Irina; Møller, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    This study is dedicated to characterising the chemical composition and biochemical methane potential (BMP) of individual material fractions in untreated Danish source-separated organic household waste (SSOHW). First, data on SSOHW in different countries, available in the literature, were evaluated and then, secondly, laboratory analyses for eight organic material fractions comprising Danish SSOHW were conducted. No data were found in the literature that fully covered the objectives of the present study. Based on laboratory analyses, all fractions were assigned according to their specific properties in relation to BMP, protein content, lipids, lignocellulose biofibres and easily degradable carbohydrates (carbohydrates other than lignocellulose biofibres). The three components in lignocellulose biofibres, i.e. lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose, were differentiated, and theoretical BMP (TBMP) and material degradability (BMP from laboratory incubation tests divided by TBMP) were expressed. Moreover, the degradability of lignocellulose biofibres (the share of volatile lignocellulose biofibre solids degraded in laboratory incubation tests) was calculated. Finally, BMP for average SSOHW composition in Denmark (untreated) was calculated, and the BMP contribution of the individual material fractions was then evaluated. Material fractions of the two general waste types, defined as "food waste" and "fibre-rich waste," were found to be anaerobically degradable with considerable BMP. Material degradability of material fractions such as vegetation waste, moulded fibres, animal straw, dirty paper and dirty cardboard, however, was constrained by lignin content. BMP for overall SSOHW (untreated) was 404mL CH4 per g VS, which might increase if the relative content of material fractions, such as animal and vegetable food waste, kitchen tissue and dirty paper in the waste, becomes larger. PMID:26878771

  2. Resting-state low-frequency fluctuations reflect individual differences in spoken language learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhizhou; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Wang, Suiping; Wong, Patrick C M

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge in language learning studies is to identify objective, pre-training predictors of success. Variation in the low-frequency fluctuations (LFFs) of spontaneous brain activity measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) has been found to reflect individual differences in cognitive measures. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the extent to which initial spontaneous brain activity is related to individual differences in spoken language learning. We acquired RS-fMRI data and subsequently trained participants on a sound-to-word learning paradigm in which they learned to use foreign pitch patterns (from Mandarin Chinese) to signal word meaning. We performed amplitude of spontaneous low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) analysis, graph theory-based analysis, and independent component analysis (ICA) to identify functional components of the LFFs in the resting-state. First, we examined the ALFF as a regional measure and showed that regional ALFFs in the left superior temporal gyrus were positively correlated with learning performance, whereas ALFFs in the default mode network (DMN) regions were negatively correlated with learning performance. Furthermore, the graph theory-based analysis indicated that the degree and local efficiency of the left superior temporal gyrus were positively correlated with learning performance. Finally, the default mode network and several task-positive resting-state networks (RSNs) were identified via the ICA. The "competition" (i.e., negative correlation) between the DMN and the dorsal attention network was negatively correlated with learning performance. Our results demonstrate that a) spontaneous brain activity can predict future language learning outcome without prior hypotheses (e.g., selection of regions of interest--ROIs) and b) both regional dynamics and network-level interactions in the resting brain can account for individual differences in future spoken language learning success. PMID

  3. Biochemical assessment of oxidative stress by the use of açai (Euterpe oleracea Martius) gel in physically active individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Soares VIANA; Carvalho, Lucia Maria Jaeger de; Mirian Ribeiro Leite MOURA; Jacqueline Carvalho PEIXOTO; Carvalho, José Luiz Viana de

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The relation between oxidative stress and inflammation induced by diseases and exercise has increased the interest in the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the improvement of health and physical and mental performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of açai gel in reducing oxidative stress in individuals engaged in physical activities as well as their acceptance. Sensory evaluation was performed to determine its acceptability and the biochemical paramete...

  4. Hematological and serum biochemical analytes reflect physiological challenges during gestation and lactation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeck, Todd R; Nollens, Hendrik H

    2013-01-01

    Gestation and lactation result in metabolic alterations of the dam because of varying demands of the fetus and offspring during the different stages of development. Despite killer whales (Orcinus orca) having one of the longest gestations and highest birth weights of all mammals in human care, these metabolic alterations, and their impact on the physiology of the dam have not been measured. The objectives of this analysis were to determine if physiologic demands on the killer whale during pregnancy and lactation have measurable effects on hematology and biochemical analytes and if detectable, to compare these changes to those which are observed in other mammalian species. Forty hematologic and biochemical analytes from seven female killer whales (22 pregnancies, 1,507 samples) were compared between the following stages: (1) non-pregnant or lactating (control); (2) gestation; and (3) the first 12 months of lactation. Decreased hematocrit, hemoglobin, and red blood cell counts were indicative of plasma volume expansion during mid and late gestation. The killer whales exhibited a progressively increasing physiologic inflammatory state leading up to parturition. Gestation and lactation caused significant shifts in the serum lipid profiles. Gestation and lactation cause significant physiologic changes in the killer whale dam. The last 12 months of gestation had greater physiological impact than lactation, but changes associated with and immediately following parturition were the most dramatic. During this period, killer whales may experience increased susceptibility to illness, and anthropogenic and environmental disturbances. PMID:23813680

  5. Consistent individual differences in haemolymph density reflect risk propensity in a marine invertebrate

    OpenAIRE

    Fürtbauer, Ines

    2015-01-01

    While the literature on consistent individual differences in correlated suites of physiological and behavioural traits is steadily growing for vertebrates, invertebrates have received less attention. The few studies that do exist have measured temporary physiological states (or responses), rather than consistent individual physiological traits. Here, I explore the consistency of individual differences in physiology and behaviour of n=53 shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) by repeatedly measuring ha...

  6. Reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Mary B

    2008-01-01

    In the two decades after the founding of Neuron, we witnessed the unfolding of the “molecular biology revolution” and its culmination in the sequencing of individual genomes. Cloning of cDNAs and rapid nucleotide sequencing were invented in the early 1970s. By the mid-1980s, “cDNA-cloning” was all the rage. A new breed of “molecular neuroscientists” began cloning and sequencing transcripts encoding neuronal receptors, ion channels, and signaling enzymes. The wealth of molecular data they gene...

  7. Individual differences in risky decision-making among seniors reflect increased reward sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavanagh, J.F.; Neville, D.A.; Cohen, M.X.; Vijver, I. van de; Harsay, H.A.; Watson, A.J.P.; Buitenweg, J.I.V.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing age is associated with subtle but meaningful changes in decision-making. It is unknown, however, to what degree these psychological changes are reflective of age-related changes in decision quality. Here, we investigated the effect of age on latent cognitive processes associated with risk

  8. Influence of canopy biochemical and biophysical variables on reflectance spectra based on canopy radiative transfer model with adding noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pudong; Shi, Runhe; Wang, Hong; Liu, Chaoshun; Sun, Zhibin; Gao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    To provide a reference for canopy parameters inversion, sensitivity analysis of plant canopy parameters based on remote sensing model is a prerequisite for the inversion. Because the local sensitivity analysis do not consider the coupling effect among the parameters, the EFAST (i.e., Extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test), a global sensitivity analysis, can be used not only for the analysis of each parameter, but also consider the interacted effect among each parameter. Based on PROSAIL model, the paper focused on the parameters' sensitivity by using simulated data and EFAST method. The results showed that the EFAST considered not only the contribution of single parameter, but also the interactive effects among each parameter, and four parameters, leaf area index (LAI), leaf mesophyll structure (N), the controller factor of the average leaf slope (LIDFa) and soil moisture condition (psoil) had great effect on the canopy reflectance in the whole wavelength from 400 to 2500 nm than other canopy parameters, and the EFAST method enlarged the contribution of some parameters that had little effects.

  9. Biochemical assessment of oxidative stress by the use of açai (Euterpe oleracea Martius gel in physically active individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Soares VIANA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The relation between oxidative stress and inflammation induced by diseases and exercise has increased the interest in the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the improvement of health and physical and mental performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of açai gel in reducing oxidative stress in individuals engaged in physical activities as well as their acceptance. Sensory evaluation was performed to determine its acceptability and the biochemical parameters related to immune profile and biomarkers of muscle, liver and oxidative stress, with and without the use of gel were evaluated. The appearance, sweetness and overall impression of the açai gel were considered good. It was observed a significant increase in CK enzyme, without the gel as well as the oxidative stress biomarkers, it was observed that the MDA (with and without gel a significant increase (p < 0.05. Through biochemical evaluation, it is concluded that the gel provided protection for some of parameters studied, since it modulated the immunological parameter reducing the lymphocyte activity and muscular stress. However, more studies must be carried out with a larger number of individuals to confirm the gel functionality.

  10. Using the IGCRA (Individual, Group, Classroom Reflective Action) technique to enhance teaching and learning in large accountancy classes

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Poyatos; Olav Muurlink; Chew Ng

    2011-01-01

    First year accounting has generally been perceived as one of the more challenging first year business courses for university students. Various Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) have been proposed to attempt to enrich and enhance student learning, with these studies generally positioning students as learners alone. This paper uses an educational case study approach and examines the implementation of the IGCRA (individual, group, classroom reflective action) technique, a Classroom Assessme...

  11. Individual differences in risky decision-making among seniors reflect increased reward sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    James F eCavanagh; David eNeville; Cohen, Michael X; Irene eVan de Vijver; Helga A Harsay; Andrea eWatson; Jessika I V Buitenweg; K Richard eRidderinkhof

    2012-01-01

    Increasing age is associated with subtle but meaningful changes in decision-making. It is unknown, however, to what degree these psychological changes are reflective of age-related changes in decision quality. Here, we investigated the effect of age on latent cognitive processes associated with risky decision-making on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART). In the BART, participants repetitively inflate a balloon in order to increase potential reward. At any point, participants can decide...

  12. Individual differences in competent consumer choice: the role of cognitive reflection and numeracy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffeo, Michele; Polonio, Luca; Bonini, Nicolao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether cognitive reflection and numeracy skills affect the quality of the consumers' decision-making process in a purchase decision context. In a first (field) experiment, an identical product was on sale in two shops with different initial prices and discounts. One of the two deals was better than the other and the consumers were asked to choose the best one and to describe which arithmetic operations they used to solve the problem; then they were asked to complete the numeracy scale (Lipkus et al., 2001). The choice procedures used by the consumers were classified as "complete decision approach" when all the arithmetic operations needed to solve the problem were computed, and as "partial decision approach" when only some operations were computed. A mediation model shows that higher numeracy is associated with use of the complete decision approach. In turn, this approach is positively associated with the quality of the purchase decision. Given that these findings highlight the importance of the decision processes, in a second (laboratory) experiment we used a supplementary method to study the type of information search used by the participants: eye-tracking. In this experiment the participants were presented with decision problems similar to those used in Experiment 1 and they completed the Lipkus numeracy scale and the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005). Participants with a high CRT score chose the best deal more frequently, and showed a more profound and detailed information search pattern compared to participants with a low CRT score. Overall, results indicate that higher levels of cognitive reflection and numeracy skills predict the use of a more thorough decision process (measured with two different techniques: retrospective verbal reports and eye movements). In both experiments the decision process is a crucial factor which greatly affects the quality of the purchase decision. PMID:26136721

  13. Lexical Effects on Children's Speech Processing: Individual Differences Reflected in the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsuhiko; Stewart, Mary E.; Petrou, Alexandra M.; Dickie, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to examine whether children exhibit the same relationship that adults show between lexical influence on phoneme identification and individual variation on the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Method: Data from 62 4- to 7-year-olds with no diagnosis of autism were analyzed. The main task involved identification of…

  14. Intra-individual variability in information processing speed reflects white matter microstructure in multiple sclerosis ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Mazerolle, Erin L.; Wojtowicz, Magdalena A.; Omisade, Antonina; Fisk, John D

    2013-01-01

    Slowed information processing speed is commonly reported in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), and is typically investigated using clinical neuropsychological tests, which provide sensitive indices of mean-level information processing speed. However, recent studies have demonstrated that within-person variability or intra-individual variability (IIV) in information processing speed may be a more sensitive indicator of neurologic status than mean-level performance on clinical tests. We eval...

  15. Individual differences in verbal creative thinking are reflected in the precuneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun-Lin; Xu, Ting; Yang, Wen-Jing; Li, Ya-Dan; Sun, Jiang-Zhou; Wang, Kang-Cheng; Beaty, Roger E; Zhang, Qing-Lin; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    There have been many structural and functional imaging studies of creative thinking, but combining structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations with respect to creative thinking is still lacking. Thus, the aim of the present study was to explore the associations among inter-individual verbal creative thinking and both regional homogeneity and cortical morphology of the brain surface. We related the local functional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity to verbal creative thinking and its dimensions--fluency, originality, and flexibility--by examining these inter-individual differences in a large sample of 268 healthy college students. Results revealed that people with high verbal creative ability and high scores for the three dimensions of creativity exhibited lower regional functional homogeneity in the right precuneus. Both cortical volume and thickness of the right precuneus were positively associated with individual verbal creativity and its dimensions. Moreover, originality was negatively correlated with functional homogeneity in the left superior frontal gyrus and positively correlated with functional homogeneity in the right occipito-temporal gyrus. In contrast, flexibility was positively correlated with functional homogeneity in the left superior and middle occipital gyrus. These findings provide additional evidence of a link between verbal creative thinking and brain structure in the right precuneus--a region involved in internally--focused attention and effective semantic retrieval-and further suggest that local functional homogeneity of verbal creative thinking has neurobiological relevance that is likely based on anatomical substrates. PMID:26150204

  16. Effects of combined exercise training on immunological, physical and biochemical parameters in individuals with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alesandro; Fraga, Géssica Alves; Vieira, Roberto Carlos; Silva, Carolina Mendes Santos; Trombeta, Joice Cristina Dos Santos; Navalta, James Wilfred; Prestes, Jonato; Voltarelli, Fabricio Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    The practice of exercise has shown to be beneficial to quality of life of individuals with HIV/AIDS. Thus, the present study analysed the effects of a combined exercise training in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Ten participants participated in the present study. The following variables were analysed: viral load and cell counts for TCD4+/TCD8; maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max); total mass, absolute fat mass, relative fat mass, absolute lean mass, relative lean mass and body mass index; fasting glycaemia, fasting insulinaemia, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index (insulin resistance - homeostatic model assessment (IR-HOMA)); total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL); superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase activities; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The combined exercise training consisted of resistance exercises plus aerobic training (60 min · session(-1), three times per week, during 20 weeks). The number of TCD4+ cells, absolute lean mass and relative lean mass, muscle strength for the 45° leg press, seated row and triceps extension, HDL-c levels as well as VO2max increased post-training. The activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase enzymes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were diminished post-training. Finally, it can be concluded that combined exercise training is able to change positively several variables related to health of individuals with HIV/AIDS, mainly the immune system as well as antioxidant mechanisms re-establishment. PMID:24289219

  17. Individual attentional selection capacities are reflected in interhemispheric connectivity of the parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossel, Simone; Weidner, Ralph; Moos, Katharina; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-04-01

    Modelling psychophysical data using the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) allows for a quantification of attentional sub-processes, such as the resolution of competition amongst multiple stimuli by top-down control signals for target selection (TVA-parameter α). This fMRI study investigated the neural correlates of α by comparing activity differences and changes of effective connectivity between conditions where a target was accompanied by a distractor or by a second target. Twenty-five participants performed a partial report task inside the MRI scanner. The left angular gyrus (ANG), medial frontal, and posterior cingulate cortex showed higher activity when a target was accompanied by a distractor as opposed to a second target. The reverse contrast yielded activation of a bilateral fronto-parietal network, the anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and left inferior occipital gyrus. A psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed that the connectivity between left ANG and the left and right supramarginal gyrus (SMG), left anterior insula, and right putamen was enhanced in the target-distractor condition in participants with worse attentional top-down control. Dynamic causal modelling suggested that the connection from left ANG to right SMG during distractor presence was modulated by α. Our data show that interindividual differences in attentional processing are reflected in changes of effective connectivity without significant differences in activation strength of network nodes. PMID:26827815

  18. The Dorsal Rather than Ventral Pathway Better Reflects Individual Syntactic Abilities in Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kayako; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L.

    2016-01-01

    The left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) has been reported to be critically involved in syntactic processing, not only in first language (L1), but in second language (L2). Indeed, the leftward lateralization of the IFG has been shown to be correlated with the performance of a syntactic task in L2. Given that posterior language-related regions are systematically connected with the left IFG, the next question is which of the dorsal and ventral pathways is more critical to the individual syntactic abilities in L2. Here we used diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tractography with newly developed semi-automatic methods of defining seeds and selecting regions of interest (ROIs). We calculated mean thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) in each ROI for the arcuate fasciculus (Arcuate) of the dorsal pathway, as well as for the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) of the ventral pathway. In Experiment I, we performed partial correlation analyses between FA and the accuracy of the syntactic task, removing the effects of the accuracy of a spelling task, gender, and handedness. Among the two pathways in each hemisphere, only FA of the left Arcuate was significantly correlated with individual accuracy of the syntactic task. In Experiment II, we recruited monozygotic twins and examined to what extent their L2 abilities and their structural properties were similar. Within twin pairs, the highest significant correlation was observed for reaction times of the spelling task, while the correlation for the accuracy of the syntactic task was marginal; these two correlation coefficients were significantly different. Moreover, the thickness of the left Arcuate was highly correlated within pairs, while its FA, as well as the thickness/FA in the ventral pathways, was not significantly correlated. The correlation coefficient for the thickness of the left Arcuate was significantly larger than that of the left IFOF. These results suggest that the thickness of the left

  19. The Process of Motivating Inmates to Participate in Individual Programming System-Reflections on Prison Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Siemionow

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation process is a continuum of actions, changes obtained on its individual stages are the key to the success of the next step, a prisoner’s commitment in the process of changing is a very important part of rehabilitation. The prisoners may choose whether they actively participate in the rehabilitation process or not. If they decide, the completed tasks are evaluated by the staff. Currently it is still being looked for effective work with prisoners, how to change their behavior and the way of thinking. The stuff should build a specific interpersonal relationships with the prisoners because it creates opportunities to motivate the prisoners and let them see their strong points.

  20. Present and future nuclear power generation as a reflection of individual countries' resources and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear reactor industry has been in a state of decline for more than a decade in most of the world. The reasons are numerous and often unique to the energy situation of individual countries. Two commonly cited issues influence decisions relating to construction of reactors: costs and the need, or lack thereof, for additional generating capacity. Public concern has ''politicized'' the nuclear industry in many non-communist countries, causing a profound effect on the economics of the option. The nuclear installations and future plans are reviewed on a country-by-country basis for 36 countries in the light of the resources and objectives of each. Because oil and gas for power production throughout the world are being phased out as much as possible, coal-fired generation currently tends to be the chosen alternative to nuclear power production. Exceptions occur in many of the less developed countries that collectively have a very limited operating experience with nuclear reactors. The Chernobyl accident in the USSR alarmed the public; however, national strategies and plans to build reactors have not changed markedly in the interim. Assuming that the next decade of nuclear power generation is uneventful, additional electrical demand would cause the nuclear power industry to experience a rejuvenation in Europe as well as in the US. 80 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs

  1. Native-Likeness in Second Language Lexical Categorization Reflects Individual Language History and Linguistic Community Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Zinszer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Second language learners face a dual challenge in vocabulary learning: First, they must learn new names for the hundreds of common objects that they encounter every day. Second, after some time, they discover that these names do not generalize according to the same rules used in their first language. Lexical categories frequently differ between languages (Malt et al., 1999, and successful language learning requires that bilinguals learn not just new words but new patterns for labeling objects. In the present study, Chinese learners of English with varying language histories and resident in two different language settings (Beijing, China and State College, PA, USA named 67 photographs of common serving dishes (e.g., cups, plates, and bowls in both Chinese and English. Participants’ response patterns were quantified in terms of similarity to the responses of functionally monolingual native speakers of Chinese and English and showed the cross-language convergence previously observed in simultaneous bilinguals (Ameel et al., 2005. For English, bilinguals’ names for each individual stimulus were also compared to the dominant name generated by the native speakers for the object. Using two statistical models, we disentangle the effects of several highly interactive variables from bilinguals' language histories and the naming norms of the native speaker community to predict inter-personal and inter-item variation in L2 (English native-likeness. We find only a modest age of earliest exposure effect on L2 category native-likeness, but importantly, we find that classroom instruction in L2 negatively impacts L2 category native-likeness, even after significant immersion experience. We also identify a significant role of both L1 and L2 norms in bilinguals’ L2 picture naming responses.

  2. BRAZILIAN INTERNATIONALIZATION STRATEGIES FOR CHINA AND THEIR REFLECTIONS IN THE INTERCULTURAL ADJUSTMENT OF THE BRAZILIAN EXPATRIATE INDIVIDUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aletéia Carpes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The search for sites with greater strategic location advantage for the development of activities means that for some companies in the footwear sector, China represents a favorable site for the establishment of factories and commercial offices. The transfer of activities to foreign territory accords the inherent benefits of proximity to the chosen country, but highlights the challenges of choosing and preparing people for appropriate international action and following up on the development of selected work abroad. Business performance abroad is influenced by the performance of the individual expatriate, and the greater the difference of culture experienced between the country of origin and the country to which the individual will relocate, the lower the psychological comfort of the expatriate. Knowing this, this study’s objective was to check the reflection of the internationalization of China in the individual expatriate intercultural adjustment, through the Black model, Mendehall and Oddou (1991. Among other findings, researchers noted the absence of advance directives coming from the expatriate company, the obstacle of psychic distance in the adjustment of the individual, and the reactive posture of Brazilians as a way of adjusting to the circumstance.

  3. Increased N250 amplitudes for other-race faces reflect more effortful processing at the individual level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzmann, Grit

    2016-07-01

    The N250 and N250r (r for repetition, signaling a difference measure of priming) has been proposed to reflect the activation of perceptual memory representations for individual faces. Increased N250r and N250 amplitudes have been associated with higher levels of familiarity and expertise, respectively. In contrast to these observations, the N250 amplitude has been found to be larger for other-race than own-race faces in recognition memory tasks. This study investigated if these findings were due to increased identity-specific processing demands for other-race relative to own-race faces and whether or not similar results would be obtained for the N250 in a repetition priming paradigm. Only Caucasian participants were available for testing and completed two tasks with Caucasian, African-American, and Chinese faces. In a repetition priming task, participants decided whether or not sequentially presented faces were of the same identity (individuation task) or same race (categorization task). Increased N250 amplitudes were found for African-American and Chinese faces relative to Caucasian faces, replicating previous results in recognition memory tasks. Contrary to the expectation that increased N250 amplitudes for other-race face would be confined to the individuation task, both tasks showed similar results. This could be due to the fact that face identity information needed to be maintained across the sequential presentation of prime and target in both tasks. Increased N250 amplitudes for other-race faces are taken to represent increased neural demands on the identity-specific processing of other-race faces, which are typically processed less holistically and less on the level of the individual. PMID:27184183

  4. REFLECTION OF THE AUTHOR'S INDIVIDUALITY OF A.I. SOLZHENITSYN IN THE MEDIA PUBLICISM OF 2000-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. SOPOVA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A. I. Solzhenitsyn‟s publicist works became a significant phenomenon in the information space of the beginning of the 21st century. Almost all of his publicist texts have factographical and historical features. The aim of the article is to describe the reflection of Solzhenitsyn‟ s authoring individuality in the media publicism in 2000-2008. The author's media texts are marked by the individual style identity thanks to the genre and compositional features, introduction of national archaic words, particular rhythm, alliterations, numerous symbolic images and motives. Solzhenitsyn is a master of shaping the informationalcommunicative fields. His author‟s intentionality is clearly read in the media texts. The topicality of the study is conditioned by the increased interest to the publicist works of A.I. Solzhenitsyn in newspapers and magazine editions in the beginning of the 21st century. The author of the article revealed the main features and stylistic means used by A.I. Solzhenitsyn in his texts. The main means of expressiveness in A. I. Solzhenitsyn‟ s media texts are experiments with the language, his own system of word formation and orthography. The artistic heritage of Solzhenitsyn-publicist, who created his works in the information space of the early XXIst century, is important for future generations,because it reflects a folk sense of Being and human self-consciousness.

  5. Hydrogen isotopes in individual amino acids reflect differentiated pools of hydrogen from food and water in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Marilyn L; Griffin, Patrick L; Newsome, Seth D

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen isotope (δ(2)H) analysis is widely used in animal ecology to study continental-scale movement because δ(2)H can trace precipitation and climate. To understand the biochemical underpinnings of how hydrogen is incorporated into biomolecules, we measured the δ(2)H of individual amino acids (AAs) in Escherichia coli cultured in glucose-based or complex tryptone-based media in waters with δ(2)H values ranging from -55‰ to +1,070‰. The δ(2)H values of AAs in tryptone spanned a range of ∼250‰. In E. coli grown on glucose, the range of δ(2)H among AAs was nearly 200‰. The relative distributions of δ(2)H of AAs were upheld in cultures grown in enriched waters. In E. coli grown on tryptone, the δ(2)H of nonessential AAs varied linearly with the δ(2)H of media water, whereas δ(2)H of essential AAs was nearly identical to δ(2)H in diet. Model calculations determined that as much as 46% of hydrogen in some nonessential AAs originated from water, whereas no more than 12% of hydrogen in essential AAs originated from water. These findings demonstrate that δ(2)H can route directly at the molecular level. We conclude that the patterns and distributions in δ(2)H of AAs are determined through biosynthetic reactions, suggesting that δ(2)H could become a new biosignature for studying novel microbial pathways. Our results also show that δ(2)H of AAs in an organism's tissues provides a dual tracer for food and environmental (e.g., drinking) water. PMID:27444017

  6. An investigation of degradation to the Clinch River Basin in Virginia coupling individual, biochemical and community level indicators of stress in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical and organismic indicators of pollution were used to assess stress to fish in the Clinch River Basin. These data were gathered in parallel with an independent study of a community level assessment of the basin, the index of biotic integrity (IBI). Hence, site condition had been previously established with the IBI data. Contaminants were suspected to originate from sources such as coal mining, agricultural development and urbanization. Induction of pollution sensitive proteins in fish in the field was investigated. Sites were selected along an IBI gradient in the Basin. Fish from relatively pristine sites (high IBI) were used as references, while those from polluted sites (low IBI) were used as sampling sites suspected of contamination. The enzyme ethoxyresorufin deethylase and the protein metallothionein were used as indicators of fish stress from organic and heavy metal contamination respectively. Relatively abundant species were selected from three trophic levels. Organismic indices of pollution stress indicated that fish from the most uncontaminated sites had higher values of hepatosomatic index (HSI) than those from the more pristine sites. The biochemical indicators of stress showed a good relationship with the IBI data, showing that it may be possible to link biochemical and community level indicators of stress in the fish that were studied

  7. The Eyes Test as a Measure of Individual Differences: How much of the Variance Reflects Verbal IQ?

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Eric; Miller, Stephanie F.

    2012-01-01

    Developed by Baron-Cohen et al. (1997, 2001), the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test requires individuals to determine mental states from photos of pairs of eyes. Used in over 250 studies, it has been conceptualized as an advanced theory of mind test that is relatively free of general cognitive abilities. Given the sensitivity of the instrument, many studies with healthy adult samples have used this instrument as a measure of individual differences in social-perceptual processes that contribut...

  8. The myth of self-managing teams: A reflection on the allocation of responsibilities between individuals, teams and the organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Leede, de, J.; Nijhof, André H.J.; Fisscher, Olaf A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts that include the participation and empowerment of workers are becoming increasingly important nowadays. In many of these concepts, the formal responsibility is delegated to teams. Does this imply that the normative responsibility for the actions of teams is also delegated? In this article we will reflect on the difference between holding a person accountable and bearing responsibility. A framework is elaborated in order to analyse the accountability and responsibility of teams. In th...

  9. The Individual View on the Complexities of the National Economy Modernization (Reflections on the Book by G. I. Khanin)

    OpenAIRE

    Didenko Dmitry, V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is based on reflections on the key aspects of the Russian national economic history through the lens of judgments and assessments proposed in the fundamental and specific 3-volume work by G. I. Khanin. The paper stresses such strong points of this research as its fundamental and encyclopedically wide coverage, broad informational base of sources, academic ‘bona fide’ and critical approach to reliability of various indicators of the Soviet and post-Soviet statistics. Especially highl...

  10. The Eyes Test as a measure of individual differences: How much of the variance reflects verbal IQ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric ePeterson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Developed by Baron-Cohen and colleagues, the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test requires individuals to determine mental states from photos of pairs of eyes. Used in over 250 studies, it has been conceptualized as an advanced theory of mind test that is relatively free of general cognitive abilities. Given the sensitivity of the instrument, many studies with healthy adult samples have used this instrument as a measure of individual differences in social perceptual processes that contribute to theory of mind and overall phenotype. We administered the two-subtest WASI, a face processing task (Cambridge Face Memory Test, and the Eyes Test to forty-two college students. Surprisingly, verbal IQ contributed significantly to the variance in Eyes Test performance while the face perception measure did not. These findings have both practical and theoretical ramifications for interpreting Eyes Test results in normative adult samples.

  11. Lexical effects on children’s speech processing:: Individual differences reflected in the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ)

    OpenAIRE

    Ota, Mitsuhiko; Stewart, Mary E.; Petrou, Alexandra; Dickie, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether children exhibit the same relationship that adults show between the lexical influence on phoneme identification and individual variation on the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ).Method: Data from 62 4- to 7-year-olds with no diagnosis of autism were analyzed. The main task involved identification of the initial sound in pairs of voice-onset time continua with a real word on one end and a nonword on the other (e.g., gift-kift, giss-kiss). Participants were also given th...

  12. Present and future nuclear power generation as a reflection of individual countries' resources and objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, I.Y.

    1987-06-26

    The nuclear reactor industry has been in a state of decline for more than a decade in most of the world. The reasons are numerous and often unique to the energy situation of individual countries. Two commonly cited issues influence decisions relating to construction of reactors: costs and the need, or lack thereof, for additional generating capacity. Public concern has ''politicized'' the nuclear industry in many non-communist countries, causing a profound effect on the economics of the option. The nuclear installations and future plans are reviewed on a country-by-country basis for 36 countries in the light of the resources and objectives of each. Because oil and gas for power production throughout the world are being phased out as much as possible, coal-fired generation currently tends to be the chosen alternative to nuclear power production. Exceptions occur in many of the less developed countries that collectively have a very limited operating experience with nuclear reactors. The Chernobyl accident in the USSR alarmed the public; however, national strategies and plans to build reactors have not changed markedly in the interim. Assuming that the next decade of nuclear power generation is uneventful, additional electrical demand would cause the nuclear power industry to experience a rejuvenation in Europe as well as in the US. 80 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. The characterization of caffeine and nine individual catechins in the leaves of green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Seuk; Hwang, Young-Sun; Lee, Jinwook; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2014-09-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to determine the contents of caffeine and nine individual catechins in tea leaves. A total of 665 samples were scanned by NIRS, and also by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector to determine the contents of caffeine and nine individual catechins. The calibration models for caffeine, EGC, C, EGCG, EC, ECG, and total catechins had high r(2) (more than 0.90) and RSP (the ratio of standard deviation of reference data to SEP(C) in the external validation set) values (more than 4.1), indicating a good correlation between reference values and NIRS predicted values. In contrast, the calibration models of GC and EGCG-3Me had low r(2) and RSP values (below 0.8 and 2.0). Therefore, these results suggest that NIRS could be applied for the rapid determination of the contents of caffeine, EGC, C, EGCG, EC, ECG, and total catechins in tea leaves for breeding programs that develop high-quality tea plants. PMID:24731354

  14. Quick lateral movements of the trunk in a seated position reflect mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) function in frail elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Kimura, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kensuke; Arai, Shin; Iwata, Hiroshi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel and safe performance test for measuring mobility is described. The test, which we have named the Seated Side Tapping test (Side Tapping test), requires the subjects to move their bodies laterally to the left and right in turn as quickly as possible whilst remaining in a seated position. We examined the associations between the results of the new test and those of other mobility tests, ADL, and the use of walking aids. The participants were 75 frail elderly people who were receiving rehabilitation services. Gait speed and the timed up and go (TUG) test were employed as mobility tests, and the participants' use of walking aids was recorded. The ADL score was assessed using the Barthel Index. Significant correlations were found between the side tapping test and gait speed (r=-0.59, pwalking aids. These results indicate that an ability to perform quick lateral trunk movements in a seated position reflects their mobility during standing. Thus, we concluded that since the side tapping test is simple and safe, it is useful for detecting mobility impairments, ADL levels, and the need for walking aids, especially in frail elderly individuals. PMID:23270712

  15. Grey matter volume and resting-state functional connectivity of the motor cortex-cerebellum network reflect the individual variation in masticatory performance in the healthy elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Shu eLin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have consistently identified brain activation in the motor area and the cerebellum during chewing. In this study, we further investigated the structural and functional brain signature associated with masticatory performance, which is a widely used index for evaluating overall masticatory function in the elderly. Twenty-five healthy elderly participants underwent oral examinations, masticatory performance tests, and behavioral assessments, including the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument and the short-form Geriatric Depression Scale. Masticatory performance was assessed with the validated colorimetric method, using color-changeable chewing gum. T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and resting-state function MRI were performed. We analyzed alterations in grey matter volume (GMV using voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC between brain regions using the seed-based method. The structural and functional MRI analyses revealed the following findings: (1 the GMV change in the premotor cortex was positively correlated with masticatory performance. (2 The rsFC between the cerebellum and the premotor cortex was positively correlated with masticatory performance. (3 The GMV changes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, as well as the rsFC between the cerebellum and the DLPFC, was positively correlated with masticatory performance. The findings showed that in the premotor cortex, a reduction of GMV and rsFC would reflect declined masticatory performance. The positive correlation between DLPFC connectivity and masticatory performance implies that masticatory ability is associated with cognitive function in the elderly. Our findings highlighted the role of the central nervous system in masticatory performance and increased our understanding of the structural and functional brain signature underlying individual variations in masticatory performance in the elderly.

  16. Study of Laser Reflectivity on Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to the light on the skin can be manifested as temperature increase or creation of biochemical byproducts, in which further studies are required to asset the light effect. This response changes the average response over time and can produce discrepancies between similar studies. In this work we present a Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) study with feedback. We study the time response reflectivity of a 980 nm laser diode of 25 mW modulated at frequencies close to 40 kHz and detect the reflected light on a silicon photodiode, finding no direct correlation between different test points or individuals, while finding reproducible responses within the same individual and test point

  17. Change at Work and Professional Learning: How Readiness to Change, Self-Determination and Personal Initiative Affect Individual Learning through Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzner, Stefanie; Heid, Helmut; Gruber, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Reflection offers an important means to learn effectively from changes induced by the workplace. The authors examined readiness to change and work-related self-determination as preconditions for reflection at work and expected personal initiative--defined as "self-starting" and "proactive behaviour"--to have a mediating effect. The study tested…

  18. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  19. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  20. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...... previously associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier...... views of reflection, rehabilitate them in order to capture broader connotations or move to new ways of regarding reflection that are more in keeping with not only reflective but also emotive, normative and formative views on supervision. The paper presents a critical perspective on supervision that...

  1. Reflecting on Cherenkov reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Fargion, D.; Gaug, M.; Oliva, P.

    2007-01-01

    Magic Telescope may observe and reveal at horizons lights from air-shower Cherenkov reflections. The ground, the sea, the cloudy sky (below the mountain) may reflect PeVs-EeV UHECR Cherenkov lights observable by MAGIC telescopes. Even rarest UHE neutrino skimming the atmosphere or skimming the Earth may induce upward-horizontal airshowers: a new Neutrino Astronomy. These fluorescence signals or the Cherenkov reflections in upper cloudy sky may flash in correlated BL-Lac or GRB shining at oppo...

  2. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  3. Inter-Individual Difference in the Effect of Mirror Reflection-Induced Visual Feedback on Phantom Limb Awareness in Forearm Amputees

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Mita, Tomoki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test whether the phantom limb awareness could be altered by observing mirror reflection-induced visual feedback (MVF) in unilateral forearm amputees. Methods Ten unilateral forearm amputees were asked to perform bilateral (intact and phantom) synchronous wrist motions with and without MVF. During wrist motion, electromyographic activities in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and flexor carpi radialis muscles (FCR) were recorded with bipolar electrodes. Degree of wrist range of ...

  4. 高校辅导员做好个别生教育工作的思考%Reflection on Individual Student Education of Counselors in University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李群

    2015-01-01

    对个别生开展教育和管理工作是辅导员工作的重要内容, 也是实现立德树人任务的根本要求. 以情感教育为基础, 以潜能开发为内涵, 以多元智能理论为依据, 以促进精神成长为目的, 借助心理辅导方法教育个别生, 合理调整期望值, 提高个别生自我教育的能力, 让 "失败者"转化为 "成功者".%The education and management aimed for individual students is not only an important part of the work of counselors, but also the fundamental requirements for achieving the task of moral education. Individual students should be educated with the method of psychological counseling, taking emotional education as the basis, the potential development as the content, multiple intelligences theory as the gist, promoting mentality growth as the purpose. It also requires rationally adjusting expectations, improving the self-education ability of the individual student so that 'losers' can be transited into 'winners'.

  5. Recent abstracts in biochemical technology

    OpenAIRE

    R R Siva Kiran; Brijesh P

    2008-01-01

    “Recent abstracts in biochemical technology” is a collection of interesting research articles published in “List of biochemical technology journals” (Table 1). The abstracts are most likely to report significant results in biochemical technology.

  6. Reflective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  7. The reflection of work-study combination training mode in the teaching of Biochemical Technology%产学结合培养模式在生化工艺教学中的体现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁艳; 姚东云; 卢楠

    2012-01-01

    The work-study combination personnel training mode has been approved in higher vocational education and teaching reform.At present, the key issue is how to implement the combination of production and learning and the cooperation between colleges and enterprises in the daily teaching.We propose the means of carrying out the work-study combination training mode in the teaching of biochemical technology based on our long-term teaching practice.We aim to explore a new path for the implement of the combination of production and learning by combining the teaching contents with the employment orientation, combining school classrooms with workshops, combining teachers in colleges with workers in enterprises,combining teaching process with production process and combining scientific research of colleges with factories.%在高职教育教学改革中,大家已经认同了产学结合的人才培养模式,目前非常核心的关键问题是如何在日常课程教学中实现产学结合、校企合作.结合长期的教学实践,提出在生化工艺课程教学中产学结合培养模式的实施方式,即教学内容与就业面向相结合,学校课堂与生产车间相结合,学校教师与企业工人相结合,教学过程与生产过程相结合,学校科研与工厂研发相结合,为产学结合培养模式在课程教学中的实施探索一条新的道路.

  8. Inter-individual difference in the effect of mirror reflection-induced visual feedback on phantom limb awareness in forearm amputees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Kawashima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test whether the phantom limb awareness could be altered by observing mirror reflection-induced visual feedback (MVF in unilateral forearm amputees. METHODS: Ten unilateral forearm amputees were asked to perform bilateral (intact and phantom synchronous wrist motions with and without MVF. During wrist motion, electromyographic activities in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL and flexor carpi radialis muscles (FCR were recorded with bipolar electrodes. Degree of wrist range of motion (ROM was also recorded by electrogoniometry attached to the wrist joint of intact side. Subjects were asked to answer the degree of attainment of phantom limb motion using a visual analog scale (VAS: ranging from 0 (hard to 10 (easy. RESULTS: VAS and ROM were significantly increased by utilizing MVF, and the extent of an enhancement of the VAS and wrist ROM was positively correlated (r = 0.72, p<0.05. Although FCR EMG activity also showed significant enhancement by MVF, this was not correlated with the changes of VAS and ROM. Interestingly, while we found negative correlation between EDL EMG activity and wrist ROM, MVF generally affected to be increasing both EDL EMG and ROM. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was larger extent of variability in the effect of MVF on phantom limb awareness, MVF has a potential to enhance phantom limb awareness, in case those who has a difficulty for the phantom limb motion. The present result suggests that the motor command to the missing limb can be re-activated by an appropriate therapeutic strategy such as mirror therapy.

  9. Facilitating management learning: Developing critical reflection through reflective tools

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, David E

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how the practice of critical reflection within a management learning process can be facilitated through the application of reflective processes and tools. A distinction is drawn between reflection as a form of individual development (of, say, the reflective practitioner), and critical reflection as a route to collective action and a component of organizational learning and change. Critical reflection, however, is not a process that comes naturally to many...

  10. Biochemical Analysis of Microbial Rhodopsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Julia A; Keffer, Jessica L; Miller, Kelsey J

    2016-01-01

    Ion-pumping rhodopsins transfer ions across the microbial cell membrane in a light-dependent fashion. As the rate of biochemical characterization of microbial rhodopsins begins to catch up to the rate of microbial rhodopsin identification in environmental and genomic sequence data sets, in vitro analysis of their light-absorbing properties and in vivo analysis of ion pumping will remain critical to characterizing these proteins. As we learn more about the variety of physiological roles performed by microbial rhodopsins in different cell types and environments, observing the localization patterns of the rhodopsins and/or quantifying the number of rhodopsin-bearing cells in natural environments will become more important. Here, we provide protocols for purification of rhodopsin-containing membranes, detection of ion pumping, and observation of functional rhodopsins in laboratory and environmental samples using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153387

  11. Reflection, Reflective Practice and Embodied Reflective Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Leigh, Jennifer S; Bailey, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Although widely employed in professional practice of all kinds, ‘reflection’ and ‘reflective practice’ can be considered ‘success words’. That is, they elicit positive and supportive responses and yet the concepts are vague, ill-defined, contradictory and reflective skills can be hard to teach. Using examples from education and somatic movement therapy, we argue that a purely analytical approach to reflective practice that involves reflecting on thoughts alone is likely to lead into a negativ...

