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Sample records for biochemical evolution iii

  1. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  2. In silico evolution of biochemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Paul

    2010-03-01

    We use computational evolution to select models of genetic networks that can be built from a predefined set of parts to achieve a certain behavior. Selection is made with the help of a fitness defining biological functions in a quantitative way. This fitness has to be specific to a process, but general enough to find processes common to many species. Computational evolution favors models that can be built by incremental improvements in fitness rather than via multiple neutral steps or transitions through less fit intermediates. With the help of these simulations, we propose a kinetic view of evolution, where networks are rapidly selected along a fitness gradient. This mathematics recapitulates Darwin's original insight that small changes in fitness can rapidly lead to the evolution of complex structures such as the eye, and explain the phenomenon of convergent/parallel evolution of similar structures in independent lineages. We will illustrate these ideas with networks implicated in embryonic development and patterning of vertebrates and primitive insects.

  3. Galapagos III World Evolution Summit: why evolution matters

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2013-01-01

    There is no place on Earth like the Galapagos Islands and no better destination to discuss the reality of evolution. Under the theme ‘Why Does Evolution Matter’, the University San Francisco of Quito (USFQ), Ecuador, and its Galapagos Institute for the Arts and Sciences (GAIAS), organized the III World Evolution Summit in San Cristóbal Island. The 200-attendee meeting took place on 1 to 5 June 2013; it included 12 keynote speakers, 20 oral presentations by international scholars, and 31 poste...

  4. Biochemical properties of Bacillus Calmette Guerin ribonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan-Li; Dai, Jin-Chuan; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2016-04-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is discovered to participate in the regulation of gene expression in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells. Members of ribonuclease III (RNase III) family recognize RNA motifs and cleave substrates at specific sites in a divalent-metal-ion-dependent manner. In this study, we find the RNase III from Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG-RNase III) cleaves small hairpin RNA based on the conserved stem structure associated with Mycobacterium 16S ribosomal RNA precursor at specific sites which are not determined. To evaluate the influence of remnant endogenous ribonucleases from expression host on RNA cleavage assays for RNase III, we use E44A and D48A mutant of the enzyme to perform RNA cleavage assays and find that remnant ribonucleases have no effect on cleavage assays. The RNA cleavage activity of the enzyme can be supported by Mg(2+) , Mn(2+) , and Co(2+) and enhanced with the increasing salt concentration. The catalytic activity of the enzyme is exhibited when the temperature of the reaction buffer ranges from 30 to 55 °C and the pH of the buffer from 7.0 to 10.0. Two major cleavage sites in RNA substrate are identified using RNA Ligase Mediated Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RLM-RACE). PMID:26632143

  5. Influence of Population III stars on cosmic chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Rollinde, E.; Vangioni, E.; Maurin, D.; Olive, K. A.; Daigne, F.; Silk, J.; Vincent, F.

    2008-01-01

    New observations from the Hubble ultra deep field suggest that the star formation rate at z>7 drops off faster than previously thought. Using a newly determined star formation rate for the normal mode of Population II/I stars (PopII/I), including this new constraint, we compute the Thomson scattering optical depth and find a result that is marginally consistent with WMAP5 results. We also reconsider the role of Population III stars (PopIII) in light of cosmological and stellar evolution const...

  6. Cosmic chemical evolution with intermediate mass pop III stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the consequences of an early population of intermediate mass stars (IMS) in the 2 – 8 Msun range on cosmic chemical evolution. We discuss the implications of this population as it pertains to several cosmological and astrophysical observables. Some very metal-poor galactic stars show large enhancements of carbon, typical of the C-rich ejecta of IMS; moreover, halo star carbon and oxygen abundances show a scatter, which imply a wide range of star-formation and nucleosynthetic histories contributed to the first generations of stars. Also, recent analyses of the He abundance in metal-poor extragalactic H II regions suggest an elevated primitive abundance of Helium, Yp ≅ 0.256 by mass, higher than the predicted result from big bang nucleosynthesis assuming the baryon density determined by WMAP, Yp ≅ 0.249. This offset suggests a prompt initial enrichment of He in early metal-poor structures, and IMS Pop III stars are again good candidates. We also discuss the effect of these Pop III stars on global cosmic evolution for example the reionization of the Universe. We conclude that if IMS are to be associated with some Population III stars, their relevance is limited to low mass structures involving a little fraction of the total baryon content of the Universe typical at redshift 10 [1].

  7. Biochemical Evolution of Iron and Copper Proteins, Substances Vital to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieden, Earl

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes studies in the area of biochemical evolution of iron, copper, and heme proteins to provide an historical outline. Included are lists of major kinds of proteins and enzymes and charts illustrating electron flow in a cytochrome electron transport system and interconversion of jerrous to ferric ion in iron metabolism. (CC)

  8. Domestic light water reactor fuel design evolution. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume III of this report examines the design evolution of domestic light water reactor fuel. The fuel of each vendor is individually described. Tables and figures detail the fuel's design parameters. A data base of this nature is required for the design of an underwater fuel disassembly and rod storage system. An assessment of fuel failure mechanisms and fuel performance is presented showing that spent fuel pool operational problems will be minimal or nonexistent. A summary and projection of spent fuel discharges, organized by reactor and fuel design type, is included to show the magnitude and composition of the spent fuel situation facing the nuclear industry

  9. Genes encoding Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase from various plants: identification, biochemical functions, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Yuan, Jin-Hong; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min; Gao, Wu-Jun

    2016-09-01

    ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase catalyzes the C8 desaturation of a long chain base, which is the characteristic structure of various complex sphingolipids. The genes of 20 ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases from 12 plants were identified and functionally detected by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae system to elucidate the relationship between the biochemical function and evolution of this enzyme. Results showed that the 20 genes all can encode a functional ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase, which catalyzes different ratios of two products, namely, 8(Z) and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine. The coded enzymes could be divided into two groups on the basis of biochemical functions: ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for an E-isomer product and ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for a Z-isomer product. The conversion rate of the latter was generally lower than that of the former. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 20 desaturases could also be clustered into two groups, and this grouping is consistent with that of the biochemical functions. Thus, the biochemical function of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase is correlated with its evolution. The two groups of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases could arise from distinct ancestors in higher plants. However, they might have initially evolved from ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in lower organisms, such as yeasts, which can produce E-isomer products only. Furthermore, almost all of the transgenic yeasts harboring ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase genes exhibit an improvement in aluminum tolerance. Our study provided new insights into the biochemical function and evolution of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in plants. PMID:27294968

  10. Evolution of long-term coloration trends with biochemically unstable ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Dawn M; Belloni, Virginia; Davis, Sarah N; Morrison, Erin S; Andrews, John E; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2016-05-25

    The evolutionarily persistent and widespread use of carotenoid pigments in animal coloration contrasts with their biochemical instability. Consequently, evolution of carotenoid-based displays should include mechanisms to accommodate or limit pigment degradation. In birds, this could involve two strategies: (i) evolution of a moult immediately prior to the mating season, enabling the use of particularly fast-degrading carotenoids and (ii) evolution of the ability to stabilize dietary carotenoids through metabolic modification or association with feather keratins. Here, we examine evolutionary lability and transitions between the two strategies across 126 species of birds. We report that species that express mostly unmodified, fast-degrading, carotenoids have pre-breeding moults, and a particularly short time between carotenoid deposition and the subsequent breeding season. Species that expressed mostly slow-degrading carotenoids in their plumage accomplished this through increased metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids, and the selective expression of these slow-degrading compounds. In these species, the timing of moult was not associated with carotenoid composition of plumage displays. Using repeated samples from individuals of one species, we found that metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids significantly slowed their degradation between moult and breeding season. Thus, the most complex and colourful ornamentation is likely the most biochemically stable in birds, and depends less on ecological factors, such as moult timing and migration tendency. We suggest that coevolution of metabolic modification, selective expression and biochemical stability of plumage carotenoids enables the use of unstable pigments in long-term evolutionary trends in plumage coloration. PMID:27194697

  11. Basel III and the continuing evolution of bank capital regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ennis, Huberto M.; Price, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopted in part as a response to the 2007-08 financial crisis, the Basel III accord is the most recent revision to international capital standards for banks. Basel III primarily relies on methods similar to those of Basel II for assessing the relative risks of different types of assets. The main focus of the changes in Basel III, rather, is to increase banks' equity capital requirements. This emphasis is a reflection of the conclusions drawn from the crisis: that bank fragility is more preval...

  12. Hybrid Differential Evolution for Estimation of Kinetic Parameters for Biochemical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chao; XU Qiaoling; LIN Siming; LI Xuelai

    2013-01-01

    Determination of the optimal model parameters for biochemical systems is a time consuming iterative process.In this study,a novel hybrid differential evolution(DE)algorithm based on the differential evolution technique and a local search strategy is developed for solving kinetic parameter estimation problems.By combining the merits of DE with Gauss-Newton method,the proposed hybrid approach employs a DE algorithm for identifying promising regions of the solution space followed by use of Gauss-Newton method to determine the optimum in the identified regions.Some well-known benchmark estimation problems are utilized to test the efficiency and the robustness of the proposed algorithm compared to other methods in literature.The comparison indicates that the present hybrid algorithm outperforms other estimation techniques in terms of the global searching ability and the convergence speed.Additionally,the estimation of kinetic model parameters for a feed batch fermentor is carried out to test the applicability of the proposed algorithm.The result suggests that the method can be used to estimate suitable values of model parameters for a complex mathematical model.

  13. Impact of Population~III binaries on early cosmic evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Jeon, Myoungwon; Woosley, Stan

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of the stellar feedback from Pop~III binaries by employing improved, more realistic Pop~III evolutionary stellar models. To facilitate a meaningful comparison, we consider a fixed mass of 60 solar masses (Msun) incorporated in Pop~III stars, either contained in a single star, or split up in binary stars of 30 Msun each or an asymmetric case of one 45 Msun and one 15 Msun star. Whereas the sizes of the resulting HII regions are comparable across all cases, the HeIII regions around binary stars are significantly smaller than that of the single star. Consequently, the He$^{+}$ 1640 angstrom recombination line is expected to become much weaker. Supernova feedback exhibits great variety due to the uncertainty in possible explosion pathways. If at least one of the component stars dies as a hypernova about ten times more energetic than conventional core-collapse supernovae, the gas inside the host minihalo is effectively blown out, chemically enriching the intergalactic medium (IGM) to an aver...

  14. Hydrogen Evolution from Water Coupled with the Oxidation of As(III) in a Photocatalytic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian-Ping; Wu, Dan-Dan; Bao, Shao-Kui; Luo, Jinming; Luo, Xu-Biao; Lei, Si-Liang; Liu, Hui-Long; Du, Hong-Mei; Luo, Sheng-Lian; Au, Chak-Tong; Suib, Steven L

    2015-12-30

    A series of heterostructured CdS/Sr2(Nb17/18Zn1/18)2O7-δ composites with excellent photocatalytic ability for simultaneous hydrogen evolution and As(III) oxidation under simulated sunlight were synthesized and characterized. Among them, 30% CdS/Sr2(Nb17/18Zn1/18)2O7-δ (30CSNZO) has the highest in activity, exhibiting a H2 production rate of 1669.1 μmol·h(-1)·g(-1) that is higher than that of many photocatalysts recently reported in the literature. At pH 9, As(III) is completely oxidized to As(V) over 30CSNZO in 30 min of irradiation of simulated sunlight. In the photocatalytic system, H2 production rate decreases with the increase of As(III) concentration, and the recycle experiments show that 30CSNZO exhibits excellent stability, durability, and recyclability for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and As(III) oxidation. We propose a mechanism in which superoxide radical (·O2(-)) is the active species for As(III) oxidation and the oxidation of As(III) has an effect on hydrogen evolution. For the first time, it is demonstrated that simultaneous hydrogen evolution and arsenite oxidation is possible in a photocatalytic system. PMID:26650610

  15. Biochemical evolution II: origin of life in tubular microstructures on weathered feldspar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, I; Lee, M R; Smith, J V

    1998-12-22

    Mineral surfaces were important during the emergence of life on Earth because the assembly of the necessary complex biomolecules by random collisions in dilute aqueous solutions is implausible. Most silicate mineral surfaces are hydrophilic and organophobic and unsuitable for catalytic reactions, but some silica-rich surfaces of partly dealuminated feldspars and zeolites are organophilic and potentially catalytic. Weathered alkali feldspar crystals from granitic rocks at Shap, north west England, contain abundant tubular etch pits, typically 0.4-0.6 microm wide, forming an orthogonal honeycomb network in a surface zone 50 microm thick, with 2-3 x 10(6) intersections per mm2 of crystal surface. Surviving metamorphic rocks demonstrate that granites and acidic surface water were present on the Earth's surface by approximately 3.8 Ga. By analogy with Shap granite, honeycombed feldspar has considerable potential as a natural catalytic surface for the start of biochemical evolution. Biomolecules should have become available by catalysis of amino acids, etc. The honeycomb would have provided access to various mineral inclusions in the feldspar, particularly apatite and oxides, which contain phosphorus and transition metals necessary for energetic life. The organized environment would have protected complex molecules from dispersion into dilute solutions, from hydrolysis, and from UV radiation. Sub-micrometer tubes in the honeycomb might have acted as rudimentary cell walls for proto-organisms, which ultimately evolved a lipid lid giving further shelter from the hostile outside environment. A lid would finally have become a complete cell wall permitting detachment and flotation in primordial "soup." Etch features on weathered alkali feldspar from Shap match the shape of overlying soil bacteria. PMID:9860941

  16. THE EVOLUTION OF SOME BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN THE HONEYBEES’ HAEMOLYMPH (A. M. CARPATHICA COLLECTED IN THE INACTIVE SEASON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGRIPINA SAPCALIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical analyses of the blood are largely used for the routine diagnosis and especially for the metabolic survey in farm animals. These facts conduct us to the idea that similar analyses, applied on honeybee hemolymph, could be used IN monitoring the healthy state of honeybee colonies. The present studies represent preliminary researches, which aimed to investigate the variability of the main biochemical parameters in the hemolymph of the healthy honeybees (Apis mellifera in inactive season. The researches were carried out on honeybee samples collected from 5 honeybee colonies belonging to a breeding apiary of the Institute for Beekeeping Research and Development from Bucharest. In order to perform the biochemical analyses, the honeybees samples, consisting in 50 individuals on sample (10 individuals/colony were randomly collected and their haemolimph collected, at different time intervals, in inactive season (fall-winter. Totally, there were collected 250 haemolyph samples in a 2 years interval and the following 21 biochemical parameters were analysed: GLU, HDL-c, ALP, T-cho, Tprot, Alb., BUN, LDH, CPK,, Mg, IP, GGT, GOT, GPT, Ca, Cre,, Amy, T–BIL, TG, UA.. The test was carried out after the collection and processing of the samples using the SPOTCHEM EZSP4430, equipment with dry kits, the slides technique, respectively .During the 2nd part of the inactive season, the values of most biochemical parameters increase in different proportions, their levels being maintained also in the first part of the active seasons (April, May, June.The values obtained for the main studied biochemical parameters in the haemolymph of the healthy honeybees collected from honeybee colonies kept in natural conditions show a highly variable evolution in the two consecutive years of experiments during the inactive season.

  17. Cell wall-bound cationic and anionic class III isoperoxidases of pea root: biochemical characterization and function in root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavica, Biljana M; Veljovicc-Jovanovicc, Sonja D; Menckhoff, Ljiljana; Lüthje, Sabine

    2012-07-01

    Cell wall isolated from pea roots was used to separate and characterize two fractions possessing class III peroxidase activity: (i) ionically bound proteins and (ii) covalently bound proteins. Modified SDS-PAGE separated peroxidase isoforms by their apparent molecular weights: four bands of 56, 46, 44, and 41kDa were found in the ionically bound fraction (iPOD) and one band (70kDa) was resolved after treatment of the cell wall with cellulase and pectinase (cPOD). Isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns for iPODs and cPODs were significantly different: five iPODs with highly cationic pI (9.5-9.2) were detected, whereas the nine cPODs were anionic with pI values between pH 3.7 and 5. iPODs and cPODs showed rather specific substrate affinity and different sensitivity to inhibitors, heat, and deglycosylation treatments. Peroxidase and oxidase activities and their IEF patterns for both fractions were determined in different zones along the root and in roots of different ages. New iPODs with pI 9.34 and 9.5 were induced with root growth, while the activity of cPODs was more related to the formation of the cell wall in non-elongating tissue. Treatment with auxin that inhibits root growth led to suppression of iPOD and induction of cPOD. A similar effect was obtained with the widely used elicitor, chitosan, which also induced cPODs with pI 5.3 and 5.7, which may be specifically related to pathogen defence. The differences reported here between biochemical properties of cPOD and iPOD and their differential induction during development and under specific treatments implicate that they are involved in specific and different physiological processes. PMID:22760472

  18. Mutualistic co-evolution of type III effector genes in Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Kimbrel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Two diametric paradigms have been proposed to model the molecular co-evolution of microbial mutualists and their eukaryotic hosts. In one, mutualist and host exhibit an antagonistic arms race and each partner evolves rapidly to maximize their own fitness from the interaction at potential expense of the other. In the opposing model, conflicts between mutualist and host are largely resolved and the interaction is characterized by evolutionary stasis. We tested these opposing frameworks in two lineages of mutualistic rhizobia, Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To examine genes demonstrably important for host-interactions we coupled the mining of genome sequences to a comprehensive functional screen for type III effector genes, which are necessary for many Gram-negative pathogens to infect their hosts. We demonstrate that the rhizobial type III effector genes exhibit a surprisingly high degree of conservation in content and sequence that is in contrast to those of a well characterized plant pathogenic species. This type III effector gene conservation is particularly striking in the context of the relatively high genome-wide diversity of rhizobia. The evolution of rhizobial type III effectors is inconsistent with the molecular arms race paradigm. Instead, our results reveal that these loci are relatively static in rhizobial lineages and suggest that fitness conflicts between rhizobia mutualists and their host plants have been largely resolved.

  19. Adaptative biochemical pathways and regulatory networks in Klebsiella oxytoca BAS-10 producing a biotechnologically relevant exopolysaccharide during Fe(III-citrate fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallo Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bacterial strain previously isolated from pyrite mine drainage and named BAS-10 was tentatively identified as Klebsiella oxytoca. Unlikely other enterobacteria, BAS-10 is able to grow on Fe(III-citrate as sole carbon and energy source, yielding acetic acid and CO2 coupled with Fe(III reduction to Fe(II and showing unusual physiological characteristics. In fact, under this growth condition, BAS-10 produces an exopolysaccharide (EPS having a high rhamnose content and metal-binding properties, whose biotechnological applications were proven as very relevant. Results Further phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rDNA sequence, definitively confirmed that BAS-10 belongs to K. oxytoca species. In order to rationalize the biochemical peculiarities of this unusual enterobacteriun, combined 2D-Differential Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE analysis and mass spectrometry procedures were used to investigate its proteomic changes: i under aerobic or anaerobic cultivation with Fe(III-citrate as sole carbon source; ii under anaerobic cultivations using Na(I-citrate or Fe(III-citrate as sole carbon source. Combining data from these differential studies peculiar levels of outer membrane proteins, key regulatory factors of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and enzymes involved in TCA cycle and sugar biosynthesis or required for citrate fermentation and stress response during anaerobic growth on Fe(III-citrate were revealed. The protein differential regulation seems to ensure efficient cell growth coupled with EPS production by adapting metabolic and biochemical processes in order to face iron toxicity and to optimize energy production. Conclusion Differential proteomics provided insights on the molecular mechanisms necessary for anaeorobic utilization of Fe(III-citrate in a biotechnologically promising enterobacteriun, also revealing genes that can be targeted for the rational design of high-yielding EPS producer strains.

  20. Evolution of [O III] λ5007 Emission-line Profiles in Narrow Emission-line Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Mao, Y. F.; Wei, J. Y.

    2011-11-01

    The active galactic nucleus (AGN)-host co-evolution issue is investigated here by focusing on the evolution of the [O III] λ5007 emission-line profile. A large sample of narrow emission-line galaxies is selected from the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics/Johns Hopkins University Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 catalog to simultaneously measure both the [O III] line profile and circumnuclear stellar population in an individual spectrum. By requiring that (1) the [O III] line signal-to-noise ratio is larger than 30 and (2) the [O III] line width is larger than the instrumental resolution by a factor of two, our sample is narrowed down to 2333 Seyfert galaxies/LINERs (AGNs), 793 transition galaxies, and 190 star-forming galaxies. In addition to the commonly used profile parameters (i.e., line centroid, relative velocity shift, and velocity dispersion), two dimensionless shape parameters, skewness and kurtosis, are used to quantify the line shape deviation from a pure Gaussian function. We show that the transition galaxies are systematically associated with narrower line widths and weaker [O III] broad wings than the AGNs, which implies that the kinematics of emission-line gas are different in the two kinds of objects. By combining the measured host properties and line shape parameters, we find that the AGNs with stronger blue asymmetries tend to be associated with younger stellar populations. However, a similar trend is not identified in the transition galaxies. The failure likely results from a selection effect in which the transition galaxies are systematically associated with younger stellar populations than the AGNs. The evolutionary significance revealed here suggests that both narrow-line region kinematics and outflow feedback in AGNs co-evolve with their host galaxies.

  1. EVOLUTION OF [O III] λ5007 EMISSION-LINE PROFILES IN NARROW EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The active galactic nucleus (AGN)-host co-evolution issue is investigated here by focusing on the evolution of the [O III] λ5007 emission-line profile. A large sample of narrow emission-line galaxies is selected from the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics/Johns Hopkins University Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 catalog to simultaneously measure both the [O III] line profile and circumnuclear stellar population in an individual spectrum. By requiring that (1) the [O III] line signal-to-noise ratio is larger than 30 and (2) the [O III] line width is larger than the instrumental resolution by a factor of two, our sample is narrowed down to 2333 Seyfert galaxies/LINERs (AGNs), 793 transition galaxies, and 190 star-forming galaxies. In addition to the commonly used profile parameters (i.e., line centroid, relative velocity shift, and velocity dispersion), two dimensionless shape parameters, skewness and kurtosis, are used to quantify the line shape deviation from a pure Gaussian function. We show that the transition galaxies are systematically associated with narrower line widths and weaker [O III] broad wings than the AGNs, which implies that the kinematics of emission-line gas are different in the two kinds of objects. By combining the measured host properties and line shape parameters, we find that the AGNs with stronger blue asymmetries tend to be associated with younger stellar populations. However, a similar trend is not identified in the transition galaxies. The failure likely results from a selection effect in which the transition galaxies are systematically associated with younger stellar populations than the AGNs. The evolutionary significance revealed here suggests that both narrow-line region kinematics and outflow feedback in AGNs co-evolve with their host galaxies.

  2. Terminal reassortment drives the quantum evolution of type III effectors in bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stavrinides

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens employ a type III secretion system to deliver type III secreted effectors (T3SEs into host cells, where they interact directly with host substrates to modulate defense pathways and promote disease. This interaction creates intense selective pressures on these secreted effectors, necessitating rapid evolution to overcome host surveillance systems and defenses. Using computational and evolutionary approaches, we have identified numerous mosaic and truncated T3SEs among animal and plant pathogens. We propose that these secreted virulence genes have evolved through a shuffling process we have called "terminal reassortment." In terminal reassortment, existing T3SE termini are mobilized within the genome, creating random genetic fusions that result in chimeric genes. Up to 32% of T3SE families in species with relatively large and well-characterized T3SE repertoires show evidence of terminal reassortment, as compared to only 7% of non-T3SE families. Terminal reassortment may permit the near instantaneous evolution of new T3SEs and appears responsible for major modifications to effector activity and function. Because this process plays a more significant role in the evolution of T3SEs than non-effectors, it provides insight into the evolutionary origins of T3SEs and may also help explain the rapid emergence of new infectious agents.

  3. Evolution, biogeography, and systematics of Puriana: evolution and speciation in Ostracoda, III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.

    1987-01-01

    Three types of geographic isolation - land barriers, deep water barriers, and climatic barriers - resulted in three distinct evolutionary responses in Neogene and Quaternary species of the epineritic ostracode genus Puriana. Through systematic, paleobiogeographic, and morphologic study of several hundred fossil and Recent populations from the eastern Pacific, western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean, the phylogeny of the genus and the geography of speciation events were determined. Isolation of large populations by the Isthumus of Panama during the Pliocene did not lead to lineage splitting in species known to have existed before the Isthmus formed. Conversely, the establishment of small isolated populations on Caribbean islands by passive dispersal mechanisms frequently led to the evolution of new species or subspecies. Climatic changes along the southeastern United States during the Pliocene also catalyzed possible parapatric speciation as populations that immigrated to the northeastern periphery of the genus' range split to form new species. The results provide evidence that evolutionary models describing the influence of abiotic events on patterns of evolution and speciation can be tested using properly selected tectonic and climatic events and fossil groups amenable to species-level analysis. Two new species, P. bajaensis and P. paikensis, are described. -Author

  4. Cold adaptation of a mesophilic cellulase, EG III from Trichoderma reesei, by directed evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO; Zhizhuang(肖志壮); WANG; Pan(王攀); QU; Yinbo(曲音波); GAO; Peiji(高培基); WANG; Tianhong(汪天虹)

    2002-01-01

    Cold-active enzymes have received little research attention although they are very useful in industries. Since the structure bases of cold adaptation of enzymes are still unclear, it is also very difficult to obtain cold-adapted enzymes for industrial applications using routine protein engineering methods. In this work, we employed directed evolution method to randomly mutate a mesophilic cellulase, endoglucanase III (EG III) from Trichoderma reesei, and obtained a cold- adapted mutant, designated as w-3. DNA sequence analysis indicates that w-3 is a truncated form of native EG III with a deletion of 25 consecutive amino acids at C-terminus. Further examination of enzymatic kinetics and thermal stability shows that mutant w-3 has a higher Kcat value and becomes more thermolabile than its parent. In addition, activation energies of w-3 and wild type EG III calculated from Arrhenius equation are 13.3 kJ@mol-1 and 26.2 kJ@mol-1, respectively. Therefore, the increased specific activity of w-3 at lower temperatures could result from increased Kcat value and decreased activation energy.

  5. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L; Pforr, Janine; Saglia, Roberto P; Bender, Ralf; Tojeiro, Rita; Chen, Yan-Mei; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R; Johansson, Jonas; Leauthaud, Alexie; Nichol, Robert C; Schneider, Donald P; Senger, Robert; Skibba, Ramin; Wake, David; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Shelden, Alaina; Ebelke, Garrett

    2014-01-01

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ~180,000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.12sigma significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z~0.7 up to z>2 as Mdyn/Mstar~ (1+z)^{-0.30+/- 0.12} further strengthening the evidence for an increase of Mdyn/Mstar with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  6. Modular evolution of glutathione peroxidase genes in association with different biochemical properties of their encoded proteins in invertebrate animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zo Young-Gun

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidases (PHGPx, the most abundant isoforms of GPx families, interfere directly with hydroperoxidation of lipids. Biochemical properties of these proteins vary along with their donor organisms, which has complicated the phylogenetic classification of diverse PHGPx-like proteins. Despite efforts for comprehensive analyses, the evolutionary aspects of GPx genes in invertebrates remain largely unknown. Results We isolated GPx homologs via in silico screening of genomic and/or expressed sequence tag databases of eukaryotic organisms including protostomian species. Genes showing strong similarity to the mammalian PHGPx genes were commonly found in all genomes examined. GPx3- and GPx7-like genes were additionally detected from nematodes and platyhelminths, respectively. The overall distribution of the PHGPx-like proteins with different biochemical properties was biased across taxa; selenium- and glutathione (GSH-dependent proteins were exclusively detected in platyhelminth and deuterostomian species, whereas selenium-independent and thioredoxin (Trx-dependent enzymes were isolated in the other taxa. In comparison of genomic organization, the GSH-dependent PHGPx genes showed a conserved architectural pattern, while their Trx-dependent counterparts displayed complex exon-intron structures. A codon for the resolving Cys engaged in reductant binding was found to be substituted in a series of genes. Selection pressure to maintain the selenocysteine codon in GSH-dependent genes also appeared to be relaxed during their evolution. With the dichotomized fashion in genomic organizations, a highly polytomic topology of their phylogenetic trees implied that the GPx genes have multiple evolutionary intermediate forms. Conclusion Comparative analysis of invertebrate GPx genes provides informative evidence to support the modular pathways of GPx evolution, which have been accompanied with sporadic

  7. Improved Differential Evolution Algorithm for Parameter Estimation to Improve the Production of Biochemical Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuii Khim Chong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an improved Differential Evolution algorithm (IDE which aims at improving its performance in estimating the relevant parameters for metabolic pathway data to simulate glycolysis pathway for yeast. Metabolic pathway data are expected to be of significant help in the development of efficient tools in kinetic modeling and parameter estimation platforms. Many computation algorithms face obstacles due to the noisy data and difficulty of the system in estimating myriad of parameters, and require longer computational time to estimate the relevant parameters. The proposed algorithm (IDE in this paper is a hybrid of a Differential Evolution algorithm (DE and a Kalman Filter (KF. The outcome of IDE is proven to be superior than Genetic Algorithm (GA and DE. The results of IDE from experiments show estimated optimal kinetic parameters values, shorter computation time and increased accuracy for simulated results compared with other estimation algorithms

  8. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priolisi, Ornella, E-mail: ornella.priolisi@depretto.gov.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Fabrizi, Alberto, E-mail: fabrizi@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Deon, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.deon@depretto-vi.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Bonollo, Franco, E-mail: bonollo@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Cattini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cattini@unimore.it [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering Enzo Ferrari (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  9. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  10. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Senger, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L.; Pforr, Janine; Tojeiro, Rita; Johansson, Jonas; Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Chen, Yan-Mei; Wake, David [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Leauthaud, Alexie [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Skibba, Ramin [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Pan, Kaike, E-mail: beifiori@mpe.mpg.de [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ∼180, 000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.6. The typical stellar mass of this sample is M{sub *} ∼2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}. We analyze the evolution of the galaxy parameters effective radius, stellar velocity dispersion, and the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift. As the effective radii of BOSS galaxies at these redshifts are not well resolved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging we calibrate the SDSS size measurements with Hubble Space Telescope/COSMOS photometry for a sub-sample of galaxies. We further apply a correction for progenitor bias to build a sample which consists of a coeval, passively evolving population. Systematic errors due to size correction and the calculation of dynamical mass are assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. At fixed stellar or dynamical mass, we find moderate evolution in galaxy size and stellar velocity dispersion, in agreement with previous studies. We show that this results in a decrease of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift at >2σ significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data, we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z ∼ 0.7 up to z > 2 as M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} ∼(1 + z){sup –0.30±0.12}, further strengthening the evidence for an increase of M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated type III collagen degradation as a novel serological biochemical marker for liver fibrogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, Sanne S; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Barascuk, Natasha;

    2010-01-01

    During fibrogenesis in the liver, in which excessive remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs, both the quantity of type III collagen (CO3) and levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9, increase significantly. MMPs play major roles in ECM remodelling, via their...... activity in the proteolytic degradation of extracellular macromolecules such as collagens, resulting in the generation of specific cleavage fragments. These neo-epitopes may be used as markers of fibrosis....

  12. Structural and biochemical characterization of SrcA, a multi-cargo type III secretion chaperone in Salmonella required for pathogenic association with a host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Cooper

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2 is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 A revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2 and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  13. The evolution of increased competitive ability, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons act in concert for a tropical invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rui-Min; Zheng, Yu-Long; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Callaway, Ragan M; Barclay, Gregor F; Pereyra, Carlos Silva; Feng, Yu-Long

    2013-02-01

    There are many non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for exotic invasions but few studies have concurrently tested more than one hypothesis for the same species. Here, we tested the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis in two common garden experiments in which Chromolaena odorata plants originating from native and nonnative ranges were grown in competition with natives from each range, and the novel weapons hypothesis in laboratory experiments with leachates from C. odorata. Compared with conspecifics originating from the native range, C. odorata plants from the nonnative range were stronger competitors at high nutrient concentrations in the nonnative range in China and experienced far more herbivore damage in the native range in Mexico. In both China and Mexico, C. odorata was more suppressed by species native to Mexico than by species native to China. Species native to China were much more inhibited by leaf extracts from C. odorata than species from Mexico, and this difference in allelopathic effects may provide a possible explanation for the biogeographic differences in competitive ability. Our results indicate that EICA, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons may act in concert to promote invasion by C. odorata, and emphasize the importance of exploring multiple, non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for invasions. PMID:23252450

  14. Evolution of Very Massive Population III Stars with Mass Accretion from Pre-Main Sequence to Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Takuya; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of zero-metallicity Population III (Pop III) stars whose mass grows from the initial mass of $\\sim 1M_{\\odot}$ by accreting the surrounding gases. Our calculations cover a whole evolutionary stages from the pre-main sequence, via various nuclear burning stages, through the final core collapse or pair-creation instability phases. We adopt the following stellar mass-dependent accretion rates which are derived from cosmological simulations of early structure formation based on the low mass dark matter halos at redshifts $z \\sim 20$: (1) the accretion rates for the first generation (Pop III.1) stars and (2) the rates for zero-metallicity but the second generation (Pop III.2) stars which are affected by radiation from the Pop III.1 stars. For comparison, we also study the evolution with the mass-dependent accretion rates which are affected by radiatibe feedback. We show that the final mass of Pop III.1 stars can be as large as $\\sim 1000M_{\\odot}$, beyond the mass range ($140 - 300M_{\\od...

  15. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of 7 M☉ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ∼1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  16. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant plant class III chitinase from the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishisaki, Kana; Arai, Sachiko; Hamada, Tatsuro; Honda, Yuji

    2012-11-01

    A class III chitinase belonging to the GH18 family from Nepenthes alata (NaCHIT3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity toward colloidal chitin, ethylene glycol chitin, and (GlcNAc)(n) (n=5 and 6). The enzyme hydrolyzed the fourth glycosidic linkage from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)(6). The anomeric form of the products indicated it was a retaining enzyme. The colloidal chitin hydrolytic reaction displayed high activity between pH 3.9 and 6.9, but the pH optimum of the (GlcNAc)(6) hydrolytic reaction was 3.9 at 37 °C. The optimal temperature for activity was 65 °C in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 3.9). The pH optima of NaCHIT3 and NaCHIT1 might be related to their roles in chitin degradation in the pitcher fluid. PMID:23026711

  17. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Rieke, George H; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M; Wang, Yiping; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3x10^7 M_sun using [NeIII]15.56micron and optical [OIII]5007A gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3micron PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios highe...

  18. THE EVOLUTION OF SOME BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN THE HONEYBEES’ HAEMOLYMPH (A. M. CARPATHICA) COLLECTED IN THE INACTIVE SEASON

    OpenAIRE

    AGRIPINA SAPCALIU; I. RADOI; D. CONDUR; A. SICEANU; ELIZA CAUIA; CRENGUTA PAVEL

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical analyses of the blood are largely used for the routine diagnosis and especially for the metabolic survey in farm animals. These facts conduct us to the idea that similar analyses, applied on honeybee hemolymph, could be used IN monitoring the healthy state of honeybee colonies. The present studies represent preliminary researches, which aimed to investigate the variability of the main biochemical parameters in the hemolymph of the healthy honeybees (Apis mellifera) in inactive...

  19. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-19

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems. PMID:26961352

  20. Type III polyketide synthase repertoire in Zingiberaceae: computational insights into the sequence, structure and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallika, Vijayanathan; Aiswarya, Girija; Gincy, Paily Thottathil; Remakanthan, Appukuttan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    Zingiberaceae or 'ginger family' is the largest family in the order 'Zingiberales' with more than 1300 species in 52 genera, which are mostly distributed throughout Asia, tropical Africa and the native regions of America with their maximum diversity in Southeast Asia. Many of the members are important spice, medicinal or ornamental plants including ginger, turmeric, cardamom and kaempferia. These plants are distinguished for the highly valuable metabolic products, which are synthesised through phenylpropanoid pathway, where type III polyketide synthase is the key enzyme. In our present study, we used sequence, structural and evolutionary approaches to scrutinise the type III polyketide synthase (PKS) repertoire encoded in the Zingiberaceae family. Highly conserved amino acid residues in the sequence alignment and phylogram suggested strong relationships between the type III PKS members of Zingiberaceae. Sequence and structural level investigation of type III PKSs showed a small number of variations in the substrate binding pocket, leading to functional divergence among these PKS members. Molecular evolutionary studies indicate that type III PKSs within Zingiberaceae evolved under strong purifying selection pressure, and positive selections were rarely detected in the family. Structural modelling and protein-small molecule interaction studies on Zingiber officinale PKS 'a representative from Zingiberaceae' suggested that the protein is comparatively stable without much disorder and exhibited wide substrate acceptance. PMID:27138283

  1. The effects of stimulated star formation on the evolution of the galaxy. III - The chemical evolution of nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Steven N.; Ferrini, Federico; Palla, Francesco

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of models for star formation in galaxies with disk and halo components is discussed. Two phases for the halo (gas and stars) and three for the disk (including clouds) are used in these calculations. The star-formation history is followed using nonlinear phase-coupling models which completely determine the populations of the phases as a function of time. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, including the effects of both spontaneous and stimulated star formation and mass exchange between the spatial components of the system, the observed chemical history of the galaxy can easily be obtained. The most sensitive parameter in the detailed metallicity and star-formation history for the system is the rate of return of gas to the diffuse phase upon stellar death.

  2. Effects of stimulated star formation on the evolution of the Galaxy. III. The chemical evolution of nonlinear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of models for star formation in galaxies with disk and halo components is discussed. Two phases for the halo (gas and stars) and three for the disk (including clouds) are used in these calculations. The star-formation history is followed using nonlinear phase-coupling models which completely determine the populations of the phases as a function of time. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, including the effects of both spontaneous and stimulated star formation and mass exchange between the spatial components of the system, the observed chemical history of the galaxy can easily be obtained. The most sensitive parameter in the detailed metallicity and star-formation history for the system is the rate of return of gas to the diffuse phase upon stellar death. 36 references

  3. Spectral evolution of galaxies. III - Cosmological predictions for the Space Telescope faint object camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzual A., G.

    1983-10-01

    The galactic spectral evolutionary models of Bruzual A. (1981) are employed to estimate parameters which will be observable by the wide-field camera and faint-object camera of the Space Telescope. The capabilities and bandpasses of the instruments are reviewed, and the results are presented in tables and graphs. Parameters calculated include the amplitude of the Lyman discontinuity at 912 A, stellar and galaxy rest-frame colors, color evolution, two-color diagrams as a function of redshift, luminosity evolution, surface brightness profiles, galaxy counts, and color and redshift distributions. In general, it is predicted that the space measurements will follow the trends noted in round-based observations.

  4. Effects of the variation of fundamental constants on Pop III stellar evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ekstrom, Sylvia; Coc, Alain; Descouvemont, Pierre; Meynet, Georges; Olive, Keith A.; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    A variation of the fundamental constants is expected to affect the thermonuclear rates important for stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, because of the very small resonant energies of Be8 and C12, the triple $\\alpha$ process is extremely sensitive to any such variations. Using a microscopic model for these nuclei, we derive the sensitivity of the Hoyle state to the nucleon-nucleon potential allowing for a change in the magnitude of the nuclear interaction. We follow the evolution of 15 an...

  5. Local luminous infrared galaxies. III. Co-evolution of black hole growth and star formation activity?

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of

  6. Evolution of massive population III stars with rotation and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, S -C; Langer, N

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] We present a new grid of massive population III star models including the effects of rotation on the stellar structure and chemical mixing, and magnetic torques for the transport of angular momentum. Based on the grid, we also present a phase diagram for the expected final fates of rotating massive Pop III stars. Our non-rotating models become redder than the previous models in the literature, given the larger overshooting parameter adopted in this study. In particular, convective dredge-up of the helium core material into the hydrogen envelope is observed in our non-rotating very massive star models (>~200 Msun), which is potentially important for the chemical yields. On the other hand, the stars become bluer and more luminous with a higher rotational velocity. With the Spruit-Tayler dynamo, our models with a sufficiently high initial rotational velocity can reach the critical rotation earlier and lose more mass as a result, compared to the previous models without magnetic fields. The most dramati...

  7. Non-grey hydrogen burning evolution of sub-Solar mass Population III stars

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, G J; Tennyson, S M J

    2006-01-01

    The primordial elements, H, He and Li are included in a low temperature equation of state and monochromatic opacity function. The equation of state and opacity function are incorporated into the stellar evolution code NG-ELMS, which makes use of a non-grey model atmosphere computed at runtime. NG-ELMS is used to compute stellar evolution models for primordial and lithium free element mixtures, for stars in the sub-Solar mass range 0.8--0.15 Msol. We find that lithium has little or no effect upon the structure and observable properties of of stars in this mass range. Furthermore lithium is completely destroyed by fusion before the main sequence in stars of mass less than ~0.7 Mol. We find that on the red giant branch and Hayashi track, the use of a non-grey model atmosphere to provide the upper boundary conditions for the stellar evolution calculation, results in significantly cooler less luminous stars, across the mass range

  8. Interacting Binaries with Eccentric Orbits. III. Orbital Evolution due to Direct Impact and Self-Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F A

    2010-01-01

    The rapid circularization and synchronization of the stellar components in an eccentric binary system at the onset of mass transfer is a fundamental assumption common to all binary stellar evolution and population synthesis codes, even though the validity of this assumption is questionable both theoretically and observationally. Here we calculate the evolution of the orbital elements of an eccentric binary through the direct three-body integration of a massive particle ejected through the inner Lagrangian point of the donor star at periastron. The trajectory of this particle leads to three possible outcomes: direct accretion onto the companion star within a single orbit, self-accretion back onto the donor star within a single orbit, or a quasi-periodic orbit around the companion star, possibly leading to the formation of a disk. We calculate the secular evolution of the binary orbit in the first two cases and conclude that direct impact accretion can increase as well as decrease the orbital semi-major axis an...

  9. ENTHALPY-BASED THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LOOPS. III. COMPARISON OF ZERO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic models provide a simple and quick way to study the thermal evolution of coronal loops subjected to time-dependent heating. This paper presents a comparison of a number of 0D models that have been published in the past and is intended to provide a guide for those interested in either using the old models or developing new ones. The principal difference between the models is the way the exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region, and chromosphere is treated, as plasma cycles into and out of a loop during a heating-cooling cycle. It is shown that models based on the principles of mass and energy conservation can give satisfactory results at some or, in the case of the Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops model, all stages of the loop evolution. Empirical models can have significant difficulties in obtaining accurate behavior due to invocation of assumptions incompatible with the correct exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region, and chromosphere.

  10. Chemical and biochemical strategies for the randomization of protein encoding DNA sequences: library construction methods for directed evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Neylon, Cameron

    2004-01-01

    Directed molecular evolution and combinatorial methodologies are playing an increasingly important role in the field of protein engineering. The general approach of generating a library of partially randomized genes, expressing the gene library to generate the proteins the library encodes and then screening the proteins for improved or modified characteristics has successfully been applied in the areas of protein–ligand binding, improving protein stability and modifying enzyme selectivity. A ...

  11. Evolution of the biochemical profile of children treated or undergoing treatment for moderate or severe stunting: consequences of metabolic programming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jullyana F.R. Alves

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate changes in the biochemical profile of children treated or being treated for moderate or severe stunting in a nutrition recovery and education center. METHODS: this was a retrospective longitudinal study of 263 children treated at this center between August of 2008 to August of 2011, aged 1 to 6 years, diagnosed with moderate (z-score of height-for-age [HAZ] < -2 or severe stunting (HAZ < -3. Data were collected on socioeconomic conditions, dietary habits, and biochemical changes, as well as height according to age. RESULTS: the nutritional intervention showed an increase in HAZ of children with moderate (0.51 ± 0.4, p = 0.001 and severe (0.91 ± 0.7, p = 0.001 stunting during the monitoring. Increased levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 (initial: 71.7 ng/dL; final: 90.4 ng/dL; p = 0.01 were also observed, as well as a reduction in triglycerides (TG in both severely (initial: 91.8 mg/dL; final: 79.1 mg/dL; p = 0.01 and in moderately malnourished children (initial: 109.2 mg/dL; final 88.7 mg/dL; p = 0.01, and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol HDL-C only in the third year of intervention (initial: 31.4 mg/dL; final: 42.2 mg/dL. The values of total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels remained high throughout the treatment (initial: 165.1 mg/dL; final: 163.5 mg/dL and initial: 109.0 mg/dL; final: 107.3 mg/dL, respectively. CONCLUSION: the nutritional treatment for children with short stature was effective in reducing stunting and improving TG and HDL-C after three years of intervention. However, the levels of LDL-C and TC remained high even in treated children. It is therefore speculated that these changes may result from metabolic programming due to malnutrition.

