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Sample records for biochemical control rates

  1. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  2. Evaluation of biogas production rate and biochemical changes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rate of biogas generation and biochemical changes in pig dung used in a simple mobile biogas digester designed and constructed at the Department of Environmental Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Nigeria were evaluated. Measurable gas production started 4 days after feeding the digester with ...

  3. Clinical and pathologic factors predictive of biochemical control following post-prostatectomy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Gonzalez, Jose; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Indications for post-prostatectomy radiation therapy are not well defined. We reviewed our experience treating post-prostatectomy patients with external beam irradiation to assess clinical and pathologic factors predictive of biochemical control. Materials and Methods: Between 1/87 and 3/93, 61 patients received post-operative tumor bed irradiation with a median dose of 59.4 Gy (50.4 - 68 Gy). Median follow-up was 4.1 years (7.6 months - 8.3 years) from irradiation. Patients were treated for the following reasons: 1) adjuvantly, within 6 months of surgery for extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle involvement, or positive surgical margins (n=38); 2) persistently elevated PSA post-operatively (n=2); 3) rising PSA >6 months after surgery (n=9); and 4) biopsy proven local recurrence (n=12). No patients had known nodal or metastatic disease. All patients had post-radiation PSA data available. Biochemical control was the endpoint studied using Kaplan-Meier life table analysis. Biochemical control was defined as the ability to maintain an undetectable PSA ( 4 and ≤1 0, >10 and ≤20, and > 20 ng/ml. The 3 year actuarial rates of biochemical control were 100% for group 1, 66.7% for group 2, 61.5% for group 3, and 28.6% for group 4. Pre-RT PSA values were also evaluated. Univariate Cox models indicated lower presurgical and pre-RT PSA values were predictive of biochemical control (p=0.017, p 6 months after surgery (group 3), the 3 year actuarial rate of biochemical control was 55.6%. The 3 year actuarial rate of biochemical control for patients treated for a biopsy proven recurrence (group 4) was 8.3%. By pair-wise log rank test, the rates of biochemical control were significantly different between groups 1 and 3 (p=0.036), groups 1 and 4 (p<0.001), and groups 3 and 4 (p=0.009). Conclusion: Biochemical control was achieved in approximately half of the patients treated with post-operative prostatic fossa irradiation. Elevated presurgical and pre

  4. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level ≤1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Darren M.; McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to ≤1 ng/mL after ≥2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was ≤1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was ≤1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of ≤1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after ≥2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of ≤1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments

  5. Assessing the variability of outcome for patients treated with localized prostate irradiation using different definitions of biochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric; Ziaja, Ellen; Vicini, Frank; Dmuchowski, Carl; Gonzalez, Jose; Stromberg, Jannifer; Brabbins, Donald; Hollander, Jay; Chen, Peter; Martinez, Alvaro

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical control is rapidly becoming the standard to assess treatment outcome of clinically localized prostate cancer. However, no standardized definition of biochemical control has been established. We reviewed our experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer and applied 3 different commonly used definitions to estimate the variability in rates of biochemical control. Materials and Methods: Between (1(87)) and (12(91)), 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received uniform treatment with external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58 to 70.4 Gy) through a 4 field technique. A total of 14 patients received pelvic nodal RT (median dose 45 Gy). Four hundred seventy patients had post-treatment (posttx) PSA values and 414 patients had pre-treatment (pretx) PSA values. Three different definitions of biochemical control were used: 1) Biochemical control was defined as posttx PSA nadir < 1 ng/ml within 1 year. After achieving nadir, if there were 2 consecutive increases, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase; 2) Biochemical control was defined as posttx PSA nadir < 1.5 ng/ml within 1 year. After achieving nadir, if there were 2 consecutive increases, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase; 3) Posttx PSA nadir < 4 ng/ml without a time limit. Once the nadir was achieved, and it did not rise above normal, the patient was considered controlled. Clinical local control was defined as no palpable prostate nodularity beyond 18 months, no new prostate nodularity, or a negative biopsy. If hormonal therapy was started, the patient was censored for biochemical failure at that time. Results: Median follow-up is 48 months (range 3 to 112 months). Pre-treatment PSA values were correlated with biochemical response using the 3 definitions of biochemical control as well as clinical local

  6. Hydrolysis rates of domestic wastewater sludge using biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Domestic wastewater treatment can be improved by reducing energy consumption and increasing carbon recovery, which can be achieved using anaerobic digestion of sludge with methane recovery at ambient temperature. Hydrolysis can be a limiting step in anaerobic digestion, and characterisation of hydrolysis rates ...

  7. Thermodynamically based constraints for rate coefficients of large biochemical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Marcel O; Ross, John

    2009-01-01

    Wegscheider cyclicity conditions are relationships among the rate coefficients of a complex reaction network, which ensure the compatibility of kinetic equations with the conditions for thermodynamic equilibrium. The detailed balance at equilibrium, that is the equilibration of forward and backward rates for each elementary reaction, leads to compatibility between the conditions of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, Wegscheider cyclicity conditions can be derived by eliminating the equilibrium concentrations from the conditions of detailed balance. We develop matrix algebra tools needed to carry out this elimination, reexamine an old derivation of the general form of Wegscheider cyclicity condition, and develop new derivations which lead to more compact and easier-to-use formulas. We derive scaling laws for the nonequilibrium rates of a complex reaction network, which include Wegscheider conditions as a particular case. The scaling laws for the rates are used for clarifying the kinetic and thermodynamic meaning of Wegscheider cyclicity conditions. Finally, we discuss different ways of using Wegscheider cyclicity conditions for kinetic computations in systems biology.

  8. Assessing the variability of outcome for patients treated with localized prostate irradiation using different definitions of biochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Gonzalez, Jose; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Hollander, Jay; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical control using serial posttreatment serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels is being increasingly used to assess treatment efficacy for localized prostate cancer. However, no standardized definition of biochemical control has been established. We reviewed our experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer and applied three different commonly used definitions of biochemical control to determine if differences in therapeutic outcome would be observed. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and December 1991, 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58-70.4) using a four-field or arc technique. Pretreatment and posttreatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Over 86% (414 of 480) of patients had a pretreatment PSA level available. Three different definitions of biochemical control were used: (a) PSA nadir 20), and 5-year actuarial rates of biochemical control were calculated using the three biochemical control and one clinical local control definitions. For Group 1, 5-year actuarial rates of biochemical control were 84%, 90%, and 96% for Definitions 1-3 and clinical local control, respectively. For Group 2, 5-year actuarial control rates were 45%, 54%, 74%, and 92% for the four definitions, respectively. For Group 3, 5-year actuarial control rates were 26%, 31%, 63%, and 100% for the four definitions, respectively. For Group 4, 5-year actuarial control rates were 24%, 24%, 50%, and 100% for the four definitions, respectively. Finally, for Group 5, 5-year actuarial control rates were 5%, 14%, 15%, and 89% for the four definitions, respectively. Depending on the definition used, statistically significant differences overall in outcome rates were observed. Differences between all four definitions for all pairwise comparisons ranged from 5 to 53% (p < 0

  9. Improved methods for the mathematically controlled comparison of biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwacke John H

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The method of mathematically controlled comparison provides a structured approach for the comparison of alternative biochemical pathways with respect to selected functional effectiveness measures. Under this approach, alternative implementations of a biochemical pathway are modeled mathematically, forced to be equivalent through the application of selected constraints, and compared with respect to selected functional effectiveness measures. While the method has been applied successfully in a variety of studies, we offer recommendations for improvements to the method that (1 relax requirements for definition of constraints sufficient to remove all degrees of freedom in forming the equivalent alternative, (2 facilitate generalization of the results thus avoiding the need to condition those findings on the selected constraints, and (3 provide additional insights into the effect of selected constraints on the functional effectiveness measures. We present improvements to the method and related statistical models, apply the method to a previously conducted comparison of network regulation in the immune system, and compare our results to those previously reported.

  10. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  11. Biologically inspired rate control of chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Scheper, Tjeerd V

    2017-10-01

    The overall intention of chaotic control is to eliminate chaos and to force the system to become stable in the classical sense. In this paper, I demonstrate a more subtle method that does not eliminate all traces of chaotic behaviour; yet it consistently, and reliably, can provide control as intended. The Rate Control of Chaos (RCC) method is derived from metabolic control processes and has several remarkable properties. RCC can control complex systems continuously, and unsupervised, it can also maintain control across bifurcations, and in the presence of significant systemic noise. Specifically, I show that RCC can control a typical set of chaotic models, including the 3 and 4 dimensional chaotic Lorenz systems, in all modes. Furthermore, it is capable of controlling spatiotemporal chaos without supervision and maintains control of the system across bifurcations. This property of RCC allows a dynamic system to operate in parameter spaces that are difficult to control otherwise. This may be particularly interesting for the control of forced systems or dynamic systems that are chaotically perturbed. These control properties of RCC are applicable to a range of dynamic systems, thereby appearing to have far-reaching effects beyond just controlling chaos. RCC may also point to the existence of a biochemical control function of an enzyme, to stabilise the dynamics of the reaction cascade.

  12. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto; D'Imperio, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  13. Towards benchmarking of multivariable controllers in chemical/biochemical industries: Plantwide control for ethylene glycol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Bialas, Dawid Jan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a simple yet realistic benchmark plant for evaluation and comparison of advanced multivariable control for chemical and biochemical processes. The benchmark plant is based on recycle-separator-recycle systems for ethylene glycol production and implemented in Matlab...... for education purposes (operator training, student education, etc) as well as scientific research into chemical process control where it enables rapid evaluation and comparison of advanced multivariable controllers as demonstrated in this study....

  14. Linear analysis near a steady-state of biochemical networks: control analysis, correlation metrics and circuit theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Several approaches, including metabolic control analysis (MCA, flux balance analysis (FBA, correlation metric construction (CMC, and biochemical circuit theory (BCT, have been developed for the quantitative analysis of complex biochemical networks. Here, we present a comprehensive theory of linear analysis for nonequilibrium steady-state (NESS biochemical reaction networks that unites these disparate approaches in a common mathematical framework and thermodynamic basis. Results: In this theory a number of relationships between key matrices are introduced: the matrix A obtained in the standard, linear-dynamic-stability analysis of the steady-state can be decomposed as A = SRT where R and S are directly related to the elasticity-coefficient matrix for the fluxes and chemical potentials in MCA, respectively; the control-coefficients for the fluxes and chemical potentials can be written in terms of RT BS and ST BS respectively where matrix B is the inverse of A; the matrix S is precisely the stoichiometric matrix in FBA; and the matrix eAt plays a central role in CMC. Conclusion: One key finding that emerges from this analysis is that the well-known summation theorems in MCA take different forms depending on whether metabolic steady-state is maintained by flux injection or concentration clamping. We demonstrate that if rate-limiting steps exist in a biochemical pathway, they are the steps with smallest biochemical conductances and largest flux control-coefficients. We hypothesize that biochemical networks for cellular signaling have a different strategy for minimizing energy waste and being efficient than do biochemical networks for biosynthesis. We also discuss the intimate relationship between MCA and biochemical systems analysis (BSA.

  15. A consideration of two biochemical approaches to monitoring human populations for a change in germ cell mutation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Mohrenweiser, H.; Satoh, Chiyoko; Hamilton, H.B.

    1978-10-01

    This report presents two different strategies for monitoring increased mutation rates resulting from exposure to an environmental mutagen, both of which are based on the detection of biochemical variants of polypeptides. Using the first strategy, one monitors a defined population continuously for the rate at which children with such a variant are born to normal parents. An increase in this rate implies increasing exposure to a mutagen. With the second strategy, one contrasts the findings in the children born to a control group or groups with the findings in the children born to an exposed group, however this is defined. An example of each strategy is included. The alternatives to mutation which must be considered when a child with a variant is found to have nonaffected parents are considered. The numbers of individuals necessary to detect an increase of a specified magnitude are discussed. (author)

  16. Automatic Strain-Rate Controller,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    D—AO37 9~e2 ROME AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER GRIFFISS AFB N 1’ FIG 13/ 6AUTOMATIC STRAIN—RATE CONTROLLER, (U) DEC 76 R L HUNTSINGER. J A ADAMSK I...goes to zero. CONTROLLER, Leeds and Northrup Series 80 CAT with proportional band , rate , reset, and approach controls . Input from deviation output...8) through ( 16) . (8) Move the set-point slowl y up to 3 or 4. (9) If the recorder po inter hunts , adjust the func t ion controls on tine Ser

  17. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  18. Speed control variable rate irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed control variable rate irrigation (VRI) is used to address within field variability by controlling a moving sprinkler’s travel speed to vary the application depth. Changes in speed are commonly practiced over areas that slope, pond or where soil texture is predominantly different. Dynamic presc...

  19. Linear constraint relations in biochemical reaction systems: I. Classification of the calculability and the balanceability of conversion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, R T; Heijnen, J J; Hellinga, C; Romein, B; Luyben, K C

    1994-01-05

    Measurements provide the basis for process monitoring and control as well as for model development and validation. Systematic approaches to increase the accuracy and credibility of the empirical data set are therefore of great value. In (bio)chemical conversions, linear conservation relations such as the balance equations for charge, enthalpy, and/or chemical elements, can be employed to relate conversion rates. In a pactical situation, some of these rates will be measured (in effect, be calculated directly from primary measurements of, e.g., concentrations and flow rates), as others can or cannot be calculated from the measured ones. When certain measured rates can also be calculated from other measured rates, the set of equations, the accuracy and credibility of the measured rates can indeed be improved by, respectively, balancing and gross error diagnosis. The balanced conversion rates are more accurate, and form a consistent set of data, which is more suitable for further application (e.g., to calculate nonmeasured rates) than the raw measurements. Such an approach has drawn attention in previous studies. The current study deals mainly with the problem of mathematically classifying the conversion rates into balanceable and calculable rates, given the subset of measured rates. The significance of this problem is illustrated with some examples. It is shown that a simple matrix equation can be derived that contains the vector of measured conversion rates and the redundancy matrix R. Matrix R plays a predominant role in the classification problem. In supplementary articles, significance of the redundancy matrix R for an improved gross error diagnosis approach will be shown. In addition, efficient equations have been derived to calculate the balanceable and/or calculable rates. The method is completely based on matrix algebra (principally different from the graph-theoretical approach), and it is easily implemented into a computer program. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons

  20. Physiological, biochemical and productive changes in sesame genotypes subjected to different rates of water replenishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. R. Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The sesame crop has stood out due to the high nutritional content of its seeds, in addition to being able to be cultivated in the tropical and subtropical regions such as Northeast Brazil. Thus, it is necessary to identify the physiological, biochemical and productive changes related to the tolerance to stress. Objective of this study was to evaluate the physiological, biochemical and productive aspects of sesame genotypes as a function of different rates of water replenishment. The experiment was carried out at the Embrapa Cotton Experimental Unit, located in the municipality of Barbalha-CE, Brazil, under field conditions. The experiment was carried out in a randomized complete block design, with treatments in a factorial scheme (4 × 6, corresponding to four irrigation depths (40, 70, 100 and 130% ETo and six sesame genotypes (G1 = T3-EGSGO3; G2 = T7-EGSGO7; G3 = T5-EGSGO5; G4 = T2-EGSGO2; G5 = T6-EGSGO6; G6 = T4-EGSG04, with three replicates. Data corresponding to the following variables were collected: leaf area, photosynthetic pigments, relative water content in leaf, electrolyte leakage, catalase, peroxidase, yield and oil content. The genotypes did not differ statistically and there were differences in the variables between the water replacement rates. Increments in growth and, consequently, in production, enzymatic activity, oil content and maximum production potential were observed with water depths between 75 and 90% ETo. Contents of chlorophyll a and b, total chlorophyll and carotenoids, were increased with the application of 80% ETo.

  1. Comparison of three radiotherapy modalities on biochemical control and overall survival for the treatment of prostate cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieters, Bradley R.; Back, Djuna Z. de; Koning, Caro C.E.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: For the radiation treatment of prostate cancer high dose should be delivered for optimal biochemical control. Treatment can be given by dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or external beam radiotherapy combined with a radioactive seed implantation (EBSeeds) or high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy (EBTI). Differences in outcome between the modalities were assessed by a systematic review. Materials and methods: A systematic search was performed resulting in 40 articles to be used. Data were extracted on biochemical control and overall survival at 3, 5, and 8 years and other time points mentioned in the articles. Also known prognostic parameters were noted. Comparison of the modalities was done by a Weibull survival analysis and estimation of Hazard Ratio's (HR) was done with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: The HR for biochemical recurrence was 1.40 (95% CI 1.31-1.51) for EBRT relative to EBTI, and was 1.37 (95% CI 1.26-1.49) for EBSeeds relative to EBTI. The HR for overall survival was 1.50 (95% CI 1.29-1.73) for EBRT relative to EBTI, and was 2.33 (95% CI 2.04-2.66) for EBSeeds relative to EBTI. Conclusion: The combination of external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy results in a superior biochemical control and overall survival found in a systematic review on radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  2. Metabolic rates and biochemical compositions of Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) tissue during periods of inactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie; Dong, Shuanglin; Tian, Xiangli; Wang, Fang; Gao, Qinfeng; Dong, Yunwei

    2010-03-01

    Estivation, hibernation, and starvation are indispensable inactive states of sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus in nature and in culture ponds. Generally, temperature is the principal factor that induces estivation or hibernation in the sea cucumber. The present study provided insight into the physiological adaptations of A. japonicus during the three types of inactivity (hibernation, estivation, and starvation) by measuring the oxygen consumption rates ( Vo2) and biochemical compositions under laboratory conditions of low (3°C), normal (17°C) and high (24°C) temperature. The results show that the characteristics of A. japonicus in dormancy (hibernation and estivation) states were quite different from higher animals, such as fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals, but more closely resembled a semi-dormant state. It was observed that the shift in the A. japonicus physiological state from normal to dormancy was a chronic rather than acute process, indicated by the gradual depression of metabolic rate. While metabolic rates declined 44.9% for the estivation group and 71.7% for the hibernation group, relative to initial rates, during the 36 d culture period, metabolic rates were not maintained at constant levels during these states. The metabolic depression processes for sea cucumbers in hibernation and estivation appeared to be a passive and an active metabolic suppression, respectively. In contrast, the metabolic rates (128.90±11.70 μg/g h) of estivating sea cucumbers were notably higher (107.85±6.31 μg/g h) than in starving sea cucumbers at 17°C, which indicated that the dormancy mechanism here, as a physiological inhibition, was not as efficient as in higher animals. Finally, the principle metabolic substrate or energy source of sea cucumbers in hibernation was lipid, whereas in estivation they mainly consumed protein in the early times and both protein and lipid thereafter.

  3. Pest Control Section Biochemical Group, Progress Report 1982-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Reserch efforts in the Pest Control Section, BARC, a continuator of insect sterilization and pest control section of the erstwhile Biology and Agriculture Division, were continued to develop integrated management practices for the control of important insect pests of agricultural and medical importance. Insect pests chosen are, ubiquitous potato tuberworm, a serious pest of potatoes, cotton bollworms with particular reference to spotted bollworms and a mosquito (Culex fatigans), a vector of filariasis. Keeping these insects as targets, research activities have been concentrated in the fields of biological control with parasities, pathogens and sterile insects, sex pheromones and insect plant interaction with a view to integrate pest management programme. Besides, the research activity also encompasses investigations of basic nature in the fields of insect sex pheromones, insect pathology and insect plant interaction. Studies on insect pheromones relate to the modifying influence of abiotic and biotic factors of the environment on pheromone production and perception and the possibility of insect developing resistance to pheromones. Studies in the field of insect plant interaction are directed towards identifying weak links in the insect plant relationship with a view to exploit them for developing control. Basic studies in the field of insect pathology relate to isolation and identification of entomopathogens, source of their pathogenecity, improvement in their virulence and formulation of cheaper and potent microbial insecticides. This report pertains to the period 1982-86. (Orig.). 11 tables, 5 figures

  4. Bypass flow rate control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyama, Yoichi.

    1997-01-01

    In a PWR type reactor, bypass flow rate is controlled by exchanging existent jetting hole plugs of a plurality of nozzles disposed to the upper end of incore structures in order to flow a portion of primary coolants as a bypass flow to the upper portion of the pressure vessel. Two kinds of exchange plugs, namely, a first plug and a second plug each having a jetting out hole of different diameter are used as exchange plugs. The first plug has the diameter as that of an existent plug and the second plug has a jetting out hole having larger diameter than that of the existent plug. Remained extent plugs are exchanged to a combination of the first and the second plugs without exchanging existent plugs having seizing with the nozzles, in which the number and the diameter of the jetting out holes of the second plugs are previously determined based on predetermined total bypass flow rate to be jetted from the entire plugs after exchange of plugs. (N.H.)

  5. Importance of biochemical exploration of the liver in the control of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viral infection continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world in particular those caused by the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of the biochemical exploration of the liver function in the control of disease ...

  6. Salivary flow rate and biochemical composition analysis in stimulated whole saliva of children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Modesto, Karine Barros; de Godói Simões, Jéssica Bueno; de Souza, Amanda Ferreira; Damaceno, Neiva; Duarte, Danilo Antonio; Leite, Mariana Ferreira; de Almeida, Eliete Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    It is recognized that cystic fibrosis (CF) patients present a risk for oral diseases, since it affects exocrine glands, and the treatment consists of a carbohydrate-rich diet. Recognizing the protective function of saliva on maintaining oral health, the aim of the study was to evaluate salivary parameters in stimulated whole saliva from children with CF. A case-control study was conducted comparing stimulated whole saliva of healthy (n=28; control group) and CF children (n=21; experimental group). Salivary flow rate, initial pH, buffer capacity (total and in each range of pH), total protein and sialic acid (total, free, and conjugated) concentration, α-amylase and salivary peroxidase activities were evaluated. Data were compared by two-tailed Student t test (95% CI; p ≤ 0.05). CF patients presented a significant reduction in salivary parameters compared with the control group (p ≤ 0.05): salivary flow rate (36%), buffer capacity (pH range from 6.9 to 6.0), sialic acid concentration (total 75%, free 61%, and conjugated 83%); α-amylase and salivary peroxidase activities (55%). Additionally, a significant increase in total protein concentration (180%) of stimulated whole saliva from CF patients was verified compared with the control group (p ≤ 0.05). Children with CF presented significant changes in salivary composition, including salivary flow rate, buffering capacity and protective proteins of the oral cavity, compared with children without CF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  8. Rate control for electron gun evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellingerhout, A.J.G.; Janocko, M.A.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Principles for obtaining high-quality rate control for electron gun evaporation are discussed. The design criteria for rate controllers are derived from this analysis. Results are presented which have been obtained with e-guns whose evaporation rate is controlled by a Wehnelt electrode or by sweeping of the electron beam. Further improvements of rate stability can be obtained by improved design of e-guns and power supplies

  9. Body Composition and Ectopic Lipid Changes With Biochemical Control of Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredella, Miriam A; Schorr, Melanie; Dichtel, Laura E; Gerweck, Anu V; Young, Brian J; Woodmansee, Whitney W; Swearingen, Brooke; Miller, Karen K

    2017-11-01

    Acromegaly is characterized by growth hormone (GH) and insulinlike growth factor-1 (IGF-1) hypersecretion, and GH and IGF-1 play important roles in regulating body composition and glucose homeostasis. The purpose of our study was to investigate body composition including ectopic lipids, measures of glucose homeostasis, and gonadal steroids in patients with active acromegaly compared with age-, body mass index (BMI)-, and sex-matched controls and to determine changes in these parameters after biochemical control of acromegaly. Cross-sectional study of 20 patients with active acromegaly and 20 healthy matched controls. Prospective study of 16 patients before and after biochemical control of acromegaly. Body composition including ectopic lipids by magnetic resonance imaging/proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy; measures of glucose homeostasis by an oral glucose tolerance test; gonadal steroids. Patients with active acromegaly had lower mean intrahepatic lipid (IHL) and higher mean fasting insulin and insulin area under the curve (AUC) values than controls. Men with acromegaly had lower mean total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, and estradiol values than male controls. After therapy, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, fasting insulin level, and insulin AUC decreased despite an increase in IHL and abdominal and thigh adipose tissues and a decrease in muscle mass. Patients with acromegaly were characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia but lower IHL compared with age-, BMI-, and sex-matched healthy controls. Biochemical control of acromegaly improved insulin resistance but led to a less favorable anthropometric phenotype with increased IHL and abdominal adiposity and decreased muscle mass. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  10. Recycle flow rate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, Susumu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Oka, Yoko.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To attain stable low hydraulic power operation with no abnormal changes in the reactor water level by smoothly varying the speed control for the recycling pump for regulating the reactor core flowrate in BWR type reactors. Constitution: In a recycling control system equipped with an internal pump having a response characteristic higher by ten and several times or more than that of prior pump, a previously programed recycling run-back signal is inputted to a speed regulator upon load interruption of the electric generator to thereby control the operation of the internal pump driving motor such that the speed is decreased rapidly at the initial state and smoothly thereafter. The run-back singal is passed through a primary delay circuit so that the interruption of the motor operation does not directly performed by the signal interruption upon failure. As the result, the amount of void produced is also made smooth and the reactor water level varies smoothly as well, whereby the reactor power can be reduced with a sufficient margin. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Effect of dose rate of gamma irradiation on biochemical quality and browning of mushrooms Agaricus bisporus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, M.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    In order to enhance the shelf-life of edible mature mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, 2 kGy ionising treatments were applied at two different dose rates: 4.5 kGy/h ( I-) and 32 kGy/h ( I+). Both I+ and I- showed 2 and 4 days shelf-life enhancement compared to the control ( C). Before day 9, no significant difference ( p>0.05) in L* value was detected in irradiated mushrooms. However, after day 9, the highest observed L* value (whiteness) was obtained for the mushrooms irradiated in I-. Analyses of phenolic compounds revealed that mushrooms in I- contained more phenols than I+ and C, the latter containing the lower level of phenols. The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities of irradiated mushrooms, analysed via catechol oxidase and dopa oxidase substrates, resulted in being significantly lowered ( p⩽0.05) compared to C, with a further decrease in I+. Analyses of the enzymes indicated that PPO activity was lower in I+, contrasting with its lower phenol concentration. Ionising treatments also increased significantly ( p⩽0.05) the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity. The observation of mushrooms cellular membranes, by electronic microscopy, revealed a better preserved integrity in I- than in I+. It is thus assumed that the browning effect observed in I+ was caused by both the decompartimentation of vacuolar phenol and by the entry of molecular oxygen into the cell cytoplasm. The synergetic effect of the residual active PPO and the molecular oxygen, in contact with the phenols, allowed an increased oxidation rate and, therefore, a more pronounced browning in I+ than in I-.

  12. Effect of dose rate of gamma irradiation on biochemical quality and browning of mushrooms Agaricus bisporus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, M.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-01-01

    In order to enhance the shelf-life of edible mature mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, 2 kGy ionising treatments were applied at two different dose rates: 4.5 kGy/h (I - ) and 32 kGy/h (I + ). Both I + and I - showed 2 and 4 days shelf-life enhancement compared to the control (C). Before day 9, no significant difference (p>0.05) in L * value was detected in irradiated mushrooms. However, after day 9, the highest observed L * value (whiteness) was obtained for the mushrooms irradiated in I - . Analyses of phenolic compounds revealed that mushrooms in I - contained more phenols than I + and C, the latter containing the lower level of phenols. The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities of irradiated mushrooms, analysed via catechol oxidase and dopa oxidase substrates, resulted in being significantly lowered (p≤0.05) compared to C, with a further decrease in I + . Analyses of the enzymes indicated that PPO activity was lower in I + , contrasting with its lower phenol concentration. Ionising treatments also increased significantly (p≤0.05) the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity. The observation of mushrooms cellular membranes, by electronic microscopy, revealed a better preserved integrity in I - than in I + . It is thus assumed that the browning effect observed in I + was caused by both the decompartimentation of vacuolar phenol and by the entry of molecular oxygen into the cell cytoplasm. The synergetic effect of the residual active PPO and the molecular oxygen, in contact with the phenols, allowed an increased oxidation rate and, therefore, a more pronounced browning in I + than in I -

  13. Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation : Successful and Failed Strict Rate Control Against a Background of Lenient Rate Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenveld, Hessel F.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Hillege, Hans L.; Alings, Marco; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate differences in outcome between patients treated with successful strict, failed strict, and lenient rate control. Background The RACE II (Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation) study showed no difference in outcome between lenient and

  14. On the edge of death: Rates of decline and lower thresholds of biochemical condition in food-deprived fish larvae and juveniles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Stefan; Caldarone, E.M.; Chicharo, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Gaining reliable estimates of how long fish early life stages can survive without feeding and how starvation rate and time until death are influenced by body size, temperature and species is critical to understanding processes controlling mortality in the sea. The present study is an across-speci...... are viable proxies for the physiological processes under food deprivation of individual fish pre-recruits in the laboratory and provide useful metrics for research on the role of starvation in the sea......Gaining reliable estimates of how long fish early life stages can survive without feeding and how starvation rate and time until death are influenced by body size, temperature and species is critical to understanding processes controlling mortality in the sea. The present study is an across......-species analysis of starvation-induced changes in biochemical condition in early life stages of ninemarine and freshwater fishes. Datawere compiled on changes in body size (dry weight, DW) and biochemical condition (standardized RNA–DNA ratio, sRD) throughout the course of starvation of yolk-sac and feeding larvae...

  15. Rate Control for MPEG-4 Bit Stream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振洲; 李桂苓

    2003-01-01

    For a very long time video processing dealt exclusively with fixed-rate sequences of rectangular shaped images. However, interest has been recently moving toward a more flexible concept in which the subject of the processing and encoding operations is a set of visual elements organized in both time and space in a flexible and arbitrarily complex way. The moving picture experts group (MPEG-4) standard supports this concept and its verification model (VM) encoder has adopted scalable rate control (SRC) as the rate control scheme, which is based on the spatial domain and compatible with constant bit rate (CBR) and variable bit rate (VBR). In this paper,a new rate control algorithm based on the DCT domain instead of the pixel domain is presented. More-over, macroblock level rate control scheme to compute the quantization step for each macroblock has been adopted. The experimental results show that the new algorithm can achieve a much better result than the original one in both peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the coding bits, and that the new algorithm is more flexible than test model 5 (TM5) rate control algorithm.

  16. Real-time relationship between PKA biochemical signal network dynamics and increased action potential firing rate in heart pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Yang, Dongmei; Ziman, Bruce D.; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Levchenko, Andre; Zhang, Jin; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    cAMP-PKA protein kinase is a key nodal signaling pathway that regulates a wide range of heart pacemaker cell functions. These functions are predicted to be involved in regulation of spontaneous action potential (AP) generation of these cells. Here we investigate if the kinetics and stoichiometry of increase in PKA activity match the increase in AP firing rate in response to β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, that alter the AP firing rate of heart sinoatrial pacemaker cells. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirous expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, the EC50 in response to graded increases in the intensity of β-AR stimulation (by Isoproterenol) the magnitude of the increases in PKA activity and the spontaneous AP firing rate were similar (0.4±0.1nM vs. 0.6±0.15nM, respectively). Moreover, the kinetics (t1/2) of the increases in PKA activity and spontaneous AP firing rate in response to β-AR stimulation or PDE inhibition were tightly linked. We characterized the system rate-limiting biochemical reactions by integrating these experimentally derived data into mechanistic-computational model. Model simulations predicted that phospholamban phosphorylation is a potent target of the increase in PKA activity that links to increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. In summary, the kinetics and stoichiometry of increases in PKA activity in response to a physiological (β-AR stimulation) or pharmacological (PDE inhibitor) stimuli match those of changes in the AP firing rate. Thus Ca2+-cAMP/PKA-dependent phosphorylation limits the rate and magnitude of increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. PMID:26241846

  17. Analysis of Biochemical Control and Prognostic Factors in Patients Treated With Either Low-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy or High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Sujay A.; Wong, William W.; Schild, Steven E.; Ezzell, Gary A.; Halyard, Michele Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic factors and evaluate biochemical control rates for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with either high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy 3D-CRT. Methods: Four hundred sixteen patients with a minimum follow-up of 3 years (median, 5 years) were included. Two hundred seventy-one patients received 3D-CRT with a median dose of 68.4 Gy (range, 66-71 Gy). The next 145 patients received IMRT with a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 70.2-77.4 Gy). Biochemical control rates were calculated according to both American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions. Prognostic factors were identified using both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-year biochemical control rate was 60.4% for 3D-CRT and 74.1% for IMRT (p < 0.0001, first ASTRO Consensus definition). Using the ASTRO Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical control rate was 74.4% and 84.6% with 3D-RT and IMRT, respectively (p = 0.0326). Univariate analyses determined that PSA level, T stage, Gleason score, perineural invasion, and radiation dose were predictive of biochemical control. On multivariate analysis, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion remained significant. Conclusion: On the basis of both ASTRO definitions, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion were predictive of biochemical control. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy allowed delivery of higher doses of radiation with very low toxicity, resulting in improved biochemical control

  18. Rate-cost tradeoffs in control

    KAUST Repository

    Kostina, Victoria

    2017-02-13

    Consider a distributed control problem with a communication channel connecting the observer of a linear stochastic system to the controller. The goal of the controller is minimize a quadratic cost function. The most basic special case of that cost function is the mean-square deviation of the system state from the desired state. We study the fundamental tradeoff between the communication rate r bits/sec and the limsup of the expected cost b, and show a lower bound on the rate necessary to attain b. The bound applies as long as the system noise has a probability density function. If target cost b is not too large, that bound can be closely approached by a simple lattice quantization scheme that only quantizes the innovation, that is, the difference between the controller\\'s belief about the current state and the true state.

  19. The association between biochemical control and cardiovascular risk factors in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, John D; Broder, Michael S; Cherepanov, Dasha; Chang, Eunice; Mamelak, Adam; Said, Qayyim; Neary, Maureen P; Bonert, Vivien

    2017-03-09

    The study aim was to estimate the proportion of acromegaly patients with various comorbidities and to determine if biochemical control was associated with reduced proportion of cardiovascular risk factors. Data were from a single-center acromegaly registry. Study patients were followed for ≥12 months after initial treatment. Study period was from first to last insulin-like growth factor-I and growth hormone tests. Of 121 patients, 55% were female. Mean age at diagnosis was 42.4 (SD: 15.0). Mean study period was 8.8 (SD: 7.2) years. Macroadenomas were observed in 93 of 106 patients (87.7%), and microadenomas in 13 (12.3%). Initial treatment was surgery in 104 patients (86%), pharmacotherapy in 16 (13.2%), and radiation therapy in 1 (0.8%). Of 120 patients, 79 (65.8%) achieved control during the study period. New onset comorbidities (reported 6 months after study start) were uncommon (acromegaly compared to their controlled counterparts in this single-center registry. About a third of the patients remained uncontrolled after a mean of >8 years of treatment, demonstrating the difficulty of achieving control in some patients.

  20. Climatic Controls on Leaf Nitrogen Content and Implications for Biochemical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcherednichenko, I. A.; White, M.; Bastidas, L.

    2007-12-01

    Leaf nitrogen (N) content, expressed as percent total nitrogen per unit of leaf dry mass, is a widely used parameter in biochemical modeling, due mainly to its role as a potentially limiting factor for photosynthesis. The amount of nitrogen, however, does not occur in a fixed amount in every leaf, but rather varies continuously with the leaf life cycle, in constant response to soil-root-stem-leaf-climate interactions and demand for growth. Moreover, while broad data on leaf N has become available it is normally measured under ambient conditions with consequent difficulty for distinguishing between genetic and time specific environmental effects. In the present work we: 1) Investigate the theoretical variation of leaf mass, specific heat capacity and leaf thickness of full sun-expanded leaves as a regulatory mechanism to ensure thermal survival along with long-term climatic radiation/temperature gradient; and discuss nitrogen and carbon controls on leaf thickness. 2) Based on possible states of partition between nitrogenous and non-nitrogenous components of a leaf we further derive probability density functions (PDFs) of nitrogen and carbon content and assess the effect of water and nutrient uptake on the PDFs. 3) Translate the results to spatially explicit representation over the conterminous USA at 1 km spatial resolution by providing maximum potential values of leaf N of fully expanded leaf optimally suited for long term climatic averages values and soils conditions. Implications for potential presence of inherently slow/fast growing species are discussed along with suitability of results for use by biochemical models.

  1. Automatic dose-rate controlling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szasz, T.; Nagy Czirok, Cs.; Batki, L.; Antal, S.

    1977-01-01

    The patent of a dose-rate controlling equipment that can be attached to X-ray image-amplifiers is presented. In the new equipment the current of the photocatode of the image-amplifier is led into the regulating unit, which controls the X-ray generator automatically. The advantages of the equipment are the following: it can be simply attached to any type of X-ray image-amplifier, it accomplishes fast and sensitive regulation, it makes possible the control of both the mA and the kV values, it is attached to the most reliable point of the image-transmission chain. (L.E.)

  2. Testing jumps via false discovery rate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yu-Min

    2013-01-01

    Many recently developed nonparametric jump tests can be viewed as multiple hypothesis testing problems. For such multiple hypothesis tests, it is well known that controlling type I error often makes a large proportion of erroneous rejections, and such situation becomes even worse when the jump occurrence is a rare event. To obtain more reliable results, we aim to control the false discovery rate (FDR), an efficient compound error measure for erroneous rejections in multiple testing problems. We perform the test via the Barndorff-Nielsen and Shephard (BNS) test statistic, and control the FDR with the Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure. We provide asymptotic results for the FDR control. From simulations, we examine relevant theoretical results and demonstrate the advantages of controlling the FDR. The hybrid approach is then applied to empirical analysis on two benchmark stock indices with high frequency data.

  3. Testing jumps via false discovery rate control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Yen

    Full Text Available Many recently developed nonparametric jump tests can be viewed as multiple hypothesis testing problems. For such multiple hypothesis tests, it is well known that controlling type I error often makes a large proportion of erroneous rejections, and such situation becomes even worse when the jump occurrence is a rare event. To obtain more reliable results, we aim to control the false discovery rate (FDR, an efficient compound error measure for erroneous rejections in multiple testing problems. We perform the test via the Barndorff-Nielsen and Shephard (BNS test statistic, and control the FDR with the Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure. We provide asymptotic results for the FDR control. From simulations, we examine relevant theoretical results and demonstrate the advantages of controlling the FDR. The hybrid approach is then applied to empirical analysis on two benchmark stock indices with high frequency data.