  12. Reflection Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  13. Reflection in professional practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hetzner, Stefanie Bianca

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the research on professional learning through reflective practice. The main goal is to examine—against the backdrop of workplace changes and errors—individual and contextual factors that are theoretically assumed to influence reflection in the context of professional work. Reflective practice is defined as a retrospective but future- and goal-oriented cognitive-affective process that basically involves (a) the awareness and review of incident...

  14. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  15. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  16. Multiplexing oscillatory biochemical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, Wiet; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2014-04-01

    In recent years it has been increasingly recognized that biochemical signals are not necessarily constant in time and that the temporal dynamics of a signal can be the information carrier. Moreover, it is now well established that the protein signaling network of living cells has a bow-tie structure and that components are often shared between different signaling pathways. Here we show by mathematical modeling that living cells can multiplex a constant and an oscillatory signal: they can transmit these two signals simultaneously through a common signaling pathway, and yet respond to them specifically and reliably. We find that information transmission is reduced not only by noise arising from the intrinsic stochasticity of biochemical reactions, but also by crosstalk between the different channels. Yet, under biologically relevant conditions more than 2 bits of information can be transmitted per channel, even when the two signals are transmitted simultaneously. These observations suggest that oscillatory signals are ideal for multiplexing signals. PMID:24685537

  17. Biochemical Indicators of Radiation Injury in Man. Proceedings of a Scientific Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an organism has suffered a radiation insult, knowledge of the dose and localization of the exposure is of the greatest importance for the treatment of any radiation damage. Supplementary to the information obtained from physical dosimetry, data obtained by biochemical indicators can, on the basis of metabolic changes in the irradiated organism, help in making early diagnosis, in assessing the extent of the radiation injury, and making a prognosis. Biochemical tests under optimal conditions would not depend on the quality and distribution of the dose in the body and would also reflect the sensitivity of the individual organisms. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization convened a joint scientific meeting on Biochemical Indicators of Radiation Injury in Man in Paris-Le Vésinet, France, from 22 to 26 June 1970. The main purpose of the meeting was to discuss recent problems in determining which biochemical and metabolic changes occurring in irradiated organisms could be used as indicators of radiation injury and its extent, and could thus be of help in planning the proper treatment of the injured persons. During the meeting the results obtained with various biochemical indicators, and experimental techniques and laboratory methods used in this field, were evaluated and compared. Both research workers and clinicians were invited to participate at the meeting. They discussed the possible value of several tests, used successfully in experimental animals, for clinical application; ways of standardizing suitable tests; and mutual collaboration between laboratories and clinics. The outcome of their discussions is summarized in the conclusions and recommendations which are included in these Proceedings together with the papers presented

  18. Individualizing Services, Individualizing Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Hollertz, Katarina; Jacobsson, Kerstin

    The paper focuses on the unemployed individual and her position in local activation practice. The overall aim is to analyse the role of individualisation of local activation policy in the construction of social citizenship in Sweden. More specifically, we ask: To what extent do clients have possi...

  19. Biochemical Hypermedia: Galactose Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animations of biochemical processes and virtual laboratory environments lead to true molecular simulations. The use of interactive software’s in education can improve cognitive capacity, better learning and, mainly, it makes information acquisition easier. Material and Methods: This work presents the development of a biochemical hypermedia to understanding of the galactose metabolism. It was developed with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. Results and Discussion: A step by step animation process shows the enzymatic reactions of galactose conversion to glucose-1-phosphate (to glycogen synthesis, glucose-6-phosphate (glycolysis intermediary, UDP-galactose (substrate to mucopolysaccharides synthesis and collagen’s glycosylation. There are navigation guide that allow scrolling the mouse over the names of the components of enzymatic reactions of via the metabolism of galactose. Thus, explanatory text box, chemical structures and animation of the actions of enzymes appear to navigator. Upon completion of the module, the user’s response to the proposed exercise can be checked immediately through text box with interactive content of the answer. Conclusion: This hypermedia was presented for undergraduate students (UFSC who revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the theme.

  20. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  1. Quantifying Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, Gordon Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents 1st semester student reflections on “learning to learn” in a team-based PBL environment with quantitative and qualitative student reflective feedback on the learning gains of 60 Architectural Technology and Construction Management students at VIA University College, Denmark. It...... contrasts the students’ self-assessment in a range of ‘product’ skills such as Revit, Structural Design, Mathematics of construction, Technical Installations; as well as ‘process’ competencies such as ‘Working in a team’, Sharing knowledge, Maintaining a portfolio and Reflecting ON learning and FOR learning...

  2. Biochemical synthesis with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descriptions of the biochemical synthesis of glucose-13C6 from Agmenellum quadruplication; the biochemical labelling of [13C, 15N] Chlorella and [13C] E. coli, [15N] E. coli, and the production of lactic-13C3 acid utilizing Lactobacillus casei are discussed

  3. Isotopic and molecular distributions of biochemicals from fresh and buried Rhizophora mangle leaves†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobson Myrna E

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora mangle L. (red mangrove is the dominant species of mangrove in the Americas. At Twin Cays, Belize (BZ red mangroves are present in a variety of stand structures (tall >5 m in height, transition ~2–4 m and dwarf ~1–1.5 m. These height differences are coupled with very different stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic values1 (mean tall δ13C = -28.3‰, δ15N = 0‰; mean tall δ13C = -25.3‰, δ15N = -10‰. To determine the utility of using these distinct isotopic compositions as 'biomarkers' for paleoenvironmental reconstruction of mangrove ecosystems and nutrient availability, we investigated the distribution and isotopic (δ13C and δ15N composition of different biochemical fractions (water soluble compounds, free lipids, acid hydrolysable compounds, individual amino acids, and the residual un-extractable compounds in fresh and preserved red mangrove leaves from dwarf and tall trees. The distribution of biochemicals are similar in dwarf and tall red mangrove leaves, suggesting that, regardless of stand structure, red mangroves use nutrients for biosynthesis and metabolism in a similar manner. However, the δ13C and δ15N of the bulk leaf, the biochemical fractions, and seven amino acids can be used to distinguish dwarf and tall trees at Twin Cays, BZ. The data support the theory that the fractionation of carbon and nitrogen occurs prior to or during uptake in dwarf and tall red mangrove trees. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes could, therefore, be powerful tools for predicting levels of nutrient limitation at Twin Cays. The δ13C and δ15N of biochemical fractions within preserved leaves, reflect sedimentary cycling and nitrogen immobilization. The δ15N of the immobilized fraction reveals the overlying stand structure at the time of leaf deposition. The isotopic composition of preserved mangrove leaves could yield significant information about changes in ecosystem dynamics, nutrient limitation and past stand structure in

  4. EVALUATING BIOCHEMICAL INTERNET RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Many people fail to properly evaluate INTERNET information. This is often due to alack of understanding of the issues, by responsible authorities, and, morespecifically, a lack of understanding of the structure and modis operandi of theINTERNET tool. The aim of this project was to analyze biochemical issuesavailable in WEB pages, evaluating contents quality, coverage, accuracy, authorityand currency. Twenty three sites were analyzed for their contents, presence ofbibliographical references, authorship, titles responsibility and adequacy to targetpublic. The great majority (95% did not mention bibliographic references andtarget public. Less than half divulged names and/or graduation status ofresponsibles. Some sites contained critical conceptual errors, such as: oxygen isessential for anaerobic respiration; presence of H2O in photosynthesis dark phase;yeast is a pluricellular fungal; the overall equation of photosynthesis with errors;NADH2 instead NAD+; etc. None of the analyzed sites was thus consideredexcellent. Although the use of the internet is expanding rapidly on collegecampuses, little is known about students usage; how they perceive the reality ofinternet information and how successful they are in searching through it. Our datastrenghthen the need for rigorous evaluation concerning to educational research ofbiochemical themes on the WEB.

  5. [Biochemical antenatal screening for fetal anomalies.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfadóttir, G; Jónsson, J J

    2001-05-01

    Biochemical antenatal screening started 30 years ago. Initially, the goal was to detect neural tube defects by measuring a-fetoprotein in maternal serum (MS-AFP) and amniotic fluid (AF-AFP). The serendipitous discovery of an association between low AFP maternal serum concentration and chromosomal anomalies resulted in increased research interest in biochemical screening in pregnancy. Subsequently double, triple or quadruple tests in 2nd trimester of pregnancy became widely used in combination with fetal chromosome determination in at risk individuals. In Iceland, antenatal screening for chromosomal anomalies has essentially been based on fetal chromosome studies offered to pregnant women 35 years or older. This strategy needs to be revised. Recently first trimester biochemical screening based on maternal serum pregnancy associated plasma protein A (MS-PAPP-A) and free b-human chorionic gonadotropin (MS-free b-hCG) and multivariate risk assessment has been developed. This screening test can be improved if done in conjunction with nuchal translucency measurements in an early sonography scan. PMID:17018982

  6. Reflective optics

    CERN Document Server

    Korsch, Dietrich

    1991-01-01

    This is the first book dedicated exclusively to all-reflective imaging systems. It is a teaching tool as well as a practical design tool for anyone who specializes in optics, particularly for those interested in telescopes, infrared, and grazing-incidence systems. The first part of the book describes a unified geometric optical theory of all-reflective imaging systems (from near-normal to grazing incidence) developed from basic principles. The second part discusses correction methods and a multitude of closed-form solutions of well-corrected systems, supplemented with many conventional and unc

  7. Enzyme and biochemical producing fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Lübeck, Mette; Nilsson, Lena;

    2010-01-01

    factories for sustainable production of important molecules. For developing fungi into efficient cell factories, the project includes identification of important factors that control the flux through the pathways using metabolic flux analysis and metabolic engineering of biochemical pathways....

  8. Ouroboros - Playing A Biochemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Rodrigues

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ouroboros: Playing A Biochemical RODRIGUES,D.T.1,2;GAYER, M.C.1,2; ESCOTO, D.F.1; DENARDIN, E.L.G.2, ROEHRS, R.1,2 1Interdisciplinary Research Group on Teaching Practice, Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil 2Laboratory of Physicochemical Studies and Natural Products, Post Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil Introduction: Currently, teachers seek different alternatives to enhance the teaching-learning process. Innovative teaching methodologies are increasingly common tools in educational routine. The use of games, electronic or conventional, is an effective tool to assist in learning and also to raise the social interaction between students. Objective: In this sense our work aims to evaluate the card game and "Ouroboros" board as a teaching and learning tool in biochemistry for a graduating class in Natural Sciences. Materials and methods: The class gathered 22 students of BSc in Natural Sciences. Each letter contained a question across the board that was drawn to a group to answer within the allotted time. The questions related concepts of metabolism, organic and inorganic chemical reactions, bioenergetics, etc.. Before the game application, students underwent a pre-test with four issues involving the content that was being developed. Soon after, the game was applied. Then again questions were asked. Data analysis was performed from the ratio of the number of correct pre-test and post-test answers. Results and discussion: In the pre-test 18.1% of the students knew all issues, 18.1% got 3 correct answers, 40.9% answered only 2 questions correctly and 22.7% did not hit any. In post-test 45.4% answered all the questions right, 31.8% got 3 questions and 22.7% got 2 correct answers. The results show a significant improvement of the students about the field of content taught through the game. Conclusion: Generally, traditional approaches of chemistry and biochemistry are abstract and complex. Thus, through games

  9. Advances in Biochemical Screening for Phaeochromocytoma using Biogenic Amines

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Malcolm J; Doogue, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical testing for phaeochromocytoma is performed in diagnostic laboratories using a variety of tests with plasma, serum or 24-hour urine collections. These tests include catecholamines and their methylated metabolites - the metanephrines, either individually or in combination with their sulfated metabolites. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) continues to be the dominant analytical method for biogenic amine quantitation. Chromatographic techniques are changing, with improveme...

  10. Study on color difference estimation method of medicine biochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhong; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Hongxia; Sun, Jiashi; Zhou, Fengkun

    2006-01-01

    The biochemical analysis in medicine is an important inspection and diagnosis method in hospital clinic. The biochemical analysis of urine is one important item. The Urine test paper shows corresponding color with different detection project or different illness degree. The color difference between the standard threshold and the test paper color of urine can be used to judge the illness degree, so that further analysis and diagnosis to urine is gotten. The color is a three-dimensional physical variable concerning psychology, while reflectance is one-dimensional variable; therefore, the estimation method of color difference in urine test can have better precision and facility than the conventional test method with one-dimensional reflectance, it can make an accurate diagnose. The digital camera is easy to take an image of urine test paper and is used to carry out the urine biochemical analysis conveniently. On the experiment, the color image of urine test paper is taken by popular color digital camera and saved in the computer which installs a simple color space conversion (RGB -> XYZ -> L *a *b *)and the calculation software. Test sample is graded according to intelligent detection of quantitative color. The images taken every time were saved in computer, and the whole illness process will be monitored. This method can also use in other medicine biochemical analyses that have relation with color. Experiment result shows that this test method is quick and accurate; it can be used in hospital, calibrating organization and family, so its application prospect is extensive.

  11. Biochemical changes in blood under Cr6+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzenko E.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For the manufacture of dentures many different alloys containing chromium are used. Interaction with oral fluid, organic acids and food, results in formation of Cr3+, Cr6+ ions, but their influence on the whole organism is poorly investigated. Objective. To analyze the biochemical changes in blood plasma during the influence of Cr6+ ions. Methods. 15 animals of experimental group were receiving drinking water with potassium dichromate in a dose of 0,2 mol/l. Rats of control group (5 individuals drank usual drinking water. Animals were led out of experiment on the 20th, 40th and 60th days after the beginning of introduction of potassium dichromate. Results. It was established that at the beginning of experiment the blood biochemical indicators of control and the 1st experimental groups differed by its content. Increase of urea concentration led to suspicion about violation of a glomerular filtration, damage of a kidney parenchyma and tissue disintegration. On the 20th and 40th days of experiment the symptoms of acidosis and increase of potassium ions concentration in blood plasma were defined. Continuous and dynamic increase of creatin-phosphokinase was observed during 60 days of experiment. Conclusion. Biochemical changes in blood under the influence of Cr6+ ions evidence their toxic action on an organism. Especial concern is caused by changes of ionic composition and increase of the atherogenic index of blood plasma on the 40th day of experiment. Substantial increase of the creatin-phosphokinase level indicates general somatic influence of chromium ions.

  12. Inspiring Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo

    2011-01-01

    life is not free from fluctuations, cycles, disruptions, crises and destructions both human and ecological. Innovation research ought to position itself to address environmental, financial and economic crises. The third is innovation research for development by addressing not only poverty erdaication......A numberof Chris Freeman's colleagues were asked to reflect on what they thought describes his life and work in a few words. Some of the colleagues replied including former SPRU students that were taught or supervised by Chris Freeman. Their views on what they thought were Chris Freeman's defining...... contributions have been put together. There are a number of ways to continue Chris Freeman's legacy on innovation research. The first is to build in a critical tradition in the economics of innovation research by introducing fearlessly emancipatory epistemology. Second the economic system that dominates social...

  13. Relationship between daily dietary fructose intake, body composition and biochemical parameters patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabriye Arslan

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more specific suggestions regarding fructose intake and to better understand the relationship between fructose intakes, body composition and biochemical parameters in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Thoughts on Reflection (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-06-01

    Evidence in Practice section uses a standardized format enabling practitioners to share their experience of integrating research evidence into their practice. The final section of these brief articles asks the writers to reflect on their experience. Although it is not research, the individual reflection allies with what Schön (1983 called “reflection on action” and such reflections over time form a practical, tacit knowledge that we use to inform our work. Within this section of the journal, we hope readers will become more aware of how different types of evidence can be integrated into real‐world decision making. Not everything requires a full blown research study, and this section allows readers to see what other practitioners are doing, and in turn it should enable them to reflect upon what they are doing in their own practice. Being aware of situations where things may or may not have worked, and reflecting on the reasons why, brings together our sense of critical thought and practical experience that go a long way in filling the “librarian observed” and “professional judgements” parts of the EBLIP definition (Booth and Brice 2004. Acquiring professional knowledge does not end when we complete a graduate program, or have a certain number of years experience under our belts. It needs to be continually and consciously cultivated via reflection on our practice, our research, and simply what works and why. Research knowledge only takes us so far. People often ask me, “What do I do when there is no evidence? Or when the research evidence is weak?” Does this stop us from moving ahead? No. A decision still needs to be made. Evidence based practice is not only about acting when there is good evidence. Enhancing our professional judgments via a career built on analytical reflection, will provide knowledge that goes a long way towards making difficult decisions a little bit easier; even (or perhaps, especially in the cases when there is already a large body of

  15. Serum biochemical markers in carcinoma breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth R

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the extensive research for many years throughout the world, the etiopathogenesis of cancer still remains obscure. For the early detection of carcinoma of various origins, a number of biochemical markers have been studied to evaluate the malignancy. AIM: To analyse serum gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and superoxide dismutase (SOD in carcinoma breast patients. SETTINGS & DESIGN: The serum biochemical markers were estimated in twenty five histopathologically confirmed patients with carcinoma breast and equal number of healthy age- matched individuals served as control. MATERIAL & METHODS: Serum gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and superoxide dismutase (SOD were estimated and their sensitivity determined. Statistics: Data was analysed with student′s ′t′-test and sensitivity score of these markers was determined. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: The mean serum GGTP, LDH and SOD activities in patients with carcinoma breast were tremendously increased as compared to controls, and a steady increase was observed in their activities from stage I through stage IV as well as following distant metastasis. Serum GGTP, LDH and SOD might prove to be most sensitive biomarkers in carcinoma breast in early detection of the disease.

  16. Reflections on Teaching Financial Statement Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwistle, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In her 2011 article "Towards a 'scholarship of teaching and learning': The individual and the communal journey," Ursula Lucas calls for more critical reflection on individual teaching experiences and encourages sharing such experiences with the wider academy. In this spirit Gary Entwistle reflects upon his experiences teaching financial…

  17. Joint reflection in teacher training

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, Marie; Hošpesová, A.; Macháčková, Jana

    Plzeň : ZČU PedF, 2006 - (Coufalová, J.), s. 293-298 ISBN 80-7043-478-3. [CIEAEM 58. Srní (CZ), 09.07.2006-15.07.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA406/05/2444 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : individual reflection * joint reflection * teachers´knowledge base Subject RIV: AM - Education

  18. Hyponatraemia: biochemical and clinical perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, G; Leese, G

    1998-01-01

    Hyponatraemia is a common bio-chemical abnormality, occurring in about 15% of hospital inpatients. It is often associated with severe illness and relatively poor outcome. Pathophysiologically, hyponatraemia may be spurious, dilutional, depletional or redistributional. Particularly difficult causes and concepts of hyponatraemia are the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and the sick cell syndrome, which are discussed here in detail. Therapy should always be targeted at the underlying disea...

  19. Entrepreneurial Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Halbinger, Maria

    2014-01-01

    New ventures are central to an economy’s welfare and substantial promoters of technological change and innovation. Extant research has identified individuals and their role in entrepreneurial processes as the core pillars of entrepreneurship. This PhD dissertation aims to refine our understanding of the fundamental relationship between individuals and their entrepreneurial activities. In order to empirically test the hypotheses built, the analyses are based on a unique dataset ...

  20. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  1. A Critical Reflection on Dworkin’ s Individualism Conception of Rights%德沃金个人主义权利观的论述逻辑及其反思

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于柏华

    2014-01-01

    德沃金的权利理论是一种个人主义权利观,“诠释”与“人性尊严”是其中的两个关键词。“诠释”确定了权利的表现形式,权利表现为一种个体性的诠释实践;“人性尊严”则赋予权利以价值,权利的价值在于它承认与尊重每一个人的内在价值与责任。《认真对待权利》、《法律帝国》与《刺猬正义》这三部著作代表了德沃金权利理论的三个发展阶段,权利的个人主义观念在此过程中得以形成与完善。该权利观虽然极为精致且具有说服力,但并非理解权利的唯一可能路径。%Dworkin’s rights theory bears the feature of individualism with two key words , namely,“Inter-pretation” and “human dignity”.“Interpretation” determines the form of rights , which indicate an individual-ized interpretative practice .While “human dignity” confers value on rights , thus the value of rights is to rec-ognize and respect every one ’ s innate value and responsibility .The rights theory of Dworkin is developed in three phases represented respectively by his three books of Taking Rights Seriously , Law’s Empire, and Jus-tice for Hedgehogs , in which his individualism conception of rights is formed and developed .Although this rights theory is delicate and persuasive , it is not the exclusive approach to understanding of rights .

  2. Occurrence of bacteria and biochemical markers on public surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kelly A; Watt, Pamela M; Boone, Stephanie A; Gerba, Charles P

    2005-06-01

    From 1999-2003, the hygiene of 1061 environmental surfaces from shopping, daycare, and office environments, personal items, and miscellaneous activities (i.e., gymnasiums, airports, movie theaters, restaurants, etc.), in four US cities, was monitored. Samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliform bacteria, protein, and biochemical markers. Biochemical markers, i.e., hemoglobin (blood marker), amylase (mucus, saliva, sweat, and urine marker), and urea (urine and sweat marker) were detected on 3% (26/801); 15% (120/801), and 6% (48/801) of the surfaces, respectively. Protein (general hygiene marker) levels > or = 200 microg/10 cm2 were present on 26% (200/801) of the surfaces tested. Surfaces from children's playground equipment and daycare centers were the most frequently contaminated (biochemical markers on 36%; 15/42 and 46%; 25/54, respectively). Surfaces from the shopping, miscellaneous activities, and office environments were positive for biochemical markers with a frequency of 21% (69/333), 21% (66/308), and 11% (12/105), respectively). Sixty samples were analyzed for biochemical markers and bacteria. Total and fecal coliforms were detected on 20% (12/60) and 7% (4/ 60) of the surfaces, respectively. Half and one-third of the sites positive for biochemical markers were also positive for total and fecal coliforms, respectively. Artificial contamination of public surfaces with an invisible fluorescent tracer showed that contamination from outside surfaces was transferred to 86% (30/ 35) of exposed individual's hands and 82% (29/35) tracked the tracer to their home or personal belongings hours later. Results provide information on the relative hygiene of commonly encountered public surfaces and aid in the identification of priority environments where contaminant occurrence and risk of exposure may be greatest. Children's playground equipment is identified as a priority surface for additional research on the occurrence of and potential exposure to infectious

  3. Individualizing Medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds. PMID:10915458

  4. 学术型硕士研究生个性化培养的调查与思考%The Investigation and Reflection on the Individualized Cultivation of Academic Postgraduate Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘苏强; 黄莎

    2014-01-01

    The current cultivation condition of the academic postgraduates were investigated and analyzed from the aspect of the learning motivation,learning attitude,employment intention and employment status. The results shows that academic postgraduates are intellectuals who have diverse development requirements and with great po-tential for growth. Along with large - scale recruit postgraduates and diverse development of economy and society,a single academic training model can hardly meet the diverse development requirements of postgraduates and the di-verse development of economy and society. Therefore,not only the individualized development requirements of post-graduates should be highly concerned,but also the individualized cultivation for academic postgraduates should be strengthened.%从学习动机、学习态度、就业意向和就业现状三个维度,对学术型研究生的培养状况进行调查分析。结果显示,学术型研究生是个具有多样化发展要求和多重发展潜力的知识群体,在经济社会发展多样化和研究生招生规模不断扩大的背景下,单一的学术型人才培养模式难以满足研究生多样化的发展要求和经济社会多样化的人才需求。要高度关注学术型研究生个性化发展,加强学术型研究生的个性化培养。

  5. Plasma biochemical values from apparently healthy free-ranging polar bears from Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryland, Morten; Brun, Edgar; Derocher, Andrew E; Arnemo, Jon M; Kierulf, Peter; Ølberg, Rolf-Arne; Wiig, Øystein

    2002-07-01

    To establish reference values for free-ranging polar bears (Ursus maritimus) at Svalbard, Norway, plasma samples from 15 females and 20 males were analyzed for 28 blood biochemistry parameters. Animals were chemically immobilized (Zoletil: tiletamine and zolazepam) on land at Barentsøya, Edgeøya, and the eastern coast of Spitsbergen in August 1998. All bears were apparently healthy, with ages ranging from 1-22 yr. Females had almost two times higher levels of lipase than males. Several parameters varied with age. Levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and calcium (Ca) decreased with age, being significantly higher in young individuals ( 13 yr). Globulin was lower in animals 13 yr of age, while the opposite was the case for albumin. Levels of ALP, Ca, and potassium decreased with age. We found no significant changes in total protein correlated to age, but total protein levels were higher in obese compared to lean individuals. Further, total protein levels were slightly lower and had greater variation compared to data from polar bears in captivity, which may reflect food availability for the latter group. The mean ratio between urea and creatinine was 10.9 and indicated these bears were fasting. These data provide a baseline from which to compare biochemical parameters in captive and free-ranging polar bears and will be especially valuable for future studies of polar bears at Svalbard. PMID:12238374

  6. Reflections on Ethics in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Helen R.

    2009-01-01

    Each profession has its own code of ethics. The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (2008) defines professional ethics as "the principles of conduct governing an individual or a group." The Code of Ethics of the American Library Association (ALA Council 2008) has served librarians for seventy years and reflects the ideals toward which all librarians…

  7. Biochemical Characterization of Prion Strains in Bank Voles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romolo Nonno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prions exist as different strains exhibiting distinct disease phenotypes. Currently, the identification of prion strains is still based on biological strain typing in rodents. However, it has been shown that prion strains may be associated with distinct PrPSc biochemical types. Taking advantage of the availability of several prion strains adapted to a novel rodent model, the bank vole, we investigated if any prion strain was actually associated with distinctive PrPSc biochemical characteristics and if it was possible to univocally identify strains through PrPSc biochemical phenotypes. We selected six different vole-adapted strains (three human-derived and three animal-derived and analyzed PrPSc from individual voles by epitope mapping of protease resistant core of PrPSc (PrPres and by conformational stability and solubility assay. Overall, we discriminated five out of six prion strains, while two different scrapie strains showed identical PrPSc types. Our results suggest that the biochemical strain typing approach here proposed was highly discriminative, although by itself it did not allow us to identify all prion strains analyzed.

  8. Quantitative Morphological and Biochemical Studies on Human Downy Hairs using 3-D Quantitative Phase Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, SangYun; Lee, Yuhyun; Park, Sungjin; Shin, Heejae; Yang, Jongwon; Ko, Kwanhong; Park, HyunJoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the morphological and biochemical findings on human downy arm hairs using 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques. 3-D refractive index tomograms and high-resolution 2-D synthetic aperture images of individual downy arm hairs were measured using a Mach-Zehnder laser interferometric microscopy equipped with a two-axis galvanometer mirror. From the measured quantitative images, the biochemical and morphological parameters of downy hairs were non-invasively quantified including the mean refractive index, volume, cylinder, and effective radius of individual hairs. In addition, the effects of hydrogen peroxide on individual downy hairs were investigated.

  9. [Concept analysis of reflective thinking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vuuren, M; Botes, A

    1999-09-01

    The nursing practice is described as a scientific practice, but also as a practice where caring is important. The purpose of nursing education is to provide competent nursing practitioners. This implies that future practitioners must have both critical analytical thinking abilities, as well as empathy and moral values. Reflective thinking could probably accommodate these thinking skills. It seems that the facilitation of reflective thinking skills is essential in nursing education. The research question that is relevant in this context is: "What is reflective thinking?" The purpose of this article is to report on the concept analysis of reflective thinking and in particular on the connotative meaning (critical attributes) thereof. The method used to perform the concept analysis is based on the original method of Wilson (1987) as described by Walker & Avant (1995). As part of the concept analysis the connotations (critical attributes) are identified, reduced and organized into three categories, namely pre-requisites, processes and outcomes. A model case is described which confirms the essential critical attributes of reflective thinking. Finally a theoretical definition of reflective thinking is derived and reads as follows: Reflective thinking is a cyclic, hierarchical and interactive construction process. It is initiated, extended and continued because of personal cognitive-affective interaction (individual dimension) as well as interaction with the social environment (social dimension). to realize reflective thinking, a level of internalization on the cognitive and affective domain is required. The result of reflective thinking is a integrated framework of knowledge (meaningful learning) and a internalized value system providing a new perspective on and better understanding of a problem. Reflective thinking further leads to more effective decision making- and problem solving skills. PMID:11040626

  10. Individualized Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    IntelliWeb and IntelliPrint, products from MicroMass Communications, utilize C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a development and delivery expert systems tool developed at Johnson Space Center. IntelliWeb delivers personalized messages by dynamically creating single web pages or entire web sites based on information provided by each website visitor. IntelliPrint is a product designed to create tailored, individualized messages via printed media. The software uses proprietary technology to generate printed messages that are personally relevant and tailored to meet each individual's needs. Intelliprint is in use in many operations including Brystol-Myers Squibb's personalized newsletter, "Living at Your Best," geared to each recipient based on a health and lifestyle survey taken earlier; and SmithKline Beecham's "Nicorette Committed Quitters Program," in which customized motivational materials support participants in their attempt to quit smoking.

  11. Collective individualism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baarts, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Safety knowledge appears to be ‘a doing’. In construction work safety is practised in the complex interrelationship between the individual, pair and gang. Thus the aim is to explore the nature and scope of individualist and collectivist preferences pertaining to the practice of safety at a...... construction site. An ethnographic fieldwork, in which the researcher worked as an apprentice, will provide detailed and experiencenear insights into the complexity of these processes. Findings show that individualist and collectivist preferences influence the amount of risk the individual worker will assume...... and expose workmates to. Aspects such as self-regulation, self-confidence and independence are acceptable values only to the extent that they do not pose a threat to the solidarity of the community or safety of other workers. The informal practice of safety is a tight-rope act that involves balancing...

  12. Individual monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Practical Radiation Technical Manual is one of a series which has been designed to provide guidance on radiological protection for employers, Radiation Protection Officers, managers and other technically competent persons who have a responsibility to ensure the safety of employees working with ionizing radiation. The Manual may be used together with the appropriate IAEA Practical Radiation Safety Manual to provide adequate training, instruction or information on individual monitoring for all employees engaged in work with ionizing radiations. Sources of ionizing radiation have a large number of applications in the workplace. The exposures of the individual workers involved may need to be routinely monitored and records kept of their cumulative radiation doses. There are also occasions when it is necessary to retrospectively determine a dose which may have been received by a worker. This Manual explains the basic terminology associated with individual monitoring and describes the principal types of dosimeters and other related techniques and their application in the workplace. The Manual will be of most benefit if it forms part of more comprehensive training or is supplemented by the advice of a qualified expert in radiation protection. Most of the dosimeters and techniques described in this Manual can only be provided by qualified experts

  13. Quantitative Morphological and Biochemical Studies on Human Downy Hairs using 3-D Quantitative Phase Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, Yuhyun; Park, Sungjin; Shin, Heejae; Yang, Jongwon; Ko, Kwanhong; Park, HyunJoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the morphological and biochemical findings on human downy arm hairs using 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques. 3-D refractive index tomograms and high-resolution 2-D synthetic aperture images of individual downy arm hairs were measured using a Mach-Zehnder laser interferometric microscopy equipped with a two-axis galvanometer mirror. From the measured quantitative images, the biochemical and morphological parameters of downy hairs were non-invasively quantified inclu...

  14. Biochemical and lysosomal biomarkers in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis from the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschino, Vanessa; Da Ros, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Biomarkers are internationally recognized as useful tools in marine coastal biomonitoring, in particular, as early-warning signals at the level of individual organisms to assess biological effects of pollutants and other stressors. In the present study, Mytilus galloprovincialis has been employed as a sentinel organism to assess biological pollution effects in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Southern Italy), a coastal lagoon divided into two small inlets, connected to the open sea through one natural and one artificial narrow openings. Mussels were collected in June 2013 at three sites located within each of the two inlets of the Mar Piccolo. Biological effects were investigated through a suite of biomarkers suitable to reflect effects and/or exposure to contaminants at biochemical and cellular levels. Biochemical biomarkers included glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activities; as histochemical biomarkers, lysosomal membrane stability, lipofuscin and neutral lipid accumulation, and lysosomal structural changes were considered. As a whole, results highlighted differences among the three study sites, particularly for GST, AChE, and lipofuscins, which are consistent with the variations of the chemical pollutants in sediments. The applied biomarkers showed that a stress syndrome likely to be ascribed to environmental pollutants is occurring in mussels living in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto, in particular, the ones inhabiting the first inlet. PMID:26160119

  15. Individual responsibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Prof. Ph.D. Paul Marinescu

    2005-01-01

    When, and how far, should individuals assume responsibility for their own disadvantages themselves, and when, in contrast to this, is it right for society as a collective body to try to remedy or mitigate disadvantage? Some theorists argue that in so far as disadvantages result from voluntary choices, they should be borne by the agents themselves and do not raise a case of justice for public assistance. This criterion is plausible in some cases but far from self-evident in others. In reality,...

  16. Orientations to Reflective Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Bud; Austin, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Delineates five orientations to reflective practice: immediate, technical, deliberative, dialectic, and transpersonal, each reflecting different social science bases and beliefs and values about education. Views them as interactive, interdependent, noncompeting, aspects of reflective practice. (SK)

  17. Relationship between cellular response models and biochemical mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most cellular response experiments, survival reflects the kinetics of a variety of damage and repair processes. Unfortunately, biochemical studies of molecular repair deal with mechanisms which cannot be readily correlated with these kinetic observations. The difference in these approaches sometimes leads to confusion over terms such as potentially-lethal and sublethal damage. These terms were introduced with operation definitions, derived from kinetic studies of cell survival, but some researchers have since attempted to associate them with specific biochemical mechanisms. Consequently, the terms are often used in totally different ways be different investigators. The use of carefully constructed models originating either out of assumptions based on mechanisms, or on kinetics, can be used to design experiments to eliminate some alternative kinetic schemes. In turn, some mechanisms may also be eliminated, resulting in a reduction in the number of mechanisms which must be investigated biochemically. One must take advantage of a wide range of specialized radiation procedures in order to accomplish this. Examples of the use of such specialized experimental designs, which have led to a more detailed understanding of the kinetics of both algal and mammalian cell responses, are discussed

  18. Digital daily cycles of individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Humans, like almost all animals, are phase-locked to the diurnal cycle. Most of us sleep at night and are active through the day. Because we have evolved to function with this cycle, the circadian rhythm is deeply ingrained and even detectable at the biochemical level. However, within the broader...... day-night pattern, there are individual differences: e.g., some of us are intrinsically morning-active, while others prefer evenings. In this article, we look at digital daily cycles: circadian patterns of activity viewed through the lens of auto-recorded data of communication and online activity. We...

  19. Towards a Philosophy of Reflective Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Fersing, Eliane

    1999-01-01

    Study of reflective teaching must consider the individual being, subject, and actor. This paper addresses questions to contemporary sociology about competencies of social actors and examines reflectivity which is based on the action itself, concluding that teachers must become conscious of themselves as social actors in a critical society and…

  20. Internal Structure of the Reflective Functioning Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubner, Svenja; Horz, Susanne; Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Doering, Stephan; Buchheim, Anna; Zimmermann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The Reflective Functioning Scale (RFS) was developed to assess individual differences in the ability to mentalize attachment relationships. The RFS assesses mentalization from transcripts of the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). A global score is given by trained coders on an 11-point scale ranging from antireflective to exceptionally reflective.…

  1. Reflectivity, reflexivity and situated reflective practice

    OpenAIRE

    Malthouse, R; Roffey-Barentsen, J; Watts, DM

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as ‘Situated Reflective Practice’ (SRP). The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens’s (1984) theory of structuration, this sees social life as interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported here centres on the nature of such situated reflection, considers related literature and presents the data collected in a recent small-scale st...

  2. Biochemical bases of mineral waters genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Zhernosekov

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This work directs data about mineral water genesis. The accent on balneological sense is done. We suggest the criteria of biochemical processes estimation which take part in mineral water compounds creation. These criteria can be used for illustration of dependence between waters medical properties and biochemical processes of their genesis.

  3. Individual and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bénabou, Roland; Tirole, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Society's demands for individual and corporate social responsibility as an alternative response to market and distributive failures are becoming increasingly prominent. We first draw on recent developments in the 'psychology and economics' of prosocial behavior to shed light on this trend, which reflects a complex interplay of genuine altruism, social or self image concerns, and material incentives. We then link individual concerns to corporate social responsibility, contrasting three possibl...

  4. Modes of collaborative reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Degeling, Martin; Prilla, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe different modes of collaborative reflection as processes of learning at the workplace. We explain why reflection is a decisive means of learning and - based on the modes we describe - how groups of people can be supported in reflection together. For this, we describe how scheduled, concurrent and spontaneous collaborative reflection can be supported by articulation, guidance and synergizing.

  5. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  6. Oxidation state, bioavailability & biochemical pathway define the fate of carbon in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Apostel, Carolin; Gunina, Anna; Herrmann, Anke M.; Dippold, Michaela

    2015-04-01

    Numerous experiments under laboratory and field conditions analyzed microbial utilization and mean residence time (MRT) of carbon (C) from plant and microbial residues as well as root exudates in soil. Most of these studies tested the effects of various environmental factors, such as temperature, soil moisture, texture etc. on these parameters. However, only a few studies compared the properties of the substances themselves and there is no conceptual framework based on biochemical pathways. We hypothesize that the fate of C from organic substances in soil strongly depends on the first step of their microbial utilization, specifically, on biochemical pathway and initial C oxidation state, as well as its bioavailability in soils, defined by its hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Here we introduce and evaluate a new conceptual framework based on the following parameters: 1) C oxidation state, 2) molecular weight and hydrophobicity, 3) initial biochemical pathway of a substance class in microbial cells. To assess these parameters, two databases were prepared based on the literature and own studies. The first database included only the studies with 14C or 13C position specific labeled sugars, amino acids, carboxylic acids, phenols and lipids in soil. This database allowed us to analyze microbial utilization and mineralization of organics to CO2 depending on their C oxidation state (OS) and on functional groups. Additionally, we calculated data on the bond electronegativity of all compounds investigated in these studies. The second data base included the results of 14C and 13C studies with uniformly labeled substances of various classes. This database considered the free enthalpie (Delta H) per C unit from a variety of substrates differing in their aromaticity, hydrophobicity/electronegativity and location of the substance on the van Krevelen diagram. In addition, we calculated the hydrophobicity from the electronegativity of the individual bonds and recorded their

  7. Mathematics classroom and collective reflection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, Marie; Macháčková, Jana; Hošpesová, A.

    Praha: Pedagogická fakulta UK, 2005 - (Novotná, J.), s. 307-315 ISBN 80-7290-220-2. [SEMT ´05. Praha (CZ), 21.08.2005-26.08.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA406/05/2444 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : elementary school teachers * qualified professional competence * individual and collective reflection Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  8. Non-destructive Identification of Individual Leukemia Cells by Optical Trapping Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Taylor, D S; Lane, S; Zwerdling, T; Tuscano, J; Huser, T

    2007-03-05

    Currently, a combination of technologies is typically required to assess the malignancy of cancer cells. These methods often lack the specificity and sensitivity necessary for early, accurate diagnosis. Here we demonstrate using clinical samples the application of laser trapping Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach that provides intrinsic biochemical markers for the noninvasive detection of individual cancer cells. The Raman spectra of live, hematopoietic cells provide reliable molecular fingerprints that reflect their biochemical composition and biology. Populations of normal T and B lymphocytes from four healthy individuals, and cells from three leukemia patients were analyzed, and multiple intrinsic Raman markers associated with DNA and protein vibrational modes have been identified that exhibit excellent discriminating power for cancer cell identification. A combination of two multivariate statistical methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), was used to confirm the significance of these markers for identifying cancer cells and classifying the data. The results indicate that, on average, 95% of the normal cells and 90% of the patient cells were accurately classified into their respective cell types. We also provide evidence that these markers are unique to cancer cells and not purely a function of differences in their cellular activation.

  9. Understanding reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Jacqueline Sian; Dosser, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) requires that nurses and midwives use feedback as an opportunity for reflection and learning, to improve practice. The NMC revalidation process stipulates that practitioners provide examples of how they have achieved this. To reflect in a meaningful way, it is important to understand what is meant by reflection, the skills required, and how reflection can be undertaken successfully. Traditionally, reflection occurs after an event encountered in practice. The authors challenge this perception, suggesting that reflection should be undertaken before, during and after an event. This article provides practical guidance to help practitioners use reflective models to write reflective accounts. It also outlines how the reflective process can be used as a valuable learning tool in preparation for revalidation. PMID:27154119

  10. BIOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by the following- Persistent albuminuria (>300mg/d or >200μg/min, that is confirmed on at least 2 occasions 3-6 months apart diabetic, progressive decline in the Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, elevated arterial blood pressure. The earliest biochemical criteria for the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is the presence of micro-albumin in the urine, which if left untreated will eventually lead to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD. Micro-albuminuria refers to the excretion of albumin in the urine at a rate that exceeds normal limits. The current study was conducted to establish the prevalence of micro-albuminuria in a sequential sample of diabetic patients attending hospital and OPD Clinic to determine its relationship with known and putative risk factors to identify micro- and normo-albuminuric patients in their sample for subsequent comparison in different age, sex, weight and creatinine clearance of the micro- and normo-albuminuric patients. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in one hundred patients at Saraswathi Institute of Medical Sciences, Anwarpur, Hapur, U. P. Patients having diabetes mellitus in different age group ranging from 30 to 70 years were selected. Data was analysed by SPSS software. Micro-albuminuria was observed in 35% in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It was observed that 65% patients were free from any type of albuminuria. Also micro-albuminuria was present in 10% of the patients less than 50 yrs. of age, while 15% of the patients more than 50 yrs. of age were having micro-albuminuria. There was a statistically significant correlation of micro-albuminuria with duration of diabetes. Incidence of micro-albuminuria increases with age as well as increased duration of diabetes mellitus. Our study shows that only 5% patients developed macro-albuminuria. Glycosylated haemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose was significantly raised among all these

  11. Mango Supplementation Improves Blood Glucose in Obese Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Shirley F; Maureen Meister; Maryam Mahmood; Heba Eldoumi; Sandra Peterson; Penelope Perkins-Veazie; Clarke, Stephen L.; Mark Payton; Smith, Brenda J; Edralin A. Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study examined the effects of freeze-dried mango (Mangifera indica L.) supplementation on anthropometrics, body composition, and biochemical parameters in obese individuals. Twenty obese adults (11 males and 9 females) ages 20- to 50-years old, received 10 g/day of ground freeze-dried mango pulp for 12 weeks. Anthropometrics, biochemical parameters, and body composition were assessed at baseline and final visits of the study. After 12 weeks, mango supplementation significantly redu...