  12. Charge State Evolution in the Solar Wind. III. Model Comparison with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; van der Holst, B.

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  13. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  14. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals. III. Modelling the heat conductivity of porous chondrite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Stephan; Gail, Hans-Peter; Trieloff, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Context. The construction of models for the internal constitution and temporal evolution of large planetesimals, which are the parent bodies of chondrites, requires as accurate as possible information on the heat conductivity of the complex mixture of minerals and iron metal found in chondrites. The few empirical data points on the heat conductivity of chondritic material are severely disturbed by impact-induced microcracks modifying the thermal conductivity. Aims: We attempt to evaluate the heat conductivity of chondritic material with theoretical methods. Methods: We derived the average heat conductivity of a multi-component mineral mixture and granular medium from the heat conductivities of its mixture components. We numerically generated random mixtures of solids with chondritic composition and packings of spheres. We solved the heat conduction equation in high spatial resolution for a test cube filled with such matter. We derived the heat conductivity of the mixture from the calculated heat flux through the cube. Results: For H and L chondrites, our results are in accord with empirical thermal conductivity at zero porosity. However, the porosity dependence of heat conductivity of granular material built from chondrules and matrix is at odds with measurements for chondrites, while our calculations are consistent with data for compacted sandstone. The discrepancy is traced back to subsequent shock modification of the currently available meteoritic material resulting from impacts on the parent body over the last 4.5 Ga. This causes a structure of void space made of fractures/cracks, which lowers the thermal conductivity of the medium and acts as a barrier to heat transfer. This structure is different from the structure that probably exists in the pristine material where voids are represented by pores rather than fractures. The results obtained for the heat conductivity of the pristine material are used for calculating models for the evolution of the H chondrite

  15. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first stellar cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low metallicity (0.01 Zsun) stellar cluster in a dwarf galaxy at redshift z~14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks with the MESA code. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 Msun. Their masses range from ~0.1 Msun to 14.4 Msun with a median mass ~0.5-1 Msun. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while...

  16. POISSON project - III - Investigating the evolution of the mass accretion rate

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniucci, S; Nisini, B; Garatti, A Caratti o; Giannini, T; Lorenzetti, D

    2014-01-01

    As part of the POISSON project (Protostellar Optical-Infrared Spectral Survey on NTT), we present the results of the analysis of low-resolution NIR spectra 0.9-2.4 um) of two samples of YSOs in Lupus and Serpens (52 and 17 objects), with masses 0.1-2.0 Msun and ages from 10^5 to a few 10^7 yr. After determining the accretion parameters of the Lup and Ser targets by analysing their HI near-IR emission features, we added the results to those from previous regions (investigated in POISSON with the same methodology). We obtained a final catalogue (143 objects) of mass accretion rates (Macc) derived in a homogeneous fashion and analysed how Macc correlates with M* and how it evolves in time. We derived the accretion luminosity (Lacc) and Macc for Lup and Ser objects from the Br_gamma line by using relevant empirical relationships from the literature that connect HI line luminosity and Lacc. To minimise the biases and also for self-consistency, we re-derived mass and age for each source using the same set of evolut...

  17. Rotation in the Pleiades With K2: III. Speculations on Origins and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Stauffer, J R; Bouvier, J; Hillenbrand, L A; Cameron, A Collier; Pinsonneault, M; Aigrain, S; Barrado, D; Bouy, H; Ciardi, D; Cody, A M; David, T; Micela, G; Soderblom, D; Somers, G; Stassun, K; Valenti, J; Vrba, F

    2016-01-01

    We use high quality K2 light curves for hundreds of stars in the Pleiades to understand better the angular momentum evolution and magnetic dynamos of young, low mass stars. The K2 light curves provide not only rotational periods but also detailed information from the shape of the phased light curve not available in previous studies. A slowly rotating sequence begins at $(V-K_{\\rm s})_0\\sim$1.1 (spectral type F5) and ends at $(V-K_{\\rm s})_0\\sim$ 3.7 (spectral type K8), with periods rising from $\\sim$2 to $\\sim$11 days in that interval. Fifty-two percent of the Pleiades members in that color interval have periods within 30\\% of a curve defining the slow sequence; the slowly rotating fraction decreases significantly redward of $(V-K_{\\rm s})_0$=2.6. Nearly all of the slow-sequence stars show light curves that evolve significantly on timescales less than the K2 campaign duration. The majority of the FGK Pleiades members identified as photometric binaries are relatively rapidly rotating, perhaps because binarity ...

  18. Evolution of planetary nebulae. III. Position-velocity images of butterfly-type nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the motions of the shells of the planetary nebulae NGC 2346, NGC 2371-2, NGC 2440, NGC 6058, NGC 6210, IC 1747, IC 5217, J-320, and M2-9 are presented. These are all 'butterfly' type PNs, and show evidence for bipolar shocks. The observations are interpreted in terms of a fast spherical wind, driven by the central star into a quasi-toroidal envelope deposited earlier by the star, during its slow-wind phase on the asymptotic giant branch. It is shown that this model, which is a straightforward extension of a mechanism previously invoked to account for elliptical PNs, reproduces the essential kinematic features of butterfly PNs. It is inferred that the envelopes of butterflies must have a considerable equator-to-pole density gradient, and it is suggested that the origin of this asphericity must be sought in an as yet unknown mechanism during the AGB, Mira, or OH/IR phases of late stellar evolution. 28 references

  19. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals III. Modelling the heat conductivity of porous chondrite material

    CERN Document Server

    Henke, Stephan; Trieloff, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The construction of models for the internal constitution and the temporal evolution of large planetesimals, the parent bodies of chondrites, requires information on the heat conductivity of the complex mixture of minerals and iron metal found in chondrites. It is attempted to evaluate the heat conductivity of a multi-component mineral mixture and granular medium from the heat conductivities of its mixture components. Random mixtures of solids with chondritic composition and packings of spheres are numerically generated. The heat conduction equation is solved in high spatial resolution for a test cube filled with such matter. From the heat flux through the cube the heat conductivity of the mixture is derived. The model results for porous material are consistent with data for compacted sandstone, but are at odds with measurements for H and L chondrites. The discrepancy is traced back to shock modification of the currently available meteoritic material by impacts on the parent body over the last 4.5 Ga. This cau...

  20. Coronal hole boundaries evolution at small scales. III. EIS and SUMER views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Huang, Z.; Doyle, J. G.; Subramanian, S.

    2012-09-01

    Context. We report on the plasma properties of small-scale transient events identified in the quiet Sun, coronal holes and their boundaries. Aims: We aim at deriving the physical characteristics of events that were identified as small-scale transient brightenings in XRT images. Methods: We used spectroscopic co-observations from SUMER/SoHO and EIS/Hinode combined with high-cadence imaging data from XRT/Hinode. We measured Doppler shifts using single and multiple Gaussian fits of the transition region and coronal lines as well as electron densities and temperatures. We combined co-temporal imaging and spectroscopy to separate brightening expansions from plasma flows. Results: The transient brightening events in coronal holes and their boundaries were found to be very dynamical, producing high-density outflows at high speeds. Most of these events represent X-ray jets from pre-existing or newly emerging coronal bright points at X-ray temperatures. The average electron density of the jets is log10 Ne ≈ 8.76 cm-3 while in the flaring site it is log10 Ne ≈ 9.51 cm-3. The jet temperatures reach a maximum of 2.5 MK but in the majority of the cases the temperatures do not exceed 1.6 MK. The footpoints of jets have maximum temperatures of 2.5 MK, though in a single event scanned a minute after the flaring the measured temperature was 12 MK. The jets are produced by multiple microflaring in the transition region and corona. Chromospheric emission was only detected in their footpoints and was only associated with downflows. The Doppler shift measurements in the quiet Sun transient brightenings confirmed that these events do not produce jet-like phenomena. The plasma flows in these phenomena remain trapped in closed loops. Conclusions: We can conclude that the dynamic day-by-day and even hour-by-hour small-scale evolution of coronal hole boundaries reported in Paper I is indeed related to coronal bright points. The XRT observations reported in Paper II revealed that these

  1. Biochemical Evolution and Histological Response of Patients with Hepatitis C Undergoing Antiviral Therapy. Evolución bioquímica y respuesta histológica de pacientes con hepatitis C bajo tratamiento antiviral.

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Julián Hernández Ojeda; Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola; Orelvis Martínez Martínez; Denis Monzón Vega; Mabel Vega Galindo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C is a major health problem worldwide and the most common indicator for the need of a liver transplantation in many countries. Objective: To determine the biochemical evolution and the histological response of patients with chronic hepatitis C who were treated with ribavirin and recombinant interferon alfa-

  2. Distinct co-evolution patterns of genes associated to DNA polymerase III DnaE and PolC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelen Stefan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes displaying a strong bias between the leading and the lagging strand of DNA replication encode two DNA polymerases III, DnaE and PolC, rather than a single one. Replication is a highly unsymmetrical process, and the presence of two polymerases is therefore not unexpected. Using comparative genomics, we explored whether other processes have evolved in parallel with each polymerase. Results Extending previous in silico heuristics for the analysis of gene co-evolution, we analyzed the function of genes clustering with dnaE and polC. Clusters were highly informative. DnaE co-evolves with the ribosome, the transcription machinery, the core of intermediary metabolism enzymes. It is also connected to the energy-saving enzyme necessary for RNA degradation, polynucleotide phosphorylase. Most of the proteins of this co-evolving set belong to the persistent set in bacterial proteomes, that is fairly ubiquitously distributed. In contrast, PolC co-evolves with RNA degradation enzymes that are present only in the A+T-rich Firmicutes clade, suggesting at least two origins for the degradosome. Conclusion DNA replication involves two machineries, DnaE and PolC. DnaE co-evolves with the core functions of bacterial life. In contrast PolC co-evolves with a set of RNA degradation enzymes that does not derive from the degradosome identified in gamma-Proteobacteria. This suggests that at least two independent RNA degradation pathways existed in the progenote community at the end of the RNA genome world.

  3. Charge photo-accumulation and photocatalytic hydrogen evolution under visible light at an iridium(III)-photosensitized polyoxotungstate

    OpenAIRE

    Matt, Benjamin; Fize, Jennifer; Moussa, Jamal; Amouri, Hani; Pereira, Alexandre,; Artero, Vincent; Izzet, Guillaume; Proust, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state irradiation under visible light of a covalent Ir(III)-photosensitized polyoxotungstate is reported. In the presence of a sacrificial electron donor, the photolysis leads to the very efficient photoreduction of the polyoxometalate. Successive formation of the one-electron and two-electron reduced species, which are unambiguously identified by comparison with spectroelectrochemical measurements, is observed with a significantly faster rate reaction for the formation of the one-elec...

  4. The oxygen evolution reaction on passive oxide covered transition metal electrodes in alkaline solution. Part III - Iron.

    OpenAIRE

    LYONS, MICHAEL EDWARD

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) at passive oxide covered polycrystalline Fe electrodes in aqueous alkaline solution were examined using both dc steady state polarisation and ac impedance techniques. It proved difficult to obtain reproducible polarisation data for bright anodes, and so an electrochemical pre-treatment routine was devised. Upon ageing of a given electrode specimen, and with application of the pre-treatment regime before each experiment, it was po...

  5. The great escape - III. Placing post-main-sequence evolution of planetary and binary systems in a Galactic context

    OpenAIRE

    Veras, D.; Evans, N. W.; Wyatt, M. C.; Tout, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Our improving understanding of the life cycle of planetary systems prompts investigations of the role of the Galactic environment before, during and after Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stellar evolution. Here, we investigate the interplay between stellar mass loss, Galactic tidal perturbations, and stellar flybys for evolving stars which host one planet, smaller body or stellar binary companion and reside in the Milky Way's bulge or disc. We find that the potential evolutionary pathways from ...

  6. Evolution of newly formed dust in Population III supernova remnants and its impact on the elemental composition of Population II.5 stars

    CERN Document Server

    Nozawa, Takaya; Habe, Asao; Dwek, Eli; Umeda, Hideyuki; Tominaga, Nozomu; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of dust formed in Population III supernovae (SNe) by considering its transport and processing by sputtering within the SN remnants (SNRs). We find that the fates of dust grains within SNRs heavily depend on their initial radii $a_{\\rm ini}$. For Type II SNRs expanding into the ambient medium with density of $n_{\\rm H,0} = 1$ cm$^{-3}$, grains of $a_{\\rm ini} 0.2$ $\\mu$m are injected into the surrounding medium without being destroyed significantly. Grains with $a_{\\rm ini}$ = 0.05-0.2 $\\mu$m are finally trapped in the dense shell behind the forward shock. We show that the grains piled up in the dense shell enrich the gas up to 10$^{-6}-10^{-4}$ $Z_\\odot$, high enough to form low-mass stars with 0.1-1 $M_\\odot$. In addition, [Fe/H] in the dense shell ranges from -6 to -4.5, which is in good agreement with the ultra-metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < -4. We suggest that newly formed dust in a Population III SN can have great impacts on the stellar mass and elemental composition of P...

  7. Galaxy evolution in nearby galaxy groups - III. A GALEX view of NGC 5846, the largest group in the local universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Antonietta; Mazzei, Paola; Rampazzo, Roberto; Bianchi, Luciana

    2016-06-01

    We explore the co-evolution of galaxies in nearby groups (Vhel ≤ 3000 km s-1) with a multiwavelength approach. We analyse GALEX far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) imaging, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey u, g, r, i, z data of groups spanning a large range of dynamical phases. We characterize the photometric properties of spectroscopically confirmed galaxy members and investigate the global properties of the groups through a dynamical analysis. Here, we focus on NGC 5846, the third most massive association of early-type galaxies (ETGs) after the Virgo and Fornax clusters. The group, composed of 90 members, is dominated by ETGs (about 80 per cent), and among ETGs about 40 per cent are dwarfs. Results are compared with those obtained for three groups in the LeoII cloud, which are radically different both in member-galaxy population and dynamical properties. The FUV-NUV cumulative colour distribution and the normalized UV luminosity function (LF) significantly differ due to the different fraction of late-type galaxy population. The UV LF of NGC 5846 resembles that of the Virgo cluster, however our analysis suggests that star formation episodes are still occurring in most of the group galaxies, including ETGs. The NUV-i colour distribution, the optical-UV colour-colour diagram, and NUV-r versus Mr colour-magnitude relation suggest that the gas contribution cannot be neglected in the evolution of ETG-type group members. Our analysis highlights that NGC 5846 is still in an active phase of its evolution, notwithstanding the dominance of dwarf and bright ETGs and its virialized configuration.

  8. Evolution of lattice strain and phase transformation of β III Ti alloy during room temperature cyclic tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction cyclic tension test was carried out on a β III Ti alloy to study its micromechanical behavior and the stress-induced phase transformation. Pre-strained material showed a microscopic multi-stage re-loading behavior following the sequence of elastic deformation, stress-induced martensite (SIM) transformation, a second stage of elastic deformation followed by a final stage of SIM transformation. Based on the relationship of internal strains and diffraction intensities between the β phase and the SIM, it is concluded that after a small strain deformation, the austenite is divided into two different sets of grains with different properties. Those that previously experienced phase transformation have a lower critical stress for the SIM transformation due to residual martensite and dislocations, while the rest have a higher trigger stress and only transform to martensite after the stress is back to levels comparable to where transformation was seen in the previous cycle. The different properties within the same austenite grain family cause the multistage re-loading behavior. The reverse phase transformation during unloading was impeded by the combination of increased dislocation density in the austenite and the increased tensile strain in the martensite prior to unloading

  9. Dynamic analysis of biochemical network using complex network method

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Shuqiang; Shen Yanyan; Hu Jinxing; Li Ning; Zeng Dewei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the stochastic biochemical reaction model is proposed based on the law of mass action and complex network theory. The dynamics of biochemical reaction system is presented as a set of non-linear differential equations and analyzed at the molecular-scale. Given the initial state and the evolution rules of the biochemical reaction system, the system can achieve homeostasis. Compared with random graph, the biochemical reaction network has larger ...

  10. Galaxy evolution in nearby galaxy groups. III. A GALEX view of NGC 5846, the largest group in the local universe

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Antonietta; Rampazzo, Roberto; Bianchi, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    We explore the co-evolution of galaxies in nearby groups (V < 3000 km/s) with a multi-wavelength approach. We analyze GALEX far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) imaging and SDSS u,g,r,i,z data of groups spanning a large range of dynamical phases. We characterize the photometric properties of spectroscopically-confirmed galaxy members and investigate the global properties of the groups through a dynamical analysis. Here we focus on NGC 5846, the third most massive association of Early-Type Galaxies (ETG) after the Virgo and Fornax clusters. The group, composed of 90 members, is dominated by ETGs (about 80 per cent), and among ETGs about 40\\% are dwarfs. Results are compared with those obtained for three groups in the LeoII cloud, which are radically different both in member-galaxy population and dynamical properties. The FUV-NUV cumulative colour distribution and the normalized UV luminosity function (LF) significantly differ due to the different fraction of late-type galaxy population. The UV LF of NGC 5846 rese...

  11. The MUSIC of Galaxy Clusters III: Properties, evolution and Y-M scaling relation of protoclusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sembolini, Federico; Yepes, Gustavo; Foschi, Emma; Lamagna, Luca; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study the properties of protoclusters of galaxies by employing the MUSIC set of hydrodynamical simulations, featuring a mass-limited sample of 282 resimulated clusters with available merger trees up to high redshift, and we trace the cluster formation back to $z$ = 1.5, 2.3 and 4. We study the features and redshift evolution of the mass and the spatial distribution for all the cluster progenitors and for the protoclusters, which we define as the most massive progenitors of the clusters identified at $z$ = 0. A natural extension to redshifts larger than 1 is applied to the estimate of the baryon content also in terms of gas and stars budgets: no remarkable variations with redshift are discovered. Furthermore, motivated by the proven potential of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys to blindly search for faint distant objects, we focus on the scaling relation between total object mass and integrated Compton $y$-parameter, and we check for the possibility to extend the mass-observable paradigm to the proto...

  12. The MUSIC of Galaxy Clusters - III. Properties, evolution and Y-M scaling relation of protoclusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; De Petris, Marco; Yepes, Gustavo; Foschi, Emma; Lamagna, Luca; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we study the properties of protoclusters of galaxies by employing the MultiDark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) set of hydrodynamical simulations, featuring a sample of 282 resimulated clusters with available merger trees up to z = 4. We study the characteristics and redshift evolution of the mass and the spatial distribution for all the protoclusters, which we define as the most massive progenitors of the clusters identified at z = 0. We extend the study of the baryon content to redshifts larger than 1 also in terms of gas and stars budgets: no remarkable variations with redshift are discovered. Furthermore, motivated by the proven potential of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys to blindly search for faint distant objects, we compute the scaling relation between total object mass and integrated Compton y-parameter. We find that the slope of this scaling law is steeper than what expected for a self-similarity assumption among these objects, and it increases with redshift mainly when radiative processes are included. We use three different criteria to account for the dynamical state of the protoclusters, and find no significant dependence of the scaling parameters on the level of relaxation. We exclude the dynamical state as the cause of the observed deviations from self-similarity in protoclusters.

  13. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As(III)) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Y; Mouzourakis, E; Bourlinos, A B; Zboril, R; Karakassides, M A; Douvalis, A P; Bakas, Th; Deligiannakis, Y

    2016-07-15

    A novel hybrid material (gC3N4-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC3N4), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC3N4-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC3N4 surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20-100nm). (57)Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O2. The as-prepared gC3N4-rFe bears Fe(2+) and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O2, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC3N4-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As(III) uptake capacity of 76.5mgg(-1), i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC3N4-rFe is a superior As(III) sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11-36mgg(-1)). The present results demonstrate that the gC3N4 matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity. PMID:27037479

  14. Quantum chemistry of the oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt(ii,iii) oxide - implications for designing the optimal catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Craig P; Reuter, Karsten; van Santen, Rutger A

    2016-07-01

    Density functional theory is used to examine the changes in electronic structure that occur during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyzed by active sites on three different surface terminations of Co3O4. These three active sites have reactive oxo species with differing degrees of coordination by Co cations - a μ(3)-oxo on the (311) surface, a μ(2)-oxo on the (110)-A surface, and an η-oxo on the (110)-B surface. The kinetically relevant step on all surfaces over a wide range of applied potentials is the nucleophilic addition of water to the oxo, which is responsible for formation of the O-O bond. The intrinsic reactivity of a site for this step is found to increase as the coordination of the oxo decreases with the μ(3)-oxo on the (311) surface being the least reactive and the η-oxo on the (110)-B surface being the most reactive. A detailed analysis of the electronic changes occurring during water addition on the three sites reveals that this trend is due to both a decrease in the attractive local Madelung potential on the oxo and a decrease in electron withdrawal from the oxo by Co neighbors. Applying a similar electronic structure analysis to the oxidation steps preceding water addition in the catalytic cycle shows that analogous electronic changes occur during this process, explaining a correlation observed between the oxidation potential of a site and its intrinsic reactivity for water addition. This concept is then used to specify criteria for the design of an optimal OER catalyst at a given applied potential. PMID:27108887

  15. Chemical weathering rates of a soil chronosequence on granitic alluvium: III. Hydrochemical evolution and contemporary solute fluxes and rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Blum, A.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Although long-term changes in solid-state compositions of soil chronosequences have been extensively investigated, this study presents the first detailed description of the concurrent hydrochemical evolution and contemporary weathering rates in such sequences. The most direct linkage between weathering and hydrology over 3 million years of soil development in the Merced chronosequence in Central California relates decreasing permeability and increasing hydrologic heterogeneity to the development of secondary argillic horizons and silica duripans. In a highly permeable, younger soil (40 kyr old), pore water solutes reflect seasonal to decadal-scale variations in rainfall and evapotranspiration (ET). This climate signal is strongly damped in less permeable older soils (250 to 600 kyr old) where solutes increasingly reflect weathering inputs modified by heterogeneous flow. Elemental balances in the soils are described in terms of solid state, exchange and pore water reservoirs and input/output fluxes from precipitation, ET, biomass, solute discharge and weathering. Solute mineral nutrients are strongly dependent on biomass variations as evidenced by an apparent negative K weathering flux reflecting aggradation by grassland plants. The ratios of solute Na to other base cations progressively increase with soil age. Discharge fluxes of Na and Si, when integrated over geologic time, are comparable to solid-state mass losses in the soils, implying similar past weathering conditions. Similarities in solute and sorbed Ca/Mg ratios reflect short-term equilibrium with the exchange reservoir. Long-term consistency in solute ratios, when contrasted against progressive decreases in solid-state Ca/Mg, requires an additional Ca source, probably from dry deposition. Amorphous silica precipitates from thermodynamically-saturated pore waters during periods of high evapotranspiration and result in the formation of duripans in the oldest soils. The degree of feldspar and secondary

  16. The Tenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Christopher P; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bastien, Fabienne A; Bautista, Julian E; Beers, Timothy C; Beifiori, Alessandra; Bender, Chad F; Berlind, Andreas A; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H; Blanton, Michael R; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J; Bolton, Adam S; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, Alaina Shelden; Brandt, W N; Brauer, Dorothée; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolás G; Carithers, William; Carlberg, Joleen K; Carnero, Aurelio R; Carr, Michael A; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Crepp, Justin R; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A C; Cuesta, Antonio J; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N; Dawson, Kyle S; De Lee, Nathan; Dean, Janice D R; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L; Edmondson, Edward M; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Epstein, Courtney R; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L; Fabbian, D; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Castellá, Bruno Femen\\'\\ia; Alvar, Emma Fernández; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Galbraith-Frew, J G; Garc\\'\\ia-Hernández, D A; Pérez, Ana E Garc\\'\\ia; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R; Gillespie, Bruce A; Girardi, Léo; Hernández, Jonay I González; Gott, J Richard; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Halverson, Samuel; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Frederick R; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Holtzman, Jon A; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I; Jackson, Kelly M; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A; Kirkby, David; Kinemuchi, K; Klaene, Mark A; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koesterke, Lars; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C; Loomis, Craig P; Lucatello, Sara; Lupton, Robert H; Ma, Bo; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A G; Majewski, Steven R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L; Masters, Karen L; McBride, Cameron K; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Ménard, Brice; Mészáros, Sz; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Montesano, Francesco; More, Surhud; Morrison, Heather L; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A; Myers, Adam D; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C; Nidever, David L; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E; O'Connell, Julia E; O'Connell, Robert W; O'Connell, Ross; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel J; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K; Pâris, Isabelle; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Perottoni, Hélio Dotto; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Pinsonneault, M H; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Raddick, M Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Rebolo, Rafael; Reid, Beth A; Richards, Jonathan C; Riffel, Rogério; Robin, Annie C; Rocha-Pinto, H J; Rockosi, Constance M; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Roy, Arpita; Rubiño-Martin, J A; Sabiu, Cristiano G; Sánchez, Ariel G; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Schlegel, David J; Schlesinger, Katharine J; Schmidt, Sarah J; Schneider, Donald P; Schultheis, Mathias; Sellgren, Kris; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Simmons, Audrey E; Skrutskie, M F; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V; Snedden, Stephanie A; Sobeck, Jennifer S; Sobreira, Flavia; Stassun, Keivan G; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E C; Terrien, Ryan C; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W; Vandenberg, Jan; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Weiner, Benjamin J; White, Martin; White, Simon D M; Wilson, John C; Wisniewski, John P; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G; Zamora, O; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun

    2013-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the tenth public data release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R~22,500 300-fiber spectrograph covering 1.514--1.696 microns. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included.DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the ninth data r...

  17. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. III - The Structure and Formation of Early-type Galaxies and their Evolution since z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmans, L V E; Burles, S; Moustakas, L A; Treu, T

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a joint gravitational lensing and stellar dynamical analysis of fifteen massive field early-type galaxies, selected from the Sloan Lens (SLACS) Survey. The following numerical results are found: (i) A joint-likelihood gives an average logarithmic density slope for the total mass density of 2.01 (+0.02/-0.03) (68 perecnt C.L). inside the Einstein radius. (ii) The average position-angle difference between the light distribution and the total mass distribution is found to be 0+-3 degrees, setting an upper limit of <= 0.035 on the average external shear. (iii) The average projected dark-matter mass fraction is inferred to be 0.25+-0.06 inside R_E, using the stellar mass-to-light ratios derived from the Fundamental Plane as priors. (iv) Combined with results from the LSD Survey, we find no significant evolution of the total density slope inside one effective radius: a linear fit gives d\\gamma'/dz = 0.23+-0.16 (1-sigma) for the range z=0.08-1.01. The small scatter and absence of significant...

  18. Dynamic analysis of biochemical network using complex network method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stochastic biochemical reaction model is proposed based on the law of mass action and complex network theory. The dynamics of biochemical reaction system is presented as a set of non-linear differential equations and analyzed at the molecular-scale. Given the initial state and the evolution rules of the biochemical reaction system, the system can achieve homeostasis. Compared with random graph, the biochemical reaction network has larger information capacity and is more efficient in information transmission. This is consistent with theory of evolution.

  19. Astrophysical S-factor of the N-12(p,gamma)O-13 reaction in relation to Population III star evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banu, A.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Burjan, Václav; Carstoiu, F.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, C. A.; McCleskey, M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Zhai, Y.

    Melville : American Institute of Physics, 2008 - (O'Shea, B.; Heger, A.; Abel, T.), s. 347-349 ISBN 978-0-7354-0509-7. ISSN 0094-243X. - (AIP Conference proceedings. 990). [International Conference on First Stars III. Santa Fe (US), 15.07.2007-20.07.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Population III stars * radiative proton capture * ANC Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  20. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE FIRST GALAXIES. I. JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE DETECTION LIMITS AND COLOR CRITERIA FOR POPULATION III GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the high-redshift universe, and may be able to test the prediction that the first, chemically pristine (Population III) stars are formed with very high characteristic masses. Since isolated Population III stars are likely to be beyond the reach of JWST, small Population III galaxies may offer the best prospects of directly probing the properties of metal-free stars. Here, we present Yggdrasil, a new spectral synthesis code geared toward the first galaxies. Using this model, we explore the JWST imaging detection limits for Population III galaxies and investigate to what extent such objects may be identified based on their JWST colors. We predict that JWST should be able to detect Population III galaxies with stellar population masses as low as ∼105 Msun at z ∼ 10 in ultra deep exposures. Over limited redshift intervals, it may also be possible to use color criteria to select Population III galaxy candidates for follow-up spectroscopy. The colors of young Population III galaxies dominated by direct starlight can be used to probe the stellar initial mass function (IMF), but this requires almost complete leakage of ionizing photons into the intergalactic medium. The colors of objects dominated by nebular emission show no corresponding IMF sensitivity. We also note that a clean selection of Population III galaxies at z ∼ 7-8 can be achieved by adding two JWST/MIRI filters to the JWST/NIRCam filter sets usually discussed in the context of JWST ultra deep fields.

  1. Possible γ-ray emission of radio intermediate AGN III Zw 2 and its implication on the evolution of jets in AGNs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AGNs with hard γ-ray emission identified so far are radio-loud. III Zw 2 is a radio intermediate AGN with a relativistic jet. We study its spectral energy distribution (SED) and find that the broad band emissions are dominated by the non-thermal emissions from the jet. We model its SED through a synchrotron + inverse Compton (IC) model. The results show that the IC component of III Zw 2 peaks at a few MeV, and the flux density drops rapidly at higher energy with photon index Γ ∼ 3.3 above 0.1 GeV. The predicted flux is slightly over the sensitivity of Fermi/LAT, but it was not included in the first Fermi/LAT AGN catalog. The reason for this may be: 1) that the IC peak is low and the spectrum is very steep above 0.1 GeV, 2) that III Zw 2 is in the low state during the period of the Fermi/LAT operation. We also find that III Zw 2 follows similar jet processes as those in γ-ray AGNs, e.g., the relation between jet power and radiation power, which is called the blazar sequence. We suggest that III Zw 2 may be a young source at an earlier stage of jet activity. (letters)

  2. Recent abstracts in biochemical technology

    OpenAIRE

    R R Siva Kiran; Brijesh P

    2008-01-01

    “Recent abstracts in biochemical technology” is a collection of interesting research articles published in “List of biochemical technology journals” (Table 1). The abstracts are most likely to report significant results in biochemical technology.

  3. Evolución e impacto de la regulación bancaria internacional hasta Basilea III: el caso de América Latina = Evolution and impact of international banking regulation until Basel III: The case of Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gutiérrez López

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La crisis financiera ha cuestionado la efectividad de los Acuerdos de Basilea como herramienta de regulación y supervisión bancaria a nivel internacional, especialmente por la coincidencia temporal de Basilea II y los problemas del sector bancario. En el caso de América Latina, esto se une tanto a las particularidades de su sistema financiero, que ha afrontado reformas muy significativas en los últimos años, como a la forma diferencial en que la crisis financiera se ha manifestado.El artículo revisa las características del esquema de regulación bancaria internacional hasta llegar al nuevo Acuerdo de Basilea III y su previsible adaptación al caso latinoamericano, con especial interés sobre los efectos en la financiación y prociclicidad.The financial crisis has questioned Basel Accords effectiveness as regulatory and supervisory tools in the international banking area, especially because Basel II was firstly applied when banking problems started. In the Latin America case, this happens in a particular financial system, which has suffered significant reforms over the last years, and where the financial crisis has behaved in a different way.The paper analyses the main characteristics of the international banking regulatory framework until current Basel III Accord. It also addresses its foreseeable adaptation to the Latin American context, with special emphasis on funding and pro-cyclicality

  4. Mathematics III

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Canals, Pelegrí

    2013-01-01

    Apunts de l'assignatura Mathematics III del Grau en International Business Economics del curs 2012-2013. Conté : Diagonalization, Difference Equations, Differential Equations, Lagrange-Kuhn-Tucker, Second order Difference Equations.

  5. Star Formation Properties in Barred Galaxies(SFB). III. Statistical Study of Bar-driven Secular Evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend to be coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges towards stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the ...

  6. A stochastic Monte Carlo approach to model real star cluster evolution, III. Direct integrations of three- and four-body interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Giersz, M

    2003-01-01

    Spherically symmetric equal mass star clusters containing a large amount of primordial binaries are studied using a hybrid method, consisting of a gas dynamical model for single stars and a Monte Carlo treatment for relaxation of binaries and the setup of close resonant and fly-by encounters of single stars with binaries and binaries with each other (three- and four-body encounters). What differs from our previous work is that each encounter is being integrated using a highly accurate direct few-body integrator which uses regularized variables. Hence we can study the systematic evolution of individual binary orbital parameters (eccentricity, semi-major axis) and differential and total cross sections for hardening, dissolution or merging of binaries (minimum distance) from a sampling of several ten thousands of scattering events as they occur in real cluster evolution including mass segregation of binaries, gravothermal collapse and reexpansion, binary burning phase and ultimately gravothermal oscillations. Fo...

  7. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  8. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  9. Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Štrbová, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze current capital adequacy in Europe under regulatory framework Basel III and compare the state of its implementation within European banks and Slovak financial sector, which is represented by two Slovak case banks. Firstly it is focused on the two previous regulatory frameworks, especially on their capital adequacy and three-pillar structure of Basel II. Then we proceed to present the new regulatory framework Basel III. The third regulatory framework of the...

  10. The evolution of the [O II], H β and [O III] emission line luminosity functions over the last nine billions years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparat, Johan; Zhu, Guangtun; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Norberg, Peder; Newman, Jeffrey; Tresse, Laurence; Richard, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Raichoor, Anand; Prada, Francisco; Maraston, Claudia; Yèche, Christophe; Delubac, Timothée; Jullo, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Emission line galaxies are one of the main tracers of the large-scale structure to be targeted by the next-generation dark energy surveys. To provide a better understanding of the properties and statistics of these galaxies, we have collected spectroscopic data from the VVDS and DEEP2 deep surveys and estimated the galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) of three distinct emission lines, [O II}] (λ λ 3726,3729) (0.5 < z < 1.3), Hβ (λ4861) (0.3 < z < 0.8) and [O {III}] (λ 5007) (0.3 < z < 0.8). Our measurements are based on 35 639 emission line galaxies and cover a volume of ˜107 Mpc3. We present the first measurement of the Hβ LF at these redshifts. We have also compiled LFs from the literature that were based on independent data or covered different redshift ranges, and we fit the entire set over the whole redshift range with analytic Schechter and Saunders models, assuming a natural redshift dependence of the parameters. We find that the characteristic luminosity (L*) and density (φ*) of all LFs increase with redshift. Using the Schechter model over the redshift ranges considered, we find that, for [O {II}] emitters, the characteristic luminosity L*(z = 0.5) = 3.2 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.7 ± 0.2 from z = 0.5 to 1.3; for Hβ emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 1.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.0 ± 0.2 from z = 0.3 to 0.8; and for [O {III}] emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 7.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 3.5 ± 0.4 from z = 0.3 to 0.8.

  11. Studies of luminous stars in nearby galaxies. III. Comments on the evolution of the most massive stars in the Milky Way and the large magellanic cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An empirical comparison of the observed H-R diagrams for the supergiants in our region of the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud reveals comparable distributions of spectral types and luminosities in the two galaxies. Supergiants of similar spectral types have the same luminosities, except for the A-type stars, where selection effects may be important. These results suggest that the same basic physical processes govern the evolution of the most massive stars in the two galaxies.Variations in the blue-to-red supergiant ratio with galactocentric distance and with luminosity involve chemical composition gradients and varying rates of mass loss. Since the relative numbers of the most luminous stars are more sensitive to mass loss, the B/R ratio from the less luminous supergiants may be a better indicator of galactic abundance gradients.The upper luminosity boundary for both the galactic and the LMC supergiants is characterized by (1) decreasing luminosity with decreasing temperature for the hottest stars and (2) an upper limit to the luminosity near M/sub bol/approx. =-9.5 to -10 mag for stars cooler than 15,000 K. We suggest that the observed luminosity limits are due primarily to the effects of large mass loss on the evolution of the most massive stars. The examples of eta Car and P Cyg suggest that mass-loss rates can be very rapid and unsteady--higher on the average than presently observed for most of the hot supergiants. The evolution of stars greater than 60 M/sub sun/ to cooler temperatures is consequently limited by instabilities and the accompanying high mass loss. An initial mass near 50--60 M/sub sun/ may be an empirical upper limit to the mass at which a star can evolve to the region of the M supergiants and probably accounts for the observed upper bound to the luminosities of the cooler supergiants

  12. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Cao, Chen, E-mail: zmzhou@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: caochen@sdu.edu.cn [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  13. Formation and Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies. III Star formation history as a function of mass and over-density

    CERN Document Server

    Merlin, Emiliano; Piovan, Lorenzo; Grassi, Tommaso; Buonomo, Umberto; La Barbera, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the initial proto-galaxies over-densities and masses on their evolution, to understand whether the internal properties of the proto-galactic haloes are sufficient to account for the varied properties of the galactic populations. By means of fully hydrodynamical N-body simulations performed with the code EvoL we produce twelve self-similar models of early-type galaxies of different initial masses and over-densities, following their evolution from z \\geq 20 down to z \\leq 1. The simulations include radiative cooling, star formation, stellar energy feedback, a reionizing photoheating background, and chemical enrichment of the ISM. We find a strong correlation between the initial properties of the proto-haloes and their star formation histories. Massive (10^13M\\odot) haloes experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates \\geq 10^3M\\odot/yr) at early epochs, consistently with observations, with a less pronounced dependence on the initial over-density; intermediate m...

  14. Multiplexing oscillatory biochemical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, Wiet; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2014-04-01

    In recent years it has been increasingly recognized that biochemical signals are not necessarily constant in time and that the temporal dynamics of a signal can be the information carrier. Moreover, it is now well established that the protein signaling network of living cells has a bow-tie structure and that components are often shared between different signaling pathways. Here we show by mathematical modeling that living cells can multiplex a constant and an oscillatory signal: they can transmit these two signals simultaneously through a common signaling pathway, and yet respond to them specifically and reliably. We find that information transmission is reduced not only by noise arising from the intrinsic stochasticity of biochemical reactions, but also by crosstalk between the different channels. Yet, under biologically relevant conditions more than 2 bits of information can be transmitted per channel, even when the two signals are transmitted simultaneously. These observations suggest that oscillatory signals are ideal for multiplexing signals. PMID:24685537

  15. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. III. Exon sequences confirm most dendrograms based on protein sequences: calmodulin dendrograms show significant lack of parallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the first report in this series we presented dendrograms based on 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand family. In the second we used sequences from 228 proteins, containing 835 domains, and showed that eight of the 29 subfamilies are congruent and that the EF-hand domains of the remaining 21 subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories. In this study we have computed dendrograms within and among the EF-hand subfamilies using the encoding DNA sequences. In most instances the dendrograms based on protein and on DNA sequences are very similar. Significant differences between protein and DNA trees for calmodulin remain unexplained. In our fourth report we evaluate the sequences and the distribution of introns within the EF-hand family and conclude that exon shuffling did not play a significant role in its evolution.

  16. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. III. Effect of the initial helium spread on the position of stars in a synthetic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantereau, W.; Charbonnel, C.; Meynet, G.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Globular clusters host multiple populations of long-lived low-mass stars whose origin remains an open question. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the associated photometric and spectroscopic peculiarities. They differ, for instance, in the maximum helium enrichment they predict for stars of the second population, which these stars can inherit at birth as the result of the internal pollution of the cluster by different types of stars of the first population. Aims: We present the distribution of helium-rich stars in present-day globular clusters as it is expected in the original framework of the fast-rotating massive stars scenario (FRMS) as first-population polluters. We focus on NGC 6752. Methods: We completed a grid of 330 stellar evolution models for globular cluster low-mass stars computed with different initial chemical compositions corresponding to the predictions of the original FRMS scenario for [Fe/H] = -1.75. Starting from the initial helium-sodium relation that allows reproducing the currently observed distribution of sodium in NGC 6752, we deduce the helium distribution expected in that cluster at ages equal to 9 and 13 Gyr. We distinguish the stars that are moderately enriched in helium from those that are very helium-rich (initial helium mass fraction below and above 0.4, respectively), and compare the predictions of the FRMS framework with other scenarios for globular cluster enrichment. Results: The effect of helium enrichment on the stellar lifetime and evolution reduces the total number of very helium-rich stars that remain in the cluster at 9 and 13 Gyr to only 12% and 10%, respectively, from an initial fraction of 21%. Within this age range, most of the stars still burn their hydrogen in their core, which widens the MS band significantly in effective temperature. The fraction of very helium-rich stars drops in the more advanced evolution phases, where the associated spread in effective temperature strongly decreases. These

  17. Andaman-Sumatra island arc: III. Time evolution of seismogenic activation of the arc since the beginning of the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakina, L. M.; Moskvina, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of the intense burst in seismogenesis within the Andaman-Sumatra island arc in 2000-2010 is analyzed. The onset of seismogenic activation was marked by two strong ( M S ˜ 7.9, M S ˜ 7.8) quakes that occurred in the lithosphere of the South Sumatra region on June 4, 2000 and by the strongest ( M W = 7.3) earthquake of July 25, 2004 that took place in the lower part of the focal zone. These seismic events were the foreshocks of the main episode of seismogenic activation of the island arc—the catastrophic earthquake of December 26, 2004, with its source near the northern coast of Sumatra. The large shocks ( M S ˜ 7.7-8.4) that occurred from March 28, 2005 to October 25, 2010 between the source of the Sumatran earthquake and epicentral zone of the foreshocks of June 4, 2000, are the aftershocks of the Sumatran event. The spatiotemporal evolution of seismogenic activation of the Andaman-Sumatra island arc at the beginning of the 21st century is compared to the seismogenic activation of the Kuril-Kamchatka arc in the middle of the 20th century. The positions, geological conditions, and focal parameters of the strongest Sumatran earthquakes of 2000-2010 are determined. The interpretation of the sources relies on the (1) complex analysis of all the manifestations of the earthquakes of 2000-2010 and (2) the established regularities of the occurrence of the earthquakes in the island arcs. The sources of the earthquakes of 2005-2010 are the steep longitudinal (trending along the arc) reverse faults of a backthrust type, which have a bedding depth of about a few dozen kilometers. The reverse-fault sources of the earthquakes of March 28, 2005, September 12, 2007 (11:10 UT), and October 10, 2010 are located in the zone of the Outer Range, and the earthquakes of September 12, 2007 (23:49 UT) fall in the Mentawai Trough. The strike-slip reverse fault, which cuts the island arc, is likely to be the focal mechanism of the earthquake of June 4, 2000

  18. Variations on a theme - the evolution of hydrocarbon solids: III. Size-dependent properties - the optEC(s)(a) model

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, A P

    2015-01-01

    Context. The properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) dust evolve in response to the local radiation field in the interstellar medium and the evolution of these properties is particularly dependent upon the particle size. Aims. A model for finite-sized, low-temperature amorphous hydrocarbon particles, based on the microphysical properties of random and defected networks of carbon and hydrogen atoms, with surfaces passivated by hydrogen atoms, has been developed. Methods. The eRCN/DG and the optEC(s) models have been combined, adapted and extended into a new optEC(s)(a) model that is used to calculate the optical properties of hydrocarbon grain materials down into the sub-nanometre size regime, where the particles contain only a few tens of carbon atoms. Results. The optEC(s)(a) model predicts a continuity in properties from large to small (sub-nm) carbonaceous grains. Tabulated data of the size-dependent optical constants (from EUV to cm wavelengths) for a-C:H (nano-)particles as a function of the ...