  4. Persistent negative illness perceptions despite long-term biochemical control of acromegaly: novel application of the drawing test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemensma, Jitske; Pereira, Alberto M.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Kaptein, Adrian A.

    2015-01-01

    Context and objective: Patients with acromegaly have persistent complaints despite long-term biochemical control. Drawings can be used to assess patients' perceptions about their disease. We aimed to explore the utility of the drawing test and its relation to illness perceptions and quality of life

  5. Season-controlled changes in biochemical constituents and oxidase enzyme activities in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Supatra; Mukherji, S

    2009-07-01

    Season-controlled changes in biochemical constituents viz. carotenoids (carotene and xanthophyll) and pectic substances along with IAA-oxidase and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme activities were estimated/assayed in leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. (tomato) in two developmental stages--pre-flowering (35 days after sowing) and post-flowering (75 days after sowing) in three different seasons--summer rainy and winter Carotenoid content along with pectic substances were highest in winter and declined significantly in summer followed by rainy i.e. winter > summer > rainy. Carotenoid content was significantly higher in the pre-flowering as compared to post-flowering in all three seasons while pectic substances increased in the post-flowering as compared to pre-flowering throughout the annual cycle. IAA oxidase and PPO enzyme activities were enhanced in rainy and decreased sharply in summer and winter i.e. rainy > summer > winter. Both the enzymes exhibited higher activity in the post-flowering stage as compared to pre-flowering in all three seasons. These results indicate winter to be the most favourable season for tomato plants while rainy season environmental conditions prove to be unfavourable (stressful) with diminished content of carotenoid and pectic substances and low activities of IAA oxidase and PPO, ultimately leading to poor growth and productivity.

  6. Impact of type 1 diabetes and glycemic control on fetal aneuploidy biochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helen Nordahl; Ekelund, Charlotte K; Tørring, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the influence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on the first trimester serum markers of fetal aneuploidy; pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and free beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG) and to evaluate the influence of glycemic control...... on these parameters in the pregnant diabetic women. Design. Retrospective study. Setting. Data were extracted from electronic obstetric and laboratory databases at two Danish University Hospitals. Population. Based on 36 415 pregnancies without T1DM (non-T1DM) and 331 pregnancies with T1DM; β-hCG and PAPP-A were...... across the T1DM and non-T1DM groups, respectively. Additionally, the relationship between PAPP-A MoM and HgbA1C was examined in 348 T1DM pregnancies by Spearman's rank correlation. Main outcome measures. Difference in biochemical marker levels between T1DM and non-T1DM. Results. PAPP-A was 0.86 MoM in T1...

  7. Impact of type 1 diabetes and glycemic control on fetal aneuploidy biochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helen Nordahl; Ekelund, Charlotte Kvist; Tørring, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on the first trimester serum markers of fetal aneuploidy; pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and free beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG) and to evaluate the influence of glycemic control...... on these parameters in the pregnant diabetic women. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: Data were extracted from electronic obstetric and laboratory databases at two Danish University Hospitals. Population: Based on 36,415 pregnancies without T1DM (non-T1DM) and 331 pregnancies with T1DM; β-hCG and PAPP-A were...... across the T1DM and non-T1DM groups, respectively. Additionally, the relation between PAPP-A MoM and HgbA1C was examined in 348 T1DM pregnancies by Spearman’s rank correlation. Main outcome measure: Difference in biochemical marker levels between T1DM and non-T1DM. Results: PAPP-A was 0.86 MoM in T1DM...

  8. [Awareness rate, treatment rate and control rate of dyslipidemia in Chinese adults, 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-hong; Wang, Li-min; Mi, Sheng-quan; Zhang, Mei; Li, Yi-chong; Jiang, Yong; Xu, Yu; Dai, Meng; Wang, Lin-hong

    2012-08-01

    To explore the awareness, treatment and control rates of dyslipidemia among Chinese adults aged over 18 in 2010, and to analyze the prevalent features. 97 409 subjects aged over 18 were recruited from 162 monitoring sites around 31 provinces in China mainland in 2010, applying multi-stage stratified cluster random sampling method. Information about subjects' history of dyslipidemia, treatment and control were collected by face-to-face interview; and each subject's fasting venous blood was drawn in the morning before having food, to test total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). In total, 51 818 cases of dyslipidemia ever or now, including 2235 subjects who once suffered from dyslipidemia but had their blood lipid controlled to normal, were screened out. And the awareness, treatment and control rates were calculated by complex weighting. The awareness rate of dyslipidemia among Chinese adults was 10.93%, while the stratified rates were 6.00%, 16.75% and 18.74% in the groups of subjects aged 18 - 44, 45 - 59 and over 60 years old, respectively (χ² = 1293.02, P China, respectively (χ² = 117.04, P China, respectively (χ² = 50.71, P control rate of dyslipidemia was 3.53% among total subjects, while whose stratified rates were 1.64%, 5.49% and 6.94% in the groups of subjects aged 18 - 44, 45 - 59 and over 60 years old, respectively (χ² = 554.12, P China, respectively (χ² = 91.45, P control rates of dyslipidemia have been comparatively low among Chinese adults, especially among the population who were young, or who were from rural area or western China.

  9. Controlling the Rate of GWAS False Discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyski, Damian; Peterson, Christine B; Sobczyk, Piotr; Candès, Emmanuel J; Bogdan, Malgorzata; Sabatti, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    With the rise of both the number and the complexity of traits of interest, control of the false discovery rate (FDR) in genetic association studies has become an increasingly appealing and accepted target for multiple comparison adjustment. While a number of robust FDR-controlling strategies exist, the nature of this error rate is intimately tied to the precise way in which discoveries are counted, and the performance of FDR-controlling procedures is satisfactory only if there is a one-to-one correspondence between what scientists describe as unique discoveries and the number of rejected hypotheses. The presence of linkage disequilibrium between markers in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often leads researchers to consider the signal associated to multiple neighboring SNPs as indicating the existence of a single genomic locus with possible influence on the phenotype. This a posteriori aggregation of rejected hypotheses results in inflation of the relevant FDR. We propose a novel approach to FDR control that is based on prescreening to identify the level of resolution of distinct hypotheses. We show how FDR-controlling strategies can be adapted to account for this initial selection both with theoretical results and simulations that mimic the dependence structure to be expected in GWAS. We demonstrate that our approach is versatile and useful when the data are analyzed using both tests based on single markers and multiple regression. We provide an R package that allows practitioners to apply our procedure on standard GWAS format data, and illustrate its performance on lipid traits in the North Finland Birth Cohort 66 cohort study. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. DKDP crystal growth controlled by cooling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Qi, Hongji; Shao, Jianda

    2017-08-01

    The performance of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystal directly affects beam quality, energy and conversion efficiency in the Inertial Confinement Fusion(ICF)facility, which is related with the initial saturation temperature of solution and the real-time supersaturation during the crystal growth. However, traditional method to measure the saturation temperature is neither efficient nor accurate enough. Besides, the supersaturation is often controlled by experience, which yields the higher error and leads to the instability during the crystal growth. In this paper, DKDP solution with 78% deuteration concentration is crystallized in different temperatures. We study the relation between solubility and temperature of DKDP and fit a theoretical curve with a parabola model. With the model, the measurement of saturation temperature is simplified and the control precision of the cooling rate is improved during the crystal growth, which is beneficial for optimizing the crystal growth process.

  11. Assessment of process control parameters in the biochemical methane potential of sunflower oil cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raposo, F.; Borja, R.; Rincon, B.; Jimenez, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory-scale study was conducted on the batch anaerobic digestion of sunflower oil cake (SuOC), solid waste derived from the extraction process of sunflower oil. A multi-reactor system was used to compare methane production from this waste at inoculum to substrate ratios (ISRs) of 3.0, 2.0, 1.5, 1.0, 0.8 and 0.5 (expressed as volatile solids (VS) basis). The tests were carried out at mesophilic temperature (35 deg. C) and run against a control of inoculum without substrate. The results obtained in the biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests showed that the ultimate methane yield (Y M,ult ) decreased considerably from 227±23 to 107±11 ml CH 4 at standard temperature and pressure (STP) conditions g -1 VS added when the ISR decreased from 3.0 to 0.5, showing a clear influence of the ISR on the methane yield coefficient. The biodegradability (BD) of the waste also decreased from 86% to 41% when the ISR varied from 3.0 to 0.5. A net total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) yield of 39.2 mg N g -1 VS added was obtained, and this value was not influenced by the ISRs assayed, which demonstrated the appropriate operation of the hydrolytic-acidogenic stage of the overall digestion process. A clear imbalance of the methanogenic process was observed at the lowest ISRs studied (0.5 and 0.8) due to a considerable increase in CODs and TVFA in the digestates. The profile of VFA was also influenced by the ISR, typical of the proteinaceous substrates

  12. Clinical and biochemical heterogeneity between patients with glycogen storage disease type IA: the added value of CUSUM for metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeks, Fabian; Steunenberg, Thomas A H; de Boer, Foekje; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Williams, Monique; Burghard, Rob; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Weinstein, David A; Derks, Terry G J

    2017-09-01

    To study heterogeneity between patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia), a rare inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Descriptive retrospective study of longitudinal clinical and biochemical data and long-term complications in 20 GSD Ia patients. We included 11 patients with homozygous G6PC mutations and siblings from four families carrying identical G6PC genotypes. To display subtle variations for repeated triglyceride measurements with respect to time for individual patients, CUSUM-analysis graphs were constructed. Patients with different homozygous G6PC mutations showed important differences in height, BMI, and biochemical parameters (i.e., lactate, uric acid, triglyceride, and cholesterol concentrations). Furthermore, CUSUM-analysis predicts and displays subtle changes in longitudinal blood triglyceride concentrations. Siblings in families also displayed important differences in biochemical parameters (i.e., lactate, uric acid, triglycerides, and cholesterol concentrations) and long-term complications (i.e., liver adenomas, nephropathy, and osteopenia/osteoporosis). Differences between GSD Ia patients reflect large clinical and biochemical heterogeneity. Heterogeneity between GSD Ia patients with homozygous G6PC mutations indicate an important role of the G6PC genotype/mutations. Differences between affected siblings suggest an additional role (genetic and/or environmental) of modifying factors defining the GSD Ia phenotype. CUSUM-analysis can facilitate single-patient monitoring of metabolic control and future application of this method may improve precision medicine for patients both with GSD and remaining inherited metabolic diseases.

  13. A detailed radiobiological and dosimetric analysis of biochemical outcomes in a case-control study of permanent prostate brachytherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Wayne M.; Stewart, Renee R.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine dosimetric and radiobiological predictors of biochemical control after recalculation of prostate implant dosimetry using updated AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) parameters and the radiobiological parameters recommended by TG-137. All biochemical failures among patients implanted with 125 I or 103 Pd sources between 1994 and March 2006 were matched 2:1 with nonfailure controls. The individual matching was by risk group, radionuclide, prescribed dose, and time of implant (one match before and one after the failed patient) resulting in a median follow-up of 10.9 years. Complete dose volume histogram (DVH) data were recalculated for all 55 cases and 110 controls after updating the original source strength by the retrospectively determined ratios of TG-43. Differential DVH data were acquired in 179 increments of prostate volume versus percentage prescribed dose. At each incremental dose level i, the biologically equivalent dose BED i , equivalent uniform dose EUD i , and tumor control probability TCP i were calculated from the implant dose plus any external beam delivered to the patient. Total BED, EUD, and TCP were then derived from the incremental values for comparison with single point dosimetric quality parameters and DVH-based averages. There was no significant difference between failures and controls in terms of total BED (143 vs 142 Gy), EUD (95 vs 94 Gy), or TCP (0.87 vs 0.89). Conditional logistic regression analysis factored out the matching variables and stratified the cohort into each case and its controls, but no radiobiological parameter was predictive of biochemical failure. However, there was a significant difference between radiobiological parameters of 125 I and 103 Pd due to less complete coverage of the target volume by the former isotope. The implant BED and TCP were highly correlated with the D 90 and natural prescription doses and a series of mean DVH-based doses such as the harmonic mean and expressions of the

  14. Radiotherapy options for localized prostate cancer based upon pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen levels and biochemical control: A comprehensive review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Kini, Vijay R.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To review all the available radiotherapy (RT) literature on localized prostate cancer treatment where serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were used to both stratify patients and evaluate outcome and determine if any conclusions can be reached regarding an optimal radiotherapeutic management for this disease. Methods and Materials: A MEDLINE search was conducted to obtain all articles in English on prostate cancer treatment employing RT from 1986-1997. Studies were considered eligible for review only if they met all the following criteria: 1) pretreatment PSA values were recorded and grouped for subsequent evaluation, 2) posttreatment PSA values were continuously monitored, 3) definitions of biochemical control were stated, and 4) the median follow-up was given. Results: Of the 246 articles identified, only 20 met the inclusion criteria; 4 using conformal external beam RT, 8 using conventional external beam RT, and 8 using interstitial brachytherapy (4 using a permanent implant alone, 3 combining external beam RT with a permanent implant, and 1 combining a conformal temporary interstitial implant boost with external beam RT). No studies using neutrons (with or without external beam RT) or androgen deprivation (combined with external beam RT) were identified where patients were stratified by pretreatment PSA levels. Results for all therapies were extremely variable with the 3-5-year rates of biochemical control for patients with pretreatment PSA levels ≤4 ng/ml ranging from 48 to 100%, for PSA levels >4 and ≤10 ng/ml ranging from 44 to 90%, for PSA levels >10 and ≤20 ng/ml ranging from 27 to 89%, and for PSA levels >20 ranging from 14 to 89%. The median Gleason score, T-stage, definition of biochemical control, and follow-up were substantially different from series to series. No RT option consistently produced superior results. Conclusions: When data are reviewed from studies using serum PSA levels to stratify patients and to evaluate

  15. Effect of UV irradiation on cutaneous cicatrices: a randomized, controlled trial with clinical, skin reflectance, histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Eva; Rossen, Kristian; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Kliem, Anette; Karlsmark, Tonny; Haedersdal, Merete

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on human cutaneous cicatrices. In this randomized, controlled study, dermal punch biopsy wounds served as a wound healing model. Wounds healed by primary or second intention and were randomized to postoperative solar UV irradiation or to no UV exposure. Evaluations after 5 and 12 weeks included blinded clinical assessments, skin reflectance measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical analyses of the N-terminal propeptide from procollagen-1, hydroxyproline, hydroxylysine, and proline. Twelve weeks postoperatively, UV-irradiated cicatrices healing by second intention: (i) were significantly pointed out as the most disfiguring; (ii) obtained significantly higher scores of colour, infiltration and cicatrix area; and (iii) showed significantly higher increase in skin-reflectance measurements of skin-pigmentation vs. non-irradiated cicatrices. No histological, immunohistochemical or biochemical differences were found. In conclusion, postoperative UV exposure aggravates the clinical appearance of cicatrices in humans.

  16. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  17. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, Christopher; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Joffres, Michel; Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle; Moiseenko, Vitali; Pickles, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51–176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%–94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%–71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%–100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%–91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p 90%.

  18. A Dose–Response Analysis of Biochemical Control Outcomes After {sup 125}I Monotherapy for Patients With Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Yutaka, E-mail: shiraishi@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Yorozu, Atsunori [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ohashi, Toshio [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Toya, Kazuhito [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Shiro; Nishiyama, Toru; Yagi, Yasuto [Department of Urology, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Shigematsu, Naoyuki [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To define the optimal dose for {sup 125}I prostate implants by correlating postimplantation dosimetry findings with biochemical failure and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2009, 683 patients with prostate cancer were treated with {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy without supplemental external beam radiation therapy and were followed up for a median time of 80 months. Implant dose was defined as the D90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate) on postoperative day 1 and 1 month after implantation. Therefore, 2 dosimetric variables (day 1 D90 and day 30 D90) were analyzed for each patient. We investigated the dose effects on biochemical control and toxicity. Results: The 7-year biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) rate for the group overall was 96.4% according to the Phoenix definition. A multivariate analysis found day 1 D90 and day 30 D90 to be the most significant factors affecting BFFS. The cutoff points for day 1 D90 and day 30 D90, calculated from ROC curves, were 163 Gy and 175 Gy, respectively. By use of univariate analysis, various dosimetric cutoff points for day 30 D90 were tested. We found that day 30 D90 cutoff points from 130 to 180 Gy appeared to be good for the entire cohort. Greater D90s were associated with an increase in late genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity ≥ grade 2, but the increase was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Improvements in BFFS rates were seen with increasing D90 levels. Day 30 D90 doses of 130 to 180 Gy were found to serve as cutoff levels. For low-risk and low-tier intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients, high prostate D90s, even with doses exceeding 180 Gy, achieve better treatment results and are feasible.

  19. Effect of controlled release formulations of diuron and alachlor herbicides on the biochemical activity of agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Manuel; Morillo, Esmeralda; Gómez, Isidoro; Madrid, Fernando; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2017-01-15

    The use of pesticides in agriculture is essential because it reduces the economic losses caused by pests, improving crop yields. In spite of the growing number of studies concerning the development and application of controlled release formulations (CRFs) of pesticides in agricultural soils, there are no studies about the effects of such formulations on the biochemical properties. In this paper the dissipation of diuron and alachlor in three agricultural soils for 127days, applied either as commercial or CRFs, was determined as well as their concomitant effects on soil biochemical properties. Dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activities were measured thought the experimental period. The application of alachlor as CRF increases its half-life time in soils, whereas no differences were noticed between diuron formulations due to its slower degradation, which takes longer than its release from the CRF. At the end of the incubation period, the enzymatic activities were the same after the use of diuron either as commercial or CRF, recovering the soil previous status. For alachlor formulations, no differences in enzymatic activities were again observed between both formulations, but their levels in soils were enhanced. Therefore, the use of these CRFs does not adversely affect the soil biochemical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rate Control in Dual Source Evaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielinga, T.; Gruisinga, W.; Leeuwis, H.; Lodder, J.C.; van Weers, J.F.; Wilmans, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Two-component thin films are deposited in a high-vacuum system from two close sources, heated by an electron beam which is deflected between them. By using quartz-crystal monitors the evaporation rates are measured seperately, which is usually considered to be problematical. One rate signal is used

  1. Rate-cost tradeoffs in control

    KAUST Repository

    Kostina, Victoria; Hassibi, Babak

    2017-01-01

    function is the mean-square deviation of the system state from the desired state. We study the fundamental tradeoff between the communication rate r bits/sec and the limsup of the expected cost b, and show a lower bound on the rate necessary to attain b

  2. The detection rate of [11C]Choline-PET/CT depends on the serum PSA-value in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Souvatzoglou, M.; Tuncel, M.; Herrmann, K.; Buck, A.K.; Praus, C.; Schwaiger, M.; Schuster, T.; Geinitz, H.; Treiber, U.

    2008-01-01

    An increase of the serum PSA-level is a sensitive in vitro marker for recurrent prostate cancer. However, it remains difficult to differentiate between local, regional or distant recurrent disease. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the detection rate of [ 11 C]Choline-PET/CT and the serum PSA-level in patients with a biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer with the view towards localisation of recurrent disease. Sixty-three patients (mean age, 68.8 ± 6.9; range, 45-83 years) with biochemical recurrence after primary therapy for prostate cancer were included in the analysis. Mean PSA-levels were 5.9 ± 9.7 ng/ml (range, 0.2-39 ng/ml; median, 2.15). Of the 63 patients, 17 were under anti-androgen therapy at the time of [ 11 C]Choline PET/CT. Patients underwent a [ 11 C]Choline-PET/CT study after injection of 656 ± 119 MBq [ 11 C]Choline on a Sensation 16 Biograph PET/CT scanner. Of the 63 patients, 35 (56%) showed a pathological [ 11 C]Choline uptake. The detection rate of [ 11 C]Choline-PET/CT showed a relationship with the serum PSA-level: The detection rate was 36% for a PSA-value 11 C]Choline-PET/CT (p = 0.374). As an important result our study shows that even for PSA-values 11 C]Choline-PET/CT is 36%. Furthermore, the detection rate of [ 11 C]Choline-PET/CT shows a positive relationship with serum PSA-levels in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after primary therapy. Therefore, in these patients, [ 11 C]Choline PET/CT allows not only to diagnose but also to localise recurrent disease with implications on disease management (localised vs systemic therapy). (orig.)

  3. Reactor core flow rate control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Hitoshi; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Miyakawa, Tetsuya.

    1996-01-01

    When an internal pump is started by a variable frequency power source device, if magnetic fields of an AC generator are introduced after the rated speed is reached, neutron flux high scram occurs by abrupt increase of a reactor core flow rate. Then, in the present invention, magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced at a speed previously set at which the fluctuation range of the reactor core flow rate (neutron flux) by the start up of the internal pump is within an allowable value. Since increase of the speed of the internal pump upon its start up is suppressed to determine the change of the reactor core flow rate within an allowable range, increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed to enable stable start up. Then, since transition boiling of fuels caused by abrupt decrease of the reactor core flow rate upon occurrence of abnormality in an external electric power system is prevented, and the magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced in such a manner to put the speed increase fluctuation range of the internal pump upon start up within an allowable value, neutron flux high scram is not caused to enable stable start-up. (N.H.)

  4. An analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience in treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if previously analyzed clinical and treatment related prognostic factors affected outcome when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Materials and methods: Between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991, 470 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with external beam RT using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment. After achieving nadir, if two consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Prognostic factors, including the total number of days in treatment, the method of diagnosis, a history of any pretreatment transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the type of boost were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months. No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), history of any pretreatment TURP, history of diagnosis by TURP, or boost techniques. Patients diagnosed by TURP had a significant improvement in the overall rate of biochemical control (P < 0.03) compared to transrectal/transperineal biopsy. The 5-year actuarial rates were 58 versus 39%, respectively. This improvement was not evident when pretreatment PSA, T stage, or Gleason score were controlled for. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with outcome. When analysis was limited to a more favorable group of patients (T1/T2 tumors, pretreatment PSA ≤20 ng/ml and Gleason score <7), none of these variables were significantly predictive of biochemical control when controlling for pretreatment PSA, T stage and Gleason score. Conclusions: No significant effect of treatment time, overall time, pretreatment

  5. Familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism associated with germline GCM2 mutations is more aggressive and has a lesser rate of biochemical cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Lakis, Mustapha; Nockel, Pavel; Guan, Bin; Agarwal, Sunita; Welch, James; Simonds, William F; Marx, Stephen; Li, Yulong; Nilubol, Naris; Patel, Dhaval; Yang, Lily; Merkel, Roxanne; Kebebew, Electron

    2018-01-01

    Hereditary primary hyperparathyroidism may be syndromic or nonsyndromic (familial isolated hyperparathyroidism). Recently, germline activating mutations in the GCM2 gene were identified in a subset of familial isolated hyperparathyroidism. This study examined the clinical and biochemical characteristics and the treatment outcomes of GCM2 mutation-positive familial isolated hyperparathyroidism as compared to sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical features, parathyroid pathology, and operative outcomes in 18 patients with GCM2 germline mutations and 457 patients with sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism. Age at diagnosis, sex distribution, race/ethnicity, and preoperative serum calcium concentrations were similar between the 2 groups. The preoperative serum levels of intact parathyroid hormone was greater in patients with GCM2-associated primary hyperparathyroidism (239 ± 394 vs 136 ± 113, P = .005) as were rates of multigland disease and parathyroid carcinoma in the GCM2 group (78% vs 14.3%, P hyperparathyroidism patients have greater preoperative parathyroid hormone levels, a greater rate of multigland disease, a lesser rate of biochemical cure, and a substantial risk of parathyroid carcinoma. Knowledge of these clinical characteristics could optimize the surgical management of GCM2-associated familial isolated hyperparathyroidism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Capital Controls and the Real Exchange Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen, S.J.G.

    1990-01-01

    Capital import taxes lower (raise) world (home) interest rates. This shifts home expenditure from the present to the future and foreign expenditure from the future to today. With identical home and foreign expenditure patterns, the change in the composition of world expenditure has no effects on

  7. Late toxicity and biochemical control in 554 prostate cancer patients treated with and without dose escalated image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, David; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Byrne, Keelan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris; Duchesne, Gillian; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare rates of late gastrointestinal toxicity, late genitourinary toxicity and biochemical failure between patients treated for prostate cancer with implanted fiducial marker image guided radiotherapy (FMIGRT), and those treated without FMIGRT. Methods and materials: We performed a single institution retrospective study comparing all 311 patients who received 74 Gy without fiducial markers in 2006 versus all 243 patients who received our updated regimen of 78 Gy with FMIGRT in 2008. Patient records were reviewed 27 months after completing radiotherapy. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition. Details of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were graded according to CTCAEv4. Moderate/severe toxicity was defined as a grade 2 or higher toxicity. Cumulative incidence and prevalence curves for moderate/severe toxicity were constructed and compared using multistate modeling while biochemical failure free survival was compared using the log rank test. A Cox regression model was developed to correct for confounding factors. Results: Median follow-up time for both groups was 22 months. The hazard ratio for moderate/severe late gastrointestinal toxicity in the non-FMIGRT group was 3.66 [95% CI (1.63–8.23), p = 0.003] compared to patients in the FMIGRT group. There was no difference in the hazard ratio of moderate/severe late genitourinary toxicity between the two groups (0.44 [95% CI (0.19–1.00)]), but patients treated with FMIGRT did have a quicker recovery from their genitourinary toxicities HR = 0.24 [95% CI (0.10–0.59)]. We were unable to detect any differences in biochemical failure free survival between the cohorts HR = 0.60 [95% CI (0.30–1.20), p = 0.143]. Conclusion: Despite dose escalation, the use of FMIGRT in radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer significantly reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity and the duration of late genitourinary toxicity when compared to conventional non

  8. BIOCHEMICAL CONTROL DURING LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF 230 ADULT PATIENTS WITH CUSHING DISEASE: A MULTICENTER RETROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Eliza B; Shafiq, Ismat; Gordon, Murray B; Bonert, Vivien; Ayala, Alejandro; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Katznelson, Laurence; Lalazar, Yelena; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Pulaski-Liebert, Karen J; Carmichael, John D; Hannoush, Zeina; Surampudi, Vijaya; Broder, Michael S; Cherepanov, Dasha; Eagan, Marianne; Lee, Jackie; Said, Qayyim; Neary, Maureen P; Biller, Beverly M K

    2017-08-01

    Cushing disease (CD) results from excessive exposure to glucocorticoids caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary tumor. Inadequately treated CD is associated with significant morbidity and elevated mortality. Multicenter data on CD patients treated in routine clinical practice are needed to assess treatment outcomes in this rare disorder. The study purpose was to describe the burden of illness and treatment outcomes for CD patients. Eight pituitary centers in four U.S. regions participated in this multicenter retrospective chart review study. Subjects were CD patients diagnosed at ≥18 years of age within the past 20 years. Descriptive statistical analyses were conducted to examine presenting signs, symptoms, comorbidities, and treatment outcomes. Of 230 patients, 79% were female (median age at diagnosis, 39 years; range, 18 to 78 years). Length of follow-up was 0 to 27.5 years (median, 1.9 years). Pituitary adenomas were 0 to 51 mm. The most common presenting comorbidities included hypertension (67.3%), polycystic ovary syndrome (43.5%), and hyperlipidemia (41.5%). Biochemical control was achieved with initial pituitary surgery in 41.4% patients (91 of 220), not achieved in 50.0% of patients (110 of 220), and undetermined in 8.6% of patients (19 of 220). At the end of follow-up, control had been achieved with a variety of treatment methods in 49.1% of patients (110 of 224), not achieved in 29.9% of patients (67 of 224), and undetermined in 21.0% of patients (47 of 224). Despite multiple treatments, at the end of follow-up, biochemical control was still not achieved in up to 30% of patients. These multicenter data demonstrate that in routine clinical practice, initial and long-term control is not achieved in a substantial number of patients with CD. BLA = bilateral adrenalectomy CD = Cushing disease CS = Cushing syndrome eCRF = electronic case report form MRI = magnetic resonance imaging PCOS = polycystic ovary syndrome.

  9. Soil biochemical properties and microbial resilience in agroforestry systems: effects on wheat growth under controlled drought and flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, David; Lorente, Miren; Olivier, Alain; Messier, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Agroforestry is increasingly viewed as an effective means of maintaining or even increasing crop and tree productivity under climate change while promoting other ecosystem functions and services. This study focused on soil biochemical properties and resilience following disturbance within agroforestry and conventional agricultural systems and aimed to determine whether soil differences in terms of these biochemical properties and resilience would subsequently affect crop productivity under extreme soil water conditions. Two research sites that had been established on agricultural land were selected for this study. The first site included an 18-year-old windbreak, while the second site consisted in an 8-year-old tree-based intercropping system. In each site, soil samples were used for the determination of soil nutrient availability, microbial dynamics and microbial resilience to different wetting-drying perturbations and for a greenhouse pot experiment with wheat. Drying and flooding were selected as water stress treatments and compared to a control. These treatments were initiated at the beginning of the wheat anthesis period and maintained over 10 days. Trees contributed to increase soil nutrient pools, as evidenced by the higher extractable-P (both sites), and the higher total N and mineralizable N (tree-based intercropping site) found in the agroforestry compared to the conventional agricultural system. Metabolic quotient (qCO2) was lower in the agroforestry than in the conventional agricultural system, suggesting higher microbial substrate use efficiency in agroforestry systems. Microbial resilience was higher in the agroforestry soils compared to soils from the conventional agricultural system (windbreak site only). At the windbreak site, wheat growing in soils from agroforestry system exhibited higher aboveground biomass and number of grains per spike than in conventional agricultural system soils in the three water stress treatments. At the tree

  10. The Effects of Gun Ownership Rates and Gun Control Laws on Suicide Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Gius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of gun control laws and gun ownership rates on state-level suicide rates. Using the most recent data on suicide rates, gun control measures, and gun ownership rates, the results of the present study suggest that states that require handgun permits have lower gun-related suicide rates, and states that have higher gun ownership rates have higher gun-related suicide rates. Regarding non-gun suicides, results suggest that stricter gun c...

  11. Lymph node yield during radical prostatectomy does not impact rate of biochemical recurrence in patients with seminal vesicle invasion and node-negative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badani, Ketan K; Reddy, Balaji N; Moskowitz, Eric J; Paulucci, David J; Beksac, Alp Tuna; Martini, Alberto; Whalen, Michael J; Skarecky, Douglas W; Huynh, Linda My; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2018-06-01

    Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) is a risk factor for poor oncologic outcome in patients with prostate cancer. Modifications to the pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) during radical prostatectomy (RP) have been reported to have a therapeutic benefit. The present study is the first to determine if lymph node yield (LNY) is associated with a lower risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) for men with SVI. A total of 220 patients from 2 high-volume institutions who underwent RP without adjuvant treatment between 1990 and 2015 and had prostate cancer with SVI (i.e., pT3b) were identified, and 21 patients did not undergo lymph node dissection. BCR was defined as a postoperative PSA>0.2ng/mL, or use of salvage androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or radiation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine whether LNY was predictive of BCR, controlling for PSA, pathologic Gleason Score, pathologic lymph node status, NCCN risk category, etc. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine 3-year freedom from BCR. Median number of lymph nodes sampled were 7 (IQR: 3-12; range: 0-35) and 90.5% underwent PLND. The estimated 3-year BCR rate was 43.9%. Results from multivariable analysis demonstrated that LNY was not significantly associated with risk of BCR overall (HR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.98-1.03; P = 0.848) for pN0 (HR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.97-1.03; P = 0.916) or pN1 patients (HR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.88-1.06; P = 0.468). Overall, PSA (HR = 1.02, P2 positive lymph nodes (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.06-1.65, P = 0.023). Seminal vesicle invasion is associated with an increased risk of BCR at 3 years, primarily due to pathologic Gleason score and PSA. Although greater lymph node yield is diagnostic and facilitates more accurate pathologic staging, our data do not show a therapeutic benefit in reducing BCR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of the Optimal Exchange Rate Via Control of the Domestic Interest Rate in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virtue U. Ekhosuehi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic scenario has been considered where the government seeks to achieve a favourable balance-of-payments over a fixed planning horizon through exchange rate policy and control of the domestic interest rate. The dynamics of such an economy was considered in terms of a bounded optimal control problem where the exchange rate is the state variable and the domestic interest rate is the control variable. The idea of balance-of-payments was used as a theoretical underpinning to specify the objective function. By assuming that, changes in exchange rates were induced by two effects: the impact of the domestic interest rate on the exchange rate and the exchange rate system adopted by the government. Instances for both fixed and flexible optimal exchange rate regimes have been determined. The use of the approach has been illustrated employing data obtained from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN statistical bulletin. (original abstract

  13. Molecular and elemental effects underlying the biochemical action of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in appetite control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowka, Artur D.; Ziomber, Agata; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Migliori, Alessandro; Kasper, Kaja; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies highlight that obesity may alter the electric activity in brain areas triggering appetite and craving. Transcranial direct current brain stimulation (tDCS) has recently emerged as a safe alternative for treating food addiction via modulating cortical excitability without any high-risk surgical procedure to be utilized. As for anodal-type tDCS (atDCS), we observe increased excitability and spontaneous firing of the cortical neurons, whilst for the cathodal-type tDCS (ctDCS) a significant decrease is induced. Unfortunately, for the method to be fully used in a clinical setting, its biochemical action mechanism must be precisely defined, although it is proposed that molecular remodelling processes play in concert with brain activity changes involving the ions of: Na, Cl, K and Ca. Herein, we proposed for the first time Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobes for a combined molecular and elemental analysis in the brain areas implicated appetite control, upon experimental treatment by either atDCS or ctDCS. The study, although preliminary, shows that by stimulating the prefrontal cortex in the rats fed high-caloric nutrients, the feeding behavior can be significantly changed, resulting in significantly inhibited appetite. Both, atDCS and ctDCS produced significant molecular changes involving qualitative and structural properties of lipids, whereas atDCS was found with a somewhat more significant effect on protein secondary structure in all the brain areas investigated. Also, tDCS was reported to reduce surface masses of Na, Cl, K, and Ca in almost all brain areas investigated, although the atDCS deemed to have a stronger neuro-modulating effect. Taken together, one can report that tDCS is an effective treatment technique, and its action mechanism in the appetite control seems to involve a variety of lipid-, protein- and metal/non-metal-ion-driven biochemical changes, regardless the current polarization.

  14. Real-time relationship between PKA biochemical signal network dynamics and increased action potential firing rate in heart pacemaker cells: Kinetics of PKA activation in heart pacemaker cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Yang, Dongmei; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Levchenko, Andre; Zhang, Jin; Lakatta, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    cAMP-PKA protein kinase is a key nodal signaling pathway that regulates a wide range of heart pacemaker cell functions. These functions are predicted to be involved in regulation of spontaneous action potential (AP) generation of these cells. Here we investigate if the kinetics and stoichiometry of increase in PKA activity match the increase in AP firing rate in response to β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, that alters the AP firing rate of heart sinoatrial pacemaker cells. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, the EC50 in response to graded increases in the intensity of β-AR stimulation (by Isoproterenol) the magnitude of the increases in PKA activity and the spontaneous AP firing rate were similar (0.4±0.1nM vs. 0.6±0.15nM, respectively). Moreover, the kinetics (t1/2) of the increases in PKA activity and spontaneous AP firing rate in response to β-AR stimulation or PDE inhibition were tightly linked. We characterized the system rate-limiting biochemical reactions by integrating these experimentally derived data into a mechanistic-computational model. Model simulations predicted that phospholamban phosphorylation is a potent target of the increase in PKA activity that links to increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. In summary, the kinetics and stoichiometry of increases in PKA activity in response to a physiological (β-AR stimulation) or pharmacological (PDE inhibitor) stimuli match those of changes in the AP firing rate. Thus Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-dependent phosphorylation limits the rate and magnitude of increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Controlling Object Heat Release Rate using Geometrical Features

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, Stefan Marc

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of complex geometries on the burning rate of materials made using additive manufacturing. Controlling heat release rate has applicability in limiting fire hazards as well as for designing fuels for optimal burning rate. The burning rate of a structure is a function of the material properties as well as the airflow through it, which is dictated by the geometry. This burning rate is generally proportional to the porosity for obj...

  16. A packet-based dual-rate PID control strategy for a slow-rate sensing Networked Control System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, A; Alcaina, J; Salt, J; Casanova, V; Pizá, R

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces a packet-based dual-rate control strategy to face time-varying network-induced delays, packet dropouts and packet disorder in a Networked Control System. Slow-rate sensing enables to achieve energy saving and to avoid packet disorder. Fast-rate actuation makes reaching the desired control performance possible. The dual-rate PID controller is split into two parts: a slow-rate PI controller located at the remote side (with no permanent communication to the plant) and a fast-rate PD controller located at the local side. The remote side also includes a prediction stage in order to generate the packet of future, estimated slow-rate control actions. These actions are sent to the local side and converted to fast-rate ones to be used when a packet does not arrive at this side due to the network-induced delay or due to occurring dropouts. The proposed control solution is able to approximately reach the nominal (no-delay, no-dropout) performance despite the existence of time-varying delays and packet dropouts. Control system stability is ensured in terms of probabilistic Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs). Via real-time control for a Cartesian robot, results clearly reveal the superiority of the control solution compared to a previous proposal by authors. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Growing Chlorella vulgaris in Photobioreactor by Continuous Process Using Concentrated Desalination: Effect of Dilution Rate on Biochemical Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo Paggi Matos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desalination wastewater, which contains large amount of salt waste, might lead to severely environmental pollution. This study evaluated the effect of dilution rate (0.1≤D≤0.3 day−1 on microalgal biomass productivity, lipid content, and fatty acid profile under steady-state condition of Chlorella vulgaris supplemented with concentrated desalination. Continuous culture was conducted for 55 days. Results show that the biomass productivity (Px varied from 57 to 126 mg L−1 d−1 (dry mass when the dilution rate ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 day−1. At lowest dilution rate (D=0.1 day−1, the continuous culture regime ensured the highest values of maximum biomass concentration (Xm=570±20 mL−1 and protein content (52%. Biomass lipid content was an increasing function of D. The most abundant fatty acids were the palmitic (25.3±0.6% at D=0.1 day−1 and the gamma-linolenic acid (23.5±0.1% at D=0.3 day−1 ones. These fatty acids present 14 to 18 carbons in the carbon chain, being mainly saturated and polyunsaturated, respectively. Overall, the results show that continuous culture is a powerful tool to investigate the cell growth kinetics and physiological behaviors of the algae growing on desalination wastewater.