  12. Biochemical genetics of some Indian fishes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.; Qasim, S.Z.

    Studies on biochemical genetics of fishes, using electrophoretic methods, are relatively of recent origin. Earlier serum and eye lens protein were used to identify marine populations. This technique showed that closely related species have...

  13. Physics and Electro-Biochemical Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad P Pritscher

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Not Available Keywords: Biochemical technology, physics Received: 22 October 2008 / Received in revised form: 23 October 2008, Accepted: 24 October 2008 Published online: 07 January 2009

  14. Free energy simulations of important biochemical processes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang LIU; 刘洋

    2013-01-01

    Free energy simulations have been widely employed to compute the thermodynamic properties of many important biochemical processes. In the first part of this dissertation, two important biochemical processes, protonation/deprotonation of acid in solution and solvation of small organic molecules, are investigated using free energy simulations. Accurate computation of the pKa value of a compound in solution is important and challenging. To efficiently simulate the free energy change associat...

  15. Square and Delta reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Fontanella, Laura; Hayut, Yair

    2016-01-01

    Starting from infinitely many supercompact cardinals, we force a model of ZFC where $\\aleph_{\\omega^2+1}$ satisfies simultaneously a strong principle of reflection, called $\\Delta$-reflection, and a version of the square principle, denoted $\\square(\\aleph_{\\omega^2+1}).$ Thus we show that $\\aleph_{\\omega^2+1}$ can satisfy simultaneously a strong reflection principle and an anti-reflection principle.

  16. RMBNToolbox: random models for biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemi Jari

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing interest to model biochemical and cell biological networks, as well as to the computational analysis of these models. The development of analysis methodologies and related software is rapid in the field. However, the number of available models is still relatively small and the model sizes remain limited. The lack of kinetic information is usually the limiting factor for the construction of detailed simulation models. Results We present a computational toolbox for generating random biochemical network models which mimic real biochemical networks. The toolbox is called Random Models for Biochemical Networks. The toolbox works in the Matlab environment, and it makes it possible to generate various network structures, stoichiometries, kinetic laws for reactions, and parameters therein. The generation can be based on statistical rules and distributions, and more detailed information of real biochemical networks can be used in situations where it is known. The toolbox can be easily extended. The resulting network models can be exported in the format of Systems Biology Markup Language. Conclusion While more information is accumulating on biochemical networks, random networks can be used as an intermediate step towards their better understanding. Random networks make it possible to study the effects of various network characteristics to the overall behavior of the network. Moreover, the construction of artificial network models provides the ground truth data needed in the validation of various computational methods in the fields of parameter estimation and data analysis.

  17. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  18. Reflective practice: A Guide to Reflective Practice with Workbook: For post graduate and post experience learners

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Gillian; Blake, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this guide is to assist individuals to : • Engage in the reflective process to encourage professional and personal development • Help understand the importance of reflection and to practice using the tools and techniques to support reflective practice • Allow the exploration of work experiences and to make sense of them in the context of academic theory and contemporary thinking • blend the structured learning experience with the unstructured experiences in lif...

  19. Reflection Positive Doubles

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce reflection positive doubles, a general framework for reflection positivity, covering a wide variety of systems in statistical physics and quantum field theory. These systems may be bosonic, fermionic, or parafermionic in nature. Within the framework of reflection positive doubles, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for reflection positivity. We use a reflection-invariant cone to implement our construction. Our characterization allows for a direct interpretation in terms of coupling constants, making it easy to check in concrete situations. We illustrate our methods with numerous examples.

  20. Digital Daily Cycles of Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Lehmann, Sune; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-10-01

    Humans, like almost all animals, are phase-locked to the diurnal cycle. Most of us sleep at night and are active through the day. Because we have evolved to function with this cycle, the circadian rhythm is deeply ingrained and even detectable at the biochemical level. However, within the broader day-night pattern, there are individual differences: e.g., some of us are intrinsically morning-active, while others prefer evenings. In this article, we look at digital daily cycles: circadian patterns of activity viewed through the lens of auto-recorded data of communication and online activity. We begin at the aggregate level, discuss earlier results, and illustrate differences between population-level daily rhythms in different media. Then we move on to the individual level, and show that there is a strong individual-level variation beyond averages: individuals typically have their distinctive daily pattern that persists in time. We conclude by discussing the driving forces behind these signature daily patterns, from personal traits (morningness/eveningness) to variation in activity level and external constraints, and outline possibilities for future research.

  1. Digital Daily Cycles of Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talayeh eAledavood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Humans, like almost all animals, are phase-locked to the diurnal cycle. Most of us sleep at night and are active through the day. Because we have evolved to function with this cycle, the circadian rhythm is deeply ingrained and even detectable at the biochemical level. However, within the broader day-night pattern, there are individual differences: e.g., some of us are intrinsically morning-active, while others prefer evenings. In this article, we look at digital daily cycles: circadian patterns of activity viewed through the lens of auto-recorded data of communication and online activity. We begin at the aggregate level, discuss earlier results, and illustrate differences between population-level daily rhythms in different media. Then we move on to the individual level, and show that there is a strong individual-level variation beyond averages: individuals typically have their distinctive daily pattern that persists in time. We conclude by discussing the driving forces behind these signature daily patterns, from personal traits (morningness/eveningness to variation in activity level and external constraints, and outline possibilities for future research.

  2. Classification and fingerprinting of different berries based on biochemical profiling and antioxidant capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Milivojević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the biochemical composition of six berry types belonging to Fragaria, Rubus, Vaccinium and Ribes genus. Fruit samples were collected in triplicate (50 fruit each from 18 different species or cultivars of the mentioned genera, during three years (2008 to 2010. Content of individual sugars, organic acids, flavonols, and phenolic acids were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis, while total phenolics (TPC and total antioxidant capacity (TAC, by using spectrophotometry. Principal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical cluster analysis (CA were performed to evaluate the differences in fruit biochemical profile. The highest contents of bioactive components were found in Ribes nigrum and in Fragaria vesca, Rubus plicatus, and Vaccinium myrtillus. PCA and CA were able to partially discriminate between berries on the basis of their biochemical composition. Individual and total sugars, myricetin, ellagic acid, TPC and TAC showed the highest impact on biochemical composition of the berry fruits. CA separated blackberry, raspberry, and blueberry as isolate groups, while classification of strawberry, black and red currant in a specific group has not occurred. There is a large variability both between and within the different types of berries. Metabolite fingerprinting of the evaluated berries showed unique biochemical profiles and specific combination of bioactive compound contents.

  3. [INVITED] Tilted fiber grating mechanical and biochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tuan; Liu, Fu; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) is a new kind of fiber-optic sensor that possesses all the advantages of well-established Bragg grating technology in addition to being able to excite cladding modes resonantly. This device opens up a multitude of opportunities for single-point sensing in hard-to-reach spaces with very controllable cross-sensitivities, absolute and relative measurements of various parameters, and an extreme sensitivity to materials external to the fiber without requiring the fiber to be etched or tapered. Over the past five years, our research group has been developing multimodal fiber-optic sensors based on TFBG in various shapes and forms, always keeping the device itself simple to fabricate and compatible with low-cost manufacturing. This paper presents a brief review of the principle, fabrication, characterization, and implementation of TFBGs, followed by our progress in TFBG sensors for mechanical and biochemical applications, including one-dimensional TFBG vibroscopes, accelerometers and micro-displacement sensors; two-dimensional TFBG vector vibroscopes and vector rotation sensors; reflective TFBG refractometers with in-fiber and fiber-to-fiber configurations; polarimetric and plasmonic TFBG biochemical sensors for in-situ detection of cell, protein and glucose.

  4. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  5. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs...

  6. Biochemical changes of saliva in tobacco chewers tobacco smokers, alcohol consumers, leukoplakia and oral cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Girja K; Sundharam B; Krishnan P; Devi C

    2002-01-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. Oral fluids provide an easily available non-invasive for the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases and clinical situations. The present study evaluated the variations in the biochemical constituents of saliva of leukoplakia and oral cancer patients when compared with that of the control group. 90 individuals were grouped into 6 categories with 15 individuals in each group. The groups included ind...

  7. Dance for Individuals With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapum, Jennifer L; Bar, Rachel J

    2016-03-01

    The movement and music associated with dance plays an important role in many individuals' lives and can become imprinted upon the body and mind. Dance is thus closely associated with memory because of these deep connections. Without conscious thought, dance has the potential to be initiated as individuals age. In the current article, the authors share narrative reflections about their experiences with, and the potential of, dance as an intervention for aging populations diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. They draw upon their experiences in working with the aging population and a dance program currently being developed by Canada's National Ballet School and Baycrest Health Sciences for individuals with dementia-related diseases in long-term care. The current article is structured as dialogue between the authors because it mimics dance as a dialogical encounter between movement and music, and/or between individuals. PMID:26935188

  8. Relationship Between Hyperspectral Parameters and Physiological and Biochemical Indexes of Flue-Cured Tobacco Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang-yang; LIU Guo-shun; YANG Yong-feng; ZHAO Chun-hua; YU Qi-wei; SONG Shi-xu

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was set up for examining the physiological and biological indexes quickly and exactly, for obtaining information of tobacco-field fertilizing and tobacco growing. The ASD Field spec FR 2500 was used to measure spectra reflectance of flue-cured tobacco and the relationship between hyperspectral parameters and biochemical contents (total nitrogen, chlorophyll, carotenoid), and physiological indexes (fresh weight, dry weight, moisture content) of flue-cured tobacco leaves was studied by correlation and stepwise regression statistic methods at different nitrogen and potassium levels. The results indicated that the spectra curves of different treatments had obvious rules and great diversities. There were high correlations between different types of spectra parameters and ten physiological and biochemical indexes of flue-cured tobacco leaves. Hyperspectral characteristic variables of ten physiological and biochemical indexes were found through stepwise regression, and SDr/SDb was the characteristic variable closest to seven biochemical contents. Simultaneously, the R2 and regression coefficient of equations reached 0.05 significant level and the equations had good estimating effects through the examination of other samples. Accordingly, this study suggested that the ten physiological and biochemical indexes could be estimated quickly by the estimating models, at the same time nitrogen-potassium fertilization and growth condition of flue-cured tobacco could be inspected.

  9. Media for Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This article develops the concept media for reflection in the interest of conceptualizing the interpretative frames that enable and limit reflection in management and leadership education. The concept ‘media for reflection’ allows us to conceptualize the social and cultural mediation of reflection...... without reducing reflection to an effect of the social structures and cultural norms in which it is embedded. Based on the developed theoretical framework, this article analyses how a renaissance ‘mirror for princes’ and contemporary research-based management education mediate reflection. The content of...... the mediations is analysed as well as the societal and organizational background. Furthermore, the means by which the two media enable and limit reflection in different ways is compared. Finally, the article discusses possible implications of the analysis in terms of management and leadership...

  10. Individual Differences in Susceptibility to Inattentional Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, Janelle K.; Watson, Jason M.; Strayer, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Inattentional blindness refers to the finding that people do not always see what appears in their gaze. Though inattentional blindness affects large percentages of people, it is unclear if there are individual differences in susceptibility. The present study addressed whether individual differences in attentional control, as reflected by…

  11. Reconfigurable neuromorphic computation in biochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hui-Ju Katherine; Jiang, Jie-Hong R; Fages, Francois

    2015-08-01

    Implementing application-specific computation and control tasks within a biochemical system has been an important pursuit in synthetic biology. Most synthetic designs to date have focused on realizing systems of fixed functions using specifically engineered components, thus lacking flexibility to adapt to uncertain and dynamically-changing environments. To remedy this limitation, an analog and modularized approach to realize reconfigurable neuromorphic computation with biochemical reactions is presented. We propose a biochemical neural network consisting of neuronal modules and interconnects that are both reconfigurable through external or internal control over the concentrations of certain molecular species. Case studies on classification and machine learning applications using the DNA strain displacement technology demonstrate the effectiveness of our design in both reconfiguration and autonomous adaptation. PMID:26736417

  12. Psychosomatic concept of hyperthyroidism - Graves type: Behavioral and biochemical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draganić-Gajić Saveta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this study we test the hypothesis that specific behavioral and biochemical vulnerabilities characterize individuals with hyperthyroidism - Graves type, one of the classically cited 'psychosomatic disorders'. Material and methods. The sample included 24 subjects with Graves disease and 34 controls. All participants were evaluated for personality and temperament characteristics and for platelet MAO activity. A smaller group of panic disorder patients was tested with the same set of measures to ensure a validity of the study, especially regarding results on personality tests. RESULTS. Individuals with hyperthyroidism had lower platelet MAO activity and higher scores on histrionic (Hy, depressive (D and hypochondriac (H subscale on the MMPI-201 than normal controls. Their TPQ temperament scores were characterized by high Harm Avoidance, whereas other temperament traits were average. Platelet MAO activity was inversely correlated with the MMPI-201 psychopatic deviance scale (Pd and positively correlated with the TPQ Reward Dependence scale. CONCLUSIONS. Our results provide support for the psychosomatic concept of Graves' disease. Personality features, temperament traits, and platelet MAO activity of hyperthyroid individuals are different from those in normal controls and correspond to those observed in anxiety disorders. We propose that the observed behavioral and biochemical similaritites between hyperthyroid and anxiety disorder patients represent an equicausality phenomenon, where the same underlying heritable factors, such as variable central monoaminergic activity coupled with temperament-related susceptibility to stress, facilitate phenotypic manifestation of a number of psychosomatic and psychiatric disorders - including Graves disease. The observed correlations between personality traits and MAO activity provide support for the hypothesized functional relationship between the underlying central monoaminergic activity and

  13. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Reflective monitoring of research practices is essential. However, we often lack formal training in the practices of doing action research, and descriptions of actual inquiry practice are seldom included in publications. Our aim is to provide a glimpse of self-reflective practices based on our...

  14. Reflecting Magnon Bound States

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, C; Rey, S J

    2008-01-01

    In N=4 super Yang-Mills spin chain, we compute reflection amplitudes of magnon bound-state off giant graviton. We first compute the reflection amplitude off Y=0 brane boundary and compare it with the scattering amplitude between two magnon bound-states in the bulk. We find that analytic structure of the two amplitudes are intimately related each other: the boundary reflection amplitude is a square-root of the bulk scattering amplitude. Using such relation as a guide and taking known results at weak and strong coupling limits as inputs, we find the reflection amplitude of an elementary magnon off Z=0 giant graviton boundary. The reflection phase factor is shown to solve crossing and unitarity relations. We then compute the reflection amplitude of magnon bound-state off the Z=0 brane boundary and observe that its analytic structures are again intimately related to the bulk scattering and the Y=0 boundary reflection amplitudes. We also take dyonic giant magnon limit of these reflection amplitudes and confirm tha...

  15. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  16. Biochemical software: Carbohydrates on Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Heidrich

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Educators around  the  world  are  being  challenged  to  develop  and  design  better and  more  effective strategies for student learning  using a variety  of modern  resources.  In this  present  work, an educa- tional  hypermedia  software  was constructed as a support tool to biochemistry teaching.  Occurrence, structure, main  characteristics and  biological  function  of the  biomolecule  Carbohydrates were pre- sented  through  modules.  The  software was developed  using concept  maps,  ISIS-Draw,  and  FLASH- MX animation program.  The chapter  Carbohydrates on Laboratory illustrates experimental methods of carbohydrates characterization, through  animation of a laboratory scenery.   The  subject was de- veloped showing reactions  as Bial, Benedict, Selliwanoff, Barfoed, Phenol  Sulphuric,  and Iodines, and also enzymatic  reactions  as glucose oxidase and amylase.  There are also links with short texts  in order to help the understanding of the contents  and principles of laboratory practice  as well as background reactions. Application of the software to undergraduate students and high school teachers  showed an excellent  acceptance.   All of them  considered  the  software  a very good learning  tool.  Both  teachers and students welcomed this program  as it is more flexible, and allows the learning in a more individual rhythm. In addition, application of the software would be suitable  to a more effective learning  and it is less expensive than conventional experimental teaching.

  17. Reflecting on Čerenkov reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, D.; Gaug, M.; Oliva, P.

    2008-05-01

    MAGIC, as well as HESS and VERITAS, is a Čerenkov Telescope unveiling γ-ray sources above 60 GeV at vertical within noisy (hadronic) airshowering sky. These telescopes while facing the horizons may reveal rarest blazing UHECR as well as far fluorescence tails of downward PeV-EeV hadronic airshowers. Few of these inclined airshowers blazing on axis are spread by the geomagnetic field into twin spots. These twin flashes and their morphology may tag the UHECR origination site. There is a rich window of such reflecting Čerenkov lights visible by Telescopes on top of Mountains as MAGIC (and partially VERITAS): the reflections from the nearby ground (possibly enhanced by rain or snow, ice white cover), from the Sea and from the cloudy sky; in particular, these cloudy sheets may lay above or below the observer. MAGIC looking downward to the clouds or the snow, may well reveal blazing Moliere disks diffusing Čerenkov spots (few events per night). Because of geomagnetic forces and splitting of the inclined air-shower, one should reveal for the first time (at tens PeV or above) Čerenkov airshowers whose flashes are skimming the MAGIC nearby Sea and opened into twin spots. Their morphology may tag the UHECR origination, its consequent cross-section and composition. Magic telescopes looking upward into cloudy sky may observe very rare up-going UHE Tau, originated by UHE PeVs neutrinos skimming earth, air-showering into sky, reflecting into clouds. In particular Glashow resonant antineutrinos electron hitting into Earth electrons may lead to gauged boson W-, whose decay (inside the Earth) may produce a τ + bar nuτ [3], which later escape and decay in air is producing Čerenkov lights; these flashes may blaze into the clouds above MAGIC as upward dot spots. The Magic energy threshold for such UHE Neutrinos showers rises to PeV values. EeV UHE tau neutrinos by guaranteed GZK UHECR secondaries [6, 16], via the muon-tau flavor mixing, may skim the Earth, produce UHE tau

  18. Total synthesis and biochemical evaluation of azumamides A–E and analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jesper

    NMR solution structures we hypothesize that the 2-methyl group, found in the natural products, guides the 3-side chain towards the active site. Judging from the biochemical data on the desmethylated series, this directing feature is important for the activity of this type of inhibitors. Furthermore, a......Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are a family of enzymes, which serve as epigenetic modulators. Their biological function has been related to DNA transcription and regulation of various biochemical pathways. Development of isoform selective HDAC inhibitors could be useful for dissecting the individual...... biochemical pathways associated with each HDAC isoform and these compounds could potentially serve as anti-cancer drugs. Macrocyclic peptides and depsipeptides is an interesting class of HDAC inhibitors, which are found in Nature. These compounds are characterized by being highly potent and moderate selective...

  19. Sewage Reflects the Microbiomes of Human Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan J Newton; McLellan, Sandra L.; Dila, Deborah K.; Vineis, Joseph H; Morrison, Hilary G; Eren, A. Murat; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molecular characterizations of the gut microbiome from individual human stool samples have identified community patterns that correlate with age, disease, diet, and other human characteristics, but resources for marker gene studies that consider microbiome trends among human populations scale with the number of individuals sampled from each population. As an alternative strategy for sampling populations, we examined whether sewage accurately reflects the microbial community of a mixt...

  20. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  1. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  2. Survey of Biochemical Education in Japanese Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Reports findings of questionnaires sent to faculty in charge of biochemical education in medical schools and other programs from dentistry to agriculture. Total class hours have declined since 1984. New trends include bioethics and computer-assisted learning. Tables show trends in lecture hours, lecture content, laboratory hours, core subject…

  3. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve

  4. 2009 Biochemical Conversion Platform Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, John [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion platform review meeting, held on April 14-16, 2009, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown, Denver, Colorado.

  5. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  6. Reflection and teaching: a taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Henk; Cowan, John

    2009-01-01

    A major problem in teaching reflection is that educational objectives for reflection in terms of student behaviour are lacking. Therefore a taxonomy of reflection has been developed based on Bloom’s taxonomy. Reflective assignments can then be better focused on any chosen educational objectives. The act of reflection has been analysed and abstracted from goal, content, context, means, and moment of reflecting. Reflection was operationalised as answering reflective questions. Bloom’s taxonomy ...

  7. Review of Teacher's Teaching Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爽爽

    2015-01-01

    Teacher's teaching reflection has become the core focus in school.However,there are different understandings of the concept of teacher's teaching reflection.The paper introduces and compares different understandings of the concept of teachers' teaching reflection.Based on the summarizing of the concept on reflection and teaching reflection,this paper tries to provide reference for the teacher's teaching reflection.

  8. Value reflected health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of a value-reflected approach in health education by demonstrating the nature of professional competence development connected to this approach. It is based on findings from two three-year health educational development projects carried out by school health nurses...... and researchers at primary schools in Denmark from 2004-2009. We argue for the importance of reflecting on values in school health nursing in order to navigate between human values and values deriving from medicine. Our studies demonstrate that value clarification, peer observation and reflective spaces at work...... develop pedagogical competences in health education improving school childrens’ health....

  9. A Statistical Evaluation of Rules for Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy in Men Treated for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The 'PSA nadir + 2 rule,' defined as any rise of 2 ng/ml above the current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir, has replaced the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) rule, defined as three consecutive PSA rises, to indicate biochemical failure (BF) after radiotherapy in patients treated for prostate cancer. We propose an original approach to evaluate BF rules based on the PSAdt as the gold standard rule and on a simulation process allowing us to evaluate the BF rules under multiple settings (different frequency, duration of follow-up, PSA doubling time [PSAdt]). Methods and Materials: We relied on a retrospective, population-based cohort of individuals identified by the Connecticut Tumor Registry and treated for localized prostate cancer with radiotherapy. We estimated the 470 underlying true PSA trajectories, including the PSAdt, using a Bayesian hierarchical changepoint model. Next, we simulated realistic, sophisticated data sets that accurately reflect the systematic and random variations observed in PSA series. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity by comparing the simulated PSA series to the underlying true PSAdt. Results: For follow-up of more than 3 years, the specificity of the PSA nadir + 2 rule was systematically greater than that of the ASTRO criterion. In few settings, the nadir + 2 rule had a lower sensitivity than the ASTRO. The PSA nadir + 2 rule appeared less dependent on the frequency and duration of follow-up than the ASTRO. Conclusions: Our results provide some refinements to earlier findings as the BF rules were evaluated according to various parameters. In most settings, the PSA nadir + 2 rule outperforms the ASTRO criterion.

  10. Biochemical markers of bone metabolism reflect osteoclastic and osteoblastic activity in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, N; Glerup, H; Rungby, Jørgen;

    2000-01-01

    histomorphometric findings. MARKERS OF BONE FORMATION: Serum C-terminal propeptide of procollagen I (PICP) and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bAP) showed significant correlations with the dynamic parameters of bone formation (r=0.57-0.58), whereas serum osteocalcin and serum total AP did not. CYTOKINES......: Highly significant correlations were observed between marrow IL-6 and rates of bone resorption and activation frequency (r=0.76-0.82) and with serum ICTP (r=0.63). Minor, but also significant correlations were observed between the resorptive indices and IL-6sR and IL-1beta. The data indicate that...

  11. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikos V Margaritelis; Veskoukis, Aristidis S.; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Michalis G. Nikolaidis; Ioannis S. Vrabas

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise...

  12. Hybrid Nanogenerator for Concurrently Harvesting Biomechanical and Biochemical Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Hansen, Benjamin J.

    2010-07-27

    Harvesting energy from multiple sources available in our personal and daily environments is highly desirable, not only for powering personal electronics, but also for future implantable sensor-transmitter devices for biomedical and healthcare applications. Here we present a hybrid energy scavenging device for potential in vivo applications. The hybrid device consists of a piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofiber nanogenerator for harvesting mechanical energy, such as from breathing or from the beat of a heart, and a flexible enzymatic biofuel cell for harvesting the biochemical (glucose/O2) energy in biofluid, which are two types of energy available in vivo. The two energy harvesting approaches can work simultaneously or individually, thereby boosting output and lifetime. Using the hybrid device, we demonstrate a "self-powered" nanosystem by powering a ZnO nanowire UV light sensor. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Modeling isotopomer distributions in biochemical networks using isotopomer mapping matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Karsten; Carlsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens Bredal;

    1997-01-01

    Within the last decades NMR spectroscopy has undergone tremendous development and has become a powerful analytical tool for the investigation of intracellular flux distributions in biochemical networks using C-13-labeled substrates. Not only are the experiments much easier to conduct than...... experiments employing radioactive tracer elements, but NMR spectroscopy also provides additional information on the labeling pattern of the metabolites. Whereas the maximum amount of information obtainable with C-14-labeled substrates is the fractional enrichment in the individual carbon atom positions, NMR...... spectroscopy can also provide information on the degree of labeling at neighboring carbon atom positions by analyzing multiplet patterns in NMR spectra or using 2-dimensional NMR spectra. It is possible to quantify the mole fractions of molecules that show a specific labeling pattern, i.e., information of the...

  14. Physiological and biochemical reaction of anxiety among individuals with different special characteristics under military stress%军事应激状态下不同特质焦虑者发生状态焦虑生理与生化的变化差异

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽杰; 董兆伦; 严进; 于军; 董建树; 刘爱丽

    2010-01-01

    Objective To understand the difference between psychological characteristics and stress response as a result of military stress and to evaluate the rate of stress response among individuals with different psychological characteristics.Methods The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory,blood pressure,breath,pulse wave,and serum levels of lactate acid and cortisol were measured at 8 to 9 am for 372 servicemen following 15 days'training.Results In 97 subjects ,the value of special characteristic anxiety Was 2-standard deviation higher than normal model(i.e.high special characteristic anxiety).and low special characteristic anxiety was found in 79.The condition anxiety of 2 standard deviation higher than normal model wag found in 172 participants.A total of 132 subjects showed significant changes in condition anxiety,serum cortisol and lactic acid,and systolic blood pressure(P<0.01).Sixty-one or 71 subjects with high or low special characteristic anxiety experienced condition anxiety,changed serum cortisol and lactic acid,and systolic blood pressure,respectively.Conclusion Psychological characteristics may be considered as a predicting factor of stress response.%目的 了解心理特质在军事应激中与应激反应生理指标的差异,从而评估不同心理特质军人应激反应发生率.方法 在突然紧急连续机械化拉动训练第15天时,对372人进行状态-特质焦虑问卷、血压、呼吸、脉搏、血乳酸及血皮质醇(08:00am-09:00am)测定,其结果 分别与常模、正常值比较.结果 特质焦虑值高于常模2个标准差(高特质焦虑)占26.1%(97/372),特质焦虑值低于常模2个标准差(低特质焦虑者)占21.2%(79/372).状态焦虑值高于常模2个标准差的占总人数的46.0%(172/372).状态焦虑、血皮质醇、血乳酸及收缩压(四联症)同时变化显著者132人(P<0.01),舒张压变化不明显.高特质焦虑者发生"四联症"占62.9%(61/97);非高特质焦虑者发生"四联症",占25.9%(71/275),其

  15. Thinking the individual as form of individuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Mateus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will ponder the problem of the individualism through the individuation, pointing out the implications on the idea of “individual”. It attempts to find a theoretical way that allows a broader understanding of its role in human societies It will be suggested that the emphasis placed by modernity in the individual can be evaluated, not as a solipsist individualism, but as a figurational form specific of social contexts characterized by a wide objectivation of the social tissue. That means that beside individualism we can think individualizations through the seminal setting of individuation. This hypothesis is already insinuated in the German sociological thought, in particular, in the sociology of the social forms of Georg Simmel and in the process sociology of Norbert Elias.

  16. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Reflective monitoring of research practices is essential. However, we often lack formal training in the practices of doing action research, and descriptions of actual inquiry practice are seldom included in publications. Our aim is to provide a glimpse of self-reflective practices based on our...... experience of enacting action research. Our engagement in a large action research project brought about many dilemmas and uncertainties related to our roles and interventions. We focus on these uncertainties as a way of opening the ?black box? of action research ?in the making?. We conceptualize a...... methodological reflective approach that provides space for taking seriously uncertainties experienced in the field as these can be a catalyst for learning and sharpening our theoretical and empirical skills as action researchers. Through first-person inquiry, we investigate how our reflective conversations...

  17. Andreev reflection in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenakker, Carlo

    2007-03-01

    Relativity and superconductivity have no common ground in ordinary matter, because the velocity of electrons is only a small fraction of the velocity of light. The unusual band structure of a single layer of carbon atoms (graphene) contains negatively and positively charged particles that move as relativistic electrons and positrons. The electron-like particles in the conduction band can be converted into positron-like particles in the valence band when they are reflected by a superconductor. (The missing charge of 2e enters the superconductor as a Cooper pair.) This interband reflection process can be distinguished from the usual intraband Andreev reflection, because the reflection angle has the opposite sign. A new phenomenology of graphene--superconductor junctions is predicted, including an anomalous scaling of the supercurrent with the length of the junction and the existence of charge-neutral modes propagating along the interface.

  18. The Chemical Master Equation Approach to Nonequilibrium Steady-State of Open Biochemical Systems: Linear Single-Molecule Enzyme Kinetics and Nonlinear Biochemical Reaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Bishop

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We develop the stochastic, chemical master equation as a unifying approach to the dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a mesoscopic volume under a living environment. A living environment provides a continuous chemical energy input that sustains the reaction system in a nonequilibrium steady state with concentration fluctuations. We discuss the linear, unimolecular single-molecule enzyme kinetics, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC with bistability, and network exhibiting oscillations. Emphasis is paid to the comparison between the stochastic dynamics and the prediction based on the traditional approach based on the Law of Mass Action. We introduce the difference between nonlinear bistability and stochastic bistability, the latter has no deterministic counterpart. For systems with nonlinear bistability, there are three different time scales: (a individual biochemical reactions, (b nonlinear network dynamics approaching to attractors, and (c cellular evolution. For mesoscopic systems with size of a living cell, dynamics in (a and (c are stochastic while that with (b is dominantly deterministic. Both (b and (c are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network; We suggest that the (c is most relevant to major cellular biochemical processes such as epi-genetic regulation, apoptosis, and cancer immunoediting. The cellular evolution proceeds with transitions among the attractors of (b in a “punctuated equilibrium” manner.

  19. The chemical master equation approach to nonequilibrium steady-state of open biochemical systems: linear single-molecule enzyme kinetics and nonlinear biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Bishop, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    We develop the stochastic, chemical master equation as a unifying approach to the dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a mesoscopic volume under a living environment. A living environment provides a continuous chemical energy input that sustains the reaction system in a nonequilibrium steady state with concentration fluctuations. We discuss the linear, unimolecular single-molecule enzyme kinetics, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC) with bistability, and network exhibiting oscillations. Emphasis is paid to the comparison between the stochastic dynamics and the prediction based on the traditional approach based on the Law of Mass Action. We introduce the difference between nonlinear bistability and stochastic bistability, the latter has no deterministic counterpart. For systems with nonlinear bistability, there are three different time scales: (a) individual biochemical reactions, (b) nonlinear network dynamics approaching to attractors, and (c) cellular evolution. For mesoscopic systems with size of a living cell, dynamics in (a) and (c) are stochastic while that with (b) is dominantly deterministic. Both (b) and (c) are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network; We suggest that the (c) is most relevant to major cellular biochemical processes such as epi-genetic regulation, apoptosis, and cancer immunoediting. The cellular evolution proceeds with transitions among the attractors of (b) in a "punctuated equilibrium" manner. PMID:20957107

  20. Biochemical alterations induced in Hediste diversicolor under seawater acidification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Rosa; Pires, Adília; Moreira, Anthony; Wrona, Frederick J; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2016-06-01

    Seawater pH is among the environmental factors controlling the performance of marine organisms, especially in calcifying marine invertebrates. However, changes in non-calcifying organisms (including polychaetes) may also occur due to pH decrease. Polychaetes are often the most abundant group of organisms in estuarine systems, representing an important ecological and economic resource. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impacts of seawater acidification in the polychaete Hediste diversicolor, a species commonly used as bioindicator. For this, organisms were exposed to different pH levels (7.9, 7.6 and 7.3) during 28 days and several biochemical markers were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that pH decrease negatively affected osmotic regulation and polychaetes metabolism, with individuals under low pH (7.6 and 7.3) presenting higher carbonic anhydrase activity, lower energy reserves (protein and glycogen content) and higher metabolic rate (measured as Electron transport system activity). The increase on CA activity was associated to organisms osmoregulation capacity while the increase on ETS and decrease on energy reserves was associated to the polychaetes capacity to develop defense mechanisms (e.g. antioxidant defenses). In fact, despite having observed higher lipid peroxidation at pH 7.6, in polychaetes at the lowest tested pH (7.3) LPO levels were similar to values recorded in individuals under control pH (7.9). Such findings may result from higher antioxidant enzyme activity at the lowest tested pH, which prevented organisms from higher oxidative stress levels. Overall, our study demonstrated how polychaetes may respond to near-future ocean acidification conditions, exhibiting the capacity to develop biochemical strategies which will prevent organisms from lethal injuries. Such defense strategies will contribute for polychaetes populations maintenance and survival under predicted seawater acidification scenarios. PMID:27088614

  1. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  2. Kombucha tea fermentation: Microbial and biochemical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Chakraborty, Writachit; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-03-01

    Kombucha tea, a non-alcoholic beverage, is acquiring significant interest due to its claimed beneficial properties. The microbial community of Kombucha tea consists of bacteria and yeast which thrive in two mutually non-exclusive compartments: the soup or the beverage and the biofilm floating on it. The microbial community and the biochemical properties of the beverage have so far mostly been described in separate studies. This, however, may prevent understanding the causal links between the microbial communities and the beneficial properties of Kombucha tea. Moreover, an extensive study into the microbial and biochemical dynamics has also been missing. In this study, we thus explored the structure and dynamics of the microbial community along with the biochemical properties of Kombucha tea at different time points up to 21 days of fermentation. We hypothesized that several biochemical properties will change during the course of fermentation along with the shifts in the yeast and bacterial communities. The yeast community of the biofilm did not show much variation over time and was dominated by Candida sp. (73.5-83%). The soup however, showed a significant shift in dominance from Candida sp. to Lachancea sp. on the 7th day of fermentation. This is the first report showing Candida as the most dominating yeast genus during Kombucha fermentation. Komagateibacter was identified as the single largest bacterial genus present in both the biofilm and the soup (~50%). The bacterial diversity was higher in the soup than in the biofilm with a peak on the seventh day of fermentation. The biochemical properties changed with the progression of the fermentation, i.e., beneficial properties of the beverage such as the radical scavenging ability increased significantly with a maximum increase at day 7. We further observed a significantly higher D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone content and caffeine degradation property compared to previously described Kombucha tea fermentations. Our

  3. Physical and Biochemical Characteristics of Sharhabiel Reservoir Water, NW Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazem M. El-Radaideh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jordan relies heavily on rainwater stored in reservoirs because it has extremely limited alternative water resources. These reservoirs are essential for drinking water and irrigation, so monitoring their water quality is extremely important. Variations in physical and biochemical conditions were investigated at Sharhabiel Reservoir (Jordan. Water quality monitoring of Sharhabiel Dam, from January to December 2013 indicates that the dam is subject to agricultural runoff. It also revealed that mineral dissolution, sediment load, rainfall evaporation and pumping, are the major contributors to variations in water quality. The water chemistry of the impounded Sharnabiel Reservoir showed that Na, Ca, Mg, HCO3 , and Cl are the principal ions, reflecting the dominance of calcareous weathering, with some contribution of silicates. The pH values showed an irregular pattern with highest values observed in the spring months. Total dissolved solids (TDS, Ca, Mg, and HCO3 are primarily related to leaching and evaporation, with elevated levels that occurred in the winter months. In contrast, seasonal patterns in Na, K, Cl, and NH4–N contents showed decreased values in wet months. Peaks in NO3 –N observed in winter are strongly associated with agricultural runoff. Changes in chlorophyll-a level were coincided with low ratio of TN to TP. BOD5 and COD peaks in spring corresponding with high algal growth. No significant changes in most of physical and biochemical parameters with depth, probably due to shallow depth, high annual sedimentation rate and heavy pumping rate in dry months. No available recorded data for long-term monitoring of Sharhabiel reservoir water to emphasize the self-purification capacity of dam.

  4. Dynamic analysis of biochemical network using complex network method

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Shuqiang; Shen Yanyan; Hu Jinxing; Li Ning; Zeng Dewei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the stochastic biochemical reaction model is proposed based on the law of mass action and complex network theory. The dynamics of biochemical reaction system is presented as a set of non-linear differential equations and analyzed at the molecular-scale. Given the initial state and the evolution rules of the biochemical reaction system, the system can achieve homeostasis. Compared with random graph, the biochemical reaction network has larger ...

  5. Biochemical considerations in the design of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of radiopharmaceutical chemistry is to design and develop radiotracers targeted to an organ or function whose activity kinetics in tissue can be detected externally by a gamma or a positron device. Radiopharmaceuticals are divided into the general categories of specific and non-specific agents. The specific radiopharmaceuticals are the tracers that follow a biochemical pathway or are involved in a particular interaction, for example metabolic substrates, drugs or analogs, and antibodies. This paper will focus on trends in the design of specific agents. The best radionuclides for the development of specific tracers are the positron emitting nuclides: carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. First the design of radiopharmaceuticals are considered in general (labeling strategies, stereochemical effects, specific activity). Next, a brief summary of the use of several radiopharmaceuticals is presented on the basis of their biochemical rationale. (orig./G.J.P.)

  6. Cytologic-Biochemical Radiation Dosimeters in Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The result of radiation interacting with living tissue is the deposition of energy therein. This energy triggers numerous chemical reactions within the molecules of the target tissues. We have measured in man the results of some of these reactions at doses up to 300 rads: chromosome aberrations; alterations in the kinetics of specific human cell populations; changes in 37 biochemical constituents of serum and/or urine. The utilization of chromosomes as a biological dosimeter is partially perfected but there are numerous discrepancies in data between different laboratories. Etiocholanolone can be used to evaluate marrow injury before the white-cell count falls below 5000/mm3. Most biochemical dosimeters evaluated gave negative or inconsistent results. However, salivary amylase is a promising indicator of human radiation injury from doses as low as 100 rads. (author)

  7. Reconstructing biochemical pathways from time course data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srividhya, Jeyaraman; Crampin, Edmund J; McSharry, Patrick E; Schnell, Santiago

    2007-03-01

    Time series data on biochemical reactions reveal transient behavior, away from chemical equilibrium, and contain information on the dynamic interactions among reacting components. However, this information can be difficult to extract using conventional analysis techniques. We present a new method to infer biochemical pathway mechanisms from time course data using a global nonlinear modeling technique to identify the elementary reaction steps which constitute the pathway. The method involves the generation of a complete dictionary of polynomial basis functions based on the law of mass action. Using these basis functions, there are two approaches to model construction, namely the general to specific and the specific to general approach. We demonstrate that our new methodology reconstructs the chemical reaction steps and connectivity of the glycolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis from time course experimental data. PMID:17370261

  8. Optical Biochemical Platforms for Nanoparticles Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Campanella, Clarissa Martina

    2014-01-01

    In the biochemical sensing field, a fervent research activity related to the development of real time, low cost, compact and high throughput devices for the detection and characterization of natural or synthetic nanoparticles NPs actually exists. In this research scenario, different platforms for biosensing purposes have been developed according to the huge amount of physical effects involved in the transduction of the biochemical-signal into a measurable output signal. In the present work two different optical platforms for NP detection have been investigated, one based on integrated optics and the other based on microscopy. Both the approaches rely on the study of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with a small particle in the hypothesis of dealing with a Rayleigh scatterer, i.e. a nanoparticle having a size really smaller than the one of the wavelength of the incident light and scattering light elastically.

  9. Biological dosimetry: biochemical and cellular parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early after the beginning of radiobiology studies, biochemistry has led to research of a biological dosimeter. From an extensive literature review, methods were selected that might be suitable for dose assessment via biochemical indicators. By now, research both in laboratory animals and in therapeutic or accidental human exposures, do not allow to retain a biochemical parameter alone for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. Several enzymatic activities have been precociously studied after irradiation: from these studies, it seems that analysis of four enzymatic activities in serum (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, amylase, lactic dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase) could be the most useful dosimetry system for mass sorting. Detection of DNA damage or methods for measuring somatic mutations are currently advancing and provide important new opportunities for biological dosimetry of low doses

  10. Advancement in biochemical assays in andrology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolf-BernhardSchill; RaftHenkel

    1999-01-01

    Determination of maikers of sperm function, accessory sex gland secretion and silent male genital tract inflammation is of considerable diagnostic value in the evaluation of male infertility. The introduction of biochemical tests into the analysis of male factor has the advantage that standardized assays with a coefficient of variafion characteristic of clinical chemistry are performed, in contrast to biological test systems with a large variability .Biochemical parameters may be used in clinical practice to evaluate the sperm fertitizing capacity (acrosin, aniline blue,ROS), to characterize male accessory sex gland secretinns (fructose, a-glucosidase, PSA), and to identify men with silent genital tract inflammation (elastase, C'3 complement component, coeruloplasmin, IgA, IgG, ROS). (As/an J Androl 1999 Jun; 1: 45-51)

  11. Thinking the individual as form of individuation

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Mateus

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will ponder the problem of the individualism through the individuation, pointing out the implications on the idea of “individual”. It attempts to find a theoretical way that allows a broader understanding of its role in human societies It will be suggested that the emphasis placed by modernity in the individual can be evaluated, not as a solipsist individualism, but as a figurational form specific of social contexts characterized by a wide objectivation of the social tissue. Tha...