  19. The M31 Velocity Vector. III. Future Milky Way-M31-M33 Orbital Evolution, Merging, and Fate of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    van der Marel, Roeland P; Cox, T J; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay

    2012-01-01

    We study the future orbital evolution and merging of the MW-M31-M33 system, using a combination of collisionless N-body simulations and semi-analytic orbit integrations. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to explore the consequences of varying the initial phase-space and mass parameters within their observational uncertainties. The observed M31 transverse velocity implies that the MW and M31 will merge t = 5.86 (+1.61-0.72) Gyr from now, after a first pericenter at t = 3.87 (+0.42-0.32) Gyr. M31 may (probability p=41%) make a direct hit with the MW (defined here as a first-pericenter distance less than 25 kpc). Most likely, the MW and M31 will merge first, with M33 settling onto an orbit around them. Alternatively, M33 may make a direct hit with the MW first (p=9%), or M33 may get ejected from the Local Group (p=7%). The MW-M31 merger remnant will resemble an elliptical galaxy. The Sun will most likely (p=85%) end up at larger radius from the center of the MW-M31 merger remnant than its current distance from th...

  20. Keck Deep Fields. III. Luminosity-dependent Evolution of the Ultraviolet Luminosity and Star Formation Rate Densities at z~4, 3, and 2

    CERN Document Server

    Sawicki, M; Sawicki, Marcin; Thompson, David

    2006-01-01

    We use the Keck Deep Fields UGRI catalog of z~4, 3, and 2 UV-selected galaxies to study the evolution of the rest-frame 1700A luminosity density at high redshift. The ability to reliably constrain the contribution of faint galaxies is critical and our data do so as they reach to M*+2 even at z~4 and deeper still at lower redshifts. We find that the luminosity density at high redshift is dominated by the hitherto poorly studied galaxies fainter than L*, and, indeed, the the bulk of the UV light in the high-z Universe comes from galaxies in the luminosity range L=0.1-1L*. It is these faint galaxies that govern the behavior of the total UV luminosity density. Overall, there is a gradual rise in luminosity density starting at z~4 or earlier, followed by a shallow peak or a plateau within z~3--1, and then followed by the well-know plunge at lower redshifts. Within this total picture, luminosity density in sub-L* galaxies evolves more rapidly at high redshift, z>~2, than that in more luminous objects. However, this...

  1. The Redshift Evolution of the High-Mass End of the Red Sequence Luminosity Function from the SDSS-III/BOSS CMASS Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Brownstein, Joel R; Swanson, Molly; Dawson, Kyle; Prada, Francisco; Eisenstein, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; McBride, Cameron K; Favole, Ginevra; Guo, Hong; Rodriguez, Sergio; Schneider, Donald P

    2014-01-01

    We present the redshift evolution of the high-mass end of the ^{0.55}i-band Red Sequence Luminosity Function (RS LF) within the redshift range 0.52

  2. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  3. Biochemical Hypermedia: Galactose Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animations of biochemical processes and virtual laboratory environments lead to true molecular simulations. The use of interactive software’s in education can improve cognitive capacity, better learning and, mainly, it makes information acquisition easier. Material and Methods: This work presents the development of a biochemical hypermedia to understanding of the galactose metabolism. It was developed with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. Results and Discussion: A step by step animation process shows the enzymatic reactions of galactose conversion to glucose-1-phosphate (to glycogen synthesis, glucose-6-phosphate (glycolysis intermediary, UDP-galactose (substrate to mucopolysaccharides synthesis and collagen’s glycosylation. There are navigation guide that allow scrolling the mouse over the names of the components of enzymatic reactions of via the metabolism of galactose. Thus, explanatory text box, chemical structures and animation of the actions of enzymes appear to navigator. Upon completion of the module, the user’s response to the proposed exercise can be checked immediately through text box with interactive content of the answer. Conclusion: This hypermedia was presented for undergraduate students (UFSC who revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the theme.

  4. ON THE CLUSTER PHYSICS OF SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH AND X-RAY SURVEYS. III. MEASUREMENT BIASES AND COSMOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF GAS AND STELLAR MASS FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, N. [Department of Physics, McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Bond, J. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St George, Toronto ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Pfrommer, C. [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Sievers, J. L., E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    Gas masses tightly correlate with the virial masses of galaxy clusters, allowing for a precise determination of cosmological parameters by means of X-ray surveys. However, the gas mass fractions (f{sub gas}) at the virial radius (R{sub 200}) derived from recent Suzaku observations are considerably larger than the cosmic mean, calling into question the accuracy of cosmological parameters. Here, we use a large suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study measurement biases of f{sub gas}. We employ different variants of simulated physics, including radiative gas physics, star formation, and thermal feedback by active galactic nuclei, which we show is able to arrest overcooling and to result in constant stellar mass fractions for redshifts z < 1. Computing the mass profiles in 48 angular cones, we find anisotropic gas and total mass distributions that imply an angular variance of f{sub gas} at the level of 30%. This anisotropy originates from the recent formation epoch of clusters and from the strong internal baryon-to-dark-matter density bias. In the most extreme cones, f{sub gas} can be biased high by a factor of two at R{sub 200} in massive clusters (M{sub 200} ∼ 10{sup 15} M{sub ☉}), thereby providing an explanation for high f{sub gas} measurements by Suzaku. While projection lowers this factor, there are other measurement biases that may (partially) compensate. At R{sub 200}, f{sub gas} is biased high by 20% when assuming hydrostatic equilibrium masses, i.e., neglecting the kinetic pressure, and by another ∼10%-20% due to the presence of density clumping. At larger radii, both measurement biases increase dramatically. While the cluster sample variance of the true f{sub gas} decreases to a level of 5% at R{sub 200}, the sample variance that includes both measurement biases remains fairly constant at the level of 10%-20%. The constant redshift evolution of f{sub gas} within R{sub 500} for massive clusters is encouraging for using gas masses to

  5. Mass and environment as drivers of galaxy evolution. III. The constancy of the faint-end slope and the merging of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using our continuity approach, we explore the underlying connections between the evolution of the faint-end slope αs of the stellar mass function of star-forming galaxies, the logarithmic slope β of the specific star formation rate (sSFR)-mass relation, and the merging of galaxies. We derive analytically the consequences of the observed constancy of αs since redshifts of at least z ∼ 2. If the logarithmic slope β of the sSFR-mass relation is negative, then the faint-end slope αs should quickly diverge due to the differential mass increase of galaxies on the star-forming main sequence, and this will also quickly destroy the Schechter form of the mass function. This problem can be solved by removing low-mass galaxies by merging them into more massive galaxies. We quantify this process by introducing the specific merger mass rate (sMMR) as the specific rate of mass added to a given galaxy through mergers. For a modest negative value of β ∼ –0.1, an average sMMR ∼ 0.1 sSFR across the population is required to keep αs constant with epoch, as observed. This in turn implies a merger rate of ∼0.2 sSFR for major mergers, which is consistent with the available observational estimates. More negative values of β require higher sMMR and higher merger rates, and the steepening of the mass function becomes impossible to control for β < –(αs + 2). The close link that is required between the in situ sSFR and the sMMR probably arises because both are closely linked to the buildup of dark matter halos. These new findings further develop the formalism for the evolving galaxy population that we introduced earlier and show how striking symmetries in the galaxy population can emerge as the result of deep links between the physical processes involved.

  6. Biochemical Evolution and Histological Response of Patients with Hepatitis C Undergoing Antiviral Therapy. Evolución bioquímica y respuesta histológica de pacientes con hepatitis C bajo tratamiento antiviral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Julián Hernández Ojeda

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Hepatitis C is a major health problem worldwide and the most common indicator for the need of a liver transplantation in many countries. Objective: To determine the biochemical evolution and the histological response of patients with chronic hepatitis C who were treated with ribavirin and recombinant interferon alfa-2b in the provincial Hepatology consultation. Methods: A descriptive observational study was conducted. It included 31 patients who presented the hepatitis C virus and were treated in the Hepatology consultation of the Provincial General University Hospital of Cienfuegos "Dr. Aldereguía Gustavo Lima’’ from January 2007 to June 2009. These patients were administered with ribavirin and recombinant interferon alfa-2b. Variables such as age, sex, possible route of infection, aminotransferase alanine serum, biochemical evaluation (after treatment and after follow-up and histological response were included. In order to assess the histological activity of chronic liver injuries Knodell Index was used. In order to compare the results (biochemical and histological response before and after treatment the Sign Test was used. Results: Women were predominant in the sample group (58.1%. The average age was 45.5 ± 11.6 years. The possible route of transmission could not be identified in 51.6% of patients, while surgical treatment was identified as the route of infection in 22.6% of the cases, followed by repeated parenteral treatment in 16.1% of them. Conclusion: By the end of treatment there was a higher response rate in terms of biochemical changes and histological response.

  1. Evolution of Biochemical Parameters During Composting of Various Wastes Compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saidi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Tunisia the most treatment waste is landfill (50% of wastes were land filled and only 5% are composted. And since our soil become more and more poor in organic matter, green waste can be a significant source of organic matter; in parallel we cited the domestic waste and dead posodonia collected from beaches. All these wastes coming from various origins can be exploited to produce stable compost able to correct the deficiency of soil. Exploiting waste could lead at different quality of mature compost. We are not interested in only the quality of the mature compost but we are interested in the time of the composting cycle. The goals of this study were to characterize the maturity and the sanitary quality of compost in relation with the feed stock source (green waste (C1, green waste mixed with Posidonia (C2 and municipal solid waste (C3. The results obtained showed that the duration of the cycle of composting depends on the nature of the substrate. The longest cycle (200 days was observed with the feed stock source C3. The C/N ratios ranged between 22 and 27 at the beginning of the cycle of composting and decreased notably during time of composting. NH4-N decreased over the progress cycle and at the end of composting progress, all wastes presented a content of NH4-N not exceeding the maximal value recommended for mature compost (400 mg kg-1. The CO2 released by C1 was of approximately 6000 mg C-CO2 DM kg-1 at the start of the cycle and it reached at the end of the cycle of composting 2300 mg C-CO2 DM kg-1. Nevertheless, the deshydrogenase activity (DHA recorded was important during the thermophilous phase at the level of the three piles C1, C2 and C3, where it reached the respective values of 5.9; 6.2 and 4 TPFS/TPF/g of DM. Maturity stage showed the values of 0.3; 0.8 and 0.4 TPFS/TPF/g of DM, respectively. Salmonella appeared only at the level of the piles C2 et C3 at the beginning of composting. After 40th days composting these bacteria are not detected. Staphylocoques were not detected at the level of the two piles C1 and C2. The number of these bacteria was important in the compost C3, where it fluctuated between 103 and 105 bacteria g-1 of dry matter. Statistical analyses showed that the compost of municipal solid waste C3 presented a value of salinity (6.8 g Kg-1 of DM higher than those obtained at the level of the other studied piles 2.6 g kg%/1 of DM for C1; 4 g Kg-1 of DM for C2. We also noted that the compost C2 was relatively rich in P (2.17%/ of DM and MgO (2.62% of DM as compared with the two other studied piles which contain a percentage of MgO of 0. 73 in C1 pile and 0. 8 in C3 pile. Although important heavy metals contents determined in the three studied composts were lower than the levels indicated by the standards of the European Union.

  2. Hyponatraemia: biochemical and clinical perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, G; Leese, G

    1998-01-01

    Hyponatraemia is a common bio-chemical abnormality, occurring in about 15% of hospital inpatients. It is often associated with severe illness and relatively poor outcome. Pathophysiologically, hyponatraemia may be spurious, dilutional, depletional or redistributional. Particularly difficult causes and concepts of hyponatraemia are the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and the sick cell syndrome, which are discussed here in detail. Therapy should always be targeted at the underlying disea...

  3. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  4. Biochemical and histological characterization of tomato mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C. Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical responses inherent to antioxidant systems as well morphological and anatomical properties of photomorphogenic, hormonal and developmental tomato mutants were investigated. Compared to the non-mutant Micro-Tom (MT, we observed that the malondialdehyde (MDA content was enhanced in the diageotropica (dgt and lutescent (l mutants, whilst the highest levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were observed in high pigment 1 (hp1 and aurea (au mutants. The analyses of antioxidant enzymes revealed that all mutants exhibited reduced catalase (CAT activity when compared to MT. Guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX was enhanced in both sitiens (sit and notabilis (not mutants, whereas in not mutant there was an increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX. Based on PAGE analysis, the activities of glutathione reductase (GR isoforms III, IV, V and VI were increased in l leaves, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD isoform III was reduced in leaves of sit, epi, Never ripe (Nr and green flesh (gf mutants. Microscopic analyses revealed that hp1 and au showed an increase in leaf intercellular spaces, whereas sit exhibited a decrease. The au and hp1 mutants also exhibited a decreased in the number of leaf trichomes. The characterization of these mutants is essential for their future use in plant development and ecophysiology studies, such as abiotic and biotic stresses on the oxidative metabolism.Neste trabalho, analisamos as respostas bioquímicas inerentes ao sistema antioxidante, assim como propriedades morfológicas e anatômicas de mutantes fotomorfogenéticos e hormonais de tomateiro. Comparados ao não mutante Micro-Tom (MT, observamos que o conteúdo de malondialdeído (MDA aumentou nos mutantes diageotropica (dgt e lutescent (l, enquanto os maiores níveis de H2O2 foram encontrados nos mutantes high pigment 1 (hp1 e aurea (au. Análises de enzimas antioxidantes mostraram que todos os mutantes reduziram a atividade de catalase (CAT quando comparado a MT. A

  5. Spinal muscular atrophy type II (intermediary and III (Kugelberg-Welander: evolution of 50 patients with physiotherapy and hydrotherapy in a swimming pool Atrofia muscular espinhal tipo II (intermediária e III (Kugelberg-Welander: evolução de 50 pacientes com fisioterapia e hidroterapia em piscina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia C. B. Cunha

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available We added hydrotherapy to 50 patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA who were being treated with individual conventional physiotherapy. Hydrotherapy was performed at an approximate temperature of 30 degrees Celsius, twice a week, for thirty minutes in children and for forty-five minutes in adults during a 2-year period. The outcome derived from this combined modality of treatment was rated according to physiotherapeutic evaluations, the MMT (Manual Muscular Test, and the Barthel Ladder. Patients were reevaluated at 2-month intervals. After two years of ongoing treatment, we were able to observe that the deformities in hip, knee and foot were progressive in all SMA Type II patients, and in some Type III. Muscle strength stabilized in most SMA Type III patients, and improved in some. MMT was not done in SMA Type II. In all patients we were able to detect an improvement in the Barthel Ladder scale. This study suggests that a measurable improvement in the quality of daily living may be obtained in patients with SMA Types II and III subjected to conventional physiotherapy when associated with hydrotherapy.A hidroterapia foi realizada em SO pacientes com atrofia muscular espinhal, os quais foram também tratados com fisioterapia individual convencional. O tratamento hidroterápico foi realizado em piscina aquecida numa temperatura de aproximadamente 30° Celsius, duas vezes por semana, durante 30 minutos em crianças e 45 minutos em adultos num período de dois anos. Os benefícios deste tipo de tratamento foram avaliados de acordo com a evolução clínica, o MMT(Teste de Força Muscular e a Escala de Barthel. Os pacientes foram reavaliados a cada dois meses. Após dois anos de tratamento nós observamos que as deformidades nos quadris, joelhos e pés foram progressivas em todos os pacientes do Tipo II e em alguns do Tipo III. Houve estabilização da força muscular na maioria dos pacientes com SMA Tipo III, e melhora da força em alguns; nos

  6. Protein Evolution in Cell and Tissue Development: Going Beyond Sequence and Transcriptional Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Daniel J.; Weis, William I.; Nelson, W. James

    2011-01-01

    Studies of animal evolution often focus on sequence and transcriptional analysis, based on an assumption that the evolution of development is driven by changes in gene expression. We argue that biochemical and cell biological approaches are also required, because sequence-conserved proteins can have different biochemical, cellular and developmental properties.

  7. Population III stars around the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Komiya, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop~III) stars, born of the primordial gas. Pop~III stars with masses below $0.8 M_\\odot$ should survive to date though are not observed yet, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [Fe/H]$ < -5$ in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop~III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop~III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from the surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press--Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop~III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars are also escap...

  8. Biochemical Analysis of Microbial Rhodopsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Julia A; Keffer, Jessica L; Miller, Kelsey J

    2016-01-01

    Ion-pumping rhodopsins transfer ions across the microbial cell membrane in a light-dependent fashion. As the rate of biochemical characterization of microbial rhodopsins begins to catch up to the rate of microbial rhodopsin identification in environmental and genomic sequence data sets, in vitro analysis of their light-absorbing properties and in vivo analysis of ion pumping will remain critical to characterizing these proteins. As we learn more about the variety of physiological roles performed by microbial rhodopsins in different cell types and environments, observing the localization patterns of the rhodopsins and/or quantifying the number of rhodopsin-bearing cells in natural environments will become more important. Here, we provide protocols for purification of rhodopsin-containing membranes, detection of ion pumping, and observation of functional rhodopsins in laboratory and environmental samples using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153387

  9. Haemato-biochemical alterations induced by lead acetate toxicity in wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Suradkar

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the haemato-biochemical alterations induced by lead acetate toxicity in 48 Wistar rats of either sex, divided uniformly into four different groups. The rats of group I received only deionised water as control while, group II, III and IV were given lead acetate @ 1 PPM, 100 PPM and 1000 PPM, in drinking deionised water respectively for 28 days. In group III and IV dose dependant significant (P<0.05 reductions in TEC, Hb, PCV and TLC were observed. No significant change was observed in neutrophil, eosinophil, basophil and monocyte count in any treatment groups, whereas the lymphocyte count decreased significantly (P<0.05 in group III and IV. A dose dependant significant (P<0.05 increase in AST, ALP, AKP, GGT, BUN and creatinine was experiential while TP and albumin levels were decreased in group III and IV. [Vet World 2009; 2(11.000: 429-431

  10. Population III Stars Around the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop III) stars, born of primordial gas. Pop III stars with masses below 0.8 M⊙ should survive to date though are not yet observed, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]\\lt -5 in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press-Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor stars also escaped from the mini-halos. We discuss the spatial distributions of these escaped stars by evaluating the distances between the mini-halos in the branches of merger trees under the spherical collapse model of dark matter halos. It is demonstrated that the escaped stars distribute beyond the stellar halo with a density profile close to the dark matter halo, while Pop III stars are slightly more centrally concentrated. 6%-30% of the escaped stars leave the Milky Way and go out into the intergalactic space. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of observing the Pop III stars with the pristine surface abundance.

  11. Co(II)1-xCo(0)x/3Mn(III)2x/3S Nanoparticles Supported on B/N-Codoped Mesoporous Nanocarbon as a Bifunctional Electrocatalyst of Oxygen Reduction/Evolution for High-Performance Zinc-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zilong; Xiao, Shuang; An, Yiming; Long, Xia; Zheng, Xiaoli; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Yang, Shihe

    2016-06-01

    Rechargeable Zn-air battery is an ideal type of energy storage device due to its high energy and power density, high safety, and economic viability. Its large-scale application rests upon the availability of active, durable, low-cost electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the discharge process and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in the charge process. Herein we developed a novel ORR/OER bifunctional electrocatalyst for rechargeable Zn-air batteries based on the codoping and hybridization strategies. The B/N-codoped mesoporous nanocarbon supported Co(II)1-xCo(0)x/3Mn(III)2x/3S nanoparticles exhibit a superior OER performance compared to that of IrO2 catalyst and comparable Zn-air battery performance to that of the Pt-based battery. The rechargeable Zn-air battery shows high discharge peak power density (over 250 mW cm(-2)) and current density (180 mA cm(-2) at 1 V), specific capacity (∼550 mAh g(-1)), small charge-discharge voltage gap of ∼0.72 V at 20 mA cm(-2) and even higher stability than the Pt-based battery. The advanced performance of the bifunctional catalysts highlights the beneficial role of the simultaneous formation of Mn(III) and Co(0) as well as the dispersed hybridization with the codoped nanocarbon support. PMID:27163673

  12. The evolution of low-mass close binary systems. III. 1.50 M/sub sun/+0.50 M/sub sun/: Unsteady mass loss and shrinking secondaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of a binary system of 1.50 M/sub sun/ and 0.50 M/sub sun/ components with initial separation 3.00 R/sub sun/ is computed. In the computation, both components are followed simultaneously.The more massive component (primary) fills its Roche lobe during core hydrogen burning (case A evolution), and mass transfer quickly grows to a typical thermal time scale rate (approx.1.1 x 10-7 M/sub sun/ yr-1). The primary's rapid decrease in mass and its underluminosity lead to the growth of an abnormally deep surface convection zone, preventing stabilization of the mass loss rate. Runaway (dynamical time scale) mass loss develops, reaching 1.5 x 10-4 M/sub sun/ yr-1. This rate is itself unsteady because of a Bath-type mechanism. Two runaway episodes occur, leaving a 0.67 M/sub sun/+1.33 M/sub sun/ binary still in a semidetached state.The deep convective envelope of the secondary dominates its evolution, leading to contraction in response to accretion, and avoidance of contact. The rapid compression of the secondary's core during dynamical time scale mass transfer causes runaway hydrogen burning, driving large-scale convection which ultimately mixes the star completely.The behavior of the system modeled, and the absence of observational counterparts to it, are interpreted as supporting the fission theory of the origin of close binaries, and as indicating that most W UMa systems have always been contact binaries

  13. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  14. Biochemical bases of mineral waters genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Zhernosekov

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This work directs data about mineral water genesis. The accent on balneological sense is done. We suggest the criteria of biochemical processes estimation which take part in mineral water compounds creation. These criteria can be used for illustration of dependence between waters medical properties and biochemical processes of their genesis.

  15. Biochemical and physiological processes associated with the differential ozone response in ozone-tolerant and sensitive soybean genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochemical and physiological traits of two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes that differ in sensitivity to ozone (O3) were investigated to determine the possible basis for the differential response. Fiskeby III (O3-tolerant) and Mandarin (Ottawa) (O3-sensitive) were grown in a greenhouse ...

  16. Effects of Training Load on Some Hormonal, Hematological and Biochemical Profile of Male Cyclists

    OpenAIRE

    Pralay Majumdar; Srividhya Sivaprakasam

    2014-01-01

    Hematological profiles of cyclists fluctuates are based on the volume/frequency/intensity of training. The present study examined the effects of training load on the cyclist’s biochemical profile which may be associated with over training. Twelve male cyclists volunteered to participate in this study. The participants completed a systematic training program which was divided into four phases i.e. phase I (560 km, continuous aerobic training), II (680 km, continuous aerobic training), III (720...

  17. The Nature of H$\\beta+$[O{\\sc iii}] and [O{\\sc ii}] emitters to $z \\sim 5$ with HiZELS: stellar mass functions and the evolution of EWs

    CERN Document Server

    Khostovan, Ali Ahmad; Mobasher, Bahram; Smail, Ian; Darvish, Behnam; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Stott, John P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of $\\sim7000$ narrow-band selected galaxies with strong H$\\beta+$[OIII] and [OII] nebular emission lines from the High-$z$ Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) between $z \\sim 0.8 - 5.0$. Our sample covers a wide range in stellar mass ($M\\sim10^{7.5 - 12.0}$ M$_\\odot$), rest-frame equivalent widths (EW$_\\mathrm{rest}\\sim 10 - 10^5$ \\AA), and line luminosities ($L\\sim10^{40.5 - 43.2}$ erg s$^{-1}$). We measure the H$\\beta+$[OIII] and [OII]-selected stellar mass functions out to $z \\sim 3.5$ and find that both $M_\\star$ and $\\phi_\\star$ increases with cosmic time, which may be due to the [OIII] selection including an increasing fraction of AGN at lower redshifts. The [OII]-selected stellar mass functions show a constant $M_\\star\\sim10^{11.6}$ M$_\\odot$ and a strong, increasing evolution with cosmic time in $\\phi_\\star$ in line with H$\\alpha$ studies. We also investigate the EW$_\\mathrm{rest}$ evolution as a function of redshift with a fixed mass range (10$^{9.5 - 10.0}$ M$_\\odot$) and fin...

  18. Basel III B: Basel III Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M. McNamara; Michael Wedow; Andrew Metrick

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the financial crisis of 2007-2009, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) faced the critical task of diagnosing what went wrong and then updating regulatory standards aimed at preventing it from occurring again.  In seeking to strengthen the microprudential regulation associated with the earlier Basel Accords while also adding a macroprudential overlay, Basel III consists of proposals in three main areas intended to address 1) capital reform, 2) liquidity standards, ...

  19. The Chemical Master Equation Approach to Nonequilibrium Steady-State of Open Biochemical Systems: Linear Single-Molecule Enzyme Kinetics and Nonlinear Biochemical Reaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Bishop

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We develop the stochastic, chemical master equation as a unifying approach to the dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a mesoscopic volume under a living environment. A living environment provides a continuous chemical energy input that sustains the reaction system in a nonequilibrium steady state with concentration fluctuations. We discuss the linear, unimolecular single-molecule enzyme kinetics, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC with bistability, and network exhibiting oscillations. Emphasis is paid to the comparison between the stochastic dynamics and the prediction based on the traditional approach based on the Law of Mass Action. We introduce the difference between nonlinear bistability and stochastic bistability, the latter has no deterministic counterpart. For systems with nonlinear bistability, there are three different time scales: (a individual biochemical reactions, (b nonlinear network dynamics approaching to attractors, and (c cellular evolution. For mesoscopic systems with size of a living cell, dynamics in (a and (c are stochastic while that with (b is dominantly deterministic. Both (b and (c are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network; We suggest that the (c is most relevant to major cellular biochemical processes such as epi-genetic regulation, apoptosis, and cancer immunoediting. The cellular evolution proceeds with transitions among the attractors of (b in a “punctuated equilibrium” manner.

  20. The chemical master equation approach to nonequilibrium steady-state of open biochemical systems: linear single-molecule enzyme kinetics and nonlinear biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Bishop, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    We develop the stochastic, chemical master equation as a unifying approach to the dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a mesoscopic volume under a living environment. A living environment provides a continuous chemical energy input that sustains the reaction system in a nonequilibrium steady state with concentration fluctuations. We discuss the linear, unimolecular single-molecule enzyme kinetics, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC) with bistability, and network exhibiting oscillations. Emphasis is paid to the comparison between the stochastic dynamics and the prediction based on the traditional approach based on the Law of Mass Action. We introduce the difference between nonlinear bistability and stochastic bistability, the latter has no deterministic counterpart. For systems with nonlinear bistability, there are three different time scales: (a) individual biochemical reactions, (b) nonlinear network dynamics approaching to attractors, and (c) cellular evolution. For mesoscopic systems with size of a living cell, dynamics in (a) and (c) are stochastic while that with (b) is dominantly deterministic. Both (b) and (c) are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network; We suggest that the (c) is most relevant to major cellular biochemical processes such as epi-genetic regulation, apoptosis, and cancer immunoediting. The cellular evolution proceeds with transitions among the attractors of (b) in a "punctuated equilibrium" manner. PMID:20957107

  1. Characterization of Aquifex aeolicus ribonuclease III and the reactivity epitopes of its pre-ribosomal RNA substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhongjie; Nicholson, Rhonda H.; Jaggi, Ritu; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    Ribonuclease III cleaves double-stranded (ds) structures in bacterial RNAs and participates in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Essential insight on the RNase III mechanism of dsRNA cleavage has been provided by crystallographic studies of the enzyme from the hyperthermophilic bacterium, Aquifex aeolicus. However, the biochemical properties of A. aeolicus (Aa)-RNase III and the reactivity epitopes of its substrates are not known. The catalytic activity of purified recombinant Aa-RNa...

  2. Earth's earliest biosphere: Its origin and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the subjects discussed are related to the early biogeologic history, the nature of the earth prior to the oldest known rock record, the early earth and the Archean rock record, the prebiotic organic syntheses and the origin of life, Precambrian organic geochemistry, the biochemical evolution of anaerobic energy conversion, the isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries, Archean stromatolites providing evidence of the earth's earliest benthos, Archean microfossils, the geologic evolution of the Archean-Early Proterozoic earth, and the environmental evolution of the Archean-Early Proterozoic earth. Other topics examined are concerned with geochemical evidence bearing on the origin of aerobiosis, biological and biochemical effects of the development of an aerobic environment, Early Proterozoic microfossils, the evolution of earth's earliest ecosystems, and geographic and geologic data for processed rock samples. Attention is given to a processing procedure for abiotic samples and calculation of model atmospheric compositions, and procedures of organic geochemical analysis

  3. The Mass Distribution of Population III Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M; Gilmore, G; Heger, A; Chan, C

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor stars are uniquely informative on the nature of massive Population III stars. Modulo a few elements that vary with stellar evolution, the present-day photospheric abundances observed in extremely metal-poor stars are representative of their natal gas cloud composition. For this reason, the detailed chemistry of extremely metal-poor stars closely reflects the nucleosynthetic yields of supernovae from massive Population III stars. Here we collate detailed chemical abundances of 53 extremely metal-poor stars from the literature and infer the masses of their Population III progenitors. We fit a simple initial mass function to the ensemble of inferred Population III star masses, and find that the mass distribution is well-represented by a powerlaw IMF with an exponent of \\$\\alpha=2.35^{+0.29}_{-0.24}\\$. The inferred maximum progenitor mass for supernovae from massive Population III stars is \\$M=87^{+13}_{-33}M_\\odot\\$, and we find no evidence for a contribution from stars with masses above \\$\\...

  4. Las tesis doctorales como instrumento para conocer la evolución de la producción en biblioteconomía y documentación: el caso del Departamento de Biblioteconomía y Documentación de la Universidad Carlos III Dissertations as tools for knowing the evolution of production on library and information science: the case study of the library and information science department of Carlos III University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarivette Ortiz-Sánchez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios doctorales son los que conducen al grado académico más alto y dada su importancia son regulados por diferentes normativas. Por ello es importante conocer la evolución de la producción investigadora de los departamentos que otorgan dicho grado. En este estudio se analiza el caso del Departamento de Biblioteconomía y Documentación (ByD de la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M a través de las 46 tesis doctorales defendidas durante los cursos 1996-1997 y 2005-2006. Su objetivo es conocer la evolución de la producción de tesis, la colaboración del Departamento con otras instituciones, el perfil actual de los autores, así como las fuentes y autores más citados en las tesis. Para ello se ha utilizado una metodología basada en técnicas bibliométricas, a fin de estudiar las 16,208 referencias utilizadas en las tesis. Se ha distribuido un cuestionario a los autores de las tesis para conocer su perfil actual. Entre los resultados se observa una media de 352 referencias por tesis, con preferencia a revistas y sobre temas relacionados con bibliometría y estudios de usuarios. En cuanto a la actividad actual de los autores de las tesis, cabe señalar que principalmente se encuentran en ambientes académicos y continúan investigando en su tema de tesis. Con respecto al consumo de información actual, se encontró similitud con la utilizada en las tesis.Doctoral studies lead to the top academic degree and given its significance they are regulated by norms. Therefore, it is important to know the University departments' profile and research evolution. This study analyzes the case of the Library and Information Science Department at Carlos III University of Madrid, focusing on the 46 doctoral theses produced in the mentioned department during the following periods: 1996-1997 and 2005-2006. The scope is the study of evolution of theses production, collaboration between that Department and other Institutions, the current profile of

  5. Impact of volcanism on the evolution of Lake Van (eastern Anatolia) III: Periodic (Nemrut) vs. episodic (Süphan) explosive eruptions and climate forcing reflected in a tephra gap between ca. 14 ka and ca. 30 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Sumita, Mari

    2014-09-01

    Fifteen Lateglacial to Holocene rhyolitic, dominantly primary tephra layers piston-cored and drilled (ICDP Paleovan drilling project) in western Lake Van (eastern Anatolia, Turkey) were precisely correlated to either of the two adjacent and active large volcanoes Nemrut and Süphan based on shard textures, mineralogy and mineral and glass compositions. The young peralkaline (comenditic to pantelleritic) primary rhyolitic Nemrut tephras are characterized by anorthoclase, hedenbergitic to augitic clinopyroxene, fayalitic olivine, minor quartz, and rare accessory chevkinite and zircon. Phenocrysts in subalkaline primary rhyolitic Süphan tephras are chiefly oligoclase-labradorite, with minor K-rich sanidine in some, biotite, amphibole, hypersthene, rare augitic clinopyroxene, relatively common allanite and rare zircon. Two contrasting explosive eruptive modes are distinguished from each other: episodic (Süphan) and periodic (Nemrut). The Lateglacial Süphan tephra swarm covers a short time interval of ca. 338 years between ca. 13,078 vy BP and 12,740 vy BP, eruptions having occurred statistically every ca. 42 years with especially short intervals between V-11 (reworked) and V-14. Causes for the strongly episodic Süphan explosive behavior might include seismic triggering of a volcano-magma system unable to erupt explosively without the benefit of external triggering, as reflected in pervasive faulting preceding the Süphan tephra swarm. Seismic triggering may have caused the rise of more mafic ("trachyandesitic") parent magma, heating near-surface pockets of highly evolved magma - that might have formed silicic domes during this stage of volcano evolution - resulting in ascent and finally explosive fragmentation of magma essentially by external factors, probably significantly enhanced by magma-water/ice interaction. Explosive eruptions of the Nemrut volcano system, interpreted to be underlain by a large fractionating magma reservoir, follow a more periodic mode of (a

  6. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  7. Radiation and cadmium induced biochemical alterations in mouse kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present investigation radiation and cadmium induced biochemical changes in the kidney of Swiss albino mice have been studied. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, adult male Swiss albino mice (6-8 weeks old) were divided into four groups. Group I (sham-irradiated), Group II (treated with CdCl2 solution 20 ppm), Group III (irradiated with 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 Gy gamma rays), Group IV (both irradiated with 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 Gy gamma rays and treated with CdCl2 solution). The animals were autopsied after 1, 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days of treatment. The kidney was taken out and different biochemical parameters, such as total proteins, glycogen, cholesterol, acid phosphatase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, DNA and RNA were estimated. Results: In irradiated animals, the values of total proteins, glycogen, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase activity and RNA increased continuously up to day-7 and decreased thereafter up to day-28. The changes were dose dependent. In CdCl2 treated animals, the values of glycogen and total proteins decreased during the early intervals and increased thereafter whereas the values of acid and alkaline phosphatase activity and RNA increased during early Intervals and decreased thereafter, The values of cholesterol and DNA showed decrease in all the experimental groups (except group I) up to day-7 and increase thereafter up to day-28. After combined treatment also, the parameters followed the same pattern of increase and decrease, but the changes were more pronounced indicating their synergistic effect. The biochemical parameters showed highly significant values (P<0.001) as compared to normal ones. Conclusion: These results indicate that combined treatment of cadmium and gamma radiations causes synergistic or additive effect

  8. BIOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by the following- Persistent albuminuria (>300mg/d or >200μg/min, that is confirmed on at least 2 occasions 3-6 months apart diabetic, progressive decline in the Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, elevated arterial blood pressure. The earliest biochemical criteria for the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is the presence of micro-albumin in the urine, which if left untreated will eventually lead to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD. Micro-albuminuria refers to the excretion of albumin in the urine at a rate that exceeds normal limits. The current study was conducted to establish the prevalence of micro-albuminuria in a sequential sample of diabetic patients attending hospital and OPD Clinic to determine its relationship with known and putative risk factors to identify micro- and normo-albuminuric patients in their sample for subsequent comparison in different age, sex, weight and creatinine clearance of the micro- and normo-albuminuric patients. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in one hundred patients at Saraswathi Institute of Medical Sciences, Anwarpur, Hapur, U. P. Patients having diabetes mellitus in different age group ranging from 30 to 70 years were selected. Data was analysed by SPSS software. Micro-albuminuria was observed in 35% in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It was observed that 65% patients were free from any type of albuminuria. Also micro-albuminuria was present in 10% of the patients less than 50 yrs. of age, while 15% of the patients more than 50 yrs. of age were having micro-albuminuria. There was a statistically significant correlation of micro-albuminuria with duration of diabetes. Incidence of micro-albuminuria increases with age as well as increased duration of diabetes mellitus. Our study shows that only 5% patients developed macro-albuminuria. Glycosylated haemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose was significantly raised among all these

  9. Simulation of Biochemical Pathway Adaptability Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosl, W J

    2005-01-26

    The systems approach to genomics seeks quantitative and predictive descriptions of cells and organisms. However, both the theoretical and experimental methods necessary for such studies still need to be developed. We are far from understanding even the simplest collective behavior of biomolecules, cells or organisms. A key aspect to all biological problems, including environmental microbiology, evolution of infectious diseases, and the adaptation of cancer cells is the evolvability of genomes. This is particularly important for Genomes to Life missions, which tend to focus on the prospect of engineering microorganisms to achieve desired goals in environmental remediation and climate change mitigation, and energy production. All of these will require quantitative tools for understanding the evolvability of organisms. Laboratory biodefense goals will need quantitative tools for predicting complicated host-pathogen interactions and finding counter-measures. In this project, we seek to develop methods to simulate how external and internal signals cause the genetic apparatus to adapt and organize to produce complex biochemical systems to achieve survival. This project is specifically directed toward building a computational methodology for simulating the adaptability of genomes. This project investigated the feasibility of using a novel quantitative approach to studying the adaptability of genomes and biochemical pathways. This effort was intended to be the preliminary part of a larger, long-term effort between key leaders in computational and systems biology at Harvard University and LLNL, with Dr. Bosl as the lead PI. Scientific goals for the long-term project include the development and testing of new hypotheses to explain the observed adaptability of yeast biochemical pathways when the myosin-II gene is deleted and the development of a novel data-driven evolutionary computation as a way to connect exploratory computational simulation with hypothesis

  10. Biochemical genetics of some Indian fishes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.; Qasim, S.Z.

    Studies on biochemical genetics of fishes, using electrophoretic methods, are relatively of recent origin. Earlier serum and eye lens protein were used to identify marine populations. This technique showed that closely related species have...

  11. Physics and Electro-Biochemical Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad P Pritscher

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Not Available Keywords: Biochemical technology, physics Received: 22 October 2008 / Received in revised form: 23 October 2008, Accepted: 24 October 2008 Published online: 07 January 2009

  12. A case study of evolutionary computation of biochemical adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations of evolution have a long history, but their relation to biology is questioned because of the perceived contingency of evolution. Here we provide an example of a biological process, adaptation, where simulations are argued to approach closer to biology. Adaptation is a common feature of sensory systems, and a plausible component of other biochemical networks because it rescales upstream signals to facilitate downstream processing. We create random gene networks numerically, by linking genes with interactions that model transcription, phosphorylation and protein–protein association. We define a fitness function for adaptation in terms of two functional metrics, and show that any reasonable combination of them will yield the same adaptive networks after repeated rounds of mutation and selection. Convergence to these networks is driven by positive selection and thus fast. There is always a path in parameter space of continuously improving fitness that leads to perfect adaptation, implying that the actual mutation rates we use in the simulation do not bias the results. Our results imply a kinetic view of evolution, i.e., it favors gene networks that can be learned quickly from the random examples supplied by mutation. This formulation allows for deductive predictions of the networks realized in nature

  13. Free energy simulations of important biochemical processes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang LIU; 刘洋

    2013-01-01

    Free energy simulations have been widely employed to compute the thermodynamic properties of many important biochemical processes. In the first part of this dissertation, two important biochemical processes, protonation/deprotonation of acid in solution and solvation of small organic molecules, are investigated using free energy simulations. Accurate computation of the pKa value of a compound in solution is important and challenging. To efficiently simulate the free energy change associat...

  14. RMBNToolbox: random models for biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemi Jari

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing interest to model biochemical and cell biological networks, as well as to the computational analysis of these models. The development of analysis methodologies and related software is rapid in the field. However, the number of available models is still relatively small and the model sizes remain limited. The lack of kinetic information is usually the limiting factor for the construction of detailed simulation models. Results We present a computational toolbox for generating random biochemical network models which mimic real biochemical networks. The toolbox is called Random Models for Biochemical Networks. The toolbox works in the Matlab environment, and it makes it possible to generate various network structures, stoichiometries, kinetic laws for reactions, and parameters therein. The generation can be based on statistical rules and distributions, and more detailed information of real biochemical networks can be used in situations where it is known. The toolbox can be easily extended. The resulting network models can be exported in the format of Systems Biology Markup Language. Conclusion While more information is accumulating on biochemical networks, random networks can be used as an intermediate step towards their better understanding. Random networks make it possible to study the effects of various network characteristics to the overall behavior of the network. Moreover, the construction of artificial network models provides the ground truth data needed in the validation of various computational methods in the fields of parameter estimation and data analysis.

  15. Type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (P-III-P), prolyl hydroxylase (PH), and laminin P sub 1 levels in serum and BALF of radiotherapy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Shuichi (Komaki Municipal Hospital, Aichi (Japan)); Shindo, Jo; Horiba, Michiaki; Hara, Michihiro; Inoue, Koji

    1992-01-01

    The etiology of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear, and at present there are no definite biochemical markers of its activity. We measured serum and BALF levels of type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (P-III-P), prolyl hydroxylase (PH), and laminin P{sub 1} in patients who had undergone radiotherapy for malignant neoplasms, and investigated their value as biochemical markers in a model of pulmonary fibrosis. The following results were obtained: 1) Patients with abnormal liver function had significantly higher serum P-III-P levels and showed a tendency to have higher serum PH levels. If P-III-P or PH are to be used as markers of pulmonary fibrosis, the effect of liver function must be taken into consideration; however, no significant difference was detected with respect to laminin P{sub 1} levels. 2) Serum P-III-P levels were significantly elevated by radiotherapy. 3) Laminin P{sub 1} levels rose in a similar manner to P-III-P levels after radiotherapy, but no significant change was detected. 4) In most cases, the levels of all markers in BALF were below the threshold of detection, nevertheless all three markers were elevated in a patient who developed diffuse radiation pneumonitis during radiotherapy. Increase in the lymphocyte count were found in BALF of this patient. 5) BALF hyaluronic acid levels were negative in the 3 cases assayed. 6) A significant correlation between P-III-P and laminin P{sub 1} in serum was shown, but no significant correlations could be found between the other combinations of markers in serum. Thus it appears that serum P-III-P and laminin P{sub 1} are valid biochemical markers of pulmonary fibrosis. It is expected that they will be useful for the detection of early radiation pneumonitis, the assessment of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, and the monitoring of steroid therapy. (author).

  16. Chemical Properties And Toxicity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-19

    The status of Cr(III) as an essential micronutrient for humans is currently under question. No functional Cr(III)-containing biomolecules have been definitively described as yet, and accumulated experience in the use of Cr(III) nutritional supplements (such as [Cr(pic){sub 3}], where pic = 2-pyridinecarboxylato) has shown no measurable benefits for nondiabetic people. Although the use of large doses of Cr(III) supplements may lead to improvements in glucose metabolism for type 2 diabetics, there is a growing concern over the possible genotoxicity of these compounds, particularly of [Cr(pic){sub 3}]. The current perspective discusses chemical transformations of Cr(III) nutritional supplements in biological media, with implications for both beneficial and toxic actions of Cr(III) complexes, which are likely to arise from the same biochemical mechanisms, dependent on concentrations of the reactive species. These species include: (1) partial hydrolysis products of Cr(III) nutritional supplements, which are capable of binding to biological macromolecules and altering their functions; and (2) highly reactive Cr(VI/V/IV) species and organic radicals, formed in reactions of Cr(III) with biological oxidants. Low concentrations of these species are likely to cause alterations in cell signaling (including enhancement of insulin signaling) through interactions with the active centers of regulatory enzymes in the cell membrane or in the cytoplasm, while higher concentrations are likely to produce genotoxic DNA lesions in the cell nucleus. These data suggest that the potential for genotoxic side-effects of Cr(III) complexes may outweigh their possible benefits as insulin enhancers, and that recommendations for their use as either nutritional supplements or antidiabetic drugs need to be reconsidered in light of these recent findings.