  18. Genetic and biochemical investigations of the role of MamP in redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie R; Wilson, Tiffany D; Brown, Margaret E; Rahn-Lee, Lilah; Yu, Yi; Fredriksen, Laura L; Ozyamak, Ertan; Komeili, Arash; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2015-03-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. To dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out a genetic and biochemical study of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization. In this study, we show that the redox sites of c-type cytochromes of the Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 magnetosome island, MamP and MamT, are essential to their physiological function and that ablation of one or both heme motifs leads to loss of function, suggesting that their ability to carry out redox chemistry in vivo is important. We also develop a method to heterologously express fully heme-loaded MamP from AMB-1 for in vitro biochemical studies, which show that its Fe(III)-Fe(II) redox couple is set at an unusual potential (-89 ± 11 mV) compared with other related cytochromes involved in iron reduction or oxidation. Despite its low reduction potential, it remains competent to oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and mineralize iron to produce mixed-valent iron oxides. Finally, in vitro mineralization experiments suggest that Mms mineral-templating peptides from AMB-1 can modulate the iron redox chemistry of MamP.

  19. Comparison of biochemical properties of liver arginase from streptozocin-induced diabetic and control mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolarics, Z; Bond, J S

    1989-11-01

    Arginase activity is elevated in livers of diabetic animals compared to controls and there is evidence that this is due in part to increased specific activity (activity/mg arginase protein). To investigate the molecular basis of this increased activity, the physicochemical and kinetic properties of hepatic arginase from diabetic and control mice were compared. Two types of arginase subunits with molecular weights of 35,000 and 38,000 were found in both the diabetic and control animals and the subunits in these animals had similar, multiple ionic forms. Kinetic parameters of purified preparations of arginase for arginine (apparent Km and Vmax values) and the thermal stability of these preparations from diabetics and controls were also similar. Furthermore, no difference was found in the distribution of arginase activity among different subcellular liver fractions. Separation of basic and acidic oligomeric forms of arginase by fast-protein liquid chromatography resulted in a slightly different distribution of activity among the forms in the normal and diabetic group. The apparent Km values for Mn2+ of the basic form of the enzyme were 25 and 33 microM for the enzyme from normal and diabetic animals, respectively; for acidic forms, for which two apparent Km values were measured, the values were 8 and 197 microM for arginase from controls and 35 and 537 microM from diabetics. These results indicate that in diabetes, while no marked changes in the physicochemical characteristics of arginase are obvious, some changes are found in the interaction of arginase with its cofactor Mn.

  20. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total quantities the order fill rate would be the preferred service level m...

  1. Control mechanisms for stochastic biochemical systems via computation of reachable sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Eszter; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2017-08-01

    Controlling the behaviour of cells by rationally guiding molecular processes is an overarching aim of much of synthetic biology. Molecular processes, however, are notoriously noisy and frequently nonlinear. We present an approach to studying the impact of control measures on motifs of molecular interactions that addresses the problems faced in many biological systems: stochasticity, parameter uncertainty and nonlinearity. We show that our reachability analysis formalism can describe the potential behaviour of biological (naturally evolved as well as engineered) systems, and provides a set of bounds on their dynamics at the level of population statistics: for example, we can obtain the possible ranges of means and variances of mRNA and protein expression levels, even in the presence of uncertainty about model parameters.

  2. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total quantities the order fill rate would be the preferred service level...... measure. The main result shows how the order and volume fill rates are related in magnitude. Earlier results derived for a single-item, single-stage, continuous review inventory system with backordering and constant lead times controlled by a base-stock policy are extended in different directions...

  3. Quality of Control of Clinical-Biochemical Laboratories – Serbian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Peric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years in medical laboratories, numerous activities regarding quality and accreditation system were taken. Approach to this problem in European countries is different, so the task of the Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 to help the efforts to harmonize this issue. External quality control in clinical-chemical laboratories imposed the need for the implementation of quality management system. »Good laboratory practice« and its principles were adopted by nominated bodies, both international and national. In the beginning, the standard ISO 9001 was applied for certification and for accreditation EN 45001 and ISO Guide 25, which are prepared for testing and calibration laboratories. Standard ISO 17025 is the successor of the previous documents and for now it is a reference for mentioned laboratories. Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 made an amendment of the requirements for medical laboratories, which this standard describes. Standard draft ISO 15189 was adopted on February 2003 as a final version with requirements for medical laboratories.

  4. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, R

    2010-07-21

    Chemical master equations provide a mathematical description of stochastic reaction kinetics in well-mixed conditions. They are a valid description over length scales that are larger than the reactive mean free path and thus describe kinetics in compartments of mesoscopic and macroscopic dimensions. The trajectories of the stochastic chemical processes described by the master equation can be ensemble-averaged to obtain the average number density of chemical species, i.e., the true concentration, at any spatial scale of interest. For macroscopic volumes, the true concentration is very well approximated by the solution of the corresponding deterministic and macroscopic rate equations, i.e., the macroscopic concentration. However, this equivalence breaks down for mesoscopic volumes. These deviations are particularly significant for open systems and cannot be calculated via the Fokker-Planck or linear-noise approximations of the master equation. We utilize the system-size expansion including terms of the order of Omega(-1/2) to derive a set of differential equations whose solution approximates the true concentration as given by the master equation. These equations are valid in any open or closed chemical reaction network and at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. In the limit of large volumes, the effective mesoscopic rate equations become precisely equal to the conventional macroscopic rate equations. We compare the three formalisms of effective mesoscopic rate equations, conventional rate equations, and chemical master equations by applying them to several biochemical reaction systems (homodimeric and heterodimeric protein-protein interactions, series of sequential enzyme reactions, and positive feedback loops) in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions. In all cases, we find that the effective mesoscopic rate equations can predict very well the true concentration of a chemical species. This provides a useful method by which one can quickly determine the

  5. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total demanded quantity the order fill rate would be the preferred service...... level measure. The main result shows how the order and volume fill rates are related in magnitude. Earlier results derived for a single-item, single-stage, continuous review inventory system with backordering and constant lead times controlled by a base-stock policy are extended in different directions...... extensions consider more general inventory control review policies with backordering, as well as some relations between service measures. A particularly important result in the paper concerns an alternative service measure, the customer order fill rate, and shows how this measure always exceeds the other two...

  6. Performance ratings and personality factors in radar controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether primary or second-order personality questionnaire factors were related to job performance ratings on the Employee Appraisal Record in a sample of 264 radar controllers. A Pearson correlation matrix wa...

  7. Comparison of biochemical failure rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy and radical retropubic prostatectomy as a function of posttherapy PSA nadir plus ‘X’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A; Davis, Brian J; Mynderse, Lance A; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Bergstralh, Eric J; Wilson, Torrence M; Choo, C Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir + 2 ng/mL, also known as the Phoenix definition, is the definition most commonly used to establish biochemical failure (BF) after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer management. The purpose of this study is to compare BF rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) as a function of PSA nadir plus varying values of X and examine the associated implications. We retrospectively searched for patients who underwent PPB or RRP at our institution between 1998 and 2004. Only primary patients not receiving androgen-deprivation therapy were included in the study. Three RRP patients were matched to each PPB patient on the basis of prognostic factors. BF rates were estimated for PSA nadirs + different values of X. A total of 1,164 patients were used for analysis: 873 in the RRP group and 291 in the PPB group. Patients were equally matched by clinical stage, biopsy Gleason sum, primary Gleason grade, and pretherapy PSA value. Median follow-up was 3.1 years for RRP patients and 3.6 years in the PPB group (P = .01). Using PSA nadir + 0.1 ng/mL for the definition of BF, the 5-year BF rate was 16.3% for PPB patients and 13.5% for RRP patients (P = .007), whereas at nadir + 2 ng/mL or greater, the BF rates were less than 3% and were indistinguishable between PPB and RRP patients. In a cohort of well-matched patients who had prostatectomy or brachytherapy, we examined BF as a function of nadir + X, where X was treated as a continuous variable. As X increases from 0.1 to 2.0 ng/mL, the BF curves converge, and above 2.0 ng/mL they are essentially indistinguishable. The data presented are of interest as BF definitions continue to evolve

  8. Rate-control algorithms testing by using video source model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Turlikov, Andrey; Ukhanova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the method of rate control algorithms testing by the use of video source model is suggested. The proposed method allows to significantly improve algorithms testing over the big test set.......In this paper the method of rate control algorithms testing by the use of video source model is suggested. The proposed method allows to significantly improve algorithms testing over the big test set....

  9. Early PET imaging with [68]Ga-PSMA-11 increases the detection rate of local recurrence in prostate cancer patients with biochemical recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Kendler, Dorota; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Nilica, Bernhard; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; Di Santo, Gianpaolo; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen PSMA-11 (HBEDD-CC) has emerged as a promising imaging method in the diagnostic evaluation of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical recurrence. However, assessment of local recurrence (LR) may be limited by intense physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole-body scans, normally conducted 60 min post-tracer injection (p.i.). It could be shown on early dynamic imaging studies that {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in PC lesions occurs earlier than tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. This study aims to investigate whether early static PET acquisition increases detection rate of local recurrence on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in comparison to PET imaging 60 min p.i. 203 consecutive PC patients with biochemical failure referred to {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were analysed retrospectively (median prostate specific antigen (PSA) value: 1.44 ng/ml). In addition to whole-body PET/CT scans 60 min p.i., early static imaging of the pelvis was performed, starting at a median time of 283 s p.i. (range: 243-491 s). Assessment was based on visual analysis and calculation of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of pathologic lesions present in the pelvic area found on early PET imaging and on 60 min-PET scans. 26 patients (12.8%) were judged positive for LR on PET scans 60 min p.i. (median SUV{sub max}: 10.8; range: 4.7-40.9), whereas 50 patients (24.6%) revealed a lesion suggestive of LR on early PET imaging (median SUV{sub max}: 5.9; range: 2.9-17.6), resulting in a significant rise in detection rate (p < 0.001). Equivocal findings on PET scans 60 min p.i. decreased significantly with the help of early imaging (15.8% vs. 4.5% of patients; p < 0.001). Tracer activity in the urinary bladder with a median SUV{sub max} of 8.2 was present in 63 patients on early PET scans (31.0%). However, acquisition starting time of early PET scans differed significantly in the patient groups

  10. Evaluation and comparison of efficacy of three desensitizing dentifrices on dentinal hypersensitivity and salivary biochemical characteristics: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Athuluru

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The desensitizing toothpaste containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate was found to be more effective in reducing DH and showed improvement in salivary biochemical characteristics over a period of 12 weeks compared to others.

  11. Rate control is more cost-effective than rhythm control for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation - results from the RAte Control versus Electrical cardioversion (RACE) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, VE; Vermeulen, KM; TenVergert, EM; Van Veldhuisen, JGP; Bosker, HA; Kamp, O; Kingma, JH; Tijssen, JGP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    Aims To evaluate costs between a rate and rhythm control strategy in persistent atrial. fibrillation. Methods and results In a prospective substudy of RACE (Rate control versus electrical cardioversion for persistent atrial. fibrillation) in 428 of the total 522 patients (206 rate control and 222

  12. Oxygen uptake rate (OUR) control strategy for improving avermectin B

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glucose metabolism plays a crucial role in the process of avermectin B1a biosynthesis. Controlling glucose feeding based on oxygen uptake rate (OUR) was established to improve the efficiency of avermectin B1a production. The result showed that avermectin B1a production was greatly enhanced by OUR control strategy.

  13. Visual Perception Based Rate Control Algorithm for HEVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zeqi; Liu, PengYu; Jia, Kebin

    2018-01-01

    For HEVC, rate control is an indispensably important video coding technology to alleviate the contradiction between video quality and the limited encoding resources during video communication. However, the rate control benchmark algorithm of HEVC ignores subjective visual perception. For key focus regions, bit allocation of LCU is not ideal and subjective quality is unsatisfied. In this paper, a visual perception based rate control algorithm for HEVC is proposed. First bit allocation weight of LCU level is optimized based on the visual perception of luminance and motion to ameliorate video subjective quality. Then λ and QP are adjusted in combination with the bit allocation weight to improve rate distortion performance. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm reduces average 0.5% BD-BR and maximum 1.09% BD-BR at no cost in bitrate accuracy compared with HEVC (HM15.0). The proposed algorithm devotes to improving video subjective quality under various video applications.

  14. Exercise, Insulin Absorption Rates, and Artificial Pancreas Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Spencer; Hinshaw, Ling; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by an inability of a person to endogenously produce the hormone insulin. Because of this, insulin must be injected - usually subcutaneously. The size of the injected dose and the rate at which the dose reaches the circulatory system have a profound effect on the ability to control glucose excursions, and therefore control of diabetes. However, insulin absorption rates via subcutaneous injection are variable and depend on a number of factors including tissue perfusion, physical activity (vasodilation, increased capillary throughput), and other tissue geometric and physical properties. Exercise may also have a sizeable effect on the rate of insulin absorption, which can potentially lead to dangerous glucose levels. Insulin-dosing algorithms, as implemented in an artificial pancreas controller, should account accurately for absorption rate variability and exercise effects on insulin absorption. The aforementioned factors affecting insulin absorption will be discussed within the context of both fluid mechanics and data driven modeling approaches.

  15. Control of the Protein Turnover Rates in Lemna minor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewavas, A.

    1972-01-01

    The control of protein turnover in Lemna minor has been examined using a method described in the previous paper for determining the rate constants of synthesis and degradation of protein. If Lemna is placed on water, there is a reduction in the rate constants of synthesis of protein and an increase (3- to 6-fold) in the rate constant of degradation. The net effect is a loss of protein from the tissue. Omission of nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, magnesium, or calcium results in increases in the rate constant of degradation of protein. An unusual dual effect of benzyladenine on the turnover constants has been observed. Treatment of Lemna grown on sucrose-mineral salts with benzyladenine results in alterations only in the rate constant of synthesis. Treatment of Lemna grown on water with benzyladenine alters only the rate constant of degradation. Abscisic acid on the other hand alters both rate constants of synthesis and degradation of protein together. Inclusion of growth-inhibiting amino acids in the medium results in a reduction in the rate constants of synthesis and increases in the rate constant of degradation of protein. It is concluded that the rate of turnover of protein in Lemna is very dependent on the composition of the growth medium. Conditions which reduce growth rates also reduce the rates of synthesis of protein and increase those of degradation. PMID:16657895

  16. Pretreatment Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict Biochemical Tumor Control in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Combination Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, Nadeem; Afaq, Asim; Akin, Oguz; Pei Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Hricak, Hedvig; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of endorectal coil magenetic resonance imaging (eMRI) in predicting biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2008, 279 men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer underwent eMRI of their prostate before receiving brachytherapy and supplemental intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed before treatment and retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists experienced in genitourinary MRI. Image-based variables, including tumor diameter, location, number of sextants involved, and the presence of extracapsular extension (ECE), were incorporated with other established clinical variables to predict biochemical control outcomes. The median follow-up was 49 months (range, 1–13 years). Results: The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival for the cohort was 92%. Clinical findings predicting recurrence on univariate analysis included Gleason score (hazard ratio [HR] 3.6, p = 0.001), PSA (HR 1.04, p = 0.005), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (HR 4.1, p = 0.002). Clinical T stage and the use of androgen deprivation therapy were not correlated with biochemical failure. Imaging findings on univariate analysis associated with relapse included ECE on MRI (HR 3.79, p = 0.003), tumor size (HR 2.58, p = 0.04), and T stage (HR 1.71, p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis incorporating both clinical and imaging findings, only ECE on MRI and Gleason score were independent predictors of recurrence. Conclusions: Pretreatment eMRI findings predict for biochemical recurrence in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Gleason score and the presence of ECE on MRI were the only significant predictors of biochemical relapse in this group of patients.

  17. Rate-Based Model Predictive Control of Turbofan Engine Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    An innovative model predictive control strategy is developed for control of nonlinear aircraft propulsion systems and sub-systems. At the heart of the controller is a rate-based linear parameter-varying model that propagates the state derivatives across the prediction horizon, extending prediction fidelity to transient regimes where conventional models begin to lose validity. The new control law is applied to a demanding active clearance control application, where the objectives are to tightly regulate blade tip clearances and also anticipate and avoid detrimental blade-shroud rub occurrences by optimally maintaining a predefined minimum clearance. Simulation results verify that the rate-based controller is capable of satisfying the objectives during realistic flight scenarios where both a conventional Jacobian-based model predictive control law and an unconstrained linear-quadratic optimal controller are incapable of doing so. The controller is evaluated using a variety of different actuators, illustrating the efficacy and versatility of the control approach. It is concluded that the new strategy has promise for this and other nonlinear aerospace applications that place high importance on the attainment of control objectives during transient regimes.

  18. Dynamics of biochemical components, lipid classes and energy values on gonadal development of R. philippinarum associated with the temperature and ingestion rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Reiriz, M J; Pérez-Camacho, A; Delgado, M; Labarta, U

    2007-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of temperature, coupled with ingestion rate, on the dynamics of biochemical components and lipid classes in R. philippinarum. The data are discussed with regard to sexual development and energy balance. Experimental protocol developed in the present study used two groups of the clam R. philippinarum: L (temperatures of 14 degrees C and 18 degrees C) and H (temperatures of 18 degrees C and 22 degrees C). The intra-group ingestion level was similar, although the ingestion level of the clams in the group H was 2.4 times higher than group L. We observed that R. philippinarum conditioned at 18 degrees C (18L) shows higher protein content, furthermore an important loss of organic weight was observed after 48 days. In such a situation, the clams use their own reserves (carbohydrates and glycogen) for sexual development while in situations without food stress (positive energy balance) and low temperature (14 degrees C) an accumulation of reserves is produced. Strikingly dissimilar behaviour in biochemical composition was observed for the 18H and 22H treatments, both with a positive energy balance. Despite similar protein content, the highest levels of carbohydrates were observed at the lower temperature (18 degrees C). Glycogen was also higher for the 18 degrees C treatment, although the differences were significant only in the males. Although the total lipids in R. philippinarum showed no significant differences in any treatment, they became apparent and related to sex when considering the individual lipid classes. There was no variation in lipid classes in the males between the 14L and 22H treatments despite the large disparity in the degree of sexual development. However, in the females significant differences in lipid classes (phospholipids, triglycerides) were observed. The results of this study show that a positive energy balance permits R. philippinarum gonadal development and accumulation of reserves both in low and high temperature

  19. Cellular and biochemical responses of the oyster Crassostrea gigas to controlled exposures to metals and Alexandrium minutum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, Hansy; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France); Quéré, Claudie [IFREMER Centre de Brest, Laboratoire de Physiologie des Invertébrés, Unité Physiologie Fonctionnelle des Organismes Marins, BP 70, 29280 Plouzané (France); Bruneau, Audrey; Riso, Ricardo; Auffret, Michel [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France); Soudant, Philippe, E-mail: Philippe.Soudant@univ-brest.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: •Oysters, C. gigas, were exposed to both metals and PST-producer A. minutum. •Oysters exposed to metals accumulated about thirty-six times less PSTs. •Exposure to both metals and A. minutum induced antagonistic or synergetic effects. -- Abstract: Effects of simultaneous exposure of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, to both a harmful dinoflagellate that produces Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST), Alexandrium minutum, and cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu), were assessed. Oysters were exposed to a mix of Cd–Cu with two different diets (i.e. A. minutum or Tisochrysis lutea) and compared to control oysters fed A. minutum or T. lutea, respectively, without metal addition. Metals and PST accumulations, digestive gland lipid composition, and cellular and biochemical hemolymph variables were measured after 4 days of exposure. Oysters exposed to Cd–Cu accumulated about thirty-six times less PSTs than oysters exposed to A. minutum alone. Exposure to Cd–Cu induced significant changes in neutral lipids (increase in diacylglycerol – DAG – and decrease in sterols) and phospholipids (decreases in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and ceramide aminoethylphosphonate) of digestive gland suggesting that lipid metabolism disruptions and/or lipid peroxidation have occurred. Simultaneously, concentrations, percentages of dead cells and phenoloxidase activity of hemocytes increased in oysters exposed to metals while reactive oxygen species production of hemocytes decreased. Feeding on the harmful dinoflagellate A. minutum resulted in significant decreases in monoacylglycerol (MAG) and DAG and ether glycerides (EG), as well as significant increases in hemocyte concentration and phagocytic activity as compared to oysters fed T. lutea. Finally, the present study revealed that short-term, simultaneous exposure to Cd–Cu and A. minutum may induce antagonistic (i.e. hemocyte concentration and phagocytosis) or synergic (i.e. DAG content in

  20. Persistent negative illness perceptions despite long-term biochemical control of acromegaly: novel application of the drawing test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemensma, Jitske; Pereira, Alberto M; Romijn, Johannes A; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Biermasz, Nienke R; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2015-05-01

    Patients with acromegaly have persistent complaints despite long-term biochemical control. Drawings can be used to assess patients' perceptions about their disease. We aimed to explore the utility of the drawing test and its relation to illness perceptions and quality of life (QoL) in patients after long-term remission of acromegaly. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the utility of the drawing test. A total of 50 patients after long-term remission (mean±s.e.m., 16±1.2 years) of acromegaly were included in this study. Patients completed the drawing test (two retrospective drawings of their body perception before acromegaly and during the active phase of acromegaly, and one drawing on the current condition after long-term remission), Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, Physical Symptom Checklist, EuroQoL-5D, and AcroQoL. Patients perceived a dramatic change in body size during the active state of the disease compared with the healthy state before the awareness of acromegaly. Patients reported that their body did not completely return to the original proportions after long-term remission. In addition, larger drawings indicated more negative consequences (Pdrawings also indicated more impaired QoL, especially disease-specific QoL (all Pdrawing test, illness perceptions, and QoL. The drawing test appears to be a novel and relatively easy tool to assess the perception of patients after long-term remission of acromegaly. The assessment of drawings may enable health care providers to appreciate the perceptions of patients with long-term remission of acromegaly, and enable discussion of symptoms and remission. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  1. Does runoff or temperature control chemical weathering rates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiriksdottir, Eydis Salome; Gislason, Sigurdur Reynir; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The rate chemical weathering is affected by both temperature and runoff. Separating out these two factors is challenging because runoff tends to increase with increasing temperature. → In this study, natural river water samples collected on basaltic catchments over a five year period are used together with experimentally derived dissolution rate model for basaltic glass to pull apart the effects of runoff and temperature. → This study shows that the rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff, but is dominated by runoff. - Abstract: The rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff. The relative role of these two factors in the rivers of NE Iceland is determined through the rigorous analysis of their water chemistry over a 5-a period. River catchments are taken to be analogous to laboratory flow reactors; like the fluid in flow reactors, the loss of each dissolved element in river water is the sum of that of the original rainwater plus that added from kinetically controlled dissolution and precipitation reactions. Consideration of the laboratory determined dissolution rate behaviour of basalts and measured water chemistry indicates that the maximum effect of changing temperature on chemical denudation in the NE Icelandic rivers was 5-25% of the total change, whereas that of runoff was 75-95%. The bulk of the increased denudation rates with runoff appear to stem from an increase in reactive surface area for chemical weathering of catchment solids.

  2. Improved Bit Rate Control for Real-Time MPEG Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranata Sugiri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The alteration of compressed video bitstream due to embedding of digital watermark tends to produce unpredictable video bit rate variations which may in turn lead to video playback buffer overflow/underflow or transmission bandwidth violation problems. This paper presents a novel bit rate control technique for real-time MPEG watermarking applications. In our experiments, spread spectrum watermarks are embedded in the quantized DCT domain without requantization and motion reestimation to achieve fast watermarking. The proposed bit rate control scheme evaluates the combined bit lengths of a set of multiple watermarked VLC codewords, and successively replaces watermarked VLC codewords having the largest increase in bit length with their corresponding unmarked VLC codewords until a target bit length is achieved. The proposed method offers flexibility and scalability, which are neglected by similar works reported in the literature. Experimental results show that the proposed bit rate control scheme is effective in meeting the bit rate targets and capable of improving the watermark detection robustness for different video contents compressed at different bit rates.

  3. State estimation for networked control systems using fixed data rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Quan; Jin, Fang

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates state estimation for linear time-invariant systems where sensors and controllers are geographically separated and connected via a bandwidth-limited and errorless communication channel with the fixed data rate. All plant states are quantised, coded and converted together into a codeword in our quantisation and coding scheme. We present necessary and sufficient conditions on the fixed data rate for observability of such systems, and further develop the data-rate theorem. It is shown in our results that there exists a quantisation and coding scheme to ensure observability of the system if the fixed data rate is larger than the lower bound given, which is less conservative than the one in the literature. Furthermore, we also examine the role that the disturbances have on the state estimation problem in the case with data-rate limitations. Illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Parallel efficient rate control methods for JPEG 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-del-Amor, Miguel Á.; Bruns, Volker; Sparenberg, Heiko

    2017-09-01

    Since the introduction of JPEG 2000, several rate control methods have been proposed. Among them, post-compression rate-distortion optimization (PCRD-Opt) is the most widely used, and the one recommended by the standard. The approach followed by this method is to first compress the entire image split in code blocks, and subsequently, optimally truncate the set of generated bit streams according to the maximum target bit rate constraint. The literature proposes various strategies on how to estimate ahead of time where a block will get truncated in order to stop the execution prematurely and save time. However, none of them have been defined bearing in mind a parallel implementation. Today, multi-core and many-core architectures are becoming popular for JPEG 2000 codecs implementations. Therefore, in this paper, we analyze how some techniques for efficient rate control can be deployed in GPUs. In order to do that, the design of our GPU-based codec is extended, allowing stopping the process at a given point. This extension also harnesses a higher level of parallelism on the GPU, leading to up to 40% of speedup with 4K test material on a Titan X. In a second step, three selected rate control methods are adapted and implemented in our parallel encoder. A comparison is then carried out, and used to select the best candidate to be deployed in a GPU encoder, which gave an extra 40% of speedup in those situations where it was really employed.

  5. Efficient rate control scheme using modified inter-layer dependency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The IRC from the prior art is modified to achieve better rate control per layer by recursive updates for mean absolute difference values of eachbasic unit. Proposed modified inter-layer dependency shows improvement in the PSNR for enhancement layers while the updated IRC enforces better IRC for all the layers.

  6. Monotonicity of fitness landscapes and mutation rate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavkin, Roman V; Channon, Alastair; Aston, Elizabeth; Aston, John; Krašovec, Rok; Knight, Christopher G

    2016-12-01

    A common view in evolutionary biology is that mutation rates are minimised. However, studies in combinatorial optimisation and search have shown a clear advantage of using variable mutation rates as a control parameter to optimise the performance of evolutionary algorithms. Much biological theory in this area is based on Ronald Fisher's work, who used Euclidean geometry to study the relation between mutation size and expected fitness of the offspring in infinite phenotypic spaces. Here we reconsider this theory based on the alternative geometry of discrete and finite spaces of DNA sequences. First, we consider the geometric case of fitness being isomorphic to distance from an optimum, and show how problems of optimal mutation rate control can be solved exactly or approximately depending on additional constraints of the problem. Then we consider the general case of fitness communicating only partial information about the distance. We define weak monotonicity of fitness landscapes and prove that this property holds in all landscapes that are continuous and open at the optimum. This theoretical result motivates our hypothesis that optimal mutation rate functions in such landscapes will increase when fitness decreases in some neighbourhood of an optimum, resembling the control functions derived in the geometric case. We test this hypothesis experimentally by analysing approximately optimal mutation rate control functions in 115 complete landscapes of binding scores between DNA sequences and transcription factors. Our findings support the hypothesis and find that the increase of mutation rate is more rapid in landscapes that are less monotonic (more rugged). We discuss the relevance of these findings to living organisms.

  7. Leak-rate qualification of the FFTF control area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, M.P.; Swenson, L.D.

    1983-06-01

    Positive experience with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Control Area boundary has demonstrated that strigent requirements for reactor control room leak-tightness can be met and maintained. Guidance contained in 10CFR50, Appendix A, Criteria 4 and 19, and Regulatory Guides 1.78 and 1.95 provided criteria for control room habitability, to provide safe, central control of the FFTF plant under normal and accident conditions. A leak rate criterion of 178 scfm for the approximate 53,000 cu. ft. Volume of the Control Area was established for the limiting condition of airborne sodium oxide aerosols from a postulated fire in one of the three secondary sodium loops. Numerous tests utilizing a variety of leak identification techniques were conducted

  8. Re-analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziaja, Ellen L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Hollander, Jay; Matter, Richard C.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate specific antigen (PSA) has been established as the most important prognostic factor for prostate cancer. We reviewed our experience treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to evaluate if previously defined clinical and treatment related prognostic factors remain valid when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Methods and Materials: Between 1/87 and 12/91, 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58 - 70.4 Gy) using a 4 field or arc technique. Pre- and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤ 1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment completion. After achieving nadir, if 2 consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Patients (pts) were divided into 3 groups according to total number of days on treatment: ≤ 49 days (≤ 7 weeks)- 21 pts; 50-63 days (8-9 weeks)- 429 pts; and ≥ 64 days (≥ 9 weeks)- 15 pts. Patients were also divided into groups with respect to the method of diagnosis: TURP (81 pts), or other means (399 pts). Patients were further divided into 2 groups: 1) if they had ever had a pre-treatment TURP (170 pts) or 2) if they had not (310 pts). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to boost technique: bilateral arcs (459 pts) or 4 field box (21 pts). Patients were also divided into groups according to total RT dose: ≤ 70 Gy (421 pts) or > 70 Gy (59 pts). Patients were further subdivided into 3 dose groups: 70 Gy (59 pts). Results: Median follow-up is 48 months (range 3 - 112 months). No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), or treatment time divided into

  9. Controlled rate cooling of fungi using a stirling cycle freezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew J; Kasulyte-Creasey, Daiva; Kermode, Anthony; San, Shwe Phue; Buddie, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    The use of a Stirling cycle freezer for cryopreservation is considered to have significant advantages over traditional methodologies including N2 free operation, application of low cooling rates, reduction of sample contamination risks and control of ice nucleation. The study assesses the suitability of an 'N2-free' Stirling Cycle controlled rate freezer for fungi cryopreservation. In total, 77 fungi representing a broad taxonomic coverage were cooled using the N2 free cooler following a cooling rate of -1 degrees C min(-1). Of these, 15 strains were also cryopreserved using a traditional 'N2 gas chamber' controlled rate cooler and a comparison of culture morphology and genomic stability against non-cryopreserved starter cultures was undertaken. In total of 75 fungi survived cryopreservation, only a recalcitrant Basidiomycete and filamentous Chromist failed to survive. No changes were detected in genomic profile after preservation, suggesting that genomic function is not adversely compromised as a result of using 'N2 free' cooling. The results demonstrate the potential of 'N2-free' cooling for the routine cryopreservation of fungi in Biological Resource Centres.

  10. Fumigant dosages below maximum label rate control some soilborne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachaf Triky-Dotan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The activity of commercial soil fumigants on some key soilborne pathogens was assessed in sandy loam soil under controlled conditions. Seven soil fumigants that are registered in California or are being or have been considered for registration were used in this study: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS mixed with chloropicrin (Pic (79% DMDS and 21% Pic, Tri-Con (50% methyl bromide and 50% Pic, Midas Gold (33% methyl iodide [MI] and 67% Pic, Midas Bronze (50% MI and 50% Pic, Midas (MI, active ingredient [a.i.] 97.8%, Pic (a.i. 99% trichloronitromethane and Pic-Clor 60 (57% Pic and 37% 1,3-dichloropropene [1–3,D]. Dose-response models were calculated for pathogen mortality after 24 hours of exposure to fumigants. Overall, the tested fumigants achieved good efficacy with dosages below the maximum label rate against the tested pathogens. In this study, Pythium ultimum and citrus nematode were sensitive to all the fumigants and Verticillium dahliae was resistant. For most fumigants, California regulations restrict application rates to less than the maximum (federal label rate, meaning that it is possible that the fumigants may not control major plant pathogens. This research provides information on the effectiveness of these alternatives at these lower application rates. The results from this study will help growers optimize application rates for registered fumigants (such as Pic and 1,3-D and will help accelerate the adoption of new fumigants (such as DMDS if they are registered in California.

  11. Enzyme and biochemical producing fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Lübeck, Mette; Nilsson, Lena

    2010-01-01

    factories for sustainable production of important molecules. For developing fungi into efficient cell factories, the project includes identification of important factors that control the flux through the pathways using metabolic flux analysis and metabolic engineering of biochemical pathways....

  12. POLYMORPHISM AT THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER - EFFECTS OF REARING TEMPERATURE ON DEVELOPMENTAL RATE, BODY-WEIGHT, AND SOME BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    The role of developmental time in the world-wide cline of Adh and alpha-Gpdh allele frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster, and the relationship with weight and some biochemical characters, were investigated. Experimental strains were constructed with different combinations of Adh and alpha-Gpdh

  13. Speech rate in Parkinson's disease: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, F; Meilán, J J G; Carro, J; Gómez Íñiguez, C; Millian-Morell, L; Pujante Valverde, I M; López-Alburquerque, T; López, D E

    2016-09-01

    Speech disturbances will affect most patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) over the course of the disease. The origin and severity of these symptoms are of clinical and diagnostic interest. To evaluate the clinical pattern of speech impairment in PD patients and identify significant differences in speech rate and articulation compared to control subjects. Speech rate and articulation in a reading task were measured using an automatic analytical method. A total of 39 PD patients in the 'on' state and 45 age-and sex-matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. None of the patients experienced dyskinesias or motor fluctuations during the test. The patients with PD displayed a significant reduction in speech and articulation rates; there were no significant correlations between the studied speech parameters and patient characteristics such as L-dopa dose, duration of the disorder, age, and UPDRS III scores and Hoehn & Yahr scales. Patients with PD show a characteristic pattern of declining speech rate. These results suggest that in PD, disfluencies are the result of the movement disorder affecting the physiology of speech production systems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulating carbon dioxide exchange rates of deciduous tree species: evidence for a general pattern in biochemical changes and water stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert F; Bauerle, William L; Wang, Ying

    2009-09-01

    Deciduous trees have a seasonal carbon dioxide exchange pattern that is attributed to changes in leaf biochemical properties. However, it is not known if the pattern in leaf biochemical properties - maximum Rubisco carboxylation (V(cmax)) and electron transport (J(max)) - differ between species. This study explored whether a general pattern of changes in V(cmax), J(max), and a standardized soil moisture response accounted for carbon dioxide exchange of deciduous trees throughout the growing season. The model MAESTRA was used to examine V(cmax) and J(max) of leaves of five deciduous trees, Acer rubrum 'Summer Red', Betula nigra, Quercus nuttallii, Quercus phellos and Paulownia elongata, and their response to soil moisture. MAESTRA was parameterized using data from in situ measurements on organs. Linking the changes in biochemical properties of leaves to the whole tree, MAESTRA integrated the general pattern in V(cmax) and J(max) from gas exchange parameters of leaves with a standardized soil moisture response to describe carbon dioxide exchange throughout the growing season. The model estimates were tested against measurements made on the five species under both irrigated and water-stressed conditions. Measurements and modelling demonstrate that the seasonal pattern of biochemical activity in leaves and soil moisture response can be parameterized with straightforward general relationships. Over the course of the season, differences in carbon exchange between measured and modelled values were within 6-12 % under well-watered conditions and 2-25 % under water stress conditions. Hence, a generalized seasonal pattern in the leaf-level physiological change of V(cmax) and J(max), and a standardized response to soil moisture was sufficient to parameterize carbon dioxide exchange for large-scale evaluations. Simplification in parameterization of the seasonal pattern of leaf biochemical activity and soil moisture response of deciduous forest species is demonstrated. This

  15. Polymer degradation rate control of hybrid rocket combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D. B.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1970-01-01

    Polymer degradation to small fragments is treated as a rate controlling step in hybrid rocket combustion. Both numerical and approximate analytical solutions of the complete energy and polymer chain bond conservation equations for the condensed phase are obtained. Comparison with inert atmosphere data is very good. It is found that the intersect of curves of pyrolysis rate versus interface temperature for hybrid combustors, with the thermal degradation theory, falls at a pyrolysis rate very close to that for which a pressure dependence begins to be observable. Since simple thermal degradation cannot give sufficient depolymerization at higher pyrolysis rates, it is suggested that oxidative catalysis of the process occurs at the surface, giving a first order dependence on reactive species concentration at the wall. Estimates of the ratio of this activation energy and interface temperature are in agreement with best fit procedures for hybrid combustion data. Requisite active species concentrations and flux are shown to be compatible with turbulent transport. Pressure dependence of hybrid rocket fuel regression rate is thus shown to be describable in a consistent manner in terms of reactive species catalysis of polymer degradation.

  16. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F Henríquez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW. A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT and eight moderately trained (MT, who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s, and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1 analysis of heart rate variability (HRV, using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s. Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05 and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05 and SD145-60s (p <0.05. The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW.

  17. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbines with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. The contingency control involves de-rating the generator operating point to achieve reduced loads on the wind turbine. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  18. Synchronous temperature rate control for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2015-09-22

    Methods of operation for refrigerator appliance configurations with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The methods may include synchronizing alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system. The methods may also include controlling the cooling rate in one or both compartments. Refrigeration compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its lower threshold temperature. Freezer compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its upper threshold temperature.

  19. Synchronous temperature rate control for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2017-11-07

    Methods of operation for refrigerator appliance configurations with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The methods may include synchronizing alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system. The methods may also include controlling the cooling rate in one or both compartments. Refrigeration compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its lower threshold temperature. Freezer compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its upper threshold temperature.