  12. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes.

  13. Variability in biochemical components of the mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) cultured after Prestige oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteiro, Laura G; Labarta, Uxío; Fernández-Reiriz, María José

    2007-05-01

    The biochemical composition (proteins, carbohydrates, glycogen, total lipids and lipid classes) of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis was investigated during an experimental culture using mussel seed from areas with different degree of exposure to the Prestige oil spill. The aim of the study was to identify alterations in the biochemical composition of mussel seed from natural populations commonly used in Galicia for mussel raft culture that might be linked to previous oil exposure. We have selected three mussel seed populations from Pindo, Miranda and Redes, that were characterised in a previous study according to the oil exposure three months after the spill. These populations were transplanted to a raft culture system in the Ría de Ares-Betanzos where our experimental culture followed standard commercial techniques from March 2003 to February 2004. Mussels from Pindo (characterised as the most affected area by the oil spill) showed marked differences in lipid composition with regard to other populations in the content of triacylglycerols, (PRedes (designed as reference area) which may reflect that Miranda mussels were not affected or only hardly affected by the spill. With the exception of the onset of the culture, biochemical composition showed similar patterns in all mussel populations. Then, the fact of being cultured in a common environment seemed to be more responsible for the long-term variability in the energetic reserve than the origin of the populations or their previous biochemical status. PMID:17360242

  14. Biochemical changes in ginger after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginger (Zingiber officinate) was irradiated with gamma rays (0.1Kgy, 1.0Kgy). Biochemical changes during storage at room temperature (23-28 degree centigrade), in sand (23-28 degree centigrade) and at cold (8 degree centigrade) temperature were observed. Changes in starch, soluble protein, fixed oil and volatile oil contents showed that treatment of ginger at 0.1Kgy radiation level was most appropriate for storage upto 45 days

  15. Prions: the danger of biochemical weapons

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Almeida Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of biotechnology increases the risk of using biochemical weapons for mass destruction. Prions are unprecedented infectious pathogens that cause a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases by a novel mechanism. They are transmissible particles that are devoid of nucleic acid. Due to their singular characteristics, Prions emerge as potential danger since they can be used in the development of such weapons. Prions cause fatal infectious diseases, and to date there is no therapeutic...

  16. The stochastic dynamics of biochemical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Challenger, Joseph Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the stochastic dynamics of biochemical reaction systems. The importance of the intrinsic fluctuations in these systems has become more widely appreciated in recent years, and should be accounted for when modelling such systems mathematically. These models are described as continuous time Markov processes and their dynamics defined by a master equation. Analytical progress is made possible by the use of the van Kampen system-size expansion, which splits the dynamics...

  17. The Biochemical Anatomy of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, E.A.; Zhang, W.; Selimi, F.; Earnheart, J.C.; Slimak, M.A.; Santos-Torres, J.; Ibanez-Tallon, I.; Aoki, C; Chait, B. T.; Heintz, N

    2012-01-01

    Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD) exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from th...

  18. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hong-Xuan; Dempsey, William P.; Goutsias, John

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems as well as for designing optimal approaches for selective perturbation and intervention. Deterministic sensitivity analysis techniques, using derivatives of the system response, have been extensively used in the literature. However, these techniques suffer from several drawbacks, which must be carefully considered before using them in problems of systems biology. ...

  19. Biochemical and functional characterisation of casein and whey protein hydrolysates.

    OpenAIRE

    Ven, van de, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Whey protein and sodium caseinate were hydrolysed with commercially available enzyme preparations. The resulting hydrolysates were characterised using several analytical characterisation methods and by determination of several functional properties. Subsequently, correlations between the biochemical characteristics themselves and between biochemical and functional properties were studied using multivariate regression analysis.Biochemical characteristics of hydrolysates were determined using u...

  20. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  1. Hydrogel-based piezoresistive biochemical microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Margarita; Schulz, Volker; Gerlach, Gerald; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Solzbacher, Florian; Magda, Jules J.; Tathireddy, Prashant; Lin, Genyao; Orthner, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This work is motivated by a demand for inexpensive, robust and reliable biochemical sensors with high signal reproducibility and long-term-stable sensitivity, especially for medical applications. Micro-fabricated sensors can provide continuous monitoring and on-line control of analyte concentrations in ambient aqueous solutions. The piezoresistive biochemical sensor containing a special biocompatible polymer (hydrogel) with a sharp volume phase transition in the neutral physiological pH range near 7.4 can detect a specific analyte, for example glucose. Thereby the hydrogel-based biochemical sensors are useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. The response of the glucosesensitive hydrogel was studied at different regimes of the glucose concentration change and of the solution supply. Sensor response time and accuracy with which a sensor can track gradual changes in glucose was estimated. Additionally, the influence of various recommended sterilization methods on the gel swelling properties and on the mechano-electrical transducer of the pH-sensors has been evaluated in order to choose the most optimal sterilization method for the implantable sensors. It has been shown that there is no negative effect of gamma irradiation with a dose of 25.7 kGy on the hydrogel sensitivity. In order to achieve an optimum between sensor signal amplitude and sensor response time, corresponding calibration and measurement procedures have been proposed and evaluated for the chemical sensors.

  2. sup(99m)Tc-EHDP scanning in Paget's disease of bone correlation with biochemical and radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific aim of the study has been to search for a correlation between bone scan and biochemical parameters which reflect the increased remodeling activity of pagetic bone: serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP); total hydroxyproline excretion (OHP); acute hypocalcaemic response to calcitonin. The data demonstrate that the scintigraphic index is better correlated with SAP than with OHP, or with the acute hypocalcaemic response to calcitonin. Correlation of the modulated uptake index with SAP is also significantly higher than the correlation of the anatomical scintigraphic index with this biochemical parameter. This fact confirms the role of osteoblastic activity in 99mTc-EHDP bone uptake

  3. A Framework for Teacher Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Claire

    1998-01-01

    Proposes a framework for teacher reflection based on a longitudinal study of the development of six experienced second-language teachers who attempted to implement reflection and reflective action into their teaching practice. The resulting framework included several phases in the development of reflective teaching: engaging with reflection,…

  4. Ubuntu feminism: Tentative reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drucilla Cornell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The starting-point for the article is to provide a brief background on the Ubuntu Project that Prof. Drucilla Cornell convened in 2003; most notably the interviews conducted in Khayamandi, the support of a sewing collective, and the continued search to launch an Ubuntu Women�s Centre. The article will reflect on some of the philosophical underpinnings of ubuntu, whereafter debates in Western feminism will be revisited. Ubuntu feminism is suggested as a possible response to these types of feminisms. The authors support an understanding of ubuntu as critique and ubuntu feminism accordingly as a critical intervention that recalls a politics of refusal. The article ends by raising the importance of thinking about spatiality through ubuntu, and vice versa. It may seem strange to title an article Ubuntu feminism when feminism itself has often been identified as a European or Western idea. But, this article will argue that ubuntu offers conceptions of transindividuality and ways of social belonging that could respond in a meaningful way to some of European feminism�s own dilemmas and contradictions. Famously, one of the most intense debates in feminism was between those who defended an ethic of care in a relational view of the self, on one side, and those feminists who held on to more traditional conceptions of justice, placing an emphasis on individuality and autonomy, on the other side. The authors will suggest that ubuntu could address this tension in feminism. Thus, in this article the focus will not simply be on ubuntu, in order to recognise that there are other intellectual heritages worthy of consideration, other than those in Europe and the United States. It will also take a next step in arguing that ubuntu may be a better standpoint entirely from which to continue thinking about what it means to be a human being, as well as how to conceive of the integral interconnection human beings all have with one another. This connection through

  5. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  6. Focused crossed Andreev reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, H.; Brataas, A.; Waintal, X.; Bauer, G. E. W.

    2011-03-01

    We consider non-local transport mediated by Andreev reflection in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) connected to one superconducting and two normal metal terminals. A robust scheme is presented for observing crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) between the normal metal terminals based on electron focusing by weak perpendicular magnetic fields. At slightly elevated temperatures the CAR signature can be easily distinguished from a background of quantum interference fluctuations. The CAR-induced entanglement between electrons can be switched on and off over large distances by the magnetic field.

  7. Reflection from black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchiev, M Yu

    2003-01-01

    Black holes are presumed to have an ideal ability to absorb and keep matter. Whatever comes close to the event horizon, a boundary separating the inside region of a black hole from the outside world, inevitably goes in and remains inside forever. This work shows, however, that quantum corrections make possible a surprising process, reflection: a particle can bounce back from the event horizon. For low energy particles this process is efficient, black holes behave not as holes, but as mirrors, which changes our perception of their physical nature. Possible ways for observations of the reflection and its relation to the Hawking radiation process are outlined.

  8. Postscript: Delving into Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Noffke

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Although, the authors presented an earlier version of the paper, "The Dimensions of Reflection: A Conceptual and Contextual Analysis", at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, April, 1988, they did not have a chance to publish the paper till today. This postscript is about why the paper stayed as an “unpublished” conference paper for so long. Editors believe that the authors’ reflection on their academic journey with the paper in the postscript could be seen as an outstanding practical exemplar, a moral-political narrative of how to shape and create well-formed academic lives and identities.

  9. Impact of sudarshan kriya yoga on mean arterial blood pressure and biochemical parameters in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Living a happy and healthy life on all planes is possible through the unified practice of sudarshan kriya yoga (SKY along with asana and pranayam. The practice of SKY seems to be beneficial on mean blood pressure and biochemical parameters in normal healthy individuals. This unique breathing practice is a potent energizer. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2150-2152

  10. Integral representation of Skorokhod reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Anantharam, Venkat; Konstantopoulos, Takis

    2010-01-01

    We show that a certain integral representation of the one-sided Skorokhod reflection of a continuous bounded variation function characterizes the reflection in that it possesses a unique maximal solution which solves the Skorokhod reflection problem.

  11. Biochemical and Immunological Modifications in Saliva of SFINCSS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Kuznetsov, P. A.; Ilyin, V. K.; Kuzmina, E. M.; Sashkina, T. I.

    of Russian and foreign volunteers and was divided onto 3 parts, 4 persons per each depending on isolation time. All the individuals were isolated days in confined habitat.: 1st group - 240 days; 2nd and 3rd - 110 days each. 1 group members were individually orally instructed on perfect dental care, 2nd group members were given an instruction how to use means for mouth and dental care. 3rd group was only studied but was not given any instruction. Biochemical studies of non-stimulated mixed saliva were done before and after the experiment. protein concentration increased due to increasing of it's density. The urea concentration did not changed. The glucose concentration changes were flexible within norm values before experiment and sufficiently increased after the experiment only in two individuals. Natrium and potassium level was stable and did not differed from normal value before and after the experiment. There was a tendency of decreasing of calcium concentration in volunteers saliva as a result of their long-term isolation. Concentration of non-organic phosphor did not changed. Alanintranspherase (ALT) activity increased 2-3 times in 3 volunteers, aspartataminotranspherase (AST) activity increased in three people. No changes were revealed for alpha-amilase. Content of IgG increased which fact indirectly suggest bacterial overgrowth. No changes in IgA and SIgA were estimated. of urea and glucose didn't changed. The concentration of calcium had a tendency to decrease, no changes for non-organic phosphor, potassium and natrium. However ALT and AST values sufficiently increased as well as IgG concentration. isolation, despite of individual measures of mouth and dental care, and in group of 110-day isolation with no hygienic measures. Significant indices of mouth and dental state in long-term isolation are levels of: protein ALT, AST (cytoplasmatic enzymes), and IgG.

  12. Reflection in learning at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steen Høyrup

    2006-01-01

    Three domains and approaches of learning - adult learning, problem-solving and cirtical reflection theory are used as different lenses through which the question: what is reflection and how is reflection related to learning, - are interpreted.......Three domains and approaches of learning - adult learning, problem-solving and cirtical reflection theory are used as different lenses through which the question: what is reflection and how is reflection related to learning, - are interpreted....

  13. Smoking topography and outcome expectancies among individuals with schizotypy

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Diana W.; Vinci, Christine; Adams, Claire E.; Cohen, Alex S.; Copeland, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Compared to smokers in the general population, smokers with schizophrenia smoke more cigarettes per day and have higher nicotine dependence and biochemical indicators of nicotine intake. They also have more intense smoking topography and greater positive smoking expectancies. Little is known about the relationship between smoking and schizotypy, defined as the personality organization reflecting a vulnerability to schizophrenia-spectrum pathology. This study assessed schizotypy symptoms, smok...

  14. A review of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand models for large rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and modifications of mathematical models for Dissolved Oxygen (DO) are reviewed in this paper. The field and laboratory methods to estimate the kinetics of Carbonaceous Biochemical Oxygen Demand (CBOD) and Nitrogenous Biochemical Oxygen Demand (NBOD) are also presented. This review also includes recent approaches of BOD and DO modeling beside the conventional ones along with their applicability to the natural rivers. The most frequently available public domain computer models and their applications in real life projects are also briefly covered. The literature survey reveals that currently there is more emphasis on solution techniques rather than understanding the mechanisms and processes that control DO in large rivers. The DO modeling software contains inbuilt coefficients and parameters that may not reflect the specific conditions under study. It is therefore important that the selected mathematical and computer models must incorporate the relevant processes specific to the river under study and be within the available resources in term of data collection. (author)

  15. Punctum: Reflections on Photography

    OpenAIRE

    Fusco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Group show for which I was invited to contribute one photograph to the exhibition Punctum. Consisting of fifty photographs and artworks chosen by artists, curators and writers, curated by Séamus Kealy, Punctum takes its cue from the term “punctum” coined by Roland Barthes in his final book Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography.

  16. The Reflective Methodologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Bjørg

    2013-01-01

    in which the practical sense and tacit knowledge are related to questions of power and social actors’ strategies for positioning themselves within a social space. This demands a particular focus on the historical effect of the concept of ‘the reflective practitioner’ as a symbolic marker of identity...

  17. Reflection by Porro Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2010-04-01

    Students all know that reflection from a plane mirror produces an image that is reversed right to left and so cannot be read by anyone but Leonardo da Vinci, who kept his notes in mirror writing. A useful counter-example is the Porro prism, which produces an image that is not reversed.

  18. Reflecting on Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Rudolf V.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a two-day optics laboratory activity that investigates the scientific phenomenon of reflection, which students are generally familiar with but usually have not studied in depth. This investigation can be used on its own or as part of a larger unit on optics. This lesson encourages students to think critically and…

  19. Changes Brought by Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Feng: A number of changes have taken place in Europe after reflection, such as specific anti-terrorist measures, progress in the construction of integration, changes in the structure of political forces and adjustments in the EU foreign policy. Would you make some comments first, Dr. Sun?

  20. Lights, Camera, Reflection!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourlam, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to critique teaching, but few are more effective than video. Personal reflection through the use of video allows one to see what really happens in the classrooms--good and bad--and provides a visual path forward for improvement, whether it be in one's teaching, work with a particular student, or learning environment. This…

  1. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  2. Reflections on 25 Years of Journal Editorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2015-07-01

    These reflections range over some distinctive features of the journal Science & Education, they acknowledge in a limited way the many individuals who over the past 25 years have contributed to the success and reputation of the journal, they chart the beginnings of the journal, and they dwell on a few central concerns—clear writing and the contribution of HPS to teacher education. The reflections also revisit the much-debated and written-upon philosophical and pedagogical arguments occasioned by the rise and possible demise of constructivism in science education.

  3. Biochemical Network Stochastic Simulator (BioNetS: software for stochastic modeling of biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elston Timothy C

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrinsic fluctuations due to the stochastic nature of biochemical reactions can have large effects on the response of biochemical networks. This is particularly true for pathways that involve transcriptional regulation, where generally there are two copies of each gene and the number of messenger RNA (mRNA molecules can be small. Therefore, there is a need for computational tools for developing and investigating stochastic models of biochemical networks. Results We have developed the software package Biochemical Network Stochastic Simulator (BioNetS for efficientlyand accurately simulating stochastic models of biochemical networks. BioNetS has a graphical user interface that allows models to be entered in a straightforward manner, and allows the user to specify the type of random variable (discrete or continuous for each chemical species in the network. The discrete variables are simulated using an efficient implementation of the Gillespie algorithm. For the continuous random variables, BioNetS constructs and numerically solvesthe appropriate chemical Langevin equations. The software package has been developed to scale efficiently with network size, thereby allowing large systems to be studied. BioNetS runs as a BioSpice agent and can be downloaded from http://www.biospice.org. BioNetS also can be run as a stand alone package. All the required files are accessible from http://x.amath.unc.edu/BioNetS. Conclusions We have developed BioNetS to be a reliable tool for studying the stochastic dynamics of large biochemical networks. Important features of BioNetS are its ability to handle hybrid models that consist of both continuous and discrete random variables and its ability to model cell growth and division. We have verified the accuracy and efficiency of the numerical methods by considering several test systems.

  4. [Biochemical markers for acute and chronic alcohol consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, Bogna; Tezyk, Artur; Zaba, Czesław

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the fact, that ethyl alcohol is a legal and socially accepted recreational drug its abuse may cause numerous problems for the individual and society. Casualties of car accidents caused by drunk drivers, aggressive behavior, family problems and effective less work are the main problems connected with alcohol abuse. The easiest and most effective way of proving recent alcohol consumption is confirming its presence in biological samples taken from the individual. However, the main disadvantage of this method is a short window detection for ethanol, because of its high speed of elimination process. Nowadays, in order to prevent and have a better control of alcohol abuse, markers that could provide a better view of short and long term ethanol consumption are in frequent use. Ethyl alcohol present in the body cause many qualitative and quantitative disturbances in biochemical metabolites that could be used as markers of its consumption. In practice markers of ethanol consumption are usually divided into acute (tests confirm single alcohol intake) and chronic (confirm long term alcohol consumption or lack of teetotalism). Markers of ethanol consumption are valuable alternative and complementation to customary examinations performed in medical practice and forensic medicine. PMID:23421117

  5. Simulation methods with extended stability for stiff biochemical Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rué Pau

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increasing computer power, simulating the dynamics of complex systems in chemistry and biology is becoming increasingly routine. The modelling of individual reactions in (biochemical systems involves a large number of random events that can be simulated by the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA. The key quantity is the step size, or waiting time, τ, whose value inversely depends on the size of the propensities of the different channel reactions and which needs to be re-evaluated after every firing event. Such a discrete event simulation may be extremely expensive, in particular for stiff systems where τ can be very short due to the fast kinetics of some of the channel reactions. Several alternative methods have been put forward to increase the integration step size. The so-called τ-leap approach takes a larger step size by allowing all the reactions to fire, from a Poisson or Binomial distribution, within that step. Although the expected value for the different species in the reactive system is maintained with respect to more precise methods, the variance at steady state can suffer from large errors as τ grows. Results In this paper we extend Poisson τ-leap methods to a general class of Runge-Kutta (RK τ-leap methods. We show that with the proper selection of the coefficients, the variance of the extended τ-leap can be well-behaved, leading to significantly larger step sizes. Conclusions The benefit of adapting the extended method to the use of RK frameworks is clear in terms of speed of calculation, as the number of evaluations of the Poisson distribution is still one set per time step, as in the original τ-leap method. The approach paves the way to explore new multiscale methods to simulate (biochemical systems.

  6. The Possum Story: Reflections of an Early Childhood Drama Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Jan; Brown, Robert; Young, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Support for reflective practice (Dewey, 1910; Schon, 1983) as a way of reviewing, articulating and informing practice, is well-established within teacher education and research, though there is still much to learn from the individual experience of the practitioner who grapples with the reflective process. This paper highlights the deliberations of…

  7. Measuring Practicum Student Teachers' Reflectivity: The Reflective Pedagogical Thinking Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Toh Wah

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the original study was to investigate practicum student teachers' reflectivity. This paper describes the use of a revised version of the Reflective Pedagogical Thinking Scale (Sparks-Langer, et al., 1990) to measure reflectivity. The original scale was used by the developers to assess reflectivity through a structured interview. The…

  8. Being a reflective teacher——reflection on group management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan; Lehui

    2015-01-01

    <正>Introduction According to Pollard and Triggs(1997),reflective teaching is a process through which the capacity to make such professional judgments can be developed and maintained.Then what is a reflective teacher?Reflective teacher is someone who reflects systematically on her practice in a constant attempt to improve

  9. BNDB – The Biochemical Network Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufmann Michael

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances in high-throughput techniques and efficient data acquisition methods have resulted in a massive amount of life science data. The data is stored in numerous databases that have been established over the last decades and are essential resources for scientists nowadays. However, the diversity of the databases and the underlying data models make it difficult to combine this information for solving complex problems in systems biology. Currently, researchers typically have to browse several, often highly focused, databases to obtain the required information. Hence, there is a pressing need for more efficient systems for integrating, analyzing, and interpreting these data. The standardization and virtual consolidation of the databases is a major challenge resulting in a unified access to a variety of data sources. Description We present the Biochemical Network Database (BNDB, a powerful relational database platform, allowing a complete semantic integration of an extensive collection of external databases. BNDB is built upon a comprehensive and extensible object model called BioCore, which is powerful enough to model most known biochemical processes and at the same time easily extensible to be adapted to new biological concepts. Besides a web interface for the search and curation of the data, a Java-based viewer (BiNA provides a powerful platform-independent visualization and navigation of the data. BiNA uses sophisticated graph layout algorithms for an interactive visualization and navigation of BNDB. Conclusion BNDB allows a simple, unified access to a variety of external data sources. Its tight integration with the biochemical network library BN++ offers the possibility for import, integration, analysis, and visualization of the data. BNDB is freely accessible at http://www.bndb.org.

  10. Fluctuation preserving coarse graining for biochemical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Altaner, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Finite stochastic Markov models play a major role for modelling biochemical pathways. Such models are a coarse-grained description of the underlying microscopic dynamics and can be considered mesoscopic. The level of coarse-graining is to a certain extend arbitrary since it depends on the resolution of accomodating measurements. Here, we present a way to simplify such stochastic descriptions, which preserves both the meso-micro and the meso-macro connection. The former is achieved by demanding locality, the latter by considering cycles on the network of states. Using single- and multicycle examples we demonstrate how our new method preserves fluctuations of observables much better than na\\"ive approaches.

  11. Radiation treatment of drugs, biochemicals and vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concise and tabulated review reports experimental results on the effects of radiation treatment on drugs, vaccines, biochemicals and adjuvants including enzymes as well. Irradiation was mostly performed by γ-radiation using 60Co and to a lesser extent by 137Cs, 182Ta, X-rays and accelerators. Ionizing radiation proved to be a useful tool for sterilization and inactivation in producing drugs, vaccines, and bioactive agents and will contribute to realize procedures difficultly solvable as to engineering and economy, respectively. 124 refs

  12. Induced biochemical conversions of heavy crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Products formed during multiple interactions of microorganisms with oils fall into two major categories: those formed due to the action of indigenous microorganisms under reservoir conditions over geological periods of time and those products which are generated by the action of introduced organisms. The extreme end product of the first category is the production of heavy 'biodegraded' crudes. The extreme end product of the second category is the production of reduced sulfates due to the introduction of sulfate-reducing bacteria which may lead to the souring of a field. There is, however, a select group of microorganisms whose action on the crudes is beneficial. The interactions between such microorganisms and different crude oils occur through complex biochemical and chemical reactions. These reactions depend on multiple variables within and at the interface of a multicomponent system consisting of organic, aqueous, and inorganic components. Studies, carried out in this laboratory (BNL) of biochemical and chemical reactions in crude oils which involve extremophilic organisms (organisms which thrive in extreme environments), have shown that the reactions are not random and follow distinct trends. These trends can be categorized. The use of a group of characteristic chemical markers, such as mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of light and heavy hydrocarbons, heterocyclic and organometallic compounds, as well as total trace metal and heteroatom contents of crude oils before and after the biochemical treatment allows to follow the type and the extent of chemical changes which occur during the biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils by microorganisms. The bioconversion involves multiple, simultaneous, and/or concurrent chemical reactions in which the microorganisms serve as biocatalysts. In this sense, the biocatalysts are active in a reaction medium which depends on the chemical composition of the crude and the selectivity of the biocatalyst. Thus, the

  13. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  14. Label-Free Optical Ring Resonator Bio/Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Suter, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xudong

    Optical micro-ring resonator sensors are an emerging category of label-free optical sensors for bio/chemical sensing that have recently been under intensive investigation. Researchers of this technology have been motivated by a tremendous breadth of different applications, including medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, homeland security, and food quality control, which require sensitive analytical tools. Ring resonator sensors use total internal reflection to support circulating optical resonances called whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The WGMs have an evanescent field of several hundred nanometers into the surrounding medium, and can therefore detect the refractive index change induced when the analyte binds to the resonator surface. Despite the small physical size of a resonator, the circulating nature of the WGM creates extremely long effective lengths, greatly increasing light-matter interaction and improving its sensing performance. Moreover, only small sample volume is needed for detection because the sensors can be fabricated in sizes well below 100 μm. The small footprint allows integration of those ring resonator sensors onto lab-on-a-chip types of devices for multiplexed detection.

  15. Biochemical markers of trisomy 21 in amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, K; Muller, F; Aitken, D A

    1997-01-01

    In a study of amniotic fluid from 91 Down's syndrome cases and 240 controls, we have shown that the median values of four biochemical markers (AFP, total hCG, free beta hCG, and unconjugated oestriol) in the amniotic fluid of pregnancies affected by Down's syndrome on the whole reflect those observed in the maternal serum of affected cases. The median MOM for AFP was lower than average (0.56), as was that for unconjugated oestriol (0.55), whilst those for total hCG (1.82) and free beta hCG (2.10) were increased on average. The width of the distribution of marker levels in amniotic fluid is similar to that in serum for free beta hCG and total hCG but between 1.5 and 2 times wider for unconjugated oestriol and AFP. Analysis of data by fetal sex showed a significantly higher median MOM in female control cases compared with male controls for the analytes free beta hCG, total hCG, and unconjugated oestriol, but not for AFP. Amongst the Down's syndrome cases, this trend was not statistically significant and we cannot confirm a previous study which reported that elevated levels of amniotic fluid total and free beta hCG were associated only with female fetuses. PMID:9021826

  16. Bragg reflection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This user's guide to the Bragg Reflection Program (BRP) is in the nature of an informal report. The general purpose of BRP is to scan a series of Bragg reflections automatically in order to obtain profiles and integrated intensities. The program is used in conjunction with the SUPERVISOR and READ packages, and the procedures for using it are similar to those for the Triple-Axis Control program. All the general features of the system, SUPERVISOR and READ packages as described in the Spectrometer Control Systems User's Guide are preserved. The presentation assumes that the reader is familiar with these. Sections are given on the READ package, execution and use, error messages, and output. A few sample problems are shown. (1 figure) (U.S.)

  17. Biologically effective dose and definitive radiation treatment for localized prostate cancer. Treatment gaps do affect the risk of biochemical failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not clear if prolongation of definitive external radiation therapy for prostate cancer has an effect on biochemical failure. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the biologically effective dose (BED), and in particular the duration of radiotherapy, intended as overall treatment time, has an effect on biochemical failure rates and to develop a nomogram useful to predict the 6-year probability of biochemical failure. A total of 670 patients with T1-3 N0 prostate cancer were treated with external beam definitive radiotherapy, to a total dose of 72-79.2 Gy in 40-44 fractions. The computed BED values were treated with restricted cubic splines. Variables were checked for colinearity using Spearman's test. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate freedom from biochemical relapse (FFBR) rates. The Cox regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in the final most performing model and to create a nomogram. Concordance probability estimate and calibration methods were used to validate the nomogram. Neoadjuvant and concomitant androgen deprivation was administered to 475 patients (70 %). The median follow-up was 80 months (range 20-129 months). Overall, the 6-year FFBR rate was 88.3 %. BED values were associated with higher biochemical failure risk. Age, iPSA, risk category, and days of radiotherapy treatment were independent variables of biochemical failure. A prolongation of RT (lower BED values) is associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. The nomogram may be helpful in decision making for the individual patient. (orig.)

  18. The Linguistic Individual: An Integrational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Hayley G.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the integrational approach to languages and linguistics, which claims that language is radically indeterminate with regard to what is meant and what is said. One aim of the approach is to encourage an analytic reflection of one's own linguistic experience, and therefore the individual linguistic utterance, not the language or dialect, is…

  19. Service Learning Reflection Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Sass, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Service-Learning, a subset of service-engagement, is a course-based, credit-bearing educational experience in which students participate in an organized service activity that meets identified community needs; use knowledge and skills directly related to a course or discipline; and reflect on the service activity in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of personal values and civic responsibility. This ...

  20. Reflection Revisited: The Class Collage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Through the regular use of what Donald Schon has termed reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action, students can learn to improve their "reflection-in-presentation," in Kathleen Blake Yancey's term. Students are often asked to do this type of reflection-in-presentation as a capstone to first-year or basic writing courses. However, a number of…

  1. My Reflective Practice as Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marcia A.

    1999-01-01

    Using Schon's concepts and definition of reflective practice, this article elaborates a model used to analyze the author's own processes of "reflection-in-action" and "reflection-on-action" in teaching first-year architectural students. Emphasizes the importance of the concept of "role-frame" in informing the whole reflective process. (EV)

  2. Polarizer reflectivity variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On Shiva the beam energy along the chain is monitored using available reflections and/or transmission through beam steering, splitting, and polarizing optics without the intrusion of any additional glass for diagnostics. On the preamp table the diagnostic signal is obtained from the signal transmitted through turning mirrors. At the input of each chain the signal is obtained from the transmission through one of the mirrors used for the chain input alignment sensor (CHIP). At the chain output the transmission through the final turning mirror is used. These diagnostics have proved stable and reliable. However, one of the prime diagnostic locations is at the output of the beta rod. The energy at this location is measured by collecting small reflections from the last polarizer surface of the beta Pockels cell polarizer package. Unfortunately, calibration of this diagnostic has varied randomly, seldom remaining stable for a week or more. The cause of this fluctuation has been investigated for the past year and'it has been discovered that polarizer reflectivity varies with humidity. This report will deal with the possible causes that were investigated, the evidence that humidity is causing the variation, and the associated mechanism

  3. Ion-plasma way of receiving strengthening heat reflecting anti-reflection coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion-plasma deposition strengthening heat reflecting clarifying coatings is developed for plastic screens of means of individual protection. The method of magnetron sputtering are received strengthening coatings with integrated coefficient of a transmission in visible area of a range more than 96%

  4. Biochemical research elucidating metabolic pathways in Pneumocystis*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneshiro E.S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in sequencing the Pneumocystis carinii genome have helped identify potential metabolic pathways operative in the organism. Also, data from characterizing the biochemical and physiological nature of these organisms now allow elucidation of metabolic pathways as well as pose new challenges and questions that require additional experiments. These experiments are being performed despite the difficulty in doing experiments directly on this pathogen that has yet to be subcultured indefinitely and produce mass numbers of cells in vitro. This article reviews biochemical approaches that have provided insights into several Pneumocystis metabolic pathways. It focuses on 1 S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet; SAM, which is a ubiquitous participant in numerous cellular reactions; 2 sterols: focusing on oxidosqualene cyclase that forms lanosterol in P. carinii; SAM:sterol C-24 methyltransferase that adds methyl groups at the C-24 position of the sterol side chain; and sterol 14α-demethylase that removes a methyl group at the C-14 position of the sterol nucleus; and 3 synthesis of ubiquinone homologs, which play a pivotal role in mitochondrial inner membrane and other cellular membrane electron transport.

  5. Biochemical mechanisms of laser vascular tissue fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, C R; Murray, L W; Kopchok, G E; Rosenbaum, D; White, R A

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the biochemical changes that occur in argon laser-fused canine veins compared with control segments of vein. Laser fusions were formed using 0.5 W argon laser energy (1100-1500 J/cm2). Immediately following tissue fusion, blood flow was reestablished to test the integrity of the welds. 1-mm3 sections of the anastomoses and control sections were minced and protein extraction was performed by solubilizing the tissue in hot SDS Laemmli gel sample buffer. The proteins were separated electrophoretically on 5 and 10% polyacylamide SDS gels and silver stained. The analysis demonstrated significant biochemical differences between control and lased veins. We noted increases in several proteins after laser welding: the putative beta chain of type V collagen (5/5 gels), the putative gamma chain of type I collagen (4/5 gels), a 156-kDa protein (based on collagen molecular weight standards) 7/7 gels), an 82-kDa protein (8/9 gels), and several proteins of lower molecular weight (3/8 gels). The increases may be due to crosslinking of lower molecular weight proteins, degradation of higher molecular weight proteins, or increased solubility of certain proteins. These findings suggest that laser welding may occur by formation of crosslinks or by denaturation and reannealment of structural proteins. PMID:1863584

  6. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

    1998-09-20

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  7. Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  8. Implementing reflection: insights from pre-registration mental health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Moira O

    2007-08-01

    Reflection and reflective practice continues to be contentious issues in nursing. The focus of this article is the use of reflection by pre-registration mental health students. The broad aim of this preliminary study was to discover student mental health nurses' perceptions of reflection as a learning strategy during clinical placement. Using a constructivist grounded theory methodology [Charmaz, K., 2000. Grounded theory: Objectivist and Constructivist Methods. In: Denzin, N., Lincoln, Y. (Eds.), Handbook of Qualitative Research, second ed. Sage, Thousand Oaks, California], five students were interviewed individually in their clinical placements. Data analysis revealed three major categories: understanding the process of reflection, using reflection in clinical practice, and needing support and guidance. Findings indicated that students were primarily using reflection-on-action, but to varying extents. Overall, students felt that reflection facilitated their learning. Factors were discovered that both helped and hindered students' use of reflection. These included level of preparation to reflect, a limited culture of reflection and the level of support from preceptors, clinical staff, clinical placement co-ordinators, and lecturers. In conclusion, it appears that a collaborative approach between students, Health Service Providers and institutes of nursing is vital for the successful development and implementation of reflective learning strategies in clinical placement. Suggestions are made as to how a collaborative approach may be developed to enhance this process. PMID:17081658

  9. Reflective writing: a management skill

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze students' reflective writing in terms of identifiable outcomes and explore students' thoughts on reflection and reflective writing as a process. Design/methodology/approach – A mixed methods approach is taken with a qualitative analysis of 116 written reflections from MA Librarianship studying management over an eight-month period. A quantitative statistical analysis assesses the relationships between reflective writing and a number of po...

  10. Responder individuality in red blood cell alloimmunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körmöczi, Günther F; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2014-11-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red blood cell (RBC) antigens, their dose (number of transfusions and pregnancies, absolute number of antigens per RBC) and the mode of exposure impact on RBCA rates. In addition, individual circumstances determine the risk to form RBCA. Responder individuality in terms of age, sex, severity of underlying disease, disease- or therapy-induced immunosuppression and inflammation are discussed with respect to influencing RBC alloimmunization. For particular high-risk patients, extended phenotype matching of transfusion and recipient efficiently decreases RBCA induction and associated clinical risks. PMID:25670932

  11. Explicating Individual Training Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marcel; Mueller, Normann

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explicate individual training decisions. For this purpose, we propose a framework based on instrumentality theory, a psychological theory of motivation that has frequently been applied to individual occupational behavior. To test this framework, we employ novel German individual data and estimate the effect of subjective expected…

  12. Mutual information in time-varying biochemical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tostevin, Filipe; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten

    2010-01-01

    Cells must continuously sense and respond to time-varying environmental stimuli. These signals are transmitted and processed by biochemical signalling networks. However, the biochemical reactions making up these networks are intrinsically noisy, which limits the reliability of intracellular signalling. Here we use information theory to characterise the reliability of transmission of time-varying signals through elementary biochemical reactions in the presence of noise. We calculate the mutual...

  13. Possibilities and methods for biochemical assessment of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensitive review (77 references) is made of the application of biochemical diagnostic methods for assessment of radiation diseases. A brief characteristics of several biochemical indicators is given: deoxycytidine, thymidine, ρ-aminoisocarboxylic acid, DNA-ase, nucleic acids. Influence of such factors as age, sex, season etc. is studied by means of functional biochemical indicators as: creatine, triptophanic metabolites, 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid, biogenic amines, serum proteins, enzymes, etc

  14. Conceptual Aspects of Theory Appraisal: Some Biochemical Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Michael Akeroyd

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers papers on conceptual analysis by Laudan (1981 and Whitt (1989 and relates them to three biochemical episodes: (1 the modern 'biochemical explanation' of acupuncture; (2 the chemio-osmotic hypothesis of oxidative phosphorylation; (3 the theory of the complete digestion of proteins in the gut. The advantages of including philosophical debate in chemical/biochemical undergraduate courses is then discussed.

  15. Evaluation of biochemical alterations produced by combined exposure of fenvalerate and nitrate in Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalpreet Kaur Gill

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluation of combined effect of fenvalerate and nitrate on biochemical parameters in buffalo calves. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male buffalo calves were divided into four groups of four calves each. Group I receiving no treatment served as the control. Group II and III animals were orally administered with fenvalerate (1.0 mg/kg/day and sodium nitrate (20 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 21 consecutive days and were kept as positive control. Group IV animals were co-administered with fenvalerate and sodium nitrate at the above dose rates for 21 consecutive days. Biochemical parameters including Aspartate aminotransferase (AST, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, Glucose, Total protein, Albumin, Cholesterol, Blood urea nitrogen (BUN and Creatinine were determined on 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 day of treatment. Estimation of these parameters was also done on 7th day of post-treatment period. Results: Co-administration of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate produced significant increase in the plasma levels of AST, ALP, GGT, LDH, glucose, BUN, cholesterol and creatinine while significant decrease in the plasma levels of total proteins was observed. No significant alteration was observed in albumin levels. Extent of organ damage as evidenced by biochemical alterations was more pronounced in calves exposed to combination of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate as compared to their individual exposures. Conclusion: Fenvalerate and sodium nitrate co-administration potentiates the toxicological injury produced, in comparison to their individual exposure.

  16. Exposure of fish to biologically treated bleached-kraft effluent; 1: Biochemical, physiological and pathological assessment of Rocky Mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) and longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloepper-Sams, P.J.; Owens, J.W. (Procter Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Swanson, S.M. (SENTAR Consultants Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Marchant, T. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Biology); Schryer, R. (SENTAR Consultants Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    1994-09-01

    A suite of biochemical, physiological, and pathological measures was used to assess possible effects of exposure to bleached-kraft mill effluent (BKME) on wild longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus=LS) and mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni=MW) in the Wapiti/Smoke River system, as compared to similar populations in a reference river system without BKME inputs. Individual fish body burden data were examined for correlations between chemical exposure and biological response. General incidence of gross pathology and histopathology showed no relationship with exposure to BKME, and no neoplastic or preneoplastic lesions were observed in either exposed or reference fish. The few significant differences observed in LS blood parameters were not correlated with exposure to BKME and appeared to reflect habitat gradients. Liver somatic indexes were higher for female BKME-exposed LS, but were not significantly different in male LS nor in MW. Some differences in circulating sex steroid levels were observed in LS exposed to BKME (but not in MW, the species with higher contaminant body burdens). Steroid profile differences may have been related to natural differences in duration of spawning periods in the two fish populations. Other measures of reproductive capacity (relative gonad size, fecundity, young-of-the-year) showed no reductions in exposed fish. The detoxification enzyme cytochrome P4501A was induced in both species, with greater induction in MW than in LS. MW P4501A induction correlated well with some BKME exposure measures, but not with liver or gonad weights, pathology, reproductive capacity, or population-level parameters. Increased liver size and apparent differences in sex steroid profiles in LS did not translate to other health effects or population-level effects. Thus, exposure to this biologically treated BKME produced one consistent biochemical marker of exposure in the two fish species that was not associated with any adverse effects on fish health.

  17. Reflection on Digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Couch, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This smaller version of Reflection on Digestion, stemming from the nine metre edition, this version too, is awkward. In the same concertina form, a third the length of its sister, its eighteen pages hold a miniaturised text. The language is only legible with the aid of a magnifying glass, and even then the script is hard to read, hovering between word and image, content and form. The original scribed text stems from a body of knowledge encountered whilst on a post-graduate course in educa...

  18. Global South: Anthropological Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steur, Luisa Johanna; Kalb, Don

    2015-01-01

    The global south is a complex and dynamic concept that straddles multiple social science and humanist disciplines. Emerging around 2000, it reflects the agenda of two ascending forces in those years: the antiglobalist (alterglobalist/global justice) movement and the World Social Forum, on the one...... hand, and an alliance of Southern states within the World Trade Organization on the other. Generally seen as an inheritor of the emancipatory thought behind the notion of the ‘third world,’ in the social sciences the idea of the ‘global south’ is also entangled with more classical academic themes such...