  17. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report

  18. Lutetium(III cyclotetraphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïcha Mbarek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound, tetralutetium(III tris(cyclotetraphosphate, Lu4(P4O123, were obtained by solid-state reaction. The cubic structure is isotypic with its AlIII and ScIII analogues and is built up from four-membered (P4O124− phosphate ring anions (overline{4} symmetry, isolated from each other and further linked through isolated LuO6 octahedra (.3. symmetry via corner sharing. Each LuO6 octahedron is linked to six (P4O124− rings, while each (P4O124− ring is linked to eight LuO6 octahedra.

  19. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  20. A general method for modeling biochemical and biomedical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Roberto; Lerd Ng, Jia; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    The impressive achievements of biomedical science have come mostly from experimental research with human subjects, animal models, and sophisticated laboratory techniques. Additionally, theoretical chemistry has been a major aid in designing new drugs. Here we introduce a method which is similar to others already well known in theoretical systems biology, but which specifically addresses biochemical changes as the human body responds to medical interventions. It is common in systems biology to use first-order differential equations to model the time evolution of various chemical concentrations, and we as physicists can make a significant impact through designing realistic models and then solving the resulting equations. Biomedical research is rapidly advancing, and the technique presented in this talk can be applied in arbitrarily large models containing tens, hundreds, or even thousands of interacting species, to determine what beneficial effects and side effects may result from pharmaceuticals or other medical interventions.

  1. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobaloximes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Jillian L; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2009-12-21

    Natural photosynthesis uses sunlight to drive the conversion of energy-poor molecules (H(2)O, CO(2)) to energy-rich ones (O(2), (CH(2)O)(n)). Scientists are working hard to develop efficient artificial photosynthetic systems toward the "Holy Grail" of solar-driven water splitting. High on the list of challenges is the discovery of molecules that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons to H(2). In this Account, we report on one promising class of molecules: cobalt complexes with diglyoxime ligands (cobaloximes). Chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical methods all have been utilized to explore proton reduction catalysis by cobaloxime complexes. Reduction of a Co(II)-diglyoxime generates a Co(I) species that reacts with a proton source to produce a Co(III)-hydride. Then, in a homolytic pathway, two Co(III)-hydrides react in a bimolecular step to eliminate H(2). Alternatively, in a heterolytic pathway, protonation of the Co(III)-hydride produces H(2) and Co(III). A thermodynamic analysis of H(2) evolution pathways sheds new light on the barriers and driving forces of the elementary reaction steps involved in proton reduction by Co(I)-diglyoximes. In combination with experimental results, this analysis shows that the barriers to H(2) evolution along the heterolytic pathway are, in most cases, substantially greater than those of the homolytic route. In particular, a formidable barrier is associated with Co(III)-diglyoxime formation along the heterolytic pathway. Our investigations of cobaloxime-catalyzed H(2) evolution, coupled with the thermodynamic preference for a homolytic route, suggest that the rate-limiting step is associated with formation of the hydride. An efficient water splitting device may require the tethering of catalysts to an electrode surface in a fashion that does not inhibit association of Co(III)-hydrides. PMID:19928840

  2. Photon track evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given the time scale of biological, biochemical, biophysical and physical effects in a radiation exposure of living tissue, the first physical stage can be considered to be independent of time. All the physical interactions caused by the incident photons happen at the same starting time. From this point of view it would seem that the evolution of photon tracks is not a relevant topic for analysis; however, if the photon track is considered as a sequence of several interactions, there are several steps until the total degradation of the energy of the primary photon. We can characterise the photon track structure by the probability p(E,j), that is, the probability that a photon with energy E suffers j secondary interactions. The aim of this work is to analyse the photon track structure by considering j as a step of the photon track evolution towards the total degradation of the photon energy. Low energy photons (<150 keV) are considered, with water phantoms and half-extended geometry. The photon track evolution concept is presented and compared with the energy deposition along the track and also with the spatial distribution of the several steps in the photon track. (authors)

  3. In the light of directed evolution: Pathways of adaptive protein evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bloom, Jesse D; Arnold, Frances H.

    2009-01-01

    Directed evolution is a widely-used engineering strategy for improving the stabilities or biochemical functions of proteins by repeated rounds of mutation and selection. These experiments offer empirical lessons about how proteins evolve in the face of clearly-defined laboratory selection pressures. Directed evolution has revealed that single amino acid mutations can enhance properties such as catalytic activity or stability and that adaptation can often occur through pathways consisting of s...

  4. Summary of Session III

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III "Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up" of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  5. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  6. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs...

  7. Evolutionary origin of power-laws in Biochemical Reaction Network; embedding abundance distribution into topology

    OpenAIRE

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2005-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of universal statistics in biochemical reaction network is studied, to explain the power-law distribution of reaction links and the power-law distributions of chemical abundances. Using cell models with catalytic reaction network, we find evidence that the power-law distribution in abundances of chemicals emerges by the selection of cells with higher growth speeds. Through the further evolution, this inhomogeneity in chemical abundances is shown to be embedded in the d...

  8. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  9. Reconfigurable neuromorphic computation in biochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hui-Ju Katherine; Jiang, Jie-Hong R; Fages, Francois

    2015-08-01

    Implementing application-specific computation and control tasks within a biochemical system has been an important pursuit in synthetic biology. Most synthetic designs to date have focused on realizing systems of fixed functions using specifically engineered components, thus lacking flexibility to adapt to uncertain and dynamically-changing environments. To remedy this limitation, an analog and modularized approach to realize reconfigurable neuromorphic computation with biochemical reactions is presented. We propose a biochemical neural network consisting of neuronal modules and interconnects that are both reconfigurable through external or internal control over the concentrations of certain molecular species. Case studies on classification and machine learning applications using the DNA strain displacement technology demonstrate the effectiveness of our design in both reconfiguration and autonomous adaptation. PMID:26736417

  10. Calculus III essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Calculus III includes vector analysis, real valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrations, vector fields, and infinite series.

  11. Implementace Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Sychra, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of bachelor thesis is to introduce counterparty risk as one of the main risks, which the banks are exposed to. There is a decription of regulation and opinions of the expert community on its necessity in the thesis. The thesis includes characterization of institutions, which are connected to Basel frameworks, summary of standards Basel I and Basel II and especially new regulatory framework Basel III. This particular standard comprises new revision of capital charge for counterparty ri...

  12. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, and other measurements collected using bottle from Ice Camp FRAM III in the Arctic Ocean from 8 April 1981 to 16 April 1981 (NODC Accession 0002237)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical and biochemical data obtained by Bigelow Laboratory Investigators from Ice Camp FRAM III. Profile data digitized from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sceinces...

  13. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  14. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  15. Survey of Biochemical Education in Japanese Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Reports findings of questionnaires sent to faculty in charge of biochemical education in medical schools and other programs from dentistry to agriculture. Total class hours have declined since 1984. New trends include bioethics and computer-assisted learning. Tables show trends in lecture hours, lecture content, laboratory hours, core subject…

  16. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve

  17. 2009 Biochemical Conversion Platform Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, John [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion platform review meeting, held on April 14-16, 2009, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown, Denver, Colorado.

  18. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  19. Separation of Am(III), Cm(III), and Cf(III) using capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivalent actinides Am(III), Cm(III), and Cf(III) were successfully separated for the first time using capillary electrophoresis in 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid/acetic acid. It was found that the ionic radius was primarily important for separation of trivalent actinides as well as lanthanides in this condition. The stability constants of the Am(III) complexes with 2-hydroxyisobutyrate were estimated using the correlations between the molar fraction ratio of lanthanides and their ionic radii. (orig.)

  20. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  1. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type III

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions mucopolysaccharidosis type III mucopolysaccharidosis type III Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III), also known as Sanfilippo ...

  2. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    This draft of a book on Schumpeter is distributed for commenting. It is a stylised intellectual biography that focus on the emergence and extension of the Schumpeterian vision and analysis of economic and social evolution. The draft provides novel interpretations of Schumpeter's six major books. He...... reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model of...... economic evolution and added evolutionary contributions to other social sciences. History, which was published by his widow, was based on his evolutionary theory of the history of economic analysis. This sequential analysis of Schumpeter's six books demonstrates the progress he within his research...

  3. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wiggins, Brandon K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: dwhalen1999@gmail.com [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  4. Kombucha tea fermentation: Microbial and biochemical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Chakraborty, Writachit; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-03-01

    Kombucha tea, a non-alcoholic beverage, is acquiring significant interest due to its claimed beneficial properties. The microbial community of Kombucha tea consists of bacteria and yeast which thrive in two mutually non-exclusive compartments: the soup or the beverage and the biofilm floating on it. The microbial community and the biochemical properties of the beverage have so far mostly been described in separate studies. This, however, may prevent understanding the causal links between the microbial communities and the beneficial properties of Kombucha tea. Moreover, an extensive study into the microbial and biochemical dynamics has also been missing. In this study, we thus explored the structure and dynamics of the microbial community along with the biochemical properties of Kombucha tea at different time points up to 21 days of fermentation. We hypothesized that several biochemical properties will change during the course of fermentation along with the shifts in the yeast and bacterial communities. The yeast community of the biofilm did not show much variation over time and was dominated by Candida sp. (73.5-83%). The soup however, showed a significant shift in dominance from Candida sp. to Lachancea sp. on the 7th day of fermentation. This is the first report showing Candida as the most dominating yeast genus during Kombucha fermentation. Komagateibacter was identified as the single largest bacterial genus present in both the biofilm and the soup (~50%). The bacterial diversity was higher in the soup than in the biofilm with a peak on the seventh day of fermentation. The biochemical properties changed with the progression of the fermentation, i.e., beneficial properties of the beverage such as the radical scavenging ability increased significantly with a maximum increase at day 7. We further observed a significantly higher D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone content and caffeine degradation property compared to previously described Kombucha tea fermentations. Our

  5. Biochemical considerations in the design of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of radiopharmaceutical chemistry is to design and develop radiotracers targeted to an organ or function whose activity kinetics in tissue can be detected externally by a gamma or a positron device. Radiopharmaceuticals are divided into the general categories of specific and non-specific agents. The specific radiopharmaceuticals are the tracers that follow a biochemical pathway or are involved in a particular interaction, for example metabolic substrates, drugs or analogs, and antibodies. This paper will focus on trends in the design of specific agents. The best radionuclides for the development of specific tracers are the positron emitting nuclides: carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. First the design of radiopharmaceuticals are considered in general (labeling strategies, stereochemical effects, specific activity). Next, a brief summary of the use of several radiopharmaceuticals is presented on the basis of their biochemical rationale. (orig./G.J.P.)

  6. Cytologic-Biochemical Radiation Dosimeters in Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The result of radiation interacting with living tissue is the deposition of energy therein. This energy triggers numerous chemical reactions within the molecules of the target tissues. We have measured in man the results of some of these reactions at doses up to 300 rads: chromosome aberrations; alterations in the kinetics of specific human cell populations; changes in 37 biochemical constituents of serum and/or urine. The utilization of chromosomes as a biological dosimeter is partially perfected but there are numerous discrepancies in data between different laboratories. Etiocholanolone can be used to evaluate marrow injury before the white-cell count falls below 5000/mm3. Most biochemical dosimeters evaluated gave negative or inconsistent results. However, salivary amylase is a promising indicator of human radiation injury from doses as low as 100 rads. (author)

  7. Reconstructing biochemical pathways from time course data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srividhya, Jeyaraman; Crampin, Edmund J; McSharry, Patrick E; Schnell, Santiago

    2007-03-01

    Time series data on biochemical reactions reveal transient behavior, away from chemical equilibrium, and contain information on the dynamic interactions among reacting components. However, this information can be difficult to extract using conventional analysis techniques. We present a new method to infer biochemical pathway mechanisms from time course data using a global nonlinear modeling technique to identify the elementary reaction steps which constitute the pathway. The method involves the generation of a complete dictionary of polynomial basis functions based on the law of mass action. Using these basis functions, there are two approaches to model construction, namely the general to specific and the specific to general approach. We demonstrate that our new methodology reconstructs the chemical reaction steps and connectivity of the glycolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis from time course experimental data. PMID:17370261

  8. Optical Biochemical Platforms for Nanoparticles Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Campanella, Clarissa Martina

    2014-01-01

    In the biochemical sensing field, a fervent research activity related to the development of real time, low cost, compact and high throughput devices for the detection and characterization of natural or synthetic nanoparticles NPs actually exists. In this research scenario, different platforms for biosensing purposes have been developed according to the huge amount of physical effects involved in the transduction of the biochemical-signal into a measurable output signal. In the present work two different optical platforms for NP detection have been investigated, one based on integrated optics and the other based on microscopy. Both the approaches rely on the study of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with a small particle in the hypothesis of dealing with a Rayleigh scatterer, i.e. a nanoparticle having a size really smaller than the one of the wavelength of the incident light and scattering light elastically.

  9. Biological dosimetry: biochemical and cellular parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early after the beginning of radiobiology studies, biochemistry has led to research of a biological dosimeter. From an extensive literature review, methods were selected that might be suitable for dose assessment via biochemical indicators. By now, research both in laboratory animals and in therapeutic or accidental human exposures, do not allow to retain a biochemical parameter alone for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. Several enzymatic activities have been precociously studied after irradiation: from these studies, it seems that analysis of four enzymatic activities in serum (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, amylase, lactic dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase) could be the most useful dosimetry system for mass sorting. Detection of DNA damage or methods for measuring somatic mutations are currently advancing and provide important new opportunities for biological dosimetry of low doses

  10. Advancement in biochemical assays in andrology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolf-BernhardSchill; RaftHenkel

    1999-01-01

    Determination of maikers of sperm function, accessory sex gland secretion and silent male genital tract inflammation is of considerable diagnostic value in the evaluation of male infertility. The introduction of biochemical tests into the analysis of male factor has the advantage that standardized assays with a coefficient of variafion characteristic of clinical chemistry are performed, in contrast to biological test systems with a large variability .Biochemical parameters may be used in clinical practice to evaluate the sperm fertitizing capacity (acrosin, aniline blue,ROS), to characterize male accessory sex gland secretinns (fructose, a-glucosidase, PSA), and to identify men with silent genital tract inflammation (elastase, C'3 complement component, coeruloplasmin, IgA, IgG, ROS). (As/an J Androl 1999 Jun; 1: 45-51)

  11. Biochemical changes in ginger after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginger (Zingiber officinate) was irradiated with gamma rays (0.1Kgy, 1.0Kgy). Biochemical changes during storage at room temperature (23-28 degree centigrade), in sand (23-28 degree centigrade) and at cold (8 degree centigrade) temperature were observed. Changes in starch, soluble protein, fixed oil and volatile oil contents showed that treatment of ginger at 0.1Kgy radiation level was most appropriate for storage upto 45 days

  12. Prions: the danger of biochemical weapons

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Almeida Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of biotechnology increases the risk of using biochemical weapons for mass destruction. Prions are unprecedented infectious pathogens that cause a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases by a novel mechanism. They are transmissible particles that are devoid of nucleic acid. Due to their singular characteristics, Prions emerge as potential danger since they can be used in the development of such weapons. Prions cause fatal infectious diseases, and to date there is no therapeutic...

  13. The stochastic dynamics of biochemical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Challenger, Joseph Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the stochastic dynamics of biochemical reaction systems. The importance of the intrinsic fluctuations in these systems has become more widely appreciated in recent years, and should be accounted for when modelling such systems mathematically. These models are described as continuous time Markov processes and their dynamics defined by a master equation. Analytical progress is made possible by the use of the van Kampen system-size expansion, which splits the dynamics...

  14. The Biochemical Anatomy of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, E.A.; Zhang, W.; Selimi, F.; Earnheart, J.C.; Slimak, M.A.; Santos-Torres, J.; Ibanez-Tallon, I.; Aoki, C; Chait, B. T.; Heintz, N

    2012-01-01

    Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD) exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from th...

  15. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hong-Xuan; Dempsey, William P.; Goutsias, John

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems as well as for designing optimal approaches for selective perturbation and intervention. Deterministic sensitivity analysis techniques, using derivatives of the system response, have been extensively used in the literature. However, these techniques suffer from several drawbacks, which must be carefully considered before using them in problems of systems biology. ...

  16. Biochemical and functional characterisation of casein and whey protein hydrolysates.

    OpenAIRE

    Ven, van de, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Whey protein and sodium caseinate were hydrolysed with commercially available enzyme preparations. The resulting hydrolysates were characterised using several analytical characterisation methods and by determination of several functional properties. Subsequently, correlations between the biochemical characteristics themselves and between biochemical and functional properties were studied using multivariate regression analysis.Biochemical characteristics of hydrolysates were determined using u...

  17. [Biochemical antenatal screening for fetal anomalies.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfadóttir, G; Jónsson, J J

    2001-05-01

    Biochemical antenatal screening started 30 years ago. Initially, the goal was to detect neural tube defects by measuring a-fetoprotein in maternal serum (MS-AFP) and amniotic fluid (AF-AFP). The serendipitous discovery of an association between low AFP maternal serum concentration and chromosomal anomalies resulted in increased research interest in biochemical screening in pregnancy. Subsequently double, triple or quadruple tests in 2nd trimester of pregnancy became widely used in combination with fetal chromosome determination in at risk individuals. In Iceland, antenatal screening for chromosomal anomalies has essentially been based on fetal chromosome studies offered to pregnant women 35 years or older. This strategy needs to be revised. Recently first trimester biochemical screening based on maternal serum pregnancy associated plasma protein A (MS-PAPP-A) and free b-human chorionic gonadotropin (MS-free b-hCG) and multivariate risk assessment has been developed. This screening test can be improved if done in conjunction with nuchal translucency measurements in an early sonography scan. PMID:17018982

  18. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  19. Hydrogel-based piezoresistive biochemical microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Margarita; Schulz, Volker; Gerlach, Gerald; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Solzbacher, Florian; Magda, Jules J.; Tathireddy, Prashant; Lin, Genyao; Orthner, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This work is motivated by a demand for inexpensive, robust and reliable biochemical sensors with high signal reproducibility and long-term-stable sensitivity, especially for medical applications. Micro-fabricated sensors can provide continuous monitoring and on-line control of analyte concentrations in ambient aqueous solutions. The piezoresistive biochemical sensor containing a special biocompatible polymer (hydrogel) with a sharp volume phase transition in the neutral physiological pH range near 7.4 can detect a specific analyte, for example glucose. Thereby the hydrogel-based biochemical sensors are useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. The response of the glucosesensitive hydrogel was studied at different regimes of the glucose concentration change and of the solution supply. Sensor response time and accuracy with which a sensor can track gradual changes in glucose was estimated. Additionally, the influence of various recommended sterilization methods on the gel swelling properties and on the mechano-electrical transducer of the pH-sensors has been evaluated in order to choose the most optimal sterilization method for the implantable sensors. It has been shown that there is no negative effect of gamma irradiation with a dose of 25.7 kGy on the hydrogel sensitivity. In order to achieve an optimum between sensor signal amplitude and sensor response time, corresponding calibration and measurement procedures have been proposed and evaluated for the chemical sensors.

  20. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  1. Pseudo Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance "modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow," some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  2. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  3. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  4. The fine details of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2009-08-01

    Charles Darwin's theory of evolution was based on studies of biology at the species level. In the time since his death, studies at the molecular level have confirmed his ideas about the kinship of all life on Earth and have provided a wealth of detail about the evolutionary relationships between different species and a deeper understanding of the finer workings of natural selection. We now have a wealth of data, including the genome sequences of a wide range of organisms, an even larger number of protein sequences, a significant knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of proteins, DNA and other biological molecules, and a huge body of information about the operation of these molecules as systems in the molecular machinery of all living things. This issue of Biochemical Society Transactions contains papers from oral presentations given at a Biochemical Society Focused Meeting to commemorate the 200th Anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, held on 26-27 January 2009 at the Wellcome Trust Conference Centre, Cambridge. The talks reported on some of the insights into evolution which have been obtained from the study of protein sequences, structures and systems. PMID:19614583

  5. Semiconducting III-V compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Hilsum, C; Henisch, Heinz R

    1961-01-01

    Semiconducting III-V Compounds deals with the properties of III-V compounds as a family of semiconducting crystals and relates these compounds to the monatomic semiconductors silicon and germanium. Emphasis is placed on physical processes that are peculiar to III-V compounds, particularly those that combine boron, aluminum, gallium, and indium with phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony (for example, indium antimonide, indium arsenide, gallium antimonide, and gallium arsenide).Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an assessment of the crystal structure and binding of III-V compounds, f

  6. PopIII signatures in the spectra of PopII/I GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Maio, U.; Ciardi, B.; Salvaterra, R.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate signatures of Population III (PopIII) stars in the metal-enriched environment of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) originating from Population II-I (PopII/I) stars by using abundance ratios derived from numerical simulations that follow stellar evolution and chemical enrichment. We find that at z > 10 more than 10 per cent of PopII/I GRBs explode in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (we refer to them as GRBII→III). Although the formation of GRBII→III is more frequent than that of pristine PopIII GRBs (GRBIIIs), we find that the expected GRBII→III observed rate is comparable to that of GRBIIIs, due to the usually larger luminosities of the latter. GRBII→III events take place preferentially in small protogalaxies with stellar masses M⋆ ˜ 104.5-107 M⊙, star formation rates SFR ˜ 10^{-3}-10^{-1} M_{⊙} yr^{-1} and metallicities Z ˜ 10- 4-10- 2 Z⊙. On the other hand, galaxies with Z environments pre-enriched by PopIII stars. Abundance measurements for GRBs at z ≃ 5 - such as GRB 100219A and GRB 111008A - are still poor to draw definitive conclusions, although their hosts seem to be dominated by PopII/I pollution and do not show evident signatures of massive PopIII pre-enrichment.

  7. Complexes of 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexes of 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III) have been synthesized as polycrystalline hydrated solids, and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopy, magnetic studies and also by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric measurements. The analysed complexes have the following colours: violet for Nd(III), white for Gd(III) and cream for Ho(III) compounds. The carboxylate groups bind as bidentate chelating (Ho) or bridging ligands (Nd, Gd). On heating to 1173K in air the complexes decompose in several steps. At first, they dehydrate in one step to form anhydrous salts, that next decompose to the oxides of respective metals. The gaseous products of their thermal decomposition in nitrogen were also determined and the magnetic susceptibilities were measured over the temperature range of 76-303K and the magnetic moments were calculated. The results show that 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III) are high-spin complexes with weak ligand fields. The solubility value in water at 293K for analysed 4-chlorophenoxyacetates is in the order of 10-4mol/dm3. (author)

  8. Evaluation of biochemical alterations produced by combined exposure of fenvalerate and nitrate in Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalpreet Kaur Gill

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluation of combined effect of fenvalerate and nitrate on biochemical parameters in buffalo calves. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male buffalo calves were divided into four groups of four calves each. Group I receiving no treatment served as the control. Group II and III animals were orally administered with fenvalerate (1.0 mg/kg/day and sodium nitrate (20 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 21 consecutive days and were kept as positive control. Group IV animals were co-administered with fenvalerate and sodium nitrate at the above dose rates for 21 consecutive days. Biochemical parameters including Aspartate aminotransferase (AST, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, Glucose, Total protein, Albumin, Cholesterol, Blood urea nitrogen (BUN and Creatinine were determined on 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 day of treatment. Estimation of these parameters was also done on 7th day of post-treatment period. Results: Co-administration of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate produced significant increase in the plasma levels of AST, ALP, GGT, LDH, glucose, BUN, cholesterol and creatinine while significant decrease in the plasma levels of total proteins was observed. No significant alteration was observed in albumin levels. Extent of organ damage as evidenced by biochemical alterations was more pronounced in calves exposed to combination of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate as compared to their individual exposures. Conclusion: Fenvalerate and sodium nitrate co-administration potentiates the toxicological injury produced, in comparison to their individual exposure.

  9. Prostate stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy using a standard linear accelerator: Toxicity, biochemical, and pathological outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Biological dose escalation through stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) holds promise of improved patient convenience, system capacity and tumor control with decreased cost and side effects. The objectives are to report the toxicities, biochemical and pathologic outcomes of this prospective study. Materials and methods: A phase I/II study was performed where low risk localized prostate cancer received SABR 35 Gy in 5 fractions, once weekly on standard linear accelerators. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scores were used to assess acute and late toxicities, respectively. Biochemical control (BC) was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results: As of May 2012, 84 patients have completed treatment with a median follow-up of 55 months (range 13–68 months). Median age was 67 years and median PSA was 5.3 ng/ml. The following toxicities were observed: acute grade 3+: 0% gastrointestinal (GI), 1% genitourinary (GU), 0% fatigue; late grade 3+: 1% GI, 1% GU. Ninety-six percent were biopsy negative post-treatment. The 5-year BC was 98%. Conclusions: This novel technique employing standard linear accelerators to deliver an extreme hypofractionated schedule of radiotherapy is feasible, well tolerated and shows excellent pathologic and biochemical control

  10. ROSA-III system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ROSA-III system and its instrumentations are described. The informations are necessary to understand and analyze the experimental data obtained from loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs) conducted in the ROSA (Rig of Safety Assessment)-III facility. (author)

  11. Biochemical Network Stochastic Simulator (BioNetS: software for stochastic modeling of biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elston Timothy C

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrinsic fluctuations due to the stochastic nature of biochemical reactions can have large effects on the response of biochemical networks. This is particularly true for pathways that involve transcriptional regulation, where generally there are two copies of each gene and the number of messenger RNA (mRNA molecules can be small. Therefore, there is a need for computational tools for developing and investigating stochastic models of biochemical networks. Results We have developed the software package Biochemical Network Stochastic Simulator (BioNetS for efficientlyand accurately simulating stochastic models of biochemical networks. BioNetS has a graphical user interface that allows models to be entered in a straightforward manner, and allows the user to specify the type of random variable (discrete or continuous for each chemical species in the network. The discrete variables are simulated using an efficient implementation of the Gillespie algorithm. For the continuous random variables, BioNetS constructs and numerically solvesthe appropriate chemical Langevin equations. The software package has been developed to scale efficiently with network size, thereby allowing large systems to be studied. BioNetS runs as a BioSpice agent and can be downloaded from http://www.biospice.org. BioNetS also can be run as a stand alone package. All the required files are accessible from http://x.amath.unc.edu/BioNetS. Conclusions We have developed BioNetS to be a reliable tool for studying the stochastic dynamics of large biochemical networks. Important features of BioNetS are its ability to handle hybrid models that consist of both continuous and discrete random variables and its ability to model cell growth and division. We have verified the accuracy and efficiency of the numerical methods by considering several test systems.

  12. Stellar Evolution Physics 2 Volume Hardback Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iben, Icko

    2012-12-01

    Volume 1: Part I. Introduction and Overview: 1. Qualitative description of single and binary star evolution; 2. Quantitative foundations of stellar evolution theory; Part II. Basic Physical Processes in Stellar Interiors: 3. Properties of and physical processes in the interiors of main sequence stars - order of magnitude estimates; 4. Statistical physics, thermodynamics, and equations of state; 5. Polytropes and single zone models: elementary tools for understanding some aspects of stellar structure and evolution; 6. Hydrogen-burning nuclear reactions and energy-generation rates; 7. Photon-matter interactions and opacity; 8. Equations of stellar evolution and methods of solution; Part III. Pre-Main Sequence, Main Sequence, and Shell Hydrogen Burning Evolution of Single Stars: 9. Star formation and evolution to the main-sequence; 10. Solar structure and neutrino physics; 11. Evolution during core hydrogen-burning phases up to the onset of helium burning; Volume 2: Part IV. Transport Processes, Weak Interaction Processes and Helium-Burning Reactions: 12. Diffusion and gravitational settling; 13. Heat conduction by electrons; 14. Beta decay and electron capture at high densities in stars; 15. The current-current weak interaction and the production of neutrino-antineutrino pairs; 16. Helium-burning nuclear reactions and energy-generation rates; Part V. Evolution during Helium-Burning Phases: 17. Evolution of a low mass model burning helium and hydrogen; 18. Evolution of an intermediate mass model burning helium and hydrogen; 19. Neutron production and neutron capture in a thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch star of intermediate mass; 20. Evolution of a massive population I model during helium- and carbon-burning stages; Part VI. Terminal Evolution of Low and Intermediate Mass Stars: 21. Wind mass loss on the AGB and formation of a circumstellar envelope, evolution of the remnant as the central star of a planetary nebula, and white dwarf evolution; Index.

  13. Representing Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, Gry

    2012-01-01

    article discusses Willumsen's etching in the context of evolutionary theory, arguing that Willumsen is a rare example of an artist who not only let the theory of evolution fuel his artistic imagination, but also concerned himself with a core issue of the theory, namely to what extent it could be applied...

  14. Cepheid evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the phases of stellar evolution relevant to Cepheid variables of both Types I and II is presented. Type I Cepheids arise as a result of normal post-main sequence evolutionary behavior of many stars in the intermediate to massive range of stellar masses. In contrast, Type II Cepheids generally originate from low-mass stars of low metalicity which are undergoing post core helium-burning evolution. Despite great progress in the past two decades, uncertainties still remain in such areas as how to best model convective overshoot, semiconvection, stellar atmospheres, rotation, and binary evolution as well as uncertainties in important physical parameters such as the nuclear reaction rates, opacity, and mass loss rates. The potential effect of these uncertainties on stellar evolution models is discussed. Finally, comparisons between theoretical predictions and observations of Cepheid variables are presented for a number of cases. The results of these comparisons show both areas of agreement and disagreement with the latter result providing incentive for further research

  15. BNDB – The Biochemical Network Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufmann Michael

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances in high-throughput techniques and efficient data acquisition methods have resulted in a massive amount of life science data. The data is stored in numerous databases that have been established over the last decades and are essential resources for scientists nowadays. However, the diversity of the databases and the underlying data models make it difficult to combine this information for solving complex problems in systems biology. Currently, researchers typically have to browse several, often highly focused, databases to obtain the required information. Hence, there is a pressing need for more efficient systems for integrating, analyzing, and interpreting these data. The standardization and virtual consolidation of the databases is a major challenge resulting in a unified access to a variety of data sources. Description We present the Biochemical Network Database (BNDB, a powerful relational database platform, allowing a complete semantic integration of an extensive collection of external databases. BNDB is built upon a comprehensive and extensible object model called BioCore, which is powerful enough to model most known biochemical processes and at the same time easily extensible to be adapted to new biological concepts. Besides a web interface for the search and curation of the data, a Java-based viewer (BiNA provides a powerful platform-independent visualization and navigation of the data. BiNA uses sophisticated graph layout algorithms for an interactive visualization and navigation of BNDB. Conclusion BNDB allows a simple, unified access to a variety of external data sources. Its tight integration with the biochemical network library BN++ offers the possibility for import, integration, analysis, and visualization of the data. BNDB is freely accessible at http://www.bndb.org.

  16. Biochemical changes in blood under Cr6+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzenko E.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For the manufacture of dentures many different alloys containing chromium are used. Interaction with oral fluid, organic acids and food, results in formation of Cr3+, Cr6+ ions, but their influence on the whole organism is poorly investigated. Objective. To analyze the biochemical changes in blood plasma during the influence of Cr6+ ions. Methods. 15 animals of experimental group were receiving drinking water with potassium dichromate in a dose of 0,2 mol/l. Rats of control group (5 individuals drank usual drinking water. Animals were led out of experiment on the 20th, 40th and 60th days after the beginning of introduction of potassium dichromate. Results. It was established that at the beginning of experiment the blood biochemical indicators of control and the 1st experimental groups differed by its content. Increase of urea concentration led to suspicion about violation of a glomerular filtration, damage of a kidney parenchyma and tissue disintegration. On the 20th and 40th days of experiment the symptoms of acidosis and increase of potassium ions concentration in blood plasma were defined. Continuous and dynamic increase of creatin-phosphokinase was observed during 60 days of experiment. Conclusion. Biochemical changes in blood under the influence of Cr6+ ions evidence their toxic action on an organism. Especial concern is caused by changes of ionic composition and increase of the atherogenic index of blood plasma on the 40th day of experiment. Substantial increase of the creatin-phosphokinase level indicates general somatic influence of chromium ions.

  17. Impact of scaffold rigidity on the design and evolution of an artificial Diels-Alderase

    OpenAIRE

    Preiswerk, Nathalie; Beck, Tobias; Schulz, Jessica D.; Milovník, Peter; Mayer, Clemens; Siegel, Justin B.; Baker, David; Hilvert, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Creating artificial enzymes that catalyze arbitrary chemical reactions is challenging. Although computational approaches to this problem hold great promise, starting designs typically exhibit low efficiency and require extensive optimization through directed evolution. In this study, we chronicle the evolution of a modestly active, computationally designed Diels-Alderase into a proficient biocatalyst for an abiological [4+2] cycloaddition reaction. Biochemical and structural characterization ...

  18. Fluctuation preserving coarse graining for biochemical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Altaner, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Finite stochastic Markov models play a major role for modelling biochemical pathways. Such models are a coarse-grained description of the underlying microscopic dynamics and can be considered mesoscopic. The level of coarse-graining is to a certain extend arbitrary since it depends on the resolution of accomodating measurements. Here, we present a way to simplify such stochastic descriptions, which preserves both the meso-micro and the meso-macro connection. The former is achieved by demanding locality, the latter by considering cycles on the network of states. Using single- and multicycle examples we demonstrate how our new method preserves fluctuations of observables much better than na\\"ive approaches.

  19. Radiation treatment of drugs, biochemicals and vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concise and tabulated review reports experimental results on the effects of radiation treatment on drugs, vaccines, biochemicals and adjuvants including enzymes as well. Irradiation was mostly performed by γ-radiation using 60Co and to a lesser extent by 137Cs, 182Ta, X-rays and accelerators. Ionizing radiation proved to be a useful tool for sterilization and inactivation in producing drugs, vaccines, and bioactive agents and will contribute to realize procedures difficultly solvable as to engineering and economy, respectively. 124 refs

  20. Induced biochemical conversions of heavy crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Products formed during multiple interactions of microorganisms with oils fall into two major categories: those formed due to the action of indigenous microorganisms under reservoir conditions over geological periods of time and those products which are generated by the action of introduced organisms. The extreme end product of the first category is the production of heavy 'biodegraded' crudes. The extreme end product of the second category is the production of reduced sulfates due to the introduction of sulfate-reducing bacteria which may lead to the souring of a field. There is, however, a select group of microorganisms whose action on the crudes is beneficial. The interactions between such microorganisms and different crude oils occur through complex biochemical and chemical reactions. These reactions depend on multiple variables within and at the interface of a multicomponent system consisting of organic, aqueous, and inorganic components. Studies, carried out in this laboratory (BNL) of biochemical and chemical reactions in crude oils which involve extremophilic organisms (organisms which thrive in extreme environments), have shown that the reactions are not random and follow distinct trends. These trends can be categorized. The use of a group of characteristic chemical markers, such as mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of light and heavy hydrocarbons, heterocyclic and organometallic compounds, as well as total trace metal and heteroatom contents of crude oils before and after the biochemical treatment allows to follow the type and the extent of chemical changes which occur during the biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils by microorganisms. The bioconversion involves multiple, simultaneous, and/or concurrent chemical reactions in which the microorganisms serve as biocatalysts. In this sense, the biocatalysts are active in a reaction medium which depends on the chemical composition of the crude and the selectivity of the biocatalyst. Thus, the

  1. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  2. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-05-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  3. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH)2 type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the 'alkali disturbed zone' of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  4. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N. [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W.; Fritz, P.; Geyer, S.; Geyer, W.; Hanschman, G.; Kopinke, F.D.; Poerschmann, J. [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I.D. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E.; Hughes, C.R. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E.K. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E. [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B. [Cement Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A.F. [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  5. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N. [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K. [Goeteborg University (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W.; Fritz, P.; Geyer, S.; Geyer, W.; Hanschman, G.; Kopinke, F.D.; Poerschmann, J. [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I.D. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E.; Hughes, C.R. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E.K. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E. [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B. [Cement Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A.F. [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  6. Cyto-palynological, Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Original and Induced Mutants of Garden Chrysanthemum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of new somatic flower color/type mutants have been evolved by induced mutations in different ornamental plants. Few reports are available on the systematic work being done on the comparative analysis of the original and mutant cultivars. This paper reports the result of comparative analysis on cyto-palynological, biochemical and molecular characters of original and mutant cultivars for a better understanding of the exact mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of flower color mutations. Cultivar identification and cultivar relatedness are important issues for horticultural breeders. Proper characterization and identification of new mutant cultivars is extremely important to protect plant breeder's rights for commercial exploitation. (author)

  7. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  8. New complexes of samarium(III), terbium(III) and holmium (III) with quercetin-5'-sulfonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New solid complexes of samarium(III), terbium (III), and holmium (III) with quercetin-5'-sulfonic acid were obtained. Their composition and physicochemical properties were investigated. Ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectroscopy methods were used to determine their structure. (author)

  9. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  10. Historical aspect of photosynthesis biochemical diversity of and it’s role at plant ecology and phytoindication

    OpenAIRE

    T. E. Khrystova; O. E. Pyurko

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of formation of views on biochemical diversity of photosynthesis within the bounds of plants ecological physiology is analyzed. Data on the dark period of photosynthesis are generalized in the historical aspect and its role in the plants ecology and phytoindication is determined. The genesis of research of plants carbonaceous nutrition biochemistry is characterized in the world and in Ukraine. The influential contribution of Ukrainian scientists (O. M. Volkov, E. P. Votchal, K. ...

  11. Microbiological and Biochemical Characterization of Cassava Retting, a Traditional Lactic Acid Fermentation for Foo-Foo (Cassava Flour) Production

    OpenAIRE

    Brauman, A.; Keleke, S.; Malonga, M.; Miambi, E.; Ampe, F

    1996-01-01

    The overall kinetics of retting, a spontaneous fermentation of cassava roots performed in central Africa, was investigated in terms of microbial-population evolution and biochemical and physicochemical parameters. During the traditional process, endogenous cyanogens were almost totally degraded, plant cell walls were lysed by the simultaneous action of pectin methylesterase and pectate lysate, and organic acids (C2 to C4) were produced. Most microorganisms identified were found to be facultat...

  12. Biochemical research elucidating metabolic pathways in Pneumocystis*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneshiro E.S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in sequencing the Pneumocystis carinii genome have helped identify potential metabolic pathways operative in the organism. Also, data from characterizing the biochemical and physiological nature of these organisms now allow elucidation of metabolic pathways as well as pose new challenges and questions that require additional experiments. These experiments are being performed despite the difficulty in doing experiments directly on this pathogen that has yet to be subcultured indefinitely and produce mass numbers of cells in vitro. This article reviews biochemical approaches that have provided insights into several Pneumocystis metabolic pathways. It focuses on 1 S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet; SAM, which is a ubiquitous participant in numerous cellular reactions; 2 sterols: focusing on oxidosqualene cyclase that forms lanosterol in P. carinii; SAM:sterol C-24 methyltransferase that adds methyl groups at the C-24 position of the sterol side chain; and sterol 14α-demethylase that removes a methyl group at the C-14 position of the sterol nucleus; and 3 synthesis of ubiquinone homologs, which play a pivotal role in mitochondrial inner membrane and other cellular membrane electron transport.

  13. Biochemical mechanisms of laser vascular tissue fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, C R; Murray, L W; Kopchok, G E; Rosenbaum, D; White, R A

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the biochemical changes that occur in argon laser-fused canine veins compared with control segments of vein. Laser fusions were formed using 0.5 W argon laser energy (1100-1500 J/cm2). Immediately following tissue fusion, blood flow was reestablished to test the integrity of the welds. 1-mm3 sections of the anastomoses and control sections were minced and protein extraction was performed by solubilizing the tissue in hot SDS Laemmli gel sample buffer. The proteins were separated electrophoretically on 5 and 10% polyacylamide SDS gels and silver stained. The analysis demonstrated significant biochemical differences between control and lased veins. We noted increases in several proteins after laser welding: the putative beta chain of type V collagen (5/5 gels), the putative gamma chain of type I collagen (4/5 gels), a 156-kDa protein (based on collagen molecular weight standards) 7/7 gels), an 82-kDa protein (8/9 gels), and several proteins of lower molecular weight (3/8 gels). The increases may be due to crosslinking of lower molecular weight proteins, degradation of higher molecular weight proteins, or increased solubility of certain proteins. These findings suggest that laser welding may occur by formation of crosslinks or by denaturation and reannealment of structural proteins. PMID:1863584

  14. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

    1998-09-20

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  15. Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  16. Serum biochemical markers in carcinoma breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth R

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the extensive research for many years throughout the world, the etiopathogenesis of cancer still remains obscure. For the early detection of carcinoma of various origins, a number of biochemical markers have been studied to evaluate the malignancy. AIM: To analyse serum gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and superoxide dismutase (SOD in carcinoma breast patients. SETTINGS & DESIGN: The serum biochemical markers were estimated in twenty five histopathologically confirmed patients with carcinoma breast and equal number of healthy age- matched individuals served as control. MATERIAL & METHODS: Serum gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and superoxide dismutase (SOD were estimated and their sensitivity determined. Statistics: Data was analysed with student′s ′t′-test and sensitivity score of these markers was determined. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: The mean serum GGTP, LDH and SOD activities in patients with carcinoma breast were tremendously increased as compared to controls, and a steady increase was observed in their activities from stage I through stage IV as well as following distant metastasis. Serum GGTP, LDH and SOD might prove to be most sensitive biomarkers in carcinoma breast in early detection of the disease.

  17. Effects of Training Load on Some Hormonal, Hematological and Biochemical Profile of Male Cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pralay Majumdar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hematological profiles of cyclists fluctuates are based on the volume/frequency/intensity of training. The present study examined the effects of training load on the cyclist’s biochemical profile which may be associated with over training. Twelve male cyclists volunteered to participate in this study. The participants completed a systematic training program which was divided into four phases i.e. phase I (560 km, continuous aerobic training, II (680 km, continuous aerobic training, III (720 km, aerobic and anaerobic interval training and IV (560 km, continuous aerobic training. Blood samples were collected at the end of each phase. The hemoglobin level of the cyclists increased throughout the training cycle whereas iron level increased till the third phase and decreased in the fourth phase due to alteration in training. Hemoglobin level was high during the IV phase and this was due to the lowest volume/frequency of training given to the cyclists in final phase. Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC level was elevated during the competitive phase, due to the high volume / intensity during III phase. The depletion of ferritin was high during phase II which was associated with a 21% increase in training volume after the first phase. The highest intensity, volume and frequency of E2S training (phase III were associated with a large increase in Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK, Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH and cortisol levels, demonstrating a significant decrease in testosterone that showed the over-trained state. Hence, these biochemical markers are important in monitoring athlete’s training load as these parameters are altered with the training intensity, frequency and volume of training given to the cyclist.

  18. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro); Spektroskopische Untersuchungen zur Komplexbildung von Cm(III) und Eu(III) mit organischen Modellliganden sowie ihrer chemischen Bindungsform in menschlichem Urin (in vitro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-10-26

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  19. Basel III D: Swiss Finish to Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M. McNamara; Natalia Tente; Andrew Metrick

    2014-01-01

    After the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) introduced the Basel III framework in 2010, individual countries confronted the question of how best to implement the framework given their unique circumstances.  Switzerland, with a banking industry that is both heavily concentrated and very large relative to the size of its overall economy, faced a special challenge.  It ultimately adopted what is sometimes referred to as the “Swiss Finish” to Basel III – enhanced requirements applicab...

  20. Mitochondrial Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of the genome it contains, the mitochondrion is of unquestioned bacterial ancestry, originating from within the bacterial phylum α-Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria). Accordingly, the endosymbiont hypothesis—the idea that the mitochondrion evolved from a bacterial progenitor via symbiosis within an essentially eukaryotic host cell—has assumed the status of a theory. Yet mitochondrial genome evolution has taken radically different pathways in diverse eukaryotic lineag...