  20. Pharmacologic Rhythm Control versus Rate Control in Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Gladys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with atrial fibrillation (AF is correlated with worse prognosis requiring special approach.Rate control has been the first line of treatment in cases of HF and HF. On the other hand, rhythm controlhas been proven to be effective in returning sinus rhythm resulting in better prognosis for patients with HFbut not HF. Its role in cocurring cases of HF and AF is not fully understood. Thus, this study aims to analysewhether pharmacologic rhythm control can be applied to cases of HF and AF to reduce mortality. A searchwas conducted via PubMed, Medline, ProQuest, and Cochrane Database on January 2016. One study wasselected after filtering process by inclusion and exclusion criteria and critical appraisal was performed. It wasfound that there was rhythm control and rate control do no have favouring effect towards mortality shown byRR 1.03 (95% CI 0.90-1.17, p=0.69. Rate control has protective effect towards hospitalizations by RR of 0.92(95% CI 0.86 – 0.98, p=0.008, NNT=19. To conclude, rhythm control is not superior to rate control in reducingmortality and rate control should be still be considered as first line treatment of HF and AF. Keywords: heart failure, pharmacologic rhythm control, rate control, atrial fibrillation   Farmakologis Rhythm Control Dibandingkan dengan Rate Control padaKasus Gagal Jantung dan Atrial Fibrilasi Abstrak Gagal jantung dengan atrial fibrilasi berhubungan dengan prognosis yang lebih buruk dan membutuhkanpenanganan khusus. Saat ini strategi rate control merupakan terapi lini pertama pada kasus gagal jantungdan atrial fibrilasi. Rhythm control memberikan prognosis yang lebih baik pada pasien gagal jantung denganmengembalikan sinus ritme. Kegunaan rhythm control pada kasus gagal jantung dan atrial fibrilasi sampaisaat ini belum sepenuhnya dimengerti. Tujuan studi ini adalah menelaah apakah terapi farmakologis rhythmcontrol dapat menurunkan mortalitas gagal jantung dan atrial fibrilasi. Pencarian data

  1. Optimal control of arrival and service rates in tandem queues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, M.S.

    1995-08-01

    We consider n M/M/1 queues in series. At queue one the arrival and service rates are chosen in pair from a finite set whenever there are arrivals or service completions at any queue. Customers arriving to queue L (L=1,2,...,n-1) must go on to queue L+1 after finishing service at server L. Customers arriving to queue n leave the system after finishing service at the last server. At queues 2 to n arrival and service rates are fixed. The objective is to minimize the expected discounted cost of the system over finite and infinite horizons. We show that the optimal policy is of threshold type. In order to establish the result, we formulate the optimal control problem as a Linear Programming. (author). 9 refs

  2. Biochemical Frequency Control by Synchronisation of Coupled Repressilators: An In Silico Study of Modules for Circadian Clock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, Thomas; Schumann, Mathias; Bodenstein, Christian; Heiland, Ines; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Exploration of chronobiological systems emerges as a growing research field within bioinformatics focusing on various applications in medicine, agriculture, and material sciences. From a systems biological perspective, the question arises whether biological control systems for regulation of oscillatory signals and their technical counterparts utilise similar mechanisms. If so, modelling approaches and parameterisation adopted from building blocks can help to identify general components for frequency control in circadian clocks along with gaining insight into mechanisms of clock synchronisation to external stimuli like the daily rhythm of sunlight and darkness. Phase-locked loops could be an interesting candidate in this context. Both, biology and engineering, can benefit from a unified view resulting from systems modularisation. In a first experimental study, we analyse a model of coupled repressilators. We demonstrate its ability to synchronise clock signals in a monofrequential manner. Several oscillators initially deviate in phase difference and frequency with respect to explicit reaction and diffusion rates. Accordingly, the duration of the synchronisation process depends on dedicated reaction and diffusion parameters whose settings still lack to be sufficiently captured analytically. PMID:22046179

  3. A case-control analysis of common variants in GIP with type 2 diabetes and related biochemical parameters in a South Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Harish

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP is one of the incretins, which plays a crucial role in the secretion of insulin upon food stimulus and in the regulation of postprandial glucose level. It also exerts an effect on the synthesis and secretion of lipoprotein lipase, from adipocytes, important for lipid metabolism. The aim of our study was to do a case-control association analysis of common variants in GIP in association with type 2 diabetes and related biochemical parameters. Method A total of 2000 subjects which includes 1000 (584M/416F cases with type 2 diabetes and 1000 (470M/530F normoglycemic control subjects belonging to Dravidian ethnicity from South India were recruited to assess the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in GIP (rs2291725, rs2291726, rs937301 on type 2 diabetes in a case-control manner. The SNPs were genotyped by using tetra primer amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (ARMS PCR. For statistical analysis, our study population was divided into sub-groups based on gender (male and female. Association analysis was carried out using chi-squared test and the comparison of biochemical parameters among the three genotypes were performed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Result Initial analysis revealed that, out of the total three SNPs selected for the present study, two SNPs namely rs2291726 and rs937301 were in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD with each other. Therefore, only two SNPs, rs2291725 and rs2291726, were genotyped for the association studies. No significant difference in the allele frequency and genotype distribution of any of the SNPs in GIP were observed between cases and controls (P > 0.05. Analysis of biochemical parameters among the three genotypes showed a significant association of total cholesterol (P = 0.042 and low density lipoprotein (LDL with the G allele of the SNP rs2291726 in GIP (P = 0.004, but this was observed only in the case of female

  4. Choice and Outcomes of Rate Control versus Rhythm Control in Elderly Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paciullo, Francesco; Proietti, Marco; Bianconi, Vanessa

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among rate-control or rhythm-control strategies, there is conflicting evidence as to which is the best management approach for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) in elderly patients. DESIGN: We performed an ancillary analysis from the 'Registro Politerapie SIMI' study, enrolling el...

  5. On the design of multi-rate tracking controllers : application to rotorcraft guidance and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerreiro Tome Antunes, D.J.; Silvestre, C.J.; Cunha, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the design and implementation of gain-scheduled controllers for multi-rate systems. The proposed methodology provides a natural way to address the integrated guidance and control problem for autonomous vehicles when the outputs are sampled at different

  6. Unsteady Flows Control Hydrologic Turnover Rates in Antarctic Hyporheic Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlostowski, A. N.; Gooseff, M. N.; McKnight, D. M.; Lyons, W. B.; Saelens, E.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrologic turnover of the hyporheic zone (HZ) is the process of HZ flowpaths receiving water and solutes from the stream channel while simultaneously contributing water and solutes from the HZ back to the stream channel. The influence of hydrologic turnover on HZ solute storage depends on the relative magnitude of hyporheic exchange rates (i.e. physical transport) and biogeochemical reaction rates. Because both exchange rates and reaction rates are unsteady in natural systems, the availability of solutes in the HZ is controlled by the legacy of hydraulic and biological conditions. In this study, we quantify the influence of unsteady flows on hydrologic turnover of the HZ. We study a glacial melt stream in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica (MDVs). The MDVs provide an ideal setting for investigating hydrologic and chemical storage characteristics of HZs, because nearly all streamflow is generated from glacier melt and the HZ is vertically bounded by continuous permafrost. A dense network of shallow groundwater wells and piezometers was installed along a 60-meter reach of Von Guerard Stream. 12 days of continuous water level data in each well was used to compute the magnitude and direction of 2D hydraulic gradients between the stream channel and lateral hyporheic aquifer. Piezometers were sampled daily for stable isotope abundances. The direction and magnitude of the cross-valley (CV), perpendicular to the thalweg, component of hydraulic gradients is sensitive to daily flood events and exhibits significant spatial heterogeneity. CV gradients are consistently oriented from the hyporheic aquifer towards the stream channel on 2 sections of the study reach, whereas CV gradients are consistently oriented from the stream channel towards the hyporheic aquifer on 1 section. Three sections show diel changes in orientation of CV gradients, coincident with the passage of daily flood events. During a 4-day period of low flows, the HZ is isotopically distinct from the stream

  7. Rate control and quality assurance during rhythmic force tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Ya; Su, Jyong-Huei; Hwang, Ing-Shiou

    2014-02-01

    Movement characteristics can be coded in the single neurons or in the summed activity of neural populations. However, whether neural oscillations are conditional to the frequency demand and task quality of rhythmic force regulation is still unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate EEG dynamics and behavior correlates during force-tracking at different target rates. Fourteen healthy volunteers conducted load-varying isometric abduction of the index finger by coupling the force output to sinusoidal targets at 0.5 Hz, 1.0 Hz, and 2.0 Hz. Our results showed that frequency demand significantly affected EEG delta oscillation (1-4 Hz) in the C3, CP3, CPz, and CP4 electrodes, with the greatest delta power and lowest delta peak around 1.5 Hz for slower tracking at 0.5 Hz. Those who had superior tracking congruency also manifested enhanced alpha oscillation (8-12 Hz). Alpha rhythms of the skilled performers during slow tracking spread through the whole target cycle, except for the phase of direction changes. However, the alpha rhythms centered at the mid phase of a target cycle with increasing target rate. In conclusion, our findings clearly suggest two advanced roles of cortical oscillation in rhythmic force regulation. Rate-dependent delta oscillation involves a paradigm shift in force control under different time scales. Phasic organization of alpha rhythms during rhythmic force tracking is related to behavioral success underlying the selective use of bimodal controls (feedback and feedforward processes) and the timing of attentional focus on the target's peak velocity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The single-process biochemical reaction of Rubisco: a unified theory and model with the effects of irradiance, CO₂ and rate-limiting step on the kinetics of C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis from gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazdaghi, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the origin of oxygenic life on the planet, and its models are the core of all models of plant biology, agriculture, environmental quality and global climate change. A theory is presented here, based on single process biochemical reactions of Rubisco, recognizing that: In the light, Rubisco activase helps separate Rubisco from the stored ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), activates Rubisco with carbamylation and addition of Mg²(+), and then produces two products, in two steps: (Step 1) Reaction of Rubisco with RuBP produces a Rubisco-enediol complex, which is the carboxylase-oxygenase enzyme (Enco) and (Step 2) Enco captures CO₂ and/or O₂ and produces intermediate products leading to production and release of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) and Rubisco. PGA interactively controls (1) the carboxylation-oxygenation, (2) electron transport, and (3) triosephosphate pathway of the Calvin-Benson cycle that leads to the release of glucose and regeneration of RuBP. Initially, the total enzyme participates in the two steps of the reaction transitionally and its rate follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. But, for a continuous steady state, Rubisco must be divided into two concurrently active segments for the two steps. This causes a deviation of the steady state from the transitional rate. Kinetic models are developed that integrate the transitional and the steady state reactions. They are tested and successfully validated with verifiable experimental data. The single-process theory is compared to the widely used two-process theory of Farquhar et al. (1980. Planta 149, 78-90), which assumes that the carboxylation rate is either Rubisco-limited at low CO₂ levels such as CO₂ compensation point, or RuBP regeneration-limited at high CO₂. Since the photosynthesis rate cannot increase beyond the two-process theory's Rubisco limit at the CO₂ compensation point, net photosynthesis cannot increase above zero in daylight, and since there is always respiration at

  9. Split-face histological and biochemical evaluation of tightening efficacy using temperature- and impedance-controlled continuous non-invasive radiofrequency energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisnic, Sylvie; Divaris, Marc; Branchet, Marie-Christine; Nelson, Andrew A

    2017-06-01

    Bipolar radiofrequency (RF) is capable of heating dermal collagen fibers and inducing skin tightening by collagen remodeling. To substantiate safety and improvement of skin laxity following skin heating with a novel temperature- and impedance-controlled non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) device by histological and biochemical evaluations. A split-face study was performed on 4 subjects who underwent 8 weekly RF sessions on one side of their face, leaving the other side an untreated control and then underwent facelift procedure. Clinical evaluation by photographs was done prior to the surgical procedure. Ex vivo fragments were harvested from both sides and compared. Morphometric analysis of dermal collagen fibers, collagen synthesis, and elastin synthesis evaluations were compared in triplicates. Facial skin tightening was apparent in split-face photographs. A significant increase of 7.9% in dermal collagen content, and a significant increase of 34.7% in collagen synthesis were demonstrated in the treated samples. No statistically significant effect on elastin synthesis was detected. Skin tightening following treatment with non-invasive RF has proven histologically and biochemically to derive from increase in dermal collagen synthesis and content.

  10. Geomorphic versus land use controls on suspended sediment rating curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, P.; Vaughan, A. A.; Fisher, A. C. N.

    2017-12-01

    The relation between river discharge (Q) and suspended sediment (SS) concentration reflects the degree to which sediment sources are accessed or depleted across the range of flow conditions. Increased availability of high resolution topography and land use data greatly enhance our ability to evaluate linkages between characteristics of these sediment rating curves (SRCs) and the geomorphic features that influence them. We evaluated Q-SS relations at 45 gages throughout Minnesota, USA representing a wide variety of landscape settings in terms of topography, land use, and geologic history. We characterized the SRCs according to the overall shape, steepness (exponent), vertical offset (coefficient) and SS concentration under low flow (90% exceedance) conditions. Rivers exhibited three distinct SRC shapes, simple power functions, threshold power functions and peaked power functions. We used random forest models to analyze relations between SRC parameters and attributes of the watershed as well as the near-channel environment. The model correctly classified 78% of SRC shapes and explained 60% of variance in the SRC exponent, 43% of the SRC coefficient for rising limb samples, and 45% of variance under low flow conditions. Notably, the random forest models predict that near-channel morphology predominately controls both the shape and steepness of the sediment rating curves. Land use predominately controls the vertical offset (coefficient) and SS concentration under low flow conditions. These findings suggest that land use and watershed restoration practices may have little capacity to alter the shape and steepness of these curves as these characteristics may be dictated by the geologic and geomorphic setting. Rather, human influences in the watershed may exhibit the greatest influence on suspended sediment concentrations at moderate to low flows. Criteria to evaluate improvements in water quality as a result of changes in land management might be most meaningful if they

  11. Electromagnetic application device for flow rate/flow speed control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Senji.

    1994-01-01

    Electric current and magnetic field are at first generated in a direction perpendicular to a flow channel of a fluid, and forces generated by electromagnetic interaction of the current and the magnetic field are combined and exerted on the fluid, to control the flow rate and the flow speed thereby decreasing flowing pressure loss. In addition, an electric current generation means and a magnetic field generation means integrated together are disposed to a structural component constituting the flow channel, and they are combined to attain the aimed effect. The current generating means forms a potential difference by supplying electric power to a pair of electrodes as a cathode and an anode by using structures disposed along the channel, to generate an electric field or electric current in a direction perpendicular to the flow channel. The magnetic field generating means forms a counter current (reciprocal current) by using structures disposed along the flow channel, to generate synthesized or emphasized magnetic field. The fluid can be applied with a force in the direction of the flowing direction by the electromagnetic interaction of the electric current and the magnetic field, thereby capable of propelling the fluid. Accordingly, the flowrate/flowing speed can be controlled inside of the flow channel and flowing pressure loss can be decreased. (N.H.)

  12. Control of the neutron detector count rate by optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquemore, A.L.; Johnson, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    The signal processing electronics used for the NE451 detectors on the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator are presently showing saturation effects at high counting rates equivalent to neutron yields of ∼10 16 n/s. While nonlinearity due to pulse pileup can be corrected for in most present TFTR experiments, additional steps are required for neutron source strengths above ∼3x10 16 n/s. These pulse pileup effects could be reduced by inserting sleeves in the collimator shielding to reduce the neutron flux in the vicinity of the detectors or by reducing the volume of detector exposed to the flux. We describe a novel method of avoiding saturation by optically controlling the number neutron events processed by the detector electronics. Because of the optical opacity of the ZnS-plastic detectors such as NE451, photons from a proton-recoil scintillation arise from a spatially localized area of the detector. By imaging a selected portion of the detector onto a photomultiplier, we reduce the effective volume of the detector in a controllable, reversible way. A prototype system, consisting of a focusing lens, a field lens, and a variable aperture, has been constructed. Results of laboratory feasibility tests are presented

  13. Rate control management of atrial fibrillation: may a mathematical model suggest an ideal heart rate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Anselmino

    Full Text Available Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF, clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation.The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively.Left ventricular pressure increased by 57%, from 33.92±37.56 mmHg to 53.15±47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27%, from 82.66±14.04 mmHg to 105.3±7.6 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45±8.50 to 39.09±8.08 mL, ejection fraction (from 61.10±4.40 to 39.32±5.42% and stroke work (SW, from 0.88±0.04 to 0.58±0.09 J decreased by 50, 36 and 34%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen consumption indexes (rate pressure product - RPP, tension time index per minute - TTI/min, and pressure volume area per minute - PVA/min increased from the 50 to the 130 bpm simulation, respectively, by 186% (from 5598±1939 to 15995±3219 mmHg/min, 56% (from 2094±265 to 3257±301 mmHg s/min and 102% (from 57.99±17.90 to 117.4±26.0 J/min. In fact, left ventricular efficiency (SW/PVA decreased from 80.91±2.91% at 50 bpm to 66.43±3.72% at the 130 bpm HR simulation.Awaiting compulsory direct clinical evidences, the present mathematical model suggests that lower HRs during permanent AF relates to improved hemodynamic parameters, cardiac efficiency, and lower oxygen consumption.

  14. Rate control management of atrial fibrillation: may a mathematical model suggest an ideal heart rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Scarsoglio, Stefania; Camporeale, Carlo; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF), clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR) to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation. The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively. Left ventricular pressure increased by 57%, from 33.92±37.56 mmHg to 53.15±47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27%, from 82.66±14.04 mmHg to 105.3±7.6 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45±8.50 to 39.09±8.08 mL), ejection fraction (from 61.10±4.40 to 39.32±5.42%) and stroke work (SW, from 0.88±0.04 to 0.58±0.09 J) decreased by 50, 36 and 34%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen consumption indexes (rate pressure product - RPP, tension time index per minute - TTI/min, and pressure volume area per minute - PVA/min) increased from the 50 to the 130 bpm simulation, respectively, by 186% (from 5598±1939 to 15995±3219 mmHg/min), 56% (from 2094±265 to 3257±301 mmHg s/min) and 102% (from 57.99±17.90 to 117.4±26.0 J/min). In fact, left ventricular efficiency (SW/PVA) decreased from 80.91±2.91% at 50 bpm to 66.43±3.72% at the 130 bpm HR simulation. Awaiting compulsory direct clinical evidences, the present mathematical model suggests that lower HRs during permanent AF relates to improved hemodynamic parameters, cardiac efficiency, and lower oxygen consumption.

  15. Evaluation of olibanum and its resin as rate controlling matrix for controlled release of diclofenac

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdary KPR; Mohapatra P; Murali Krishna M

    2006-01-01

    Olibanum and its resin and carbohydrate fractions were evaluated as rate controlling matrix materials in tablets for controlled release of diclofenac. Diclofenac matrix tablets were formulated employing olibanum and its resin and carbohydrate fractions in different concentrations and the tablets were evaluated for various tablet characters including drug release kinetics and mechanism. Olibanum and its resin component exhibited excellent retarding effect on drug release from the matrix tablet...

  16. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, Nathan; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores (≤6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and ≤6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  17. Tracking Control of Hysteretic Piezoelectric Actuator using Adaptive Rate-Dependent Controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, U-Xuan; Latt, Win Tun; Widjaja, Ferdinan; Shee, Cheng Yap; Riviere, Cameron N; Ang, Wei Tech

    2009-03-16

    With the increasing popularity of actuators involving smart materials like piezoelectric, control of such materials becomes important. The existence of the inherent hysteretic behavior hinders the tracking accuracy of the actuators. To make matters worse, the hysteretic behavior changes with rate. One of the suggested ways is to have a feedforward controller to linearize the relationship between the input and output. Thus, the hysteretic behavior of the actuator must first be modeled by sensing the relationship between the input voltage and output displacement. Unfortunately, the hysteretic behavior is dependent on individual actuator and also environmental conditions like temperature. It is troublesome and costly to model the hysteresis regularly. In addition, the hysteretic behavior of the actuators also changes with age. Most literature model the actuator using a cascade of rate-independent hysteresis operators and a dynamical system. However, the inertial dynamics of the structure is not the only contributing factor. A complete model will be complex. Thus, based on the studies done on the phenomenological hysteretic behavior with rate, this paper proposes an adaptive rate-dependent feedforward controller with Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) hysteresis operators for piezoelectric actuators. This adaptive controller is achieved by adapting the coefficients to manipulate the weights of the play operators. Actual experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the adaptive controller. The main contribution of this paper is its ability to perform tracking control of non-periodic motion and is illustrated with the tracking control ability of a couple of different non-periodic waveforms which were created by passing random numbers through a low pass filter with a cutoff frequency of 20Hz.

  18. Recycling flow rate control device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Tadashi; Koda, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the recycling pump speed if the pressure variation width and the variation ratio in the nuclear reactor exceed predetermined values, to thereby avoid the shutdown of the plant. Constitution: There has been proposed a method of monitoring the neutron flux increase thereby avoiding unnecessary plant shutdown, but it involves a problems of reactor scram depending on the state of the plant and the set values. In view of the above, in the plant using internal pumps put under the thyristor control and having high response to recycling flow rate, the reactor pressure is monitored and the speed of the internal pump is rapidly reduced when the pressure variation width and variation ratio exceed predetermined values to reduce the reactor power and avoid the plant shutdown. This can reduce the possibility of unnecessary power reduction due to neutron flux noises or the possibility of plant shutdown under low power conditions. Further, since the reactor operation can be continued without stopping the recycling pump, the operation upon recovery can be made rapid. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. Cross-Layer Design of Source Rate Control and Congestion Control for Wireless Video Streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-layer design has been used in streaming video over the wireless channels to optimize the overall system performance. In this paper, we extend our previous work on joint design of source rate control and congestion control for video streaming over the wired channel, and propose a cross-layer design approach for wireless video streaming. First, we extend the QoS-aware congestion control mechanism (TFRCC proposed in our previous work to the wireless scenario, and provide a detailed discussion about how to enhance the overall performance in terms of rate smoothness and responsiveness of the transport protocol. Then, we extend our previous joint design work to the wireless scenario, and a thorough performance evaluation is conducted to investigate its performance. Simulation results show that by cross-layer design of source rate control at application layer and congestion control at transport layer, and by taking advantage of the MAC layer information, our approach can avoid the throughput degradation caused by wireless link error, and better support the QoS requirements of the application. Thus, the playback quality is significantly improved, while good performance of the transport protocol is still preserved.

  20. Perineural invasion on prostate needle biopsy does not predict biochemical failure following brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight, Christopher J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhou Ming; Klein, Eric A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if the presence of perineural invasion (PNI) predicts biochemical recurrence in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case control matching study was performed. The records of 651 patients treated with brachytherapy between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed. Sixty-three of these patients developed biochemical failure. These sixty-three patients were then matched in a one-to-one ratio to patients without biochemical failure, controlling for biopsy Gleason score, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, age, and the use of androgen deprivation. The pathology of the entire cohort was then reviewed for evidence of perineural invasion on initial prostate biopsy specimens. The biochemical relapse free survival rates for these two groups were compared. Results: Cases and controls were well matched, and there were no significant differences between the two groups in age, Gleason grade, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, and the use of androgen deprivation. PNI was found in 19 (17%) patients. There was no significant difference in the rates of PNI between cases and controls, 19.6% and 14.3% respectively (p 0.45). PNI did not correlate with biochemical relapse free survival (p 0.40). Conclusion: Perineural invasion is not a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing brachytherapy for prostate cancer

  1. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  2. BISEN: Biochemical simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlier, J.; Wu, F.; Qi, F.; Vinnakota, K.C.; Han, Y.; Dash, R.K.; Yang, F.; Beard, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Biochemical Simulation Environment (BISEN) is a suite of tools for generating equations and associated computer programs for simulating biochemical systems in the MATLAB® computing environment. This is the first package that can generate appropriate systems of differential equations for

  3. [The use of controlled physical training in patients with acute coronary syndrome treated with intervention - assessment of effects on biochemical parameters and functional myocardial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, Joanna; Kapusta, Anna; Pawlicki, Lucjan; Irzmański, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system is one of the most common causes of death among people over 65 years. Due to its course and incidence are a major cause of disability and impaired quality of life for seniors, as well as a serious economic problem in health care. Important role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease plays making systematic physical activity, which is a component of any rehabilitation program. Regular physical training by doing cardio-and vasoprotective has a beneficial effect on cardiovascular status and physical performance in patients with diagnosed coronary heart disease, regardless of age. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of controlled exercise on selected biochemical parameters and functional myocardial infarction. A group of 89 patients were divided into 3 subgroups. In group I (n = 30) was performed 2 weeks cardiac rehabilitation program, in group II (n = 30) 4 weekly. Streamline the program consisted of a series of interval training performed using a bicycle ergometer and general exercise. The remaining group (gr. III, n = 29) participated in individually selected training program. In all subjects before and after the training cycle underwent thoracic impedance plethysmography, also determined the level of plasma natriuretic peptide NT-proBNP and echocardiography and exercise test. After training, in groups, which carried out a controlled physical training, improvement was observed: exercise capacity of patients respectively in group I (p = 0.0003), group II (p = 0.0001) and group III (p = 0.032), stroke volume SV, cardiac output CO and global myocardial contractility, there was also reduction in the concentration of natriuretic peptide NT-proBNP. Furthermore, the correlation between the results shown pletyzmography parameters and NT-proBNP, SV, CO and EF. Regular physical training as part of the cardiac rehabilitation has a beneficial effect on biochemical parameters and functional myocardial infarction in patients

  4. Achievable Performance of Zero-Delay Variable-Rate Coding in Rate-Constrained Networked Control Systems with Channel Delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barforooshan, Mohsen; Østergaard, Jan; Stavrou, Fotios

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an upper bound on the minimum data rate required to achieve a prescribed closed-loop performance level in networked control systems (NCSs). The considered feedback loop includes a linear time-invariant (LTI) plant with single measurement output and single control input. Moreover......, in this NCS, a causal but otherwise unconstrained feedback system carries out zero-delay variable-rate coding, and control. Between the encoder and decoder, data is exchanged over a rate-limited noiseless digital channel with a known constant time delay. Here we propose a linear source-coding scheme...

  5. The Efficacy of Acupuncture on Anthropometric Measures and the Biochemical Markers for Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjuan Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many previous studies have shown the potential therapeutic effect of acupuncture for metabolic syndrome (MetS. However, most of these studies were limited by short durations of observation and a lack of sham acupuncture as control. We designed a randomized controlled trial, used sham acupuncture as the control, and evaluated the efficacy over 12 weeks of treatment and 12 weeks of follow-up. Methods/Design. The study was designed as a multicentre, parallel-group, randomized, double-blinded trial. 40 patients were randomly assigned to two groups: treatment group (treated with acupuncture and control group (treated with sham acupuncture. Outcomes were measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks and 3 months after treatment. Results. 33 participants (17 in acupuncture group and 16 in control group completed the treatment and the follow-up. Decreases from baseline in mean waist circumference (WC and weight at the end of treatment were 4.85 cm (95% CI [2.405,5.595] and 4.00 kg (95% CI [1.6208,4.4498] in acupuncture group and 1.62 cm and 1.64 kg in control group (P<0.01. The changes in mean glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, and blood pressure in acupuncture group were greater than the changes in control group (P<0.05, P<0.01. Conclusion. Acupuncture decreases WC, HC, HbA1c, TG, and TC values and blood pressure in MetS.

  6. The efficacy of a herbal-based toothpaste in the control of plaque and gingivitis: A clinico-biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A double-blinded controlled clinical trial with parallel groups was designed to investigate the effectiveness of a herbal-based toothpaste in the control of plaque and gingivitis as compared with a conventional dentifrice. The efficacy of Colgate Herbal over Colgate tooth paste was assessed in this study. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects with gingivitis participated in the study. All participants had at least 20 natural teeth with no probing depths greater than 3 mm and a plaque index score of 2 or more at baseline. At baseline, the clinical parameters like gingival index, plaque index and salivary pH were estimated. Paired t-test was used to compare the difference within the groups and unpaired t-test was used to compare the difference between the groups at baseline and on the 30 th day. Results: At the end of the study, there were statistically significant reductions in the gingival index and the plaque index scores within the test group. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the test and the control groups. The salivary pH changes were not statistically significant in the test group but were displaced more toward the acidic range in the control group. Conclusion: It was however concluded that the herbal-based toothpaste was as effective as the conventionally formulated dentifrice in the control of plaque and gingivitis.

  7. Testing the Control of Mineral Supply Rates on Chemical Erosion Rates in the Klamath Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N.; Ferrier, K.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between rates of chemical erosion and mineral supply is central to many problems in Earth science, including how tightly Earth's climate should be coupled to tectonics, how strongly nutrient supply to soils and streams depends on soil production, and how much lithology affects landscape evolution. Despite widespread interest in this relationship, there remains no consensus on how closely coupled chemical erosion rates should be to mineral supply rates. To address this, we have established a network of field sites in the Klamath Mountains along a latitudinal transect that spans an expected gradient in mineral supply rates associated with the geodynamic response to the migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction. Here, we present new measurements of regolith geochemistry and topographic analyses that will be compared with cosmogenic 10Be measurements to test hypotheses about supply-limited and kinetically-limited chemical erosion on granodioritic ridgetops. Previous studies in this area suggest a balance between rock uplift rates and basin wide erosion rates, implying the study ridgetops may have adjusted to an approximate steady state. Preliminary data are consistent with a decrease in chemical depletion fraction (CDF) with increasing ridgetop curvature. To the extent that ridgetop curvature reflects ridgetop erosion rates, this implies that chemical erosion rates at these sites are influenced by both mineral supply rates and dissolution kinetics.

  8. Physical heterogeneity control on effective mineral dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heewon; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis

    2018-04-01

    Hydrologic heterogeneity may be an important factor contributing to the discrepancy in laboratory and field measured dissolution rates, but the governing factors influencing mineral dissolution rates among various representations of physical heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Here, we present multiple reactive transport simulations of anorthite dissolution in 2D latticed random permeability fields and link the information from local grid scale (1 cm or 4 m) dissolution rates to domain-scale (1m or 400 m) effective dissolution rates measured by the flux-weighted average of an ensemble of flow paths. We compare results of homogeneous models to heterogeneous models with different structure and layered permeability distributions within the model domain. Chemistry is simplified to a single dissolving primary mineral (anorthite) distributed homogeneously throughout the domain and a single secondary mineral (kaolinite) that is allowed to dissolve or precipitate. Results show that increasing size in correlation structure (i.e. long integral scales) and high variance in permeability distribution are two important factors inducing a reduction in effective mineral dissolution rates compared to homogeneous permeability domains. Larger correlation structures produce larger zones of low permeability where diffusion is an important transport mechanism. Due to the increased residence time under slow diffusive transport, the saturation state of a solute with respect to a reacting mineral approaches equilibrium and reduces the reaction rate. High variance in permeability distribution favorably develops large low permeability zones that intensifies the reduction in mixing and effective dissolution rate. However, the degree of reduction in effective dissolution rate observed in 1 m × 1 m domains is too small (equilibrium conditions reduce the effective dissolution rate by increasing the saturation state. However, in large domains where less- or non-reactive zones develop, higher

  9. PSA-stratified detection rates for [68Ga]THP-PSMA, a novel probe for rapid kit-based 68Ga-labeling and PET imaging, in patients with biochemical recurrence after primary therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlin, Thorsten; Schmuck, Sebastian; Juhl, Cathleen; Zörgiebel, Johanna; Schneefeld, Sophie M; Walte, Almut C A; Hueper, Katja; von Klot, Christoph A; Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans; Thackeray, James T; Ross, Tobias L; Bengel, Frank M

    2018-06-01

    [ 68 Ga]Tris(hydroxypyridinone)(THP)-PSMA is a novel radiopharmaceutical for one-step kit-based radiolabelling, based on direct chelation of 68 Ga 3+ at low concentration, room temperature and over a wide pH range, using direct elution from a 68 Ge/ 68 Ga-generator. We evaluated the clinical detection rates of [ 68 Ga]THP-PSMA PET/CT in patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy. Consecutive patients (n=99) referred for evaluation of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer by [ 68 Ga]THP-PSMA PET/CT were analyzed retrospectively. Patients underwent a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified cohorts of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values (SUVs) and target-to-background ratios (TBRs) were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. At least one lesion suggestive of recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer was identified on PET images in 52 patients (52.5%). Detection rates of [ 68 Ga]THP-PSMA PET/CT increased with increasing PSA level: 94.1% for a PSA value of ≥10 ng/mL, 77.3% for a PSA value of 2 to PSA value of 1 to PSA value of 0.5 to PSA value of >0.2 to PSA value of 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL. [ 68 Ga]THP-PSMA uptake (SUVs) in metastases decreased over time, whereas TBRs improved. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 2% of [ 68 Ga]THP-PSMA PET/CT scans. Detection rate was higher in patients with a Gleason score ≥8 (P=0.02) and in patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (P=0.003). In this study, [ 68 Ga]THP-PSMA PET/CT showed suitable detection rates in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer and PSA levels ≥ 2 ng /mL. Detections rates were lower than in previous studies evaluating other PSMA ligands, though prospective direct radiotracer comparison studies are mandatory particularly in patients with low PSA levels to evaluate the relative performance of different PSMA ligands.

  10. What controls respiration rate in stored sugarbeet roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although respiration is estimated to be responsible for 60 to 80% of the sucrose lost during storage, the mechanisms by which sugarbeet roots regulate their respiration rate are unknown. In plants, respiration rate is regulated by (1) available respiratory capacity, (2) cellular energy status, (3) ...

  11. Prostate-Specific Antigen Halving Time While on Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is Associated With Biochemical Control in Men Treated With Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Renuka; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the PSA response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with biochemical control in men treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a cohort of men treated with curative-intent RT for localized prostate cancer between 1988 and 2005, 117 men had PSA values after the first and second months of neoadjuvant ADT. Most men had intermediate-risk (45%) or high-risk (44%) disease. PSA halving time (PSAHT) was calculated by first order kinetics. Median RT dose was 76 Gy and median total duration of ADT was 4 months. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF, nadir + 2 definition) was analyzed by PSAHT and absolute PSA nadir before the start of RT. Results: Median follow-up was 45 months. Four-year FFBF was 89%. Median PSAHT was 2 weeks. A faster PSA decline (PSAHT ≤2 weeks) was associated with greater FFBF (96% vs. 81% for a PSAHT >2 weeks, p = 0.0110). Those within the fastest quartile of PSAHTs (≤ 10 days) achieved a FFBF of 100%. Among high-risk patients, a PSAHT ≤2 weeks achieved a 4-yr FFBF of 93% vs. 70% for those with PSAHT >2 weeks (p = 0.0508). Absolute PSA nadir was not associated with FFBF. On multivariable analysis, PSAHT (p = 0.0093) and Gleason score (p = 0.0320) were associated with FFBF, whereas T-stage (p = 0.7363) and initial PSA level (p = 0.9614) were not. Conclusions: For men treated with combined ADT and RT, PSA response to the first month of ADT may be a useful criterion for prognosis and treatment modification.

  12. Adaptive threshold control for auto-rate fallback algorithm in IEEE 802.11 multi-rate WLANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qilin; Lu, Yang; Zhu, Xiaolin; Ge, Fangzhen

    2012-03-01

    The IEEE 802.11 standard supports multiple rates for data transmission in the physical layer. Nowadays, to improve network performance, a rate adaptation scheme called auto-rate fallback (ARF) is widely adopted in practice. However, ARF scheme suffers performance degradation in multiple contending nodes environments. In this article, we propose a novel rate adaptation scheme called ARF with adaptive threshold control. In multiple contending nodes environment, the proposed scheme can effectively mitigate the frame collision effect on rate adaptation decision by adaptively adjusting rate-up and rate-down threshold according to the current collision level. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme can achieve significantly higher throughput than the other existing rate adaptation schemes. Furthermore, the simulation results also demonstrate that the proposed scheme can effectively respond to the varying channel condition.

  13. Detection rate of PET/CT in patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer using [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and comparison with published data of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berliner, Christoph; Tienken, Milena; Kobayashi, Yuske; Helberg, Annabelle; Kirchner, Uve; Klutmann, Susanne; Mester, Janos; Bannas, Peter [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Frenzel, Thorsten [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Ambulatory Center, Department for Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Beyersdorff, Dirk [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Klinik, Hamburg (Germany); Budaeus, Lars [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Klinik, Hamburg (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technical University Munich, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To determine the detection rate of PET/CT in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer using [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and to compare it with published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC. We performed a retrospective analysis in 83 consecutive patients with documented biochemical relapse after prostatectomy. All patients underwent whole body [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT. PET/CT images were evaluated for presence of local recurrence, lymph node metastases, and distant metastases. Proportions of positive PET/CT results were calculated for six subgroups with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels (<0.5 ng/mL, 0.5 to <1.0 ng/mL, 1.0 to <2.0 ng/mL, 2.0 to <5.0 ng/mL, 5.0 to <10.0, ≥10.0 ng/mL). Detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T were statistically compared with published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC using exact Fisher's test. Median PSA was 0.81 (range: 0.01 - 128) ng/mL. In 58/83 patients (70 %) at least one [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T positive lesion was detected. Local recurrent cancer was present in 18 patients (22 %), lymph node metastases in 29 patients (35 %), and distant metastases in 15 patients (18 %). The tumor detection rate was positively correlated with PSA levels, resulting in detection rates of 52 % (<0.5 ng/mL), 55 % (0.5 to <1.0 ng/mL), 70 % (1.0 to <2.0 ng/mL), 93 % (2.0 to <5.0 ng/mL), 100 % (5.0 to <10.0 ng/mL), and 100 % (≥10.0 ng/mL). There was no significant difference between the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC (all p>0.05). [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT has high detection rates of recurrent prostate cancer that are comparable to [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC. (orig.)

  14. The effects of rhythm control strategies versus rate control strategies for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash; Safi, Sanam; Nielsen, Emil E

    2017-01-01

    by Jakobsen and colleagues. We plan to include all relevant randomised clinical trials assessing the effects of any rhythm control strategy versus any rate control strategy. We plan to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, Science Citation Index Expanded...... on Web of Science, and BIOSIS to identify relevant trials. Any eligible trial will be assessed and classified as either high risk of bias or low risk of bias, and our conclusions will be based on trials with low risk of bias. The analyses of the extracted data will be performed using Review Manager 5....... This protocol for a systematic review aims at identifying the best overall treatment strategy for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. METHODS: This protocol for a systematic review was performed following the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration and the eight-step assessment procedure suggested...