  19. Dynamic analysis of biochemical network using complex network method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stochastic biochemical reaction model is proposed based on the law of mass action and complex network theory. The dynamics of biochemical reaction system is presented as a set of non-linear differential equations and analyzed at the molecular-scale. Given the initial state and the evolution rules of the biochemical reaction system, the system can achieve homeostasis. Compared with random graph, the biochemical reaction network has larger information capacity and is more efficient in information transmission. This is consistent with theory of evolution.

  20. Reflective composite sheet design for LCD backlight recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Kibeom; Lee, Eun Soo; Jeong, Won Young; Lim, Dae Young; Choi, Suk-Won

    2014-05-01

    We have designed a reflective composite sheet consisting of a birefringent polymer matrix and isolated isotropic or minimally birefringent fibers. The optical properties of the sheet have been investigated in terms of the width, spacing, and thickness of the individual fibers. Commercial software (FDTD Solution) was used to simulate the reflectance of the proposed sheet, and conventional processes such as cast-film extrusion in combination with solid-state drawing were used to manufacture the multilayer composite sheet. The measured and simulated reflectance spectra confirm the feasibility of employing the sheet as a reflective polarizer. PMID:24921815

  1. Force reflection with compliance control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won S.

    1993-08-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  2. Category analysis: from biochemical mechanics to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the main goals of this report is to bridge the gap between computer modelling and group analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. But we can work with a category of groups rather than a Lie group. In view of the experience of the past development of the relation between mathematics, mechanics and physics, the categorical extension may be justified that one day categoric structures will be as important as groups are today. Also our aim is the application of the same category-theoretic methods in biochemical mechanics and astrophysics. As examples we consider the category analysis of material models for concrete, wood and reinforcing or prestressing steel, on the one hand, and process of the linear and circular polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation due to the quantum effects of electromagnetic field in anisotropic Bianchi-type cosmological models, on the other hand. (author)

  3. Prions: the danger of biochemical weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Almeida Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of biotechnology increases the risk of using biochemical weapons for mass destruction. Prions are unprecedented infectious pathogens that cause a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases by a novel mechanism. They are transmissible particles that are devoid of nucleic acid. Due to their singular characteristics, Prions emerge as potential danger since they can be used in the development of such weapons. Prions cause fatal infectious diseases, and to date there is no therapeutic or prophylactic approach against these diseases. Furthermore, Prions are resistant to food-preparation treatments such as high heat and can find their way from the digestive system into the nervous system; recombinant Prions are infectious either bound to soil particles or in aerosols. Therefore, lethal Prions can be developed by malicious researchers who could use it to attack political enemies since such weapons cause diseases that could be above suspicion.

  4. Robust simplifications of multiscale biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinovyev Andrei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular processes such as metabolism, decision making in development and differentiation, signalling, etc., can be modeled as large networks of biochemical reactions. In order to understand the functioning of these systems, there is a strong need for general model reduction techniques allowing to simplify models without loosing their main properties. In systems biology we also need to compare models or to couple them as parts of larger models. In these situations reduction to a common level of complexity is needed. Results We propose a systematic treatment of model reduction of multiscale biochemical networks. First, we consider linear kinetic models, which appear as "pseudo-monomolecular" subsystems of multiscale nonlinear reaction networks. For such linear models, we propose a reduction algorithm which is based on a generalized theory of the limiting step that we have developed in 1. Second, for non-linear systems we develop an algorithm based on dominant solutions of quasi-stationarity equations. For oscillating systems, quasi-stationarity and averaging are combined to eliminate time scales much faster and much slower than the period of the oscillations. In all cases, we obtain robust simplifications and also identify the critical parameters of the model. The methods are demonstrated for simple examples and for a more complex model of NF-κB pathway. Conclusion Our approach allows critical parameter identification and produces hierarchies of models. Hierarchical modeling is important in "middle-out" approaches when there is need to zoom in and out several levels of complexity. Critical parameter identification is an important issue in systems biology with potential applications to biological control and therapeutics. Our approach also deals naturally with the presence of multiple time scales, which is a general property of systems biology models.

  5. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  6. Biochemical Pharmacology of the Sigma-1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2016-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223 amino acid two transmembrane (TM) pass protein. It is a non-ATP-binding nonglycosylated ligand-regulated molecular chaperone of unknown three-dimensional structure. The S1R is resident to eukaryotic mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes with broad functions that regulate cellular calcium homeostasis and reduce oxidative stress. Several multitasking functions of the S1R are underwritten by chaperone-mediated direct (and indirect) interactions with ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and cell-signaling molecules involved in the regulation of cell growth. The S1R is a promising drug target for the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases related to cellular stress. In vitro and in vivo functional and molecular characteristics of the S1R and its interactions with endogenous and synthetic small molecules have been discovered by the use of pharmacologic, biochemical, biophysical, and molecular biology approaches. The S1R exists in monomer, dimer, tetramer, hexamer/octamer, and higher oligomeric forms that may be important determinants in defining the pharmacology and mechanism(s) of action of the S1R. A canonical GXXXG in putative TM2 is important for S1R oligomerization. The ligand-binding regions of S1R have been identified and include portions of TM2 and the TM proximal regions of the C terminus. Some client protein chaperone functions and interactions with the cochaperone 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (binding immunoglobulin protein) involve the C terminus. Based on its biochemical features and mechanisms of chaperone action the possibility that the S1R is a member of the small heat shock protein family is discussed. PMID:26560551

  7. Haematological and biochemical reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsli, Anne Randi; Fahlman, Åsa; Evans, Alina L.;

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundEstablishment of haematological and biochemical reference intervals is important to assess health of animals on individual and population level. Reference intervals for 13 haematological and 34 biochemical variables were established based on 88 apparently healthy free-ranging brown bears...... and marking for ecological studies. For each of the variables, the reference interval was described based on the 95% confidence interval, and differences due to host characteristics sex and age were included if detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of reference intervals for free-ranging brown...... and the differences due to host factors age and gender can be useful for evaluation of health status in free-ranging European brown bears....

  8. Reflecting on Reflective Practice: (Re)Visiting Dewey and Schon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Since the author began work in reflective practice, at first informally in the late 1970s and then more formally in the mid-1980s, he has always looked at reflective practice as a compass of sorts to guide teachers when they may be seeking direction as to what they are doing in their classrooms. The metaphor of reflection as a compass enables…

  9. Cushing's syndrome: update on signs, symptoms and biochemical screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Lynnette K

    2015-10-01

    Endogenous pathologic hypercortisolism, or Cushing's syndrome, is associated with poor quality of life, morbidity, and increased mortality. Early diagnosis may mitigate against this natural history of the disorder. The clinical presentation of Cushing's syndrome varies, in part related to the extent and duration of cortisol excess. When hypercortisolism is severe, its signs and symptoms are unmistakable. However, most of the signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome are common in the general population (e.g., hypertension and weight gain) and not all are present in every patient. In addition to classical features of glucocorticoid excess, such as proximal muscle weakness and wide purple striae, patients may present with the associated comorbidities that are caused by hypercortisolism. These include cardiovascular disease, thromboembolic disease, psychiatric and cognitive deficits, and infections. As a result, internists and generalists must consider Cushing's syndrome as a cause, and endocrinologists should search for and treat these comorbidities. Recommended tests to screen for Cushing's syndrome include 1  mg dexamethasone suppression, urine free cortisol, and late night salivary cortisol. These may be slightly elevated in patients with physiologic hypercortisolism, which should be excluded, along with exogenous glucocorticoid use. Each screening test has caveats and the choice of tests should be individualized based on each patient's characteristics and lifestyle. The objective of this review is to update the readership on the clinical and biochemical features of Cushing's syndrome that are useful when evaluating patients for this diagnosis. PMID:26156970

  10. Individualizing fracture risk prediction

    OpenAIRE

    van Geel, Tineke A. C. M.; van den Bergh, Joop P. W.; Dinant, Geert Jan; Geusens, Piet

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and clinical factors (CRF) have been identified as factors associated with an increased relative risk of fractures. From this observation and for clinical decision making, the concept of prediction of the individual absolute risk of fractures has emerged. It refers to the individual's risk for fractures over a certain time period, e.g. the next 5 and 10 years. Two individualized fracture risk calculation tools that are increasingly used and are available on the ...

  11. Characterizing Individual Communication Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Malmgren, R. Dean; Hofman, Jake M.; Amaral, Luis A. N.; Watts, Duncan J.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of electronic communication data, such as that arising from e-mail exchange, presents social and information scientists with new possibilities for characterizing individual behavior and, by extension, identifying latent structure in human populations. Here, we propose a model of individual e-mail communication that is sufficiently rich to capture meaningful variability across individuals, while remaining simple enough to be interpretable. We show that the model, a ...

  12. The biochemical aftermath of anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoll James AR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active and passive immunotherapy in both amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP transgenic mice and Alzheimer's Disease (AD patients have resulted in remarkable reductions in amyloid plaque accumulation, although the degree of amyloid regression has been highly variable. Nine individuals with a clinical diagnosis of AD dementia were actively immunized with the Aβ peptide 1-42 (AN-1792 and subjected to detailed postmortem biochemical analyses. These patients were compared to 6 non-immunized AD cases and 5 non-demented control (NDC cases. Results All patients were assessed for the presence of AD pathology including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and vascular amyloidosis. This effort revealed that two immunotherapy recipients had dementia as a consequence of diseases other than AD. Direct neuropathological examination consistently demonstrated small to extensive areas in which amyloid plaques apparently were disrupted. Characterization of Aβ species remnants by ELISA suggested that total Aβ levels may have been reduced, although because the amounts of Aβ peptides among treated individuals were extremely variable, those data must be regarded as tentative. Chromatographic analysis and Western blots revealed abundant dimeric Aβ peptides. SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry demonstrated a substantive number of Aβ-related peptides, some of them with elongated C-terminal sequences. Pro-inflammatory TNF-α levels were significantly increased in the gray matter of immunized AD cases compared to the NDC and non-immunized AD groups. Conclusions Immunotherapy responses were characterized by extreme variability. Considering the broad range of biological variation that characterizes aging and complicates the recognition of reliable AD biomarkers, such disparities will make the interpretation of outcomes derived from epidemiologic and therapeutic investigations challenging. Although in some cases the apparent removal of amyloid plaques

  13. Reflections on Conformal Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function. (based on 1510.08772 with Kim & Ooguri). This seminar will be given via videolink

  14. Reflections on Conformal Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyungrok; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2015-01-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions $\\Delta_0$ of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite $\\Delta_0$ as well as for large $\\Delta_0$. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function.

  15. Reflections on SLAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLAP data bases represent a major step forward in the reliability analysis of passive components. The present reflections are motivated by draft documentation for SLAP and have profited greatly from discussions with the SLAP team. We collect a number of remarks and suggestions: The use of event and failure fields to organize the data seems sensible and feasible, from a data analysis viewpoint. Influence factors, i. e. environmental influences which are affected by plant operations, are clearly important yet very difficult to accommodate in any straightforward data analysis methodology. We would welcome a serious effort to estimate the exposure in the various exposure cells. These estimates would not be based on failure records, but on knowledge of plant design and operations. Quantitative expert judgement might be a viable alternative to a massive review of all plants in the SLAP data base

  16. Simple reflection holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeppen, John

    1990-03-01

    White light reflection holography is a good starting point for the first time holographer. The building of an inexpensive holographic camera offers an approach that has many distinct advantages. Not only can such a device be constructed by the average craftsman at a minimum cost but the monolithic design helps assure good results. The finished images are reasonably bright and easy to view in sunlight. The building of the camera itself is instructional as a design task which considers practical problems and scientific principles. The convenience of the finished device avoids many of the difficulties in setting up a dedicated optics lab. Further, the satisfaction of producing quality holograms is reinforced by a tangible reward for successful efforts. Methods, rather than theory, are the essence of this paper. It is intended that this project is not only an end in itself but that it serves as a basis for an outlook towards practical science.

  17. KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH REFLECTIVE PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Kehily, Dermot

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development of knowledge through reflective practice and more specifically the development of the author’s knowledge as a result of engaging in reflection on an issue in the field of the author’s research interest. The author commences by consulting and analysing existing published research on reflective practice. The paper sets out the theory of reflective practice as documented by eminent authors in the field. The author addresses the concept of action learning and f...

  18. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted A.G. Steemers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared. By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  19. Computer extracted texture features on T2w MRI to predict biochemical recurrence following radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Shoshana B.; Rusu, Mirabela; Kurhanewicz, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    T2w MRI texture features are potential independent prognostic markers of PSA failure, we implement a partial least squares (PLS) method to embed the data in a low{dimensional space and then use the variable importance in projections (VIP) method to quantify the contributions of individual features to classification on the PLS embedding. In spite of the poor resolution of the 1.5 T MRI data, we are able to identify three Gabor wavelet features that, in conjunction with a logistic regression classifier, yield an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.83 for predicting the probability of biochemical recurrence following radiation therapy. In comparison to both the Kattan nomogram and semantic MRI attributes, the ability of these three computer-extracted features to predict biochemical recurrence risk is demonstrated.

  20. Local biochemical and morphological differences in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J, Pingel; Fredberg, Ulrich; K, Qvortrup;

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is high and underlying etiology as well as biochemical and morphological pathology associated with the disease is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe biochemical and morphological differences in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The...

  1. Reflections From a Fresnel Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2005-01-01

    Reflection of light by a convex Fresnel lens gives rise to two distinct images. A highly convex inverted real reflective image forms on the object side of the lens, while an upright virtual reflective image forms on the opposite side of the lens. I describe here a set of laser experiments performed upon a Fresnel lens. These experiments provide…

  2. Action Research and Reflective Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阿莉

    2008-01-01

    Reflection is an impontant core of professional development and action research in which the teachers reflect through the Systematic collection and analym of data is a form of srrucured reflection.The teachers can be provided with powerful means of professional development.

  3. THE EVOLUTION OF SOME BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN THE HONEYBEES’ HAEMOLYMPH (A. M. CARPATHICA COLLECTED IN THE INACTIVE SEASON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGRIPINA SAPCALIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical analyses of the blood are largely used for the routine diagnosis and especially for the metabolic survey in farm animals. These facts conduct us to the idea that similar analyses, applied on honeybee hemolymph, could be used IN monitoring the healthy state of honeybee colonies. The present studies represent preliminary researches, which aimed to investigate the variability of the main biochemical parameters in the hemolymph of the healthy honeybees (Apis mellifera in inactive season. The researches were carried out on honeybee samples collected from 5 honeybee colonies belonging to a breeding apiary of the Institute for Beekeeping Research and Development from Bucharest. In order to perform the biochemical analyses, the honeybees samples, consisting in 50 individuals on sample (10 individuals/colony were randomly collected and their haemolimph collected, at different time intervals, in inactive season (fall-winter. Totally, there were collected 250 haemolyph samples in a 2 years interval and the following 21 biochemical parameters were analysed: GLU, HDL-c, ALP, T-cho, Tprot, Alb., BUN, LDH, CPK,, Mg, IP, GGT, GOT, GPT, Ca, Cre,, Amy, T–BIL, TG, UA.. The test was carried out after the collection and processing of the samples using the SPOTCHEM EZSP4430, equipment with dry kits, the slides technique, respectively .During the 2nd part of the inactive season, the values of most biochemical parameters increase in different proportions, their levels being maintained also in the first part of the active seasons (April, May, June.The values obtained for the main studied biochemical parameters in the haemolymph of the healthy honeybees collected from honeybee colonies kept in natural conditions show a highly variable evolution in the two consecutive years of experiments during the inactive season.

  4. Individual Attitudes Towards Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäkel, Ina Charlotte; Smolka, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Using the 2007 wave of the Pew Global Attitudes Project, this paper finds statistically significant and economically large Stolper-Samuelson effects in individuals’ preference formation towards trade policy. High-skilled individuals are substantially more pro-trade than low-skilled individuals......-Ohlin model in shaping free trade attitudes, relative to existing literature....

  5. On the Digital Daily Cycles of Individuals

    CERN Document Server

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Humans, like almost all animals, are phase-locked to the diurnal cycle. Most of us sleep at night and are active through the day. Because we have evolved to function with this cycle, the circadian rhythm is deeply ingrained and even detectable at the biochemical level. However, within the broader day-night pattern, there are individual differences: e.g., some of us are intrinsically morning-active, while others prefer evenings. In this article, we look at digital daily cycles: circadian patterns of activity viewed through the lens of auto-recorded data of communication and online activity. We begin at the aggregate level, discuss earlier results, and illustrate differences between population-level daily rhythms in different media. Then we move on to the individual level, and show that there is a strong individual-level variation beyond averages: individuals typically have their distinctive daily pattern that persists in time. We conclude by discussing the driving forces behind these signature daily patterns, ...

  6. Model-Based Design of Biochemical Microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbinger, Tobias; Gahn, Markus; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Hante, Falk M; Voll, Lars M; Leugering, Günter; Knabner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical pathways is an important resource in Synthetic Biology, as the predictive power of simulating synthetic pathways represents an important step in the design of synthetic metabolons. In this paper, we are concerned with the mathematical modeling, simulation, and optimization of metabolic processes in biochemical microreactors able to carry out enzymatic reactions and to exchange metabolites with their surrounding medium. The results of the reported modeling approach are incorporated in the design of the first microreactor prototypes that are under construction. These microreactors consist of compartments separated by membranes carrying specific transporters for the input of substrates and export of products. Inside the compartments of the reactor multienzyme complexes assembled on nano-beads by peptide adapters are used to carry out metabolic reactions. The spatially resolved mathematical model describing the ongoing processes consists of a system of diffusion equations together with boundary and initial conditions. The boundary conditions model the exchange of metabolites with the neighboring compartments and the reactions at the surface of the nano-beads carrying the multienzyme complexes. Efficient and accurate approaches for numerical simulation of the mathematical model and for optimal design of the microreactor are developed. As a proof-of-concept scenario, a synthetic pathway for the conversion of sucrose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was chosen. In this context, the mathematical model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal distributions of the metabolite concentrations, as well as application relevant quantities like the outflow rate of G6P. These computations are performed for different scenarios, where the number of beads as well as their loading capacity are varied. The computed metabolite distributions show spatial patterns, which differ for different experimental arrangements. Furthermore, the total output of G6P

  7. Definitions of biochemical failure in prostate cancer following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a consensus panel definition of biochemical failure following radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In this paper, we develop a series of alternative definitions of biochemical failure. Using data from 688 patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the various definitions, with respect to a defined 'clinically meaningful' outcome. Methods and Materials: The ASTRO definition of biochemical failure requires 3 consecutive rises in prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We considered several modifications to the standard definition: to require PSA rises of a certain magnitude, to consider 2 instead of 3 rises, to require the final PSA value to be greater than a fixed cutoff level, and to define biochemical failure based on the slope of PSA over 1, 1.5, or 2 years. A clinically meaningful failure is defined as local recurrence, distant metastases, initiation of unplanned hormonal therapy, unplanned radical prostatectomy, or a PSA>25 later than 6 months after radiation. Results: Requiring the final PSA in a series of consecutive rises to be larger than 1.5 ng/mL increased the specificity of biochemical failure. For a fixed specificity, defining biochemical failure based on 2 consecutive rises, or the slope over the last year, could increase the sensitivity by up to approximately 20%, compared to the ASTRO definition. Using a rule based on the slope over the previous year or 2 rises leads to a slightly earlier detection of biochemical failure than does the ASTRO definition. Even with the best rule, only approximately 20% of true failures are biochemically detected more than 1 year before the clinically meaningful event time. Conclusion: There is potential for improvement in the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure. Further research is needed, in studies with long follow-up times, to evaluate the relationship between various definitions of biochemical failure and

  8. BALL - biochemical algorithms library 1.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöckel Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Biochemical Algorithms Library (BALL is a comprehensive rapid application development framework for structural bioinformatics. It provides an extensive C++ class library of data structures and algorithms for molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics. Using BALL as a programming toolbox does not only allow to greatly reduce application development times but also helps in ensuring stability and correctness by avoiding the error-prone reimplementation of complex algorithms and replacing them with calls into the library that has been well-tested by a large number of developers. In the ten years since its original publication, BALL has seen a substantial increase in functionality and numerous other improvements. Results Here, we discuss BALL's current functionality and highlight the key additions and improvements: support for additional file formats, molecular edit-functionality, new molecular mechanics force fields, novel energy minimization techniques, docking algorithms, and support for cheminformatics. Conclusions BALL is available for all major operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and MacOS X. It is available free of charge under the Lesser GNU Public License (LPGL. Parts of the code are distributed under the GNU Public License (GPL. BALL is available as source code and binary packages from the project web site at http://www.ball-project.org. Recently, it has been accepted into the debian project; integration into further distributions is currently pursued.

  9. PHA bioplastics, biochemicals, and energy from crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somleva, Maria N; Peoples, Oliver P; Snell, Kristi D

    2013-02-01

    Large scale production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in plants can provide a sustainable supply of bioplastics, biochemicals, and energy from sunlight and atmospheric CO(2). PHAs are a class of polymers with various chain lengths that are naturally produced by some microorganisms as storage materials. The properties of these polyesters make them functionally equivalent to many of the petroleum-based plastics that are currently in the market place. However, unlike most petroleum-derived plastics, PHAs can be produced from renewable feedstocks and easily degrade in most biologically active environments. This review highlights research efforts over the last 20 years to engineer the production of PHAs in plants with a focus on polyhydroxybutryrate (PHB) production in bioenergy crops with C(4) photosynthesis. PHB has the potential to be a high volume commercial product with uses not only in the plastics and materials markets, but also in renewable chemicals and feed. The major challenges of improving product yield and plant fitness in high biomass yielding C(4) crops are discussed in detail. PMID:23294864

  10. NUTRITION AND SPORTS: A BIOCHEMICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.G. Bianco

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a course dedicated to the pedagogical instruction of graduate students (Ensino deBioqumica - QBQ 5711 in which they have to plan and teach a 30 hour-discipline for undergraduatestudents. The graduate students have to choose a subject for the discipline and, in 2003, the cho-sen subject was Nutrition and Sports: a Biochemical Approach, which is not specically broached inregular disciplines. The discipline was structured in the basis of collaborative learning, thus, the 75 en-rolled undergraduate students (from dierent courses as Nutrition, Sports, Pharmacy, Chemistry andBiology were organized in small working groups. The students were given a study guide produced bythe graduate teachers (available in Portuguese at http://www.sbbq.org.br/revista/mtdidaticos.php,in which the following contents were covered: muscle contraction, O2 up-take, oxidative stress andanti-oxidant response, cramp, hydration, doping and nutritional supplies. In the nal activity thestudents had to evaluate critically myths and true facts in 80 statements usually associated to physi-cal activities and sports. The discipline was evaluated through questionnaires. From the analysis ofthe answers of both undergraduate and graduate/teachers students it is possible to conclude that thediscipline was well conduced and succeeded. These results emphasize the relevance and contribution ofthis kind of discipline to the pedagogical instruction of the graduate students and also to the increaseof undergraduate students interests in Biochemistry.

  11. Biochemical and proteomic characterization of alkaptonuric chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as "black" AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as "white" AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both "white" and "black" AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in "black" AKU chondrocytes. PMID:22213341

  12. Skin biochemical composition analysis by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Patricia Karen; Tosato, Maira Gaspar; Alves, Rani de Souza; Martin, Airton Abrahao; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro, E-mail: amartin@univap.br [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia Vibracional Biomedica, Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento - IP e D, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba - UniVap, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Skin aging is characterized by cellular and molecular alterations. In this context, Confocal Raman spectroscopy was used in vivo to measure these biochemical changes as function of the skin depth. In this study we have tried to correlate spectra from pure amino acids to in vivo spectra from volunteers with different ages. This study was performed on 32 volunteers: 11 from Group A (20-23 years), 11 from Group B (39-42 years) and 10 from Group C (59-62 years). For each group, the Raman spectra were measured on the surface (0 mm), 30 +- 3 mm and 60 +- 3 {mu}m below the surface. The results from intergroup comparisons showed that the oldest group had a prevalence of the tyrosine band, but it also presented a decrease in the band centered at 875 cm{sup -1} of pyrrolidone acid. The amide I band centered at 1637 cm{sup -1} that is attributed to collagen, as well as other proteins and lipid, showed a smaller amount of these biomolecules for Group C, which can be explained by the decrease in collagen concentration as a function of age. (author)

  13. Reflective Fourier ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Shaun; Zheng, Guoan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-02-01

    The Fourier ptychography technique in reflection mode has great potential applications in tissue imaging and optical inspection, but the current configuration either has a limitation on cut-off frequency or is not practical. By placing the imaging aperture stop outside the illumination path, the illumination numerical aperture (NA) can be greater than the imaging NA of the objective lens. Thus, the cut-off frequency achieved in the proposed optical system is greater than twice the objective's NA divided by the wavelength (2NAobj/λ), which is the diffraction limit for the cut-off frequency in an incoherent epi-illumination configuration. We experimentally demonstrated that the synthesized NA is increased by a factor of 4.5 using the proposed optical concept. The key advantage of the proposed system is that it can achieve high-resolution imaging over a large field of view with a simple objective. It will have a great potential for applications in endoscopy, biomedical imaging, surface metrology, and industrial inspection.

  14. A reflection on health

    OpenAIRE

    Laporte, Josep

    2003-01-01

    El concepte de salut ha anat evolucionant al llarg del temps i ha passat d'una definició que només tenia en compte l'absència de malaltia a la consideració global de l'individu, des del punt de vista físic, mental i, fins i tot, social. Les diferències de salut entre el món occidental i el Tercer Món són ben paleses i es manifesten en la mortalitat infantil o l'esperança de vida. Les condicions de vida de les persones, el grau d'escolarització i el nivell de desenvolupament són els principals...

  15. Correlation of serum arylesterase activity on phenylacetate estimated by the integrated method to common classical biochemical indexes of liver damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Fei; ZHU Xiao-yun; WANG Yong-mei; ZHAO Yun-sheng; ZHU Lian-ping; ZUO Yu-ping

    2007-01-01

    The correlation of serum arylesterase (PON1) activity on phenylacetate determined by an integrated method to classical biochemical indexes of liver damage was investigated for the use of PON1 activity to evaluate liver damage. PON1 reaction curve as absorbance at 270 nm for 0.20 mmol/L phenylacetate hydrolysis was analyzed by the integrated method to determine maximal PON1 reaction rate. Classical biochemical indexes of liver damage were determined routinely. The 95% confidence threshold of PON1 activity in sera from healthy individuals was 2.12 mkat/L [(4.73±1.31) mkat/L, n=105]. PON1 activity in clinical sera was closely correlated to serum albumin, total protein and the ratio of albumin to globulins, but was weakly correlated to both direct and total bilirubin in serum. There were no correlations of PON1 activity to γ-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Among 127 clinical sera with PON1 activity>2.12 mkat/L, there were 92% healthy individuals examined by albumin, 90% healthy individuals examined by total protein, 88% healthy individuals examined by total bilirubin, 86% healthy individuals examined by direct bilirubin and 64% healthy individuals examined by the ratio of albumin to globulins, respectively. In each group of healthy individuals judged by classical biochemical indexes of close correlation to PON1 activity, percentage of healthy individuals examined by PON1 activity was always >80%. These results suggested PON1 activity on phenylacetate estimated by the integrated method was also suitable for the evaluation of liver damage.

  16. Cultivating Reflective Practitioners in Technology Preparation: Constructing TPACK through Reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Liangyue Lu

    2013-01-01

    Teaching is a complex profession, which is further complicated by the integration of technology into classrooms. Reflection can help teachers unpack the complexity in their practice. Reflection can be an effective instructional strategy in helping preservice teachers develop technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK), the complex and dynamic knowledge necessary for effective technology integration into instruction. In this study, reflective activities were integrated into a Learning ...

  17. Nurse teachers' constructions of reflection and reflective practice

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Aideen; Hyde, Abbey; Treacy, Margaret P.

    2010-01-01

    This article concerns the meanings that a sample of nurse teachers ascribed to the concepts of reflection and reflective practice as aspects of an undergraduate nursing curriculum. It represents one of the major findings in a qualitative study that set out to explore nurse teachers’ perceptions and experiences of using reflection with diploma nursing students in the Republic of Ireland. Eleven nurse teachers were interviewed intensively, and data were analysed using a strategy ...

  18. Contextualising the Individual in International Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I call for further contextualisation of the individual in international management research. In this 'opinion piece', my goal is to stimulate debate and elicit a thoughtful reaction. Accordingly, this paper aims to provoke and excite, rather than review and summarise. On the basis of...... my own work and the work of my colleagues, I critically reflect on arguments previously made in this line of research, and illustrate the nuances that become apparent when we (a) purposefully introduce individual heterogeneity into the research model and (b) use context heterogeneity as a source for...

  19. Evolution of long-term coloration trends with biochemically unstable ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Dawn M; Belloni, Virginia; Davis, Sarah N; Morrison, Erin S; Andrews, John E; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2016-05-25

    The evolutionarily persistent and widespread use of carotenoid pigments in animal coloration contrasts with their biochemical instability. Consequently, evolution of carotenoid-based displays should include mechanisms to accommodate or limit pigment degradation. In birds, this could involve two strategies: (i) evolution of a moult immediately prior to the mating season, enabling the use of particularly fast-degrading carotenoids and (ii) evolution of the ability to stabilize dietary carotenoids through metabolic modification or association with feather keratins. Here, we examine evolutionary lability and transitions between the two strategies across 126 species of birds. We report that species that express mostly unmodified, fast-degrading, carotenoids have pre-breeding moults, and a particularly short time between carotenoid deposition and the subsequent breeding season. Species that expressed mostly slow-degrading carotenoids in their plumage accomplished this through increased metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids, and the selective expression of these slow-degrading compounds. In these species, the timing of moult was not associated with carotenoid composition of plumage displays. Using repeated samples from individuals of one species, we found that metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids significantly slowed their degradation between moult and breeding season. Thus, the most complex and colourful ornamentation is likely the most biochemically stable in birds, and depends less on ecological factors, such as moult timing and migration tendency. We suggest that coevolution of metabolic modification, selective expression and biochemical stability of plumage carotenoids enables the use of unstable pigments in long-term evolutionary trends in plumage coloration. PMID:27194697

  20. Recent Advances on the Use of Biochemical Extracts as Filaricidal Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeh M. Al-Abd

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is a parasitic infection that causes a devastating public health and socioeconomic burden with an estimated infection of over 120 million individuals worldwide. The infection is caused by three closely related nematode parasites, namely, Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and B. timori, which are transmitted to human through mosquitoes of Anopheles, Culex, and Aedes genera. The species have many ecological variants and are diversified in terms of their genetic fingerprint. The rapid spread of the disease and the genetic diversification cause the lymphatic filarial parasites to respond differently to diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This in turn prompts the current challenge encountered in its management. Furthermore, most of the chemical medications used are characterized by adverse side effects. These complications urgently warrant intense prospecting on bio-chemicals that have potent efficacy against either the filarial worms or thier vector. In lieu of this, we presented a review on recent literature that reported the efficacy of filaricidal biochemicals and those employed as vector control agents. In addition, methods used for biochemical extraction, screening procedures, and structure of the bioactive compounds were also presented.

  1. INFORMATION: INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    We inform you that the Individual Dosimetry Service will be exceptionally closed on April 13 and 14 (Tuesday and Wednesday). Only the very urgent cases will be handled during the days mentioned above.

  2. Photothermal analysis of individual nanoparticulate samples using micromechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom; Schmid, Silvan; Villanueva Torrijo, Luis Guillermo; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    photothermal spectroscopy, a novel method that enables the analysis of individual nanoparticulate samples. Absorption of light by an individual sample placed on a microstring resonator results in local heating of the string, which is reflected in its resonance frequency. The working principle of the...

  3. Biochemical alteration in cells following phagocytosis of M. leprae--the consequence--a basic concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, P R; Antia, N H

    1980-06-01

    When macrophages from lepromatous leprosy patients are exposed to M. leprae, the macrophages show reduced protein synthesis. Such a phenomenon is not seen with macrophages from tuberculoid patients or normal individuals. M. leprae phagocytized by Schwann cells affect the incorporation of DNA precursor in the cells, leading to failure of Schwann cell association with axons in in vitro cultures. These 2 observations form a basis of proposing that basic biochemical events take place when M. leprae are associated with host cells, which in turn can be amplified to physiologically functional defects. PMID:6995358

  4. Against Individual Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Bown, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    In this paper I discuss reasons for viewing creativity more as a social process than as an individual act. These reasons include the subjectivity of evaluation in attributing creativity, the potentially arbitrary relationship between individuals and creativity at the cultural level, the importance of the capacity for preserving cultural information over and above the capacity to innovate, the role of objects, institutions and interaction in sparking creativity, and the social constructedness ...

  5. Troubling Muddy Waters: Problematizing Reflective Practice in Global Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Thirusha; Kumagai, Arno K

    2016-03-01

    The idea of exporting the concept of reflective practice for a global medical education audience is growing. However, the uncritical export and adoption of Western concepts of reflection may be inappropriate in non-Western societies. The emphasis in Western medical education on the use of reflection for a specific end--that is, the improvement of individual clinical practice--tends to ignore the range of reflective practice, concentrating on reflection alone while overlooking critical reflection and reflexivity. This Perspective places the concept of reflective practice under a critical lens to explore a broader view for its application in medical education outside the West. The authors suggest that ideas about reflection in medicine and medical education may not be as easily transferable from Western to non-Western contexts as concepts from biomedical science are. The authors pose the question, When "exporting" Western medical education strategies and principles, how often do Western-trained educators authentically open up to the possibility that there are alternative ways of seeing and knowing that may be valuable in educating Western physicians? One answer lies in the assertion that educators should aspire to turn exportation of educational theory into a truly bidirectional, collaborative exchange in which culturally conscious views of reflective practice contribute to humanistic, equitable patient care. This discussion engages in troubling the already-muddy waters of reflective practice by exploring the global applicability of reflective practice as it is currently applied in medical education. The globalization of medical education demands critical reflection on reflection itself. PMID:26630601

  6. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  7. [Blood biochemical indices of female red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) in Zhalong Nature Reserve of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Sun, Zhong-Wu; Zou, Hong-Fei; Jin, Guang-Yao

    2009-10-01

    From November 2004 to October 2005, twenty blood biochemical indices, i. e., total protein, serum albumin, serum globulin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, blood glucose, serum urea nitrogen, serum creatine, total cholesterol, triglyceride, aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase, alkaline phosphatase, serum creatine kinase, hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, serum calcium ion, inorganic phosphate, and magnesium ion, of 10 female Grus japonensis adults in their wintering, reproduction, and migration periods in Zhalong Nature Reserve were analyzed by automatic biochemical analyzer. Significant differences (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) were observed in the test indices except serum total protein, serum globulin, and blood glucose among the three life periods, which suggested that the serum total protein, serum globulin, and blood glucose could be used as the reliable references of blood biochemical indices of female G. japonensis, while the year-round dynamics of the other 17 indices reflected the physiological characteristics and ecological adaptability of female G. japonensis in its different periods in one year. When using these 17 indices as the references of the blood biochemical indices of female G. japonensis, the physiological period should be considered. PMID:20077721

  8. Self-Reflection: Beyond Conventional Fiction Film Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Vaage, Margrethe Bruun

    2009-01-01

    Idiosyncratic responses are more strictly personal responses to fiction film that vary across individual spectators. In philosophy of film, idiosyncratic responses are often deemed inappropriate, unwarranted and unintended by the film. One type of idiosyncratic response is when empathy with a character triggers the spectator to reflect on his own real-life issues. Self-reflection can be triggered by egoistic drift, where the spectator starts imagining himself in the character’s...

  9. Demystifying the reflective clinical journal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Student learning on clinical placement is a complex issue and cannot be defined solely by just doing things. Reflection during clinical practice is essential if the student is going to learn from the experience. Therefore it is important for educators to include as part of clinical education programs learning strategies that encourage reflection. The reflective clinical journal is an educational tool that is employed by the School of Medical Radiation Sciences at the University of Sydney to encourage reflection of undergraduate radiation therapy students whilst on clinical placement. This discussion paper explores the key concepts of reflection and the reflective clinical journal. Due to the paucity of information about this issue in radiation therapy the literature reviewed is from across all areas of the health sciences

  10. Demystifying the reflective clinical journal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milinkovic, Danielle [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)]. E-mail: d.milinkovic@fhs.usyd.edu.au; Field, Nikki [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)

    2005-08-01

    Student learning on clinical placement is a complex issue and cannot be defined solely by just doing things. Reflection during clinical practice is essential if the student is going to learn from the experience. Therefore it is important for educators to include as part of clinical education programs learning strategies that encourage reflection. The reflective clinical journal is an educational tool that is employed by the School of Medical Radiation Sciences at the University of Sydney to encourage reflection of undergraduate radiation therapy students whilst on clinical placement. This discussion paper explores the key concepts of reflection and the reflective clinical journal. Due to the paucity of information about this issue in radiation therapy the literature reviewed is from across all areas of the health sciences.

  11. Web Science and Reflective Practice

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Kieron; Hall, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The notion of reflective practice has been influential in professional practice of all kinds, including engineering. Reflective practice suggests that knowledge and practice are linked, that improvisation based on actual practice, as opposed to the application of formalised theory, drives understanding in many applied fields. A key feature of reflective practice is a feedback loop between actions and their effects, which need to be evaluated to produce understanding. The WWW is of course a pi...

  12. The functional consequences of relative substrate specificity in complex biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eZeng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A biochemical activity, that is, enzymatic reaction or molecular interaction, frequently involves a molecule, for example, an enzyme, capable of interacting with numerous substrates or partners. Specificity is a fundamental property of biochemical activities, and relative specificity refers to the situation whereby a molecule interacts with multiple substrates or partners but with different affinities. Here, a hypothesis is proposed that any molecule, such as an enzyme, would have a range of preferences or relative specificity for its many native substrates, which differentially impacts the phenotypes of these substrates and hence shapes the relevant biological processes in vivo. While the mechanisms underlying the specific recognition between enzymes and individual substrates have been studied extensively, whether any enzyme exhibits intrinsic selectivity towards its ensemble of substrates is often overlooked, and whether this selectivity has any functional consequences is much less appreciated. There are, however, several lines of evidence in the literature that are consistent with the hypothesis and reviewed here. Furthermore, this hypothesis is supported by our analyses of a number of diverse biochemical systems at a large scale. Thus, the human microRNA processing machinery possesses relative specificity towards its hundreds of substrates, which might contribute to differential microRNA biogenesis; the promoter binding affinity of the transcription factor Ndt80 might regulate Ndt80 target mRNA expression in the budding yeast; Cdk1 kinase specificity might lead to variable substrate phosphorylation in vivo; and the density of HuR deposition to its thousands of RNA targets might partly explain differential RNA expression in human cells. It is proposed, therefore, that relative specificity is a universal property of complex biochemical systems and that the hypothesis could denote a general principle in biology.

  13. Biochemical markers for assessment of calcium economy and bone metabolism: application in clinical trials from pharmaceutical agents to nutritional products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; Kohrt, Wendy; Levasseur, Régis; Warren, Michelle; Whiting, Susan; Kraenzlin, Marius

    2014-12-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Substantial progress in both laboratory analyses and clinical use of biochemical markers has modified the strategy of anti-osteoporotic drug development. The present review examines the use of biochemical markers in clinical research aimed at characterising the influence of foods or nutrients on bone metabolism. The two types of markers are: (i) specific hormonal factors related to bone; and (ii) bone turnover markers (BTM) that reflect bone cell metabolism. Of the former, vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-I indicate responses to variations in the supply of bone-related nutrients, such as vitamin D, Ca, inorganic phosphate and protein. Thus modification in bone remodelling, the key process upon which both pharmaceutical agents and nutrients exert their anti-catabolic or anabolic actions, is revealed. Circulating BTM reflect either osteoclastic resorption or osteoblastic formation. Intervention with pharmacological agents showed that early changes in BTM predicted bone loss and subsequent osteoporotic fracture risk. New trials have documented the influence of nutrition on bone-tropic hormonal factors and BTM in adults, including situations of body-weight change, such as anorexia nervosa, and weight loss by obese subjects. In osteoporosis-prevention studies involving dietary manipulation, randomised cross-over trials are best suited to evaluate influences on bone metabolism, and insight into effects on bone metabolism may be gained within a relatively short time when biochemical markers are monitored. PMID:25394580

  14. Signals for specular Andreev reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyun; Fu, Deyi; Wang, Baigeng; Zhang, R; Xing, D Y

    2008-07-25

    We report a theoretical investigation of the spin-dependent Andreev reflection at the interface of a graphene-based ferromagnet/superconductor junction. It is found that the ferromagnetic exchange interaction in the ferromagnet can suppress Andreev retroreflection but enhance the specular Andreev reflection. There is a transition between the specular Andreev reflection and Andreev retroreflection at which the shot noise vanishes and the Fano factor has a universal value. The present work provides a new method of detecting the specular Andreev reflection, which can be experimentally tested within the present-day technique. PMID:18764360

  15. Self-sputtering and reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-sputtering and reflection are investigated with the Monte Carlo program TRIMSP. The results include particle and energy reflection coefficients, sputtering yields and sputtered energy versus incident angle and energy. Angular and energy distributions of reflected and sputtered particles are also given. Reflection and sputtering values are compared to show their contributions to selfsputtering. A comparison of calculated sputtering yields and sputtering efficiencies (sputtering energy) with experimental data is carried out. The systems investigated are mainly the bombardment of C, Ni, and W with self-ions. (orig.)

  16. Students’ Learning through Reflective Journaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvyda Liuolienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to get acquainted with the types of journals used in education to help students to learn. The paper presents some ways of fostering student’s learning through reflective journaling. It also describes the key aspects of a new method ARRIVE cycle in connection with teachers preparation to use reflective journals in a classroom. The article also presents self-assessment in reflective journaling and students’ need to self-evaluate their learning process. Reflective journaling as central to students’ self-evaluation is described as a means of fostering metacognition.