  1. Leica Dmc III Calibration and Geometric Sensor Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C.; Neumann, K.

    2016-03-01

    As an evolution of the successful DMC II digital camera series, Leica Geosystems has introduced the Leica DMC III digital aerial camera using, for the first time in the industry, a large-format CMOS sensor as a panchromatic high-resolution camera head. This paper describes the Leica DMC III calibration and its quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedures. It will explain how calibration was implemented within the production process for the Leica DMC III camera. Based on many years of experience with the DMC and DMC II camera series, it is know that the sensor flatness has a huge influence on the final achievable results. The Leica DMC III panchromatic CMOS sensor with its 100.3mm x 56.9mm size shows remaining errors in a range of 0.1 to 0.2μm for the root mean square and shows maximum values not higher that 1.0μm. The Leica DMC III is calibrated based on a 5cm Ground Sample Distance (GSD) grid pattern flight and evaluated with three different flying heights at 5cm, 8cm and 11cm GSD. The geometric QA/QC has been performed using the calibration field area, as well as using an independent test field. The geometric performance and accuracy is unique and gives ground accuracies far better than the flown GSD.

  2. Mutual information in time-varying biochemical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tostevin, Filipe; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten

    2010-01-01

    Cells must continuously sense and respond to time-varying environmental stimuli. These signals are transmitted and processed by biochemical signalling networks. However, the biochemical reactions making up these networks are intrinsically noisy, which limits the reliability of intracellular signalling. Here we use information theory to characterise the reliability of transmission of time-varying signals through elementary biochemical reactions in the presence of noise. We calculate the mutual...

  3. Possibilities and methods for biochemical assessment of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensitive review (77 references) is made of the application of biochemical diagnostic methods for assessment of radiation diseases. A brief characteristics of several biochemical indicators is given: deoxycytidine, thymidine, ρ-aminoisocarboxylic acid, DNA-ase, nucleic acids. Influence of such factors as age, sex, season etc. is studied by means of functional biochemical indicators as: creatine, triptophanic metabolites, 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid, biogenic amines, serum proteins, enzymes, etc

  4. Conceptual Aspects of Theory Appraisal: Some Biochemical Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Michael Akeroyd

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers papers on conceptual analysis by Laudan (1981 and Whitt (1989 and relates them to three biochemical episodes: (1 the modern 'biochemical explanation' of acupuncture; (2 the chemio-osmotic hypothesis of oxidative phosphorylation; (3 the theory of the complete digestion of proteins in the gut. The advantages of including philosophical debate in chemical/biochemical undergraduate courses is then discussed.

  5. Assimilation of ocean colour data into a Biochemical Flux Model of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Triantafyllou

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the European MFSTEP project, an advanced multivariate sequential data assimilation system has been implemented to assimilate real chlorophyll data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS into a three-dimensional biochemical model of the Eastern Mediterranean. The physical ocean is described through the Princeton Ocean Model (POM while the biochemistry of the ecosystem is tackled with the Biochemical Flux Model (BFM. The assimilation scheme is based on the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK filter, in which the error statistics were parameterized by means of a suitable set of Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs. A radius of influence was further selected around every data point to limit the range of the EOFs spatial correlations. The assimilation experiment was performed for one year over 1999 and forced with ECMWF 6 hour atmospheric fields. The accuracy of the ecological state identification by the assimilation system is assessed by the relevance of the system in fitting the data, and through the impact of the assimilation on non-observed biochemical processes. Assimilation of SeaWiFS data significantly improves the forecasting capability of the BFM model. Results, however, indicate the necessity of subsurface data to enhance the controllability of the ecosystem model in the deep layers.

  6. Evolution and the complexity of bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serwer Philip

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of both long-genome (> 200 Kb bacteriophages and long-genome eukaryotic viruses have cellular gene homologs whose selective advantage is not explained. These homologs add genomic and possibly biochemical complexity. Understanding their significance requires a definition of complexity that is more biochemically oriented than past empirically based definitions. Hypothesis Initially, I propose two biochemistry-oriented definitions of complexity: either decreased randomness or increased encoded information that does not serve immediate needs. Then, I make the assumption that these two definitions are equivalent. This assumption and recent data lead to the following four-part hypothesis that explains the presence of cellular gene homologs in long bacteriophage genomes and also provides a pathway for complexity increases in prokaryotic cells: (1 Prokaryotes underwent evolutionary increases in biochemical complexity after the eukaryote/prokaryote splits. (2 Some of the complexity increases occurred via multi-step, weak selection that was both protected from strong selection and accelerated by embedding evolving cellular genes in the genomes of bacteriophages and, presumably, also archaeal viruses (first tier selection. (3 The mechanisms for retaining cellular genes in viral genomes evolved under additional, longer-term selection that was stronger (second tier selection. (4 The second tier selection was based on increased access by prokaryotic cells to improved biochemical systems. This access was achieved when DNA transfer moved to prokaryotic cells both the more evolved genes and their more competitive and complex biochemical systems. Testing the hypothesis I propose testing this hypothesis by controlled evolution in microbial communities to (1 determine the effects of deleting individual cellular gene homologs on the growth and evolution of long genome bacteriophages and hosts, (2 find the environmental conditions that

  7. Cosmic evolution, life and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the most basic problems confronting science are those regarding the origin of the universe, the origin of life and the origin of man. This general overview starts (1) with a brief introduction addressed primarily to the Cyril Ponnamperuma Memorial. Then, the thesis is presented that the appearance of life and intelligence on our planet can be understood as the result of a number of cosmic and biological evolutionary processes, including (2) the stellar thermonuclear synthesis of the biogenic elements other than hydrogen (C, N, O, P and S), their dispersal into space, and their combination into circumstellar and interstellar molecules. (3) The formation of the Solar System and the Earth-Moon System. (4) The role of comets and carbonaceous chondrites in contributing organic matter to the primitive Earth. (5) The prebiotics synthesis of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, fatty acids, and other biochemical monomers. (6) The prebiotic condensation reactions leading to the synthesis of oligomers such as oligonucleotides and oligopeptides, with replicative and catalytic activities. (7) The synthesis of amphiphilic lipids, and their self-assembly into liposomes with bi-layered membranes. (8) The formation of protocellular structures. (9) The activation of protocells into a functioning Darwin's ancestral cell. (10) Early evolution of life. (11) The K-T boundary event and the disappearance of dinosaurs. (12) Evolution of hominids leading to Homo sapiens. (13) The rapid development of civilization. (14) The exploration of the Solar System. (15) Life beyond our planetary system. (16) Epilogue. Peace from cosmic evolution? (Abstract only)

  8. Characterization of collagen fibrils after equine suspensory ligament injury: an ultrastructural and biochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikh Alsook, M K; Gabriel, A; Salouci, M; Piret, J; Alzamel, N; Moula, N; Denoix, J-M; Antoine, N; Baise, E

    2015-04-01

    Suspensory ligament (SL) injuries are an important cause of lameness in horses. The mechanical properties of connective tissue in normal and pathological ligaments are mainly related to fibril morphology, as well as collagen content and types. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using biochemical and ultrastructural approaches, the alterations in collagen fibrils after injury. Eight Warmblood horses with visible signs of injury in only one forelimb SL were selected and specimens were examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Collagen types I, III and V were purified by differential salt precipitation after collagen extraction with acetic acid containing pepsin. TEM revealed abnormal organization as well as alterations in the diameter and shape of fibrils after SL injury. The bands corresponding to types I, III and V collagen were assessed by densitometry after sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Densitometric analysis indicated that the proportions of type III and type V collagen were higher (P < 0.001) in damaged tissues compared with normal tissues with a mean increase of 20.9% and 17.3%, respectively. Concurrently, a decrease (P < 0.001) in type I collagen within damaged tissues was recorded with a mean decrease of 15.2%. These alterations could be the hallmark of a decrease in the tissue quality and mechanical properties of the ligament. The findings provide new insight for subsequent research on tissue regeneration that may lead to the development of future treatment strategies for SL injury. PMID:25795168

  9. Some biochemical and hematological changes in female rats under protein malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of low and high dietary protein on some biochemical and hematological parameters in blood of female albino rats. A total number of 75 albino female rats were equally divided into 3 groups, the first group was fed 20% protein diet and served as control and the second and third groups were fed 5% and 65% protein for 5 weeks and served as low and high protein dietary groups, respectively. The results showed high significant decreases in serum growth hormone, ferritin levels and iron concentration in group II and there was significant increase in unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) in group III, compared to control group. Studies of total protein and its fractions revealed high significant decreases in total protein, albumin, alpha-1-globulin, beta-globulin as well as gamma globulin in group II and significant increases in total protein, alpha-1- globulin, beta-globulin and gamma-globulin in group III, compared to normal control group. The hematological investigations in group II revealed significant decreases in hemoglobin value, total leukocyte count, platelets, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), erythrocytic count and mean corpuscular volume (MCV). On the other hand, there was significant increase in total leukocyte count in group III if compared to control group

  10. Genotoxic and biochemical effects of Yohimbe after short-term treatment in somatic and germ cells of Swiss Albino Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohimbe was evaluated for its effects on cytological and biochemical toxicity in male Swiss albino mice. Adult male mice were mice were treated with different doses (750, 1500 and 3000 mg yohombe/kg., body weight/day) in form of an aqueous suspension for 7 consecutive days by gavage. The following parameters were evaluated: (i) cytological studies on micronucleus test, (ii) cytological analysis of spermatozoa abnormalities, (iii) Cytogentic analysis of meiotic chromosomes in the tests, (iv) quantification of proteins, ribose nucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) in hepatic and testicular cells and (v) estimation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) in hepatic and testicular cells. The treatment caused significant changes in the frequency of micronuclei in the femoral cells and induced spermatozoal abnormalities and testicular chromosomal aberrations. The study on biochemical parameters showed an increase of MDA and depletion of NP-SH, proteins, RNA and DNA in both hepatic and testicular cells. The data elucidated the role of free radical species in cytological and biochemical changes in both somatic and germ cells of Swiss albino mice. The exact mechanism of the genesis of lipid peroxides is not known, however, this might be related to the influence of yohimbine (the principal constituent of yohimbe) to enhance some catecholamines, including norepineprine which possess destructive stimuli on biological systems. It is suggested that, in view of the observed cytological and biochemical effects of yohimbe, it may be subjected to a thorough evaluation of toxicity before making it available for human use. (author)

  11. Category analysis: from biochemical mechanics to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the main goals of this report is to bridge the gap between computer modelling and group analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. But we can work with a category of groups rather than a Lie group. In view of the experience of the past development of the relation between mathematics, mechanics and physics, the categorical extension may be justified that one day categoric structures will be as important as groups are today. Also our aim is the application of the same category-theoretic methods in biochemical mechanics and astrophysics. As examples we consider the category analysis of material models for concrete, wood and reinforcing or prestressing steel, on the one hand, and process of the linear and circular polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation due to the quantum effects of electromagnetic field in anisotropic Bianchi-type cosmological models, on the other hand. (author)

  12. Prions: the danger of biochemical weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Almeida Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of biotechnology increases the risk of using biochemical weapons for mass destruction. Prions are unprecedented infectious pathogens that cause a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases by a novel mechanism. They are transmissible particles that are devoid of nucleic acid. Due to their singular characteristics, Prions emerge as potential danger since they can be used in the development of such weapons. Prions cause fatal infectious diseases, and to date there is no therapeutic or prophylactic approach against these diseases. Furthermore, Prions are resistant to food-preparation treatments such as high heat and can find their way from the digestive system into the nervous system; recombinant Prions are infectious either bound to soil particles or in aerosols. Therefore, lethal Prions can be developed by malicious researchers who could use it to attack political enemies since such weapons cause diseases that could be above suspicion.

  13. Robust simplifications of multiscale biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinovyev Andrei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular processes such as metabolism, decision making in development and differentiation, signalling, etc., can be modeled as large networks of biochemical reactions. In order to understand the functioning of these systems, there is a strong need for general model reduction techniques allowing to simplify models without loosing their main properties. In systems biology we also need to compare models or to couple them as parts of larger models. In these situations reduction to a common level of complexity is needed. Results We propose a systematic treatment of model reduction of multiscale biochemical networks. First, we consider linear kinetic models, which appear as "pseudo-monomolecular" subsystems of multiscale nonlinear reaction networks. For such linear models, we propose a reduction algorithm which is based on a generalized theory of the limiting step that we have developed in 1. Second, for non-linear systems we develop an algorithm based on dominant solutions of quasi-stationarity equations. For oscillating systems, quasi-stationarity and averaging are combined to eliminate time scales much faster and much slower than the period of the oscillations. In all cases, we obtain robust simplifications and also identify the critical parameters of the model. The methods are demonstrated for simple examples and for a more complex model of NF-κB pathway. Conclusion Our approach allows critical parameter identification and produces hierarchies of models. Hierarchical modeling is important in "middle-out" approaches when there is need to zoom in and out several levels of complexity. Critical parameter identification is an important issue in systems biology with potential applications to biological control and therapeutics. Our approach also deals naturally with the presence of multiple time scales, which is a general property of systems biology models.

  14. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  15. Biochemical Pharmacology of the Sigma-1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2016-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223 amino acid two transmembrane (TM) pass protein. It is a non-ATP-binding nonglycosylated ligand-regulated molecular chaperone of unknown three-dimensional structure. The S1R is resident to eukaryotic mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes with broad functions that regulate cellular calcium homeostasis and reduce oxidative stress. Several multitasking functions of the S1R are underwritten by chaperone-mediated direct (and indirect) interactions with ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and cell-signaling molecules involved in the regulation of cell growth. The S1R is a promising drug target for the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases related to cellular stress. In vitro and in vivo functional and molecular characteristics of the S1R and its interactions with endogenous and synthetic small molecules have been discovered by the use of pharmacologic, biochemical, biophysical, and molecular biology approaches. The S1R exists in monomer, dimer, tetramer, hexamer/octamer, and higher oligomeric forms that may be important determinants in defining the pharmacology and mechanism(s) of action of the S1R. A canonical GXXXG in putative TM2 is important for S1R oligomerization. The ligand-binding regions of S1R have been identified and include portions of TM2 and the TM proximal regions of the C terminus. Some client protein chaperone functions and interactions with the cochaperone 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (binding immunoglobulin protein) involve the C terminus. Based on its biochemical features and mechanisms of chaperone action the possibility that the S1R is a member of the small heat shock protein family is discussed. PMID:26560551

  16. Karyological, biochemical, and physiological aspects of Callophysus macropterus (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae from the Solimões and Negro Rivers (Central Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ramirez-Gil

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Karyological characteristics, i.e., diploid number, chromosome morphology and nucleolus organizer regions (NORs, biochemical characteristics, i.e., electrophoretic analysis of blood hemoglobin and the tissue enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI, and physiological characteristics, i.e., relative concentration of hemoglobin and intraerythrocytic concentrations of organic phosphates were analyzed for the species Callophysus macropterus collected from Marchantaria Island (white water system - Solimões River and Anavilhanas Archipelago (black water system - Negro River. Karyological and biochemical data did not reveal significant differences between specimens collected at the two sites. However, the relative distribution of hemoglobin bands I and III (I = 16.33 ± 1.05 and III = 37.20 ± 1.32 for Marchantaria specimens and I = 6.33 ± 1.32 and III = 48.05 ± 1.55 for Anavilhanas specimens and levels of intraerythrocytic GTP (1.32 ± 0.16 and 2.76 ± 0.18 for Marchantaria and Anavilhanas specimens, respectively, but not ATP or total phosphate, were significantly different, indicating a physiological adaptation to the environmental conditions of these habitats. It is suggested that C. macropterus specimens from the two collecting sites belong to a single population, and that they adjusted some physiological characteristics to adapt to local environmental conditions.

  17. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  18. Recent Advances in Shell Evolution with Shell-Model Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Utsuno, Yutaka; Tsunoda, Yusuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Honma, Michio; Togashi, Tomoaki; Mizusaki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Shell evolution in exotic nuclei is investigated with large-scale shell-model calculations. After presenting that the central and tensor forces produce distinctive ways of shell evolution, we show several recent results: (i) evolution of single-particle-like levels in antimony and cupper isotopes, (ii) shape coexistence in nickel isotopes understood in terms of configuration-dependent shell structure, and (iii) prediction of the evolution of the recently established $N=34$ magic number towards smaller proton numbers. In any case, large-scale shell-model calculations play indispensable roles in describing the interplay between single-particle character and correlation.

  19. Local biochemical and morphological differences in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J, Pingel; Fredberg, Ulrich; K, Qvortrup;

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is high and underlying etiology as well as biochemical and morphological pathology associated with the disease is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe biochemical and morphological differences in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The...

  20. Circuit topology and the evolution of robustness in two-gene circadian oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Many parameters driving the behavior of biochemical circuits vary extensively and are thus not fine-tuned. Therefore, the topology of such circuits (the who-interacts-with-whom) is key to understanding their central properties. I here explore several hundred different topologies of a simple biochemical model of circadian oscillations to ask two questions: Do different circuits differ dramatically in their robustness to parameter change? If so, can a process of gradual molecular evolution find...

  1. Gd(III)-Gd(III) distance measurements with chirp pump pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Andrin; Qi, Mian; Wili, Nino; Pribitzer, Stephan; Godt, Adelheid; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2015-10-01

    The broad EPR spectrum of Gd(III) spin labels restricts the dipolar modulation depth in distance measurements between Gd(III) pairs to a few percent. To overcome this limitation, frequency-swept chirp pulses are utilized as pump pulses in the DEER experiment. Using a model system with 3.4 nm Gd-Gd distance, application of one single chirp pump pulse at Q-band frequencies leads to modulation depths beyond 10%. However, the larger modulation depth is counteracted by a reduction of the absolute echo intensity due to the pump pulse. As supported by spin dynamics simulations, this effect is primarily driven by signal loss to double-quantum coherence and specific to the Gd(III) high spin state of S = 7/2. In order to balance modulation depth and echo intensity for optimum sensitivity, a simple experimental procedure is proposed. An additional improvement by 25% in DEER sensitivity is achieved with two consecutive chirp pump pulses. These pulses pump the Gd(III) spectrum symmetrically around the observation position, therefore mutually compensating for dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase shifts at the observer spins. The improved sensitivity of the DEER data with modulation depths on the order of 20% is due to mitigation of the echo reduction effects by the consecutive pump pulses. In particular, the second pump pulse does not lead to additional signal loss if perfect inversion is assumed. Moreover, the compensation of the dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase prevents signal loss due to spatial dependence of the dynamical phase, which is caused by inhomogeneities in the driving field. The new methodology is combined with pre-polarization techniques to measure long distances up to 8.6 nm, where signal intensity and modulation depth become attenuated by long dipolar evolution windows. In addition, the influence of the zero-field splitting parameters on the echo intensity is studied with simulations. Herein, larger sensitivity is anticipated for Gd(III) complexes with zero

  2. Regulation of the innate immune response by fibronectin: synergism between the III-1 and EDA domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsh, Rhiannon; You, Ran; Horzempa, Carol; Zheng, Mingzhe; McKeown-Longo, Paula J

    2014-01-01

    Fibronectin is a critical component of the extracellular matrix and alterations to its structure will influence cellular behavior. Matrix fibronectin is subjected to both mechanical and biochemical regulation. The Type III domains of fibronectin can be unfolded in response to increased cellular contractility, included or excluded from the molecule by alternative splicing mechanisms, or released from the matrix by proteolysis. Using Inflammatory Cytokine microarrays we found that the alternatively spliced fibronectin Type III domain, FnEDA, and the partially unfolded III-1 domain, FnIII-1c, induced the expression of a multitude of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human dermal fibroblasts, most notably CXCL1-3, IL-8 and TNF-α. FnIII-1c, a peptide representing an unfolded intermediate structure of the first Type III domain has been shown to initiate the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)-NFκB-dependent release of cytokines from human dermal fibroblasts (You, et al., J. Biol. Chem., 2010). Here we demonstrate that FnIII-1c and the alternatively spliced FnEDA domain induce a TLR4 dependent activation of p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector, MAPKAP Kinase-2 (MK-2), to regulate cytokine expression in fibroblasts. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that the p38-MK-2 pathway regulates IL-8 mRNA stability. Interestingly, addition of FnIII-1c and FnEDA synergistically enhanced TLR4-dependent IL-8 release. These data indicate that Fn contains two Type III domains which can activate TLR signaling to induce an inflammatory response in fibroblasts. Furthermore, our data identifies the NF-κB and p38/MK2 signaling pathways as transducers of signals initiated in response to structural changes in fibronectin. PMID:25051083

  3. Regulation of the innate immune response by fibronectin: synergism between the III-1 and EDA domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon Kelsh

    Full Text Available Fibronectin is a critical component of the extracellular matrix and alterations to its structure will influence cellular behavior. Matrix fibronectin is subjected to both mechanical and biochemical regulation. The Type III domains of fibronectin can be unfolded in response to increased cellular contractility, included or excluded from the molecule by alternative splicing mechanisms, or released from the matrix by proteolysis. Using Inflammatory Cytokine microarrays we found that the alternatively spliced fibronectin Type III domain, FnEDA, and the partially unfolded III-1 domain, FnIII-1c, induced the expression of a multitude of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human dermal fibroblasts, most notably CXCL1-3, IL-8 and TNF-α. FnIII-1c, a peptide representing an unfolded intermediate structure of the first Type III domain has been shown to initiate the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4-NFκB-dependent release of cytokines from human dermal fibroblasts (You, et al., J. Biol. Chem., 2010. Here we demonstrate that FnIII-1c and the alternatively spliced FnEDA domain induce a TLR4 dependent activation of p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector, MAPKAP Kinase-2 (MK-2, to regulate cytokine expression in fibroblasts. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that the p38-MK-2 pathway regulates IL-8 mRNA stability. Interestingly, addition of FnIII-1c and FnEDA synergistically enhanced TLR4-dependent IL-8 release. These data indicate that Fn contains two Type III domains which can activate TLR signaling to induce an inflammatory response in fibroblasts. Furthermore, our data identifies the NF-κB and p38/MK2 signaling pathways as transducers of signals initiated in response to structural changes in fibronectin.

  4. Model-Based Design of Biochemical Microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbinger, Tobias; Gahn, Markus; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Hante, Falk M; Voll, Lars M; Leugering, Günter; Knabner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical pathways is an important resource in Synthetic Biology, as the predictive power of simulating synthetic pathways represents an important step in the design of synthetic metabolons. In this paper, we are concerned with the mathematical modeling, simulation, and optimization of metabolic processes in biochemical microreactors able to carry out enzymatic reactions and to exchange metabolites with their surrounding medium. The results of the reported modeling approach are incorporated in the design of the first microreactor prototypes that are under construction. These microreactors consist of compartments separated by membranes carrying specific transporters for the input of substrates and export of products. Inside the compartments of the reactor multienzyme complexes assembled on nano-beads by peptide adapters are used to carry out metabolic reactions. The spatially resolved mathematical model describing the ongoing processes consists of a system of diffusion equations together with boundary and initial conditions. The boundary conditions model the exchange of metabolites with the neighboring compartments and the reactions at the surface of the nano-beads carrying the multienzyme complexes. Efficient and accurate approaches for numerical simulation of the mathematical model and for optimal design of the microreactor are developed. As a proof-of-concept scenario, a synthetic pathway for the conversion of sucrose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was chosen. In this context, the mathematical model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal distributions of the metabolite concentrations, as well as application relevant quantities like the outflow rate of G6P. These computations are performed for different scenarios, where the number of beads as well as their loading capacity are varied. The computed metabolite distributions show spatial patterns, which differ for different experimental arrangements. Furthermore, the total output of G6P

  5. Community Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Having communities extracted, appropriate knowledge and methods for dynamic analysis may be applied in order to identify changes as well as to predict the future of all or some selected groups. Furthermore, knowing the most probably change of a given group some additional steps may be performed in order to change this predicted future according to specific needs. Such ability would be a powerful tool in the hands of human resource managers, personnel recruitment, marketing, telecommunication companies, etc.

  6. Definitions of biochemical failure in prostate cancer following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a consensus panel definition of biochemical failure following radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In this paper, we develop a series of alternative definitions of biochemical failure. Using data from 688 patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the various definitions, with respect to a defined 'clinically meaningful' outcome. Methods and Materials: The ASTRO definition of biochemical failure requires 3 consecutive rises in prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We considered several modifications to the standard definition: to require PSA rises of a certain magnitude, to consider 2 instead of 3 rises, to require the final PSA value to be greater than a fixed cutoff level, and to define biochemical failure based on the slope of PSA over 1, 1.5, or 2 years. A clinically meaningful failure is defined as local recurrence, distant metastases, initiation of unplanned hormonal therapy, unplanned radical prostatectomy, or a PSA>25 later than 6 months after radiation. Results: Requiring the final PSA in a series of consecutive rises to be larger than 1.5 ng/mL increased the specificity of biochemical failure. For a fixed specificity, defining biochemical failure based on 2 consecutive rises, or the slope over the last year, could increase the sensitivity by up to approximately 20%, compared to the ASTRO definition. Using a rule based on the slope over the previous year or 2 rises leads to a slightly earlier detection of biochemical failure than does the ASTRO definition. Even with the best rule, only approximately 20% of true failures are biochemically detected more than 1 year before the clinically meaningful event time. Conclusion: There is potential for improvement in the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure. Further research is needed, in studies with long follow-up times, to evaluate the relationship between various definitions of biochemical failure and

  7. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases. PMID:26542837

  8. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  9. A critical appraisal of the phene-plate biochemical fingerprinting system for epidemiological subtyping of Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, S.L.W.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    The efficacy and reproducibility of the Phene-Plate (PhP) system (Biosys Inova, Stockholm, Sweden) for biochemical fingerprinting of Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. Duplicate and replicate assays on 40 epidemiologically related and unrelated strains were performed in two batches of PhP-48......P-types which are epidemiologically unjustified, (ii) tests currently recommended for PhP-typing S. typhimurium may be somewhat unstable and not satisfactory for fingerprinting purposes, (iii) caution must be exercised when comparing data from different batches of PhP-48 plates, and (iv) best results are...

  10. A critical appraisal of the phene-plate biochemical fingerprinting system for epidemiological subtyping of Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, S.L.W.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy and reproducibility of the Phene-Plate (PhP) system (Biosys Inova, Stockholm, Sweden) for biochemical fingerprinting of Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. Duplicate and replicate assays on 40 epidemiologically related and unrelated strains were performed in two batches of PhP-48......P-types which are epidemiologically unjustified, (ii) tests currently recommended for PhP-typing S. typhimurium may be somewhat unstable and not satisfactory for fingerprinting purposes, (iii) caution must be exercised when comparing data from different batches of PhP-48 plates, and (iv) best results are...

  11. Trigger efficiencies at BES III

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, N; Liu, Z A; Jin, D P; Xu, H; Gong, W X; Wang, K; Cao, G F

    2010-01-01

    Trigger efficiencies at BES III were determined for both the J/psi and psi' data taking of 2009. Both dedicated runs and physics datasets are used; efficiencies are presented for Bhabha-scattering events, generic hadronic decay events involving charged tracks, dimuon events and psi' -> pi+pi-J/psi, J/psi -> l+l- events (l an electron or muon). The efficiencies are found to lie well above 99% for all relevant physics cases, thus fulfilling the BES III design specifications.

  12. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  13. BALL - biochemical algorithms library 1.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöckel Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Biochemical Algorithms Library (BALL is a comprehensive rapid application development framework for structural bioinformatics. It provides an extensive C++ class library of data structures and algorithms for molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics. Using BALL as a programming toolbox does not only allow to greatly reduce application development times but also helps in ensuring stability and correctness by avoiding the error-prone reimplementation of complex algorithms and replacing them with calls into the library that has been well-tested by a large number of developers. In the ten years since its original publication, BALL has seen a substantial increase in functionality and numerous other improvements. Results Here, we discuss BALL's current functionality and highlight the key additions and improvements: support for additional file formats, molecular edit-functionality, new molecular mechanics force fields, novel energy minimization techniques, docking algorithms, and support for cheminformatics. Conclusions BALL is available for all major operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and MacOS X. It is available free of charge under the Lesser GNU Public License (LPGL. Parts of the code are distributed under the GNU Public License (GPL. BALL is available as source code and binary packages from the project web site at http://www.ball-project.org. Recently, it has been accepted into the debian project; integration into further distributions is currently pursued.

  14. PHA bioplastics, biochemicals, and energy from crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somleva, Maria N; Peoples, Oliver P; Snell, Kristi D

    2013-02-01

    Large scale production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in plants can provide a sustainable supply of bioplastics, biochemicals, and energy from sunlight and atmospheric CO(2). PHAs are a class of polymers with various chain lengths that are naturally produced by some microorganisms as storage materials. The properties of these polyesters make them functionally equivalent to many of the petroleum-based plastics that are currently in the market place. However, unlike most petroleum-derived plastics, PHAs can be produced from renewable feedstocks and easily degrade in most biologically active environments. This review highlights research efforts over the last 20 years to engineer the production of PHAs in plants with a focus on polyhydroxybutryrate (PHB) production in bioenergy crops with C(4) photosynthesis. PHB has the potential to be a high volume commercial product with uses not only in the plastics and materials markets, but also in renewable chemicals and feed. The major challenges of improving product yield and plant fitness in high biomass yielding C(4) crops are discussed in detail. PMID:23294864

  15. NUTRITION AND SPORTS: A BIOCHEMICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.G. Bianco

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a course dedicated to the pedagogical instruction of graduate students (Ensino deBioqumica - QBQ 5711 in which they have to plan and teach a 30 hour-discipline for undergraduatestudents. The graduate students have to choose a subject for the discipline and, in 2003, the cho-sen subject was Nutrition and Sports: a Biochemical Approach, which is not specically broached inregular disciplines. The discipline was structured in the basis of collaborative learning, thus, the 75 en-rolled undergraduate students (from dierent courses as Nutrition, Sports, Pharmacy, Chemistry andBiology were organized in small working groups. The students were given a study guide produced bythe graduate teachers (available in Portuguese at http://www.sbbq.org.br/revista/mtdidaticos.php,in which the following contents were covered: muscle contraction, O2 up-take, oxidative stress andanti-oxidant response, cramp, hydration, doping and nutritional supplies. In the nal activity thestudents had to evaluate critically myths and true facts in 80 statements usually associated to physi-cal activities and sports. The discipline was evaluated through questionnaires. From the analysis ofthe answers of both undergraduate and graduate/teachers students it is possible to conclude that thediscipline was well conduced and succeeded. These results emphasize the relevance and contribution ofthis kind of discipline to the pedagogical instruction of the graduate students and also to the increaseof undergraduate students interests in Biochemistry.

  16. Biochemical and proteomic characterization of alkaptonuric chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as "black" AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as "white" AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both "white" and "black" AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in "black" AKU chondrocytes. PMID:22213341

  17. Skin biochemical composition analysis by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Patricia Karen; Tosato, Maira Gaspar; Alves, Rani de Souza; Martin, Airton Abrahao; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro, E-mail: amartin@univap.br [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia Vibracional Biomedica, Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento - IP e D, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba - UniVap, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Skin aging is characterized by cellular and molecular alterations. In this context, Confocal Raman spectroscopy was used in vivo to measure these biochemical changes as function of the skin depth. In this study we have tried to correlate spectra from pure amino acids to in vivo spectra from volunteers with different ages. This study was performed on 32 volunteers: 11 from Group A (20-23 years), 11 from Group B (39-42 years) and 10 from Group C (59-62 years). For each group, the Raman spectra were measured on the surface (0 mm), 30 +- 3 mm and 60 +- 3 {mu}m below the surface. The results from intergroup comparisons showed that the oldest group had a prevalence of the tyrosine band, but it also presented a decrease in the band centered at 875 cm{sup -1} of pyrrolidone acid. The amide I band centered at 1637 cm{sup -1} that is attributed to collagen, as well as other proteins and lipid, showed a smaller amount of these biomolecules for Group C, which can be explained by the decrease in collagen concentration as a function of age. (author)

  18. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  19. Om religion og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    kulturens kausale virkning på den menneskelige kognition og ikke mindst den hominine evolution. Ud fra, hvad vi ved om den menneskelige evolution, ses det, at den hominine evolution har en dybde, som sjældent medtænkes i teorier og hypoteser om den menneskelige evolution. Den menneskelige evolution er...

  20. biochemical and hormonal studies in obese cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was carried out on a total number of 116 obese and 23 non-obese control females. Obesity was assessed mainly by body mass index (BMI). Other skinfold thickness e.g. triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, as parameters of obesity assessment were determined in some obese patients. The degree of obesity was assessed by BMI and categorized as follows: i- Mild obesity, BMI=25-30 Kg/m2. ii-Moderate obesity, BMI=31-35 kg/m2. iii-severe obesity, BMI= above 35 kg/m2. Type of fat distribution was assessed by waist/hip circumference ratio (w/H) as :- i-gynoid (lower body segment obesity). (≤ 0.81) i i- android (upper body segment obesity). (≥0.82)

  1. Problems of stellar evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three facets of the stellar and cluster content of the Magellanic clouds are presented in this observational study. Spectra and photometry of superluminous giants, stars which are much brighter than predicted by stellar evolution theory, are studied to attempt to constrain models of the evolutionary state of these stars. Color-magnitude diagrams are constructed of three clusters, NGC 1711, NGC 1755, and NGC 2041, which may be the youngest clusters capable of making superluminous stars. A preliminary color-magnitude diagram of Kron 34, SMC cluster which may contain a planetary nebula, is discussed. The second topic concerns the age and size distribution of the open clusters in the field of the cluster NGC 1978. This work is compared to previous studies, and shows that the region just north of Constellation III has undergone vigorous recent (less than 108 years ago) star formation. The lack of old (older than 109 years) clusters in this field is discussed. A new type of nebulous object, called wisps, is briefly examined. Finally, a color-magnitude diagram of NGC 1978 is presented. Based on a new photoelectric sequence, and photographic photometry m/sub v/ about 21.5, the work exploits two elegant data reduction techniques now available to the astronomical community. These programs are RICHFLD, available at Kitt Peak, and a generalized color-magnitude diagram program written by William Harris and collaborators. The age and metal abundance of NGC 1978 is derived, and compared to previous investigation

  2. Short RNA guides cleavage by eukaryotic RNase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lamontagne

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, short RNAs guide a variety of enzymatic activities that range from RNA editing to translation repression. It is hypothesized that pre-existing proteins evolved to bind and use guide RNA during evolution. However, the capacity of modern proteins to adopt new RNA guides has never been demonstrated. Here we show that Rnt1p, the yeast orthologue of the bacterial dsRNA-specific RNase III, can bind short RNA transcripts and use them as guides for sequence-specific cleavage. Target cleavage occurred at a constant distance from the Rnt1p binding site, leaving the guide RNA intact for subsequent cleavage. Our results indicate that RNase III may trigger sequence-specific RNA degradation independent of the RNAi machinery, and they open the road for a new generation of precise RNA silencing tools that do not trigger a dsRNA-mediated immune response.

  3. Ion temperatures in TORTUR III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatially resolved ion-energy distributions are presented for discharges in the TORTUR III tokamak. The measurements are performed in an active method, using a neutral hydrogen probing beam of 20-30 keV, to enhance charge-exchange processes along its path, as well as by the usual passive method. Ion temperatures can amount up to 1 keV

  4. Flora Malesiana, Series III: Bryophyta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van der R.

    1951-01-01

    Scope, organization, and purpose of Series III, Flora Malesiana (Musci and Hepaticae) are explained. Collaboration is asked on the following points: (a) To collect Mosses and Hepaticae in Malaysia and to add extensive and detailed data to the specimens (directions available on application to the Edi

  5. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  6. Insect evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    It goes without saying that insects epitomize diversity, and with over a million documented species they stand out as one of the most remarkable lineages in the 3.5-billion-year history of life on earth (Figure 1). This reality is passé to even the layperson and is taken for granted in the same way none of us think much of our breathing as we go about our day, and yet insects are just as vital to our existence. Insects are simultaneously familiar and foreign to us, and while a small fraction are beloved or reviled, most are simply ignored. These inexorable evolutionary overachievers outnumber us all, their segmented body plan is remarkably labile, they combine a capacity for high rates of speciation with low levels of natural extinction, and their history of successes eclipses those of the more familiar ages of dinosaurs and mammals alike. It is their evolution - persisting over vast expanses of geological time and inextricably implicated in the diversification of other lineages - that stands as one of the most expansive subjects in biology. PMID:26439349

  7. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications

  8. Solvent extraction studies of europium(III), ytterbium(III), and lutetium(III) with ionizable macrocyclic ligands and thenoyltrifluoroacetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent extraction behavior of Eu(III), Yb(III), and Lu(III) has been investigated by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) as extractant in the presence of 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (DAPDA) and 1,10-diaza-4,7,13,16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (DACDA) as macrocyclic ionophores. DAPDA and DACDA were chosen in this work in view of their unique complexation toward lanthanides. It was observed that in the presence of DAPDA (L), Eu(III) extracted predominantly as ternary complex [Eu(L)(TTA)], whereas Yb(III) and Lu(III) were extracted as mixed, binary Ln(TTA)3 and ternary [Ln(L)(TTA)] complexes. On the other hand, in the presence of DACDA, Eu(III) formed mixed binary and ternary complexes in the organic phase, whereas Yb(III) and Lu(III) formed predominantly binary complexes. In contrast to the extraction in the presence of DAPDA/DACDA, heavier lanthanides, i.e., Yb(III) and Lu(III), were extracted much less compared to lighter lanthanides, i.e., La(III) and Nd(III), in the presence of ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA), a structurally analogous noncyclic polyaminopolycarboyxlic acid

  9. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  10. Separation of scandium(III) and yttrium(III) by tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (TEHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatre, M H; Shinde, V M

    1998-10-01

    Tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate is proposed as an extractant for scandium(III) and yttrium(III) from salicylate media. The optimum extraction conditions are evaluated and described. The method permits mutual separation of scandium(III) and yttrium(III) and can be used for the separation and determination of scandium(III) and yttrium(III) from binary and multicomponent mixtures. PMID:18967342

  11. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Population III Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Kenji; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Bromm, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are ideal probes of the epoch of the first stars and galaxies. We review the recent theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of the first (so-called Population III) stars, in light of their viability of providing GRB progenitors. We proceed to discuss possible unique observational signatures of such bursts, based on the current formation scenario of long GRBs. These include signatures related to the prompt emission mechanism, as well as to the afterglow radiation, where the surrounding intergalactic medium might imprint a telltale absorption spectrum. We emphasize important remaining uncertainties in our emerging theoretical framework.

  12. Nudging Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine N. Farrell

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Feature, "Nudging Evolution? Critical Exploration of the Potential and Limitations of the Concept of Institutional Fit for the Study and Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems," aims to contribute toward the development of social theory and social research methods for the study of social-ecological system dynamics. Our objective is to help strengthen the academic discourse concerning if, and if so, how, to what extent, and in what concrete ways the concept of institutional "fit" might play a role in helping to develop better understanding of the social components of interlinkages between the socioeconomic-cultural and ecological dynamics of social-ecological systems. Two clearly discernible patterns provide a map of this Special Feature: (1 One pattern is the authors' positions regarding the place and role of normativity within their studies and assessment of institutional fit. Some place this at the center of their studies, exploring phenomena endogenous to the process of defining what constitutes institutional fit, whereas others take the formation of norms as a phenomenon exogenous to their study. (2 Another pattern is the type of studies presented: critiques and elaborations of the theory, methods for judging qualities of fit, and/or applied case studies using the concept. As a body of work, these contributions highlight that self-understanding of social-ecological place, whether explicit or implicit, constitutes an important part of the study object, i.e., the role of institutions in social-ecological systems, and that this is, at the same time, a crucial point of reference for the scholar wishing to evaluate what constitutes institutional fit and how it might be brought into being.

  13. SOME BIOCHEMICAL BLOOD CONSTANTS EVOLUTION IN REPORT TO THE TRAINING SCHEDULE STAGE IN SPORT HORSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLAVIA BOCHIS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether a clinical examination was adequate to assess the fitness of horses in a fence course riding, and to characterize the relationship between a clinical assessment of the horse's fitness, training schedule stage and its blood biochemistry, 22 horses were monitored before (S1, during training, immediately after warming-up (S2 and after an E level fence obstacle course ride (S3. The blood samples were taken from the jugular vein in the above three mentioned phases, for the determination of total protein (g/dl, nitrogen (mg/dl, glucose (mg/dl, lactic acid (nmol/l, calcium (mg/dl, cholesterol (mg/dl and phosphorus (mg/dl. The intend of the paper is to present the obtained results as a reference study for the appropriate use by clinicians, sport horses owners and trainers in view to have a solid base in evaluation, for the adequate protection of health and welfare of the jumper horses competitors.

  14. Biochemical Evolution and Histological Response of Patients with Hepatitis C Undergoing Antiviral Therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Julián Hernández Ojeda; Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola; Orelvis Martínez Martínez; Denis Monzón Vega; Mabel Vega Galindo

    2011-01-01

    Fundamento: la hepatitis C es uno de los principales problemas de salud a nivel mundial y la indicación más frecuente de transplante hepático en muchos países. Objetivo: determinar la evolución bioquímica y respuesta histológica de pacientes con hepatitis crónica tipo C bajo tratamiento con Interferón alfa 2b recombinante y ribavirina atendidos en consulta provincial de Hepatología. Métodos: estudio observacional y descriptivo, en 31 pacientes portadores del virus de la hepatitis C, remit...

  15. RESEARCES REGARDING THE TRIGLICERIDS EVOLUTION, AS BIOCHEMICAL INDEX, IN SPORT HORSES IN COMPLETE RIDDING TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EUGENIA ŞOVĂREL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Energetic capacity and the resistance at effort in sport horses are necessary to beobjectively evaluated. There are some practical ways which serve to measure exactlythe training length and intensity and also to appreciate the effects of these over thephysical level of training. The purpose of this study was to observe the triglyceridesevolution, in sport horses in real situation of complete ridding trial, obtainingmaximum of performances in safe conditions for the horses’ health. The biologicmaterial to determine the triglycerides values was randomly established and wasrepresented by 15 sport horses, very well trained. The analyses were done before andafter effort.

  16. Evolution of biochemical parameters in irradiated fishes: Serum proteins and intestinal nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In sublethal gamma-irradiated C. auratus, a sudden decrease of total serum protein concentration and a preferential descent of the low molecular weight gamma-globulin fraction have been observed. These effects are transient and after different latent periods dependent on doses, normal values are recovered, A temporal failure of a vascular permeability regulation system is probably implied. The DMA depolymerization. observed in the intestine indicates the action of radio-induced DNA degradation mechanisms since this effect is independent on doses. (Author) 29 refs

  17. Evolution of biochemical parameters in irradiated fishes: Serum proteins and intestinal nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In sublethal gamma-irradiated C. auratus, a sudden decrease of total serum protein concentration and a preferential descent of the low molecular weight gamma-globulin fraction have been observed. These effects are transient and after different latent periods dependent on doses, normal values are recovered. A temporal failure of a vascular permeability regulation system is probably implied. The DNA depolymerization observed in the intestine indicates the action of radio-induced DNA degradation mechanisms since this effect is independent on doses. (author)

  18. RESEARCES REGARDING THE SANGUINE CORTISOL EVOLUTION, AS BIOCHEMICAL INDEX, IN SPORT HORSES IN COMPLETE HORSE TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EUGENIA ŞOVĂREL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the horse for sport activities needs a good training and an optimization ofphysical and psychical qualities, both contributing to achieve the wantedperformances. Physical effort impose to the horse in different competitions is a stresssituation, fact which induce an endocrine answer, materialised through increasingthe sanguine levels of some hormones and decreasing of others. The purpose of thisstudy was to verify if the training and the effort intensity is reflected in the sanguinecortisol behaviour in sport horses.

  19. Biochemical evolution. I. Polymerization on internal, organophilic silica surfaces of dealuminated zeolites and feldspars

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Joseph V.