  15. The effects of rhythm control strategies versus rate control strategies for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J; Feinberg, Joshua; Nielsen, Emil E

    2017-01-01

    -effect meta-analysis and chose the most conservative result as our primary result. We used Trial Sequential Analysis (TSA) to control for random errors. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by visual inspection of forest plots and by calculating inconsistency (I2) for traditional meta-analyses and diversity...... (D2) for TSA. Sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted to explore the reasons for substantial statistical heterogeneity. We assessed the risk of publication bias in meta-analyses consisting of 10 trials or more with tests for funnel plot asymmetry. We used GRADE to assess the quality...... of the body of evidence. RESULTS: 25 randomized clinical trials (n = 9354 participants) were included, all of which were at high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that rhythm control strategies versus rate control strategies significantly increased the risk of a serious adverse event (risk ratio (RR), 1...

  16. The determination of capital controls: Which role do exchange rate regimes play?

    OpenAIRE

    von Hagen, Jürgen; Zhou, Jizhong

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of exchange rate regime choices in the determination of capital controls in transition economies. We first use a simultaneous equations model to allow direct interactions between decisions on capital controls and on exchange rate regimes. We find that exchange rate regime choices strongly influence the imposition or removal of capital controls, but the feed-back effect is weak. We further estimate a single equation model for capital controls with exchange rate...

  17. Control of oestrus and ovulation rates in Yankasa ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyedipe, E.O.; Pathiraja, N.; Gyang, E.O.; Bawa, E.K.; Eduvie, L.O.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in Yankasa sheep to study the efficacy of progesterone for oestrous synchronization and the effect of various gonadotrophin treatments (pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG), human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) and gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH)) on ovulation rates and litter size, and to elucidate responses by monitoring progesterone concentration. Preliminary studies showed normal progesterone profiles during the cycle, and a mean ovulation rate and litter size of 1.36 ± 0.34 and 1.23 respectively. Following synchronization with progesterone pessaries, PMSG dosage influenced ovulation rates. When 500 IU PMSG was given to ewes, HCG injection had an additive effect of increasing ovulation rate. Plasma progesterone concentrations showed significant treatment effects, being increased in relation to an increase in ovulation rates. Ovulation in Yankasa ewes occurred between 30-32 hours from onset of oestrus. In a fertility trial, mean ovulation rates and corresponding litter size were 2.1 versus 1.8 and 1.5 versus 1.2 for PMSG treated and untreated ewes respectively. 24 refs, 8 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Children's and Teachers' Perspectives on Children's Self-Control: The Development of Two Rating Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Laura Lynn

    1982-01-01

    Compared parallel scales of children's self-control developed for teachers and children. Self-control ratings by teachers and children related to naturalistic observations and to teacher ratings of frustration tolerance and acting-out/aggressive problems. Teachers' ratings of self-control related to IQ and achievement. Supported the validity of…

  19. The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score predicts biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose escalation or low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vimal; Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Larrivée, Sandra; Taussky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    To study the prognostic value of the University of California, San Francisco Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score to predict biochemical failure (bF) after various doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or permanent seed low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (PB). We retrospectively analysed 345 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, with PSA levels of 10-20 ng/mL and/or Gleason 7 including 244 EBRT patients (70.2-79.2 Gy) and 101 patients treated with LDR PB. The minimum follow-up was 3 years. No patient received primary androgen-deprivation therapy. bF was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the differences between CAPRA groups. The overall bF rate was 13% (45/345). The CAPRA score, as a continuous variable, was statistically significant in multivariate analysis for predicting bF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72, P = 0.006). There was a trend for a lower bF rate in patients treated with LDR PB when compared with those treated by EBRT ≤ 74 Gy (HR 0.234, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P = 0.055) in multivariate analysis. In the subgroup of patients with a CAPRA score of 3-5, CAPRA remained predictive of bF as a continuous variable (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.27, P = 0.047) in multivariate analysis. The CAPRA score is useful for predicting biochemical recurrence in patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer with EBRT or LDR PB. It could help in treatment decisions. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  20. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; Sohns, Jan M.; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M.; Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph A. von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T. 240 patients who underwent a [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to <2, 0.5 to <1, >0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study. (orig.)

  1. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. In situ temperature relationships of biochemical and stomatal controls of photosynthesis in four lowland tropical tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, Martijn; Winter, Klaus

    2017-12-01

    Net photosynthetic carbon uptake of Panamanian lowland tropical forest species is typically optimal at 30-32 °C. The processes responsible for the decrease in photosynthesis at higher temperatures are not fully understood for tropical trees. We determined temperature responses of maximum rates of RuBP-carboxylation (V CMax ) and RuBP-regeneration (J Max ), stomatal conductance (G s ), and respiration in the light (R Light ) in situ for 4 lowland tropical tree species in Panama. G s had the lowest temperature optimum (T Opt ), similar to that of net photosynthesis, and photosynthesis became increasingly limited by stomatal conductance as temperature increased. J Max peaked at 34-37 °C and V CMax ~2 °C above that, except in the late-successional species Calophyllum longifolium, in which both peaked at ~33 °C. R Light significantly increased with increasing temperature, but simulations with a photosynthesis model indicated that this had only a small effect on net photosynthesis. We found no evidence for Rubisco-activase limitation of photosynthesis. T Opt of V CMax and J Max fell within the observed in situ leaf temperature range, but our study nonetheless suggests that net photosynthesis of tropical trees is more strongly influenced by the indirect effects of high temperature-for example, through elevated vapour pressure deficit and resulting decreases in stomatal conductance-than by direct temperature effects on photosynthetic biochemistry and respiration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. An overview of zinc addition for BWR dose rate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marble, W.J. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the BWRs employing feedwater zinc addition to reduce primary system dose rates. It identifies which BWRs are using zinc addition and reviews the mechanical injection and passive addition hardware currently being employed. The impact that zinc has on plant chemistry, including the factor of two to four reduction in reactor water Co-60 concentrations, is discussed. Dose rate results, showing the benefits of implementing zinc on either fresh piping surfaces or on pipes with existing films are reviewed. The advantages of using zinc that is isotopically enhanced by the depletion of the Zn-64 precursor to Zn-65 are identified.

  4. Wireless Power Control for Tactical MANET: Power Rate Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    J; P. Hande; T. Lan; C. W. Tan [2008] Power Control in Cellular Networks, Now Publishers Inc., Hanover, MA. 12. Chaves, Fabiano de Sousa; F. R. P...Asymptotically Fast Convergence, IEEE Selected Areas in Communications, 18(3). 36. Jian, Tao; Nicholas D. Sidiropoulos; Georgios B. Giannakis [2003] Kalman...Power Control and Its Imperfections in CDMA Cellular Systems, IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technologies, 48, pages 1706–1777. 75. Tan , Chee Wei

  5. A Distributed Flow Rate Control Algorithm for Networked Agent System with Multiple Coding Rates to Optimize Multimedia Data Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wireless technologies, mobile communication applies more and more extensively in the various walks of life. The social network of both fixed and mobile users can be seen as networked agent system. At present, kinds of devices and access network technology are widely used. Different users in this networked agent system may need different coding rates multimedia data due to their heterogeneous demand. This paper proposes a distributed flow rate control algorithm to optimize multimedia data transmission of the networked agent system with the coexisting various coding rates. In this proposed algorithm, transmission path and upload bandwidth of different coding rate data between source node, fixed and mobile nodes are appropriately arranged and controlled. On the one hand, this algorithm can provide user nodes with differentiated coding rate data and corresponding flow rate. On the other hand, it makes the different coding rate data and user nodes networked, which realizes the sharing of upload bandwidth of user nodes which require different coding rate data. The study conducts mathematical modeling on the proposed algorithm and compares the system that adopts the proposed algorithm with the existing system based on the simulation experiment and mathematical analysis. The results show that the system that adopts the proposed algorithm achieves higher upload bandwidth utilization of user nodes and lower upload bandwidth consumption of source node.

  6. Use of integrity control and automatic start of reserve in a multi-channel temperature and flow rate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzalkowski, L.

    1975-01-01

    A way to increase reliability of process quantity control is control of the integrity of the control plants themselves. The possibilities of integrity control on control devices having simply duplicated control channels or working on the basis of the ''two-from-three'' principle are valued. A highly reliable integrity control is possible by use of test signals. For an appropriate control device, structure and function of the assemblies are described. The integrity control device may be used in the water coolant temperature and flow rate control system for all technological channels of the research reactor ''Maria''

  7. Routine quality control of high dose rate brachytherapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Calcina, Carmen S.; Almeida, Adelaide de; Rocha, Jose R. Oliveira

    2001-01-01

    A Quality Assurance program should be installed also for High Dose Rate brachytherapy, in the order to achieve a correct dose administration to the patient and for the safety to those involved directly with the treatment. The work presented here has the following purposes: Analyze the types of equipment tests presented by the official protocols (TG40, TG56 e ARCAL XXX), evaluate the brachytherapy routine tests of protocols from various national and international radiotherapy services and compare the latter with those presented in the official protocols. As a result, we conclude the following: TG56 presents a higher number of tests when compared to the other official protocols and most of the tests presented by the analyzed services are present in TG56. A suggestion for a basic protocol is presented, emphasizing the periodicity and tolerance level of each of the tests. (author)

  8. Controlling the local false discovery rate in the adaptive Lasso

    KAUST Repository

    Sampson, J. N.

    2013-04-09

    The Lasso shrinkage procedure achieved its popularity, in part, by its tendency to shrink estimated coefficients to zero, and its ability to serve as a variable selection procedure. Using data-adaptive weights, the adaptive Lasso modified the original procedure to increase the penalty terms for those variables estimated to be less important by ordinary least squares. Although this modified procedure attained the oracle properties, the resulting models tend to include a large number of "false positives" in practice. Here, we adapt the concept of local false discovery rates (lFDRs) so that it applies to the sequence, λn, of smoothing parameters for the adaptive Lasso. We define the lFDR for a given λn to be the probability that the variable added to the model by decreasing λn to λn-δ is not associated with the outcome, where δ is a small value. We derive the relationship between the lFDR and λn, show lFDR =1 for traditional smoothing parameters, and show how to select λn so as to achieve a desired lFDR. We compare the smoothing parameters chosen to achieve a specified lFDR and those chosen to achieve the oracle properties, as well as their resulting estimates for model coefficients, with both simulation and an example from a genetic study of prostate specific antigen.

  9. Kinematic equations for resolved-rate control of an industrial robot arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. K.

    1983-01-01

    An operator can use kinematic, resolved-rate equations to dynamically control a robot arm by watching its response to commanded inputs. Known resolved-rate equations for the control of a particular six-degree-of-freedom industrial robot arm and proceeds to simplify the equations for faster computations are derived. Methods for controlling the robot arm in regions which normally cause mathematical singularities in the resolved-rate equations are discussed.

  10. How to determine control of growth rate in a chemostat. Using metabolic control analysis to resolve the paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, Jacky L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Groeneveld, Philip

    1994-01-01

    how, paradoxically, one can determine control of growth rate, of growth yield and of other fluxes in a chemostat. We develop metabolic control analysis for the chemostat. this analysis does not depend on the particular way in which specific growth rate varies with the concentration of the growth...

  11. Rhythm vs. rate control of atrial fibrillation meta-analysed by number needed to treat

    OpenAIRE

    Kumana, Cyrus R; Cheung, Bernard M Y; Cheung, Giselle T Y; Ovedal, Tori; Pederson, Bjorn; Lauder, Ian J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Whenever feasible, rhythm control of atrial fibrillation (AF) was generally preferred over rate control, in the belief that it offered better symptomatic relief and quality of life, and eliminated the need for anticoagulation. However, recent trials appear to challenge these assumptions. Aims: To explore the desirability of rhythm vs. rate control of AF by systematic review of pertinent, published, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and a meta-analysis by number needed to treat (...

  12. Modeling and Model Predictive Power and Rate Control of Wireless Communication Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunwu Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel power and rate control system model for wireless communication networks is presented, which includes uncertainties, input constraints, and time-varying delays in both state and control input. A robust delay-dependent model predictive power and rate control method is proposed, and the state feedback control law is obtained by solving an optimization problem that is derived by using linear matrix inequality (LMI techniques. Simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Design of a heart rate controller for treadmill exercise using a recurrent fuzzy neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Hao; Wang, Wei-Cheng; Tai, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Tien-Chi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we developed a computer controlled treadmill system using a recurrent fuzzy neural network heart rate controller (RFNNHRC). Treadmill speeds and inclines were controlled by corresponding control servo motors. The RFNNHRC was used to generate the control signals to automatically control treadmill speed and incline to minimize the user heart rate deviations from a preset profile. The RFNNHRC combines a fuzzy reasoning capability to accommodate uncertain information and an artificial recurrent neural network learning process that corrects for treadmill system nonlinearities and uncertainties. Treadmill speeds and inclines are controlled by the RFNNHRC to achieve minimal heart rate deviation from a pre-set profile using adjustable parameters and an on-line learning algorithm that provides robust performance against parameter variations. The on-line learning algorithm of RFNNHRC was developed and implemented using a dsPIC 30F4011 DSP. Application of the proposed control scheme to heart rate responses of runners resulted in smaller fluctuations than those produced by using proportional integra control, and treadmill speeds and inclines were smoother. The present experiments demonstrate improved heart rate tracking performance with the proposed control scheme. The RFNNHRC scheme with adjustable parameters and an on-line learning algorithm was applied to a computer controlled treadmill system with heart rate control during treadmill exercise. Novel RFNNHRC structure and controller stability analyses were introduced. The RFNNHRC were tuned using a Lyapunov function to ensure system stability. The superior heart rate control with the proposed RFNNHRC scheme was demonstrated with various pre-set heart rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of linear flow rate control system for eccentric butter-fly valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, K. K.; Cho, S. W.; Park, J. S.; Cho, J. H.; Song, I. T.; Kim, J. G.; Kwon, S. J.; Kim, I. J.; Park, W. K.

    1999-12-01

    Butter-fly valves are advantageous over gate, globe, plug, and ball valves in a variety of installations, particularly in the large sizes. The purpose of this project development of linear flow rate control system for eccentric butter-fly valve (intelligent butter-fly valve system). The intelligent butter-fly valve system consist of a valve body, micro controller. The micro controller consist of torque control system, pressure censor, worm and worm gear and communication line etc. The characteristics of intelligent butter-fly valve system as follows: Linear flow rate control function. Digital remote control function. guard function. Self-checking function. (author)

  15. Low average blister-rust infection rates may mean high control costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Marty

    1965-01-01

    The Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, in cooperation with Federal and State forest-pest-control agencies, undertook a survey of blister-rust infection rates in the white pine region of the East during 1962 and 1963. Those engaged in blister-rust-control activities will not be surprised at the survey's results. We found that infection rates were significantly...

  16. Pilot power based rate control in CDMA 2000 1x EV-DO Rev-A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-feng; GU Jian; YANG Hong-wen

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes a new algorithm to improvethe rate control efficiency of enhanced reverse link mediumaccess control (RLMAC) in the code division multiple access(CDMA) lx EV-DO release A(Rev. A) system. The newalgorithm brings reverse access terminal (AT) pilot power tothe RLMAC rate control procedure and makes it easier for alow pilot power user to increase its data rate when the systemis slightly loaded and harder to decrease its date rate when thesystem is heavily loaded. Numerical results of system levelsimulations show that the new algorithm can bring highersystem throughput, lower AT transmission power, and lowersystem load.

  17. Power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Kandula, Rajendra Prasad; Prasai, Anish

    2016-03-08

    A power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back (BTB) converter is provided. The power flow controller provide dynamic control of both active and reactive power of a power system. The power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources at the same frequency; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between the two AC sources. A transformer may be augmented with a fractionally rated bi-directional Back to Back (BTB) converter. The fractionally rated BTB converter comprises a transformer side converter (TSC), a direct-current (DC) link, and a line side converter (LSC). By controlling the switches of the BTB converter, the effective phase angle between the two AC source voltages may be regulated, and the amplitude of the voltage inserted by the power flow controller may be adjusted with respect to the AC source voltages.

  18. Facilitating control of fed-batch fermentation processes by monitoring the growth rates of saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulers, M.L.B.; Ariaans, L.J.J.M.; Soeterboek, R.; Giuseppin, M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a growth rate controller for a fed-batch bioprocess. An observer estimates the growth rate. The observer is based on knowledge about the stoichiometric relations of the process. Furthermore, the observer needs online measurements of the oxygen uptake rate and the

  19. Capital Controls and Foreign Investor Subsidies Implicit in South Africa's Dual Exchange Rate System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, H.P.; Schaling, E.; van der Windt, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Both in theory and practice, capital controls and dual exchange rate systems can be part of a country's optimal tax policy. We first show how a dual exchange rate system can be interpreted as a tax (or subsidy) on international capital income. We show that a dual exchange rate system, with separate

  20. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Monti

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA > 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81. Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. RESULTS: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83. The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy 1 and 2 (p = 0.023. Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035. The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51. Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018. A patient presented late rectal toxicity of 2nd grade. CONCLUSIONS: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control.

  1. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Carlos R.; Nakamura, Ricardo A.; Ferrigno, Robson; Rossi Junior, Aristides; Kawakami, Neusa S.; Trevisan, Felipe A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. Materials and methods: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81). Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83). The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy ≤ 1, 100% when > 1 and ≤ 2, and 57.1% when > 2 (p = 0.023). Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035). The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51). Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018). A patient presented late rectal toxicity of second grade. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control. (author)

  2. A Globally Stable Lyapunov Pointing and Rate Controller for the Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neerav

    2011-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS) is scheduled to launch in late 2014. Its primary goal is to discover the fundamental plasma physics processes of reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere. Each of the four MMS spacecraft is spin-stabilized at a nominal rate of 3 RPM. Traditional spin-stabilized spacecraft have used a number of separate modes to control nutation, spin rate, and precession. To reduce the number of modes and simplify operations, the Delta-H control mode is designed to accomplish nutation control, spin rate control, and precession control simultaneously. A nonlinear design technique, Lyapunov's method, is used to design the Delta-H control mode. A global spin rate controller selected as the baseline controller for MMS, proved to be insufficient due to an ambiguity in the attitude. Lyapunov's design method was used to solve this ambiguity, resulting in a controller that meets the design goals. Simulation results show the advantage of the pointing and rate controller for maneuvers larger than 90 deg and provide insight into the performance of this controller.

  3. Development of ProCaRS Clinical Nomograms for Biochemical Failure-free Survival Following Either Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy or Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Andrew; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Souhami, Luis; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although several clinical nomograms predictive of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) for localized prostate cancer exist in the medical literature, making valid comparisons can be challenging due to variable definitions of biochemical failure, the disparate distribution of prognostic factors, and received treatments in patient populations. The aim of this investigation was to develop and validate clinically-based nomograms for 5-year BFFS using the ASTRO II “Phoenix” definition for two patient cohorts receiving low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from a large Canadian multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from the GUROC (Genitourinary Radiation Oncologists of Canada) Prostate Cancer Risk Stratification (ProCaRS) database if they received (1) LDR brachytherapy ≥ 144 Gy (n=4208) or (2) EBRT ≥ 70 Gy  (n=822). Multivariable Cox regression analysis for BFFS was performed separately for each cohort and used to generate clinical nomograms predictive of 5-year BFFS. Nomograms were validated using calibration plots of nomogram predicted probability versus observed probability via Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Patients receiving LDR brachytherapy had a mean age of 64 ± 7 years, a mean baseline PSA of 6.3 ± 3.0 ng/mL, 75% had a Gleason 6, and 15% had a Gleason 7, whereas patients receiving EBRT had a mean age of 70 ± 6 years, a mean baseline PSA of 11.6 ± 10.7 ng/mL, 30% had a Gleason 6, 55% had a Gleason 7, and 14% had a Gleason 8-10. Nomograms for 5-year BFFS included age, use and duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), baseline PSA, T stage, and Gleason score for LDR brachytherapy and an ADT (months), baseline PSA, Gleason score, and biological effective dose (Gy) for EBRT. Conclusions: Clinical nomograms examining 5-year BFFS were developed for patients receiving either LDR brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated EBRT and

  4. Effect of Flow Rate Controller on Liquid Steel Flow in Continuous Casting Mold using Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Kadir Ali; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2014-11-01

    In continuous casting operation of steel, the flow through tundish to the mold can be controlled by different flow rate control systems including stopper rod and slide-gate. Ladle changes in continuous casting machines result in liquid steel level changes in tundishes. During this transient event of production, the flow rate controller opening is increased to reduce the pressure drop across the opening which helps to keep the mass flow rate at the desired level for the reduced liquid steel level in tundish. In the present study, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are developed to investigate the effect of flow rate controller on mold flow structure, and particularly to understand the effect of flow controller opening on meniscus flow. First, a detailed validation of the CFD models is conducted using available experimental data and the performances of different turbulence models are compared. Then, the constant throughput casting operations for different flow rate controller openings are simulated to quantify the opening effect on meniscus region. The results indicate that the meniscus velocities are significantly affected by the flow rate controller and its opening level. The steady state operations, specified as constant throughput casting, do not provide the same mold flow if the controller opening is altered. Thus, for quality and castability purposes, adjusting the flow controller opening to obtain the fixed mold flow structure is proposed. Supported by Middle East Technical University (METU) BAP (Scientific Research Projects) Coordination.

  5. Biochemical and serological characterization of Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to determine the isolation rate, serotypes and biochemical profiles of E. coli from colibacillosis and dead-in-shell embryos in Zaria, Northern-Nigeria. The isolation rate of E. coli from hatcheries studied were 4.67% and 7.50% from farms of Simtu Agricultural Company and National Animal Production ...

  6. Positioning the 5'-flap junction in the active site controls the rate of flap endonuclease-1-catalyzed DNA cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Bo

    2018-02-09

    Flap endonucleases catalyze cleavage of single-stranded DNA flaps formed during replication, repair and recombination, and are therefore essential for genome processing and stability. Recent crystal structures of DNA-bound human flap endonuclease (hFEN1) offer new insights into how conformational changes in the DNA and hFEN1 may facilitate the reaction mechanism. For example, previous biochemical studies of DNA conformation performed under non-catalytic conditions with Ca2+ have suggested that base unpairing at the 5\\'-flap:template junction is an important step in the reaction, but the new structural data suggest otherwise. To clarify the role of DNA changes in the kinetic mechanism, we measured a series of transient steps - from substrate binding to product release - during the hFEN1-catalyzed reaction in the presence of Mg2+. We found that while hFEN1 binds and bends DNA at a fast, diffusion-limited rate, much slower Mg2+-dependent conformational changes in DNA around the active site are subsequently necessary and rate-limiting for 5\\'-flap cleavage. These changes are reported overall by fluorescence of 2-aminopurine at the 5\\'-flap:template junction, indicating that local DNA distortion (e.g., disruption of base stacking observed in structures), associated with positioning the 5\\'-flap scissile phosphodiester bond in the hFEN1 active site, controls catalysis. hFEN1 residues with distinct roles in the catalytic mechanism, including those binding metal ions (Asp-34, Asp-181), steering the 5\\'-flap through the active site and binding the scissile phosphate (Lys-93, Arg-100), and stacking against the base 5\\' to the scissile phosphate (Tyr-40), all contribute to these rate-limiting conformational changes, ensuring efficient and specific cleavage of 5\\'-flaps.

  7. Positioning the 5'-flap junction in the active site controls the rate of flap endonuclease-1-catalyzed DNA cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Bo; Hamdan, Samir; Hingorani, Manju M

    2018-01-01

    Flap endonucleases catalyze cleavage of single-stranded DNA flaps formed during replication, repair and recombination, and are therefore essential for genome processing and stability. Recent crystal structures of DNA-bound human flap endonuclease (hFEN1) offer new insights into how conformational changes in the DNA and hFEN1 may facilitate the reaction mechanism. For example, previous biochemical studies of DNA conformation performed under non-catalytic conditions with Ca2+ have suggested that base unpairing at the 5'-flap:template junction is an important step in the reaction, but the new structural data suggest otherwise. To clarify the role of DNA changes in the kinetic mechanism, we measured a series of transient steps - from substrate binding to product release - during the hFEN1-catalyzed reaction in the presence of Mg2+. We found that while hFEN1 binds and bends DNA at a fast, diffusion-limited rate, much slower Mg2+-dependent conformational changes in DNA around the active site are subsequently necessary and rate-limiting for 5'-flap cleavage. These changes are reported overall by fluorescence of 2-aminopurine at the 5'-flap:template junction, indicating that local DNA distortion (e.g., disruption of base stacking observed in structures), associated with positioning the 5'-flap scissile phosphodiester bond in the hFEN1 active site, controls catalysis. hFEN1 residues with distinct roles in the catalytic mechanism, including those binding metal ions (Asp-34, Asp-181), steering the 5'-flap through the active site and binding the scissile phosphate (Lys-93, Arg-100), and stacking against the base 5' to the scissile phosphate (Tyr-40), all contribute to these rate-limiting conformational changes, ensuring efficient and specific cleavage of 5'-flaps.

  8. Easily controlled dye doped phosphorescent OLEDs with evaporation rate in single furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, Malek; Janghouri, Mohammad; Mohajerani, Ezeddin, E-mail: e-mohajerani@sbu.ac.ir

    2015-04-15

    Electrical and optical characteristic, surface morphology and energy transfer of Ir(ppy){sub 3}:PtTPP were studied as a function of thermal evaporation rate. We have investigated the effect of various evaporation rates for mixture of dyes using single furnace method. When the deposition rate increased from 0.5 to 5 Ǻ/s, the luminescence efficiency, current density and energy transfer of OLED increased. AFM measurements showed that the surface roughness of the Ir(ppy){sub 3}:PtTPP films decreased with increasing deposition rates. These blends show excellent red emitting guest–host system with easier deposition rate control. - Highlights: • Thermal evaporation rate is used to control the doping by using single furnace. • The advantages of using single furnace are discussed. • It is shown that the evaporation rate also affects the surface roughness.

  9. Measurement and monitoring of entrance exposure dose rate in X-ray image intensifier television with dose rate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J [Bezirkskrankenhaus Brandenburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1981-03-01

    For X-ray image intensifier television operation very low entrance dose rates (about 5.2 nA/kg) are stated and demanded, respectively. These required values are often manifold exceeded in practice so that a check seems to be necessary. It is shown and proved how these measurements can be performed with simple, generally available means of measurement in the radiological practice. For ZnCdS-image intensifiers should be considered that about 13 nA/kg for the large entrance size are not to be exceeded; for the CsI type lower values (factor 1.5) are practicable because of the twofold quantum absorption efficiency. Furthermore, some tests for a semiquantitative function check of the automatic dose rate control are proposed.

  10. Intensive postoperative glucose control reduces the surgical site infection rates in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Niaimi, Ahmed N; Ahmed, Mostafa; Burish, Nikki; Chackmakchy, Saygin A; Seo, Songwon; Rose, Stephen; Hartenbach, Ellen; Kushner, David M; Safdar, Nasia; Rice, Laurel; Connor, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    SSI rates after gynecologic oncology surgery vary from 5% to 35%, but are up to 45% in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Strict postoperative glucose control by insulin infusion has been shown to lower morbidity, but not specifically SSI rates. Our project studied continuous postoperative insulin infusion for 24h for gynecologic oncology patients with DM and hyperglycemia with a target blood glucose of controlled with intermittent subcutaneous insulin injections. Group 2 was composed of patients with DM and postoperative hyperglycemia whose blood glucose was controlled by insulin infusion. Group 3 was composed of patients with neither DM nor hyperglycemia. We controlled for all relevant factors associated with SSI. We studied a total of 372 patients. Patients in Group 2 had an SSI rate of 26/135 (19%), similar to patients in Group 3 whose rate was 19/89 (21%). Both were significantly lower than the SSI rate (43/148, 29%) of patients in Group 1. This reduction of 35% is significant (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an odd ratio = 0.5 (0.28-0.91) in reducing SSI rates after instituting this protocol. Initiating intensive glycemic control for 24h after gynecologic oncology surgery in patients with DM and postoperative hyperglycemia lowers the SSI rate by 35% (OR = 0.5) compared to patients receiving intermittent sliding scale insulin and to a rate equivalent to non-diabetics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. The efficacy of centralized flow rate control in 802.11-based wireless mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Jamshaid, K.

    2013-06-13

    Commodity WiFi-based wireless mesh networks (WMNs) can be used to provide last mile Internet access. These networks exhibit extreme unfairness with backlogged traffic sources. Current solutions propose distributed source-rate control algorithms requiring link-layer or transport-layer changes on all mesh nodes. This is often infeasible in large practical deployments. In wireline networks, router-assisted rate control techniques have been proposed for use alongside end-to-end mechanisms. We wish to evaluate the feasibility of establishing similar centralized control via gateways in WMNs. In this paper, we focus on the efficacy of this control rather than the specifics of the controller design mechanism. We answer the question: Given sources that react predictably to congestion notification, can we enforce a desired rate allocation through a single centralized controller? The answer is not obvious because flows experience varying contention levels, and transmissions are scheduled by a node using imperfect local knowledge. We find that common router-assisted flow control schemes used in wired networks fail in WMNs because they assume that (1) links are independent, and (2) router queue buildups are sufficient for detecting congestion. We show that non-work-conserving, rate-based centralized scheduling can effectively enforce rate allocation. It can achieve results comparable to source rate limiting, without requiring any modifications to mesh routers or client devices. 2013 Jamshaid et al.; licensee Springer.

  12. Validation of a new control system for Elekta accelerators facilitating continuously variable dose rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Lorenzen, Ebbe L; Brink, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    ) as well as BVDR. Using CVDR opposed to BVDR for VMAT has the potential of reducing the treatment time but may lead to lower dosimetric accuracy due to faster moving accelerator parts. Using D7 and a test version of Integrity, differences in ability to control the accelerator, treatment efficiency......Elekta accelerators controlled by the current clinically used accelerator control system, Desktop 7.01 (D7), uses binned variable dose rate (BVDR) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The next version of the treatment control system (Integrity) supports continuously variable dose rate (CVDR...

  13. The efficacy of centralized flow rate control in 802.11-based wireless mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Jamshaid, K.; Ward, P.; Karsten, M.; Shihada, Basem

    2013-01-01

    predictably to congestion notification, can we enforce a desired rate allocation through a single centralized controller? The answer is not obvious because flows experience varying contention levels, and transmissions are scheduled by a node using imperfect

  14. Prostate-specific antigen nadir within 12 months as an early surrogate marker of biochemical failure and distant metastasis after low-dose-rate brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shuichi; Ohashi, Toshio; Momma, Tetsuo; Sakayori, Masanori; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Tanaka, Tomoki; Yamashita, Shoji; Kosaka, Takeo; Oya, Mototsugu; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2018-05-01

    Prostate-specific antigen nadir (nPSA) after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer has been investigated as a predictor. However, nPSA usually requires several years, limiting its clinical utility. We investigated the significance of nPSA within 12 months (nPSA12) after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) on treatment outcomes. Between 2006 and 2014, 663 patients with prostate cancer were treated with LDR-PB or EBRT at two institutions. Four hundred and seventy-four men received LDR-PB and 189 men received EBRT, without androgen deprivation therapy. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for biochemical failure (BF)-free survival (BFFS) and distant metastasis (DM)-free survival (DMFS) analyses, and multivariable Cox regression analysis was performed. The median follow-up was 61.3 months. The median nPSA12 in the LDR-PB and EBRT cohorts was 0.7 and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 7-year BFFS and DMFS rates in LDR-PB patients with nPSA12 ≤ 0.7 ng/mL were 99.1% and 99.5%, respectively; when nPSA12 was >0.7 ng/mL, they were 90.2% and 94.8%, respectively. In EBRT patients with nPSA12 ≤ 1.0 ng/mL, BFFS and DMFS rates were 85.4% and 98.5%, respectively; when nPSA12 was >1.0 ng/mL, they were 67.1% and 87.2%, respectively. nPSA12 was an independent predictor of BF and DM in both cohorts (LDR-PB, P = 0.004 and 0.020, respectively; EBRT, P = 0.005 and 0.041, respectively). The nPSA12 after LDR-PB or EBRT is significantly associated with treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Higher nPSA12 may identify patients at high risk of relapse who might benefit from salvage treatment. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Dual Rate Adaptive Control for an Industrial Heat Supply Process Using Signal Compensation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Tianyou; Jia, Yao; Wang, Hong; Su, Chun-Yi

    2017-07-09

    The industrial heat supply process (HSP) is a highly nonlinear cascaded process which uses a steam valve opening as its control input, the steam flow-rate as its inner loop output and the supply water temperature as its outer loop output. The relationship between the heat exchange rate and the model parameters, such as steam density, entropy, and fouling correction factor and heat exchange efficiency are unknown and nonlinear. Moreover, these model parameters vary in line with steam pressure, ambient temperature and the residuals caused by the quality variations of the circulation water. When the steam pressure and the ambient temperature are of high values and are subjected to frequent external random disturbances, the supply water temperature and the steam flow-rate would interact with each other and fluctuate a lot. This is also true when the process exhibits unknown characteristic variations of the process dynamics caused by the unexpected changes of the heat exchange residuals. As a result, it is difficult to control the supply water temperature and the rates of changes of steam flow-rate well inside their targeted ranges. In this paper, a novel compensation signal based dual rate adaptive controller is developed by representing the unknown variations of dynamics as unmodeled dynamics. In the proposed controller design, such a compensation signal is constructed and added onto the control signal obtained from the linear deterministic model based feedback control design. Such a compensation signal aims at eliminating the unmodeled dynamics and the rate of changes of the currently sample unmodeled dynamics. A successful industrial application is carried out, where it has been shown that both the supply water temperature and the rate of the changes of the steam flow-rate can be controlled well inside their targeted ranges when the process is subjected to unknown variations of its dynamics.

  16. Heart Rate Variability as a Measure of Airport Ramp-Traffic Controllers Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Dulchinos, Victoria Lee

    2016-01-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) has been reported to reflect the person's cognitive and emotional stress levels, and may offer an objective measure of human-operator's workload levels, which are recorded continuously and unobtrusively to the task performance. The present paper compares the HRV data collected during a human-in-the-loop simulation of airport ramp-traffic control operations with the controller participants' own verbal self-reporting ratings of their workload.

  17. Model Reference Adaptive Control of the Air Flow Rate of Centrifugal Compressor Using State Space Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jaeyoung; Jung, Mooncheong; Yu, Sangseok; Yi, Sun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a model reference adaptive controller is developed to regulate the outlet air flow rate of centrifugal compressor for automotive supercharger. The centrifugal compressor is developed using the analytical based method to predict the transient behavior of operating and the designed model is validated with experimental data to confirm the system accuracy. The model reference adaptive control structure consists of a compressor model and a MRAC(model reference adaptive control) mechanism. The feedback control do not robust with variation of system parameter but the applied adaptive control is robust even if the system parameter is changed. As a result, the MRAC was regulated to reference air flow rate. Also MRAC was found to be more robust control compared with the feedback control even if the system parameter is changed.

  18. Model Reference Adaptive Control of the Air Flow Rate of Centrifugal Compressor Using State Space Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaeyoung; Jung, Mooncheong; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Sun [North Carolina A and T State Univ., Raleigh (United States)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, a model reference adaptive controller is developed to regulate the outlet air flow rate of centrifugal compressor for automotive supercharger. The centrifugal compressor is developed using the analytical based method to predict the transient behavior of operating and the designed model is validated with experimental data to confirm the system accuracy. The model reference adaptive control structure consists of a compressor model and a MRAC(model reference adaptive control) mechanism. The feedback control do not robust with variation of system parameter but the applied adaptive control is robust even if the system parameter is changed. As a result, the MRAC was regulated to reference air flow rate. Also MRAC was found to be more robust control compared with the feedback control even if the system parameter is changed.

  19. iHeartrate: a heart rate controlled in-flight music recommendation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Hu, J.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Spink, A.J.; Grieco, O.E.; Krips, L.W.S.; Loijens, L.P.J.J.; Noldus, xx; Zimmerman, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Travel by air, especially long distance, the enclosed environment of the aircraft cabin causes discomfort and even stress to flight passengers. In this paper, we present a new heart rate controlled music recommendation system. Heart rate is used as a stress indicator. If the user is stressed and

  20. Prevalence, Treatment, and Control Rates of Conventional and Ambulatory Hypertension Across 10 Populations in 3 Continents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgarejo, Jesus D.; Maestre, Gladys E; Thijs, Lutgarde

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a major global health problem, but prevalence rates vary widely among regions. To determine prevalence, treatment, and control rates of hypertension, we measured conventional blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour ambulatory BP in 6546 subjects, aged 40 to 79 years, recruited from 10 com...

  1. A review of control strategies for manipulating the feed rate in fed-batch fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mears, Lisa; Stocks, Stuart M.; Sin, Gürkan

    2017-01-01

    . This review covers a range of strategies which have been employed to use the feed rate as a manipulated variable in a control strategy. The feed rate is chosen as the focus for this review, as it is seen that this variable may be used towards many different objectives depending on the process of interest...

  2. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  3. Stable Control of Firing Rate Mean and Variance by Dual Homeostatic Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jonathan; Miller, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Homeostatic processes that provide negative feedback to regulate neuronal firing rates are essential for normal brain function. Indeed, multiple parameters of individual neurons, including the scale of afferent synapse strengths and the densities of specific ion channels, have been observed to change on homeostatic time scales to oppose the effects of chronic changes in synaptic input. This raises the question of whether these processes are controlled by a single slow feedback variable or multiple slow variables. A single homeostatic process providing negative feedback to a neuron's firing rate naturally maintains a stable homeostatic equilibrium with a characteristic mean firing rate; but the conditions under which multiple slow feedbacks produce a stable homeostatic equilibrium have not yet been explored. Here we study a highly general model of homeostatic firing rate control in which two slow variables provide negative feedback to drive a firing rate toward two different target rates. Using dynamical systems techniques, we show that such a control system can be used to stably maintain a neuron's characteristic firing rate mean and variance in the face of perturbations, and we derive conditions under which this happens. We also derive expressions that clarify the relationship between the homeostatic firing rate targets and the resulting stable firing rate mean and variance. We provide specific examples of neuronal systems that can be effectively regulated by dual homeostasis. One of these examples is a recurrent excitatory network, which a dual feedback system can robustly tune to serve as an integrator.

  4. Packetized Predictive Control for Rate-Limited Networks via Sparse Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagahara, Masaaki; Quevedo, Daniel; Østergaard, Jan

    2012-01-01

    controller and the plant input. To achieve robustness with respect to dropouts, the controller transmits data packets containing plant input predictions, which minimize a finite horizon cost function. In our formulation, we design sparse packets for rate-limited networks, by adopting an an ℓ0 optimization...