  17. Cultivating Reflective Practitioners in Technology Preparation: Constructing TPACK through Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangyue Lu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a complex profession, which is further complicated by the integration of technology into classrooms. Reflection can help teachers unpack the complexity in their practice. Reflection can be an effective instructional strategy in helping preservice teachers develop technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK, the complex and dynamic knowledge necessary for effective technology integration into instruction. In this study, reflective activities were integrated into a Learning By Design (LBD environment, which was created to help preservice teachers develop TPACK. This paper investigated the participants’ TPACK development and examined how reflection helped them construct TPACK. Through content analysis of the participants’ reflective journals, the researcher found that the preservice teachers developed initial TPACK awareness. However, their reflection in technology knowledge and the content aspects of TPACK were limited and superficial. Interviews with the participants showed reflection helped the preservice teachers remember what they learned by describing and elaborating on their in-class experiences, pushed them to think about how to apply what they learned in their future classrooms, and helped them become more reflective and open-minded about using technology in classrooms. Finally, the researcher discussed this study’s implications for teacher educators and researchers.

  18. Embodied Reflection and the Epistemology of Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne

    2007-01-01

    Donald Schon's theory of reflective practice has been extensively referred to and has had enormous impact in education and related fields. Nonetheless, there continues to be tremendous conceptual and practical confusion surrounding interpretations of reflective practice and philosophical assumptions underlying the theory. In this paper, I argue…

  19. Reflective Practice Interventions: Raising Levels of Reflective Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Audrey; Schoen, Lea

    2009-01-01

    Reflective practice is a major focus of teacher preparation programs (Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 1992; Putnam & Borko, 2000; Zeichner, 1986; Zeichner & Liston, 1987), yet Zeichner (1986) asserts that developing reflective practice in preservice teachers has focused primarily on short-term, less systematic interventions and that interventions must be…

  20. Biochemical Changes Associated with Germinating Rice Grains and Germination Improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subajiny VELUPPILLAI; Ketheeswary NITHYANANTHARAJAH; Seevaratnam VASANTHARUBA; Sandrasegarampillai BALAKUMAR; Vasanthy ARASARATNAM

    2009-01-01

    To determine biochemical changes during the germination of rice grains (Oryza sativa L. subsp. indica var. Mottaikaruppan) and to improve germination rate using gibberellic acid and surfactants [sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (1.0 g/L) and Triton-X-100 (1.0 mL/L)], whole rice grains soaked in distilled water for 12 h at 30oC were germinated in the dark at 30oC for five days. The highest germination rate (77.1%) was obtained on the 5th day. An increase in the content of reducing sugars from 7.3 to 58.1 mg/g DM (dry matter) was observed from the 1st day of germination. Free amino acids and soluble protein contents increased to 3.69 and 5.29 mg/g DM, respectively on the 5th day of germination. Total protein content decreased from 100.5 to 91.0 g/kg DM during germination. Increases in amylolytic (1.1 to 190.0 U/g DM) and proteolytic (0 to 0.12 U/g DM) activities were observed during germination. Effects of different concentrations of gibberellic acid on the germination of rice grains were evaluated and 0.1 g/L was found to promote germination. When effects of gibberellic acid (0.1 g/L) and surfactants were evaluated individually and together, higher germination rate was observed in the control experiment (grains germinated in distilled water), whereas giberellic acid and surfactants decreased the germination rate. Therefore, the flour obtained from the grains germinated for four days using distilled water to obtain high content of soluble materials and enzyme activities can be used in preparation of bakery items.

  1. Audible reflection density for different late reflection criteria in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Donata; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas;

    2012-01-01

    For reasonably accurate but practical auralizations, some simplifications and approximations are needed. The main issue in the present investigation is that the reflection density of a room impulse response, in theory, increases so fast as a quadratic function of the elapsed time, even assuming...... only specular reflections. Therefore in this study, the upper threshold for audible reflection density is investigated for four different transition times of 25, 50, 75, and 100 ms through a headphone listening test. Binaural impulse responses and speech signals simulated in three rooms with different...... characteristics (an empty office, a lecture room, and an auditorium) are used as stimuli. Subjects are asked to increase/decrease the reflection density of a stimulus until they cannot distinguish it from the stimulus that follows the theoretical reflection density for the different transition times in the three...

  2. Individual monitoring in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of individual external exposure monitoring and the outlooks of its development are discussed. The principles and organization of monitoring settled by the current regulations are outlined. The reasons for the dominating use of the film dosimeter (FD) in regular monitoring are given, as well as the prerequisites for the wider use of thermoluminescence dosimetric systems (TLD) in this respect. Technical and dosimetric information about the individual dosimetric systems in Bulgaria is presented. ( FD, TLD, ionization), applied in regular and operative monitoring. Approximately 10000 persons are included in the system of control. The results of the measurements, the calibration of dosimeters ( FD is calibrated with photon irradiation Eeff.=42KeV and 662 KeV 137Cs and TLD is calibrated with 137Cs or 60Co) and the quality of measurements are subject of discussion. The task of the specialists engaged in individual monitoring is to work out methods for measurement of the individual equivalent dose Hp(10) by dosimeters in use Bulgaria. The creation of a National Register for Individual Doses is a major task still awaiting solution

  3. Assessment of biochemical concentrations of vegetation using remote sensing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main biochemicals (such as lignin, protein, cellulose, sugar, starch, chlorophyll and water) of vegetation are directly or indirectly involved in major ecological processes, such as the functions of terrestrial ecosystems (i.e., nutrient-cycling processes, primary production, and decomposition). Remote sensing techniques provide a very convenient way of data acquisition capable of covering a large area several times during one season, so it can play a unique and essential role provided that we can relate remote sensing measurements to the biochemical characteristics of the Earth surface in a reliable and operational way. The application of remote sensing techniques for the estimation of canopy biochemicals was reviewed. Three methods of estimating biochemical concentrations of vegetation were included in this paper: index, stepwise multiple linear regression, and stepwise multiple linear regression based on a model of the forest crown. In addition, the vitality and potential applying value are stressed.

  4. Biochemical Aspects of Acclimatization of Man to High Altitude Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Srivastava

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the biochemical aspects of acclimatization of human body to high altitude with particular reference to the adaptive changes in Skeletal muscles, hepatic function, adrenal function and carbohydrate metabolism.

  5. NERVOUS-SYSTEM SPECIFIC PROTEINS AS BIOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF NEUROTOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in neuroimmunology and protein purification methodology have led to the identification of nervous-system specific proteins. Their intimate relationship to the cellular and functional heterogeneity of the nervous system, makes these proteins ideal biochemical marke...

  6. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Biochemical Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzullo, Leslie [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  7. Community Based Assessment of Biochemical Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases in Rural and Tribal Area of Himalayan Region, India

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Kumar Bhardwaj; Dinesh Kumar; Sunil Kumar Raina; Pradeep Bansal; Satya Bhushan; Vishav Chander

    2013-01-01

    Context. Evident change in nutrition and lifestyle among individuals of urban and rural areas raises suspicion for similar change in tribal area population of India. Aim. To study the biochemical risk factor for CVDs in rural and tribal population of Sub-Himalayan state of India. Settings and Design. Cross-sectional study in rural (low altitude) and tribal (high altitude) area of Himachal Pradesh, India. Methodology. Blood lipid profile using standard laboratory methods. Statistical Analysis....

  8. Self-focus and procedural fairness: the role of self-rumination and self-reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Brebels, Lieven; De Cremer, David; Sedikides, Constantine; Van Hiel, Alain

    2013-01-01

    This article examined the differential role of self-rumination and self-reflection on the psychological influence of procedural fairness. Study 1 induced self-rumination and self-reflection relative to an outward-focused control. Self-rumination increased the perceived importance of procedural fairness, whereas self-reflection decreased it. Study 2, assessing individual differences in self-rumination and self-reflection, showed that a standard procedural fairness manipulation (voice vs. no vo...

  9. Anatomical and biochemical investigation of primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancerous transformation entails major biochemical changes including modifications of the energy metabolism of the cell, e.g. utilisation of glucose and other substrates, protein synthesis, and expression of receptors and antigens. Tumour growth also leads to heterogeneity in blood flow owing to focal necrosis, angiogenesis and metabolic demands, as well as disruption of transport mechanisms of substrates across cell membranes and other physiological boundaries such as the blood-brain barrier. All these biochemical, histological and anatomical changes can be assessed with emission tomography, X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Whereas anatomical imaging is aimed at the diagnosis of brain tumours, biochemical imaging is better suited for tissue characterisation. The identification of a tumoural mass and the assessment of its size and vascularisation are best achieved with X-ray CT and MRI, while biochemical imaging can provide additional information that is crucial for tumour classification, differential diagnosis and follow-up. As the assessment of variables such as water content, appearance of cystic lesions and location of the tumour are largely irrelevant for tissue characterisation, a number of probes have been employed for the assessment of the biochemical features of tumours. Since biochemical changes may be related to the growth rate of cancer cells, they can be thought of as markers of tumour cell proliferation. Biochemical imaging with radionuclides of processes that occur at a cellular level provides information that complements findings obtained by anatomical imaging aimed at depicting structural, vascular and histological changes. This review focusses on the clinical application of anatomical brain imaging and biochemical assessment with positron emission tomography, single-photon emission tomography and MRS in the diagnosis of primary brain tumours, as well as in follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanopro...

  11. Biomphalaria prona (Gastropoda: Planorbidae): a morphological and biochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    W. Lobato Paraense; Pointier, J.P.; Delay, B.; A. F. Pernot; Incani, R N; C. Balzan; P. Chrosciechowski

    1992-01-01

    Two samples of Biomphalaria prona (Martens, 1873) from Lake Valencia (type locality) and seven from other Venezuelan localities were studied morphologically (shell and reproductive system) and biochemically (allozyme electrophoresis). In spite of marked differences in shell characters, all of them proved indistinguishable under the anatomic and biochemical criteria. So far B. prona has been considered an endemic species, restricted to Lake Valencia. It is now demonstrated that the extralacust...

  12. Correlations between female breast density and biochemical markers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Park, Hyong-Keun; Yang, Han-Jun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify biochemical markers related to breast density. The study was performed with 200 patients who received mammography and biochemical marker testing between March 1, 2014 to October 1, 2014. [Subjects and Methods] Following the American College of Radiology, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI-RADS), breast parenchymal pattern density from mammography was categorized into four grades: grade 1, almost entirely fat; grade 2, fibroglandula...

  13. Serum Biochemical Profile of Post Partum Metritic Cow

    OpenAIRE

    Magnus P. K.; Lali F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Present study was conducted to find out the relationship between serum biochemical profile and postpartum metritis. Mainly serum glucose, total protein, albumin, albumin globulin ratio, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine and calcium were studied. Colorimetric method was used for quantitative estimation of biochemical profile. Twenty-seven animals with recent history of calving and subsequent metritis were included in the study. On analysis, serum glucose was found to be 22.3 ± 2.1...

  14. Murine interleukin 2 receptor. IV. Biochemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IL 2 receptor isolated from the IL 2-dependent CTL-L cell line was subjected to biochemical analysis. Pulse-chase and tunicamycin studies, as well as digestion with the endoglycosidases, Endo-F and Endo-H, of 35S-methionine-labeled IL 2 receptors suggested a single protein pecursor of 32,000 (p32) daltons. The p32 precursor was rapidly processed by addition of high-mannose-containing core N-linked sugars to intracytoplasmic precursor intermediates of 38,000 (p38) and 40,000 (p40) daltons, which undergo further processing to yield a mature surface receptor with heterogeneous apparent m.w. of 52,000 to 65,000 (p58). Two-dimensional gel studies indicated that p58 exhibited broad charge heterogeneity between pH 4.6 and 6.3. Endo-F digestions of p58 shifted the isoelectric focus point to a more basic 5.5 to 7.4. This considerable charge heterogeneity is consistent with the possibility that other post-translational modifications to the mouse IL 2 receptor occur besides addition of complex N-linked glycans. Immunoprecipitations of the IL 2 receptor from surface iodinated cells also revealed an additional band at 110,000 (p110) daltons. IEF vs SDS-PAGE two-dimensional gel studies demonstrated that p110 also had an isoelectric focus point identical to p58. Western blot studies with an anti-IL 2 receptor monoclonal antibody (7D4) demonstrates that p38, p40, p58, and p110 each expressed the epitope recognized by this antibody. Thus, it is likely that p110 is not a unique molecule that coprecipitates with IL 2 receptor. Western blot analysis of mitogen-stimulated T and B lymphocytes also revealed bands similar to p58 and p110, although these bands had an average apparent m.w. 3000 and 6000 less than those seen for CTL-L cells

  15. Individualized training module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An individualized training module is a device for providing an individual trainee with the training he needs in a format where he can proceed on his own, without regard for the capabilities or even the presence of other students. It is based on a pretest, each item of which is referenced to a training activity. Each activity also has a test or performance qualification to verify that the desired learning occurred. Typically, the module as a variety of training activities; the scope is purposely narrow; and the instructional materials combine commercial and instructor made materials. The instructor creates the activities based upon desired scope and depth and the training materials and budget available

  16. A Review of Reflective Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘屹

    2013-01-01

      This thesis aims at exploring theoretical basis of reflective learning in learning experience and providing the learners from all walks of life with an effective way of learning by observing and explaining how the learning as well as practice is promoted effectively and consciously through reflective activities.

  17. Why Reflection in Teacher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBoskey, Vicki Kubler

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on preservice teacher education by considering teacher reflectivity as an end rather than a means. The article provides a rationale for reflective teacher education in arguing the need to have teachers who are thoughtful, passionate, and principled educational decision makers. (GLR)

  18. Reflections on Justice in Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Patricia F.

    2012-01-01

    This article is a reflection on the concept of justice as practiced in the public schools in the United States. Examples of justice denied or misconstrued are included. Cases, stories, and concepts invite educational leaders to reflect anew on delivering justice in education to all children. Underlying the article is the belief that understanding…

  19. Transmittance of reflected diffuse radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiam, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    A correlation is presented which allows the transmittance of reflected diffuse radiation from a planar reflector to be determined. Use of the correlation involves an initial evaluation of the geometric cover-to-reflector configuration or view factor. The value of configuration factor is itself required in the evaluation of the reflected irradiance on the cover.

  20. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  1. Reflection Positivity for Majorana Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We establish reflection positivity for Gibbs trace states defined by a certain class of Hamiltonians that describe the interaction of Majorana fermions on a lattice. These Hamiltonians may include many-body interactions, as long as the signs of the associated coupling constants satisfy certain restrictions. We show that reflection positivity holds on an even subalgebra of Majorana fermions.

  2. Can Reflective Practice Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Gail; Thomas, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Almost ubiquitous in discourses about the development of teachers, reflective practice describes the process that occurs when persons are apprenticed to any meaningful activity. But reflective practice is a descriptive term for that process: it does not imply that the process is itself open to dissection and instruction. We contend that mistaken…

  3. Intraspecific variation in cellular and biochemical heat response strategies of Mediterranean Xeropicta derbentina [Pulmonata, Hygromiidae].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Troschinski

    Full Text Available Dry and hot environments challenge the survival of terrestrial snails. To minimize overheating and desiccation, physiological and biochemical adaptations are of high importance for these animals. In the present study, seven populations of the Mediterranean land snail species Xeropicta derbentina were sampled from their natural habitat in order to investigate the intraspecific variation of cellular and biochemical mechanisms, which are assigned to contribute to heat resistance. Furthermore, we tested whether genetic parameters are correlated with these physiological heat stress response patterns. Specimens of each population were individually exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 52°C for 8 h in the laboratory. After exposure, the health condition of the snails' hepatopancreas was examined by means of qualitative description and semi-quantitative assessment of histopathological effects. In addition, the heat-shock protein 70 level (Hsp70 was determined. Generally, calcium cells of the hepatopancreas were more heat resistant than digestive cells - this phenomenon was associated with elevated Hsp70 levels at 40°C.We observed considerable variation in the snails' heat response strategy: Individuals from three populations invested much energy in producing a highly elevated Hsp70 level, whereas three other populations invested energy in moderate stress protein levels - both strategies were in association with cellular functionality. Furthermore, one population kept cellular condition stable despite a low Hsp70 level until 40°C exposure, whereas prominent cellular reactions were observed above this thermal limit. Genetic diversity (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene within populations was low. Nevertheless, when using genetic indices as explanatory variables in a multivariate regression tree (MRT analysis, population structure explained mean differences in cellular and biochemical heat stress responses, especially in the group

  4. Quasimonotone Individual Demand

    OpenAIRE

    John, R.

    1998-01-01

    Quasimonotone individual demand correspondences are characterized as those which can be rationalized (in a weak sense) by a complete, upper continuous, monotone, and convex preference relation. Moreover, it is shown that an arbitrary set of demand observations can be rationalized by a reflexive, upper continuous, monotone and convex preference if and only if it is properly quasimonotone.

  5. Individual and Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2006-01-01

    organizational analysis We discuss more general problems with collectivism in the social sciences by focusing on specific problems in extant organizational analysis We introduce microfoundations to the literature by explicating the underlying theoretical foundations of the origins of individual action and...

  6. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Pavlos, Elizabeth J PhillipsInstitute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has evolved considerably over the last three decades. From the early days of monotherapy with high toxicities and pill burdens, through to larger pill burdens and more potent combination therapies, and finally, from 2005 and beyond where we now have the choice of low pill burdens and once-daily therapies. More convenient and less toxic regimens are also becoming available, even in resource-poor settings. An understanding of the individual variation in response to ART, both efficacy and toxicity, has evolved over this time. The strong association of the major histocompatibility class I allele HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity, and its translation and use in routine HIV clinical practice as a predictive marker with 100% negative predictive value, has been a success story and a notable example of the challenges and triumphs in bringing pharmacogenetics to the clinic. In real clinical practice, however, it is going to be the exception rather than the rule that individual biomarkers will definitively guide patient therapy. The need for individualized approaches to ART has been further increased by the importance of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV clinical practice. In the future, the ideal utilization of the individualized approach to ART will likely consist of a combined approach using a combination of knowledge of drug, virus, and host (pharmacogenetic and pharmacoecologic [factors in the individual's environment that may be dynamic over time] information to guide the truly personalized prescription. This review will focus on our knowledge of the pharmacogenetics of the efficacy and toxicity of currently available antiretroviral agents and the current and potential utility of such information and approaches in present and future HIV clinical care.Keywords: HIV

  7. In vivo diagnosis of colonic precancer and cancer using near-infrared autofluorescence spectroscopy and biochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiaozhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the biochemical foundation and clinical capability of an image-guided near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy technique for in vivo diagnosis of colonic malignancies during clinical colonoscopy. A novel endoscopic fiber-optic AF system was utilized for in vivo NIR AF measurements at 785 nm excitation. A total of 263 in vivo NIR AF spectra of colonic tissues were measured from 100 patients, in which 164 spectra were from benign tissue (116 normal and 48 hyperplastic polyps), 34 spectra were from precancer (adenomatous polyps), and 65 spectra were from cancer. The non-negativity constrained least squares minimization biochemical modeling was explored to estimate the biochemical compositions of colonic tissue using nine basis reference spectra from the representative biochemicals (i.e., collagen I, elastin, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, L-tryptophan, hematoporphyrin, 4-pyridoxic acid, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and water) associated with structural or cellular metabolic progression in colonic precancer and cancer. High-quality in vivo NIR AF spectra in the spectral range of 810 to 1000 nm were acquired from colonic benign, precancerous, and cancerous mucosa under white-light reflectance endoscopic imaging guidance. Partial least squares discriminant analysis, together with the leave-one tissue site-out, cross validation on in vivo NIR AF spectra yields diagnostic sensitivities of 85.4%, 76.5%, and 84.6%, and specificities of 89.9%, 93.4%, and 91.4%, respectively, for classification of benign, precancer, and cancer in the colon. This work demonstrates that image-guided NIR AF spectroscopy in conjunction with biochemical modeling has promising potential for improving in vivo detection and diagnosis of colonic precancer and cancer during clinical colonoscopic screening.

  8. Biochemical basis of drought tolerance in hybrid Populus grown under field production conditions. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschaplinski, T.J.; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wierman, C. [Boise Cascade Corp., Wallula, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this cooperative effort was to assess the use of osmotically active compounds as molecular selection criteria for drought tolerance in Populus in a large-scale field trial. It is known that some plant species, and individuals within a plant species, can tolerate increasing stress associated with reduced moisture availability by accumulating solutes. The biochemical matrix of such metabolites varies among species and among individuals. The ability of Populus clones to tolerate drought has equal value to other fiber producers, i.e., the wood products industry, where irrigation is used in combination with other cultural treatments to obtain high dry weight yields. The research initially involved an assessment of drought stress under field conditions and characterization of changes in osmotic constitution among the seven clones across the six moisture levels. The near-term goal was to provide a mechanistic basis for clonal differences in productivity under various irrigation treatments over time.

  9. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON NIGERIAN MONODORA TENUIFOLIA SEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekeanyanwu Raphael Chukwuma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritive constituents of the seeds of Monodora tenuifolia were analyzed to augment the available information on Monodora tenuifolia research. Blood glucose and lipid profile were investigated on the flavonoid rich fraction of M. tenuifolia in rats. The composition (gkg-1 of alkaloids, cyanogenic glycosides, tannins and flavonoids were 13.3±0.1, 21.2×10-2±0.6, 1.3±0.1, 1.7±0.1 and 11.7±1.1 respectively. The proximate composition (gkg-1 of M. tenuifolia seed were crude fibre (262.3±1.2, crude protein (82.6±1.0, crude fat (349.9±1.9, ash (49.9±0.6, moisture (190.0±0.00 and carbohydrate (65.5±4.7. Analysis of the minerals content (gkg-1 yielded calcium (864.0±29.38, sodium (2752.0±140.35, iron (3.34±0.06, zinc (5.26±0.08, potassium (326.4±13.06, magnesium (342.9±13.71 and phosphorus (9.52±0.17, while vitamin analysis yielded vitamin A (10.05±0.17 iu/100 g, C (56.40±0.14 gkg-1 and E (11.71±0.87 iu /100 g, thiamine (0.11±0.01 gkg-1, niacin (0.46±0.32 gkg-1 and riboflavin (0.04±0.01 gkg-1. The results of amino acid analysis showed the total amino acid of M. tenuifolia seed was 71.78 of crude protein. The total essential amino acid with Histidine was calculated to be 29.24 of the crude protein. The antinutrient analysis of M. tenuifolia shows it contained total phenol (0.8±0.0 gkg-1, oxalates (4.09±1.17 gkg-1, phytates (0.012±0.42 gkg-1 and trypsin inhibitor (0.230±0.42 iu/g. The main fatty acids of the seed oil are linoleic acid (401.7 g kg-1, oleic acid (346.1 g kg-1 and palmitic acid (122.61 g kg-1. The LD50 of the flavonoid-rich fraction was found to be above 5000 mg kg-1 b.w. After the day 14 study, biochemical markers such as triacylglycerol, very low density lipoprotein increased significantly (p0.05 effect was observed on the blood glucose and lipid profile of wistar albino rats compared with the control. The result shows that M. tenuifolia seed is rich

  10. Biochemical and histological characterization of tomato mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C. Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical responses inherent to antioxidant systems as well morphological and anatomical properties of photomorphogenic, hormonal and developmental tomato mutants were investigated. Compared to the non-mutant Micro-Tom (MT, we observed that the malondialdehyde (MDA content was enhanced in the diageotropica (dgt and lutescent (l mutants, whilst the highest levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were observed in high pigment 1 (hp1 and aurea (au mutants. The analyses of antioxidant enzymes revealed that all mutants exhibited reduced catalase (CAT activity when compared to MT. Guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX was enhanced in both sitiens (sit and notabilis (not mutants, whereas in not mutant there was an increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX. Based on PAGE analysis, the activities of glutathione reductase (GR isoforms III, IV, V and VI were increased in l leaves, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD isoform III was reduced in leaves of sit, epi, Never ripe (Nr and green flesh (gf mutants. Microscopic analyses revealed that hp1 and au showed an increase in leaf intercellular spaces, whereas sit exhibited a decrease. The au and hp1 mutants also exhibited a decreased in the number of leaf trichomes. The characterization of these mutants is essential for their future use in plant development and ecophysiology studies, such as abiotic and biotic stresses on the oxidative metabolism.Neste trabalho, analisamos as respostas bioquímicas inerentes ao sistema antioxidante, assim como propriedades morfológicas e anatômicas de mutantes fotomorfogenéticos e hormonais de tomateiro. Comparados ao não mutante Micro-Tom (MT, observamos que o conteúdo de malondialdeído (MDA aumentou nos mutantes diageotropica (dgt e lutescent (l, enquanto os maiores níveis de H2O2 foram encontrados nos mutantes high pigment 1 (hp1 e aurea (au. Análises de enzimas antioxidantes mostraram que todos os mutantes reduziram a atividade de catalase (CAT quando comparado a MT. A

  11. Individual Plant Examination review guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for review of an Individual Plant Examination (IPE) is presented. Such an evaluation might involve review and acceptance of either a developing or complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The method is designed to meet the needs of the utility industry in reviewing plant specific PRAs for submittal in response to Generic Letter 88-20. The review can be conducted in an on-going fashion by utility IPE/PRA groups in order to assure that the resulting products accurately reflect the plant and current IPE/PRA methodology can or be conducted upon completion of IPE/PRA documentation. Current probabilistic risk assessment studies being performed in compliance with NRC requirements under Generic Letter 88-20 must be submitted to the NRC with certification of accuracy from a utility senior officer. This report is intended to provide assistance to the IPE program to support development of an overall IPE/PRA study which could receive such certification. The report presents the essential elements of an IPE/PRA review and provides a checklist for evaluation of key items under each element. In addition, the report sets forth a description of the types of input and information expected in each major area of IPE development. This information is intended for the use of the utility IPE/PRA group leader or equivalent in the establishment and maintenance of an on-going IPE/PRA program

  12. Biochemical Composition Suggests Different Roles of Leaf Litter and Fine Roots in Soil Carbon Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, M.; Pregitzer, K. S.; Talhelm, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    of soil carbon formation in the ecosystems we studied. Litter type and N addition had significant interactions on lignin, holocellulose, and NSC (P< 0.05), indicating these traits of different litter types respond differently to N addition. In leaf litter, the concentrations of lignin, NSC, and bound CT were affected by N addition (P< 0.05). By contrast, N addition only reduced the soluble protein concentration in fine roots (P< 0.05). Hence, substrate quality of leaf litter and fine roots responds differently to the simulated N deposition, and may eventually lead to different responses in decomposition pattern. This is one of few studies comparing the detailed biochemical profile of leaf litter and fine roots in a dominant tree species. Different biochemical traits of fine roots and leaf litter may reflect the different specializations for their physiological functions. This work highlights the importance of fine root in the soil carbon formation due to its recalcitrant nature, and emphasizes the necessity of differentiating the responses of leaf litter and fine root decompositions to environmental changes when modeling biogeochemical cycles.

  13. TRANSFORMATION OF INDIVIDUAL CONSCIOUSNESS AS AN IMPACT OF MASS CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Viktorovich Piatakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the main directions and consequences of mass culture impact on individual consciousness in the context of functioning of mass society. Based on the analysis of the main approaches to research of the category «mass culture» the author of the article formulates the thesis that the influence of mass culture has a stabilizing effect on public system but it is destructive for individual consciousness, because the reflection of the reality is substituted with its functional perception by the individual.The author considers that mass society has temporal limits whereas the individual consciousness doesn’t have such limits, therefore the effect from the influence of mass culture is prolonged practically for all human life. The author also puts forward the thesis that the impact of mass culture on individual consciousness causes the substitution of traditional values by reduced templates promoted by mass media as «eternal truth».The author of the article believes that mass culture provides individual consciousness with comfortable existence at which it isn't required to seek answers to questions as in mass culture there are no binary schemes and cultural concepts. Such lack of need of a reflection for individual consciousness is pernicious as the person only consuming information doesn't develop as the personality. The author also notes that stabilization of system based on mass culture has the side effect which is reflected in destruction of ability of the individual to critical evaluation of objective reality.

  14. Comparison of Salivary Biochemical Composition between End Stage Renal Disease and Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Bakhshi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Following the renal disease involvement, some variations may occur in the flow, pH and biochemical components of the saliva; therefore, saliva possibly would be a useful tool for diagnosis and monitoring of the renal disease through evaluation of the components. The aim of the present study was to analyse the biochemical composition of the saliva in patients undergone haemodialysis for the end-stage renal disease (ESRD in Imam Khomeini Hospital. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 64 haemodialysis patients and 67 healthy individuals were selected and their salivary samples were obtained by spitting method. Salivary biochemical factors were determined by serum kits and auto-analyzer while the samples’ pH was determined by an automatic pH meter. Then, Creatinine, Ca, Mg, urea, α-amylase parameters as well as the salivary flow rate were measured. The saliva biochemical compositions were analyzed using Student t test. Results: The mean (± standard deviation of the salivary flow rate was statistically lower in ESRD patients than healthy ones (0.34±0.22 ml/min vs. 0.57±0.29 ml/min: P<0.001. Salivary pH (7.87±0.72 vs. 6.99±0.4: P<0.001 and concentrations of urea (134.4±40.8 vs. 40.8±15.1 mg/dl: P<0.001; Cr (1.1±0.9 vs. 0.4±0.1 mg/dl: P<0.001 and α-amylase (1107.4±788.4 vs. 568.3±437.0 mg/dl: P<0.001 were statistically higher in ESRD patients than healthy controls. Ca was significantly lower in ESRD patients than healthy ones (2.8±2.8 vs. 3.6±2.0 mg/dl: P<0.05.. No significant differences were noted between both groups regarding salivary Mg. The mean (± standard deviation age was statistically higher in ESRD patients than healthy ones (63.2±15.4 years vs. 48.2±15.3 years: P<0.001. No significant differences were noted between both groups regarding weight and gender. Conclusion: Due to the significant alternations of the salivary biochemical concentrations in ESRD patients; saliva can be used

  15. Sovereignty, individuality, and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cairns Jr.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans must acknowledge that the biosphere is the essential support for all living organisms. In order to achieve sustainable use of the planet, humans must proceed beyond egocentrism, ethnocentrism, homocentrism, and biocentrism to ecocentrism. National states, with present policies, are a major obstacle to sustainable use of the planet. However, there is some evidence that the individual has increasing sovereignty at the expense of both nation states and the environment. Still, the primary obstacle to sustainability is inherent in the present system of sovereign nation states. The basic question is how much sovereignty must nation-states and individuals relinquish to preserve the health of Earth's biospheric life support system. A free and open exchange of thoughts on this subject is long overdue. To acheive sustainable use of the planet, humankind must view its identity within the context of the interdependent web of life.

  16. Individualization of poverty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Carsten Kronborg

    2015-01-01

    The German Sociologist Ulrich Beck is best known for his book “Risk Society” which has been discussed extensively; however Beck’s claims about modern poverty have not received the same attention among poverty researchers. The individualization perspective views poverty as a relatively transient...... phenomenon and the democratization perspective views the risk of poverty as spread equally in the population. Both perspectives challenge the mainstream tradition of class analysis, and therefore both view poverty as largely independent of traditional stratification factors. In this article, I argue that...... Beck’s thesis about the individualization and democratization of poverty is based on narrow income based definitions and that (possible) empirical verification depends on the definitions of poverty and approaches used to examine poverty. My analyses show that the dynamic perspective (using income as...

  17. Individual Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Thursday 9 September (Jeûne genevois) and on Friday 10 September. We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 13 SEPTEMBER 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2004 is RED.

  18. Individual Career Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Dina Paul; Teliceanu Viorel Gabriel; Chiriac Marius

    2011-01-01

    Individual career planning defines a complex and customized process, run in parallel on two temporal axes. The management of developing a career management is a challenge to every inidivid because the levers used are not standardized and can be adapted to any employer from the labor market An optimal behavior in short-term career management requires both deep knowledge of active methods for career development and their efficient handling. Professional succes can be ensured by a correct correl...

  19. Law and individuality

    OpenAIRE

    D.F.M. Strauss

    2007-01-01

    The main contours of the history of philosophical and scientific conceptions of law and individuality are portrayed. This includes an account of perspectives and views found in ancient Greece, the Graeco-Roman world, the medieval speculation and, via the Renaissance, in early modern developments that were continued in the Enlightenment era, in Romanticism and historicism, and were eventually manifested in the linguistic turn. What is important for a proper understanding of modern law concepti...

  20. Individual Crowdfunding Practices

    OpenAIRE

    BELLEFLAMME, Paul; Lambert, Thomas; Schwienbacher, Armin

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates characteristics of individual crowdfunding practices and drivers of fundraising success, where entrepreneurs can tailor their crowdfunding initiatives better than on standardized platforms. Our data indicate that most of the funds provided are entitled to receive either financial compensations (equity, profit-share arrangement) or non-financial benefits (final product, token of appreciation), while donations are less common. Moreover, crowdfunding initiatives that are ...

  1. Understanding individual routing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Antonio; Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C

    2016-03-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779-782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65-100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325-362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin-destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. PMID:26962031

  2. Individually Controlled Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and inhaled air quality in buildings to which occupants are exposed has an effect on their health, comfort, performance and productivity. Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform environment. However, large...... individual differences in physiological and psychological response, clothing insulation, activity, preference for air temperature and movement, etc., exist between people. Environmental conditions acceptable for most of the occupants in buildings may be achieved by providing each occupant with the...

  3. Do individual directors matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Paper 1: Pilot study of Swiss firms Abstract Using a fixed effects approach, we investigate whether the presence of specific individuals on Swiss firms’ boards affects firm performance and the policy choices they make. We find evidence for a substantial impact of these directors’ presence on their firms. Moreover, the director effects are correlated across policies and performance measures but uncorrelated to the directors’ background. We find these results interesting but conclude t...

  4. Between biochemists and embryologists -- the biochemical study of embryonic induction in the 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armon, Rony

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Hans Spemann of the "organizer" tissue and its ability to induce the formation of the amphibian embryo's neural tube inspired leading embryologists to attempt to elucidate embryonic inductions' underlying mechanism. Joseph Needham, who during the 1930s conducted research in biochemical embryology, proposed that embryonic induction is mediated by a specific chemical entity embedded in the inducing tissue, surmising that chemical to be a hormone of sterol-like structure. Along with embryologist Conrad H. Waddington, they conducted research aimed at the isolation and functional characterization of the underlying agent. As historians clearly pointed out, embryologists came to question Needham's biochemical approach; he failed to locate the hormone he sought and eventually abandoned his quest. Yet, this study finds that the difficulties he ran into resulted primarily from the limited conditions for conducting his experiments at his institute. In addition, Needham's research reflected the interests of leading biochemists in hormone and cancer research, because it offered novel theoretical models and experimental methods for engaging with the function of the hormones and carcinogens they isolated. Needham and Waddington were deterred neither by the mounting challenges nor by the limited experimental infrastructure. Like their colleagues in hormone and cancer research, they anticipated difficulties in attempting to establish causal links between complex biological phenomena and simple chemical triggering. PMID:21181430

  5. Biochemical, mechanical, and spectroscopic analyses of genetically engineered flax fibers producing bioplastic (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Skórkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Dymińska, Lucyna; Maczka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy; Szopa, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The interest in biofibers has grown in recent years due to their expanding range of applications in fields as diverse as biomedical science and the automotive industry. Their low production costs, biodegradability, physical properties, and perceived eco-friendliness allow for their extensive use as composite components, a role in which they could replace petroleum-based synthetic polymers. We performed biochemical, mechanical, and structural analyses of flax stems and fibers derived from field-grown transgenic flax enriched with PHB (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate). The analyses of the plant stems revealed an increase in the cellulose content and a decrease in the lignin and pectin contents relative to the control plants. However, the contents of the fibers' major components (cellulose, lignin, pectin) remain unchanged. An FT-IR study confirmed the results of the biochemical analyses of the flax fibers. However, the arrangement of the cellulose polymer in the transgenic fibers differed from that in the control, and a significant increase in the number of hydrogen bonds was detected. The mechanical properties of the transgenic flax stems were significantly improved, reflecting the cellulose content increase. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers did not change in comparison with the control, with the exception of the fibers from transgenic line M13. The generated transgenic flax plants, which produce both components of the flax/PHB composites (i.e., fibers and thermoplastic matrix in the same plant organ) are a source of an attractive and ecologically safe material for industry and medicine. PMID:19572280

  6. Effect of salinity on growth, biochemical parameters and fatty acid composition in safflower (carthamus tinctorius l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present project is to investigate the effect of salinity on growth, biochemical parameters and fatty acid composition in six varieties of safflower as well as identification of stress tolerant variety under saline (8 d Sm-1) condition. It was observed that salinity significantly decreased the dry weight and fresh weight of safflower varieties. Nitrate reductase (NRA) and nitrite reductase (NiRA) activities were also reduced in response to salinity in all safflower genotypes but Thori-78 and PI-387820 showed less reduction which could be a useful marker for selecting salt tolerant varieties. Under salinity stress, total free amino acids, reducing, non reducing sugars and total sugars increased in all varieties. Accumulation of sugars and total free amino acids might reflect a salt protective mechanism and could be a useful criterion for selecting salt tolerant variety. Comparison among safflower genotypes indicated that Thori-78 and PI-387820 performed better than the others and successful in maintaining higher NRA, NiRA and other metabolites thus were tolerant to salinity. Differential effect upon fatty acid synthesis was observed by different varieties under salinity stress but PI-170274 and PI-387821 varieties better maintained their fatty acid composition. It can be concluded from present studies that biochemical markers can be used to select salinity tolerant safflower varieties. (author)

  7. Individualism and Collectivism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐萌

    2014-01-01

    The world could be analyzed in many dimensions, like rich and poor, peace and warfare, equal and oppressive, but one of the most important dimensions may be the difference between different societies of individualist and collectivist. This arti-cle is trying to discuss is the difference between individualism and collectivism in the western and eastern cultures, and also will explain and discuss it in some aspects, such as their viewpoint, their attitude on self-enhancement and self-criticism, and the goal setting and motivation, and take some cases which some researches and psychologists did and some cases found for example to de-scribe it. Also it presents that social orientation and environment, and culture background will take important role to impact peo-ple’s mind and choice on individualism and collectivism. No matter individual or collective, it all have advantage and disadvan-tage for each, it needs comprehensive evaluation for differential environment which can obtain relative reasonable conclusion.

  8. Reflective Practice as a Fuel for Organizational Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Tikkamäki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning theories and their interpretations in management research recognize the role of reflection as a central element in the learning process. There also exists a broad consensus that organizational learning (OL happens at three intertwined levels of the individual, the group and the organization. This tri-level analysis has been most influentially presented by Crossan, Lane and White (1999, as a premise for their 4I framework of OL. Though the 4I framework builds strongly on existing literature on OL, it does not address the role of reflection as a factor operating between the inputs and outcomes in 4I sub-processes. Though a large body of research exists regarding the notion of reflection and its importance in terms of OL, this has not been discussed in the specific context of the 4I framework. This article contributes to the development of the 4I model by discussing how reflective practice—on three levels and within 4I sub-processes—fuels the OL process. The argumentation is based on an extensive literature review in three dimensions of learning, illustrated with an empirical inquiry into three business organizations and their reflective practice. In addition, the aim is to increase the understanding of reflection as not only an individual or group process, but as an organized practice, enabled by the tools of management control.

  9. Robust suppression of background reflections in PIV images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong background reflections in PIV images are known to bias velocity estimates and their concomitant statistical ensembles. Many methods have been developed to eliminate background reflections, with the common premise of generating a reference background intensity map that is then subtracted from each individual PIV image prior to interrogation. This reference background intensity map can be generated in several ways, including acquiring a background image without particles, calculating the average or minimum intensity map based on an ensemble of PIV images, generating a reference intensity map for each individual PIV realization by means of various local sliding filters or considering the second frame of any PIV realization as its reference intensity map. Motivated by the need to suppress background reflections in a PIV study of flow over highly irregular surface roughness that generated significant diffuse background reflections from the complex topography, the efficacy of these methods was studied. It was found that all failed to adequately suppress such reflections, rendering the resulting velocity fields biased. A local-median normalization algorithm was developed to further suppress background reflections and this note reports the performance of this modified algorithm compared to those previously reported in the literature. (technical design note)

  10. [BIOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF BLUE MUSSELS MYTILUS EDULIS L. FROM THE WHITE SEA TO RAPID TEMPERATURE CHANGES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokina, N N; Lysenko, L A; Sukhovskaya, I V; Vdovichenko, E A; Borvinskaya, E V; Kantserova, N P; Krupnova, M Yu; Ruokolainen, T R; Smirnov, L P; Vysotskaya, R U; Bakhmet, I N; Nemova, N N

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a rapid temperature change on the biochemical status of blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea was studied under conditions of aquarium experiment. It is shown that modifications of the composition of reserve and structural lipids and their fatty acids, of the activity of lysosomal enzymes (β-glucosidases, cathepsins B and D), of calcium-dependent proteases of cytocol (calpains) and of the enzyme of the second phase of biotransformation of xenobiotics - glutathione-S-transferase, reflect an unspecific compensatory reaction of bivalves to stress action of environmental factors and indicate reconstruction of blue mussel metabolism as early as within first hours of temperature change. The initial high level of glutathione-S-transferase activity in control blue mussels as well as an increase of glutathione concentration in the course of experiment may facilitate successful exit of mussels from the state of reduced metabolism. PMID:26856072

  11. Editorial: Using neurophysiological signals that reflect cognitive or affective state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van Jan; Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Zander, Thorsten O.