    1998-01-01

    Catalysis at mineral surfaces might generate replicating biopolymers from simple chemicals supplied by meteorites, volcanic gases, and photochemical gas reactions. Many ideas are implausible in detail because the proposed mineral surfaces strongly prefer water and other ionic species to organic ones. The molecular sieve silicalite (Union Carbide; = Al-free Mobil ZSM-5 zeolite) has a three-dimensional, 10-ring channel system whose electrically neutral Si-O surface strongly adsorbs organic spec...

  20. Biochemical Evolution and Histological Response of Patients with Hepatitis C Undergoing Antiviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Julián Hernández Ojeda

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Fundamento: la hepatitis C es uno de los principales problemas de salud a nivel mundial y la indicación más frecuente de transplante hepático en muchos países. Objetivo: determinar la evolución bioquímica y respuesta histológica de pacientes con hepatitis crónica tipo C bajo tratamiento con Interferón alfa 2b recombinante y ribavirina atendidos en consulta provincial de Hepatología. Métodos: estudio observacional y descriptivo, en 31 pacientes portadores del virus de la hepatitis C, remitidos a la consulta de Hepatología Provincial de Cienfuegos en el Hospital Universitario “Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima”, entre enero de 2007 y junio de 2009; y tratados con interferon alfa 2b recombinante más ribavirina. Se estudiaron las variables: edad, sexo, posible vía de infección, valores séricos de alanito aminotransferasa, evaluación bioquímica (al concluir el tratamiento y al finalizar el seguimiento y respuesta histológica. Para la evaluación de la actividad histológica de las lesiones hepáticas crónicas se empleó el índice de Knodell. Para comparar los resultados (respuesta bioquímica y la respuesta histológica antes y después del tratamiento se empleó la Prueba de los Signos. Resultados: El sexo femenino predominó en la muestra (58,1 %. La edad promedio fue de 45,5±11,6 años. La vía posible de trasmisión no se pudo identificar en 51,6 % de los pacientes. El tratamiento quirúrgico fue identificado como vía de infección en el 22,6 %, seguido del tratamiento parenteral reiterado (16,1 %. Conclusión: al finalizar el tratamiento se obtuvo un mayor porcentaje de respuesta en cuanto a la evolución bioquímica y a la respuesta histológica.

  1. Assessment of biochemical concentrations of vegetation using remote sensing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main biochemicals (such as lignin, protein, cellulose, sugar, starch, chlorophyll and water) of vegetation are directly or indirectly involved in major ecological processes, such as the functions of terrestrial ecosystems (i.e., nutrient-cycling processes, primary production, and decomposition). Remote sensing techniques provide a very convenient way of data acquisition capable of covering a large area several times during one season, so it can play a unique and essential role provided that we can relate remote sensing measurements to the biochemical characteristics of the Earth surface in a reliable and operational way. The application of remote sensing techniques for the estimation of canopy biochemicals was reviewed. Three methods of estimating biochemical concentrations of vegetation were included in this paper: index, stepwise multiple linear regression, and stepwise multiple linear regression based on a model of the forest crown. In addition, the vitality and potential applying value are stressed.

  2. Biochemical Aspects of Acclimatization of Man to High Altitude Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Srivastava

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the biochemical aspects of acclimatization of human body to high altitude with particular reference to the adaptive changes in Skeletal muscles, hepatic function, adrenal function and carbohydrate metabolism.

  3. NERVOUS-SYSTEM SPECIFIC PROTEINS AS BIOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF NEUROTOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in neuroimmunology and protein purification methodology have led to the identification of nervous-system specific proteins. Their intimate relationship to the cellular and functional heterogeneity of the nervous system, makes these proteins ideal biochemical marke...

  4. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Biochemical Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzullo, Leslie [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  5. Resonance electron attachment to plant hormones and its likely connection with biochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A.; Modelli, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gas-phase formation of temporary negative ion states via resonance attachment of low-energy (0-6 eV) electrons into vacant molecular orbitals of salicylic acid (I) and its derivatives 3-hydroxy- (II) and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (III), 5-cloro salicylic acid (IV) and methyl salicylate (V) was investigated for the first time by electron transmission spectroscopy. The description of their empty-level structures was supported by density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculations, using empirically calibrated linear equations to scale the calculated virtual orbital energies. Dissociative electron attachment spectroscopy (DEAS) was used to measure the fragment anion yields generated through dissociative decay channels of the parent molecular anions of compounds I-V, detected with a mass filter as a function of the incident electron energy in the 0-14 eV energy range. The most intense negative fragment produced by DEA to isomers I-III is the dehydrogenated molecular anion [M-H]-, mainly formed at incident electron energies around 1 eV. The vertical and adiabatic electron affinities were evaluated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level as the anion/neutral total energy difference. The same theoretical method was also used for evaluation of the thermodynamic energy thresholds for production of the negative fragments observed in the DEA spectra. The gas-phase DEAS data can provide support for biochemical reaction mechanisms in vivo.

  6. Resonance electron attachment to plant hormones and its likely connection with biochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A., E-mail: sapsh@anrb.ru [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); Modelli, Alberto [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna, Italy and Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Scienze Ambientali, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy)

    2014-01-21

    Gas-phase formation of temporary negative ion states via resonance attachment of low-energy (0–6 eV) electrons into vacant molecular orbitals of salicylic acid (I) and its derivatives 3-hydroxy- (II) and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (III), 5-cloro salicylic acid (IV) and methyl salicylate (V) was investigated for the first time by electron transmission spectroscopy. The description of their empty-level structures was supported by density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculations, using empirically calibrated linear equations to scale the calculated virtual orbital energies. Dissociative electron attachment spectroscopy (DEAS) was used to measure the fragment anion yields generated through dissociative decay channels of the parent molecular anions of compounds I–V, detected with a mass filter as a function of the incident electron energy in the 0–14 eV energy range. The most intense negative fragment produced by DEA to isomers I–III is the dehydrogenated molecular anion [M–H]{sup −}, mainly formed at incident electron energies around 1 eV. The vertical and adiabatic electron affinities were evaluated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level as the anion/neutral total energy difference. The same theoretical method was also used for evaluation of the thermodynamic energy thresholds for production of the negative fragments observed in the DEA spectra. The gas-phase DEAS data can provide support for biochemical reaction mechanisms in vivo.

  7. BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE WOUNDS OF GOATS FOLLOWING TREATMENT OF SUNFLOWER OIL AND OLIVE OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Anand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimentally created forty eight wounds of similar size and shape were randomly divided in to three groups, of 16 wounds in each group. Sunflower seed oil impregnated gauze were subjected to the wounds of goats belonging to group I, while Olive oil (Olea europaea impregnated gauze were subjected to the wounds of goats of group II and normal saline solution (control soaked gauze to the wounds of goats of group III. Healing tissues were collected from the junction of wound and intact skin from all the experimental wounds in each of the three groups on 3, 10, 15 and 25 days. Biochemical examinations of healing tissue were done for collagen, elastin, hexosamine and hydroxyproline. The level of collagen, elastin, hexosamine and hydroxyproline were significantly higher in group I followed by group II and then group III. It can be concluded that both sunflower oil and olive oil are effective for acceleration of wound healing and sunflower oil is more effective than olive oil.

  8. Precipitates of Al(III), Sc(III), and La(III) at the muscovite-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A; Geiger, Franz M

    2014-11-20

    The interaction of Al(III), Sc(III), and La(III) with muscovite-water interfaces was studied at pH 4 and 10 mM NaCl using second harmonic generation (SHG) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SHG data for Sc(III) and La(III) suggest complete and/or partial irreversible adsorption that is attributed by XPS to the growth of Sc(III) and La(III) hydroxides/oxides on the muscovite surface. Al(III) adsorption appears to coincide with the growth of gibbsite (Al(OH)3) deposits on the muscovite surface, as indicated by the magnitude of the interfacial potential computed from the SHG data. This interpretation of the data is consistent with previous studies reporting the epitaxial growth of gibbsite on the muscovite surface under similar conditions. The implication of our findings is that the surface charge density of mica may change (and in the case of Al(III), even flip sign from negative (mica) to positive (gibbsite)) when Al(III), Sc(III), or La(III) is present in aqueous phases in contact with heterogeneous geochemical media rich in mica-class minerals, even at subsaturation conditions. PMID:25380548

  9. Anatomical and biochemical investigation of primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancerous transformation entails major biochemical changes including modifications of the energy metabolism of the cell, e.g. utilisation of glucose and other substrates, protein synthesis, and expression of receptors and antigens. Tumour growth also leads to heterogeneity in blood flow owing to focal necrosis, angiogenesis and metabolic demands, as well as disruption of transport mechanisms of substrates across cell membranes and other physiological boundaries such as the blood-brain barrier. All these biochemical, histological and anatomical changes can be assessed with emission tomography, X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Whereas anatomical imaging is aimed at the diagnosis of brain tumours, biochemical imaging is better suited for tissue characterisation. The identification of a tumoural mass and the assessment of its size and vascularisation are best achieved with X-ray CT and MRI, while biochemical imaging can provide additional information that is crucial for tumour classification, differential diagnosis and follow-up. As the assessment of variables such as water content, appearance of cystic lesions and location of the tumour are largely irrelevant for tissue characterisation, a number of probes have been employed for the assessment of the biochemical features of tumours. Since biochemical changes may be related to the growth rate of cancer cells, they can be thought of as markers of tumour cell proliferation. Biochemical imaging with radionuclides of processes that occur at a cellular level provides information that complements findings obtained by anatomical imaging aimed at depicting structural, vascular and histological changes. This review focusses on the clinical application of anatomical brain imaging and biochemical assessment with positron emission tomography, single-photon emission tomography and MRS in the diagnosis of primary brain tumours, as well as in follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanopro...

  11. Biomphalaria prona (Gastropoda: Planorbidae): a morphological and biochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    W. Lobato Paraense; Pointier, J.P.; Delay, B.; A. F. Pernot; Incani, R N; C. Balzan; P. Chrosciechowski

    1992-01-01

    Two samples of Biomphalaria prona (Martens, 1873) from Lake Valencia (type locality) and seven from other Venezuelan localities were studied morphologically (shell and reproductive system) and biochemically (allozyme electrophoresis). In spite of marked differences in shell characters, all of them proved indistinguishable under the anatomic and biochemical criteria. So far B. prona has been considered an endemic species, restricted to Lake Valencia. It is now demonstrated that the extralacust...

  12. Correlations between female breast density and biochemical markers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Park, Hyong-Keun; Yang, Han-Jun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify biochemical markers related to breast density. The study was performed with 200 patients who received mammography and biochemical marker testing between March 1, 2014 to October 1, 2014. [Subjects and Methods] Following the American College of Radiology, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI-RADS), breast parenchymal pattern density from mammography was categorized into four grades: grade 1, almost entirely fat; grade 2, fibroglandula...

  13. Serum Biochemical Profile of Post Partum Metritic Cow

    OpenAIRE

    Magnus P. K.; Lali F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Present study was conducted to find out the relationship between serum biochemical profile and postpartum metritis. Mainly serum glucose, total protein, albumin, albumin globulin ratio, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine and calcium were studied. Colorimetric method was used for quantitative estimation of biochemical profile. Twenty-seven animals with recent history of calving and subsequent metritis were included in the study. On analysis, serum glucose was found to be 22.3 ± 2.1...

  14. Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetic Study (SN--DREAMS III): Study design and research methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu Chinmaya; Ganesan Suganeswari; Raman Rajiv; Saumya Pal Swakshyar; Sharma Tarun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To describe the methodology of the Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetic Study III, an ongoing epidemiological study to estimate the prevalence of Diabetes and Diabetic Retinopathy in rural population of Kanchipuram and Thiravallur districts of Tamil Nadu, India and to elucidate the clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and genetic risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy in this rural population. Methods Sankara Nethralaya Dia...

  15. Murine interleukin 2 receptor. IV. Biochemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IL 2 receptor isolated from the IL 2-dependent CTL-L cell line was subjected to biochemical analysis. Pulse-chase and tunicamycin studies, as well as digestion with the endoglycosidases, Endo-F and Endo-H, of 35S-methionine-labeled IL 2 receptors suggested a single protein pecursor of 32,000 (p32) daltons. The p32 precursor was rapidly processed by addition of high-mannose-containing core N-linked sugars to intracytoplasmic precursor intermediates of 38,000 (p38) and 40,000 (p40) daltons, which undergo further processing to yield a mature surface receptor with heterogeneous apparent m.w. of 52,000 to 65,000 (p58). Two-dimensional gel studies indicated that p58 exhibited broad charge heterogeneity between pH 4.6 and 6.3. Endo-F digestions of p58 shifted the isoelectric focus point to a more basic 5.5 to 7.4. This considerable charge heterogeneity is consistent with the possibility that other post-translational modifications to the mouse IL 2 receptor occur besides addition of complex N-linked glycans. Immunoprecipitations of the IL 2 receptor from surface iodinated cells also revealed an additional band at 110,000 (p110) daltons. IEF vs SDS-PAGE two-dimensional gel studies demonstrated that p110 also had an isoelectric focus point identical to p58. Western blot studies with an anti-IL 2 receptor monoclonal antibody (7D4) demonstrates that p38, p40, p58, and p110 each expressed the epitope recognized by this antibody. Thus, it is likely that p110 is not a unique molecule that coprecipitates with IL 2 receptor. Western blot analysis of mitogen-stimulated T and B lymphocytes also revealed bands similar to p58 and p110, although these bands had an average apparent m.w. 3000 and 6000 less than those seen for CTL-L cells

  16. III-nitride blue microdisplays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype blue microdisplays have been fabricated from InGaN/GaN quantum wells. The device has a dimension of 0.5x0.5mm2 and consists of 10x10 pixels 12 μm in diameter. Emission properties such as electroluminescence spectra, output power versus forward current (L--I) characteristic, viewing angle, and uniformity have been measured. Due to the unique properties of III-nitride wide-band-gap semiconductors, microdisplays fabricated from III nitrides can potentially provide unsurpassed performance, including high-brightness/resolution/contrast, high-temperature/high-power operation, high shock resistance, wide viewing angles, full-color spectrum capability, long life, high speed, and low-power consumption, thus providing an enhancement and benefit to the present capabilities of miniature display systems

  17. Directing the evolution of Rubisco and Rubisco activase: first impressions of a new tool for photosynthesis research

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade the practice of laboratory-directed protein evolution has become firmly established as a versatile tool in biochemical research by enabling molecular evolution toward desirable phenotypes or detection of novel structure–function interactions. Applications of this technique in the field of photosynthesis research are still in their infancy, but recently first steps have been reported in the directed evolution of the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and its helper protein Rubisc...

  18. Lymphocytic Thyroiditis – is cytological grading significant? A correlation of grades with clinical, biochemical, ltrasonographic and radionuclide parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Radharaman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical, biochemical, ultrasonographic, radionuclide and cytomorphological observations in Lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT, to define the cytological grading criteria on smears and correlation of grades with above parameters. Methods This prospective study was conducted on 76 patients attending the Fine needle aspiration cytology clinic of a tertiary care institute in North India. The various parameters like patients' clinical presentation, thyroid antimicrosomal antibodies, hormonal profiles, radionuclide thyroid scan and thyroid ultrasound were studied. Fine needle aspiration of thyroid gland and grading of thyroiditis was done on smears. The grades were correlated with above parameters and the correlation indices were evaluated statistically. Results Most of the patients were females (70, 92.11% who presented with a diffuse goiter (68, 89.47%. Hypothyroid features (56, 73.68% and elevated TSH (75, 98.68% were common, but radioiodide uptake was low or normal in majority of patients. Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody was elevated in 46/70 (65.71% patients. Cytomorphology in fine needle aspirates was diagnostic of lymphocytic thyroiditis in 75 (98.68% patients. Most of them had grade I/II disease by cytology. No correlation was observed between grades of cytomorphology and clinical, biochemical, ultrasonographic and radionuclide parameters. Conclusion Despite the availability of several tests for diagnosis of LT, FNAC remains the gold standard. The grades of thyroiditis at cytology however do not correlate with clinical, biochemical, radionuclide and ultrasonographic parameters.

  19. Protection against radiation induced biochemical changes in cerebrum of Swiss albino mice by Grewia asiatica fruit extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of Grewia asiatica fruit pulp extract (GAE) on Swiss albino mice exposed to gamma radiation. In the present study radioprotective efficacy of Grewia asiatica (rich in anthocyanin, carotenes, Vit.C, etc.) was studied against radiation induced biochemical alterations in mice cerebrum. For experimental study, healthy Swiss Albino mice were selected from an inbred colony and divided into four groups. Group I (normal) did not receive any treatment. Group II was orally supplemented (GAE) once daily at the dose of 700 mg/Kg.b.wt/day for fifteen consecutive days. Group III (control) received distilled water orally equivalent to GAE for fifteen days than exposed to 5 Gy of gamma radiation. Group IV (IR+Drug) was administered orally (GAE) for 15 consecutive days once daily after exposed to single dose of 5Gy of gamma radiation respectively. Mice were sacrificed at different autopsy intervals viz. 1, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days and cerebrum were removed for various biochemical estimations viz. glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein. GAE post treatment renders protection against various biochemical changes in mice cerebrum. Radiation induced augmentation in the levels of LPO was significantly ameliorated by GAE post-treatment. Radiation-induced depletion in the level of GSH, protein was checked significantly by GAE administration

  20. Discriminating model for diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma and melanoma in vitro based on the Raman spectra of selected biochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Landulfo; Silveira, Fabrício Luiz; Bodanese, Benito; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.

    2012-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to identify differences in the biochemical constitution of malignant [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and melanoma (MEL)] cells compared to normal skin tissues, with the goal of skin cancer diagnosis. We collected Raman spectra from compounds such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which are expected to be represented in human skin spectra, and developed a linear least-squares fitting model to estimate the contributions of these compounds to the tissue spectra. We used a set of 145 spectra from biopsy fragments of normal (30 spectra), BCC (96 spectra), and MEL (19 spectra) skin tissues, collected using a near-infrared Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 50 to 200 mW, and 20 s exposure time) coupled to a Raman probe. We applied the best-fitting model to the spectra of biochemicals and tissues, hypothesizing that the relative spectral contribution of each compound to the tissue Raman spectrum changes according to the disease. We verified that actin, collagen, elastin, and triolein were the most important biochemicals representing the spectral features of skin tissues. A classification model applied to the relative contribution of collagen III, elastin, and melanin using Euclidean distance as a discriminator could differentiate normal from BCC and MEL.

  1. Solvent extraction of lanthanide ions with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP), III: extraction of gadolinium(III), terbium(III), dysprosium(III), holmium(III), and thulium(III) by HPMBP from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent extraction behaviour of Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III), and Tm(III) has been investigated using 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP or HL) in carbon tetrachloride as the extractant. Depending on the concentration of HPMBP in the organic phase the chelates LnL3[Ln(III)=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Tm] and adducts LnL3.HL[Ln(III)=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho] were extracted. The extraction equilibrium constants (Kex3 or Kex4) for the formation of LnL3 or LnL3.HL and the two-phase stability constants of the chelates or adducts (β3x, β4x) have been evaluated. (authors)

  2. Mechatronic systems and materials III

    CERN Document Server

    Gosiewski, Zdzislaw

    2009-01-01

    This very interesting volume is divided into 24 sections; each of which covers, in detail, one aspect of the subject-matter: I. Industrial robots; II. Microrobotics; III. Mobile robots; IV. Teleoperation, telerobotics, teleoperated semi-autonomous systems; V. Sensors and actuators in mechatronics; VI. Control of mechatronic systems; VII. Analysis of vibration and deformation; VIII. Optimization, optimal design; IX. Integrated diagnostics; X. Failure analysis; XI. Tribology in mechatronic systems; XII. Analysis of signals; XIII. Measurement techniques; XIV. Multifunctional and smart materials;

  3. The Negotiation of Basel III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm

    2015-01-01

    While the Basel Accords of 1988 and 2004 (Basel I and Basel II) ostensibly set out to regulate bank risk at the international level, they were effectively in the grip of neoliberal beliefs in the self-regulating potential of free markets. In 2009–2011, the Basel Accords were revised once more wit...... agency, the empirical argument is substantiated through textual–intertextual analysis of the rhetorical circulation of affective signs in the Basel III negotiations....

  4. Banking Regulatory Standards Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Costicã Vlad; Maria-Alexandra Spau

    2012-01-01

    Basel Committee issued on December 16, 2010 text Basel III standards framework, which reports on worldwide regulations for capital adequacy and bank liquidity. It is estimated that the rules will help achieve financial stability and promoting economic growth. Combined with a framework of global liquidity, will significantly reduce the likelihood and severity of banking crises in the future by covering the area of micro elements and macroprudentiality. The Framework sets out measures to improv...

  5. French participation to PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PISC III programme was set up in 1986 after the conclusions of the PISC II programme. The main objective was assessment of ISI procedures on few particular components or materials. France with IPSN, CEA/DTA, DCN INDRET, EDF, FRAMATOME and INTERCONTROLE decided to have an important participation in several of the eight actions. This paper describes shortly the key points of this participation and the consequences in France. (authors). 10 figs., 1 tab

  6. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelrod Felicia B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating. Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III, which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  7. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  8. Glycosaminoglycans and mucopolysaccharidosis type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Ciminska, Magdalena; Kloska, Anna; Malinowska, Marcelina; Piotrowska, Ewa; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Banecki, Bogdan; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III), or Sanfilippo syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disease in which heparan sulfate is accumulated in lysosomes, as well as outside of cells, as the primary storage material. This disease is a complex of four conditions caused by dysfunctions of one of genes coding for lysosomal enzymes involved in degradation of heparan sulfate: SGSH (coding for heparan N-sulfatase) - causing MPS IIIA, NAGLU (coding for alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase) - causing MPS IIIB, HGSNAT (coding for acetyl CoA alpha-glucosaminide acetyltransferase) - causing MPS IIIC), and GNS (coding for N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase) - causing MPS IIID. The primary storage is responsible for some disease symptoms, but other arise as a result of secondary storage, including glycosphingolipids, and subsequent processes, like oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Central nervous system is predominantly affected in all subtypes of MPS III. Heparan sulfate and its derivatives are the most commonly used biomarkers for diagnosis and prediction procedures. Currently, there is no therapy for Sanfilippo syndrome, however, clinical trials are ongoing for enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy and substrate reduction therapy (particularly gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy). PMID:27100513

  9. Exploring the evolution of protein function in Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Goncearenco Alexander; Berezovsky Igor N

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite recent progress in studies of the evolution of protein function, the questions what were the first functional protein domains and what were their basic building blocks remain unresolved. Previously, we introduced the concept of elementary functional loops (EFLs), which are the functional units of enzymes that provide elementary reactions in biochemical transformations. They are presumably descendants of primordial catalytic peptides. Results We analyzed distant evo...

  10. Mechanistic approaches to the study of evolution: the functional synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Antony M; Joseph W Thornton

    2007-01-01

    An emerging synthesis of evolutionary biology and experimental molecular biology is providing much stronger and deeper inferences about the dynamics and mechanisms of evolution than were possible in the past. The new approach combines statistical analyses of gene sequences with manipulative molecular experiments to reveal how ancient mutations altered biochemical processes and produced novel phenotypes. This functional synthesis has set the stage for major advances in our understanding of fun...

  11. The temperature influence on sorption of microquantities of cobalt(II), chromium(III) and gallium(III) from aqueous solutions by iron oxide (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to temperature influence on sorption of microquantities of cobalt(II), chromium(III) and gallium(III) from aqueous solutions by iron oxide (III). The sorption of cobalt(II), chromium(III) and gallium(III) by iron oxide (III) at a wide temperature ranges and under mononuclear hydrolysis conditions was studied.

  12. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Wetterslev, Jørn; Brok, Jesper Sune;

    2008-01-01

    Critical illness is associated with uncontrolled inflammation and vascular damage which can result in multiple organ failure and death. Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties but the efficacy and any harmful effects of AT III supplementation in critically ...

  13. 21 CFR 1308.13 - Schedule III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule III. 1308.13 Section 1308.13 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.13 Schedule III. (a) Schedule III shall consist of the drugs and other substances,...

  14. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on salivary myeloperoxidase levels: A biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Dagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO, the most abundant protein in neutrophils, is the focus of inflammatory pathologies. MPO could participate in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients with healthy gingiva, gingivitis, periodontitis between age group of 20–55 years were selected. Group I - 20 Patients with healthy gingiva, Group II - 20 Patients with generalized gingivitis, Group III - 20 Patients with generalized chronic periodontitis, Group IV - 20 Patients of Group III after 1-month of scaling and root planning. The following parameters were recorded: Gingival index, plaque index, bleeding on probing index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, salivary MPO levels. All the parameters were then statistically analyzed. Results: The mean MPO levels in Group I recorded was - 0.320 + 0.06, Group II was - 0.183 + 0.04, Group III was - 0.814 + 0.08 and Group IV was - 0.386 + 0.08 respectively. All these values were statistically significant when compared between the four groups (P < 0.05. A significantly elevated salivary MPO levels were found in subjects with chronic periodontitis as compared to the gingivitis group and the healthy group (P < 0.05. However, moderate but statistically significant increase in the MPO levels were observed in the gingivitis group as compared to the healthy group (P < 0.05. Furthermore, significant reduction in MPO levels were observed in Group IV after 1-month of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Conclusion: The activities of MPO enzyme were significantly increased in the saliva of patients with periodontal disease in comparison to healthy individuals. Furthermore, nonsurgical periodontal therapy was found to be effective in improving clinical parameters and in reducing MPO levels. Salivary enzymes like MPO could be considered as a biochemical marker of periodontal disease activity.

  15. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON NIGERIAN MONODORA TENUIFOLIA SEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekeanyanwu Raphael Chukwuma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritive constituents of the seeds of Monodora tenuifolia were analyzed to augment the available information on Monodora tenuifolia research. Blood glucose and lipid profile were investigated on the flavonoid rich fraction of M. tenuifolia in rats. The composition (gkg-1 of alkaloids, cyanogenic glycosides, tannins and flavonoids were 13.3±0.1, 21.2×10-2±0.6, 1.3±0.1, 1.7±0.1 and 11.7±1.1 respectively. The proximate composition (gkg-1 of M. tenuifolia seed were crude fibre (262.3±1.2, crude protein (82.6±1.0, crude fat (349.9±1.9, ash (49.9±0.6, moisture (190.0±0.00 and carbohydrate (65.5±4.7. Analysis of the minerals content (gkg-1 yielded calcium (864.0±29.38, sodium (2752.0±140.35, iron (3.34±0.06, zinc (5.26±0.08, potassium (326.4±13.06, magnesium (342.9±13.71 and phosphorus (9.52±0.17, while vitamin analysis yielded vitamin A (10.05±0.17 iu/100 g, C (56.40±0.14 gkg-1 and E (11.71±0.87 iu /100 g, thiamine (0.11±0.01 gkg-1, niacin (0.46±0.32 gkg-1 and riboflavin (0.04±0.01 gkg-1. The results of amino acid analysis showed the total amino acid of M. tenuifolia seed was 71.78 of crude protein. The total essential amino acid with Histidine was calculated to be 29.24 of the crude protein. The antinutrient analysis of M. tenuifolia shows it contained total phenol (0.8±0.0 gkg-1, oxalates (4.09±1.17 gkg-1, phytates (0.012±0.42 gkg-1 and trypsin inhibitor (0.230±0.42 iu/g. The main fatty acids of the seed oil are linoleic acid (401.7 g kg-1, oleic acid (346.1 g kg-1 and palmitic acid (122.61 g kg-1. The LD50 of the flavonoid-rich fraction was found to be above 5000 mg kg-1 b.w. After the day 14 study, biochemical markers such as triacylglycerol, very low density lipoprotein increased significantly (p0.05 effect was observed on the blood glucose and lipid profile of wistar albino rats compared with the control. The result shows that M. tenuifolia seed is rich

  16. On Technology and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Radovan, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Evolution creates structures of increasing order and power; in this process the stronger prevail over the weaker and carry the evolution further. Technology is an artificial creation that often threatens life and evolution conceived of as natural phenomena; but technology also supports life and it works together with evolution. However, there are claims that technology will do much more than that, and bring about an entirely new epoch of evolution. Technology will replace the fragile biologic...

  17. Multiplicity in Early Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Reipurth, Bo; Boss, Alan P; Goodwin, Simon P; Rodriguez, Luis Felipe; Stassun, Keivan G; Tokovinin, Andrei; Zinnecker, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Observations from optical to centimeter wavelengths have demonstrated that multiple systems of two or more bodies is the norm at all stellar evolutionary stages. Multiple systems are widely agreed to result from the collapse and fragmentation of cloud cores, despite the inhibiting influence of magnetic fields. Surveys of Class 0 protostars with mm interferometers have revealed a very high multiplicity frequency of about 2/3, even though there are observational difficulties in resolving close protobinaries, thus supporting the possibility that all stars could be born in multiple systems. Near-infrared adaptive optics observations of Class I protostars show a lower binary frequency relative to the Class 0 phase, a declining trend that continues through the Class II/III stages to the field population. This loss of companions is a natural consequence of dynamical interplay in small multiple systems, leading to ejection of members. We discuss observational consequences of this dynamical evolution, and its influenc...

  18. Chemical constraints on the contribution of Population III stars to cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, Girish; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the IGM, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ~10x more ionizing photons than Population II. But this argument depends critically on the duration of the Population III era, and because Population III stars form from pristine gas, in turn depends on the rate of galactic enrichment. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III SNe produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly{\\alpha} absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star-formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Zcrit=10^-4 Zsu...

  19. Highly monodisperse M III-based soc -MOFs (M = in and Ga) with cubic and truncated cubic morphologies

    KAUST Repository

    Pang, Maolin

    2012-08-15

    In this work, we carry out an investigation on shape-controlled growth of In III- and Ga III-based square-octahedral metal-organic frameworks (soc-MOFs). In particular, controllable crystal morphological evolution from simple cubes to complex octadecahedra has been achieved, and resultant highly uniform crystal building blocks promise new research opportunities for preparation of self-assembled MOF materials and related applications. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Separation of gadolinium(III) and lanthanum(III) by nanofiltration-complexation in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is proposed for the separation of gadolinium(III) and lanthanum(III) in aqueous medium by nanofiltration combined with a complexation step. First DTPA was chosen as ligand for a selective Gd(III)/La(III) complexation. Having investigated the influence of three factors (pH, temperature and amount of ligand) for the selective complexation of DTPA towards Gd(III) and La(III), the system is then combined with a nanofiltration separation process to remove 92% of initial Gd(III) and only 12% of initial La. (author)

  1. Evolution of plant senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mike

    2009-07-01

    characteristics of senescence-related genes allow a framework to be constructed of decisive events in the evolution of the senescence syndrome of modern land-plants. Combining phylogenetic, comparative sequence, gene expression and morphogenetic information leads to the conclusion that biochemical, cellular, integrative and adaptive systems were progressively added to the ancient primary core process of senescence as the evolving plant encountered new environmental and developmental contexts.

  2. Population III stars around the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop~III) stars, born of the primordial gas. Pop~III stars with masses below $0.8 M_\\odot$ should survive to date though are not observed yet, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [Fe/H]$ < -5$ in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop~III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop~III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the e...

  3. SDSS-III/APOGEE: Detailed Abundances of Galactic Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Frinchaboy, Peter M; Jackson, Kelly; Johnson, Jennifer A; Majewski, Steven R; Shetrone, Matthew; Rocha, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (SDSS-III/APOGEE) is a large-scale spectroscopic survey of Galactic stars and star clusters. The SDSS-III/APOGEE survey is designed to produce high-S/N, R = 27,500-31,000 spectra that cover a wavelength range of 1.51 to 1.68 microns. By utilizing APOGEE's excellent kinematics (error <= 0.5 km/s) and abundances (errors ~ 0.1 dex), we will be able to study star cluster kinematics and chemical properties in detail. Over the course of the 3-year survey beginning in 2011, APOGEE will target 25-30 key open and globular clusters. In addition, the large area coverage of the SDSS focal plane will also allow us to target stars in 100-200 additional star clusters during the main survey observations. We present the strength of APOGEE for both open and globular star cluster studies and the methods of identifying probable clusters members utilizing 2MASS and IRAC/WISE data.

  4. Europium (III) and americium (III) stability constants with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability constants for tracer concentrations of Eu(III) and Am(III) complexes with a humic acid extracted from a lake-bottom sediment were measured using a solvent extraction system. The organic extractant was di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid in toluene while the humate aqueous phase had a constant ionic strength of 0.1 M (NaClO4). Aqueous humic acid concentrations were monitored by measuring uv-visible absorbances at approx.= 380 nm. The total carboxylate capacity of the humic acid was determined by direct potentiometric titration to be 3.86 +- 0.03 meq/g. The humic acid displayed typical characteristics of a polyelectrolyte - the apparent pKsub(a), as well as the calculated metal ion stability constants increased as the degree of ionization (α) increased. The binding data required a fit of two stability constants, β1 and β2, such that for Eu, log β1 = 8.86 α + 4.39, log β2 = 3.55 α + 11.06 while for Am, log β1 = 10.58 α + 3.84, log β2 = 5.32 α + 10.42. With hydroxide, carbonate, and humate as competing ligands, the humate complex associated with the β1 constant is calculated to be the dominant species for the trivalent actinides and lanthanides under conditions present in natural waters. (orig.)

  5. Potential impact of gene regulatory mechanisms on the evolution of multicellularity in the volvocine algae

    OpenAIRE

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how multicellular organisms can arise from their single-celled precursors. The evolution of multicellularity requires the adoption of new traits in unicellular ancestors that allows the generation of form by, for example, increasing the size and developing new cell types. But what are the genetic, cellular and biochemical bases underlying the evolution of multicellularity? Recent advances in evolutionary developmental biology suggest that the regulation of...

  6. Adaptive Evolution of the Venom-Targeted vWF Protein in Opossums that Eat Pitvipers

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon A Jansa; Voss, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid evolution of venom toxin genes is often explained as the result of a biochemical arms race between venomous animals and their prey. However, it is not clear that an arms race analogy is appropriate in this context because there is no published evidence for rapid evolution in genes that might confer toxin resistance among routinely envenomed species. Here we report such evidence from an unusual predator-prey relationship between opossums (Marsupialia: Didelphidae) and pitvipers (Serp...

  7. The Evolution of Protein Structures and Structural Ensembles Under Functional Constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Liberles, David A; Grahnen, Johan A.; Jessica Siltberg-Liberles

    2011-01-01

    Protein sequence, structure, and function are inherently linked through evolution and population genetics. Our knowledge of protein structure comes from solved structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), our knowledge of sequence through sequences found in the NCBI sequence databases (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/), and our knowledge of function through a limited set of in-vitro biochemical studies. How these intersect through evolution is described in the first part of the review. In the secon...

  8. Adaptive protein evolution grants organismal fitness by improving catalysis and flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Tomatis, Pablo E.; Fabiane, Stella M.; Simona, Fabio; Carloni, Paolo; Sutton, Brian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2008-01-01

    Protein evolution is crucial for organismal adaptation and fitness. This process takes place by shaping a given 3-dimensional fold for its particular biochemical function within the metabolic requirements and constraints of the environment. The complex interplay between sequence, structure, functionality, and stability that gives rise to a particular phenotype has limited the identification of traits acquired through evolution. This is further complicated by the fact that mutations are pleiot...

  9. Biochemical systematics of the leaf mining moth family Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera). III. Allozyme variation patterns in the Ectoedemia subbimaculella group

    OpenAIRE

    Steph B J Menken

    1990-01-01

    Gel electrophoretic techniques were used to analyse patterns of variation at 12 genetic loci within and among species of the Ectoedemia subbimaculella group from western Europe. Geographically separated conspecific populations were similar to one another genetically, with the exception of E. subbimaculella where the malate dehydrogenase locus exhibited clinal variation. Genetic differences among species often concerned loci that were monomorphic or slightly polymorphic within populations. Thr...

  10. Biochemical systematics of the leaf mining moth family Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera). III. Allozyme variation patterns in the Ectoedemia subbimaculella group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menken, Steph B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gel electrophoretic techniques were used to analyse patterns of variation at 12 genetic loci within and among species of the Ectoedemia subbimaculella group from western Europe. Geographically separated conspecific populations were similar to one another genetically, with the exception of E. subbima

  11. Determining the gross biochemical composition of cells and tissue with Raman spectrosocpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Dominguez, Jorge; Carpenter, Susan; Powers, Tamara M.; Guerra, Anabel; Short, Kurt W.; Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Freyer, James P.

    2006-02-01

    The biochemical composition of mammalian cells has been estimated by Raman spectroscopy and the results compared with other biochemical methods. The Raman spectroscopy estimates were performed by fitting measured Raman and infrared spectra of dense cell suspensions to a linear combination of basis components (RNA, DNA, protein, lipid, glycoen). The Raman spectroscopy results are compared to biochemical analyses performed by extraction and quantfication of the biochemical components. Both absolute and relative measurements of biochemical composition are compared. Both the Raman and biochemical results indicate that there are signficant differences in gross biochemical composition dependent on growth stage and tumorigneicity.

  12. Extraction of Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III) with picrolonic acid in methylisobutylketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III) as representatives of lanthanide(III) ions with picrolonic acid (HPA) in methylisobutylketone (MIBK) has been studied from pH 1-2 buffer solutions. The composition of the organic species formed in the organic phase after extraction has been determined by slope analysis to be M(PA)3 [M = Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III)]. The equilibrium constant values, log kex, were deduced to be 2.96±0.02, 2.52±0.05 and 1.52±0.07 for Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III), respectively. The effect of various anions and cations on the extraction of these metal ions has also been studied. Among the masking anions, fluoride, oxalate, citrate and cyanide ions lowered the extraction, whereas presence of Zn(II) Cu(II), Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) has only reduced to 25.87%. The extraction of various other divalent metal ions from pH 2 buffer solution was also studied and high separation factors (103) for the three selected rare earth metal ions were obtained with good selectivity. (author)

  13. III-nitride semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2006-01-01

    III-Nitride semiconductor materials - (Al, In, Ga)N - are excellent wide band gap semiconductors very suitable for modern electronic and optoelectronic applications. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved recently, and current knowledge and data published have to be modified and upgraded. This book presents the new developments and achievements in the field. Written by renowned experts, the review chapters in this book cover the most important topics and achievements in recent years, discuss progress made by different groups, and suggest future directions. Each chapter also describes the

  14. Macroeconomic Impact of Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Slovik; Boris Cournède

    2011-01-01

    The estimated medium-term impact of Basel III implementation on GDP growth is in the range of -0.05 to -0.15 percentage point per annum. Economic output is mainly affected by an increase in bank lending spreads as banks pass a rise in bank funding costs, due to higher capital requirements, to their customers. To meet the capital requirements effective in 2015 (4.5% for the common equity ratio, 6% for the Tier 1 capital ratio), banks are estimated to increase their lending spreads on average b...

  15. Recent results for Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brient, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from the Mark III detector at SPEAR, in the open charm sector. The first topic discussed is the reanalysis of the direct measurement of the D hadronic branching fractions, where a detailed study has been made of the Cabibbo suppressed and multi-..pi../sup 0/'s D decays backgrounds in the double tag sample. Next, the Dalitz plot analysis of the D decays to K..pi pi.. is presented, leading to the relative fractions of three-body versus pseudoscalarvector decays. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Recent results for Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent results from the Mark III detector at SPEAR, in the open charm sector. The first topic discussed is the reanalysis of the direct measurement of the D hadronic branching fractions, where a detailed study has been made of the Cabibbo suppressed and multi-π0's D decays backgrounds in the double tag sample. Next, the Dalitz plot analysis of the D decays to Kππ is presented, leading to the relative fractions of three-body versus pseudoscalarvector decays. 7 refs., 5 figs

  17. Biochemical characterisation during seed development of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Sau-Yee; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng-Lian; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina

    2013-07-01

    Developmental biochemical information is a vital base for the elucidation of seed physiology and metabolism. However, no data regarding the biochemical profile of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) seed development has been reported thus far. In this study, the biochemical changes in the developing oil palm seed were investigated to study their developmental pattern. The biochemical composition found in the seed differed significantly among the developmental stages. During early seed development, the water, hexose (glucose and fructose), calcium and manganese contents were present in significantly high levels compared to the late developmental stage. Remarkable changes in the biochemical composition were observed at 10 weeks after anthesis (WAA): the dry weight and sucrose content increased significantly, whereas the water content and hexose content declined. The switch from a high to low hexose/sucrose ratio could be used to identify the onset of the maturation phase. At the late stage, dramatic water loss occurred, whereas the content of storage reserves increased progressively. Lauric acid was the most abundant fatty acid found in oil palm seed starting from 10 WAA. PMID:23575803

  18. Microstereolithography and its application to biochemical IC chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Koji; Maruo, Shoji; Hasegawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Takao

    2001-06-01

    The world's first micro stereo lithography, named IH process, was proposed and developed by the speaker in 1992. By now, several types of micro stereo lithography systems have been developed. Three-dimensional resolution of solidification has reached to 0.2 micron at present. These 3D micro fabrication processes using UV curable polymer gave a big impact on not only MEMS but also optics. The latest version of IH process enables us to make a movable micro mechanism without assemble process or sacrificial layer technique often used in silicon process. It is well known that the IH process is the mother of two-photon micro stereo lithography and its applications. Recently new micro chemical device named Biochemical IC Chip was proposed and developed by the speaker. This chip is based on the module IC chip-set like today's TTL family. IH process enable to make the biochemical IC including real three-dimensional micro fluid channels. Various kinds of Biochemical IC chips such as micro pump, switching valve, reactor, concentrator and detector have already been fabricated successfully. Basic performance of micro chemical devices constructed by the biochemical IC chips were demonstrated. The biochemical IC chips will open new bioscience and medicine based on innovative technology.

  19. Transformational III-V Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-04-01

    Flexible electronics using III-V materials for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. This thesis describes a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process for transforming traditional III-V materials based electronics into flexible one. The thesis reports releasing 200 nm of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) from 200 nm GaAs / 300 nm Aluminum Arsenide (AlAs) stack on GaAs substrate using diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF). This process enables releasing a single top layer compared to peeling off all layers with small sizes at the same time. This is done utilizing a network of release holes that contributes to the better transparency (45 % at 724 nm wavelengths) observed. Fabrication of metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAPs) on GaAs is followed by releasing it to have devices on flexible 200 nm GaAs. Similarly, flexible GaSb and InP fabrication process is also reported to transform traditional electronics into large-area flexible electronics.

  20. Bistability in a Metabolic Network Underpins the De Novo Evolution of Colony Switching in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallie, Jenna; Libby, Eric; Bertels, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    central metabolism (carB) generates such a striking phenotype. We show that colony switching is underpinned by ON/OFF expression of capsules consisting of a colanic acid-like polymer. We use molecular genetics, biochemical analyses, and experimental evolution to establish that capsule switching results...