  5. Radiological (MRI and Biochemical effects of Low Level LASER therapy in chronic Osteo arthritis in Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Nambi S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is one of the degenerative diseases and Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been prescribed as nonoperative treatment in physiotherapy. But the available evidences of finding the radiological and biochemical effectiveness of LLLT are very few. So, the purpose of this study is to find the radiological and biochemical effect of Low level laser therapy (LLLT in the treatment of Osteoarthritis. 34 subjects who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into two groups (Active Laser group – ALG & Placebo Laser group - PLG with randomized sampling method. ALG was treated with active laser head, whereas PLG treated same like ALG but without emission of energy. Both groups were applied with kinesio tape for 4 weeks. The frequency of the treatment was three times per week for 4 weeks in both groups. Subjects were assessed at baseline, 4th and 8th week. Contact area (mm2 – medial & lateral and cartilage thickness (percentage - medial & lateral was measured by Magnetic resonance image (MRI and CTX-II (μmg/mmol was measured by urine analysis. A statistically significant (p ≤0.05 difference between both groups were noted at the period of 8 week for contact area (lateral and CTX-II and insignificant (p ≥ 0.05 difference in contact area (medial and cartilage thickness (medial & lateral were noted. In conclusion, the low level laser therapy is helpful in modifying the biochemical components and leads to make changes in the cartilage which subsequently improve the quality of life of OA patients.

  6. Adaptive sampling rate control for networked systems based on statistical characteristics of packet disordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Na; Er, Meng-Joo; Tan, Yen-Kheng; Yu, Hai-Bin; Zeng, Peng

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive sampling rate control scheme for networked control systems (NCSs) subject to packet disordering. The main objectives of the proposed scheme are (a) to avoid heavy packet disordering existing in communication networks and (b) to stabilize NCSs with packet disordering, transmission delay and packet loss. First, a novel sampling rate control algorithm based on statistical characteristics of disordering entropy is proposed; secondly, an augmented closed-loop NCS that consists of a plant, a sampler and a state-feedback controller is transformed into an uncertain and stochastic system, which facilitates the controller design. Then, a sufficient condition for stochastic stability in terms of Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) is given. Moreover, an adaptive tracking controller is designed such that the sampling period tracks a desired sampling period, which represents a significant contribution. Finally, experimental results are given to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed scheme. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chaos Synchronization Using Adaptive Dynamic Neural Network Controller with Variable Learning Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hong Kao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the synchronization of chaotic gyros with unknown parameters and external disturbance via an adaptive dynamic neural network control (ADNNC system. The proposed ADNNC system is composed of a neural controller and a smooth compensator. The neural controller uses a dynamic RBF (DRBF network to online approximate an ideal controller. The DRBF network can create new hidden neurons online if the input data falls outside the hidden layer and prune the insignificant hidden neurons online if the hidden neuron is inappropriate. The smooth compensator is designed to compensate for the approximation error between the neural controller and the ideal controller. Moreover, the variable learning rates of the parameter adaptation laws are derived based on a discrete-type Lyapunov function to speed up the convergence rate of the tracking error. Finally, the simulation results which verified the chaotic behavior of two nonlinear identical chaotic gyros can be synchronized using the proposed ADNNC scheme.

  8. Effect of Control Mode and Test Rate on the Measured Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of control mode and test rate on the measured fracture toughness of ceramics were evaluated by using chevron-notched flexure specimens in accordance with ASTM C1421. The use of stroke control gave consistent results with about 2% (statistically insignificant) variation in measured fracture toughness for a very wide range of rates (0.005 to 0.5 mm/min). Use of strain or crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) control gave approx. 5% (statistically significant) variation over a very wide range of rates (1 to 80 µm/m/s), with the measurements being a function of rate. However, the rate effect was eliminated by use of dry nitrogen, implying a stress corrosion effect rather than a stability effect. With the use of a nitrogen environment during strain controlled tests, fracture toughness values were within about 1% over a wide range of rates (1 to 80 micons/m/s). CMOD or strain control did allow stable crack extension well past maximum force, and thus is preferred for energy calculations. The effort is being used to confirm recommendations in ASTM Test Method C1421 on fracture toughness measurement.

  9. Adjusting Expected Mortality Rates Using Information From a Control Population: An Example Using Socioeconomic Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Hannah; Andersson, Therese M-L; Crowther, Michael J; Dickman, Paul W; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2018-04-01

    Expected or reference mortality rates are commonly used in the calculation of measures such as relative survival in population-based cancer survival studies and standardized mortality ratios. These expected rates are usually presented according to age, sex, and calendar year. In certain situations, stratification of expected rates by other factors is required to avoid potential bias if interest lies in quantifying measures according to such factors as, for example, socioeconomic status. If data are not available on a population level, information from a control population could be used to adjust expected rates. We have presented two approaches for adjusting expected mortality rates using information from a control population: a Poisson generalized linear model and a flexible parametric survival model. We used a control group from BCBaSe-a register-based, matched breast cancer cohort in Sweden with diagnoses between 1992 and 2012-to illustrate the two methods using socioeconomic status as a risk factor of interest. Results showed that Poisson and flexible parametric survival approaches estimate similar adjusted mortality rates according to socioeconomic status. Additional uncertainty involved in the methods to estimate stratified, expected mortality rates described in this study can be accounted for using a parametric bootstrap, but this might make little difference if using a large control population.

  10. On mill flow rate and fineness control in cement grinding circuits: instability and delayed measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, R.; Boulvin, M.; Renotte, C.; Remy, M.

    1999-01-01

    A control structure for the mill flow rate and the product fineness is designed, with the feed flow rate and the classifier characteristic as the manipulated variables. Experimental results from a plant highlight the instability of the grinding circuit. A model previously developed by the authors stresses the major influence of the classifier nonlinearities onto this instability. A cascade control structure has been designed and implemented on site. The measurements of the product fineness, sensitive to material grindability fluctuations, are randomly time-delayed. The control structure uses a fineness estimator based on an adaptive scheme and a time delay compensator. (author)

  11. A lattice hydrodynamic model based on delayed feedback control considering the effect of flow rate difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunong; Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a lattice hydrodynamic model is derived considering not only the effect of flow rate difference but also the delayed feedback control signal which including more comprehensive information. The control method is used to analyze the stability of the model. Furthermore, the critical condition for the linear steady traffic flow is deduced and the numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the advantage of the proposed model with and without the effect of flow rate difference and the control signal. The results are consistent with the theoretical analysis correspondingly.

  12. Effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a small horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, A F; Freris, L L; Graham, J M.R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    An experiment into the effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a 5 kW, two bladed, teetered HAWT has been performed. It has been shown that control activity influences the distribution of strain in the blade but that in a high rotor speed, high cycle fatigue regime this has little influence on damage rate. The experiment was conducted on a small test turbine by implementing variable speed stall, pitch and yaw control strategies and measuring blade flapwise strain response at root and midspan locations. A full description of the investigation is provided. (au)

  13. Dynamic neural networking as a basis for plasticity in the control of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kember, G; Armour, J A; Zamir, M

    2013-01-21

    A model is proposed in which the relationship between individual neurons within a neural network is dynamically changing to the effect of providing a measure of "plasticity" in the control of heart rate. The neural network on which the model is based consists of three populations of neurons residing in the central nervous system, the intrathoracic extracardiac nervous system, and the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. This hierarchy of neural centers is used to challenge the classical view that the control of heart rate, a key clinical index, resides entirely in central neuronal command (spinal cord, medulla oblongata, and higher centers). Our results indicate that dynamic networking allows for the possibility of an interplay among the three populations of neurons to the effect of altering the order of control of heart rate among them. This interplay among the three levels of control allows for different neural pathways for the control of heart rate to emerge under different blood flow demands or disease conditions and, as such, it has significant clinical implications because current understanding and treatment of heart rate anomalies are based largely on a single level of control and on neurons acting in unison as a single entity rather than individually within a (plastically) interconnected network. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heroin addicts have higher discount rates for delayed rewards than non-drug-using controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, K N; Petry, N M; Bickel, W K

    1999-03-01

    Fifty-six heroin addicts and 60 age-matched controls were offered choices between monetary rewards ($11-$80) available immediately and larger rewards ($25-$85) available after delays ranging from 1 week to 6 months. Participants had a 1-in-6 chance of winning a reward that they chose on one randomly selected trial. Delay-discounting rates were estimated from the pattern of participants' choices. The discounting model of impulsiveness (Ainslie, 1975) implies that delay-discounting rates are positively correlated with impulsiveness. On average, heroin addicts' discount rates were twice those of controls (p = .004), and discount rates were positively correlated with impulsivity as measured by self-report questionnaires (p discounting rate as a measure of impulsiveness, a characteristic associated with substance abuse.

  15. Decentralized control of transmission rates in energy-critical wireless networks

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Li

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the decentralized optimization of delay and energy consumption in a multi-hop wireless network. The goal is to minimize the energy consumption of energy-critical nodes and the overall packet transmission delay of the network. The transmission rates of energy-critical nodes are adjustable according to the local information of nodes, i.e., the length of packets queued. The multi-hop network is modeled as a queueing network.We prove that the system performance is monotone w.r.t. (with respect to) the transmission rate, thus the “bang-bang” control is an optimal control. We also prove that there exists a threshold type control policy which is optimal. We propose a decentralized algorithm to control transmission rates of these energy-critical nodes. Some simulation experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  16. Decentralized control of transmission rates in energy-critical wireless networks

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Li; Shihada, Basem

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the decentralized optimization of delay and energy consumption in a multi-hop wireless network. The goal is to minimize the energy consumption of energy-critical nodes and the overall packet transmission delay of the network. The transmission rates of energy-critical nodes are adjustable according to the local information of nodes, i.e., the length of packets queued. The multi-hop network is modeled as a queueing network.We prove that the system performance is monotone w.r.t. (with respect to) the transmission rate, thus the “bang-bang” control is an optimal control. We also prove that there exists a threshold type control policy which is optimal. We propose a decentralized algorithm to control transmission rates of these energy-critical nodes. Some simulation experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  17. Engineering analysis of mass flow rate for turbine system control and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yong H.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A computer code is written to predict the steam mass flow rate through valves. → A test device is built to study the steam flow characteristics in the control valve. → Mass flow based methodology eases the programming and experimental procedures. → The methodology helps express the characteristics of each device of a turbine system. → The results can commercially be used for design and operation of the turbine system. - Abstract: The mass flow rate is determined in the steam turbine system by the area formed between the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. For precise control the steam mass flow rate should be known given the stem lift. However, since the thermal hydraulic characteristics of steam coming from the generator or boiler are changed going through each device, it is hard to accurately predict the steam mass flow rate. Thus, to precisely determine the steam mass flow rate, a methodology and theory are developed in designing the turbine system manufactured for the nuclear and fossil power plants. From the steam generator or boiler to the first bunch of turbine blades, the steam passes by a stop valve, a control valve and the first nozzle, each of which is connected with piping. The corresponding steam mass flow rate can ultimately be computed if the thermal and hydraulic conditions are defined at the stop valve, control valve and pipes. The steam properties at the inlet of each device are changed at its outlet due to geometry. The Compressed Adiabatic Massflow Analysis (CAMA) computer code is written to predict the steam mass flow rate through valves. The Valve Engineered Layout Operation (VELO) test device is built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve with the CAMA input data. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected as reference. CAMA is expected to be commercially utilized to accurately design and operate the turbine system for fossil as well as nuclear power

  18. Control of mitochondrial respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tager, J. M.; Wanders, R. J.; Groen, A. K.; Kunz, W.; Bohnensack, R.; Küster, U.; Letko, G.; Böhme, G.; Duszynski, J.; Wojtczak, L.

    1983-01-01

    The control theory of Kacser and Burns [in: Rate Control of Biological Processes (Davies, D.D. ed) pp. 65-104, Cambridge University Press, London, 1973] and Heinrich and Rapoport [Eur. J. Biochem. (1974) 42, 97-105] has been used to quantify the amount of control exerted by different steps on

  19. A Flow Rate Control Approach on Off-Design Analysis of an Organic Rankine Cycle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Ran Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored effects of off-design heat source temperature (TW,in or flow rate (mW on heat transfer characteristics and performance of an organic Rankine cycle system by controlling the flow rate of working fluid R245fa (i.e., the operation flow rate of R245fa was controlled to ensure that R245fa reached saturation liquid and vapor states at the outlets of the preheater and evaporator, respectively. The results showed that the operation flow rate of R245fa increased with TW,in or mW; higher TW,in or mW yielded better heat transfer performance of the designed preheater and required higher heat capacity of the evaporator; heat transfer characteristics of preheater and evaporator differed for off-design TW,in and mW; and net power output increased with TW,in or mW. The results further indicated that the control strategy should be different for various off-design conditions. Regarding maximum net power output, the flow rate control approach is optimal when TW,in or mW exceeds the design point, but the pressure control approach is better when TW,in or mW is lower than the design point.

  20. The use of quality control performance charts to analyze cesarean delivery rates nationally.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of quality control performance charts to analyze cesarean rates nationally. METHODS: Information on cesarean rates was obtained for all 19 Irish maternity hospitals receiving state funding in 2009. All women who underwent cesarean delivery of a live or stillborn infant weighing 500 g or more between January 1 and December 31 were included. Deliveries were classified as elective or emergency. Individual hospitals were not identified in the analysis. RESULTS: The mean rates per hospital of elective and emergency cesarean were 12.9+\\/-2.6% (n=9337) and 13.8+\\/-3.0% (n=9989), respectively-giving an overall mean rate of 26.7+\\/-4.2% (n=19326) per hospital. Cesarean rates were normally distributed. Using a quality control performance chart with a cutoff 2 standard deviations from the mean, 1 hospital was above the normal range for both total and elective cesareans, indicating that its pre-labor obstetric practices warrant clinical review. Another hospital had a mean emergency cesarean rate above the normal range, indicating that its labor ward practices warrant review. CONCLUSION: Quality control performance charts can be used to analyze cesarean rates nationally and, thus, to identify hospitals at which obstetric practices should be reviewed.

  1. Using consumption rate to assess potential predators for biological control of white perch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosch N.J.C.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of undesirable fishes is important in aquatic systems, and using predation as a tool for biological control is an attractive option to fishery biologists. However, determining the appropriate predators for biological control is critical for success. The objective of this study was to evaluate the utility of consumption rate as an index to determine the most effective predators for biological control of an invasive fish. Consumption rate values were calculated for nine potential predators that prey on white perch Morone americana in Branched Oak and Pawnee reservoirs, Nebraska. The consumption rate index provided a unique and insightful means of determining the potential effectiveness of each predator species in controlling white perch. Cumulative frequency distributions facilitated interpretation by providing a graphical presentation of consumption rates by all individuals within each predator species. Largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, walleye Sander vitreus and sauger S. canadensis were the most efficient white perch predators in both reservoirs; however, previous attempts to increase biomass of these predators have failed suggesting that successful biological control is unlikely using existing predator species in these Nebraska reservoirs.

  2. CHARACTERISTIC OF PARAMETERS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFICULT-TO-CONTROL AND CONTROLLED ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Tymoshenko O. S.; Yabluchansky M. I.; Martynenko O. V.

    2017-01-01

    Parameters of heart rate variability (HRV) were studied in 112 patients with arterial hypertension (AH) aged 58.5 ± 9 years (60 patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (DTCAH) and 52 patients with controlled arterial hypertension (CAH)). The control group was consisted of 20 conditionally healthy persons of the same sex and age. It has been established that patients with AH were characterized by decrease in the level of total power of the HRV spectrum, the power of the high-f...

  3. Coordinated Secondary Control for Balanced Discharge Rate of Energy Storage System in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Yajuan; Guerrero, Josep M.; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2015-01-01

    current and unintentional outage of DGs. Thus, the stability and reliability of islanded MG can be improved. The eigenvalues and root locus with the proposed controller are presented to design the parameters as well as analyzing the system stability. Simulation results based on Matlab......A coordinated secondary control based on a novel autonomous currents sharing control strategy for balanced discharge rate of energy storage systems in islanded microgrid (MG) is proposed in this paper. The coordinated secondary controller is able to regulate the output power of distributed...... generating (DG) systems according to their state-of-charge by adjusting the virtual resistances of their voltage controlled inverters. This controller can not only provide the faster response and accurate output current sharing control, but also avoid the potential operation failure resulting from the over...

  4. Adaptive Command Filtered Integrated Guidance and Control for Hypersonic Vehicle with Magnitude, Rate and Bandwidth Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel integrated guidance and control (IGC method for hypersonic vehicle in terminal phase. Firstly, the system model is developed with a second order actuator dynamics. Then the back-stepping controller is designed hierarchically with command filters, where the first order command filters are implemented to construct the virtual control input with ideal states predicted by an adaptive estimator, and the nonlinear command filter is designed to produce magnitude, rate and bandwidth limited control surface deflection finally tracked by a terminal sliding mode controller with finite convergence time. Through a series of 6-DOF numerical simulations, it’s indicated that the proposed method successfully cancels out the large aerodynamics coefficient uncertainties and disturbances in hypersonic flight under limited control surface deflection. The contribution of this paper lies in the application and determination of nonlinear integrated design of guidance and control system for hypersonic vehicle.

  5. Coordinated Secondary Control for Balanced Discharge Rate of Energy Storage System in Islanded AC Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Yajuan; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    A coordinated secondary control approach based on an autonomous current-sharing control strategy for balancing the discharge rates of energy storage systems (ESSs) in islanded AC microgrids is proposed in this paper. The coordinated secondary controller can regulate the power outputs of distributed...... incidents and unintentional outages in DG units, but also aims to provide a fast transient response and an accurate output-current-sharing performance. A complete root locus analysis is given in order to achieve system stability and parameter sensitivity. Experimental results are presented to show...... the performance of the whole system and to verify the effectiveness of the proposed controller....

  6. Changes in biochemical disease-free survival rates as a result of adoption of the consensus conference definition in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, Ronald D.; Malyszko, Bozena K.; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Rubin, Mark A.; O'Toole, Kathleen M.; Schiff, Peter B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal definition of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy remains elusive. Different institutions have developed their own definitions, and a consensus conference (CC) sponsored by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology has recently proposed another definition. This study compares the definition previously used at our institution with the definition proposed by the CC. Methods: Two hundred and eight patients were treated for localized prostate cancer with conformal external-beam radiotherapy between 1989-1993 at our institution and followed for at least 24 months. Patients were categorized as failures according to our institutional definition and the CC definition. Our definition (CPMC) required two increases in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) over at least a 3-month period with a final value of at least 1 ng/ml or a single value resulting in clinical intervention. The CC definition required three consecutive increases in PSA. This was modified to also consider those patients with one or two increases leading to clinical intervention as failures. Differences in the failure rates between the two definitions were evaluated and factors influencing these differences were explored. In an additional analysis, CC was modified such that patients with one or two PSA increases were censored at the time of the PSA prior to the increases (CC-II), rather than at the last PSA (CC). The median follow-up time was 31 months. Results: There were 36 fewer failures according to CC (n = 96) compared with CPMC (n = 132) (p < 0.001). Twenty cases called failures by CPMC subsequently had a decrease in PSA ('false failures'). The other 16 patients have had two increases in PSA, but are awaiting their next follow-up visit to obtain a third PSA ('pending failures'). Analysis of factors predicting 'pending failures' showed Gleason score to be the sole predictor of this change in status in multivariate analysis (p = 0

  7. Smart controller based scaler rate-meter for gamma column scanning application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narender Reddy, J.; Dhanajay Reddy, Y.; Dheeraj Reddy, J.

    2001-01-01

    A smart, controller based Scaler Rate-meter with scintillation probe for Gamma column scanning has been developed and made available. Designed to have advanced features with state-of-art electronic devices, hardware features include built-in adj. HV, amplifier- SCA, controller based data acquisition card, LCD display module for visualization of, HV set, preset and elapsed times, counts/count rate, column height and other programmable parameters. User interface is through a built-in programmable key pad, for instrument control, data acquisition, storage. Powerful embedded software provides all the above functions. Unit has capability to store up to 5000 readings. Data readings stored can be downloaded into a PC/lap top to generate a plot of count rate Vs column height, which is a signature for the column under study. Scintillation Probe design facilitates connection to the main unit through a single cable, permitting lengths up to 30 meters from the main unit. (author)

  8. Seroprevalence of brucellosis and associated hemato-biochemical changes in pakistani horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, S.T.; Khan, A.; Ahmad, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence and hemato-biochemical manifestations of brucellosis in horses. Serum samples were screened for Brucella antibodies by Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT) and serum agglutination test (SAT). Blood samples were evaluated for hemato-biochemical parameters following standard procedures. Results indicated seroprevalence of brucellosis 20.13 and 16.23% in horses by RBPT and SAT, respectively. Brucellosis does not lead to any significant change in hematological and biochemical parameters in relation to age, sex, body condition and lactation except few parameters. The values of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, neutrophil, basophil and alkaline phosphatase significantly decreased in brucellosis positive animals as compared to healthy animals whereas lymphocytes and alanine aminotransferase were in opposite order. It was concluded from the results that prevalence of brucellosis in horse population is of concern; therefore, control measures should be opted so that its zoonotic threat is curtailed. (author)

  9. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Operating Limits If Using the Emission Rate With Add-on Controls Option or the Control Efficiency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rate With Add-on Controls Option or the Control Efficiency/Outlet Concentration Compliance Option 4... Add-on Controls Option or the Control Efficiency/Outlet Concentration Compliance Option If you are... volumetric flow rate at a location upstream of the control device, or duct static pressure at a location...

  10. Quality control of 192Ir high dose rate after loading brachytherapy dose veracity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhongsu; Xu Xiao; Liu Fen

    2008-01-01

    Recently, 192 Ir high dose rate (HDR) afterloading are widely used in brachytherapy. The advantage of using HDR systems over low dose rate systems are shorter treatment time and higher fraction dose. To guarantee the veracity of the delivery dose, several quality control methods are deseribed in this work. With these we can improve the position precision, time precision and dose precision of the brachytherapy. (authors)

  11. Improved rate control for electron-beam evaporation and evaluation of optical performance improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevelber, Michael; Xu, Bing; Smith, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    A new deposition-rate-control and electron-beam-gun (e-gun) strategy was developed that significantly reduces the growth-rate variations for e-beam-deposited SiO2 coatings. The resulting improvements in optical performance are evaluated for multilayer bandpass filters. The adverse effect of uneven silica-source depletion on coating spectral performances during long deposition runs is discussed.

  12. Multi-rate control over AWGN channels via analog joint source-channel coding

    KAUST Repository

    Khina, Anatoly; Pettersson, Gustav M.; Kostina, Victoria; Hassibi, Babak

    2017-01-01

    We consider the problem of controlling an unstable plant over an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel with a transmit power constraint, where the signaling rate of communication is larger than the sampling rate (for generating observations and applying control inputs) of the underlying plant. Such a situation is quite common since sampling is done at a rate that captures the dynamics of the plant and which is often much lower than the rate that can be communicated. This setting offers the opportunity of improving the system performance by employing multiple channel uses to convey a single message (output plant observation or control input). Common ways of doing so are through either repeating the message, or by quantizing it to a number of bits and then transmitting a channel coded version of the bits whose length is commensurate with the number of channel uses per sampled message. We argue that such “separated source and channel coding” can be suboptimal and propose to perform joint source-channel coding. Since the block length is short we obviate the need to go to the digital domain altogether and instead consider analog joint source-channel coding. For the case where the communication signaling rate is twice the sampling rate, we employ the Archimedean bi-spiral-based Shannon-Kotel'nikov analog maps to show significant improvement in stability margins and linear-quadratic Gaussian (LQG) costs over simple schemes that employ repetition.

  13. Multi-rate control over AWGN channels via analog joint source-channel coding

    KAUST Repository

    Khina, Anatoly

    2017-01-05

    We consider the problem of controlling an unstable plant over an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel with a transmit power constraint, where the signaling rate of communication is larger than the sampling rate (for generating observations and applying control inputs) of the underlying plant. Such a situation is quite common since sampling is done at a rate that captures the dynamics of the plant and which is often much lower than the rate that can be communicated. This setting offers the opportunity of improving the system performance by employing multiple channel uses to convey a single message (output plant observation or control input). Common ways of doing so are through either repeating the message, or by quantizing it to a number of bits and then transmitting a channel coded version of the bits whose length is commensurate with the number of channel uses per sampled message. We argue that such “separated source and channel coding” can be suboptimal and propose to perform joint source-channel coding. Since the block length is short we obviate the need to go to the digital domain altogether and instead consider analog joint source-channel coding. For the case where the communication signaling rate is twice the sampling rate, we employ the Archimedean bi-spiral-based Shannon-Kotel\\'nikov analog maps to show significant improvement in stability margins and linear-quadratic Gaussian (LQG) costs over simple schemes that employ repetition.

  14. Dental implant survival rate in well-controlled diabetic patients. A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heber Arbildo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental implants have now become one of the most popular options for replacing a missing tooth. On the other hand, diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease that affects a large part of the population and is generally considered an absolute or relative contraindication to implant therapy. Aim: To determine the survival rate of dental implants in controlled diabetic patients through a systematic review. Material and methods: A systematic search in Pubmed, SciELO and RedALyC databases was performed. The selection criteria were: studies published in the last 10 years, with at least 20 controlled diabetic patients, reporting survival rate and number of implants placed, with follow-up periods equal to or longer than 1 year, including a control group of healthy patients. Methodological quality was analyzed with the follwing scales: Jadad and Downs & Black’s CMQ. Results: Three articles with a follow-up period between 1 and 12 years were analyzed. The overall survival rate of dental implants in diabetic controlled patients was 97.43%. Conclusion: The reviewed literature suggests that survival rate of dental implants in well-controlled diabetic patients is similar to non-diabetic patients.

  15. The use of laser diodes for control of uranium vaporization rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagans, K.; Galkowski, J.

    1993-09-01

    Within the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program we have successfully used the laser absorption spectroscopy technique (LAS) to diagnose process physics performance and control vaporization rate. In the LAS technique, a narrow line-width laser is tuned to an absorption line of the species to be measured. The laser light that is propagated through the sample is and, from this data, the density of the species can be calculated. These laser systems have exclusively consisted of expensive, cumbersome, and difficult to maintain argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers. While the wavelength flexibility of dye lasers is very useful in a laboratory environment, these laser systems are not well suited for the industrial process control system under development for an AVLIS plant. Diode-lasers offer lower system costs, reduced man power requirements, reduced space requirements, higher system availability, and improved operator safety. We report the. successful deployment and test of a prototype laser diode based uranium vapor rate control system. Diode-laser generated LAS data was used to control the uranium vaporization rate in a hands-off mode for greater than 50 hours. With one minor adjustment the system successfully controlled the vaporization rate for greater than 147 hours. We report excellent agreement with ring dye laser diagnostics and uranium weigh-back measurements

  16. Naphthalene induced activities on growth, respiratory metabolism and biochemical composition in juveniles of Metapenaeus affinis (H.Milne Edward, 1837)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Farshchi, P.; Faniband, M.

    Toxicity of naphthalene was carried out on Metapenaeus affinis (H. Milne Edward, 1837) to investigate its effects on growth, metabolic index and biochemical constituents. Growth rate in terms of weight gain was 32.13% in control, 12.12% in 0.125 ppm...

  17. Intrinsic And Extrinsic Controls On Unsteady Deformation Rates, Northern Apennine Mountains, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Gunderson, K. L.; Pazzaglia, F. J.; Kodama, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    The slip rates of faults in the Northern Apennine Mountains were unsteady at 104-105 year timescales during the Neogene and Quaternary. Fault slip rates were recovered from growth strata and uplifted fluvial terraces associated with the Salsomaggiore, Quatto Castella, and Castevetro fault-related folds, sampled along the Stirone, Enza, and Panaro Rivers, respectively. The forelimb stratigraphy of each anticline was dated using rock magnetic-based cyclostratigraphy, which varies with Milankovitch periodicity, multispecies biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, OSL luminescence dating, TCN burial dating, and radiocarbon dating of uplifted and folded fluvial terraces. Fault slip magnitudes were constrained with trishear forward models. We observed decoupled deformation and sediment accumulation rates at each structure. From 3.5Ma deformation of a thick and thin-skinned thrusts was temporally variable and controlled by intrinsic rock processes, whereas, the more regional Pede-Apenninic thrust fault, a thick-skinned thrust underlying the mountain front, was likely activated because of extrinsic forcing from foreland basin sedimentation rate accelerations since 1.4Ma. We found that reconstructed slip rate variability increased as the time resolution increased. The reconstructed slip history of the thin-skinned thrust faults was characterized relatively long, slow fold growth and associated fault slip, punctuated by shorter, more rapid periods limb rotation, and slip on the underlying thrust fault timed asynchronously. Thrust fault slip rates slip rates were ≤ 0.1 to 6 mm/yr at these intermediate timescales. The variability of slip rates on the thrusts is likely related to strain partitioning neighboring faults within the orogenic wedge. The studied structures slowed down at 1Ma when there was a switch to slower synchronous fault slip coincident with orogenic wedge thickening due to the emplacement of the out of sequence Pene-Apenninic thrust fault that was emplaced at 1

  18. Prevalence, Treatment, and Control Rates of Conventional and Ambulatory Hypertension Across 10 Populations in 3 Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Jesus D; Maestre, Gladys E; Thijs, Lutgarde; Asayama, Kei; Boggia, José; Casiglia, Edoardo; Hansen, Tine W; Imai, Yutaka; Jacobs, Lotte; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Li, Yan; Malyutina, Sofia; Nikitin, Yuri; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Wang, Ji-Guang; Staessen, Jan A

    2017-07-01

    Hypertension is a major global health problem, but prevalence rates vary widely among regions. To determine prevalence, treatment, and control rates of hypertension, we measured conventional blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour ambulatory BP in 6546 subjects, aged 40 to 79 years, recruited from 10 community-dwelling cohorts on 3 continents. We determined how between-cohort differences in risk factors and socioeconomic factors influence hypertension rates. The overall prevalence was 49.3% (range between cohorts, 40.0%-86.8%) for conventional hypertension (conventional BP ≥140/90 mm Hg) and 48.7% (35.2%-66.5%) for ambulatory hypertension (ambulatory BP ≥130/80 mm Hg). Treatment and control rates for conventional hypertension were 48.0% (33.5%-74.1%) and 38.6% (10.1%-55.3%) respectively. The corresponding rates for ambulatory hypertension were 48.6% (30.5%-71.9%) and 45.6% (18.6%-64.2%). Among 1677 untreated subjects with conventional hypertension, 35.7% had white coat hypertension (23.5%-56.2%). Masked hypertension (conventional BP hypertension rates. Higher social and economic development, measured by the Human Development Index, was associated with lower rates of conventional and ambulatory hypertension. In conclusion, high rates of hypertension in all cohorts examined demonstrate the need for improvements in prevention, treatment, and control. Strategies for the management of hypertension should continue to not only focus on preventable and modifiable risk factors but also consider societal issues. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Suitability of representative electrochemical energy storage technologies for ramp-rate control of photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Fletcher, John; Burr, Patrick; Hall, Charles; Zheng, Bowen; Wang, Da-Wei; Ouyang, Zi; Lennon, Alison

    2018-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems can exhibit rapid variances in their power output due to irradiance changes which can destabilise an electricity grid. This paper presents a quantitative comparison of the suitability of different electrochemical energy storage system (ESS) technologies to provide ramp-rate control of power in PV systems. Our investigations show that, for PV systems ranging from residential rooftop systems to megawatt power systems, lithium-ion batteries with high energy densities (up to 600 Wh L-1) require the smallest power-normalised volumes to achieve the ramp rate limit of 10% min-1 with 100% compliance. As the system size increases, the ESS power-normalised volume requirements are significantly reduced due to aggregated power smoothing, with high power lithium-ion batteries becoming increasingly more favourable with increased PV system size. The possibility of module-level ramp-rate control is also introduced, and results show that achievement of a ramp rate of 10% min-1 with 100% compliance with typical junction box sizes will require ESS energy and power densities of 400 Wh L-1 and 2300 W L-1, respectively. While module-level ramp-rate control can reduce the impact of solar intermittence, the requirement is challenging, especially given the need for low cost and long cycle life.

  20. Chocolate bar as an incentive did not increase response rate among physiotherapists: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahm Kristin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a small incentive, a bar of dark chocolate, on response rate in a study of physiotherapy performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Findings Norwegian physiotherapists from private practice were randomised in blocks to an intervention group (n = 1027 receiving a bar of dark chocolate together with a data-collection form, and a control group (n = 1027 that received the data-collection form only. The physiotherapists were asked to prospectively complete the data-collection form by reporting treatments provided to one patient with knee osteoarthritis through 12 treatment sessions. The outcome measure was response rate of completed forms. Out of the 510 physiotherapists that responded, 280 had completed the data-collection form by the end of the study period. There was no difference between the chocolate and no-chocolate group in response rate of those who sent in completed forms. In the chocolate group, 142 (13.8% returned completed forms compared to 138 (13.4% in the control group, ARR = 0.4 (95% CI: -3.44 to 2.6. Conclusion A bar of dark chocolate did not increase response rate in a prospective study of physiotherapy performance. Stronger incentives than chocolate seem to be necessary to increase the response rate among professionals who are asked to report about their practice. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials register: ISRCTN02397855

  1. A pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in electronic flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindson, William S.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot rating scale was developed to describe the effects of transients in helicopter flight-control systems on safety-of-flight and on pilot recovery action. The scale was applied to the evaluation of hardovers that could potentially occur in the digital flight-control system being designed for a variable-stability UH-60A research helicopter. Tests were conducted in a large moving-base simulator and in flight. The results of the investigation were combined with existing airworthiness criteria to determine quantitative reliability design goals for the control system.

  2. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE's interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals

  3. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  4. Tracking Controller for Intrinsic Output Saturated Systems in Presence of Amplitude and Rate Input Saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chater, E.; Giri, F.; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of controlling plants that are subject to multiple saturation constraints. Especially, we are interested in linear systems whose input is subject to amplitude and rate constraints of saturation type. Furthermore, the considered systems output is also subject to an intrinsi...

  5. Quality control of system of imaging for rectal ultrasound for implants seed prostate low rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luquero Llopis, N.; Ferrer Gracia, C.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Serrada Hierro, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the objective is the evaluation of the image system used in implants of prostate of low rate held at our hospital, for maximum control on the placement of the seeds in the patient and therefore carried out dosimetry. (Author)

  6. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, J.E.; de Vente, W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; de Bruin, E.I.

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing

  7. Rate Control for Network-Coded Multipath Relaying with Time-Varying Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Armen Babikyan, Nathaniel M. Jones, Thomas H. Shake, and Andrew P. Worthen MIT Lincoln Laboratory 244 Wood Street Lexington, MA 02420 DDRE, 1777...delay U U U U SAR 11 Zach Sweet 781-981-5997 1 Rate Control for Network-Coded Multipath Relaying with Time-Varying Connectivity Brooke Shrader, Armen

  8. Controlling hydrophilicity of polymer film by altering gas flow rate in atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Hur, Min; Lee, Jae-Ok; Song, Young-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Controlling hydrophilicity of polymer film by varying gas flow rate is proposed in atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasma treatment. • Without employing additional reactive gas, requiring more plasma power and longer treatment time, hydrophilicity of polyimide films was improved after the low-gas-flow plasma treatment. • The gas flow rate affects the hydrophilic properties of polymer surface by changing the discharge atmosphere in the particular geometry of the reactor developed. • Low-gas-flow induced wettability control suggests effective and economical plasma treatment. - Abstract: This paper reports on controlling the hydrophilicity of polyimide films using atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasmas by changing only the gas flow rate. The gas flow changed the discharge atmosphere by mixing the feed gas with ambient air because of the particular geometry of the reactor developed for the study, and a low gas flow rate was found to be favorable because it generated abundant nitrogen or oxygen species that served as sources of hydrophilic functional groups over the polymer surface. After low-gas-flow plasma treatment, the polymer surface exhibited hydrophilic characteristics with increased surface roughness and enhanced chemical properties owing to the surface addition of functional groups. Without adding any reactive gases or requiring high plasma power and longer treatment time, the developed reactor with low-gas-flow operation offered effective and economical wettability control of polyimide films

  9. Multi-rate path-following control for unmanned air vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerreiro Tome Antunes, D.J.; Silvestre, C.J.; Cunha, R.

    2008-01-01

    A methodology is provided to tackle the path-following integrated guidance and control problem for unmanned air vehicles with measured outputs available at different rates. The path-following problem is addressed by defining a suitable non-linear path dependent error space to express the vehicle’s

  10. Potassium supplementation and heart rate : A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Moelenberg, F. J. M.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Geleijnse, J. M.

    Background and aims: Increasing the intake of potassium has been shown to lower blood pressure, but whether it also affects heart rate (HR) is largely unknown. We therefore assessed the effect of potassium supplementation on HR in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods and results:

  11. A Framework for Control System Design Subject to Average Data-Rate Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Eduardo; Derpich, Milan; Østergaard, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies discrete-time control systems subject to average data-rate limits. We focus on a situation where a noisy linear system has been designed assuming transparent feedback and, due to implementation constraints, a source-coding scheme (with unity signal transfer function) has to be ...

  12. Dual substrate feedback control of specific growth-rate in vaccine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeleman, R.; Beuvery, E.C.; Vries, D.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Unexpectedly, primary concern of bio-pharmaceutical industry is not optimisation of product yield or cost reduction, but consistency in production and product quality. This paper describes the methodology and experimental results of specific growth-rate control for vaccine production. The

  13. Exact Fill Rates for (R, s, S) Inventory Control With Gamma Distributed Demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moors, J.J.A.; Strijbosch, L.W.G.