    2015-01-01

    The central question of this Frontiers Research Topic is: What can we learn from brain and other physiological signals about an individual's cognitive and affective state and how can we use this information? This question reflects three important issues which are addressed by the 22 articles in this

  12. Worldwide Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a large volume of both Analog and Digital seismic reflection data. Currently only a limited number of lines are available online. Digital data...

  13. Teacher Education and Teacher Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullough Jr., Robert V.

    1989-01-01

    The efforts of a small group of teacher educators to develop a program emphasizing reflectivity is described. Grounding program development in a conceptual framework is emphasized. Lessons learned about the program development process are shared. (IAH)

  14. Individual Susceptibility to Hypobaric Environments: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Watkins, Sharmi

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts are at risk for developing decompression sickness (DCS) while exposed to the hypobaric environment of the extravehicular suit in space, in terrestrial hypobaric chambers, and during ascent from neutral buoyancy training dives. There is increasing recognition that DCS risk is different between diving and altitude exposures, with many individual parameters and environmental factors implicated as risk factors for development of DCS in divers but are not recognized as risk factors in altitude exposures. Much of the literature to date has focused on patent foramen ovale (PFO), which has long been considered a major risk factor for DCS in diving exposures, but its link to serious DCS in altitude exposures remains unclear. Knowledge of those risk factors specific to hypobaric DCS may help identify susceptible individuals and aid in astronaut selection, crew assignment, and mission planning. This paper reviews the current literature pertaining to these risk factors, including PFO, anthropometric parameters, gender, menstrual cycle, lifetime diving experience, physical fitness, biochemical levels, complement activation, cigarette smoking, fluid balance, and ambient temperature. Further research to evaluate pertinent risk factors for DCS in altitude exposures is recommended.

  15. Determining the gross biochemical composition of cells and tissue with Raman spectrosocpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Dominguez, Jorge; Carpenter, Susan; Powers, Tamara M.; Guerra, Anabel; Short, Kurt W.; Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Freyer, James P.

    2006-02-01

    The biochemical composition of mammalian cells has been estimated by Raman spectroscopy and the results compared with other biochemical methods. The Raman spectroscopy estimates were performed by fitting measured Raman and infrared spectra of dense cell suspensions to a linear combination of basis components (RNA, DNA, protein, lipid, glycoen). The Raman spectroscopy results are compared to biochemical analyses performed by extraction and quantfication of the biochemical components. Both absolute and relative measurements of biochemical composition are compared. Both the Raman and biochemical results indicate that there are signficant differences in gross biochemical composition dependent on growth stage and tumorigneicity.

  16. Automated reasoning for reflective programs

    OpenAIRE

    Horsfall, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Reflective programming allows one to construct programs that manipulate or examine their behaviour or structure at runtime. One of the benefits is the ability to create generic code that is able to adapt to being incorporated into different larger programs, without modifications to suit each concrete setting. Due to the runtime nature of reflection, static verification is difficult and has been largely ignored or only weakly supported. This work focusses on supporting verification for cases w...

  17. Reflections on wisdom and self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Sophie

    2012-12-01

    The end of the year is often a time of reflection. For most of us, 2012 will have brought events that were planned, perhaps for years, as well as others that were full of serendipity or unexpected misfortune. We are invariably older than we were in January. We approach December with our own rituals: summer holidays, Hanukkah, Christmas or New Year's Eve. We may reflect on our joys and disappointments, or our actions and lessons learnt. PMID:23342382

  18. Green Criminology: Reflections, Connections, Horizons

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel South

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces aspects of the development of a ‘green’ criminology. It starts with personal reflections and then describes the emergence of explicit statements of a green criminological perspective. Initially these statements were independently voiced, in different parts of the world but they reflected shared concerns. These works have found unification as a ‘green’, ‘eco-global’ or ‘conservation’ criminology. The paper reviews the classifications available when talking about not only lega...

  19. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  20. Neutron reflectivity of spintronic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Zabel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, polarized neutron reflectivity has played an essential role in the exploration of magneto- and spintronic nanostructures. In addition to studies of well-known layered systems, neutron scattering has now also expanded in the direction of laterally structured magnetic media, such as stripes and islands on the submicrometer scale. After introducing the experimental technique of polarized neutron reflectivity, selected examples will be discussed in more detail.

  1. Biochemical characterisation during seed development of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Sau-Yee; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng-Lian; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina

    2013-07-01

    Developmental biochemical information is a vital base for the elucidation of seed physiology and metabolism. However, no data regarding the biochemical profile of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) seed development has been reported thus far. In this study, the biochemical changes in the developing oil palm seed were investigated to study their developmental pattern. The biochemical composition found in the seed differed significantly among the developmental stages. During early seed development, the water, hexose (glucose and fructose), calcium and manganese contents were present in significantly high levels compared to the late developmental stage. Remarkable changes in the biochemical composition were observed at 10 weeks after anthesis (WAA): the dry weight and sucrose content increased significantly, whereas the water content and hexose content declined. The switch from a high to low hexose/sucrose ratio could be used to identify the onset of the maturation phase. At the late stage, dramatic water loss occurred, whereas the content of storage reserves increased progressively. Lauric acid was the most abundant fatty acid found in oil palm seed starting from 10 WAA. PMID:23575803

  2. Microstereolithography and its application to biochemical IC chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Koji; Maruo, Shoji; Hasegawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Takao

    2001-06-01

    The world's first micro stereo lithography, named IH process, was proposed and developed by the speaker in 1992. By now, several types of micro stereo lithography systems have been developed. Three-dimensional resolution of solidification has reached to 0.2 micron at present. These 3D micro fabrication processes using UV curable polymer gave a big impact on not only MEMS but also optics. The latest version of IH process enables us to make a movable micro mechanism without assemble process or sacrificial layer technique often used in silicon process. It is well known that the IH process is the mother of two-photon micro stereo lithography and its applications. Recently new micro chemical device named Biochemical IC Chip was proposed and developed by the speaker. This chip is based on the module IC chip-set like today's TTL family. IH process enable to make the biochemical IC including real three-dimensional micro fluid channels. Various kinds of Biochemical IC chips such as micro pump, switching valve, reactor, concentrator and detector have already been fabricated successfully. Basic performance of micro chemical devices constructed by the biochemical IC chips were demonstrated. The biochemical IC chips will open new bioscience and medicine based on innovative technology.

  3. Fauna-associated Changes in Chemical and Biochemical Properties of Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. TRIPATHI; B. M. SHARMA

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the impacts of abundance of woodlice, termites, and mites on some functional aspects of soil in order to elucidate the specific role of soil fauna in improving soil fertility in desert. Methods Fauna-rich sites were selected as experimental sites and adjacent areas were taken as control. Soil samples were collected from both sites. Soil respiration was measured at both sites. The soil samples were sent to laboratory, their chemical and biochemical properties were analyzed.Results Woodlice showed 25% decrease in organic carbon and organic matter as compared to control site. Whereas termites and mites showed 58% and 16% decrease in organic carbon and organic matter. In contrast, available nitrogen (nitrate and ammonical both) and phosphorus exhibited 2-fold and 1.2-fold increase, respectively. Soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity at the sites rich in woodlice, termites and mites produced 2.5-, 3.5- and 2-fold increases, respectively as compared to their control values. Fauna-associated increase in these biological parameters clearly reflected fauna-induced microbial activity in soil. Maximum decrease in organic carbon and increase in nitrate-nitrogen and ammonical-nitrogen, available phosphorus, soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity were produced by termites and minimum by mites reflecting termite as an efficient soil improver in desert environment. Conclusion The soil fauna-associated changes in chemical (organic carbon, nitrate-nitrogen, ammonical-nitrogen, phosphorus) and biochemical (soil respiration, dehydrogenase activity) properties of soil improve soil health and help in conservation of desert pedoecosystem.

  4. Genetic and biochemical studies in Argentinean patients with variegate porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giudice Jimena

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A partial deficiency in Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX produces the mixed disorder Variegate Porphyria (VP, the second acute porphyria more frequent in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt VP is absolutely important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death. Methods We have studied at molecular level 18 new Argentinean patients biochemically diagnosed as VP. PPOX gene was amplified in one or in twelve PCR reactions. All coding exons, flanking intronic and promoter regions were manual or automatically sequenced. For RT-PCR studies RNA was retrotranscripted, amplified and sequenced. PPOX activity in those families carrying a new and uncharacterized mutation was performed. Results All affected individuals harboured mutations in heterozygous state. Nine novel mutations and 3 already reported mutations were identified. Six of the novel mutations were single nucleotide substitutions, 2 were small deletions and one a small insertion. Three single nucleotide substitutions and the insertion were at exon-intron boundaries. Two of the single nucleotide substitutions, c.471G>A and c.807G>A and the insertion (c.388+3insT were close to the splice donor sites in exons 5, 7 and intron 4 respectively. The other single nucleotide substitution was a transversion in the last base of intron 7, g.3912G>C (c.808-1G>C so altering the consensus acceptor splice site. However, only in the first case the abnormal band showing the skipping of exon 5 was detected. The other single nucleotide substitutions were transversions: c.101A>T, c.995G>C and c.670 T>G that result in p.E34V, p.G332A and W224G aminoacid substitutions in exons 3, 10 and 7 respectively. Activity measurements indicate that these mutations reduced about 50% PPOX activity and also that they co-segregate with this reduced activity value. Two

  5. Notas e reflexões sobre a jurisprudência internacional em matéria ambiental: a participação de indivíduos e organizações não governamentais Notes and reflections on environmental international jurisprudence: the participation of individuals and non-governmental organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fúlvio Eduardo Fonseca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do artigo é oferecer uma sistematização da jurisprudência internacional relevante envolvendo onGs e meio ambiente. Para isso, buscou-se mapear os casos exemplares levados às instâncias internacionais, como forma de ilustrar o potencial e as limitações da estratégia de se recorrer ao direito internacional, levada a efeito por um crescente número de indivíduos e organizações. A pesquisa considerou as sentenças e decisões de órgãos judiciais (Corte Interamericana de Direitos Humanos, Corte européia de Direitos Humanos, tribunal de Justiça europeu e Corte Internacional de Justiça e quasi-judiciais (Comitê de Direitos Humanos das nações unidas, constituindo um aporte inicial aos interessados na matéria e um incentivo a estudos futuros que venham a complementá-la.The aim of this article is to present relevant international jusrisprudence involving NGOs and environment in a systematic way. Therefore, it seeks to identify examples of cases taken to international instances. The reasearch considered sentences and decisions as an example of the potential and limitation of the strategy used by an increasing number of individuals and organizations in making use of judicial (Interamerican Court of Human Rights, European Court of Human Rights, European Tribunal of Justice and International Court of Justice and quasi-judicial organs (United Nations Human Rights Committee, as an initial contribution to those interested in this issue and an incentive for future studies that could complement it.

  6. On Individualism and Self-Reliance of Americans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁闯

    2014-01-01

    The American self-concept is the integral assumption of the culture, and the best expression of it is the individualism and self-reliance. In social relations, individualism asserts its influence om many aspects such as morality, ethics, or financial mat⁃ters. Also individualism reflects a continuous frontier between the individual and the cultural. For being self-reliance, Americans approve self-motivation,which in the sense of long-range goals, as well as for a specific and immediate task.

  7. Individualism in Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carré, David

    2015-01-01

    Proposing models built upon unrealistic assumptions poses a serious issue for social sciences in general –but not for economics. Since Friedman’s methodological insights (1953) assumptions about the agent of the model are irrelevant as long as it has enough predictive power. The latter becomes...... particularly problematic when econometric models have been introduced in areas like education or healthcare instead of commodities markets. Despite recent efforts from behavioral economics proposing more realistic assumptions (see Camerer, 1999), one idea remains untouched: agents are always individuals......). This revision aims to dialogue with the ever-increasing participation of economics in the social discussion, supplementing rather than excluding its ideas....

  8. La vivienda individual

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas, Héctor

    1999-01-01

    La vivienda individual, es aquella que se erige sobre lote propio y con superficie verde, lote que no queda caracterizado en términos de dominio, vale decir que comprende tanto a la Ville Savoie como a una casita en una urbanización. Claro que 10 o 20 Savoies no conforman un conjunto o un barrio. Desde la Revolución Industrial, la explosión demográfica y el crecimiento urbano, muchas veces desmesurado, las casas unifamiliares fueron alejándose de los centros urbanos debido al valor crecien...

  9. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  10. Drosophila spermatid individualization is sensitive to temperature and fatty acid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-David, Geulah; Miller, Eli; Steinhauer, Josefa

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are precursors of potent lipid signaling molecules. They are stored in membrane phospholipids and released by phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Lysophospholipid acyltransferases (ATs) oppose PLA2 by re-esterifying fatty acids into phospholipids, in a biochemical pathway known as the Lands Cycle. Drosophila Lands Cycle ATs oys and nes, as well as 7 predicted PLA2 genes, are expressed in the male reproductive tract. Oys and Nes are required for spermatid individualization. Individualization,...

  11. Carbamates toxicity in farmers and its assesment through biochemical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevalent environmental toxicity of various chemical group of pesticides and their effects leading towards increasing morbidity and mortality in the farmers is of great concerned. In this situation the biochemical biomarkers are regarded as meaningful tools for monitoring toxic end points. This work was aimed to assess the toxic impacts of carbamates through some biochemical parameters and useful validity of these biomarkers was also observed. Present results reveal inhibition of cholinesterase activity by 46% whereas bilirubin, urea and creatinine levels in serum were increased and sugar values was decreased at highly significant level (p<0.001). Urine urobilinogen concentration found raised significantly at high level (p<0.001) while protein, urea creatinine and sugar values in urine of the farmers seen non-significant. This study concluded that the selected biochemical parameters can be used as biomarkers to assess the significant toxic effects in the exposed populations. (author)

  12. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  13. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Niemeyer, Claudia; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Nunes, Adauto L V; Rameh-de-Albuquerque, Luciana C; Sant'Anna, Sávio S; Catão-Dias, José L

    2012-09-01

    The hyacinth macaw (Anodorhyncus hyacinthinus), considered the largest psittacine bird species in the world, is an endangered species, with a remaining population of approximately 6500 birds in the wild. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to verify differences related to sex, samples from 29 hyacinth macaws (14 males, 15 females) were obtained from birds apprehended from illegal wildlife trade and subsequently housed at the Sorocaba Zoo, Brazil. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Compared with published reference values, differences were found in mean concentrations of total red blood cell count, corpuscular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin level, total white blood cell count, aspartate aminotransferase level, creatine kinase concentration, alkaline phosphatase concentration, and phosphorus level. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this endangered species in captivity or rehabilitation centers. PMID:23156973

  14. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Taha, Abid Sharif; Watson, Ryan William; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Bürkle, Marcellus; Hammer, Sven

    2007-12-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is considered the world's most endangered parrot, with the last wild bird disappearing in 2001 and only 74 birds in captivity. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to look for differences relative to sex, age, and season, we obtained blood samples from 46 captive Spix's macaws (23 male, 23 female) housed in aviaries at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Adult and juvenile birds differed in mean concentrations of glucose, total protein, amylase, cholesterol, and phosphorus; in percentages of heterophils and lymphocytes; and in the absolute lymphocyte count. Total protein, cholesterol, and phosphorus concentrations; hematocrit; and heterophil and lymphocyte counts differed significantly by season. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this highly endangered species. PMID:18351006

  15. Modeling biochemical pathways in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P; D'Eustachio, Peter; Berardini, Tanya Z; Mungall, Christopher J; Renedo, Nikolai; Blake, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a biological pathway, an ordered sequence of molecular transformations, is used to collect and represent molecular knowledge for a broad span of organismal biology. Representations of biomedical pathways typically are rich but idiosyncratic presentations of organized knowledge about individual pathways. Meanwhile, biomedical ontologies and associated annotation files are powerful tools that organize molecular information in a logically rigorous form to support computational analysis. The Gene Ontology (GO), representing Molecular Functions, Biological Processes and Cellular Components, incorporates many aspects of biological pathways within its ontological representations. Here we present a methodology for extending and refining the classes in the GO for more comprehensive, consistent and integrated representation of pathways, leveraging knowledge embedded in current pathway representations such as those in the Reactome Knowledgebase and MetaCyc. With carbohydrate metabolic pathways as a use case, we discuss how our representation supports the integration of variant pathway classes into a unified ontological structure that can be used for data comparison and analysis. PMID:27589964

  16. Blood amylase - a biochemical radiation indicator?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the suitability of the biological radiation indicator 'amylase in human blood serum' to identify, if previous irradiation has occurred. After 'in vivo' exposure, of the human body with organ doses > 0,5 Gy, high activities of the enzyme are found in serum. The important results of examinations from different work groups and from own experiments were summarized in tabular form and evaluated from the statistic point of view. The results show that in more than 90% of all cases, the amylase system is suitable to identify exposure beyond 0,5 to 1 Gy, approximately. However, this is only possible if the salivary glands were also exposed and blood samples are taken about 18 hours after exposure. For the differentiation between induced increase of amylase from disease and radiation induced increase, it is recommended to carry out the isoamylase test, which makes it possible to distinguish between the individual enzymes. The assessment of the total amylase is appropriate to detect, with a range of significance of P = 0,05 that radiation exposure has occurred. The increase of activity is dose dependent when the salivary glands lie in the radiation field, however, the variations of activity are very high. Therefore the radiation dose cannot be considered. Only in cases where a very high radiation induced increase of activity is observed, a rough estimation of dose at the parotid glands can be made. (orig./MG)

  17. 'Combined reflectance stratigraphy' - subdivision of loess successions by diffuse reflectance spectrometry (DRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberényi, Jozsef; Bradak-Hayashi, Balázs; Kiss, Klaudia; Kovács, József; Varga, György; Balázs, Réka; Szalai, Zoltán; Viczián, István

    2016-04-01

    The different varieties of loess (and intercalated paleosol layers) together constitute one of the most widespread terrestrial sediments, which was deposited, altered, and redeposited in the course of the changing climatic conditions of the Pleistocene. To reveal more information about Pleistocene climate cycles and/or environments the detailed lithostratigraphical subdivision and classification of the loess variations and paleosols are necessary. Beside the numerous method such as various field measurements, semi-quantitative tests and laboratory investigations, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is one of the well applied method on loess/paleosol sequences. Generally, DRS has been used to separate the detrital and pedogenic mineral component of the loess sections by the hematite/goethite ratio. DRS also has been applied as a joint method of various environmental magnetic investigations such as magnetic susceptibility- and isothermal remanent magnetization measurements. In our study the so-called "combined reflectance stratigraphy method" were developed. At First, complex mathematical method was applied to compare the results of the spectral reflectance measurements. One of the most preferred multivariate methods is cluster analysis. Its scope is to group and compare the loess variations and paleosol based on the similarity and common properties of their reflectance curves. In the Second, beside the basic subdivision of the profiles by the different reflectance curves of the layers, the most characteristic wavelength section of the reflectance curve was determined. This sections played the most important role during the classification of the different materials of the section. The reflectance value of individual samples, belonged to the characteristic wavelength were depicted in the function of depth and well correlated with other proxies like grain size distribution and magnetic susceptibility data. The results of the correlation showed the significance of

  18. Individual Genetic Susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric J. Hall

    2008-12-08

    Risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies of exposed populations, as well as the maximum permissible doses allowed for occupational exposure and exposure of the public to ionizing radiation are all based on the assumption that the human population is uniform in its radiosensitivity, except for a small number of individuals, such as ATM homozygotes who are easily identified by their clinical symptoms. The hypothesis upon which this proposal is based is that the human population is not homogeneous in radiosensitiviry, but that radiosensitive sub-groups exist which are not easy to identify. These individuals would suffer an increased incidence of detrimental radiation effects, and distort the shape of the dose response relationship. The radiosensitivity of these groups depend on the expression levels of specific proteins. The plan was to investigate the effect of 3 relatively rare, high penetrate genes available in mice, namely Atm, mRad9 & Brca1. The purpose of radiation protection is to prevent! deterministic effects of clinical significance and limit stochastic effects to acceptable levels. We plan, therefore to compare with wild type animals the radiosensitivity of mice heterozygous for each of the genes mentioned above, as well as double heterozygotes for pairs of genes, using two biological endpoints: a) Ocular cataracts as an important and relevant deterministic effect, and b) Oncogenic transformation in cultured embryo fibroblasts, as a surrogate for carcinogenesis, the most relevant stochastic effect.

  19. Individual Genetic Susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies of exposed populations, as well as the maximum permissible doses allowed for occupational exposure and exposure of the public to ionizing radiation are all based on the assumption that the human population is uniform in its radiosensitivity, except for a small number of individuals, such as ATM homozygotes who are easily identified by their clinical symptoms. The hypothesis upon which this proposal is based is that the human population is not homogeneous in radiosensitiviry, but that radiosensitive sub-groups exist which are not easy to identify. These individuals would suffer an increased incidence of detrimental radiation effects, and distort the shape of the dose response relationship. The radiosensitivity of these groups depend on the expression levels of specific proteins. The plan was to investigate the effect of 3 relatively rare, high penetrate genes available in mice, namely Atm, mRad9 and Brca1. The purpose of radiation protection is to prevent deterministic effects of clinical significance and limit stochastic effects to acceptable levels. We plan, therefore to compare with wild type animals the radiosensitivity of mice heterozygous for each of the genes mentioned above, as well as double heterozygotes for pairs of genes, using two biological endpoints: (a) Ocular cataracts as an important and relevant deterministic effect, and (b) Oncogenic transformation in cultured embryo fibroblasts, as a surrogate for carcinogenesis, the most relevant stochastic effect.

  20. The Development of a Biochemical Profile of Acacia Honey by Identifying Biochemical Determinants of its Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Alexandru MARGHITAS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Codex Alimentarius Standard, EU Legislation and National Standards state honey authenticity. Authenticity in respect of production (to prevent adulteration and authenticity in respect of geographical and botanical origin are the two main aspects of general honey authenticity. Quality of honey depends on the plant source, the chemical composition of these plants as well, as on the climatic conditions and soil mineral composition. Romanian acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia honey that came from the most important Transylvanian massif (Valea lui Mihai, Bihor County, Romania was evaluated for authenticity by pollen-analysis, several physico-chemical analyses, including sugar profile and mineral content. As polyphenolic content could be also an important factor for botanical authentification, HPLC-DAD-MS analyses were performed to assess the fingerprint of this important secondary plant metabolite. Statistical data were processed in order to develop a biochemical profile of this type of honey and the main quality categories identification. The results of physico-chemical analysis demonstrated that the tested honey samples could be framed into monofloral type of acacia honeys. The analysis of acacia honeys originating from Valea lui Mihai, Romania, showed that polyphenolic profile (phenolic acids and flavonoids could be used as a complementary method for authenticity determination together with pollen analysis and other physico-chemical analysis.

  1. Physiological and biochemical basis of salmon young ifshes migratory behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir Ivanovich Martemyanov

    2016-01-01

    The review presents data on structural changes, physiological and biochemical reactions occurring at salmon young fishes during smoltification. It is shown, that young salmon fishes located in fresh water, in the process of smoltification undergo a complex of structural, physiological and biochemical changes directed on preparation of the organism for living in the sea. These changes cause stress reaction which excites young fishes to migrate down the river towards the sea. Measures to improve reproduction of young salmon fishes at fish farms are offered.

  2. Time-dependent effects of [apyr]BF4 and key contributors to their mixture stimulation on Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 at apical and biochemical levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, ZhenYang; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-15

    Earlier reports studied the time-dependent effects of imidazolium-based ionic liquids ([amim]X) in the aspect of biochemical explanation and that of key contributor in mixture effects. Presently, the effects of N-alkylpyridinium-based ILs ([apyr]BF4) were studied combining the above two aspects, i.e., the time-dependent effects of [bpyr]BF4, [hpyr]BF4 and [opyr]BF4 on luminescence and biochemical indicators in Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67, and those of the mixtures. In individual results, the inhibition on luminescence increased over concentrations and the side chain length, showing concentration- and side chain-dependence. Moreover, the inhibition of [apyr]BF4 decreased from 0.25 to 24h, showing a time-dependence. Notably, [hpyr]BF4 stimulated the luminescence at 24h. The biochemical effects, including inhibition and stimulation, were well correlated to those on luminescence. In mixture results, the inhibition on luminescence was lower than the predicted effects by concentration addition model which was based on individual results. Moreover, the mixture stimulation on luminescence was significantly higher than individual ones, and the mixture stimulation on biochemical indicators was even greater than that on luminescence. In mixture effects, [bpyr]BF4 was the positive contributor, and [hpyr]BF4 was the negative contributor. Similarities and differences between [amim]X and [apyr]BF4 indicated underlying mechanisms of the commonly observed hormetic effects of ionic liquids. PMID:27017397

  3. Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    This symposium was very special. It was topical: Some of the most outstanding problems in Nuclear Physics were discussed: Superheavy elements; extremely neutron rich elements, as well as nuclei with strangeness and their possible creation in the cosmos and on earth; the nuclear equation of state has to be identified within strongly compressed and hot nuclear matter as it appears in nucleus-nucleus encounters; giant nuclear systems which are short lived (˜ 10-19 - 10-20 seconds) and extremely important for identifying the vacuum decay in overcritical electric fields (this is a very fundamental process - the most fundamental one in Quantum Electrodynamics!); astrophysical centers of extreme high density around which magnificent sun-like objects are Kepler-orbiting are discovered in our Galaxy by R. Genzel and colleagues (these centers are no black holes those don't exist at all because repulsive gravitational forces may play an important role - the pseudocomplex general relativity eliminates the Schwarzschild singularity); network physics for distributing energy (nuclear, wind, sun, tides,...) all over Europe (and over the world) is basic for energy consumption now and even more so in future. We heard wonderful talks and I am grateful to all the friends and speakers (from Russia, America, Europe and India) for coming to Goa. It was a great symposium! Particular thanks go to Professor Bikash Sinha and especially to Professor Debades Bandyopadhyay from Calcutta who had the idea for and organized this Goa-symposium....

  4. Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Vikkelsø, Signe

    2012-01-01

    be theorized, categorized, evaluated and acted upon without further specification. In this article, we argue that this combination of absolutism and abstraction has some unfortunate consequences for the precise assessment and practical management of particular organizational changes. Based on re-readings...... of two classic, but partially forgotten contributions within organization theory – the work of Wilfred R. Bion on group assumptions and the work of Elliott Jaques on ‘requisite organisation’ – we suggest that contemporary discussion of organizational change could benefit considerably from regaining...

  5. The miRNA Transcriptome Directly Reflects the Physiological and Biochemical Differences between Red, White, and Intermediate Muscle Fiber Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jideng Ma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that can regulate their target genes at the post-transcriptional level. Skeletal muscle comprises different fiber types that can be broadly classified as red, intermediate, and white. Recently, a set of miRNAs was found expressed in a fiber type-specific manner in red and white fiber types. However, an in-depth analysis of the miRNA transcriptome differences between all three fiber types has not been undertaken. Herein, we collected 15 porcine skeletal muscles from different anatomical locations, which were then clearly divided into red, white, and intermediate fiber type based on the ratios of myosin heavy chain isoforms. We further illustrated that three muscles, which typically represented each muscle fiber type (i.e., red: peroneal longus (PL, intermediate: psoas major muscle (PMM, white: longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, have distinct metabolic patterns of mitochondrial and glycolytic enzyme levels. Furthermore, we constructed small RNA libraries for PL, PMM, and LDM using a deep sequencing approach. Results showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs were mainly enriched in PL and played a vital role in myogenesis and energy metabolism. Overall, this comprehensive analysis will contribute to a better understanding of the miRNA regulatory mechanism that achieves the phenotypic diversity of skeletal muscles.

  6. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the mid latitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 μm, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future. (author)

  7. BIOCHEMICAL, NUTRIENT AND INHIBITORY CHARACTERISTICS OF STREPTOMYCES CULTURED FROM A HYPERSALINE ESTUARY, THE LAGUNA MADRE (TEXAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Espinoza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces are common soil bacteria that produce secondary metabolites, including several antibiotics; however, the characteristics of marine Streptomyces are largely unknown. Sediment samples were taken from 3 sites in the Laguna Madre to isolate marine Streptomyces. Sediment was diluted, spread onto synthetic seawater media to estimate the total bacterial density of the samples and spread onto starch casein agar to isolate Streptomyces. Isolated Streptomyces were tested for salinity tolerance and optimal growth pH. Isolates were assayed using API 20E® test strips and BIOLOG™ plates to construct biochemical profiles and assess nutrient utilization abilities of the bacteria, respectively. Individual Streptomyces were tested for the ability to inhibit the growth of other isolated Streptomyces (i.e., interference competition and putatively identified by DNA sequencing. Results showed that there was no significant difference in microbial density in sediments from the 3 sampling sites. Eleven (11 Streptomyces pure cultures were obtained in total; most tolerated salinity up to 60 ppt and grew optimally at pH 7.5. Biochemical profile comparisons showed that the Streptomyces were only at least 74% similar; most (8/11 were >90% similar. Isolates could use between 87-95 carbon sources. Three (3 isolates displayed interference toward other isolates. Ten (10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces griseus by DNA sequencing. Laguna Madre Streptomyces organisms display some diverse characteristics with regards to their halotolerance, biochemical profiles, carbon source utilization and inhibition toward other organisms. Further investigations may yield greater understanding of these organisms in this and other marine environments and may be a reservoir of novel microorganisms and secondary metabolites.

  8. BIOCHEMICAL AND SEROLOGICAL PROFILING OF SANDHI SHOOLA (ARTHRALGIA PATIENTS OF AYURVEDA HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Dixit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sandhi shoola refers to the joints pain where there is pain with or without inflammation and can be caused by injury or a number of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and gout. Ayurveda system of medicine believes this as Sandhi shoola condition in which there is difficulty in walking and running and based on the physical examination, it is categorized into major types i.e. Aamvata (AV, Sandhivata (SV and Vatarakta (VR. However, biochemical and serological investigations for Sandhi shoola were not cited in ancient Ayurveda literature. A retrospective study in which biochemical and serological investigations such as uric acid (UA, Ca2+ and rheumatoid arthritis factor (RAF, C-reactive protein (CRP, antistreptolysin-O (ASO were carried out respectively in 50 Sandhi shoola patients of Ayurveda hospital in Kolkata. The individual information about clinical symptoms and diagnosis by the hospital professionals were recorded. UA and Ca2+ content in serum was determined by enzymatic and Cresolphthalein complexone kit methods respectively, however RAF, CRP and ASO were determined through latex agglutination method. Results showed that maximum number of patients (24 suffered from AV followed by SV (15 and VR (11. The range of the UA and Ca2+ were 2.6 – 18.0 mg/dl and 7.0 – 11.3 mg/dl respectively. The average UA content is maximum in case of VR, while no significant difference was found in Ca2+ content among the three Sandhi shoola. Serological tests indicated maximum RAF positive samples in case of AV followed by SV patients, while CRP was positive in maximum patients of AV and SV. Results revealed a strong diagnostic measure for Sandhi shoola and suggested that higher UA content and positive RAF should be a diagnostic measure in case of Vatarakta and Aamvata respectively. In conclusion, modern biochemical and serological investigations should be exercised in Ayurveda practice for diagnostic and validation with scientific justification

  9. Facilitating Reflective Thought in Novice Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pultorak, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the facilitation of reflection among novice teachers using three types of journal writing and reflective interviews to encourage novice teachers to reflect upon their teaching. The procedures solicited different types of reflection in the student teachers, suggesting that facilitation of teacher reflectivity is vital in teacher…

  10. Influence of atmospheric aerosols and desert reflectance properties on satellite radiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, D. E.; Davis, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of surface bidirectional reflectance factors, including shadowing, and of atmospheric aerosol variability are modeled for their effects on the remote sensing of desert targets from space in the 0.7-micron region at high spatial resolution. The white sand reflectance data of Salomonson (1968) are used as the basis for the simulation. The effects of the surface bi-directional reflectance and atmospheric aerosol on the nadir-normalized reflectance measured at the satellite are discussed individually and jointly. The net influence of these two factors is shown to depend on the magnitude of other parameters, such as the surface reflectance and solar zenith angle.

  11. Temporal variance in hematologic and plasma biochemical reference intervals for free-ranging eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Steven J A; Williams, Rod N

    2012-07-01

    Eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) populations are in decline, likely due to anthropogenic forces and disease, necessitating hematologic and biochemical data from healthy individuals for evaluation of wild populations. We repeatedly sampled 21 free-ranging eastern box turtles from May to September 2009 in the spring, summer, and fall to establish temporal hematologic and biochemical reference intervals. Packed cell volume, aspartate aminotransferase, and potassium levels declined significantly as the active season progressed. High levels of albumin, globulin, and calcium coincided with the presence of eggs in females. These reference intervals should provide baseline data for the clinical evaluation of wild box turtles presented for veterinary care or for studies of wild populations. PMID:22740550

  12. Concepts for individual dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the ''German guidelines for the physical monitoring in radiation protection of occupationally exposed personnel'' this concept is shown. Because of the unmeasurability of the dose equivalent resp. the effective dose equivalent the estimation of these quantities is based on operational quantities. They are given by the properties of the radiation source, the field quantities, the ambient dose or the individual dose equivalent. Confining to the external radiation different types of dose equivalent determinations are described: If an operational quantity is below an investigation level the dose equivalent is equated with the operational dose quantity. If one assumes that dose equivalent limits might have been exceeded conversion factors are taken into account. If accidental exposures are found a determination of absorbed dose distribution with sophisticated exposure models is used (ICRP 28). The present discussion about the properties of the new operational quantities in ICRU 39 is described. (author)

  13. Effect of foliar-applied boron and manganese on growth and biochemical activities in sunflower under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were conducted to assess whether exogenous application of some essential micro nutrients (B and Mn) through foliar spray could ameliorate the adverse effects of salt stress on growth and biochemical activities of sunflower plants. Sunflower (NuSun 636 cv) were grown under normal and different saline conditions, created through 0.4% (ECiw 6.1 dS/m) and 0.8% (ECiw 10.8dS/m) of sea salt irrigation. Salinity was found to cause a significant reduction at all the vegetative and reproductive growth parameters. Salt stress showed inhibition in biochemical activities such as amount of protein, nucleoprotein and Hill reaction in sunflower leaves. Foliar applications of B through H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and Mn through MnCl/sub 2/ and their mixture were found to improve all the studied growth parameters and biochemical activities of sunflower plant irrespective to their growth under non-saline or saline conditions. The growth and yield component as a result of the mixture of foliar spray was higher than spray of single element. Their spray appeared to ameliorate the toxic effects of excessive sodium present in growing medium which is reflected by producing economically feasible yield even beyond the threshold value of salinity (ECe 5.5ds/m). (author)

  14. External observer reflections on QBism

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    In this short review I present my personal reflections on QBism. I have no intrinsic sympathy neither to QBism nor to subjective interpretation of probability in general. However, I have been following development of QBism from its very beginning, observing its evolution and success, sometimes with big surprise. Therefore my reflections on QBism can be treated as "external observer" reflections. I hope that my representation of this interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) has some degree of objectivity. It may be useful for researchers who are interested in quantum foundations, but do not belong to the QBism-community, because I tried to analyze essentials of QBism critically (i.e., not just emphasizing its advantages, as in a typical publication of QBists). QBists may be interested as well - in comments of an external observer who monitored development of this approach to QM during last 16 years. The second part of the paper is devoted to interpretations of probability, objective versus subjective, and view...

  15. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  16. Spectral reflectance of rice seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alois J.; Herden, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of young rice plants was measured in the visible and near-IR region of the spectrum using a commercially available fiber optic contact probe and miniature spectrometer. This work aims to identify an empirical spectral index which changes when rice is exposed to increased levels of chloride anions in the irrigation water and soil. The ratio of near IR reflectance to that of green, R750/555 is known to be a quantitative measure of chlorophyll content in the leaf but int his study does not show a consistent shift for sample which are exposed to chloride levels equal to or less than 0.1 percent by mass of soil. However, leaf contact spectral reflectance measurements did reveal a significant and consistent increase in R750/555 along the length of the leaves, and this variation should represent an important factor in modeling remote and proximal sensing data.

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency: Personal reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This set of personal recollections reflect a variety of views from twenty-five people who have played major roles in shaping the policies of the IAEA or have made notable contributions to its work at different periods of its history. They provide individual insights - often from a rarely available insider's perspective - into particular aspects of the development of an international organization and thus complement the History of the IAEA written by David Fischer. The articles in this collection illustrate some of the complexities involved in the work of an international organization, where the Governing Bodies consist of over a hundred Member States, with different levels of industrial development, different political outlooks and different interests in the benefits of nuclear energy or concerns about the spread of nuclear weapons

  18. Guide on reflectivity data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Soo; Ku, Ja Seung; Seong, Baek Seok; Lee, Chang Hee; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Choi, Byung Hoon

    2004-09-01

    This report contains reduction and fitting process of neutron reflectivity data by REFLRED and REFLFIT in NIST. Because the detail of data reduction like BKG, footprint and data normalization was described, it will be useful to the user who has no experience in this field. Also, reflectivity and BKG of d-PS thin film were measured by HANARO neutron reflectometer. From these, the structure of d-PS thin film was analyzed with REFLRED and REFLFIT. Because the structure of thin film such as thickness, roughness and SLD was attained in the work, the possibility of data analysis with REFLRED and REFLFIT was certified.

  19. Guide on reflectivity data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains reduction and fitting process of neutron reflectivity data by REFLRED and REFLFIT in NIST. Because the detail of data reduction like BKG, footprint and data normalization was described, it will be useful to the user who has no experience in this field. Also, reflectivity and BKG of d-PS thin film were measured by HANARO neutron reflectometer. From these, the structure of d-PS thin film was analyzed with REFLRED and REFLFIT. Because the structure of thin film such as thickness, roughness and SLD was attained in the work, the possibility of data analysis with REFLRED and REFLFIT was certified

  20. Biochemical markers of type II collagen breakdown and synthesis are positioned at specific sites in human osteoarthritic knee cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether type II collagen turnover markers used for osteoarthritis (OA) activity evaluation in body fluids can be detected at the level of specific histological features of OA cartilage tissue, as well as how they relate with each other at this level. METHODS: Adjacent...... sections were obtained from full-depth cartilage biopsies from 32 OA knees. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Helix-II and CTX-II, which are type II collagen fragments originating from the triple helix and the telopeptide region, respectively, and believed to reflect distinct breakdown events, as well...... as for type IIA N propeptide (PIIANP), a biochemical marker reflecting synthesis of type IIA collagen. RESULTS: Helix-II and CTX-II were detected in areas where collagen damage was reported previously, most frequently around chondrocytes, but also frequently in regions not previously investigated...

  1. TRANSFORMATION OF INDIVIDUAL CONSCIOUSNESS AS AN IMPACT OF MASS CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitry Viktorovich Piatakov

    2015-01-01

    The article highlights the main directions and consequences of mass culture impact on individual consciousness in the context of functioning of mass society. Based on the analysis of the main approaches to research of the category «mass culture» the author of the article formulates the thesis that the influence of mass culture has a stabilizing effect on public system but it is destructive for individual consciousness, because the reflection of the reality is substituted with its functional p...

  2. Ideology, motivated reasoning, and cognitive reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M. Kahan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision scientists have identified various plausible sources of ideological polarization over climate change, gun violence, national security, and like issues that turn on empirical evidence. This paper describes a study of three of them: the predominance of heuristic-driven information processing by members of the public; ideologically motivated reasoning; and the cognitive-style correlates of political conservativism. The study generated both observational and experimental data inconsistent with the hypothesis that political conservatism is distinctively associated with either unreflective thinking or motivated reasoning. Conservatives did no better or worse than liberals on the Cognitive Reflection Test (Frederick, 2005, an objective measure of information-processing dispositions associated with cognitive biases. In addition, the study found that ideologically motivated reasoning is not a consequence of over-reliance on heuristic or intuitive forms of reasoning generally. On the contrary, subjects who scored highest in cognitive reflection were the most likely to display ideologically motivated cognition. These findings corroborated an alternative hypothesis, which identifies ideologically motivated cognition as a form of information processing that promotes individuals' interests in forming and maintaining beliefs that signify their loyalty to important affinity groups. The paper discusses the practical significance of these findings, including the need to develop science communication strategies that shield policy-relevant facts from the influences that turn them into divisive symbols of political identity.

  3. Seasonal variation of serum biochemical values of Amazonian snakes (Boa constrictor constrictor kept in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis José da Silva Lima

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In northern Brazil, the seasons are not well defined compared to the South and Southeast regions, due to a hot and humid equatorial climate with a rainy season, known as the Amazonian winter, and a period with less rain, known as the Amazonian summer. The goal of this study was to evaluate the biochemical variation of serum from the Amazon Boa constrictor by correlating the values with the seasons of the region. A biochemical analysis of the serum was performed (AST, ALT, LDH, ALP, calcium, uric acid, phosphorus, total protein, albumin and globulin using 31 individuals of Boa constrictor constrictor, which were kept in captivity. It was observed that eight of the ten parameters were higher in the winter compared to the summer (total protein, albumin, globulin, ALT, AST, ALP, LDH and calcium. The ALT, AST and calcium values had statistically significant differences for the summer and winter, while the other parameters appear to be influenced by seasonality. This was the first study of snakes kept in captivity that analyzed the serum chemistry profile of Boa constrictor constrictor from the state of Pará, Brazil.