  1. Carbamates toxicity in farmers and its assesment through biochemical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevalent environmental toxicity of various chemical group of pesticides and their effects leading towards increasing morbidity and mortality in the farmers is of great concerned. In this situation the biochemical biomarkers are regarded as meaningful tools for monitoring toxic end points. This work was aimed to assess the toxic impacts of carbamates through some biochemical parameters and useful validity of these biomarkers was also observed. Present results reveal inhibition of cholinesterase activity by 46% whereas bilirubin, urea and creatinine levels in serum were increased and sugar values was decreased at highly significant level (p<0.001). Urine urobilinogen concentration found raised significantly at high level (p<0.001) while protein, urea creatinine and sugar values in urine of the farmers seen non-significant. This study concluded that the selected biochemical parameters can be used as biomarkers to assess the significant toxic effects in the exposed populations. (author)

  2. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  3. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Niemeyer, Claudia; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Nunes, Adauto L V; Rameh-de-Albuquerque, Luciana C; Sant'Anna, Sávio S; Catão-Dias, José L

    2012-09-01

    The hyacinth macaw (Anodorhyncus hyacinthinus), considered the largest psittacine bird species in the world, is an endangered species, with a remaining population of approximately 6500 birds in the wild. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to verify differences related to sex, samples from 29 hyacinth macaws (14 males, 15 females) were obtained from birds apprehended from illegal wildlife trade and subsequently housed at the Sorocaba Zoo, Brazil. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Compared with published reference values, differences were found in mean concentrations of total red blood cell count, corpuscular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin level, total white blood cell count, aspartate aminotransferase level, creatine kinase concentration, alkaline phosphatase concentration, and phosphorus level. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this endangered species in captivity or rehabilitation centers. PMID:23156973

  4. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Taha, Abid Sharif; Watson, Ryan William; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Bürkle, Marcellus; Hammer, Sven

    2007-12-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is considered the world's most endangered parrot, with the last wild bird disappearing in 2001 and only 74 birds in captivity. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to look for differences relative to sex, age, and season, we obtained blood samples from 46 captive Spix's macaws (23 male, 23 female) housed in aviaries at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Adult and juvenile birds differed in mean concentrations of glucose, total protein, amylase, cholesterol, and phosphorus; in percentages of heterophils and lymphocytes; and in the absolute lymphocyte count. Total protein, cholesterol, and phosphorus concentrations; hematocrit; and heterophil and lymphocyte counts differed significantly by season. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this highly endangered species. PMID:18351006

  5. Occurrence of bacteria and biochemical markers on public surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kelly A; Watt, Pamela M; Boone, Stephanie A; Gerba, Charles P

    2005-06-01

    From 1999-2003, the hygiene of 1061 environmental surfaces from shopping, daycare, and office environments, personal items, and miscellaneous activities (i.e., gymnasiums, airports, movie theaters, restaurants, etc.), in four US cities, was monitored. Samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliform bacteria, protein, and biochemical markers. Biochemical markers, i.e., hemoglobin (blood marker), amylase (mucus, saliva, sweat, and urine marker), and urea (urine and sweat marker) were detected on 3% (26/801); 15% (120/801), and 6% (48/801) of the surfaces, respectively. Protein (general hygiene marker) levels > or = 200 microg/10 cm2 were present on 26% (200/801) of the surfaces tested. Surfaces from children's playground equipment and daycare centers were the most frequently contaminated (biochemical markers on 36%; 15/42 and 46%; 25/54, respectively). Surfaces from the shopping, miscellaneous activities, and office environments were positive for biochemical markers with a frequency of 21% (69/333), 21% (66/308), and 11% (12/105), respectively). Sixty samples were analyzed for biochemical markers and bacteria. Total and fecal coliforms were detected on 20% (12/60) and 7% (4/ 60) of the surfaces, respectively. Half and one-third of the sites positive for biochemical markers were also positive for total and fecal coliforms, respectively. Artificial contamination of public surfaces with an invisible fluorescent tracer showed that contamination from outside surfaces was transferred to 86% (30/ 35) of exposed individual's hands and 82% (29/35) tracked the tracer to their home or personal belongings hours later. Results provide information on the relative hygiene of commonly encountered public surfaces and aid in the identification of priority environments where contaminant occurrence and risk of exposure may be greatest. Children's playground equipment is identified as a priority surface for additional research on the occurrence of and potential exposure to infectious

  6. The Development of a Biochemical Profile of Acacia Honey by Identifying Biochemical Determinants of its Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Alexandru MARGHITAS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Codex Alimentarius Standard, EU Legislation and National Standards state honey authenticity. Authenticity in respect of production (to prevent adulteration and authenticity in respect of geographical and botanical origin are the two main aspects of general honey authenticity. Quality of honey depends on the plant source, the chemical composition of these plants as well, as on the climatic conditions and soil mineral composition. Romanian acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia honey that came from the most important Transylvanian massif (Valea lui Mihai, Bihor County, Romania was evaluated for authenticity by pollen-analysis, several physico-chemical analyses, including sugar profile and mineral content. As polyphenolic content could be also an important factor for botanical authentification, HPLC-DAD-MS analyses were performed to assess the fingerprint of this important secondary plant metabolite. Statistical data were processed in order to develop a biochemical profile of this type of honey and the main quality categories identification. The results of physico-chemical analysis demonstrated that the tested honey samples could be framed into monofloral type of acacia honeys. The analysis of acacia honeys originating from Valea lui Mihai, Romania, showed that polyphenolic profile (phenolic acids and flavonoids could be used as a complementary method for authenticity determination together with pollen analysis and other physico-chemical analysis.

  7. Modelling pollutant deposition to vegetation: scaling down from the canopy to the biochemical level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the atmosphere, pollutants exist in either the gas, particle or liquid (rain and cloud water) phase. The most important gas-phase pollutants from a biological or ecological perspective are oxides of nitrogen (nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid vapor), oxides of sulfur (sulfur dioxide), ammonia, tropospheric ozone and mercury vapor. For liquid or particle phase pollutants, the suite of pollutants is varied and includes hydrogen ion, multiple heavy metals, and select anions. For many of these pollutants, plant canopies are a major sink within continental landscapes, and deposition is highly dependent on the (i) physical form or phase of the pollutant, (ii) meteorological conditions above and within the plant canopy, and (iii) physiological or biochemical properties of the leaf, both on the leaf surface and within the leaf interior. In large measure, the physical and chemical processes controlling deposition at the meteorological and whole-canopy levels are well characterized and have been mathematically modelled. In contrast, the processes operating on the leaf surface and within the leaf interior are not well understood and are largely specific for individual pollutants. The availability of process-level models to estimate deposition is discussed briefly at the canopy and leaf level; however, the majority of effort is devoted to modelling deposition at the leaf surface and leaf interior using the two-layer stagnant film model. This model places a premium on information of a physiological and biochemical nature, and highlights the need to distinguish clearly between the measurements of atmospheric chemistry and the physiologically effective exposure since the two may be very dissimilar. A case study of deposition in the Los Angeles Basin is used to demonstrate the modelling approach, to present the concept of exposure dynamics in the atmosphere versus that in the leaf interior, and to document the principle that most forest canopies are exposed to multiple chemical

  8. Biochemical, liver and renal toxicities of Melissa officinals hydroalcoholic extract on balb/C mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namjoo Abdolrasool

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Melissa officinalis is usually used as antispasmodic, antiaxiety and antibacterial agent. However, its toxicity has not been evaluated, yet. In this study biochemical, liver and renal toxicities of Melissa officinals hydroalcoholic extract were evaluated in balb/C mice. Methods: In an experimental study, 21 balb/C male mice were randomly designated to three equal groups. Group I was treated with normal saline and groups II and III were respectively treated with 0.450 and 1.350 g/kg, hydroalcoholic extract of Melissa officinals daily for two weeks, intraperitoneally. Then on 15th day of the experiment, blood samples were obtained from the heart. The blood was centrifuged and then the sera were evaluated for alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine, using autoanalyzer and commercial kits. The liver and kidney tissues were also hystopathologically evaluated. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc test, and Kruskal-Wallis at a significance level of p<0.05. Results: Melissa officinals dose dependently caused a significant reduction in alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase levels compared to the control group. Furthermore, Melissa officinals extract had no effect on the amount of urea and creatinine compared to the control group. The liver and kidney histopathological changes in the groups that received different doses of the extract showed mild, moderate, and severe tissue injuries. Conclusion: The biochemical analysis in this study indicates that the extract of Melissa officinals causes liver tissue damage in mice; therefore, its consumption in high doses should be avoided.

  9. Physiological and biochemical basis of salmon young ifshes migratory behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir Ivanovich Martemyanov

    2016-01-01

    The review presents data on structural changes, physiological and biochemical reactions occurring at salmon young fishes during smoltification. It is shown, that young salmon fishes located in fresh water, in the process of smoltification undergo a complex of structural, physiological and biochemical changes directed on preparation of the organism for living in the sea. These changes cause stress reaction which excites young fishes to migrate down the river towards the sea. Measures to improve reproduction of young salmon fishes at fish farms are offered.

  10. Models of Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    The basic principles underlying galactic chemical evolution and the most important results of chemical evolution models are discussed. In particular, the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, for which we possess the majority of observational constraints, is described. Then, it is shown how different star formation histories influence the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. Finally, the role of abundances and abundance ratios as cosmic clocks is emphasized an...

  11. Chemical evolution and life

    OpenAIRE

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before na...

  12. Evolution & Diversity in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Lorentz C.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes recent findings that help in understanding how evolution has brought about the diversity of plant life that presently exists. Discusses basic concepts of evolution, diversity and classification, the three-line hypothesis of plant evolution, the origin of fungi, and the geologic time table. Included are 31 references. (CW)

  13. Nitrato-complexes of Y(III), La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III) and Ho(III) with 2-(2'-pyridyl) benzimidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrato-complexes, [Y(PyBzH)2(NO3)2]NO3.H2O and Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho ; n=1-3, m=0-0.5 ; PyBzh=2-(2 -pyridyl)benzimidazole] are formed on interaction of the ligand with metal nitrates in ethanol. The electrical conductance values (116-129 ohm-1cm2mol-1) suggest 1:1 electrolyte-nature of the complexes. Magnetic moment values of Ce(2.53 B.M.), Pr(3.62 B.M.), Nd(3.52 B.M.), Sm(1.70 B.M.), Gd(8.06 B.M.), Tb(9.44 B.M.), Dy(10.56 B.M.) and Ho(10.51 B.M.) in the complexes confirm the terpositive state of the metals. Infrared evidences are obtained for the existance of both coordinated (C2v) and uncoordinated (D3h) nitrate groups. Electronic absorption spectra of Pr(III)-, Nd(III)-, Sm(III)-, Tb(III)-, Dy(III)- and Ho(III)-complexes have been analysed in the light of LSJ terms. (author)

  14. The SINTRAN III NODAL system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NODAL is a high level programming language based on FOCAL and SNOBOL4, with some influence from BASIC. The language was developed to operate on the computer network controlling the SPS accelerator at CERN. NODAL is an interpretive language designed for interactive use. This is the most important aspect of the language, and is reflected in its structure. The interactive facilities make it possible to write, debug and modify programs much faster than with compiler based languages like FORTRAN and ALGOL. Apart from a few minor modifications, the basic part of the Oslo University NODAL system does not differ from the CERN version. However, the Oslo University implementation has been expanded with new functions which enable the user to execute many of the SINTRAN III monitor calls from the NODAL level. In particular the most important RT monitor calls have been implemented in this way, a property which renders possible the use of NODAL as a RT program administrator. (JIW)

  15. Solvent extraction of scandium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of scandium(III) from iron(III), molybdenum(VI), vanadium(V), chromium(VI), titanium(IV), bismuth(III), zirconium(IV), lanthanum(III), and thorium(IV) is achieved by solvent extraction with mesityl oxide from sodium sallcylate solution (0.1 M) adjusted to pH 4. Scandium from the organic phase is stripped with water and determined photometrically as its arsenazo complex at 570 nm. The extracted species is trisolvated, i.e., Sc(HOC6H4COO)33Me0. 1 figure, 1 table

  16. Characterization of ribonuclease III from Brucella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Xian; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Fang; Yang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Chen, Huan-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a highly conserved endonuclease, which plays pivotal roles in RNA maturation and decay pathways by cleaving double-stranded structure of RNAs. Here we cloned rncS gene from the genomic DNA of Brucella melitensis, and analyzed the cleavage properties of RNase III from Brucella. We identified Brucella-encoding small RNA (sRNA) by high-throughput sequencing and northern blot, and found that sRNA of Brucella and Homo miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA) can be bound and cleaved by B.melitensis ribonuclease III (Bm-RNase III). Cleavage activity of Bm-RNase III is bivalent metal cations- and alkaline buffer-dependent. We constructed several point mutations in Bm-RNase III, whose cleavage activity indicated that the 133th Glutamic acid residue was required for catalytic activity. Western blot revealed that Bm-RNase III was differently expressed in Brucella virulence strain 027 and vaccine strain M5-90. Collectively, our data suggest that Brucella RNase III can efficiently bind and cleave stem-loop structure of small RNA, and might participate in regulation of virulence in Brucella. PMID:26778206

  17. Recovery from population III supernova explosions and the onset of second generation star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, Myoungwon; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljevic, Milos

    2014-01-01

    We use cosmological simulations to assess how the explosion of the first stars in supernovae (SNe) influences early cosmic history. Specifically, we investigate the impact by SNe on the host systems for Population III (Pop III) star formation and explore its dependence on halo environment and Pop III progenitor mass. We then trace the evolution of the enriched gas until conditions are met to trigger second-generation star formation. To this extent, we quantify the recovery timescale, which measures the time delay between a Pop III SN explosion and the appearance of cold, dense gas, out of which second-generation stars can form. We find that this timescale is highly sensitive to the Pop III progenitor mass, and less so to the halo environment. For Pop III progenitor masses M < 40 solar mass, recovery is prompt, ~ 10 Myr. For more massive progenitors, including those exploding in pair instability SNe, second-generation star formation is delayed significantly, for up to a Hubble time. The dependence of the re...

  18. Influence of organic matters on AsIII oxidation by the microflora of polluted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescure, T; Moreau, J; Charles, C; Ben Ali Saanda, T; Thouin, H; Pillas, N; Bauda, P; Lamy, I; Battaglia-Brunet, F

    2016-06-01

    The global AsIII-oxidizing activity of microorganisms in eight surface soils from polluted sites was quantified with and without addition of organic substrates. The organic substances provided differed by their nature: either yeast extract, commonly used in microbiological culture media, or a synthetic mixture of defined organic matters (SMOM) presenting some common features with natural soil organic matter. Correlations were sought between soil characteristics and both the AsIII-oxidizing rate constants and their evolution in accordance with inputs of organic substrates. In the absence of added substrate, the global AsIII oxidation rate constant correlated positively with the concentration of intrinsic organic matter in the soil, suggesting that AsIII-oxidizing activity was limited by organic substrate availability in nutrient-poor soils. This limitation was, however, removed by 0.08 g/L of added organic carbon. In most conditions, the AsIII oxidation rate constant decreased as organic carbon input increased from 0.08 to 0.4 g/L. Incubations of polluted soils in aerobic conditions, amended or not with SMOM, resulted in short-term As mobilization in the presence of SMOM and active microorganisms. In contrast, microbial AsIII oxidation seemed to stabilize As when no organic substrate was added. Results suggest that microbial speciation of arsenic driven by nature and concentration of organic matter exerts a major influence on the fate of this toxic element in surface soils. PMID:26427654

  19. Improvement of thermostability and activity of Trichoderma reesei endo-xylanase Xyn III on insoluble substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Kaneko, Satoshi; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2016-09-01

    Trichoderma reesei Xyn III, an endo-β-1,4-xylanase belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10), is vital for the saccharification of xylans in plant biomass. However, its enzymatic thermostability and hydrolytic activity on insoluble substrates are low. To overcome these difficulties, the thermostability of Xyn III was improved using random mutagenesis and directed evolution, and its hydrolytic activity on insoluble substrates was improved by creating a chimeric protein. In the screening of thermostable Xyn III mutants from a random mutagenesis library, we identified two amino acid residues, Gln286 and Asn340, which are important for the thermostability of Xyn III. The Xyn III Gln286Ala/Asn340Tyr mutant showed xylanase activity even after heat treatment at 60 °C for 30 min or 50 °C for 96 h, indicating a dramatic enhancement in thermostability. In addition, we found that the addition of a xylan-binding domain (XBD) to the C-terminal of Xyn III improved its hydrolytic activity on insoluble xylan. PMID:27138202

  20. The Stereochemistry of Biochemical Molecules: A Subject to Revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centelles, Josep J.; Imperial, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Although Fischer's convention for stereoisomers is useful for simple molecules, the stereochemistry of complex biochemical molecules is often poorly indicated in textbooks. This article reports on errors in stereochemistry of complex hydrosoluble vitamin B12 molecule. Twenty-five popular biochemistry textbooks were examined for their treatment of…

  1. A coupled mechano-biochemical model for bone adaptation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Pérez, M. A.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Maršík, F.; Doblaré, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 69, 6-7 (2014), s. 1383-1429. ISSN 0303-6812 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : mechano-biochemical model * bone remodelling * BMU Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.846, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00285-013-0736-9

  2. Biochemical Pathways That Are Important for Cotton Fiber Cell Elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory mechanism that controls the sustained cotton fiber cell elongation is gradually being elucidated by coupling genome-wide transcriptome profiling with systematic biochemical and physiological studies.Very long chain fatty acids(VLCFA),H2O2,and several types of plant hormones

  3. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  4. BIOCHEMICAL AND NEUROPATHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF TRIPHENYL PHOSPHITE IN RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The putative neurotoxicity of the organophosphorus compound triphenyl phosphite (TPP) was examined in Long Evans, adult male rats. Animals were exposed to two 1.0 ml/kg (1184 mg/kg) injections (sc) of TPP spaced 1 week apart and sampled for biochemical and neuropathological exami...

  5. Integrating Carbon Nanotubes into Microfluidic Chip for Separating Biochemical Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Miaoxiang Max; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    We present a new type of device to separate biochemical compounds wherein carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are integrated as chromatographic stationary phase. The CNTs were directly grown on the bottom of microfluidic channels on Si/SiO2 substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Acetylene was used as...

  6. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 2. MODEL EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The multilayer biochemical dry deposition model (MLBC) described in the accompanying paper was tested against half-hourly eddy correlation data from six field sites under a wide range of climate conditions with various plant types. Modeled CO2, O3, SO2<...

  7. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 1. MODEL FORMULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multilayer biochemical dry deposition model has been developed based on the NOAA Multilayer Model (MLM) to study gaseous exchanges between the soil, plants, and the atmosphere. Most of the parameterizations and submodels have been updated or replaced. The numerical integration ...

  8. Advances in Biochemical Screening for Phaeochromocytoma using Biogenic Amines

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Malcolm J; Doogue, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical testing for phaeochromocytoma is performed in diagnostic laboratories using a variety of tests with plasma, serum or 24-hour urine collections. These tests include catecholamines and their methylated metabolites - the metanephrines, either individually or in combination with their sulfated metabolites. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) continues to be the dominant analytical method for biogenic amine quantitation. Chromatographic techniques are changing, with improveme...

  9. USE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS AS BIOCHEMICAL REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) from the nation is managed predominantly in anitary landfills. ue to the physical, chemical and biological makeup f he aste he landfill acts as a biochemical reactor and degrades the organic matter. urrent practices are to use covers and liners as engi...

  10. Biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diming; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-01-15

    Smartphone has been widely integrated with sensors, such as test strips, sensor chips, and hand-held detectors, for biochemical detections due to its portability and ubiquitous availability. Utilizing built-in function modules, smartphone is often employed as controller, analyzer, and displayer for rapid, real-time, and point-of-care monitoring, which can significantly simplify design and reduce cost of the detecting systems. This paper presents a review of biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detections. The biosensors and bioelectronics based on smartphone can mainly be classified into biosensors using optics, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemistry, and near-field communication. The developments of these biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone are reviewed along with typical biochemical detecting cases. Sensor strategies, detector attachments, and coupling methods are highlighted to show designs of the compact, lightweight, and low-cost sensor systems. The performances and advantages of these designs are introduced with their applications in healthcare diagnosis, environment monitoring, and food evaluation. With advances in micro-manufacture, sensor technology, and miniaturized electronics, biosensor and bioelectronic devices on smartphone can be used to perform biochemical detections as common and convenient as electronic tag readout in foreseeable future. PMID:26319170

  11. Biochemical correlates in an animal model of depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A valid animal model of depression was used to explore specific adrenergic receptor differences between rats exhibiting aberrant behavior and control groups. Preliminary experiments revealed a distinct upregulation of hippocampal beta-receptors (as compared to other brain regions) in those animals acquiring a response deficit as a result of exposure to inescapable footshock. Concurrent studies using standard receptor binding techniques showed no large changes in the density of alpha-adrenergic, serotonergic, or dopaminergic receptor densities. This led to the hypothesis that the hippocampal beta-receptor in responses deficient animals could be correlated with the behavioral changes seen after exposure to the aversive stimulus. Normalization of the behavior through the administration of antidepressants could be expected to reverse the biochemical changes if these are related to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. This study makes three important points: (1) there is a relevant biochemical change in the hippocampus of response deficient rats which occurs in parallel to a well-defined behavior, (2) the biochemical and behavioral changes are normalized by antidepressant treatments exhibiting both serotonergic and adrenergic mechanisms of action, and (3) the mode of action of antidepressants in this model is probably a combination of serotonergic and adrenergic influences modulating the hippocampal beta-receptor. These results are discussed in relation to anatomical and biochemical aspects of antidepressant action

  12. Biochemical Characterization of Prion Strains in Bank Voles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romolo Nonno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prions exist as different strains exhibiting distinct disease phenotypes. Currently, the identification of prion strains is still based on biological strain typing in rodents. However, it has been shown that prion strains may be associated with distinct PrPSc biochemical types. Taking advantage of the availability of several prion strains adapted to a novel rodent model, the bank vole, we investigated if any prion strain was actually associated with distinctive PrPSc biochemical characteristics and if it was possible to univocally identify strains through PrPSc biochemical phenotypes. We selected six different vole-adapted strains (three human-derived and three animal-derived and analyzed PrPSc from individual voles by epitope mapping of protease resistant core of PrPSc (PrPres and by conformational stability and solubility assay. Overall, we discriminated five out of six prion strains, while two different scrapie strains showed identical PrPSc types. Our results suggest that the biochemical strain typing approach here proposed was highly discriminative, although by itself it did not allow us to identify all prion strains analyzed.

  13. Biochemical tests for diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma: urinary versus plasma determinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Plouin, P F; Duclos, J M; Menard, J; Comoy, E; Bohuon, C; Alexandre, J M

    1981-01-01

    Fifteen patients with hypertension due to phaeochromocytoma and 35 controls with essential hypertension were studied to assess the diagnostic value of urinary and plasma biochemical determinations in phaeochromocytoma. In every case of phaeochromocytoma the urinary concentration of vanillylmandelate, metanephrines, or adrenaline plus noradrenaline was diagnostic of the disease irrespective of whether the patient was normotensive or hypertensive at the time. Plasma determinations of adrenaline...

  14. Biochemical Importance of Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Ann; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Skottrup, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    glycosylation sites could be excluded as explanation for the differential reactivity. The latency transition of non-glycosylated, but not of glycosylated PAI-1, was strongly accelerated by a non-ionic detergent. The different biochemical properties of glycosylated and non-glycosylated PAI-1 depended...

  15. Study on color difference estimation method of medicine biochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhong; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Hongxia; Sun, Jiashi; Zhou, Fengkun

    2006-01-01

    The biochemical analysis in medicine is an important inspection and diagnosis method in hospital clinic. The biochemical analysis of urine is one important item. The Urine test paper shows corresponding color with different detection project or different illness degree. The color difference between the standard threshold and the test paper color of urine can be used to judge the illness degree, so that further analysis and diagnosis to urine is gotten. The color is a three-dimensional physical variable concerning psychology, while reflectance is one-dimensional variable; therefore, the estimation method of color difference in urine test can have better precision and facility than the conventional test method with one-dimensional reflectance, it can make an accurate diagnose. The digital camera is easy to take an image of urine test paper and is used to carry out the urine biochemical analysis conveniently. On the experiment, the color image of urine test paper is taken by popular color digital camera and saved in the computer which installs a simple color space conversion (RGB -> XYZ -> L *a *b *)and the calculation software. Test sample is graded according to intelligent detection of quantitative color. The images taken every time were saved in computer, and the whole illness process will be monitored. This method can also use in other medicine biochemical analyses that have relation with color. Experiment result shows that this test method is quick and accurate; it can be used in hospital, calibrating organization and family, so its application prospect is extensive.

  16. Model Based Monitoring and Control of Chemical and Biochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    This presentation will give an overview of the work performed at the department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering related to process control. A research vision is formulated and related to a number of active projects at the department. In more detail a project describing model estimation and...

  17. [Experiments using rats on Kosmos biosatellites: morphologic and biochemical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'in, E A; Kaplanskiĭ, A S; Savina, E A

    1989-01-01

    Results of morphological and biochemical investigations of rats flown on Cosmos biosatellites are discussed. It is emphasized that most changes occurring during exposure to microgravity are directly or indirectly related to lower musculoskeletal loads which in turn produce deconditioning of different physiological systems and organism as a whole. It is concluded that this deconditioning is associated with both metabolic and structural changes. PMID:2685464

  18. MATLAB-Based Teaching Modules in Biochemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kilho; Comolli, Noelle K.; Kelly, William J.; Huang, Zuyi

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models play an important role in biochemical engineering. For example, the models developed in the field of systems biology have been used to identify drug targets to treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms. In addition, competitive binding models for chromatography processes have been developed to predict expanded…

  19. The evolution of sociality in spiders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubin, Yael; Bilde, T.

    2007-01-01

    I. Introducing Social Spiders II. Social and Subsocial Species: A Survey of Behavioral Traits III. Inbred Sociality in Spiders A. Cooperation Versus Competition: A Balancing Act B. Do Social Spiders Have Division of Labor? C. Colony Foundation: Propagule Dispersal Versus Fission D. Female....... Game Theory Models F. By-Product Mutualism VI. Transitions in the Evolution of Sociality: Processes and Patterns A. From Premating to Postmating Dispersal B. From Outbreeding to Inbreeding C. From Maternal Care to Cooperative Breeding VII. Summary: From Subsocial to Inbred Social, an Overview...

  20. Differential evolution in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Qing, Anyong

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution has proven itself a very simple while very powerful stochastic global optimizer. It has been applied to solve problems in many scientific and engineering fields. This book focuses on applications of differential evolution in electromagnetics to showcase its achievement and capability in solving synthesis and design problems in electromagnetics.Topics covered in this book include:*A comprehensive up-to-date literature survey on differential evolution*A systematic description of differential evolution*A topical review on applications of differential evolution in electromag

  1. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose concentration dynamics could not possibly occur in nature. Therefore, development of a thermodynamically consistent approach for estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system is highly desirable. Results We introduce a Bayesian analysis approach for computing thermodynamically consistent estimates of the rate constants of a closed biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry given experimental data. Our method employs an appropriately designed prior probability density function that effectively integrates fundamental biophysical and thermodynamic knowledge into the inference problem. Moreover, it takes into account experimental strategies for collecting informative observations of molecular concentrations through perturbations. The proposed method employs a maximization-expectation-maximization algorithm that provides thermodynamically feasible estimates of the rate constant values and computes appropriate measures of estimation accuracy. We demonstrate various aspects of the proposed method on synthetic data obtained by simulating a subset of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling pathway, and examine its robustness under conditions that violate key assumptions. Software, coded in MATLAB®, which implements all Bayesian analysis techniques discussed in this paper, is available free of charge at http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS%20lab/software.html. Conclusions Our approach provides an attractive statistical methodology for

  2. Separation of americium(III) from lanthanides(III) by nanofiltration-complexation in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of Am(III) from a mixture of lanthanides(III) was performed in aqueous medium by nanofiltration combined with a complexation step using a DTPA derivative as selective complexing agent. (author)

  3. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  4. Clinical Importance of The Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III) in Phacoemulsification

    OpenAIRE

    Benčić, Goran; Zorić-Geber, Mia; Šarić, Dean; Čorak, Maja; Mandić, Zdravko

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the correlation of features of cataracts graded by the Lens Opacities Classification System, version III (LOCS III) with recorded operative characteristics during the phacoemulsification. The retrospective study included 245 cases operated on by a single surgeron from October 2003 to March 2004. The cataract was graded at the biomicroscope using the 4 grading scales of the lens opacities classification sistem, version III (LOCS III); nuclear op...

  5. Shock Pulse Effects in PTFE Shocked Through the Crystalline Phase II--III Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Rae, Philip J.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2008-03-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II--III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  6. Effect of Pulse Duration on Polytetrafluoroethylene Shocked Above the Crystalline Phase II--III Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II--III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  7. Effect of Pulse Duration on Polytetrafluoroethylene Shocked above the Crystalline Phase II-Iii Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. N.; Gray, G. T.; Rae, P. J.; Trujillo, C. P.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-12-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II-III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  8. Students' Ability to Organize Biochemical and Biochemistry-Related Terms Correlates with Their Performance in a Biochemical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    Organization is believed to be related to understanding and memory. Whether this belief was applicable in biochemical education was examined about two years after students had experienced biochemistry classes in their first year. The ability of organizing information in biochemistry was judged from the number of correct links of 886 biochemical…

  9. Ce(III)/Ce(IV) in methanesulfonic acid as the positive half cell of a redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the Ce(III)/Ce(IV) redox couple in methanesulfonic acid were studied at a platinum disk electrode (0.125 cm2) over a wide range of electrolyte compositions and temperatures: cerium (III) methanesulfonate (0.1-1.2 mol dm-3), methanesulfonic acid (0.1-5.0 mol dm-3) and electrolyte temperatures (295-333 K). The cyclic voltammetry experiments indicated that the diffusion coefficient of Ce(III) ions was 0.5 x 10-6 cm2 s-1 and that the electrochemical kinetics for the oxidation of Ce(III) and the reduction of Ce(IV) was slow. The reversibility of the redox reaction depended on the electrolyte composition and improved at higher electrolyte temperatures. At higher methanesulfonic acid concentrations, the degree of oxygen evolution decreased by up to 50% when the acid concentration increased from 2 to 5 mol dm-3. The oxidation of Ce(III) and reduction of Ce(IV) were also investigated during a constant current batch electrolysis in a parallel plate zinc-cerium flow cell with a 3-dimensional platinised titanium mesh electrode. The current efficiencies over 4.5 h of the process Ce(III) to Ce(IV) and 3.3 h electrolysis of the reverse reaction Ce(IV) to Ce(III) were 94.0 and 97.6%, respectively. With a 2-dimensional, planar platinised titanium electrode (9 cm2 area), the redox reaction of the Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system was under mass-transport control, while the reaction on the 3-dimensional mesh electrode was initially under charge-transfer control but became mass-transport controlled after 2.5-3 h of electrolysis. The effect of the side reactions (hydrogen and oxygen evolution) on the current efficiencies and the conversion of Ce(III) and Ce(IV) are discussed.

  10. Effect of supplementation of lysine and methionine on growth performance, nutrients digestibility and serum biochemical indices for growing sika deer (Cervus Nippon) fed protein deficient diet

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Huang; Tie-Tao Zhang; Bao Kun; Guang-Yu Li; Kai-Ying Wang

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of supplementation of lysine (Lys) and methionine (Met) on growth performance, nutrients digestibility and serum biochemical indices for growing sika deer fed crude protein (CP) deficient diet. Sixteen 5-month-old growing male sika deer were randomly assigned to 4 groups receiving diets (n=4): i) CP-adequate (16.63%) diet; ii) CP-deficient (13.77%) diet with 3 g/kg Lys; iii) CP-deficient with 3 g/kg Lys and 1 g/kg Met; iv) CP-deficient diet w...

  11. The effect of running, strength, and vibration strength training on the mechanical, morphological, and biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legerlotz, Kirsten; Schjerling, Peter; Langberg, Henning;

    2007-01-01

    mechanical, morphological, and biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon. Sixty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: nonactive age-matched control (AMC; n = 20), voluntary wheel running (RT; n = 20), vibration strength-trained (LVST; n = 12), high-vibration strength......-trained (HVST; n = 6), and high strength-trained (HST; n = 6) group. After a 12-wk-long experimental period, the Achilles tendon was tested mechanically and the cross-sectional area, the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle mass, and mRNA concentration of collagen I, collagen III, tissue inhibitor of...

  12. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  13. Iron(III) spin crossover compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koningsbruggen, PJ; Maeda, Y; Oshio, H

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, selected results obtained so far on Fe(III) spin crossover compounds are summarized and discussed. Fe(III) spin transition materials of ligands containing chalcogen donor atoms are considered with emphasis on those of N,N-disubstituted-dithiocarbamates, N,N-disubstituted-XY-carbamat

  14. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4‧-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  16. Growth, morphology, and structural properties of group-III-nitride nanocolumns and nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth conditions to achieve group-III-nitride nanocolumns and nanocolumnar heterostructures by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The evolution of the nanocolumnar morphology with the growth conditions is determined for (Ga,Al)N and (In,Ga)N nanocolumns. The mechanisms behind the nanocolumnar growth under high N-rich conditions are clarified in the sense that no seeding or catalysts are required, as it is the case in the vapour-liquid-solid model that applies to most nanocolumns grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition, either with group-III nitrides, II-VI or III-V compounds. Some examples of nanocolumnar heterostructures are given, like quantum disks and cylindrical nanocavities. Preliminary results on the growth of arrays of ordered GaN nanocolumns are reported. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Design of a Containerized Greenhouse Module for Deployment to the Neumayer III Antarctic Station

    OpenAIRE

    Bamsey, Matthew; Zabel, Paul; Zeidler, Conrad; Poulet, Lucie; Schubert, Daniel; Kohlberg, Eberhard; Graham, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Designs for an Antarctic plant production system to be deployed at Germany’s Neumayer Station III are presented. Characterization and testing of several key controlled environment agriculture technologies are ongoing at the German Aerospace Center’s Institute of Space Systems. Subsystems under development at the Evolution and Design of Environmentally-Closed Nutrition-Sources (EDEN) laboratory include, tuned LED lighting, aeroponic nutrient delivery, ion-selective sensors and modular growth p...

  18. The anti-symmetry principle for quasi-static crack propagation in Mode III

    OpenAIRE

    Oleaga Apadula, Gerardo Enrique

    2007-01-01

    In this note we study a basic propagation criterion for quasi-static crack evolution in Mode III. Using classical techniques of complex analysis, the assumption of stable growth is expressed in terms of the parameters defining the elastic field around the tip. We explore the consequences of the local condition obtained and analyse its role as a crack propagation law. In particular, we herein extend to bounded domains a number of results previously obtained for the whole plane.

  19. Seasonal and geographical variations in the biochemical composition of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ayoa; Grienke, Ulrike; Soler-Vila, Anna; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Stengel, Dagmar B; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2015-06-15

    Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) farming constitutes the largest volume of the shellfish sector in Ireland. Recently, interest in mussel dietary supplements and functional foods has increased significantly. To identify the optimal harvesting time and location in Ireland, blue mussels were investigated for their biochemical composition over a period of one year. The study included samples from aquaculture facilities, wild grown mussels and waste material. Each sample was analysed at four time points to determine the total content of (i) glycogen, (ii) lipids, (iii) proteins, (iv) inorganic substances, and (v) energy. Moreover, fatty acid profiles were investigated by GC-FID revealing high contents of PUFAs and a high ω-3/ω-6 ratio. Compared to less pronounced geographical variations, distinct seasonal trends could be observed for all samples. The content of the investigated metabolite classes, inorganic substances, and energy was at a maximum level in spring or late summer. PMID:25660856

  20. Research on: A. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands; B. Biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae of forest trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, D.H. (comp.)

    1990-12-01

    This report furnishes a list of compiled and ongoing studies and a list of publications which resulted from the research accomplished by Institute scientists and other collaborators. The research accomplished can be placed in four categories: I. Research on borrow pit rehabilitation with 12 publications; II. Research on artificial regeneration of southern pines with 34 publications; III. Research on artificial regeneration of eastern hardwoods with 16 publications; and IV. Cooperative research with the University of Georgia on biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae with 5 publications. Major accomplishments of this research are: 1. Procedures to successfully reclaim borrow pits with sludge, subsoiling and seedlings with specific mycorrhizae. 2. Protocols to successfully artificially regenerate southern pines (particularly ling leaf pine) and certain eastern hardwoods. 3. Basic understanding of the biochemistry of mycorrhizae and the discovery of a new pathway for sucrose utilization in plants. 67 refs.

  1. Enhanced abiotic and biotic contributions to dechlorination of pentachlorophenol during Fe(III) reduction by an iron-reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium, Clostridium beijerinckii Z, was isolated from glucose amended paddy slurries, and shown to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP). Fifty percent of added PCP was removed by C. beijerinckii Z alone, which increased to 83% in the presence of both C. beijerinckii Z and ferrihydrite after 11 days of incubation. Without C. beijerinckii Z, the surface-bound Fe(II) also abiotically dechlorinated more than 40% of the added PCP. This indicated that the biotic dechlorination by C. beijerinckii Z is a dominant process causing PCP transformation through anaerobic dechlorination, and that the dechlorination rates can be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). A biochemical electron transfer coupling process between sorbed Fe(II) produced by C. beijerinckii Z and reductive dehalogenation is a possible mechanism. This finding increases our knowledge of the role of Fe(III) reducing genera of Clostridium in dechlorinating halogenated organic pollutants, such as PCP, in anaerobic paddy soils. - Highlights: • A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z was isolated and could dechlorinate pentachlorophenol. • Anaerobic transformation of PCP by C. beijerinckii Z could be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). • Biochemical electron transfer coupling between Fe redox cycling and reductive dechlorination was the mechanism involved. • The finding increases our knowledge of Clostridium sp. regarding their multiple functions for dechlorinating pollutants

  2. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  3. Reconstructed Ancestral Enzymes Impose a Fitness Cost upon Modern Bacteria Despite Exhibiting Favourable Biochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Joanne K; Prentice, Erica J; Groussin, Mathieu; Arcus, Vickery L

    2015-10-01

    Ancestral sequence reconstruction has been widely used to study historical enzyme evolution, both from biochemical and cellular perspectives. Two properties of reconstructed ancestral proteins/enzymes are commonly reported--high thermostability and high catalytic activity--compared with their contemporaries. Increased protein stability is associated with lower aggregation rates, higher soluble protein abundance and a greater capacity to evolve, and therefore, these proteins could be considered "superior" to their contemporary counterparts. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the favourable in vitro biochemical properties of reconstructed ancestral enzymes and the organismal fitness they confer in vivo. We have previously reconstructed several ancestors of the enzyme LeuB, which is essential for leucine biosynthesis. Our initial fitness experiments revealed that overexpression of ANC4, a reconstructed LeuB that exhibits high stability and activity, was only able to partially rescue the growth of a ΔleuB strain, and that a strain complemented with this enzyme was outcompeted by strains carrying one of its descendants. When we expanded our study to include five reconstructed LeuBs and one contemporary, we found that neither in vitro protein stability nor the catalytic rate was correlated with fitness. Instead, fitness showed a strong, negative correlation with estimated evolutionary age (based on phylogenetic relationships). Our findings suggest that, for reconstructed ancestral enzymes, superior in vitro properties do not translate into organismal fitness in vivo. The molecular basis of the relationship between fitness and the inferred age of ancestral LeuB enzymes is unknown, but may be related to the reconstruction process. We also hypothesise that the ancestral enzymes may be incompatible with the other, contemporary enzymes of the metabolic network. PMID:26349578

  4. Discovery of Hubble's Law: an Example of Type III Error

    CERN Document Server

    Belenkiy, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Recently much attention has been paid to the discovery of Hubble's law: the linear relation between the rate of recession of the distant galaxies and distance to them. Though we now mention several names associated with this law instead of one, the motivation of each remains somewhat obscure. As it is turns out, two major contributors arrived at their discoveries from erroneous reasoning, thus making a case for a Type III error. It appears that G. Lemaitre (1927) theoretically derived Hubble's Law due to his choice of the wrong scenario of the Universe's evolution. E. Hubble (1929) tested the linearity law not based on Lemaitre's non-static model, but rather a cumbersome extension of de Sitter's static theory proposed by H. Weyl (1923) and L. Silberstein (1924).

  5. Direct current-induced electrogenerated chemiluminescence of hydrated and chelated Tb(III) at aluminum cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodic DC polarization of oxide-covered aluminum produces electrogenerated chemiluminescence from hydrated and chelated Tb(III) ions in aqueous electrolyte solutions. At the moment of cathodic voltage onset, a strong cathodic flash is observed, which is attributed to a tunnel emission of hot electrons into the aqueous electrolyte solution and the successive chemical reactions with the luminophores. However, within a few milliseconds the insulating oxide film is damaged and finally dissolved due to (i) indiffusion of protons or alkali metal ions into the thin oxide film, (ii) subsequent hydrogen evolution at the aluminum/oxide interface and (iii) alkalization of the electrode surface induced by hydrogen evolution reaction. When the alkalization of the electrode surface has proceeded sufficiently, chemiluminescence is generated with increasing intensity. Aluminum metal, short-lived Al(II), Al(I) or atomic hydrogen and its conjugated base form, hydrated electron, can act as highly reducing species in addition to the less energetic heterogeneously transferred electrons from the aluminum electrode. Tb(III) added as a hydrated ion in the solution probably luminesces in the form of Tb(OH)3 or Tb(OH)4- by direct redox reactions of the central ion whereas multidentate aromatic ligand chelated Tb(III) probably luminesces by ligand sensitized chemiluminescence mechanism in which ligand is first excited by one-electron redox reactions, which is followed by intramolecular energy transfer to the central ion which finally emits light

  6. Species identification of enterococci by biochemical test and molecular-genetic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Lavová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was comparison different methods of species identification of enterococci. One hundred and fifty three suspected colonies were isolated from milk and dairy products (cheeses from cow´s, ewe´s and goat´s milk. On the bases of their growth on BEA agar, microscopic characteristic, results of Gram staining, catalase test and PYRAtest was thirty four isolates assigned to the genus Enterococcus. These isolates were identified by commercial biochemical test EN-COCCUS. 52.9% of them were included in species E. faecalis, 29.4% in E. faecium, 14.7% in E. durans and 2.9% in E. group III. This group includes 3 species: E. durans, E. hirae, E. faecalis asaccharolytic var. Then 16S rRNA sequencing nucleotide of all isolates was realized. Results of sequencing were compared with NCBI database. Only 14.7% of isolates were in 100% accordance. One from them was species E. durans and others were designated as E. faecium. For 20.6% of detected isolates was in accordance with more reference strains. Other isolates were identical with reference strain on 99%. For verification of all results species-specific PCR was used and 52.9% isolates were identified as species E. faecalis, 32.4% as E. faecium and 14.7% as E. durans. Strains belonging to the species E. faecalis were identified the most reliable by all used methods.

  7. Biochemical Contributions to Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Alloy 22 in a Continual Flow System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) may decrease the functional lifetime of nuclear waste packaging materials in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. Biochemical contributions to corrosion of package materials are being determined in reactors containing crushed repository-site rock with the endogenous microbial community, and candidate waste package materials. These systems are being continually supplied with simulated ground water. Periodically, bulk chemistries are analyzed on the system outflow, and surfacial chemistries are assessed on withdrawn material coupons. Both Fe and Mn dissolved from C1020 coupons under conditions that included the presence of YM microorganisms. Insoluble corrosion products remained in a reduced state at the coupon surface, indicating at least a localized anoxic condition; soluble reduced Mn and Fe were also detected in solution, while precipitated and spalled products were oxidized. Alloy 22 surfaces showed a layer of chrome oxide, almost certainly in the Cr(III) oxidation state, on microcosm-exposed coupons, while no soluble chrome was detected in solution. The results of these studies will be compared to identical testing on systems containing sterilized rock to generate, and ultimately predict, microbial contributions to waste package corrosion chemistries

  8. The role of biochemical risk factors in the etiology of AIS in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopyta, Ilona; Zimny, Mikołaj; Sarecka-Hujar, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is an abrupt onset of both focal and global neurological deficits secondary to a vascular event lasting more than 24 h and with a vascular background as its only cause. It can be triggered by a rupture of a blood vessel, aneurysm (hemorrhagic stroke, HS), thrombosis or embolisms (ischemic stroke, IS). In developed countries, it is the third most common cause of death in the adult population. Stroke in children is a rare disorder with a reported frequency of about 3 cases per 100,000 children per year. The history of acute brain ischemia is burdened with neurological complications such as motor impairment, speech impairment and intellectual delay. Moreover, in children after AIS seizures and epilepsy are also quite common. Stroke is a heterogeneous disorder; its risk factors in adults are well known, however, in pediatrics, in more than 20% cases, the cause of stroke is impossible to determine. Due to the fact that stroke usually arises as a consequence of the cerebral thrombosis, many of the mechanisms responsible for its occurrence can be considered as risk factors. We have reviewed the recent case-control studies conducted on pediatric patients regarding biochemical risk factors such as elevated levels of homocysteine, fibrinogen, protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, lipoprotein(a), cholesterol and its fractions, and compared them with the results obtained from adult patients. PMID:25428197

  9. the Role of Species, Structure, and Biochemical Traits in the Spatial Distribution of a Woodland Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeline, K.; Ustin, S.; Roth, K. L.; Huesca Martinez, M.; Schaaf, C.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The assessment of canopy biochemical diversity is critical for monitoring ecological and physiological functioning and for mapping vegetation change dynamics in relation to environmental resources. For example in oak woodland savannas, these dynamics are mainly driven by water constraints. Inversion using radiative transfer theory is one method for estimating canopy biochemistry. However, this approach generally only considers relatively simple scenarios to model the canopy due to the difficulty in encompassing stand heterogeneity with spatial and temporal consistency. In this research, we compared 3 modeling strategies for estimating canopy biochemistry variables (i.e. chlorophyll, carotenoids, water, dry matter) by coupling of the PROSPECT (leaf level) and DART (canopy level) models : i) a simple forest representation made of ellipsoid trees, and two representations taking into account the tree species and structural composition, and the landscape spatial pattern, using (ii) geometric tree crown shapes and iii) detailed tree crown and wood structure retrieved from terrestrial lidar acquisitions. AVIRIS 18m remote sensing data are up-scaled to simulate HyspIRI 30m images. Both spatial resolutions are validated by measurements acquired during 2013-2014 field campaigns (cover/tree inventory, LAI, leaf sampling, optical measures). The results outline the trade-off between accurate and abstract canopy modeling for inversion purposes and may provide perspectives to assess the impact of the California drought with multi-temporal monitoring of canopy biochemistry traits.