    2001-01-01

    For the familiar (R; s; S) inventory control system only approximate expressions exist for the fill rate, i.e. the fraction of demand that can be satisfied from stock.Best-known are the approximations derived from renewal theory by Tijms & Groenevelt (1984), holding under specific conditions; in

  14. Variable synaptic strengths controls the firing rate distribution in feedforward neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Cheng; Marsat, Gary

    2018-02-01

    Heterogeneity of firing rate statistics is known to have severe consequences on neural coding. Recent experimental recordings in weakly electric fish indicate that the distribution-width of superficial pyramidal cell firing rates (trial- and time-averaged) in the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) depends on the stimulus, and also that network inputs can mediate changes in the firing rate distribution across the population. We previously developed theoretical methods to understand how two attributes (synaptic and intrinsic heterogeneity) interact and alter the firing rate distribution in a population of integrate-and-fire neurons with random recurrent coupling. Inspired by our experimental data, we extend these theoretical results to a delayed feedforward spiking network that qualitatively capture the changes of firing rate heterogeneity observed in in-vivo recordings. We demonstrate how heterogeneous neural attributes alter firing rate heterogeneity, accounting for the effect with various sensory stimuli. The model predicts how the strength of the effective network connectivity is related to intrinsic heterogeneity in such delayed feedforward networks: the strength of the feedforward input is positively correlated with excitability (threshold value for spiking) when firing rate heterogeneity is low and is negatively correlated with excitability with high firing rate heterogeneity. We also show how our theory can be used to predict effective neural architecture. We demonstrate that neural attributes do not interact in a simple manner but rather in a complex stimulus-dependent fashion to control neural heterogeneity and discuss how it can ultimately shape population codes.

  15. Max-Min Optimality of Service Rate Control in Closed Queueing Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Li

    2013-04-01

    In this technical note, we discuss the optimality properties of service rate control in closed Jackson networks. We prove that when the cost function is linear to a particular service rate, the system performance is monotonic w.r.t. (with respect to) that service rate and the optimal value of that service rate can be either maximum or minimum (we call it Max-Min optimality); When the second-order derivative of the cost function w.r.t. a particular service rate is always positive (negative), which makes the cost function strictly convex (concave), the optimal value of such service rate for the performance maximization (minimization) problem can be either maximum or minimum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most general result for the optimality of service rates in closed Jackson networks and all the previous works only involve the first conclusion. Moreover, our result is also valid for both the state-dependent and load-dependent service rates, under both the time-average and customer-average performance criteria.

  16. Modeling and Control for Giant Magnetostrictive Actuators with Rate-Dependent Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate-dependent hysteresis in giant magnetostrictive materials is a major impediment to the application of such material in actuators. In this paper, a relevance vector machine (RVM model is proposed for describing the hysteresis nonlinearity under varying input current. It is possible to construct a unique dynamic model in a given rate range for a rate-dependent hysteresis system using the sinusoidal scanning signals as the training set input signal. Subsequently, a proportional integral derivative (PID control scheme combined with a feedforward compensation is implemented on a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA for real-time precise trajectory tracking. Simulations and experiments both verify the effectiveness and the practicality of the proposed modeling and control methods.

  17. Estimation of fuel burning rate and heating value with highly variable properties for optimum combustion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, C.-L.; Kuo, J.-T.

    2008-01-01

    Estimating solid residue gross burning rate and heating value burning in a power plant furnace is essential for adequate manipulation to achieve energy conversion optimization and plant performance. A model based on conservation equations of mass and thermal energy is established in this work to calculate the instantaneous gross burning rate and lower heating value of solid residue fired in a combustion chamber. Comparing the model with incineration plant control room data indicates that satisfactory predictions of fuel burning rates and heating values can be obtained by assuming the moisture-to-carbon atomic ratio (f/a) within the typical range from 1.2 to 1.8. Agreement between mass and thermal analysis and the bed-chemistry model is acceptable. The model would be useful for furnace fuel and air control strategy programming to achieve optimum performance in energy conversion and pollutant emission reduction

  18. Controllable deterioration rate for time-dependent demand and time-varying holding cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Vinod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop an inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items under the consideration of the facts: deterioration rate can be controlled by using the preservation technology (PT during deteriorating period, and holding cost and demand rate both are linear function of time, which was treated as constant in most of the deteriorating inventory models. So in this paper, we developed a deterministic inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items in which both demand rate and holding cost are a linear function of time, deterioration rate is constant, backlogging rate is variable and depend on the length of the next replenishment, shortages are allowed and partially backlogged. The model is solved analytically by minimizing the total cost of the inventory system. The model can be applied to optimizing the total inventory cost of non-instantaneous deteriorating items inventory for the business enterprises, where the preservation technology is used to control the deterioration rate, and demand & holding cost both are a linear function of time.

  19. Distributed Fair Auto Rate Medium Access Control for IEEE 802.11 Based WLANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanfeng; Niu, Zhisheng

    Much research has shown that a carefully designed auto rate medium access control can utilize the underlying physical multi-rate capability to exploit the time-variation of the channel. In this paper, we develop a simple analytical model to elucidate the rule that maximizes the throughput of RTS/CTS based multi-rate wireless local area networks. Based on the discovered rule, we propose two distributed fair auto rate medium access control schemes called FARM and FARM+ from the view-point of throughput fairness and time-share fairness, respectively. With the proposed schemes, after receiving a RTS frame, the receiver selectively returns the CTS frame to inform the transmitter the maximum feasible rate probed by the signal-to-noise ratio of the received RTS frame. The key feature of the proposed schemes is that they are capable of maintaining throughput/time-share fairness in asymmetric situation where the distribution of SNR varies with stations. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed schemes outperform the existing throughput/time-share fair auto rate schemes in time-varying channel conditions.

  20. Measurement of local dose rates in controlled areas of nuclear power plants. Version 6/85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Local dose rate measurements according to this regulation, serve the following purposes: Development of preventive measures for radiation protection with respect to maintenance and modifications in controlled areas, e.g. determination of individual measures for personnel protection, development of flow charts and dose rate estimates; monitoring of the personnel's location of activity within the controlled area, including determination of time-dependence of local dose rates and determination of immediate radiation protection measures required; limitation and identification of controlled areas. Such measurements are performed to ensure that the principles of radiation protection as stated in Art. 28 (1) of the Radiation Protection Ordinance with respect to external radiation exposure of the personnel, and the requirements of Art. 61 (1) of the Radiation Protection Ordinance relating to controlled areas are met and the limitation and identification of controlled areas as prescribed in Art 57 (1) of the Radiation Protection Ordinance can be performed. They are not used to determine body doses as per Art. 63 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Dynamic optimization of CELSS crop photosynthetic rate by computer-assisted feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, C.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    A procedure for dynamic optimization of net photosynthetic rate (Pn) for crop production in Controlled Ecological Life-Support Systems (CELSS) was developed using leaf lettuce as a model crop. Canopy Pn was measured in real time and fed back for environmental control. Setpoints of photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) and CO_2 concentration for each hour of the crop-growth cycle were decided by computer to reach a targeted Pn each day. Decision making was based on empirical mathematical models combined with rule sets developed from recent experimental data. Comparisons showed that dynamic control resulted in better yield per unit energy input to the growth system than did static control. With comparable productivity parameters and potential for significant energy savings, dynamic control strategies will contribute greatly to the sustainability of space-deployed CELSS.

  2. A remote handling rate-position controller for telemanipulating in a large workspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrio, Jorge; Ferre, Manuel; Suárez-Ruiz, Francisco; Aracil, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new haptic rate-position controller, which allows manipulating a slave robot in a large workspace using a small haptic device. This control algorithm is very effective when the master device is much smaller than the slave device. Haptic information is displayed to the user so as to be informed when a change in the operation mode occurs. This controller allows performing tasks in a large remote workspace by using a haptic device with a reduced workspace such as Phantom. Experimental results have been carried out using a slave robot from Kraft Telerobotics and a commercial haptic interface as a master device. A curvature path following task has been simulated using the proposed controller which was compared with the force-position control algorithm. Results obtained show that higher accuracy is obtained when the proposed method is used, spending a similar amount of time to perform the task

  3. A remote handling rate-position controller for telemanipulating in a large workspace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, Jorge, E-mail: jordi.barrio@upm.es; Ferre, Manuel, E-mail: m.ferre@upm.es; Suárez-Ruiz, Francisco, E-mail: fa.suarez@upm.es; Aracil, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.aracil@upm.es

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents a new haptic rate-position controller, which allows manipulating a slave robot in a large workspace using a small haptic device. This control algorithm is very effective when the master device is much smaller than the slave device. Haptic information is displayed to the user so as to be informed when a change in the operation mode occurs. This controller allows performing tasks in a large remote workspace by using a haptic device with a reduced workspace such as Phantom. Experimental results have been carried out using a slave robot from Kraft Telerobotics and a commercial haptic interface as a master device. A curvature path following task has been simulated using the proposed controller which was compared with the force-position control algorithm. Results obtained show that higher accuracy is obtained when the proposed method is used, spending a similar amount of time to perform the task.

  4. Biochemical Hypermedia: Galactose Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animations of biochemical processes and virtual laboratory environments lead to true molecular simulations. The use of interactive software’s in education can improve cognitive capacity, better learning and, mainly, it makes information acquisition easier. Material and Methods: This work presents the development of a biochemical hypermedia to understanding of the galactose metabolism. It was developed with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. Results and Discussion: A step by step animation process shows the enzymatic reactions of galactose conversion to glucose-1-phosphate (to glycogen synthesis, glucose-6-phosphate (glycolysis intermediary, UDP-galactose (substrate to mucopolysaccharides synthesis and collagen’s glycosylation. There are navigation guide that allow scrolling the mouse over the names of the components of enzymatic reactions of via the metabolism of galactose. Thus, explanatory text box, chemical structures and animation of the actions of enzymes appear to navigator. Upon completion of the module, the user’s response to the proposed exercise can be checked immediately through text box with interactive content of the answer. Conclusion: This hypermedia was presented for undergraduate students (UFSC who revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the theme.

  5. Clinical, biochemical and ultrasonographic features of infertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, F.; Rizvi, J.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the clinical, biochemical and ultrasonic features of infertile women with PCOS from the two infertility centers of Karachi, The Aga Khan University Hospital and Concept Fertility Centre. Patients attending the Infertility Clinics of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi and Concept Fertility Centre, Karachi, were evaluated for their clinical features. Complete biochemical evaluation was performed by day 2 FSH, LH, serum prolactin, serum testosterone and fasting serum insulin determination. These results were recorded on the data collection form. Ultrasonic evaluation was performed with transvaginal ultrasound to check the morphological appearance of ovaries. A total of 508 patients were evaluated for epidemiological features of PCOS. Frequency of PCOS in the infertility clinic was 17.6% with high rate of obesity (68.5%) and hyperinsulinemia (59%). The highest rate of abnormal clinical, biochemical features were seen above BMI of 30. High rates of obesity, hyperinsulinemia and impaired glycemic control were seen in this series. It was demonstrated that high BMI had an association and correlation with abnormal clinical and biochemical features. Obese women with PCOS need more attention for their appropriate management. (author)

  6. Duration of luteal support (DOLS with progesterone pessaries to improve the success rates in assisted conception: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazvani Rafet

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Luteal support with progesterone is necessary for successful implantation of the embryo following egg collection and embryo transfer in an in-vitro fertilization (IVF cycle. Progesterone has been used for as little as 2 weeks and for as long as 12 weeks of gestation. The optimal length of treatment is unresolved at present and it remains unclear how long to treat women receiving luteal supplementation. Design The trial is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the effect of the duration of luteal support with progesterone in IVF cycles. Following 2 weeks standard treatment and a positive biochemical pregnancy test, this randomized control trial will allocate women to a supplementary 8 weeks treatment with vaginal progesterone or 8 weeks placebo. Further studies would be required to investigate whether additional supplementation with progesterone is beneficial in early pregnancy. Discussion Currently at the Hewitt Centre, approximately 32.5% of women have a positive biochemical pregnancy test 2 weeks after embryo transfer. It is this population that is eligible for trial entry and randomization. Once the patient has confirmed a positive urinary pregnancy test they will be invited to join the trial. Once the consent form has been completed by the patient a trial prescription sheet will be sent to pharmacy with a stated collection time. The patient can then be randomized and the drugs dispensed according to pharmacy protocol. A blood sample will then be drawn for measurement of baseline hormone levels (progesterone, estradiol, free beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, Activin A, Inhibin A and Inhibin B. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of all randomized women that continue successfully to a viable pregnancy (at least one fetus with fetal heart rate >100 beats/minute on transabdominal/transvaginal ultrasound at 10 weeks post embryo

  7. Testing the control of mineral supply rates on chemical erosion in the Klamath Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N.; Ferrier, K.

    2017-12-01

    The relationship between rates of chemical erosion and mineral supply is central to many problems in Earth science, including the role of tectonics in the global carbon cycle, nutrient supply to soils and streams via soil production, and lithologic controls on landscape evolution. We aim to test the relationship between mineral supply rates and chemical erosion in the forested uplands of the Klamath mountains, along a latitudinal transect of granodioritic plutons that spans an expected gradient in mineral supply rates associated with the geodynamic response to the migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction. We present 10Be-derived erosion rates and Zr-derived chemical depletion factors, as well as bulk soil and rock geochemistry on 10 ridgetops along the transect to test hypotheses about supply-limited and kinetically-limited chemical erosion. Previous studies in this area, comparing basin-averaged erosion rates and modeled uplift rates, suggest this region may be adjusted to an approximate steady state. Our preliminary results suggest that chemical erosion at these sites is influenced by both mineral supply rates and dissolution kinetics.

  8. The potential impact of integrated malaria transmission control on entomologic inoculation rate in highly endemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, G F; McKenzie, F E; Foy, B D; Schieffelin, C; Billingsley, P F; Beier, J C

    2000-05-01

    We have used a relatively simple but accurate model for predicting the impact of integrated transmission control on the malaria entomologic inoculation rate (EIR) at four endemic sites from across sub-Saharan Africa and the southwest Pacific. The simulated campaign incorporated modestly effective vaccine coverage, bed net use, and larval control. The results indicate that such campaigns would reduce EIRs at all four sites by 30- to 50-fold. Even without the vaccine, 15- to 25-fold reductions of EIR were predicted, implying that integrated control with a few modestly effective tools can meaningfully reduce malaria transmission in a range of endemic settings. The model accurately predicts the effects of bed nets and indoor spraying and demonstrates that they are the most effective tools available for reducing EIR. However, the impact of domestic adult vector control is amplified by measures for reducing the rate of emergence of vectors or the level of infectiousness of the human reservoir. We conclude that available tools, including currently neglected methods for larval control, can reduce malaria transmission intensity enough to alleviate mortality. Integrated control programs should be implemented to the fullest extent possible, even in areas of intense transmission, using simple models as decision-making tools. However, we also conclude that to eliminate malaria in many areas of intense transmission is beyond the scope of methods which developing nations can currently afford. New, cost-effective, practical tools are needed if malaria is ever to be eliminated from highly endemic areas.

  9. Robust and Optimal Control of Magnetic Microparticles inside Fluidic Channels with Time-Varying Flow Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam S.M. Khalil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy using magnetic microparticles and nanoparticles has the potential to mitigate the negative side-effects associated with conventional medical treatment. Major technological challenges still need to be addressed in order to translate these particles into in vivo applications. For example, magnetic particles need to be navigated controllably in vessels against flowing streams of body fluid. This paper describes the motion control of paramagnetic microparticles in the flowing streams of fluidic channels with time-varying flow rates (maximum flow is 35 ml.hr−1. This control is designed using a magnetic-based proportional-derivative (PD control system to compensate for the time-varying flow inside the channels (with width and depth of 2 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. First, we achieve point-to-point motion control against and along flow rates of 4 ml.hr−1, 6 ml.hr−1, 17 ml.hr−1, and 35 ml.hr−1. The average speeds of single microparticle (with average diameter of 100 μm against flow rates of 6 ml.hr−1 and 30 ml.hr−1 are calculated to be 45 μm.s−1 and 15 μm.s−1, respectively. Second, we implement PD control with disturbance estimation and compensation. This control decreases the steady-state error by 50%, 70%, 73%, and 78% at flow rates of 4 ml.hr−1, 6 ml.hr−1, 17 ml.hr−1, and 35 ml.hr−1, respectively. Finally, we consider the problem of finding the optimal path (minimal kinetic energy between two points using calculus of variation, against the mentioned flow rates. Not only do we find that an optimal path between two collinear points with the direction of maximum flow (middle of the fluidic channel decreases the rise time of the microparticles, but we also decrease the input current that is supplied to the electromagnetic coils by minimizing the kinetic energy of the microparticles, compared to a PD control with disturbance compensation.

  10. Risk Management of Interest Rate Derivative Portfolios: A Stochastic Control Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kiriakopoulos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we formulate the Risk Management Control problem in the interest rate area as a constrained stochastic portfolio optimization problem. The utility that we use can be any continuous function and based on the viscosity theory, the unique solution of the problem is guaranteed. The numerical approximation scheme is presented and applied using a single factor interest rate model. It is shown how the whole methodology works in practice, with the implementation of the algorithm for a specific interest rate portfolio. The recent financial crisis showed that risk management of derivatives portfolios especially in the interest rate market is crucial for the stability of the financial system. Modern Value at Risk (VAR and Conditional Value at Risk (CVAR techniques, although very useful and easy to understand, fail to grasp the need for on-line controlling and monitoring of derivatives portfolio. The portfolios should be designed in a way that risk and return be quantified and controlled in every possible state of the world. We hope that this methodology contributes towards this direction.

  11. Control of proliferation rate of N27 dopaminergic neurons using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiwen; Hadimani, Ravi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to investigate possible treatments for a variety of neurological disorders. However, the effect that magnetic fields have on neurons has not been well documented in the literature. We have investigated the effect of different orientation of magnetic field generated by TMS coils with a monophasic stimulator on the proliferation rate of N27 neuronal cells cultured in flasks and multi-well plates. The proliferation rate of neurons would increase by exposed horizontally adherent N27 cells to a magnetic field pointing upward through the neuronal proliferation layer compared with the control group. On the other hand, proliferation rate would decrease in cells exposed to a magnetic field pointing downward through the neuronal growth layer compared with the control group. We confirmed results obtained from the Trypan-blue and automatic cell counting methods with those from the CyQuant and MTS cell viability assays. Our findings could have important implications for the preclinical development of TMS treatments of neurological disorders and represents a new method to control the proliferation rate of neuronal cells.

  12. Anthropogenic control on geomorphic process rates: can we slow down the erosion rates? (Geomorphology Outstanding Young Scientist Award & Penck Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, V.

    2012-04-01

    The surface of the Earth is changing rapidly, largely in response to anthropogenic perturbation. Direct anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments may be much larger in many places than the (projected) indirect effects of climate change. There is now large evidence that humans have significantly altered geomorphic process rates, mainly through changes in vegetation composition, density and cover. While much attention has been given to the impact of vegetation degradation on geomorphic process rates, I suggest that the pathway of restoration is equally important to investigate. First, vegetation recovery after crop abandonment has a rapid and drastic impact on geomorphic process rates. Our data from degraded catchments in the tropical Andes show that erosion rates can be reduced by up to 100 times when increasing the protective vegetation cover. During vegetation restoration, the combined effects of the reduction in surface runoff, sediment production and hydrological connectivity are stronger than the individual effects together. Therefore, changes in erosion and sedimentation during restoration are not simply the reverse of those observed during degradation. Second, anthropogenic perturbation causes a profound but often temporary change in geomorphic process rates. Reconstruction of soil erosion rates in Spain shows us that modern erosion rates in well-vegetated areas are similar to long-term rates, despite evidence of strong pulses in historical erosion rates after vegetation clearance and agriculture. The soil vegetation system might be resilient to short pulses of accelerated erosion (and deposition), as there might exist a dynamic coupling between soil erosion and production also in degraded environments.

  13. Quality control in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy; Controle de qualite en curietherapie de debit de dose pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metayer, Y.; Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Meyer, P. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2009-07-15

    A prospective multicenter study (P.D.R.) was leaded on pulsed dose rate brachytherapy over 2 years (2005/2006) in 20 French centres, as part of a programme entitled (Support for the innovative and expensive techniques) S.t.i.c.-P.D.R. and supported by the French ministry of health. Eight hundred and fifty patients were treated for cervix carcinoma with 2D classic or 3D innovative brachytherapy (425 in each arm). The main objectives of this study were to assess the cost of P.D.R. brachytherapy with dose optimization compared to traditional treatments, and to evaluate the complications and local control. A joint programme of quality control was established by the physicists of the different centres, concerning the software treatment planning, the source replacement, the projector and the technical parameters of the course of patient treatment. This technical note lists these controls, and their frequency. (authors)

  14. Leak Rate Quantification Method for Gas Pressure Seals with Controlled Pressure Differential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Braun, Minel J.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement to the pressure decay leak rate method with mass point analysis solved deficiencies in the standard method. By adding a control system, a constant gas pressure differential across the test article was maintained. As a result, the desired pressure condition was met at the onset of the test, and the mass leak rate and measurement uncertainty were computed in real-time. The data acquisition and control system were programmed to automatically stop when specified criteria were met. Typically, the test was stopped when a specified level of measurement uncertainty was attained. Using silicone O-ring test articles, the new method was compared with the standard method that permitted the downstream pressure to be non-constant atmospheric pressure. The two methods recorded comparable leak rates, but the new method recorded leak rates with significantly lower measurement uncertainty, statistical variance, and test duration. Utilizing this new method in leak rate quantification, projects will reduce cost and schedule, improve test results, and ease interpretation between data sets.

  15. Controlling corrosion rate of Magnesium alloy using powder mixed electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, M. A.; Rani, A. M. A.; Saad, N. M.; Littlefair, G.; Aliyu, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Biomedical implant can be divided into permanent and temporary employment. The duration of a temporary implant applied to children and adult is different due to different bone healing rate among the children and adult. Magnesium and its alloys are compatible for the biodegradable implanting application. Nevertheless, it is difficult to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy to suit the application on both the children and adult. Powder mixed electrical discharge machining (PM-EDM) method, a modified EDM process, has high capability to improve the EDM process efficiency and machined surface quality. The objective of this paper is to establish a formula to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy using the PM-EDM method. The different corrosion rate of machined surface is hypothesized to be obtained by having different combinations of PM-EDM operation inputs. PM-EDM experiments are conducted using an opened-loop PM-EDM system and the in-vitro corrosion tests are carried out on the machined surface of each specimen. There are four operation inputs investigated in this study which are zinc powder concentration, peak current, pulse on-time and pulse off-time. The results indicate that zinc powder concentration is significantly affecting the response with 2 g/l of zinc powder concentration obtaining the lowest corrosion rate. The high localized temperature at the cutting zone in spark erosion process causes some of the zinc particles get deposited on the machined surface, hence improving the surface characteristics. The suspended zinc particles in the dielectric fluid have also improve the sparking efficiency and the uniformity of sparks distribution. From the statistical analysis, a formula was developed to control the corrosion rate of magnesium alloy within the range from 0.000183 mm/year to 0.001528 mm/year.

  16. The Combined Effect of Long Working Hours and Low Job Control on Self-Rated Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Sik; Ju, Young-Su; Paek, Domyung; Kim, Hyunjoo; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effects of long working hours and low job control on self-rated health. Methods: We analyzed employees’ data obtained from the third Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS). Multiple survey logistic analysis and postestimation commands were employed to estimate the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). Results: The odds ratio (OR) for poor self-rated health was 1.24 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.13 to 1.35] for long working hours, 1.04 (95% CI: 0.97 to 1.13) for low job control, and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.33 to 1.62) for both long working hours and low job control. The RERI was 0.18 (95% CI: 0.02 to 0.34). Conclusion: These results imply that low job control may increase the negative influence of long working hours on self-rated health. PMID:29200187

  17. Growth and Biochemical performance of Cassava-Manihot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    the crude oil polluted soil improved the growth and biochemical performance of cassava. For the qualitative .... delay in the rate of soil recovery and a decrease in crop yield ... enhances biodegradation of polluted soil presumably by removing ...

  18. Avaliação da resposta bioquímica no câncer inicial de próstata: experiência uninstitucional comparando teleterapia exclusiva ou associada à braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose Evaluation of biochemical response on early prostate cancer: comparison between treatment with external beam radiation alone and in combination with high-dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Guedes de Castro

    2004-08-01

    biochemical response in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy alone or in combination with conformal brachytherapy boost. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From November 1997 to January 2000, 74 patients received 45 Gy of pelvic external irradiation and four were treated with high dose rate iridium-192 conformal boost implants of 4 Gy each (BT. These were compared with 29 other patients treated with 45 Gy of pelvic external irradiation followed by a 24 Gy of bilateral ARC boost (RT from October 1996 to February 2000. Some patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Three-year actuarial biochemical control rates (BC3 and pretreatment biochemical response predictors such as prostate-specific antigen pretreatment (PSAi, Gleason score (GS and clinical stage (CS, were evaluated. RESULTS: Median follow-up was of 25 months for the RT group and 37 months for the BT group. BC3 was 51% versus 73% (p = 0.032 for RT and BT, respectively. Comparisons of biochemical control by treatment group stratified by PSAi showed that BC3 for RT versus BT was 85.7% versus 79.1% (p = 0.76 for PSAi 10 ng/mL, respectively. For patients with GS 6, BC3 was 78% versus 55% (p = 0.58 for RT versus BT, respectively. For patients with CS T2a, BC3 was 73% versus 69% (p = 0.692 for RT versus BT, respectively. The relative risk of biochemical relapse was 2.3 (95% IC: 1.0-5.1 for patients in RT group compared to the BT group. When adjusted for PSAi and GS, the relative risk of biochemical relapse was 2.4 (95% IC: 1.0-5.7. CONCLUSION: The treatment modality was an independent prognostic factor for biochemical relapse, with a significant improvement in the biochemical control with BT. These early results suggest that this treatment was most beneficial in patients with PSAi > 10 ng/mL, CS < T2a and GS < 6.

  19. Depression, anxiety, and heart rate variability: A case-control study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Decreased heart rate variability (HRV has been reported in persons with major depressive disorder (MDD, but the results obtained are inconsistent. Little is known about the impact of comorbid anxiety disorders on HRV in MDD patients. Both issues necessitate further investigation. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine unmedicated, physically healthy, MDD patients without comorbidity, 21 MDD patients with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, 24 MDD patients with comorbid panic disorder (PD, and 81 matched controls were recruited. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale are employed to assess the severity of depression and anxiety, respectively. The cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by measuring the HRV parameters. The frequency-domain indices of HRV were obtained. Results: MDD patients without comorbidity had lower high-frequency (HF-HRV (which reflected vagal control of HRV than controls. Any comorbid anxiety disorder (GAD or PD was associated with significantly faster heart rates, relative to the controls, and caused greater reductions in HF-HRV among MDD patients. MDD participants with comorbid GAD displayed the greatest reductions in HF-HRV, relative to controls. Correlation analyses revealed that the severity of both depression and anxiety were significantly associated with the mean R wave to R wave (R-R intervals, variance, low-frequency (LF-HRV, and HF-HRV. Conclusion: The present results show decreased HRV in MDD patients, suggesting that reduction in HRV is a psychophysiological marker of MDD. MDD patients with comorbid GAD had the greatest reductions in HRV. Further investigation of the links between MDD and comorbid GAD, HRV, and cardiovascular disease is warranted.

  20. The modulatory effects of noradrenaline on vagal control of heart rate in the dogfish, Squalus acanthias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnisola, Claudio; Randall, David J; Taylor, Edwin W

    2003-01-01

    The possible interactions between inhibitory vagal control of the heart and circulating levels of catecholamines in dogfish (Squalus acanthias) were studied using an in situ preparation of the heart, which retained intact its innervation from centrally cut vagus nerves. The response to peripheral vagal stimulation typically consisted of an initial cardiac arrest, followed by an escape beat, leading to renewed beating at a mean heart rate lower than the prestimulation rate (partial recovery). Cessation of vagal stimulation led to a transient increase in heart rate, above the prestimulation rate. This whole response was completely abolished by 10(-4) M atropine (a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist). The degree of vagal inhibition was evaluated in terms of both the initial, maximal cardiac interval and the mean heart rate during partial recovery, both expressed as a percentage of the prestimulation heart rate. The mean prestimulation heart rate of this preparation (36+/-4 beats min(-1)) was not affected by noradrenaline but was significantly reduced by 10(-4) M nadolol (a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist), suggesting the existence of a resting adrenergic tone arising from endogenous catecholamines. The degree of vagal inhibition of heart rate varied with the rate of stimulation and was increased by the presence of 10(-8) M noradrenaline (the normal in vivo level in routinely active fish), while 10(-7) M noradrenaline (the in vivo level measured in disturbed or deeply hypoxic fish) reduced the cardiac response to vagal stimulation. In the presence of 10(-7) M noradrenaline, 10(-4) M nadolol further reduced the vagal response, while 10(-4) M nadolol + 10(-4) M phentolamine had no effect, indicating a complex interaction between adrenoreceptors, possibly involving presynaptic modulation of vagal inhibition.

  1. Improving inferior vena cava filter retrieval rates with the define, measure, analyze, improve, control methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutphin, Patrick D; Reis, Stephen P; McKune, Angie; Ravanzo, Maria; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Pillai, Anil K

    2015-04-01

    To design a sustainable process to improve optional inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval rates based on the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) methodology of the Six Sigma process improvement paradigm. DMAIC, an acronym for Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control, was employed to design and implement a quality improvement project to increase IVC filter retrieval rates at a tertiary academic hospital. Retrievable IVC filters were placed in 139 patients over a 2-year period. The baseline IVC filter retrieval rate (n = 51) was reviewed through a retrospective analysis, and two strategies were devised to improve the filter retrieval rate: (a) mailing of letters to clinicians and patients for patients who had filters placed within 8 months of implementation of the project (n = 43) and (b) a prospective automated scheduling of a clinic visit at 4 weeks after filter placement for all new patients (n = 45). The effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by measuring the filter retrieval rates and estimated increase in revenue to interventional radiology. IVC filter retrieval rates increased from a baseline of 8% to 40% with the mailing of letters and to 52% with the automated scheduling of a clinic visit 4 weeks after IVC filter placement. The estimated revenue per 100 IVC filters placed increased from $2,249 to $10,518 with the mailing of letters and to $17,022 with the automated scheduling of a clinic visit. Using the DMAIC methodology, a simple and sustainable quality improvement intervention was devised that markedly improved IVC filter retrieval rates in eligible patients. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biochemical verification of the self-reported smoking status of screened male smokers of the Dutch-Belgian randomized controlled lung cancer screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aalst, Carlijn M; de Koning, Harry J

    2016-04-01

    Smoking is the main cause of lung cancer, so data linked to smoking behaviour are important in lung cancer screening trials. However, self-reporting data concerning smoking behaviour are mainly used. The aim of this study was to biochemically determine the validity and reliability of self-reported smoking status among smokers at high risk for developing lung cancer participating in the Dutch-Belgian lung cancer screening (NELSON) trial. For this sub study, a random sample of 475 men was selected who were scheduled for the fourth screening round in the NELSON trial. They were asked to complete a short questionnaire to verify the smoking behaviour for the previous seven days and a blood sample was collected to measure the cotinine level. The validity (sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV)) and reliability (Kappa) of the self-reported smoking status compared to the cotinine level (as golden standard) were determined. Both a completed questionnaire as well as a cotinine level were available for 199 (41.9%) participants. Based on these data, Se and Sp were respectively 98% (95%-Confidence Interval (CI): 91-99) and 98% (95%-CI: 93-100). PPV and NPV were 98% and 96% and Kappa was 0.96. In conclusion, the validity of the self-reported smoking status turned out to be reliable amongst men at high risk for developing lung cancer who participate in the NELSON lung cancer screening trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Implantable biochemical fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G; Rao, J R

    1978-01-05

    Implantable biochemical fuel cells for the operation of heart pacemakers or artificial hearts convert oxidisable body substances such as glucose on the anode side and reduce the oxygen contained in body fluids at the cathode. The anode and cathode are separated by membranes which are impermeable to albumen and blood corpuscles in body fluids. A chemical shortcircuit cannot occur in practice if, according to the invention, one or more selective oxygen electrodes with carbon as catalyst are arranged so that the mixture which diffuses into the cell from body fluids during operation reaches the fuel cell electrode through the porous oxygen electrode. The membranes used must be permeable to water. Cellulose, polymerised polyvinyl alcohol or an ion exchanger with a buffering capacity between pH5 and 8 act as permeable materials.

  4. God-Mediated Control and Change in Self-Rated Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if feelings of God-mediated control are associated with change in self-rated health over time. In the process, an effort was made to see if a sense of meaning in life and optimism mediated the relationship between God-mediated control and change in health. The following hypothesized relationships were contained in the conceptual model that was developed to evaluate these issues: (1) people who go to church more often tend to have stronger God-mediated control beliefs than individuals who do not attend worship services as often; (2) people with a strong sense of God-mediated control are more likely to find a sense of meaning in life and be more optimistic than individuals who do not have a strong sense of God-mediated control; (3) people who are optimistic and who have a strong sense of meaning in life will rate their health more favorably over time than individuals who are not optimistic, as well as individuals who have not found a sense of meaning in life. Data from a longitudinal nationwide survey of older adults provided support for each of these hypotheses.

  5. Improvement in Device Performance and Reliability of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes through Deposition Rate Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Wei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a fabrication technique to reduce the driving voltage, increase the current efficiency, and extend the operating lifetime of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED by simply controlling the deposition rate of bis(10-hydroxybenzo[h]qinolinato beryllium (Bebq2 used as the emitting layer and the electron-transport layer. In our optimized device, 55 nm of Bebq2 was first deposited at a faster deposition rate of 1.3 nm/s, followed by the deposition of a thin Bebq2 (5 nm layer at a slower rate of 0.03 nm/s. The Bebq2 layer with the faster deposition rate exhibited higher photoluminescence efficiency and was suitable for use in light emission. The thin Bebq2 layer with the slower deposition rate was used to modify the interface between the Bebq2 and cathode and hence improve the injection efficiency and lower the driving voltage. The operating lifetime of such a two-step deposition OLED was 1.92 and 4.6 times longer than that of devices with a single deposition rate, that is, 1.3 and 0.03 nm/s cases, respectively.

  6. Operation logic and functionality of automatic dose rate and image quality control of conventional fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2009-01-01

    New generation of fluoroscopic imaging systems is equipped with spectral shaping filters complemented with sophisticated automatic dose rate and image quality control logic called ''fluoroscopy curve'' or ''trajectory''. Such fluoroscopy curves were implemented first on cardiovascular angiographic imaging systems and are now available on conventional fluoroscopy equipment. This study aims to investigate the control logic operations under the fluoroscopy mode and acquisition mode (equivalent to the legacy spot filming) of a conventional fluoroscopy system typically installed for upper-lower gastrointestinal examinations, interventional endoscopy laboratories, gastrointestinal laboratory, and pain clinics.

  7. Changes in hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control rates in Turkey from 2003 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Sule; Akpolat, Tekin; Erdem, Yunus; Derici, Ulver; Arici, Mustafa; Sindel, Sukru; Karatan, Oktay; Turgan, Cetin; Hasanoglu, Enver; Caglar, Sali; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to assess the current epidemiology of hypertension, including its prevalence, the awareness of the condition and its treatment and control, in Turkey to evaluate changes in these factors over the last 10 years by comparing the results with the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (PatenT) study data (2003), as well as to assess parameters affecting awareness and the control of hypertension. Methods: The PatenT 2 study was conducted on a representative sample of the Turkish adult population (n = 5437) in 2012. Specifically trained staff performed the data collection. Hypertension was defined as mean SBP or DBP at least 140/90 mmHg, previously diagnosed disease or the use of antihypertensive medication. Awareness and treatment were assessed by self-reporting, and control was defined as SBP/DBP less than 140/90 mmHg. Results: Although the prevalence of hypertension in the PatenT and PatenT 2 surveys was stable at approximately 30%, hypertension awareness, treatment, and control rates have improved in Turkey. Overall, 54.7% of hypertensive patients were aware of their diagnosis in 2012 compared with 40.7% in 2003. The hypertension treatment rate increased from 31.1% in 2003 to 47.4% in 2012, and the control rate in hypertensives increased from 8.1% in 2003 to 28.7% in 2012. The rate of hypertension control in treated patients improved between 2003 (20.7%) and 2012 (53.9%). Awareness of hypertension was positively associated with older age, being a woman, residing in an urban area, a history of parental hypertension, being a nonsmoker, admittance by a physician, presence of diabetes mellitus, and being obese or overweight; it was inversely associated with a higher amount of daily bread consumption. Factors associated with better control of hypertension were younger age, female sex, residing in an urban area, and higher education level in Turkey. Conclusion: Although some progress has been made in

  8. Operation logic and functionality of automatic dose rate and image quality control of conventional fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    New generation of fluoroscopic imaging systems is equipped with spectral shaping filters complemented with sophisticated automatic dose rate and image quality control logic called ''fluoroscopy curve'' or ''trajectory''. Such fluoroscopy curves were implemented first on cardiovascular angiographic imaging systems and are now available on conventional fluoroscopy equipment. This study aims to investigate the control logic operations under the fluoroscopy mode and acquisition mode (equivalent to the legacy spot filming) of a conventional fluoroscopy system typically installed for upper-lower gastrointestinal examinations, interventional endoscopy laboratories, gastrointestinal laboratory, and pain clinics.

  9. Multi-objective control of nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics with actuator magnitude and rate constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pang-Chia

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates multi-objective controller design approaches for nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics subject to actuator magnitude and rate constraints. System nonlinearity is handled by a suitable linear parameter varying system representation with drum pressure as the system varying parameter. Variation of the drum pressure is represented by suitable norm-bounded uncertainty and affine dependence on system matrices. Based on linear matrix inequality algorithms, the magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator and the deviations of fluid density and water level are formulated while the tracking abilities on the drum pressure and power output are optimized. Variation ranges of drum pressure and magnitude tracking commands are used as controller design parameters, determined according to the boiler-turbine's operation range. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Combined use of autogenic therapy and biofeedback in training effective control of heart rate by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed on 24 men and women (aged 20-27 yr) in three equal groups who were taught to control their own heart rates by autogenic training and biofeedback under dark and sound-isolated conditions. Group I was parasympathetic dominant, group II was sympathetic dominant, and group III consisted of parasympathetic-dominant subjects and controls who received only biofeedback of their own heart rates. The results corroborate three hypotheses: (1) subjects with para-sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles perform in a way that is both qualitatively and quantitatively different from subjects with sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles; (2) tests of interindividual variability yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; and (3) the combined use of autogenic training, biofeedback, and verbal feedback is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans.