  4. From Reflective Practice to Holistic Reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Examines Schon's idea of "reflective practice" in higher education through analysis of "reflectivity" -- its history, possible forms, interpretations, and underpinning values. Notes four underpinning epistemologies for reflective practice: technical rational, humanistic emancipatory, postmodern deconstructive, and radical phenomenological.…

  5. The Stereochemistry of Biochemical Molecules: A Subject to Revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centelles, Josep J.; Imperial, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Although Fischer's convention for stereoisomers is useful for simple molecules, the stereochemistry of complex biochemical molecules is often poorly indicated in textbooks. This article reports on errors in stereochemistry of complex hydrosoluble vitamin B12 molecule. Twenty-five popular biochemistry textbooks were examined for their treatment of…

  6. A coupled mechano-biochemical model for bone adaptation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Pérez, M. A.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Maršík, F.; Doblaré, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 69, 6-7 (2014), s. 1383-1429. ISSN 0303-6812 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : mechano-biochemical model * bone remodelling * BMU Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.846, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00285-013-0736-9

  7. Biochemical Pathways That Are Important for Cotton Fiber Cell Elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory mechanism that controls the sustained cotton fiber cell elongation is gradually being elucidated by coupling genome-wide transcriptome profiling with systematic biochemical and physiological studies.Very long chain fatty acids(VLCFA),H2O2,and several types of plant hormones

  8. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  9. BIOCHEMICAL AND NEUROPATHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF TRIPHENYL PHOSPHITE IN RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The putative neurotoxicity of the organophosphorus compound triphenyl phosphite (TPP) was examined in Long Evans, adult male rats. Animals were exposed to two 1.0 ml/kg (1184 mg/kg) injections (sc) of TPP spaced 1 week apart and sampled for biochemical and neuropathological exami...

  10. Integrating Carbon Nanotubes into Microfluidic Chip for Separating Biochemical Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Miaoxiang Max; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    We present a new type of device to separate biochemical compounds wherein carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are integrated as chromatographic stationary phase. The CNTs were directly grown on the bottom of microfluidic channels on Si/SiO2 substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Acetylene was used as...

  11. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 2. MODEL EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The multilayer biochemical dry deposition model (MLBC) described in the accompanying paper was tested against half-hourly eddy correlation data from six field sites under a wide range of climate conditions with various plant types. Modeled CO2, O3, SO2<...

  12. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 1. MODEL FORMULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multilayer biochemical dry deposition model has been developed based on the NOAA Multilayer Model (MLM) to study gaseous exchanges between the soil, plants, and the atmosphere. Most of the parameterizations and submodels have been updated or replaced. The numerical integration ...

  13. USE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS AS BIOCHEMICAL REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) from the nation is managed predominantly in anitary landfills. ue to the physical, chemical and biological makeup f he aste he landfill acts as a biochemical reactor and degrades the organic matter. urrent practices are to use covers and liners as engi...

  14. Biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diming; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-01-15

    Smartphone has been widely integrated with sensors, such as test strips, sensor chips, and hand-held detectors, for biochemical detections due to its portability and ubiquitous availability. Utilizing built-in function modules, smartphone is often employed as controller, analyzer, and displayer for rapid, real-time, and point-of-care monitoring, which can significantly simplify design and reduce cost of the detecting systems. This paper presents a review of biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detections. The biosensors and bioelectronics based on smartphone can mainly be classified into biosensors using optics, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemistry, and near-field communication. The developments of these biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone are reviewed along with typical biochemical detecting cases. Sensor strategies, detector attachments, and coupling methods are highlighted to show designs of the compact, lightweight, and low-cost sensor systems. The performances and advantages of these designs are introduced with their applications in healthcare diagnosis, environment monitoring, and food evaluation. With advances in micro-manufacture, sensor technology, and miniaturized electronics, biosensor and bioelectronic devices on smartphone can be used to perform biochemical detections as common and convenient as electronic tag readout in foreseeable future. PMID:26319170

  15. Biochemical correlates in an animal model of depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A valid animal model of depression was used to explore specific adrenergic receptor differences between rats exhibiting aberrant behavior and control groups. Preliminary experiments revealed a distinct upregulation of hippocampal beta-receptors (as compared to other brain regions) in those animals acquiring a response deficit as a result of exposure to inescapable footshock. Concurrent studies using standard receptor binding techniques showed no large changes in the density of alpha-adrenergic, serotonergic, or dopaminergic receptor densities. This led to the hypothesis that the hippocampal beta-receptor in responses deficient animals could be correlated with the behavioral changes seen after exposure to the aversive stimulus. Normalization of the behavior through the administration of antidepressants could be expected to reverse the biochemical changes if these are related to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. This study makes three important points: (1) there is a relevant biochemical change in the hippocampus of response deficient rats which occurs in parallel to a well-defined behavior, (2) the biochemical and behavioral changes are normalized by antidepressant treatments exhibiting both serotonergic and adrenergic mechanisms of action, and (3) the mode of action of antidepressants in this model is probably a combination of serotonergic and adrenergic influences modulating the hippocampal beta-receptor. These results are discussed in relation to anatomical and biochemical aspects of antidepressant action

  16. Biochemical tests for diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma: urinary versus plasma determinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Plouin, P F; Duclos, J M; Menard, J; Comoy, E; Bohuon, C; Alexandre, J M

    1981-01-01

    Fifteen patients with hypertension due to phaeochromocytoma and 35 controls with essential hypertension were studied to assess the diagnostic value of urinary and plasma biochemical determinations in phaeochromocytoma. In every case of phaeochromocytoma the urinary concentration of vanillylmandelate, metanephrines, or adrenaline plus noradrenaline was diagnostic of the disease irrespective of whether the patient was normotensive or hypertensive at the time. Plasma determinations of adrenaline...

  17. Biochemical Importance of Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Ann; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Skottrup, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    glycosylation sites could be excluded as explanation for the differential reactivity. The latency transition of non-glycosylated, but not of glycosylated PAI-1, was strongly accelerated by a non-ionic detergent. The different biochemical properties of glycosylated and non-glycosylated PAI-1 depended...

  18. Model Based Monitoring and Control of Chemical and Biochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    This presentation will give an overview of the work performed at the department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering related to process control. A research vision is formulated and related to a number of active projects at the department. In more detail a project describing model estimation and...

  19. [Experiments using rats on Kosmos biosatellites: morphologic and biochemical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'in, E A; Kaplanskiĭ, A S; Savina, E A

    1989-01-01

    Results of morphological and biochemical investigations of rats flown on Cosmos biosatellites are discussed. It is emphasized that most changes occurring during exposure to microgravity are directly or indirectly related to lower musculoskeletal loads which in turn produce deconditioning of different physiological systems and organism as a whole. It is concluded that this deconditioning is associated with both metabolic and structural changes. PMID:2685464

  20. MATLAB-Based Teaching Modules in Biochemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kilho; Comolli, Noelle K.; Kelly, William J.; Huang, Zuyi

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models play an important role in biochemical engineering. For example, the models developed in the field of systems biology have been used to identify drug targets to treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms. In addition, competitive binding models for chromatography processes have been developed to predict expanded…

  1. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose concentration dynamics could not possibly occur in nature. Therefore, development of a thermodynamically consistent approach for estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system is highly desirable. Results We introduce a Bayesian analysis approach for computing thermodynamically consistent estimates of the rate constants of a closed biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry given experimental data. Our method employs an appropriately designed prior probability density function that effectively integrates fundamental biophysical and thermodynamic knowledge into the inference problem. Moreover, it takes into account experimental strategies for collecting informative observations of molecular concentrations through perturbations. The proposed method employs a maximization-expectation-maximization algorithm that provides thermodynamically feasible estimates of the rate constant values and computes appropriate measures of estimation accuracy. We demonstrate various aspects of the proposed method on synthetic data obtained by simulating a subset of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling pathway, and examine its robustness under conditions that violate key assumptions. Software, coded in MATLAB®, which implements all Bayesian analysis techniques discussed in this paper, is available free of charge at http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS%20lab/software.html. Conclusions Our approach provides an attractive statistical methodology for

  2. Review of Teacher’s Teaching Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爽爽

    2015-01-01

    Teacher’s teaching reflection has become the core focus in school.However,there are different understandings of the concept of teacher’s teaching reflection.The paper introduces and compares different understandings of the concept of teachers’teaching reflection.Based on the summarizing of the concept on reflection and teaching reflection,this paper tries to provide reference for the teacher’s teaching reflection.

  3. Learning Through Reflective Writing: A Teaching Strategy. A Review of: Sen, B. A. (2010. Reflective writing: A management skill. Library Management, 31(1/2, 79-93.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L. Young

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To explore student thought on both reflection and reflective writing as a process, and to analyze the writing by the application of clearly defined and identifiable outcomes.Design – Mixed method approach consisting of a qualitative analysis of 116 written reflections from master’s level students as well as a quantitative statistical analysis.Setting –The University of Sheffield masters-level librarianship program’s course INF6005, “Management for LIS.”Subjects – Of the 31 students registered the course during the 2007-2008 academic year, 22 (71%, allowed their reflections to be used for the purposes of research. Of these, 7 students identified themselves as male, and 15 were female. All students included were over 21 years of age and had previous library experience, with varying degrees of management experience in supervisory roles. Not all supervisory experience was gathered within the library domain.Methods –A total of 116 reflective journal entries were submitted by the participating students during the eight month period from October 2008 to May 2009. In order to identify themes, qualitative analysis was applied to the reflective writing responses. Descriptive statistics were also applied to test the hypothesis, illustrate the relationships between reflective writing and outcomes, and locate identifiable outcomes.Main Results – Practising reflection demonstrated benefits for individuals groups both in and outside of the workplace. On the whole, individuals gained the most from reflection and saw it in the most positive light when it was practised as a daily activity. Quantitatively, when students began to master the practice of reflection, they demonstrated an increase in their ability to learn and an overall improvement of self-development and critical thinking skills, and gained a defined awareness of personal mental function. When decision making became easier, students understood they had begun to master

  4. Impact of Foliage Surface Properties on Vegetation Reflection and Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Yan, L.; Zhao, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Optical properties of phytoelements and their distribution in the canopy space (i.e., canopy structure) are among key factors that determine light environment in vegetation canopies, which in turn drives various physiological and physical processes required for the functioning of plants. Canopy radiative response is the source of information about ecosystem properties from remote sensing. Understanding of how radiation interacts with foliage and traverses in the 3D vegetation canopy is essential to both modeling and remote sensing communities. Radiation scattered by a leaf includes information from two dissimilar sources - the leaf surface and leaf interior. The first component of scattered radiation emanates from light reflected at the air-cuticle interface. This portion of reflected radiation does not interact with biochemical constituents inside the leaf and depends on the properties of the leaf surface. The leaf cuticle acts as a "barrier" for photons to enter the mesophyll and be absorbed; thus, tending to increase the leaf scattering. The second component mainly results from radiation interactions within the leaf-interior. The canopy radiation regime is sensitive to canopy structure, leaf surface properties and leaf biochemical constituents. Impact of leaf surface properties on canopy reflection and absorption is poorly understood. Radiation scattered at the surface of leaves is partly polarized. Fresnel reflection is the principal cause of light polarization. Polarization measurements provide a means to assess the impact of leaf surface properties on canopy radiation regime. We measured Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) in the principal plane and its polarized portion of needles and shoots of two coniferous species in the 400 to 1000 nm spectral interval. The needle and shoot BRF spectra were decomposed into polarized (PBRF) and diffuse (DBRF) components: BRF=PBRF+DBRF. Our analyses indicate: 1) PBRF in forward directions can account for up to 70% of

  5. Law and individuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F.M. Strauss

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The main contours of the history of philosophical and scientific conceptions of law and individuality are portrayed. This includes an account of perspectives and views found in ancient Greece, the Graeco-Roman world, the medieval speculation and, via the Renaissance, in early modern developments that were continued in the Enlightenment era, in Romanticism and historicism, and were eventually manifested in the linguistic turn. What is important for a proper understanding of modern law conceptions is an acknowledgement of the all-pervading influence of modern nominalism. This orientation was characterised by employing two related distinctions, namely the distinction between conceptual knowledge and concept-transcending knowledge, and that between rationalism and irrationalism. From a systematic point of view, various aspectual terms provide a frame of reference for the idea of a law of nature as a compound basic concept of science. Special attention is given to the nature of normative principles and physical laws. In the last part of the article, these perspectives are applied to a brief assessment of differences and similarities in the thought of Dooyeweerd and Vollenhoven.

  6. Hysterical individual criminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Rezaeifard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, mental disorders and their association with crime, psychologists and lawyers, has attracted one of the biggest problems is that criminal behavior, any attempt to understand it requires the efforts of a wide range of scientific fields. In this regard, hysteria disorder, has a role, and disorders that are essential for its treatment of psychiatric, drug therapy is used, the incidence of mental illness, especially hysterical disorders, central nervous system, the especially the brain, the highest role in the patient's mental equilibrium. The etiology of hysterical disorders, diseases can be organ, social and environmental factors, the role of religion, incidents and accidents, including heredity and genetics. Preventing the hysterical disorders, this study has taken into consideration. Hysterical about individual criminal responsibility, which is divided into different types, we can say that basically hysterical, has full responsibility to be apart of hysteria, the a plurality of character that, in the judgment of insanity, and the person returns absolved from criminal responsibility, as well as safeguarding measures and educational judgment, the perpetrators of these patients can be looked at.

  7. Reflectivity of metallodielectric photonic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikov, K.P.; Vos, W.L.; Moroz, A.; Blaaderen, van A.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and optical properties of metallodielectric photonic glasses of colloidal silver spheres with a radius ranging from 200 to 420 nm and volume fractions around 60%. Strong modulations (~25%) in the optical reflectivity were observed in the visible range for these structure

  8. Reflectivity of metallodielectric photonic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikov, K.; Vos, W.L.; Moroz, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and optical properties of metallodielectric photonic glasses of colloidal silver spheres with a radius ranging from 200 to 420 nm and volume fractions around 60%. Strong modulations (∼25%) in the optical reflectivity were observed in the visible range for these structure

  9. Creative reflection in industrial design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbrugge, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The dissertation is a reflection of the writer on his career as an industrial designer of Demand-Driven Design for a period of approximately 25 years. This period is exposed with a discussion of five designs. The projects are introduced by developments in the surrounding design landscape, such as Dr

  10. MODIS Solar Reflective Calibration Traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify, measurement uncertainties, and to establish absolute scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2 micrometers and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from prelaunch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  11. Reflections on Equivalence in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王皓

    2011-01-01

    The comparison of texts in different languages inevitably involves a theory of equivalence.To shed as much as possible light on theories and writings that have dealt with the notion of equivalence,this essay attempts to present a few in-depth reflections

  12. A Critically Reflective Social Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Marge

    1990-01-01

    Examines social studies in the twenty-first century from a critical theory perspective. Traces critical reflection's origins from Marxist educational theories to Jurgen Habermas's critical theory. Highlights Fred Newmann's curricular model, "Education for Citizen Action," for developing competent action in public affairs. Advocates infusing…

  13. Questioning Intuition through Reflective Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Current literature on ethics and moral development focuses on discussion concerning the impact of intuition on moral decision-making. Through the use of student journal reflections over the course of one semester, this study utilized a grounded theory approach in order to explore and understand participant levels of awareness and understanding of…

  14. Vegetables, Coctails & Reflections / Marco Laimre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laimre, Marko, 1968-

    2006-01-01

    Pealkirja "Vegetables, Coctails & Reflections" kandis Tallinna Kunstihoones 8.04.-28.05.2006 avatud Elin Kardi, Marko Mäetamme, Marco Laimre ja Andres Tali ühisnäitusel "Vägivald ja propaganda" Marco Laimre installatsioon. Marco Laimre esinemine raadiosaates "kunst.er" Klassikaraadios 16.04.2006

  15. Reflection modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is a widely used treatment which has exceptional success with a variety of skin conditions. Over-exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can however be detrimental and cause side effects such as erythema, photokeratisis, and even skin cancer. Quantifying patient dose is therefore imperative to ensure biologically effective treatment while minimizing negative repercussions. A dose model for treatment would be valuable in achieving these ends. Methods: Prior work by the authors concentrated on modeling the output of the lamps used in treatment and it was found a line source model described the output from the sources to a high degree. In practice, these lamps are surrounded by reflective anodized aluminum in patient treatment cabins and this work extends the model to quantify specular reflections from these planes on patient dose. Results: The extension of the model to allow for reflected images in addition to tube output shows a remarkably good fit to the actual data measured. Conclusions: The reflection model yields impressive accuracy and is a good basis for full UVR cabin modeling.

  16. Reflections on CME Congress 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary reflects the author's impressions of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Congress 2012, a provocative international conference on professional development and quality improvement in the health professions that took place in Toronto, Ontario, last spring. The sessions he attended and conversations he had with other attendees were…

  17. Cultivating Spiritual Reflectivity in Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Clifford

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need to address spiritual beliefs in teacher education, arguing that: because spiritual impulses are so primary for many people, they must be addressed in teacher education; educators must recognize and cultivate students' spiritual motivations to teach and foster reflectivity; and student teachers must learn what they can legally…

  18. REFLECTION IN RUSSIAN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, J.M.C.; Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    The present article explores the theoretical underpinnings upon which Russian psychologists base their analysis of reflection. The intention is to arrive at a clearer understanding of their research aims and research methods, and to explore the relevance of their research to educational practice. Th

  19. Gamma camera with reflectivity mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gamma camera is described with a plurality of photodetectors arranged for locating flashes of light produced by a scintillator in response to incident radiation. Masking material is arranged in a radially symmetric pattern on the front face of the scintillator about the axis of each photodetector to reduce the amount of internal reflection of optical photons induced by gamma ray photons

  20. Gamma camera with reflectivity mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the present invention there is provided a radiographic camera comprising: a scintillator; a plurality of photodectors positioned to face said scintillator; a plurality of masked regions formed upon a face of said scintillator opposite said photdetectors and positioned coaxially with respective ones of said photodetectors for decreasing the amount of internal reflection of optical photons generated within said scintillator. (auth)

  1. MODIS solar reflective calibration traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-08-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify measurement uncertainties, and to establish an absolute measurement scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2μm and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from pre-launch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  2. Chemical and biochemical composition of caviar from different sturgeon species and origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, M; Kirschbaum, F; Gessner, J; Krüger, A; Patriche, N; Billard, R

    2000-08-01

    The chemical and biochemical composition of caviar in 22 specimens of wild caught and of 2 farmed animals were measured. The results include grain size, protein and fat content, fatty acid composition of triglycerides and phospholipids, as well as the concentrations of relevant heavy metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The average protein content varied between 26.2 and 31.1% (wet weight) and fat from 10.9 to 19.4% (wet weight) with lowest values for caviar from farmed sturgeon. The triglycerides and phospholipids contained more n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid than n-6 fatty acids. The copper and zinc concentrations varied between 1.20 and 1.69 and 10.3 and 12.4 mg/kg (wet weight), respectively. These values reflect the elevated requirement of sturgeons for these components. Lead content varied between 0.06 and 0.15 mg/kg (wet weight). The cadmium concentrations were less than 5 micrograms/kg (wet weight) leading to the conclusion that no accumulation took place in the eggs. The concentrations of sigma DDT and sigma PCB were extremely high in caviar from Huso huso compared to the samples of the other species thus reflecting the different food habits leading to increased bio-accumulation. PMID:10996895

  3. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  4. Migratory behaviour of a dominant detritivorous fish Prochilodus lineatus evaluated by multivariate biochemical and pollutant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranza, E D; Cappelletti, N; Migoya, M C; Tatone, L M; Colombo, J C

    2012-07-01

    This paper studies the migration pathways and ranges of a dominant detritivorous fish Prochilodus lineatus along pollution gradients in the Río de la Plata basin using multivariate analysis of biochemical and pollutant data. Biochemical composition (water, ash, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, neutral lipids classes and fatty acids), aliphatic hydrocarbons (ALI), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), linear alkylbenzenes (LAB) and organochlorine pesticides (OClP) were determined in muscle samples of P. lineatus collected in Metropolitan Buenos Aires, the lower Paraná River (Paraná: 200-1000 km from Buenos Aires) and the middle Paraná and Paraguay Rivers (North: 1000-1400 km north). Biochemical variables and pollutants exhibited large variability [Lipids 1.1-89.5% wet mass; ALI 1.4-413; LABs not detectable (n.d.)-115.2; PCBs n.d.-27.9; OClPs n.d.-11.8 µg g(-1) dry mass], due to the contrast of Buenos Aires with North fish. Fish from Buenos Aires were fatty (lipids 24.7 ± 12.3% wet mass), enriched in 18 carbon fatty acids and severely contaminated (ALI 152.4 ± 72.3; LABs 65.1 ± 26.4; PCBs 15.2 ± 6.8; OClPs 1.8 ± 1.9 µg g(-1) dry mass mean ±S.D.). In contrast, fish from North were lean (4.1 ± 3.1% wet mass), enriched in long chain (>20 carbons) polyunsaturated fatty acids, with average one to two orders of magnitude lower pollutant levels (ALI 41.2 ± 51.9; PCBs 2.2 ± 3.5; LABs 8.8 ± 21.1; OClPs 0.67 ± 0.75 µg g(-1) dry mass mean ±S.D.). Paraná showed intermediate values in all variables, denoting the mixing of different fish stocks. Based on principal component analysis, 14 outliers from 60 North and Paraná samples (representing 26 from 108 individual fish) were identified as pertaining to the Buenos Aires group with very similar lipid and pollutant levels. Data suggest that P. lineatus migrates a highly variable distance, exceeding 800-1000 km in multiple spatial and temporal overlapping ranges. Chemometric analysis of biochemical and pollutant data

  5. Profile of mood states and stress-related biochemical indices in long-term yoga practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudo Nobuyuki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown the short-term or intermediate-term practice of yoga to be useful for ameliorating several mental disorders and psychosomatic disorders. However, little is known about the long-term influences of yoga on the mental state or stress-related biochemical indices. If yoga training has a stress-reduction effect and also improves an individual's mental states for a long time, long-term yoga practitioners may have a better mental state and lower stress-related biochemical indices in comparison to non-experienced participants. This study simultaneously examined the differences in mental states and urinary stress-related biochemical indices between long-term yoga practitioners and non-experienced participants. Methods The participants were 38 healthy females with more than 2 years of experience with yoga (long-term yoga group and 37 age-matched healthy females who had not participated in yoga (control group. Their mental states were assessed using the Profile of Mood States (POMS questionnaire. The level of cortisol, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and biopyrrin in urine were used as stress-related biochemical indices. Results The average self-rated mental disturbance, tension-anxiety, anger-hostility, and fatigue scores of the long-term yoga group were lower than those of the control group. There was a trend toward a higher vigor score in the long-term yoga group than that in the control group. There were no significant differences in the scores for depression and confusion in the POMS between the two groups. The urine 8-OHdG concentration showed a trend toward to being lower in the long-term yoga group in comparison to the control group. There were no significant differences in the levels of urine biopyrrin or cortisol. Conclusions The present findings suggest that long-term yoga training can reduce the scores related to mental health indicators such as self-rated anxiety, anger, and fatigue.

  6. The Role of the Individual in the Social Information Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this paper is to point out which role the individual plays in the generation of information in social systems. First, it is argued that the individual is a social, self-conscious, creative, reflective, cultural, symbol- and language-using, active natural, producing, labouring, objective, corporeal, living, real, sensuous, visionary, imaginative, designing, co-operative being that makes its own history and can strive towards freedom and autonomy. Based on these assumptions the re-creation/self-organisation of social systems is described as a dialectic of actions and social structures and as a dialectic of individual information and social information. The individual enters economic, political and cultural relationships that result in the emergence and differentiation of social (i.e. economic, political and cultural information which enables and constrains individual actions and thinking. Individuals as actors in social systems are indispensable for social self-organisation.

  7. On Collectivism-Individualism dimension in Chinese and Western Family Relationships

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芳

    2012-01-01

      Western culture emphasizes on individualism, individual freedom and personal choice, while Chinese people put more emphasis on col ectivism. Col ectivism-Individualism value differences can also be reflected in Chinese and Western Family Relationships, which may sometimes lead to conflicts between the couples in the cross-cultural marriage and their families .

  8. Factors associated with reflection among students after an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Wallman, A.; Lindblad, A.K.; Gustavsson, Maria; Ring, L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To identify individual and social factors associated with pharmacy students level of reflection in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Methods. A postal questionnaire, including a reflective assignment, was sent to all pharmacy interns (n=262) at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 4 semesters in 2005-2007. Results. In a univariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be associated with students level of reflection. After controlling for covariates, 3 social factors were foun...

  9. Students' Ability to Organize Biochemical and Biochemistry-Related Terms Correlates with Their Performance in a Biochemical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    Organization is believed to be related to understanding and memory. Whether this belief was applicable in biochemical education was examined about two years after students had experienced biochemistry classes in their first year. The ability of organizing information in biochemistry was judged from the number of correct links of 886 biochemical…

  10. Students' Reflection on Online Self-Correction and Peer Review to Improve Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Reflection is considered as a mental process of an individual's internal problem-solving activity and rarely observed in face-to-face instruction. As a consequence, students have few opportunities to observe and learn from each other. This study aimed to arouse students' reflection on both self-correction (one's own problem-solving process in…

  11. Teaching as an Amalgam of Discourses and the Consequent Need for Appropriate Modes of Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldron, John; Smith, Robin

    This paper explores the concept of reflection and reflective practice in teacher education. Teaching is a complex achievement that brings together a number of conceptual, practical, and physical resources in an individual's professional practice. Achievement in teaching is an amalgam of at least four different discourses--science, craft, art, and…

  12. Research and Reflective Practice in the ESL Classroom: Voices from Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocki, Andrzej; Tennekoon, Sujeewa; Calvo, Alicia Pena

    2014-01-01

    Modern language education favours the model of a reflective teacher-researcher who is engaged in both individual and collaborative curriculum revision and teaching-learning environment improvement. The present paper addresses the issue of classroom research and reflective practice in current ESL pedagogy and teacher professional development. The…

  13. Genetic Investigations Using Immuno-biochemical Markers in a Maramureş Brown Cattle Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Isfan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of the genetic markers and identifying new markers involves an increasing number of research projects in the fields of genetics of immunology, biochemical genetics, molecular genetics, quantity genetics and the genetic improvement of animals. Some studies on genes frequency determining the red cells specificity and for whey hemoglobin are approached in the present report. In this way, some blood factors, most of them belonging to B system (the most complex system in cattle have been evidenced. The lowest gene frequency was present in K factor (7%, and highest one in, O1, G’ , W and F1 (100%. In addition to basic importance on knowledge and determination of cattle population genetic structure for studied protein loci, another theme proposed to correlate hemoglobin type with some traits of economical importance: milk yield, fat and protein content, fat and protein yield. Higher performance was recorded by HbA/HbA individuals.

  14. Assessment of acute pesticide toxicity with selected biochemical variables in suicide attempting subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesticide induced changes were assessed in thirty two subjects of attempted suicide cases. Among all, the farmers and their families were recorded as most frequently suicide attempting. The values obtained from seven biochemical variables of 29 years old (average age) hospitalized subjects were compared to the same number and age matched normal volunteers. The results revealed major differences in the mean values of the selected parameters. The mean difference calculate; alkaline phosphatase (178.7 mu/l), Bilirubin (7.5 mg/dl), GPT (59.2 mu/l) and glucose (38.6 mg/dl) were higher than the controls, which indicate the hepatotoxicity induced by the pesticides in suicide attempting individuals. Increase in serum creatinine and urea indicated renal malfunction that could be linked with pesticide induced nephrotoxicity among them. (author)

  15. Certain Biochemical Changes in Haemolymph of Eri Silkworm, Samia Cynthia Ricini after Inoculation with Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindar Gundeti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The insect immune system exists to protect the host from pathogenic invaders and from other harmful insults. Upon bacterial infection insect haemolymph may lead to fatal consequences and it plays a most important role in transport and storage of nutrients, amino acids and free amino acids concentrations are marked changes for substrates by the immune system, these substrates are provide energy and precursors for the synthesis of new cells, effecter molecules, and protective molecule. We have been studied the certain biochemical changes in bacterial challenged Eri silkworm haemolymph at various time intervals. Results shows that the proteins and amino acids levels were significantly elevated and 18 individual free amino acids were found and that are quantitatively variation in the haemolymph after challenge with gram –ve and gram +ve bacteria when compared and control and sterile haemolymph. We may conclude that these were directly involved in the antimicrobial immune response of Eri silkworm innate immunity

  16. Moral and law problems of individual`s education

    OpenAIRE

    Kasantseva D. B.

    2011-01-01

    Moral education of individual is one of the most important part of individual`s development and universal moral values ever were general measure of that. Maturation crises, which always occur in all children life, according with provoking external factors, can cause to stable asocial behavior with illegal acts.

  17. Evaluating Learning and Teaching: Institutional Needs and Individual Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Veronica; Anderson, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Rather than a rational, technical activity, evaluation reflects the socio-political dynamics of the evaluative context. This presents a challenge for universities and the individuals within them, who may assume that plans or policies for evaluation will result in straightforward outcomes. This small-scale study in one institution looks at the…

  18. Genetic assessment of serological and biochemical markers in Bharia tribe of Chhindwara district of Madhya Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Ruchira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present sero-genetic study is the first of its kind to present the baseline data of Bharia tribe of Madhya Pradesh. The main aim of this study is to provide phenotype and allele-frequency data to characterize the population genetically and to fill the void on the genetic map of Madhya Pradesh. Materials and Methods: For this, blood samples from 92 unrelated healthy individuals of Bharia tribe from Chhindwara district (Tamia block were collected. Hemolysates prepared were analyzed for two serological (A1A2BO and Rh and six biochemical (adenosine deaminase, adenylate kinase locus 1, acid phosphatase locus 1, phosphoglucomutase locus 1, esterase D and glucosephosphate isomerase parameters, following the standard electrophoretic techniques. Results: The Chi-square test for goodness of fit revealed no significant deviation between the observed and expected numbers in any of the seven genetic markers, suggesting that the tribe is in genetic equilibrium. A high incidence of B allele in A1A2BO blood group and low incidence of the A1 allele, with presence of A2 in only one individual, and a low frequency of Rh(D (Rh negative allele was observed in serological markers. Also, no rare variant was observed for biochemical markers. Conclusion: Principal Component Analysis done in order to detect the genetic affinity of Bharia tribe with other populations from the adjoining states of Madhya Pradesh based on the allele frequencies, showed a close association of Bharia with Gujarat and Rajasthan. Hence, this study has been helpful in revealing the genetic structure and affinity of Bharia tribe.

  19. Reflecting on Reflection: A Phenomenological Inquiry into Principals' Use of Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz, Dennis Scott

    2012-01-01

    Today's principals work in a setting that has become increasingly complex and characterized by a great deal of uncertainty and variety. Reflective practice is a process that principals can utilize to develop expertise in effectively operating under these conditions (Short & Reinhart, 1993). The purpose of the study was to explore the…

  20. Reflection on problem solving in introductory and advanced physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew J.

    Reflection is essential in order to learn from problem solving. This thesis explores issues related to how reflective students are and how we can improve their capacity for reflection on problem solving. We investigate how students naturally reflect in their physics courses about problem solving and evaluate strategies that may teach them reflection as an integral component of problem-solving. Problem categorization based upon similarity of solution is a strategy to help them reflect about the deep features of the problems related to the physics principles involved. We find that there is a large overlap between the introductory and graduate students in their ability to categorize. Moreover, introductory students in the calculus-based courses performed better categorization than those in the algebra-based courses even though the categorization task is conceptual. Other investigations involved exploring if reflection could be taught as a skill on individual and group levels. Explicit self-diagnosis in recitation investigated how effectively students could diagnose their own errors on difficult problems, how much scaffolding was necessary for this purpose, and how effective transfer was to other problems employing similar principles. Difficulty in applying physical principles and difference between the self-diagnosed and transfer problems affected performance. We concluded that a sustained intervention is required to learn effective problem-solving strategies. Another study involving reflection on problem solving with peers suggests that those who reflected with peers drew more diagrams and had a larger gain from the midterm to final exam. Another study in quantum mechanics involved giving common problems in midterm and final exams and suggested that advanced students do not automatically reflect on their mistakes. Interviews revealed that even advanced students often focus mostly on exams rather than learning and building a robust knowledge structure. A survey was

  1. Estimation of Specific Salivary Enzymatic Biomarkers in Individuals with Gingivitis and Chronic Periodontitis: A Clinical and Biochemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Luke, Roji; Khan, S Nubesh; Iqbal, P Safar; Soman, Rino Roopak; Chakkarayan, Jithesh; V. Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Host response to periodontal disease includes the release of different enzymes from stromal, epithelial or inflammatory cells. The enzymes which are produced from these cells are associated with cell injury and cell death like: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Normal enzymatic activity of these enzymes is necessary for healthy functioning of gingiva and periodontium. The aim of the study is ...

  2. Reflection group on 'Expert Culture'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, a reflection group on 'Expert Culture' was established. The objectives of the reflection group are: (1) to clarify the role of SCK-CEN experts; (2) to clarify the new role of expertise in the evolving context of risk society; (3) to confront external views and internal SCK-CEN experiences on expert culture; (4) to improve trust building of experts and credibility of SCK-CEN as a nuclear actor in society; (5) to develop a draft for a deontological code; (6) to integrate the approach in training on assertivity and communication; (7) to create an output for a topical day on the subject of expert culture. The programme, achievements and perspectives of the refection group are summarised

  3. Reflective optic systems for lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein are introduced new reflective optic systems using, in sequence, expanders, adders, compressors, amplifiers, and recirculators. Techniques for shaping targets and wavefronts make possible new applications of laser power. These range from generations of plasmas simulating densities in any stellar body, very high isp rockets, cheap nuclear triggers, microwave, and x-ray and γ-ray impulse generators. Reflective systems make possible the symmetrical illumination of very small targets. Superfinishing surfaces practically eliminates scattering losses. Gravitational force on stars can force their evolution through main sequence, white dwarf, neutron, and hyperon stages. The same physical conditions can probably be equalled, in volumes of submicron extent, by crushing a solid pellet in an optical bottle augmented by magnetic pumping due to target vorticity. This possibility in the context of special relativity suggests some new physical principles. (auth)

  4. 40 CFR 158.2081 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. 158.2081 Section 158.2081 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2081 Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data...

  5. 40 CFR 158.2084 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data requirements table. 158.2084 Section 158.2084 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2084 Experimental use permit biochemical...

  6. Slow pre-movement cortical potentials do not reflect individual response to therapy in writer's cramp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, K E; Peller, M; Knutzen, A;

    2009-01-01

    apart. RESULTS: Patients benefited from the therapeutical intervention (Zeuner et al., 2008). They showed no abnormalities of the MRCPs at baseline. In controls, MRCPs did not significantly change after 4 weeks. In patients, immobilization and re-training had no effect on MRCPs. There was no correlation...

  7. From head to toe: Evidence for selective brain activation reflecting visual perception of whole individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Laura eSchmalzl; Regine eZopf; Williams, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to recognize other people’s faces and bodies is crucial for our social interactions. Previous neuroimaging studies have repeatedly demonstrated the existence of brain areas that selectively respond to visually presented faces and bodies. In daily life, however, we see "whole" people and not just isolated faces and bodies, and the question remains of how information from these two categories of stimuli is integrated at a neural level. Are faces and bodies merely processed...

  8. Composing individuals: ethnographic reflections on success and prestige in the British New Music Network

    OpenAIRE

    Malcomson, Hettie

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to established musicians, lesser-known composers have received scant attention in art music scholarship. This article, based on an ethnographic study, considers how a group of British composers construed ideas of success and prestige, which I analyse in terms of anthropological writings on exchange, Bourdieusian symbolic economies, and Foucauldian notions of disciplinary power. Prestige was ascribed to composers who created ‘interesting’ music, a category that eclipsed novelty as ...

  9. Increased cortical curvature reflects white matter atrophy in individual patients with early multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Deppe

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Whole-brain-averaged cortical extrinsic curvature appears to be a specific and quantitative marker for a WMV–cortex disproportionality and allows us to assess “pure” WMA without being confounded by intracranial volume. WMA seems to be a characteristic symptom in early MS and can already occur in patients with CIS and should thus be considered in future MS research and clinical studies.

  10. Individual Consumer Food Localism: A Review Anchored in Canadian Farmwomen's Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Lynn; Rondeau, Krista

    2011-01-01

    Local food movements have emerged in many parts of Canada to support local farmers, sustain the regional food supply, encourage the consumption of healthier foods, and address environmental concerns associated with conventional agriculture. The implementation of food localism to date, however, has remained primarily the responsibility of…

  11. Children's Eye-Movements during Reading Reflect the Quality of Lexical Representations: An Individual Differences Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Steven G.; Henderson, John M.; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    The lexical quality hypothesis (Perfetti & Hart, 2002) suggests that skilled reading requires high-quality lexical representations. In children, these representations are still developing, and it has been suggested that this development leads to more adult-like eye-movement behavior during the reading of connected text. To test this idea, a…

  12. Native-likeness in second language lexical categorization reflects individual language history and linguistic community norms

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin D Zinszer; Malt, Barbara C.; Ameel, Eef; LI, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Second language learners face a dual challenge in vocabulary learning: First, they must learn new names for the 100s of common objects that they encounter every day. Second, after some time, they discover that these names do not generalize according to the same rules used in their first language. Lexical categories frequently differ between languages (Malt et al., 1999), and successful language learning requires that bilinguals learn not just new words but new patterns for labeling objects. I...

  13. Drama and Spirituality: reflective connections

    OpenAIRE

    Grainger, Teresa; Kendall-Seatter, Sue

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates the powerful role that drama can play in facilitating spiritual development. The opportunities offered through the experience of improvisation are explored through a detailed examination of a single drama session. The children's engagement in and reflection upon the drama are seen as sensitive vehicles to build a sense of community, increase self-knowledge, develop empathy, search for meaning and purpose and experience a sense of the transcendent. Examples are given of ...

  14. REFLECTION IN RUSSIAN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, J.M.C.; Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    The present article explores the theoretical underpinnings upon which Russian psychologists base their analysis of reflection. The intention is to arrive at a clearer understanding of their research aims and research methods, and to explore the relevance of their research to educational practice. The discussion is largely restricted to those studies which are significant for education and educational psychology. The reader will no doubt notice that most of the sources cited in the article dat...

  15. Reflection positivity in simplicial gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Within the context of piecewise linear manifolds we establish reflection positivity with a Hilbert action given in terms of the Regge curvature and a cosmological term. Using this positivity a Hilbert space for a quantum theory is constructed and some field operators and observables are given. The set-up allows to introduce time reversal though no time exists. All constructions are non-perturbative.

  16. Crossing the threshold into reflective practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Encouraging reflective practice across postgraduate programmes for health professionals is challenging. Assessing reflections and determining the level of reflective practice reached can be difficult. Understanding reflection as a threshold concept may be useful to help meet the pedagogical challenges of such a valuable skill.

  17. Temporal processes involved in simultaneous reflection masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Reflection masking refers to the specific masking condition where a test reflection is masked by the direct sound. Employing reflection masking techniques, Buchholz [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 2484 (2005)] provided evidence that the binaural system suppresses the test reflection for very short refl...

  18. Advocating Students’Individual Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任锡平

    2014-01-01

    A new approach formed with the application of modern teaching facilities makes English teaching and learning more collaborative and individualized through using computers, the Internet, and multimedia. Therefore, students ’individual English learning, teaching and learning environment, and conditions that students need in their individual learning are discussed.

  19. Planar Para Algebras, Reflection Positivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    We define the notion of a planar para algebra, which arises naturally from combining planar algebras with the idea of $\\Z_{N}$ para symmetry in physics. A subfactor planar para algebra is a Hilbert space representation of planar tangles with parafermionic defects, that are invariant under isotopy. For each $\\Z_{N}$, we construct a family of subfactor planar para algebras which play the role of Temperley-Lieb-Jones planar algebras. The first example in this family is the parafermion planar para algebra. Based on this example, we introduce parafermion Pauli matrices, quaternion relations, and braided relations for parafermion algebras which one can use in the study of quantum information. Two different reflections play an important role in the theory of planar para algebras. One is the adjoint operator; the other is the modular conjugation in Tomita-Takesaki theory. We use the latter one to define the double algebra and to introduce reflection positivity. We give a new and geometric proof of reflection positivi...

  20. Individual health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The German statutory health insurance (GKV reimburses all health care services that are deemed sufficient, appropriate, and efficient. According to the German Medical Association (BÄK, individual health services (IGeL are services that are not under liability of the GKV, medically necessary or recommendable or at least justifiable. They have to be explicitly requested by the patient and have to be paid out of pocket. Research questions: The following questions regarding IGeL in the outpatient health care of GKV insurants are addressed in the present report: What is the empirical evidence regarding offers, utilization, practice, acceptance, and the relation between physician and patient, as well as the economic relevance of IGeL? What ethical, social, and legal aspects are related to IGeL? For two of the most common IGeL, the screening for glaucoma and the screening for ovarian and endometrial cancer by vaginal ultrasound (VUS, the following questions are addressed: What is the evidence for the clinical effectiveness? Are there sub-populations for whom screening might be beneficial? Methods: The evaluation is divided into two parts. For the first part a systematic literature review of primary studies and publications concerning ethical, social and legal aspects is performed. In the second part, rapid assessments of the clinical effectiveness for the two examples, glaucoma and VUS screening, are prepared. Therefore, in a first step, HTA-reports and systematic reviews are searched, followed by a search for original studies published after the end of the research period of the most recent HTA-report included. Results: 29 studies were included for the first question. Between 19 and 53% of GKV members receive IGeL offers, of which three-quarters are realised. 16 to 19% of the insurants ask actively for IGeL. Intraocular tension measurement is the most common single IGeL service, accounting for up to 40% of the offers. It is followed by