  10. Synthetic Evolution of Metabolic Productivity Using Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas C; Pretorius, Isak S; Paulsen, Ian T

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic biology has progressed to the point where genes that encode whole metabolic pathways and even genomes can be manufactured and brought to life. This impressive ability to synthesise and assemble DNA is not yet matched by an ability to predictively engineer biology. These difficulties exist because biological systems are often overwhelmingly complex, having evolved to facilitate growth and survival rather than specific engineering objectives such as the optimisation of biochemical production. A promising and revolutionary solution to this problem is to harness the process of evolution to create microbial strains with desired properties. The tools of systems biology can then be applied to understand the principles of biological design, bringing synthetic biology closer to becoming a predictive engineering discipline. PMID:26948437

  11. Evolution of Bioreactors for Extracorporeal Liver Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilkova Е.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of effective extracorporeal liver support systems in acute and chronic hepatic failure for transplantology purposes and in toxic injuries is a promising direction in modern biomedical studies. Widely used techniques are based on physicochemical interactions of biological molecules, and able to perform a detoxification function only (hemodialysis, hemofiltration, hemodiafiltration, sorption, albumin dialysis, plasmapheresis. However, support systems combining both blood/plasma perfusion and cellular technologies to maintain metabolic, synthetic and regulatory hepatic functions — “artificial liver” systems — are being extensively developed in recent decades. The review describes the main types of cell lines cultured to occupy bioreactors, various technological concepts for bioreactor design (dynamic, static, scaffold-carriers as part of bioreactors (structure, biochemical composition. The study gives metabolic characteristics of a cellular component of “bioartificial liver”: nourishment, oxygen saturation. Various types of existing extracorporeal support systems, their evolution, and preclinical and clinical test results are presented.

  12. Impact of Eu(III) on mammalian cells as a function of its speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Susanne; Heller, Anne; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    In the case of the accidental release of long-lived radionuclides, e.g., actinides, into the environment, knowledge of their behavior in bio-systems is necessary to asses and to prevent radiological and chemical induced adverse health effects. This includes knowledge of the bioavailability and chemo-/radio-toxicity of these elements for/onto cells, which are governed to a large extent by their speciation [1,2]. In order to gain a better process understanding, we study the interaction of trivalent actinides/lanthanides with mammalian cells on a cellular level combining biochemical and analytical methods. Results of these studies can contribute to the estimation of low dose effects and the development of new decontamination strategies. The cellular tolerance of FaDu cells (human squamous cell carcinoma cell line) toward Eu(III) as an analog for trivalent actinides as well as its uptake into the cells has been studied as a function of the Eu(III) concentration and nutrient composition. To differentiate between chemo-toxic and radio-toxic effects of Eu(III), {sup 152}Eu (β{sup -}, ε) was applied as radioactive tracer besides europium with natural isotope composition. The Eu(III) speciation in the cell culture media has been investigated by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as well as by solubility studies in combination with ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, cation and anion analysis. These results are used to correlate cytotoxicity and uptake of Eu(III) on/into the cells with its chemical speciation in the nutrient. Presently, we are studying the interaction of Eu(III) with NRK-52E cells (rat kidney epithelial-like cells). The results of these studies will be discussed and compared to those obtained with FaDu cells. From the studies with FaDu cells it was concluded that the Eu(III) cytotoxicity onto these cells depends on the Eu(III) concentration and is influenced by its chemical speciation. This was also reported, for instance, for the

  13. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i ∼2, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 i (z = 2.2) ≈ –24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log Φ* – M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of ∼2.6 while Φ* declines by a factor of ∼8. At z ∼< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities

  14. 40 CFR 158.2081 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. 158.2081 Section 158.2081 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2081 Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data...

  15. 40 CFR 158.2084 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data requirements table. 158.2084 Section 158.2084 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2084 Experimental use permit biochemical...

  16. Determination of the regulatory properties of Yucca schidigera extracts on the biochemical parameters and plasma hormone levels associated with obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Kucukkurt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Yucca schidigera Ortgies, Asparagaceae, is a herbaceous plant. Due to the high saponin content the powdered branches and leaves are used as natural food additive for human and animal. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Y. schidigera extracts on plasma leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, insulin, thyroid hormones and some biochemical parameters in mice fed a high-fat diet. Male Swiss Albino mice were divided into seven equal groups. Group I (negative control group was given standard diet; Group II was given high-fat diet; Group III was given high-fat diet with carboxymethylcellulose; Groups IV–VII were given hexane, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of Y. schidigera and high-fat diet via gastric gavage for 60 days. High-fat diet significantly increased plasma leptin, insulin, free T3 hormone, glucose, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triacylglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, and significantly decreased plasma ghrelin, adiponectin and free T4 hormone levels. On the other hand, hormone levels, lipid profile and biochemical parameters were improved by the administration of the PE extract. Y. schidigera extracts could be used as preventive medicine in nutritional disorders via regulating energy metabolism and hormonal functions.

  17. Could nitric oxide be a mediator of action of oxytocin on myocardial injury in rats? (Biochemical, histological and immunohistochemical study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Noha I; Mousa, Ayman M

    2016-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT) was revisited recently as a hormone of cardiovascular system with several new functions in cardiovascular regulation. But less is known about its role in acute myocardial injury (MI). The aim of our study was to investigate the possible protective effect of OT on the biochemical, histological and immunohistochemical changes of MI induced by isoprenaline (ISO) in adult male albino rats and studying the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in its action. Forty male albino rats were divided into 5 groups: control rats (Group I), acute MI rats (Group II), rats pretreated with OT prior to induction of MI (Group III), rats injected with a combination of OT and atosiban (ATO, OT receptor antagonist) prior to induction of MI (Group IV). In Group V, a combination of OT and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME) were injected to the rats prior to induction of MI. The heart wall in all groups were taken and processed for histological, immunohistochemical, morphometrical and biochemical studies. We concluded that OT has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on MI and its effects is mediated through NO. PMID:27226256

  18. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) propionate and butyrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of yttrium(III) propionate monohydrate (Y(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) and yttrium(III) butyrate dihydrate (Y(C3H7CO2)3·2H2O) were studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage microscopy. These two...... compounds follow a similar decomposition path starting with dehydration, which is complete at 110°C. The dehydrated salts convert to a dioxycarbonate (Y2O2CO3) via an unstable intermediate product (probably Y2O(C2H5CO2)4 and Y2O(C3H7CO2)4 for the propionate and butyrate respectively), with the evolution of...... CO2 and a symmetrical ketone consisting of 3-pentanone and 4-heptanone respectively. Final conversion to Y2O3 takes pace with release of CO2. Elemental carbon that is left as a by-product is finally slowly burned by the residual oxygen present in the Ar atmosphere. Fusion is observed at ≈110°C in...

  19. Vertical control in the Class III compensatory treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Costa Sobral

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compensatory orthodontic treatment, or simply orthodontic camouflage, consists in an important alternative to orthognathic surgery in the resolution of skeletal discrepancies in adult patients. It is important to point that, to be successfully performed, diagnosis must be detailed, to evaluate, specifically, dental and facial features, as well as the limitations imposed by the magnitude of the discrepancy. The main complaint, patient's treatment expectation, periodontal limits, facial pattern and vertical control are some of the items to be explored in the determination of the viability of a compensatory treatment. Hyperdivergent patients who carry a Class III skeletal discrepancy, associated with a vertical facial pattern, with the presence or tendency to anterior open bite, deserve special attention. In these cases, an efficient strategy of vertical control must be planned and executed. OBJECTIVE: The present article aims at illustrating the evolution of efficient alternatives of vertical control in hiperdivergent patients, from the use, in the recent past, of extra-oral appliances on the lower dental arch (J-hook, until nowadays, with the advent of skeletal anchorage. But for patients with a more balanced facial pattern, the conventional mechanics with Class III intermaxillary elastics, associated to an accentuated curve of Spee in the upper arch and a reverse Curve of Spee in the lower arch, and vertical elastics in the anterior region, continues to be an excellent alternative, if there is extreme collaboration in using the elastics.

  20. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications and on software architecture and design. Usually, the focus is when the software is under development. Little is known about how requirements evolve when software is put into use. Groupware is an ...

  1. Learning and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Nolfi, S.; Floreano, D.

    1999-01-01

    In the last few years several researchers have resorted to artificial evolution (e.g. genetic algorithms) and learning techniques (e.g. neural networks) for studying the interaction between learning and evolution. These studies have been conducted for two different purposes: (a) looking at the performance advantages obtained by combining these two adaptive techniques; (b) understanding the role of the interaction between learning and evolution in biological organisms. In this paper we describ...

  2. Seevolution: visualizing chromosome evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban-Marcos, Andrés; Darling, Aaron E.; Ragan, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Genome evolution underpins all of biology, yet its principles can be difficult to communicate to the non-specialist. To facilitate broader understanding of genome evolution, we have designed an interactive 3D environment that enables visualization of diverse genome evolution processes. The system can intuitively and interactively animate mutation histories involving genome rearrangement, point mutation, recombination, insertion and deletion. Multiple organisms related by a phylogeny ...

  3. Evolution of biological complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Adami, Christoph; Ofria, Charles; Collier, Travis C.

    2000-01-01

    In order to make a case for or against a trend in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined and measurable. A recent information-theoretic (but intuitively evident) definition identifies genomic complexity with the amount of information a sequence stores about its environment. We investigate the evolution of genomic complexity in populations of digital organisms and monitor in detail the evolutionary transitions that increase complexit...

  4. Modelling the chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Advanced observational facilities allow to trace back the chemical evolution of the Universe, on the one hand, from local objects of different ages and, secondly, by direct observations of redshifted objects. The chemical enrichment serves as one of the cornerstones of cosmological evolution. In order to understand this chemical evolution in morphologically different astrophysical objects models are constructed based on analytical descriptions or numerical methods. For the comparison of their...

  5. Multicolour Observations, Inhomogeneity & Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hellaby, Charles

    2000-01-01

    We propose a method of testing source evolution theories that is independent of the effects of inhomogeneity, and thus complementary to other studies of evolution. It is suitable for large scale sky surveys, and the new generation of large telescopes. In an earlier paper it was shown that basic cosmological observations - luminosity versus redshift, area distance versus redshift and number counts versus redshift - cannot separate the effects of cosmic inhomogeneity, cosmic evolution and sourc...

  6. Evolution des Geistes

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    Evolution des Geistes Vortrag am 9. Februar 2003 im Rahmen der Reihe "Evolution – Entstehung der Erde bis zur Entfaltung des Geistes" des Zoologischen Museums Nach traditioneller Auffassung besitzt nur der Mensch Geist und Bewusstsein, und hierin besteht seine Einzigartigkeit. Aus Sicht der Hirnforschung und der Verhaltensbiologie haben sich jedoch während der tierischen Evolution Geist und Bewusstsein über viele Stufen entwickelt. Eine Reihe nichtmenschlicher Tiere, vor allem Säugetiere und ...

  7. Creationism and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Quintelier, Katinka; Blancke, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    In Tower of Babel, Robert Pennock wrote that “defenders of evolution would help their case immeasurably if they would reassure their audience that morality, purpose, and meaning are not lost by accepting the truth of evolution.” We first consider the thesis that the creationists’ movement exploits moral concerns to spread its ideas against the theory of evolution. We analyze their arguments and possible reasons why they are easily accepted. Creationists usually empl...

  8. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  9. Stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included

  10. Stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippernhahn, R. (MPI fur Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (DE)); Weigert, A. (Sternwarte, Hamberg (DE))

    1990-01-01

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included.

  11. Sub-classes and evolution stability of Wolfram's classesin the total-rule cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Guangwu; TIAN Feng; DONG Yinfeng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a concept of sub-classes and its evolution stability for the Wolfram's classes. Firstly, we obtain the sub-classes of the Wolfram's class IV, gene-piece of these sub-classes and their existing circumstance. Secondly, we introduce a new concept, the evolution stability, for the Wolfram's classes and sub-classes of Wolfram's class IV. Lastly, we find that Wolfram's classes I, II, and III have the evolution stability, but sub-classes of the Wolfram's class IV have not the evolution stability for the total rule cellular automata.

  12. Programmed evolution for optimization of orthogonal metabolic output in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckdahl, Todd T; Campbell, A Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J; Poet, Jeffrey L; Blauch, David N; Snyder, Nicole L; Atchley, Dustin T; Baker, Erich J; Brown, Micah; Brunner, Elizabeth C; Callen, Sean A; Campbell, Jesse S; Carr, Caleb J; Carr, David R; Chadinha, Spencer A; Chester, Grace I; Chester, Josh; Clarkson, Ben R; Cochran, Kelly E; Doherty, Shannon E; Doyle, Catherine; Dwyer, Sarah; Edlin, Linnea M; Evans, Rebecca A; Fluharty, Taylor; Frederick, Janna; Galeota-Sprung, Jonah; Gammon, Betsy L; Grieshaber, Brandon; Gronniger, Jessica; Gutteridge, Katelyn; Henningsen, Joel; Isom, Bradley; Itell, Hannah L; Keffeler, Erica C; Lantz, Andrew J; Lim, Jonathan N; McGuire, Erin P; Moore, Alexander K; Morton, Jerrad; Nakano, Meredith; Pearson, Sara A; Perkins, Virginia; Parrish, Phoebe; Pierson, Claire E; Polpityaarachchige, Sachith; Quaney, Michael J; Slattery, Abagael; Smith, Kathryn E; Spell, Jackson; Spencer, Morgan; Taye, Telavive; Trueblood, Kamay; Vrana, Caroline J; Whitesides, E Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields - evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in energy

  13. Programmed evolution for optimization of orthogonal metabolic output in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd T Eckdahl

    Full Text Available Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields - evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in

  14. Constructive effects of fluctuations in genetic and biochemical regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Ralf; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2003-12-01

    Biochemical and genetic regulatory systems that involve low concentrations of molecules are inherently noisy. This intrinsic stochasticity has received considerable interest recently, leading to new insights about the sources and consequences of noise in complex systems of genetic regulation. However, most prior work was devoted to the reduction of fluctuation and the robustness of cellular function with respect to intrinsic noise. Here, we focus on several scenarios in which the inherent molecular fluctuations are not merely a nuisance, but act constructively and bring about qualitative changes in the dynamics of the system. It will be demonstrated that in many typical situations biochemical and genetic regulatory systems may utilize intrinsic noise to their advantage. PMID:14643492

  15. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN CHERNOZEM SOIL UNDER DIFFERENT FERTILIZATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Emnova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the evaluation of the intensity of certain soil biochemical processes (e.g. soil organic C mineralization at Organic and mixed Mineral+Organic fertilization of typical chernozem in crop rotation dynamics (for 6 years by use of eco-physiological indicators of biological soil quality: microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, as well as, microbial and metabolic quotients. Soil sampling was performed from a long-term field crop experiment, which has been established in 1971 at the Balti steppe (Northern Moldova. The crop types had a more considerable impact on the soil microbial biomass accumulation and community biochemical activity compared to long-term Organic or mixed Mineral + Organic fertilizers amendments. The Org fertilization system doesn’t make it possible to avoid the loss of organic C in arable typical chernozem. The organic fertilizer (cattle manure is able to mitigate the negative consequences of long-term mineral fertilization.

  16. Overview of the DOE/SERI Biochemical Conversion Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J D

    1986-09-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute manages a program of research and development on the biochemical conversion of renewable lignocellulosic materials to liquid fuels for the Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division. The Biochemical Conversion Program is mission oriented so effort is concentrated on technologies which appear to have the greatest potential for being adopted by the private sector to economically convert lignocellulosic materials into high value liquid transportation fuels such as ethanol. The program is structured to supply the technology for such fuels to compete economically first as an octane booster or fuel additive, and, with additional improvements, as a neat fuel. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Electrolyte-Gated Graphene Ambipolar Frequency Multipliers for Biochemical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wangyang; Feng, Lingyan; Mayer, Dirk; Panaitov, Gregory; Kireev, Dmitry; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-13

    In this Letter, the ambipolar properties of an electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) have been explored to fabricate frequency-doubling biochemical sensor devices. By biasing the ambipolar GFETs in a common-source configuration, an input sinusoidal voltage at frequency f applied to the electrolyte gate can be rectified to a sinusoidal wave at frequency 2f at the drain electrode. The extraordinary high carrier mobility of graphene and the strong electrolyte gate coupling provide the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler an unprecedented unity gain, as well as a detection limit of ∼4 pM for 11-mer single strand DNA molecules in 1 mM PBS buffer solution. Combined with an improved drift characteristics and an enhanced low-frequency 1/f noise performance by sampling at doubled frequency, this good detection limit suggests the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler a highly promising biochemical sensing platform. PMID:26928906

  18. Development of a biochemical switching device: mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, M

    1990-01-01

    There are many examples of enzymes that share substrates or cofactors in a cyclic manner. Techniques have been developed that use cyclic enzyme systems to assay quantitatively small amounts of biochemical substances (cofactor, substrate), however, only a few studies of the control of these systems have been published. The author previously showed with computer simulations that cyclic enzyme systems have the reliability of ON-OFF types of operation (McCulloch-Pitts' neuronic equation) and the applicability for a switching circuit in a biocomputer. The switching time was inevitably determined in accordance with the difference in amount between two inputs of the system. A unique switching mechanism of cyclic enzyme systems (basic switching element) and the effects of excitatory stimuli on switching properties of the integrated biochemical switching system are demonstrated. PMID:2082931

  19. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  20. The free energy cost of accurate biochemical oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yuansheng; Ouyang, Qi; Tu, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    Oscillation is an important cellular process that regulates timing of different vital life cycles. However, in the noisy cellular environment, oscillations can be highly inaccurate due to phase fluctuations. It remains poorly understood how biochemical circuits suppress phase fluctuations and what is the incurred thermodynamic cost. Here, we study four different types of biochemical oscillations representing three basic oscillation motifs shared by all known oscillatory systems. We find that the phase diffusion constant follows the same inverse dependence on the free energy dissipation per period for all systems studied. This relationship between the phase diffusion and energy dissipation is shown analytically in a model of noisy oscillation. Microscopically, we find that the oscillation is driven by multiple irreversible cycles that hydrolyze the fuel molecules such as ATP; the number of phase coherent periods is proportional to the free energy consumed per period. Experimental evidence in support of this un...

  1. Biomphalaria prona (Gastropoda: Planorbidae: a morphological and biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lobato Paraense

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Two samples of Biomphalaria prona (Martens, 1873 from Lake Valencia (type locality and seven from other Venezuelan localities were studied morphologically (shell and reproductive system and biochemically (allozyme electrophoresis. In spite of marked differences in shell characters, all of them proved indistinguishable under the anatomic and biochemical criteria. So far B. prona has been considered an endemic species, restricted to Lake Valencia. It is now demonstrated that the extralacustrine populations refered to Biomphalaria havanensis (Pfeiffer, 1839 by several authors correspond in shell characters to an extreme variant of B. prona from the Lake and really belong to the last*mentioned species. They may be regarded as the result of a process of directional selection favoring a shell phenotype other than those making up the modal class in the Lake.

  2. Fruit developmental stages effects on biochemical attributes in date palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some date palm cultivars grown in Pakistan were biochemically characterized and the effect of fruit maturity on radical scavenging capacity (DPPH), total phenolic contents (TPC), specific activity of antioxidant enzymes, sugars profile and soluble protein contents was assessed. Higher range of differences in composition of studied phytochemicals was recorded among different cultivars. Antiradical efficiency (AE), TPC, antioxidant enzymes and soluble protein contents were recorded higher at khalal stage thereafter, declined at rutab then finally at tamar stage. The amount of glucose (11.32-32.50%) and fructose (10.95-32.41%) started accumulation from khalal stage and were in higher composition at tamar stage due to hydrolysis and inversion of sucrose (10.82-3.1%) contents. The results concluded that variation in biochemical attributes primarily influenced by type of cultivars and different fruit developmental stages. (author)

  3. European Energy Law. Report III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Energy Law Report III presents an overview of the most important legal developments in the field of EU and national energy law as discussed at the 2005 European Energy Law Seminar. It examines the Commission's recent progress report on the implementation of the 2003 energy directives, its sector inquiry regarding competition conditions in the energy markets, and its recent policy on vertical and conglomerate mergers in the light of its ongoing concern as to the increased levels of concentration in Europe's energy markets. The investigation of the Bundeskartellamt in Germany concerns the role of long-term downstream gas supply agreements in a liberalised market. Regulators are increasingly confronted with the need to secure the quality of electricity supply in a competitive market. After an analysis of how electricity distribution companies can be regulated with respect to quality of supply, separate chapters from Italy and the Netherlands discuss national developments in detail. The role of LNG is increasing in the European gas market. The book discusses the main components of the short-term LNG sale and purchase agreements, the rules regarding non-discriminatory access to existing regasification terminals as well as the establishment of new LNG import terminals in the EU and the extent to which such installations can be exempted from the applicable regime on regulated third-party access. The book examines several legal developments regarding energy infrastructure. Whereas the 2003 energy directives provide for a legal unbundling of the downstream energy transmission and distribution companies, some Member States (Denmark and the Netherlands) go beyond this requirement and have introduced ownership unbundling in order to guarantee the establishment of an independent system operator. Recent developments in the North Sea include the establishment of a Framework Agreement, aiming at a simplification of rules and procedures for new projects across the UK

  4. Enzymatic activity of granulations tissues under low doses of radiation. Biochemical analysis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper was designed to investigate in the rat subcutaneous sponge-induced granulation tissue under low doses of X-ray, the activity of alkaline phosphatase, 5'nucleotide phosphodiesterase and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) enzymes. One hundred and fourteen Wistar rats were divided into three groups, as follows: Group I as control, Group II that received single 7,14 R in split-dosis immediately after sponge-implantation at the third and fifth days postoperatively. Biopsies were taken after 7, 11, 14, 21 and 28 days and the activity of the three enzymes was determined. The results have shown that in Group II alkaline phosphatase had higher activity in the 14th day of tissue evolution when compared to Groups I and III . The 5'nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in Group I was similar in all days checked, although in Group II the enzyme showed higher activity in 7th day and lower in 21st. In Group III the activity was higher after 14 and 7 days and lower after 28 and 21 days. There was no observation of changing in adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity when the three groups were compared. (author)

  5. Biochemical Characterization of Rice Somaclones Resistant to Blast

    OpenAIRE

    Antar N. El-Banna; Ismael A. Khatab

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to produce rice somaclones resistant to P. oryza that could be useful to improve rice plants against blast disease and use them in the future breeding programs. In addition, to detect biochemical changes among somaclones and their original cultivars. Mature embryo-derived calli of the three susceptible rice varieties, Sakha 101, Sakha 104 and Riho were stressed with different concentrations of fungal toxin filtrate. Blast-resistant lines of rice were developed...

  6. Biochemical and antigenic properties of Streptococcus bovis isolated from pigeons.

    OpenAIRE

    De Herdt, P; Haesebrouck, F; DEVRIESE, L.A.; Ducatelle, R.

    1992-01-01

    Biochemical and serological properties of 60 strains of Streptococcus bovis isolated from healthy pigeons and from pigeons that died from S. bovis septicemia were determined. On the basis of the hemolysis of bovine erythrocytes, the production of polysaccharides on saccharose-containing media, and the fermentation of mannitol, inulin, trehalose, and L-arabinose, the isolates were classified in five biotypes and two subbiotypes. Slide agglutination and microagglutination tests using monospecif...

  7. Morphologic and biochemical studies of canine mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    OpenAIRE

    Shull, R M; Helman, R. G.; Spellacy, E.; Constantopoulos, G.; Munger, R. J.; Neufeld, E F

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the necropsy and biochemical findings on the first dog to die with alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency (mucopolysaccharidosis I, MPS I). Gross pathologic features, light- and electron-microscopic findings, and tissue enzyme, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and sphingolipid levels are compared with the human disease counterpart and the previously described feline model. Results lend further support for the similarities of the canine disease and human MPS I.

  8. Biochemical Analyses of Sorghum Varieties Reveal Differential Responses to Drought

    OpenAIRE

    Chukwuma C Ogbaga; Piotr Stepien; Dyson, Beth C.; Nicholas J W Rattray; Ellis, David I.; Royston Goodacre; Johnson, Giles N.

    2016-01-01

    We have examined the biochemical responses of two sorghum cultivars of differing drought tolerance, Samsorg 17 (more drought tolerant) and Samsorg 40 (less drought tolerant), to sustained drought. Plants were exposed to different degrees of drought and then maintained at that level for five days. Responses were examined in terms of metabolic changes and the expression of drought induced proteins - Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) and dehydrins (DHNs). Generalised phenotypic changes were studied usi...

  9. Molecular and biochemical studies on bovine ephemeral fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahed S. Thabet; Emad W. Ghazy; Mohamed A. Nayel; Mohamed Abo-Elkhair

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF in cattle has been reported to be associated with a range of biochemical changes which are similar to those seen in milk fever. This study aimed to clarify the biochemical alterations that associate infection of cattle with BEF with special references to the mechanisms involved in the development of hypocalcemia. The study was conducted on 30 cases of cattle infected with BEF based on the characteristic clinical signs which were confirmed by isolation of virus and RT-PCR. Another 6 healthy cows were used in the study as control. The evaluated parameters included biochemical variables such as serum values of total protein (TP, albumin (Alb, glucose (Glu, total calcium (tCa, ionized calcium (iCa, inorganic phosphorus (P, magnesium (Mg, sodium (Na, potassium (K, chloride (Cl, creatinine (Cr, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and serum activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP. Hormonal profile included parathyroid hormone (PTH, insulin (Ins, and cortisol (Cor. The results showed that BEF-infected animals demonstrated a significant decrease (P<0.05 in serum concentrations of TP, Glo, iCa, P, Na, K, BUN and ALP while the mean values of serum levels of Glu and Cl were significantly increased (P<0.05. The mean values of serum levels of PTH were significantly decreased (P<0.05 while serum concentrations of Ins and Cor showed a significant increase. It was concluded that the clinical signs of bovine ephemeral fever are related to the hypocalcemia resulting from suppression of parathyroid hormone which seems to be mediated by respiratory alkalosis caused by the disease. This explanation needs future studies to provide a direct link between measurement of blood indicators of acid-base status, blood biochemical parameters and urine analysis. However, this work can provide a good knowledge about the pathogenesis of the disease that can lead to better management and proper treatment.

  10. Optical methods for monitoring physiological and biochemical variables

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, John; Rea, Philip; Dr. Philip Rea

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical methods for performing non-invasive physiological and biochemical monitoring has been investigated, with particular emphasis on the application of near-infrared spectrophotocetry for following changes in the redox state of cytochrome oxidase. Initial studies of the gross optical properties of in vivo tissue were made using an image intensifier. These demonstrated that some light is transmitted through biological tissues and that such material is very hi...

  11. Biochemical assays for the discovery of TDP1 inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Christophe; Huang, Shar-yin N.; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Lea, Wendy A.; Mott, Bryan T.; Chergui, Adel; Naumova, Alena; Stephen, Andrew G.; Rosenthal, Andrew S.; Rai, Ganesha; Murai, Junko; Gao, Rui; Maloney, David J.; Jadhav, Ajit; Jorgensen, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Drug screening against novel targets is warranted to generate biochemical probes and new therapeutic drug leads. Tyrosyl-DNA-phosphodiesterases 1 and 2 (TDP1 and TDP2) are two DNA repair enzymes that have yet to be successfully targeted. TDP1 repairs topoisomerase I-, alkylation-, and chain terminator-induced DNA damage, while TDP2 repairs topoisomerase II-induced DNA damage. Here we report the quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Reposit...

  12. Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter estimation for stochastic biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daigle Bernie J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prerequisite for the mechanistic simulation of a biochemical system is detailed knowledge of its kinetic parameters. Despite recent experimental advances, the estimation of unknown parameter values from observed data is still a bottleneck for obtaining accurate simulation results. Many methods exist for parameter estimation in deterministic biochemical systems; methods for discrete stochastic systems are less well developed. Given the probabilistic nature of stochastic biochemical models, a natural approach is to choose parameter values that maximize the probability of the observed data with respect to the unknown parameters, a.k.a. the maximum likelihood parameter estimates (MLEs. MLE computation for all but the simplest models requires the simulation of many system trajectories that are consistent with experimental data. For models with unknown parameters, this presents a computational challenge, as the generation of consistent trajectories can be an extremely rare occurrence. Results We have developed Monte Carlo Expectation-Maximization with Modified Cross-Entropy Method (MCEM2: an accelerated method for calculating MLEs that combines advances in rare event simulation with a computationally efficient version of the Monte Carlo expectation-maximization (MCEM algorithm. Our method requires no prior knowledge regarding parameter values, and it automatically provides a multivariate parameter uncertainty estimate. We applied the method to five stochastic systems of increasing complexity, progressing from an analytically tractable pure-birth model to a computationally demanding model of yeast-polarization. Our results demonstrate that MCEM2 substantially accelerates MLE computation on all tested models when compared to a stand-alone version of MCEM. Additionally, we show how our method identifies parameter values for certain classes of models more accurately than two recently proposed computationally efficient methods

  13. BIOCHEMICAL ALTERATIONS IN ZINC DEFICIENT SHEEP ASSOCIATED BY HYPERLACTATEMIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Hafez El-Far

    2013-01-01

    Blood samples from diseased and clinically healthy Balady sheep of both sexes were collected and subjected for biochemical analysis of serum glucose, fructosamine, lactate, growth hormone, insulin, creatine phosphokinase, Lactate dehydrogenase and aldolase. The obtained results revealed a significant decrease in serum zinc and growth hormone were stated. In contrary, serum glucose and lactate, insulin, CPK, LDH and aldolase were significantly increased statically. While, fructosamine levels w...

  14. Postharvest biochemical and textural characteristics of sh2 sweetcorn cobs

    OpenAIRE

    Smyrniotaki, Mari

    2011-01-01

    The determination of storage conditions leading to optimum quality attributes and extended postharvest life of sweetcorn is essential. The increased consumption and consequently the need for greater consumer satisfaction have resulted in the introduction of supersweet sweetcorn. The present study, aimed to report on the effects of various postharvest factors on biochemical and texture-related characteristics of supersweet sweetcorn cultivars as current knowledge is still incomp...

  15. Supplementation with carnitine for weight loss: a biochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henry Osorio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Carnitine is a molecule involved in transporting activated fatty acids among different cellular compartments, which is mostlikely present in all animal species, and in numerous microorganisms and plants. Recently the trend in the field of weightcontrol is to include carnitine in the diet as an agent responsible for weight loss. In the present review, some findings arediscussed from a biochemical point of view to illustrate if the use of carnitine for weight loss can be considered fiction orreality.

  16. Specialization of Biochemical Oxygen Demand for Surface Water and Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    F.M. Nurul; Z.Z. Abdul Rahman; A.N. Norizan

    2011-01-01

    Pollution of rivers is attributed to point and non-point sources and marine pollution originates mainly from land-based sources. Therefore in order to control the quality of the water a few parameters have been chosen as the index for determining the water pollution. Amongst the parameters, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, (BOD) is one of the most important and frequently used parameters for estimating the level of water pollution. BOD measures the amount of oxygen consumed by microorganism to util...

  17. Novel Biochemical Markers of Psychosocial Stress in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Asberg; Ake Nygren; Rosario Leopardi; Gunnar Rylander; Ulla Peterson; Lukas Wilczek; Håkan Källmén; Mirjam Ekstedt; Torbjörn Akerstedt; Mats Lekander; Rolf Ekman

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prolonged psychosocial stress is a condition assessed through self-reports. Here we aimed to identify biochemical markers for screening and early intervention in women. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL) 1-alpha, IL1-beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thyroid stimulating hormone (T...

  18. Biological and biochemical properties in evaluation of forest soil quality

    OpenAIRE

    Błońska Ewa; Lasota Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of using biological and biochemical parameters in the evaluation of forest soil quality and changes caused by land use. The study attempted to determine a relationship between the enzymatic activity of soil, the number of earthworms and soil physico-chemical properties. The study was carried out in central Poland in adjoining Forest Districts (Przedbórz and Smardzewice). In soil samples taken from 12 research plots, basic physico-chem...

  19. Biochemical Studies in Some Indigenous Dye Yielding Plants of Manipur

    OpenAIRE

    Joylani D. SAIKHOM; Jekendra S. SALAM; Kumar S. POTSHANGBAM; Manabendra D. Choudhury; Haripriya D. MAIBAM

    2013-01-01

    Ten natural dye yielding and two mordant plants were biochemically analyzed. Though natural dyes are widely used, information about the active principles responsible for dyeing is hardly available. In the present experiment, total chlorophyll, carotinoids, tannins, phenolics, flavonoids and curcumin were determined among the dye yielding plants, while K, S, P, Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, Fe, Cu and Co were determined in the case of mordant plants. In Bixa orellana, used for yellow dyeing, the carotinoid ...

  20. Finite time thermodynamic coupling in a biochemical network

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes some thermodynamic constrains and relations in biochemical or metabolic network and provides a basis for entropy enthalpy compensation. Conventional definition of macroscopic forces and fluxes leads to a paradox namely, non-existence of positive efficiency of a chemically driven process. This paradox is resolved by deriving an appropriate definition of macroscopic force using the local balance equations. Entropy enthalpy compensation, whose thermodynamic basis is so far un...

  1. Antibiogram, Biochemical Reactions and Biotyping of Biofield Treated Providencia rettgeri

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Providencia rettgeri (P. rettgeri) is the key organism for gastrointestinal tract infections due to its high virulence properties. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment on P. rettgeri in lyophilized as well as revived state for antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, biochemical characteristics, and biotype number. The lyophilized strain of P. rettgeri (ATCC 9250) was divided into two parts, Group (Gr.)...

  2. Biochemical Changes During Seed Germination of Sterculia urens Roxb.

    OpenAIRE

    Botcha SATYANARAYANA; Prattipati Subhashini DEVI; Atluru ARUNDATHI

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes biochemical changes taking place during seed germination of Sterculia urens. The levels of proteins, total amino acids, reducing sugars, total soluble sugars and lipids were studied during various stages of seed germination (0-15 days). Total protein content was decreased in cotyledons during seed germination while free amino acid content increased to its maximum extent by 9th day of germination and reverse trend thereafter. The levels of reducing sugars and total ...

  3. Sensitivity analysis for computational models of biochemical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Maj,

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology is an integrated area of science which aims at the analysis of biochemical systems using an holistic perspective. In this context, sensitivity analysis, a technique studying how the output variation of a computational model can be associated to its input state plays a pivotal role. In the thesis it is described how to properly apply the different sensitivity analysis techniques according to the specific case study (i.e., continuous deterministic rather than discrete stochastic...

  4. Reduction of dynamical biochemical reactions networks in computational biology

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, O.; Gorban, A.N.; Zinovyev, A.; Noel, V.

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical networks are used in computational biology, to model mechanistic details of systems involved in cell signaling, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Parametric and structural uncertainty, as well as combinatorial explosion are strong obstacles against analyzing the dynamics of large models of this type. Multiscaleness, an important property of these networks, can be used to get past some of these obstacles. Networks with many well separated time scales, can be reduced to...

  5. The role of configurational entropy in biochemical cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusuf, Sutjano; Loll, Patrick J; Axelsen, Paul H

    2002-04-10

    Cooperativity is a common biochemical phenomenon in which two or more otherwise independent processes are thermodynamically coupled. Because cooperative processes are usually attended by changes in molecular conformation, thermodynamic coupling is usually attributed to an enthalpy-driven mechanism. In the family of glycopeptide antibiotics that includes vancomycin, however, cooperative phenomena occur that cannot be explained by conformational change. In this communication, we demonstrate that cooperativity in these systems can arise solely from changes in vibrational activity. PMID:11929222

  6. Integrating Carbon Nanotubes into Microfluidic Chip for Separating Biochemical Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Miaoxiang Max; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; BØGGILD, Peter; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a new type of device to separate biochemical compounds wherein carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are integrated as chromatographic stationary phase. The CNTs were directly grown on the bottom of microfluidic channels on Si/SiO2 substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Acetylene was used as carbon source and Ni was employed as catalyst. For electrokinetic separations, higher electrical field strength is usually required; therefore, the CNTs were constructed in pillar-array-form by patte...

  7. Clinical laboratory evaluation of the automicrobic system Enterobacteriaceae biochemical card.

    OpenAIRE

    J.R. Davis; Stager, C E; Wende, R D; Qadri, S M

    1981-01-01

    The AutoMicrobic System Enterobacteriaceae Biochemical Card (AMS-EBC; Vitek Systems, Inc.) was evaluated in two clinical microbiology laboratories. A total of 502 consecutive clinical isolates representing members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were tested in parallel with the AMS-EBC, API 20E, and Enterotube II systems. Discrepancies between systems were resolved with the conventional methods of Edwards and Ewing (P. R. Edwards and W. H. Ewing [ed.], Identification of Enterobacteriaceae, 1...

  8. Prognostic Significance of Various Biochemical Parameters in Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathi, M. E.; Kumar, S. Harish; Shashidhar, K N; Takkalaki, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus (OP) compounds are a heterogeneous group of insecticides widely used in agricultural industry. These OP compounds are likely to have more adverse effects in developing countries like India due to its easy availability and less awareness which results in high morbidity and mortality. Aims and objectives: 1. To estimate plasma cholinesterase, amylase, lipase and, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in acute OP poisoning. 2. To correlate these biochemical parameters with pl...

  9. Automatising the analysis of stochastic biochemical time-series

    OpenAIRE

    Caravagna, Giulio; De Sano, Luca; Antoniotti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background Mathematical and computational modelling of biochemical systems has seen a lot of effort devoted to the definition and implementation of high-performance mechanistic simulation frameworks. Within these frameworks it is possible to analyse complex models under a variety of configurations, eventually selecting the best setting of, e.g., parameters for a target system. Motivation This operational pipeline relies on the ability to interpret the predictions of a model, often represented...

  10. Biochemical analyses of sorghum varieties reveal differential responses to drought

    OpenAIRE

    Ogbaga, C.C.; Stepien, P.; Dyson, B.C.; Rattray, N.J.W.; Ellis, D.I.; Goodacre, R.; Johnson, G. N.

    2016-01-01

    We have examined the biochemical responses of two sorghum cultivars of differing drought tolerance, Samsorg 17 (more drought tolerant) and Samsorg 40 (less drought tolerant), to sustained drought. Plants were exposed to different degrees of drought and then maintained at that level for five days. Responses were examined in terms of metabolic changes and the expression of drought induced proteins - Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) and dehydrins (DHNs). Generalised phenotypic changes were studied usi...

  11. Biochemical Analyses of Sorghum Varieties Reveal Differential Responses to Drought

    OpenAIRE

    Ogbaga, Chukwuma C.; Stepien, Piotr; Dyson, Beth C.; Nicholas J W Rattray; Ellis, David I.; Goodacre, Royston; Johnson, Giles N.

    2016-01-01

    We have examined the biochemical responses of two sorghum cultivars of differing drought tolerance, Samsorg 17 (more drought tolerant) and Samsorg 40 (less drought tolerant), to sustained drought. Plants were exposed to different degrees of drought and then maintained at that level for five days. Responses were examined in terms of metabolic changes and the expression of drought induced proteins—Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) and dehydrins (DHNs). Generalised phenotypic changes were studied using...

  12. ADVANCES ON BILINEAR MODELING OF BIOCHEMICAL BATCH PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    GONZÁLEZ MARTÍNEZ, JOSÉ MARÍA

    2015-01-01

    [EN] This thesis is aimed to study the implications of the statistical modeling approaches proposed for the bilinear modeling of batch processes, develop new techniques to overcome some of the problems that have not been yet solved and apply them to data of biochemical processes. The study, discussion and development of the new methods revolve around the four steps of the modeling cycle, from the alignment, preprocessing and calibration of batch data to the monitoring of batches trajectories....

  13. Nanoplasmonics: From biochemical sensors to surface enhanced spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Adam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonics is a field connected to optics dealing with the properties and applications of surface plasmons which are modes of metal dielectric interfaces. Nanoplasmonics concerns the excitation, manipulation and detection of the surface plasmons at the nanometric scale. It has highly potential applications for ultrasensitive biochemical sensing. Surface enhanced spectroscopies are the ultimate sensor tools as they can reach single molecule sensitivity. We will present in this paper our results towards the realization of highly controllable and reproducible nanoplasmonics substrates.

  14. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Fuerst, E. Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A.; Anderson, James V.; Morris, Craig F.

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds...

  15. Clinical and Biochemical Parameters of Children and Adolescents Applying Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    O Hendy; M Abou Salem; G Abdel Rasoul; D Rohlman; A. Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Background: The primary agricultural product in Egypt is the cotton crop. Children and adolescents work seasonally in the cotton fields applying pesticides.Objectives: To examine the effect of pesticide exposure on clinical and biochemical parameters in children and adolescents applying pesticides.Methods: Male children currently applying pesticides and aged between 9 and 19 years (n = 50) were recruited for this study. They were asked to complete work, health, and exposure questionnaires; ex...

  16. Axonal tubulin and axonal microtubules: biochemical evidence for cold stability

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Nerve extracts containing tubulin labeled by axonal transport were analyzed by electrophoresis and differential extraction. We found that a substantial fraction of the tubulin in the axons of the retinal ganglion cell of guinea pigs is not solubilized by conventional methods for preparation of microtubules from whole brain. In two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis this cold-insoluble tubulin was biochemically distinct from tubulin obtained from whole brain microtubules prepared b...

  17. Biochemical functionalization of silicon dioxide surfaces for sensing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Römhildt, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to functionalize silicon dioxide surfaces with biochemical molecules in such a way that biorecognition of target molecules in solution will be possible. By introducing a tool set of different molecules and characterization methods, a more universal approach towards various biosensor setups is presented. This includes on the one hand preparation of the biosensor surfaces to allow further molecule attachment via their reactive functional groups. Secondly, the select...

  18. 40 CFR 158.2050 - Biochemical pesticides human health assessment data requirements table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides human health... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2050 Biochemical pesticides human health assessment data requirements table. (a) General....

  19. 40 CFR 158.2040 - Biochemical pesticides residue data requirements table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides residue data... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2040 Biochemical pesticides residue data requirements table. (a) General. Sections 158.100 through 158.130 describe how to...

  20. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...