  11. Measurements and calculations of 10B(n,He) reaction rates in a control rod in ZPPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumbach, S.B.; Collins, P.J.; Grasseschi, G.L.; Oliver, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) technique has been used to measure the 10 B(n,He) reaction rate within B 4 C pellets in a control rod in ZPPR. Knowledge of this reaction rate is important to control rod design studies because helium production leads to control rod swelling, buildup of gas pressure and a reduction in thermal conductivity which can limit the lifetime of a control rod. We believe these to be the first measurements of boron capture within boron pins in a fast reactor spectrum. Previously reported measurements used 235 U foils to measure fission rates in a control rod, and to infer boron capture rates

  12. High infection control rate and function after routine one-stage exchange for chronically infected TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Barbe, Bruno; Gaudias, Jeannot; Boeri, Cyril; Argenson, Jean-Noël

    2013-01-01

    Many surgeons consider two-stage exchange the gold standard for treating chronic infection after TKA. One-stage exchange is an alternative for infection control and might provide better knee function, but the rates of infection control and levels of function are unclear. We asked whether a one-stage exchange protocol would lead to infection control rates and knee function similar to those after two-stage exchange. We followed all 47 patients with chronically infected TKAs treated with one-stage exchange between July 2004 and February 2007. We monitored for recurrence of infection and obtained Knee Society Scores. We followed patients a minimum of 3 years or until death or infection recurrence. Three of the 47 patients (6%) experienced a persistence or recurrence of the index infection with the same pathogen isolated. Three patients (6%) had control of the index infection but between 6 and 17 months experienced an infection with another pathogen. The 3-year survival rates were 87% for being free of any infection and 91% for being healed of the index infection. Twenty-five of the 45 patients (56%) had a Knee Society Score of more than 150 points. While routine one-stage exchange was not associated with a higher rate of infection recurrence failure, knee function was not improved compared to that of historical patients having two-stage exchange. One stage-exchange may be a reasonable alternative in chronically infected TKA as a more convenient approach for patients without the risks of two operations and hospitalizations and for reducing costs. The ideal one stage-exchange candidate should be identified in future studies.

  13. Relationship between two year PSA nadir and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antônio da Silva Franca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the relationship between two year PSA nadir (PSAn after brachytherapy and biochemical recurrence rates in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods In the period from January 1998 to August 2007, 120 patients were treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy alone. The results analysis was based on the definition of biochemical recurrence according to the Phoenix Consensus. Results Biochemical control was observed in 86 patients (71.7%, and biochemical recurrence, in 34 (28.3%. Mean PSAn was 0.53 ng/ml. The mean follow-up was 98 months. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, with two year PSAn < 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (74 patients; 61.7%, and group 2, with two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (46 patients; 38.3%. Group 1 presented biochemical recurrence in 15 patients (20.3%, and group 2, in 19 patients (43.2% (p < 0.02. The analysis of biochemical disease-free survival at seven years, stratified by the two groups, showed values of 80% and 64% (p < 0.02, respectively. Conclusion Levels of two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy are strongly correlated with a poor prognosis. This fact may help to identify patients at risk for disease recurrence.

  14. Securing a robust electrical discharge drilling process by means of flow rate control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risto, Matthias; Munz, Markus; Haas, Ruediger; Abdolahi, Ali

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with the increase of the process robustness while drilling cemented carbide using electrical discharge machining (EDM). A demand for high efficiency in the resulting diameter is equivalent with a high robustness of the EDM drilling process. Analysis were done to investigate the process robustness (standard deviation of the borehole diameter) when drilling cemented carbide. The investigation has shown that the dielectric flow rate changes over the drilling process. In this case the flow rate decreased with a shorter tool electrode due to an uneven wear of the tool electrode's cross section. Using a controlled flow rate during the drilling process has led to a reduced standard deviation of the borehole diameter, thus to a higher process robustness when drilling cemented carbide.

  15. A Reaction-Diffusion-Based Coding Rate Control Mechanism for Camera Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Wakamiya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal.

  16. A reaction-diffusion-based coding rate control mechanism for camera sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Katsuya; Wakamiya, Naoki; Murata, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal.

  17. Controlled precipitation for enhanced dissolution rate of flurbiprofen: development of rapidly disintegrating tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, Ebtessam A; Elmarakby, Amira O; Donia, Ahmed M A; El Maghraby, Gamal M

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of controlled precipitation of flurbiprofen on solid surface, in the presence or absence of hydrophilic polymers, as a tool for enhanced dissolution rate of the drug. The work was extended to develop rapidly disintegrated tablets. This strategy provides simple technique for dissolution enhancement of slowly dissolving drugs with high scaling up potential. Aerosil was dispersed in ethanolic solution of flurbiprofen in the presence and absence of hydrophilic polymers. Acidified water was added as antisolvent to produce controlled precipitation. The resultant particles were centrifuged and dried at ambient temperature before monitoring the dissolution pattern. The particles were also subjected to FTIR spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction and thermal analyses. The FTIR spectroscopy excluded any interaction between flurbiprofen and excipients. The thermal analysis reflected possible change in the crystalline structure and or crystal size of the drug after controlled precipitation in the presence of hydrophilic polymers. This was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The modulation in the crystalline structure and size was associated with a significant enhancement in the dissolution rate of flurbiprofen. Optimum formulations were successfully formulated as rapidly disintegrating tablet with subsequent fast dissolution. Precipitation on a large solid surface area is a promising strategy for enhanced dissolution rate with the presence of hydrophilic polymers during precipitation process improving the efficiency.

  18. Automatic learning rate adjustment for self-supervising autonomous robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    Described is an application in which an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) controls the positioning of a robot arm with five degrees of freedom by using visual feedback provided by two cameras. This application and the specific ANN model, local liner maps, are based on the work of Ritter, Martinetz, and Schulten. We extended their approach by generating a filtered, average positioning error from the continuous camera feedback and by coupling the learning rate to this error. When the network learns to position the arm, the positioning error decreases and so does the learning rate until the system stabilizes at a minimum error and learning rate. This abolishes the need for a predetermined cooling schedule. The automatic cooling procedure results in a closed loop control with no distinction between a learning phase and a production phase. If the positioning error suddenly starts to increase due to an internal failure such as a broken joint, or an environmental change such as a camera moving, the learning rate increases accordingly. Thus, learning is automatically activated and the network adapts to the new condition after which the error decreases again and learning is 'shut off'. The automatic cooling is therefore a prerequisite for the autonomy and the fault tolerance of the system.

  19. Volume Changes After Stereotactic LINAC Radiotherapy in Vestibular Schwannoma: Control Rate and Growth Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberg, Rick van de; Dohmen, Amy J.C.; Bondt, Bert J. de; Nelemans, Patty J.; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the control rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS) after treatment with linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or radiotherapy (SRT) by using a validated volumetric measuring tool. Volume-based studies on prognosis after LINAC-based SRS or SRT for VS are reported scarcely. In addition, growth patterns and risk factors predicting treatment failure were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 37 VS patients treated with LINAC based SRS or SRT were analyzed. Baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with volume measurements on contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Absence of intervention after radiotherapy was defined as “no additional intervention group, ” absence of radiological growth was defined as “radiological control group. ” Significant growth was defined as a volume change of 19.7% or more, as calculated in a previous study. Results: The cumulative 4-year probability of no additional intervention was 96.4% ± 0.03; the 4-year radiological control probability was 85.4% ± 0.1). The median follow-up was 40 months. Overall, shrinkage was seen in 65%, stable VS in 22%, and growth in 13%. In 54% of all patients, transient swelling was observed. No prognostic factors were found regarding VS growth. Previous treatment and SRS were associated with transient swelling significantly. Conclusions: Good control rates are reported for LINAC based SRS or SRT in VS, in which the lower rate of radiological growth control is attributed to the use of the more sensitive volume measurements. Transient swelling after radiosurgery is a common phenomenon and should not be mistaken for treatment failure. Previous treatment and SRS were significantly associated with transient swelling.

  20. Capital Controls, Two-tiered Exchange Rate Systems and the Exchange Rate Policy : The South African Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaling, E.

    2005-01-01

    South Africa's 40 years of experience with capital controls on residents and non-residents (1961-2001) reads like a collection of examples of perverse unanticipated effects of legislation and regulation.We show that the presence of capital controls on residents and non-residents, enabled the South

  1. Gender-related differences in rhythm control treatment in persistent atrial fibrillation : data of the Rate Control Versus Electrical Cardioversion (RACE) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hagens, Vincent E; Ranchor, Adelita V; Veeger, Nic J G M; Crijns, Hendrikus; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to compare whether gender affects the outcome of rate versus rhythm control treatment in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). Background: Large trials have shown that rate control is an acceptable alternative to rhythm control. However, the effects of

  2. The effect of initial density and parasitoid intergenerational survival rate on classical biological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yanni; Tang Sanyi

    2008-01-01

    Models of biological control have a long history of theoretical development that have focused on the interaction of a parasitoid and its host. The host-parasitoid systems have identified several important and general factors affecting the long-term dynamics of interacting populations. However, much less is known about how the initial densities of host-parasitoid populations affect the biological control as well as the stability of host-parasitoid systems. To do this, the classical Nicholson-Bailey model with host self-regulation and parasitoid intergenerational survival rate is used to uncover the effect of initial densities on the successful biological control. The results indicate that the simplest Nicholson-Bailey model has various coexistence with a wide range of parameters, including boundary attractors where the parasitoid population is absent and interior attractors where host-parasitoid coexists. The final stable states of host-parasitoid populations depend on their initial densities as well as their ratios, and those results are confirmed by basins of attraction of initial densities. The results also indicate that the parasitoid intergenerational survival rate increases the stability of the host-parasitoid systems. Therefore, the present research can help us to further understand the dynamical behavior of host-parasitoid interactions, to improve the classical biological control and to make management decisions

  3. Effects of externally rated job demand and control on depression diagnosis claims in an industrial cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSanto Iennaco, Joanne; Cullen, Mark R; Cantley, Linda; Slade, Martin D; Fiellin, Martha; Kasl, Stanislav V

    2010-02-01

    This study examined whether externally rated job demand and control were associated with depression diagnosis claims in a heavy industrial cohort. The retrospective cohort sample consisted of 7,566 hourly workers aged 18-64 years who were actively employed at 11 US plants between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2003, and free of depression diagnosis claims during an initial 2-year run-in period. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the effect of tertiles of demand and control exposure on depression diagnosis claims. Demand had a significant positive association with depression diagnosis claims in bivariate models and models adjusted for demographic (age, gender, race, education, job grade, tenure) and lifestyle (smoking status, body mass index, cholesterol level) variables (high demand odds ratio = 1.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.86). Control was associated with greater risk of depression diagnosis at moderate levels in unadjusted models only (odds ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.12, 1.93), while low control, contrary to expectation, was not associated with depression. The effects of the externally rated demand exposure were lost with adjustment for location. This may reflect differences in measurement or classification of exposure, differences in depression diagnosis by location, or other location-specific factors.

  4. Highly Controlled Codeposition Rate of Organolead Halide Perovskite by Laser Evaporation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Sugita, Takeshi; Tampo, Hitoshi; Matsubara, Koji; Chikamatsu, Masayuki

    2016-10-05

    Organolead-halide perovskites can be promising materials for next-generation solar cells because of its high power conversion efficiency. The method of precise fabrication is required because both solution-process and vacuum-process fabrication of the perovskite have problems of controllability and reproducibility. Vacuum deposition process was expected to achieve precise control; however, vaporization of amine compound significantly degrades the controllability of deposition rate. Here we achieved the reduction of the vaporization by implementing the laser evaporation system for the codeposition of perovskite. Locally irradiated continuous-wave lasers on the source materials realized the reduced vaporization of CH 3 NH 3 I. The deposition rate was stabilized for several hours by adjusting the duty ratio of modulated laser based on proportional-integral control. Organic-photovoltaic-type perovskite solar cells were fabricated by codeposition of PbI 2 and CH 3 NH 3 I. A power-conversion efficiency of 16.0% with reduced hysteresis was achieved.

  5. Internal Medicine Physicians’ Perceptions Regarding Rate versus Rhythm Control for Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, James M.; Johnson, Colleen J; Marcus, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is often managed by general internal medicine physicians. Available data suggest that guidelines regarding AF management are often not followed, but the reasons for this remain unknown. We sought to assess the knowledge and beliefs of internists regarding strategies to treat AF. We conducted a national electronic survey of internal medicine physicians regarding their perceptions of optimal AF management, with an emphasis on the rationale for choosing a rhythm or rate control strategy. One hundred and forty-eight physicians from 36 different states responded (representing at least 19% of unique e-mails opened). Half of the respondents reported managing their AF patients independently without referral to a cardiologist. Seventy-three percent of participants believe a rhythm control strategy conveys a decreased stroke risk, 64% believe there is a mortality benefit to rhythm control, and 55% think that it would help avoid long term anticoagulation. Comparing those who prefer a rhythm control strategy to everyone else, those who favor rhythm control statistically significantly more often believe that rhythm control reduces the risk for stroke (96% versus 67%, p=0.009) and that rhythm control allows for the discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy (76% versus 49%, p=0.045). In conclusion, contrary to available data in clinical trials and recent guidelines regarding the rationale for choosing a rhythm control strategy in treating AF, the majority of study participants believe that rhythm control decreases stroke risk, decreases mortality, and allows for discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy. These prevalent misconceptions may substantially contribute to guideline non-adherence. PMID:19195516

  6. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Ming Yen [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hong Kong (China); Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J.; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S.; Nguyen, Elsie T. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. (orig.)

  7. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Ming Yen; Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J.; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S.; Nguyen, Elsie T.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. (orig.)

  8. CHARACTERISTIC OF PARAMETERS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFICULT-TO-CONTROL AND CONTROLLED ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tymoshenko O. S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Parameters of heart rate variability (HRV were studied in 112 patients with arterial hypertension (AH aged 58.5 ± 9 years (60 patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (DTCAH and 52 patients with controlled arterial hypertension (CAH. The control group was consisted of 20 conditionally healthy persons of the same sex and age. It has been established that patients with AH were characterized by decrease in the level of total power of the HRV spectrum, the power of the high-frequency (HF and low-frequency (LF domains of the spectrum, and increase in the level of the very low-frequency spectrum (VLF and value LF/HF that reflect sympathovagal balance. It has been established that there were more significant disorders in neurohumoral regulation in patients with DTCAH in comparison with patients with CAH, which consist of the predominant adrenergic activation, primarily due to the sympathetic link of the autonomic nervous system. HRV can be used as an effective non-invasive method for the diagnosis and control of DTCAH.

  9. Exposure rate measurements and radiation control in post therapy with I131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez A, M.; Castillo D, C.; Flores U, H.; Cespedes C, L.; Morgan N, C.; Sifuentes D, Y.; Marin R, K.

    2015-10-01

    During hyperthyroidism treatment, 131 I activities from 111 MBq up to 296 MBq are used. In the aim to determine if the 131 I uptake by the patient is a radiological risk to family members and public around the patient exposure rate measurements were carried out, using a limit 1.8 m R/h. Measurements were carried out in the Nuclear Medicine department of Almenara hospital in Lima, Peru. The exposure rate was measured to 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0 m from the patient from 0 to 11 days after post-administrated dose (Pda). In this study measurements were carried out in 21 hyperthyroid patients. Measurements to 1 meter, along 2-4 (16/16), 5-7 (15/15), and 8-11 (14/14) days after Pda, indicate the dose rate around 100% of patients is ≤ 1.8 m R /h. Measurements to 0.6 meters along 2-4 (16/16), 5 -7 (15/15), and 8-11 (14/14) days after Pda, indicate that the dose rate around 44% (7/16), 93% (14/15), and 100% (14/14) of patients is ≤ 1.8 m R h. On the other hand, dose rate measurements to 0.3 meters, along 2-4 (16/16), 5-7 (15/15), and 8 -11 (14/14) days after Pda, indicate that de dose rate is 13% (2/16), 6% (1/15), and 43% (6/14) of patients is ≤ 1.8 m R/h. Measured exposure rates are alike to values reported in the literature, and were used to define radiation control recommendations. (Author)

  10. X-Chromosome Control of Genome-Scale Recombination Rates in House Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Beth L

    2017-04-01

    Sex differences in recombination are widespread in mammals, but the causes of this pattern are poorly understood. Previously, males from two interfertile subspecies of house mice, Mus musculus musculus and M. m. castaneus , were shown to exhibit a ∼30% difference in their global crossover frequencies. Much of this crossover rate divergence is explained by six autosomal loci and a large-effect locus on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the allelic effects at this X-linked locus are transgressive, with the allele conferring increased crossover rate being transmitted by the low crossover rate M. m. castaneus parent. Despite the pronounced divergence between males, females from these subspecies exhibit similar crossover rates, raising the question of how recombination is genetically controlled in this sex. Here, I analyze publicly available genotype data from early generations of the Collaborative Cross, an eight-way panel of recombinant inbred strains, to estimate crossover frequencies in female mice with sex-chromosome genotypes of diverse subspecific origins. Consistent with the transgressive influence of the X chromosome in males, I show that females inheriting an M. m. castaneus X possess higher average crossover rates than females lacking the M. m. castaneus X chromosome. The differential inheritance of the X chromosome in males and females provides a simple genetic explanation for sex-limited evolution of this trait. Further, the presence of X-linked and autosomal crossover rate modifiers with antagonistic effects hints at an underlying genetic conflict fueled by selection for distinct crossover rate optima in males and females. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Estimation of dose rate around the spent control rods of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino P, G.

    2016-01-01

    The energy can come from fossil renewable sources (solar (natural gas, oil), wind, hydro, tidal, geothermal, biomass, bio energy and nuclear. Nuclear power can be obtained by fission reactions and fusion (still under investigation) atomic nuclei. Fission, is a partition of a very heavy nucleus (Uranium 235, for example) into two lighter nuclei. Much of the world's electric power is generated from the energy released by fission processes. In a nuclear power reactor, light water as the BWR, there are many important elements that allow safe driving operation, one of them are the elements or control systems, the burnable poison or neutron absorber inherently allow control power reactor. The control rods, which consist mostly of stainless steel and absorbing elements (such as boron carbide, hafnium, cadmium, among others) of thermal neutrons is able to initiate, regulate or stop the reactor power. These, due to the use of depleted burned or absorbing material and therefore reach their lifespan, which can be 15 years or have other values depending on the manufacturer. Control rods worn should be removed, stored or confined in expressly places. Precisely at this stage arises the importance of knowing their radiological condition to manipulate safely and without incident to the people health responsible for conducting these proceedings state arises. This thesis consists in the estimation of the dose rate in spent control rod made of boron carbide, from a typical BWR reactor. It will be estimated by direct radiation measurements with measurement equipment for radiotherapy ionization chamber, in six spent control rods, which were taken at different reactor operating cycles and are in a spent fuel pool. Using bracket electromechanical and electronic equipment for positioning and lifting equipment for radiation measurement around the control rod in the axial and radial arrangement for proper scanning. Finally will be presented a graphic corresponding to the dose

  12. Mother-child agreement on behavioral ratings in Tourette syndrome: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termine, Cristiano; Luoni, Chiara; Selvini, Claudia; Bandera, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Eddy, Clare M; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    In Tourette syndrome, motor and phonic tics are associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders. As proxy report instruments are commonly used to assess children with Tourette syndrome, we investigated the relationship between child and mother ratings of behavioral problems. We enrolled 28 children with Tourette syndrome (25 males; mean age, 13.9 years) and 61 gender- and age-matched healthy controls (55 males; mean age, 14.7 years). Clinicians completed measures of tic severity, and all children completed the Youth Self-Report version of the Child Behavior Checklist, while their mothers completed the Child Behavior Checklist. In the clinical group, Youth Self-Report scores were significantly lower than mothers' Child Behavior Checklist scores across the majority of subscales (especially affect and somatization). In contrast, for the control group, mother and child ratings only differed for the externalizing behavior subscales. Clinicians should be aware of these differences between self and mother ratings for specific behavioral problems in Tourette syndrome.

  13. Joint Machine Learning and Game Theory for Rate Control in High Efficiency Video Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Kwong, Sam; Jia, Yuheng

    2017-08-25

    In this paper, a joint machine learning and game theory modeling (MLGT) framework is proposed for inter frame coding tree unit (CTU) level bit allocation and rate control (RC) optimization in High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC). First, a support vector machine (SVM) based multi-classification scheme is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of CTU-level Rate-Distortion (R-D) model. The legacy "chicken-and-egg" dilemma in video coding is proposed to be overcome by the learning-based R-D model. Second, a mixed R-D model based cooperative bargaining game theory is proposed for bit allocation optimization, where the convexity of the mixed R-D model based utility function is proved, and Nash bargaining solution (NBS) is achieved by the proposed iterative solution search method. The minimum utility is adjusted by the reference coding distortion and frame-level Quantization parameter (QP) change. Lastly, intra frame QP and inter frame adaptive bit ratios are adjusted to make inter frames have more bit resources to maintain smooth quality and bit consumption in the bargaining game optimization. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MLGT based RC method can achieve much better R-D performances, quality smoothness, bit rate accuracy, buffer control results and subjective visual quality than the other state-of-the-art one-pass RC methods, and the achieved R-D performances are very close to the performance limits from the FixedQP method.

  14. Correlation of a hypoxia based tumor control model with observed local control rates in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanzo, Michele; Stancanello, Joseph; Franchin, Giovanni; Sartor, Giovanna; Jena, Rajesh; Drigo, Annalisa; Dassie, Andrea; Gigante, Marco; Capra, Elvira [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Research and Clinical Collaborations, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To extend the application of current radiation therapy (RT) based tumor control probability (TCP) models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) to include the effects of hypoxia and chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: A TCP model is described based on the linear-quadratic model modified to account for repopulation, chemotherapy, heterogeneity of dose to the tumor, and hypoxia. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters exert the greatest influence on the uncertainty of modeled TCP. On the basis of the sensitivity analysis, the values of specific radiobiological parameters were set to nominal values reported in the literature for NPC or head and neck tumors. The remaining radiobiological parameters were determined by fitting TCP to clinical local control data from published randomized studies using both RT and CRT. Validation of the model was performed by comparison of estimated TCP and average overall local control rate (LCR) for 45 patients treated at the institution with conventional linear-accelerator-based or helical tomotherapy based intensity-modulated RT and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the model is most sensitive to the radiosensitivity term {alpha} and the dose per fraction. The estimated values of {alpha} and OER from data fitting were 0.396 Gy{sup -1} and 1.417. The model estimate of TCP (average 90.9%, range 26.9%-99.2%) showed good correlation with the LCR (86.7%). Conclusions: The model implemented in this work provides clinicians with a useful tool to predict the success rate of treatment, optimize treatment plans, and compare the effects of multimodality therapy.

  15. Correlation of a hypoxia based tumor control model with observed local control rates in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avanzo, Michele; Stancanello, Joseph; Franchin, Giovanni; Sartor, Giovanna; Jena, Rajesh; Drigo, Annalisa; Dassie, Andrea; Gigante, Marco; Capra, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To extend the application of current radiation therapy (RT) based tumor control probability (TCP) models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) to include the effects of hypoxia and chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: A TCP model is described based on the linear-quadratic model modified to account for repopulation, chemotherapy, heterogeneity of dose to the tumor, and hypoxia. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters exert the greatest influence on the uncertainty of modeled TCP. On the basis of the sensitivity analysis, the values of specific radiobiological parameters were set to nominal values reported in the literature for NPC or head and neck tumors. The remaining radiobiological parameters were determined by fitting TCP to clinical local control data from published randomized studies using both RT and CRT. Validation of the model was performed by comparison of estimated TCP and average overall local control rate (LCR) for 45 patients treated at the institution with conventional linear-accelerator-based or helical tomotherapy based intensity-modulated RT and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the model is most sensitive to the radiosensitivity term α and the dose per fraction. The estimated values of α and OER from data fitting were 0.396 Gy -1 and 1.417. The model estimate of TCP (average 90.9%, range 26.9%-99.2%) showed good correlation with the LCR (86.7%). Conclusions: The model implemented in this work provides clinicians with a useful tool to predict the success rate of treatment, optimize treatment plans, and compare the effects of multimodality therapy.

  16. Analysis of physical properties controlling steady-state infiltration rates on tropical savannah soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.

    1993-10-01

    A knowledge of physical properties influencing the steady-state infiltration rates (ic) of soils is needed for the hydrologic modelling of the infiltration process. In this study evidence is provided to show that effective porosity (Pe) (i.e. the proportion of macro pore spaces with equivalent radius of > 15 μm) and dry bulk density are the most important soil physical properties controlling the steady-state infiltration rates on a tropical savannah with varying land use histories. At a macro porosity value of ≤ 5.0% the steady-state infiltration rate is zero. Total porosity and the proportion of water-retaining pores explained only a small fraction of the variation in this property. Steady-state infiltration rates can also be estimated from either the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) by the equation, i c = 31.1 + 1.06 (Ks), (R 2 = 0.8104, p ≤ 0.001) or the soil water transmissivity (A) by the equation, i c = 30.0 + 29.9(A), (R 2 = 0.8228, ρ ≤ 0.001). The Philip two-parameter model under predicted steady-state infiltration rates generally. Considering the ease of determination and reliability it is suggested that effective porosity be used to estimate the steady-state infiltration rates of these other soils with similar characteristics. The model is, i c 388.7(Pe) - 10.8(R 2 = 0.7265, p ≤ 0.001) where i c is in (cm/hr) and Pe in (cm 3 /cm 3 ). (author). 20 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  17. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ming Yen; Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S; Nguyen, Elsie T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. • Relaxation music does not reduce heart rate in cardiac CT • Relaxation music does not reduce beta-blocker use in cardiac CT • Relaxation music has no effect on cardiac CT image quality • Low levels of anxiety are present in patients prior to cardiac CT • Patients enjoyed the relaxation music and this results in improved patient experience.

  18. Physiological and biochemical response to high temperature stress in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayamanesh, Shahnoosh; Keitel, Claudia; Ahmad, Nabil; Trethowan, Richard

    2016-04-01

    High temperature has been shown to lower the growth and yield of Okra, an important summer vegetable crop grown in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Australia. We aimed to characterise the physiological and biochemical response of Okra to heat stress. 150 genotypes from Pakistan and the AVRDC (The World Vegetable Centre) were screened for their physiological response (fluorescence, electrolyte leakage and yield) to heat in a greenhouse. Four genotypes (including heat tolerant and sensitive) were selected and subsequently grown in control and hot greenhouses. Daytime temperatures were on average 10°C warmer in the hot greenhouse, whereas nighttime temperatures were similar between the two temperature treatments. During a 12 week period, the physiological (assimilation rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, fluorescence, electrolyte leakage, water potential) and biochemical (carbohydrates, sugar alcohols, C content) response of the four genotypes to heat stress was assessed. The effect of heat stress on the C allocation patterns and yield in Okra will be discussed.

  19. Flow rate of transport network controls uniform metabolite supply to tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigel, Felix J; Alim, Karen

    2018-05-01

    Life and functioning of higher organisms depends on the continuous supply of metabolites to tissues and organs. What are the requirements on the transport network pervading a tissue to provide a uniform supply of nutrients, minerals or hormones? To theoretically answer this question, we present an analytical scaling argument and numerical simulations on how flow dynamics and network architecture control active spread and uniform supply of metabolites by studying the example of xylem vessels in plants. We identify the fluid inflow rate as the key factor for uniform supply. While at low inflow rates metabolites are already exhausted close to flow inlets, too high inflow flushes metabolites through the network and deprives tissue close to inlets of supply. In between these two regimes, there exists an optimal inflow rate that yields a uniform supply of metabolites. We determine this optimal inflow analytically in quantitative agreement with numerical results. Optimizing network architecture by reducing the supply variance over all network tubes, we identify patterns of tube dilation or contraction that compensate sub-optimal supply for the case of too low or too high inflow rate. © 2018 The Authors.

  20. Physical control of carrier-mediated ion-transporters by entrainment of their turnover rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Mathis, Clausell; Fang, Zhihui; Mast, Jason; Hamidi, Karim; Kelly, Patrick; Eve, Max

    2012-02-01

    In the past, tremendous efforts have been made to physically activate carrier-mediated ion-transporters, such as Na/K pumps. However, the outcome is not significant. Recently, we developed a new technique which can effectively and efficiently control the pumping rate by introducing a concept of an electronic synchrotron accelerator to the biological system. The approach consists of two steps. First, a specially designed oscillating electric field is used to force or synchronize individual pump molecules to run at the same turnover rate and phase as the field oscillation frequency. Then, by gradually changing the field frequency and carefully keeping the pump synchronization we can entrain the pump molecules so that their pumping rate can be progressively modulated, either decelerated or accelerated, following the field frequency to a defined value. Based on theoretical analysis of the underlying mechanisms involved in the technique, computer simulation of the entrainment process, and intensive experimental studies we have realized significant activation of the Na/K pumping rate up to ten-folds quickly in less than ten seconds.

  1. Rate and rhythm control strategies for apraxia of speech in nonfluent primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beber, Bárbara Costa; Berbert, Monalise Costa Batista; Grawer, Ruth Siqueira; Cardoso, Maria Cristina de Almeida Freitas

    2018-01-01

    The nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia is characterized by apraxia of speech and agrammatism. Apraxia of speech limits patients' communication due to slow speaking rate, sound substitutions, articulatory groping, false starts and restarts, segmentation of syllables, and increased difficulty with increasing utterance length. Speech and language therapy is known to benefit individuals with apraxia of speech due to stroke, but little is known about its effects in primary progressive aphasia. This is a case report of a 72-year-old, illiterate housewife, who was diagnosed with nonfluent primary progressive aphasia and received speech and language therapy for apraxia of speech. Rate and rhythm control strategies for apraxia of speech were trained to improve initiation of speech. We discuss the importance of these strategies to alleviate apraxia of speech in this condition and the future perspectives in the area.

  2. Mass Spectrometric Calibration of Controlled Fluoroform Leak Rate Devices Technique and Uncertainty Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balsley, S D; Laduca, C A

    2003-01-01

    Controlled leak rate devices of fluoroform on the order of 10 sup - sup 8 atm centre dot cc sec sup - sup 1 at 25 C are used to calibrate QC-1 War Reserve neutron tube exhaust stations for leak detection sensitivity. Close-out calibration of these tritium-contaminated devices is provided by the Gas Dynamics and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Organization 14406, which is a tritium analytical facility. The mass spectrometric technique used for the measurement is discussed, as is the first principals calculation (pressure, volume, temperature and time). The uncertainty of the measurement is largely driven by contributing factors in the determination of P, V and T. The expanded uncertainty of the leak rate measurement is shown to be 4.42%, with a coverage factor of 3 (k=3).

  3. Rate and rhythm control strategies for apraxia of speech in nonfluent primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Costa Beber

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia is characterized by apraxia of speech and agrammatism. Apraxia of speech limits patients' communication due to slow speaking rate, sound substitutions, articulatory groping, false starts and restarts, segmentation of syllables, and increased difficulty with increasing utterance length. Speech and language therapy is known to benefit individuals with apraxia of speech due to stroke, but little is known about its effects in primary progressive aphasia. This is a case report of a 72-year-old, illiterate housewife, who was diagnosed with nonfluent primary progressive aphasia and received speech and language therapy for apraxia of speech. Rate and rhythm control strategies for apraxia of speech were trained to improve initiation of speech. We discuss the importance of these strategies to alleviate apraxia of speech in this condition and the future perspectives in the area.

  4. Some biochemical studies on thyroid immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoush, M.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of induced immunological environment on: a - Carbohydrate metabolism as reflected by immunoreactive insulin and blood sugar levels. b - Biochemical parameters, namely total protein, albumin, globulin, alkaline phosphatase and transaminases, reflecting liver function. c - Radioimmunological tests reflecting thyroid function. The study comprised 36 male rabbits, boscate strain of six months age assigned randomly to : control, albumin immunized and thyroglobulin immunized groups

  5. A combined fair decentralized message-rate and data-rate congestion control for V2V communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belagal Math, Chetan; Li, Hong; De Groot, Sonia Heemstra; Niemegeers, Ignas

    2018-01-01

    Channel congestion Is one of the most critical Issues In IEEE 802.11p-based vehicular ad hoc networks as it leads to unreliability of safety applications. As a counter measure, the European Telecommunications Standard Institute (ETSI), proposes a mandatory Decentralized Congestion Control (DCC)

  6. Energy-Neutral Data Collection Rate Control for IoT Animal Behavior Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Wilhelm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy-neutral operation (ENO is a major concern for Internet of things (IoT sensor systems. Animals can be tagged with IoT sensors to monitor their movement and behavior. These sensors wirelessly upload collected data and can receive parameters to change their operation. Typically, the behavior monitors are powered by a battery where the system relies upon harvesting solar radiation for sustainable operation. Solar panels typically are used as the harvesting mechanism and can have a level of uncertainty regarding consistent energy delivery due to factors such as adverse weather, foliage, time of day, and individual animal behavior. The variability of available energy inevitably creates a trade-off in the rate at which data can be collected with respect to incoming and stored energy. The objective of this research was to investigate and simulate methods and parameters that can control the data collection rate of an IoT behavior monitor to achieve sustained operation with unknown and random energy harvesting. Analysis and development of a control system were performed by creating a software model of energy consumption and then simulating using different initial conditions and random energy harvesting rates for evaluation. The contribution of this effort was the exploration into the usage of a discrete-time gain scheduled Proportional–Integral–Derivative (PID that was tuned to a specific device configuration, using battery state of charge as an input, and found to maintain a battery level set-point, reject small solar harvesting energy disturbances, and maintain a consistent data collection rate throughout the day.

  7. Muscular Contraction Mode Differently Affects Autonomic Control During Heart Rate Matched Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eWeippert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The precise contributions of afferent feedback to cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise are still unclear. Aim of this crossover study was to assess whether and how autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory control differed in response to dynamic (DYN and isometric contractions (ISO at a similar, low heart rate (HR level. Therefore, 22 healthy males (26.7 ± 3.6 yrs performed two kinds of voluntary exercises at similar HR: ISO and DYN of the right quadriceps femoris muscle. Although HR was eqivalent (82 ± 8 bpm for DYN and ISO, respectively, rating of exertion, blood pressures, and rate pressure product were higher, whereas breathing frequency, minute ventilation, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide output were significantly lower during ISO. Tidal volume, end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2, respiratory exchange ratio and capillary blood lactate concentration were comparable between both contraction modes. Heart rate variability (HRV indicators, SDNN, HF-Power and LF-Power, representing both vagal and sympathetic influences, were significantly higher during ISO. Sample entropy, a nonlinear measure of HRV was also significantly affected by contraction mode. It can be concluded that, despite the same net effect on HR, the quality of cardiovascular control during low intensity exercise is significantly different between DYN and ISO. HRV analysis indicated a sympatho-vagal coactivation during ISO. Whether mechanoreceptor feedback alone, a change in central command, or the interaction of both mechanisms is the main contributor of the distinct autonomic responses to the different exercise modes remains to be elucidated.

  8. Engineering strategies aimed at control of acidification rate of lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Solem, Christian; Holm, Anders Koefoed

    2013-01-01

    The ability of lactic acid bacteria to produce lactic acid from various sugars plays an important role in food fermentations. Lactic acid is derived from pyruvate, the end product of glycolysis and thus a fast lactic acid production rate requires a high glycolytic flux. In addition to lactic acid......, alternative end products - ethanol, acetic acid and formic acid - are formed by many species. The central role of glycolysis in lactic acid bacteria has provoked numerous studies aiming at identifying potential bottleneck(s) since knowledge about flux control could be important not only for optimizing food...

  9. Negative transfer of heart rate control following biofeedback training: a partial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, A; Macready, D

    1985-09-01

    Ability to raise and lower heart rate (HR) on instruction was tested before and after unidirectional biofeedback training in two groups of 10 male volunteers. Instructional control was assessed in 2-min trials before training, and after 5 and 10 biofeedback trials of increasing (Group I) and decreasing (Group D) HR. The magnitude of HR elevations produced by Group D diminished following training, while modifications in Group I were unchanged. This negative transfer effect is discussed in relation to whether voluntary speeding and slowing HR reflect distinct capacities.

  10. Sintering of porous silver compacts at controlled heating rates in oxygen or argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliber, E.A; Cugno, C; Moreno, M; Esquivel, M; Haberkon, N; Fiscina, J.E; Gonzalez Oliver, C.J.R

    2002-01-01

    A submicronic (- 0.4μm grain size) spherical silver powder was mixed with 2wt% PVB and pressed into pellets (body A) of relative density (ρr) close to 0.54. The pellets were given a heat treatment at 235 o C for 4 hours (body B) in static air, after which the ρr values were increased by ∼2%. The preheated pellets (B) were densified in a vertical differential dilatometer, fitted with a silica head, at heating rates (hr) of 2, 4 and 10 o C min -1 under Ar or O 2 pure atmospheres. The total lineal densification [Δl(T)/lo, ΔI=Io-1(T) instantaneous thickness and lo: the initial thickness of the pellet] of the Ag-skeletons (B, of similar starting porosity) varied significantly upon changing either the (hr) or the atmosphere. It ranged from 8 to 12% giving still porous bodies of ρr∼0.80. After a small densification (stage (i)) each curve showed a clear Ti ( o C ) at which the densification (AD(T) exhibited a rapid increase (jump; stage (ii), and had a characteristic peak in densification rate (DR(T)). Then the AD continued by another mechanism (stage (iii)), related to grain growth, till the densification rate started to decrease probably due to densification (stage (iv)) of closed pores located at 4-grain corners. For every atmosphere the Ti increased with heating rate, and the Ti values for O 2 were 79- 105 o C lower than those for Ar. From DR kinetics analysis it is concluded that under O 2 stage (ii) is due to grain boundary diffusivity (gb) whereas for stage (iii) the volume (vol) diffusion is the main process. From detail densification fits it is shown for stage (iii) there is an initial contribution to densification coming up from an initial stage controlled by (gb) diffusion, and that the main process is still the intermediate stage with simultaneous grain growth controlled by volume self-diffusivity. For the Ar case the whole densification range appears to be controlled by (gb) diffusivity. Some impurity contamination of the Ag could produce a (gb

  11. Sample size reassessment for a two-stage design controlling the false discovery rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehetmayer, Sonja; Graf, Alexandra C; Posch, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Sample size calculations for gene expression microarray and NGS-RNA-Seq experiments are challenging because the overall power depends on unknown quantities as the proportion of true null hypotheses and the distribution of the effect sizes under the alternative. We propose a two-stage design with an adaptive interim analysis where these quantities are estimated from the interim data. The second stage sample size is chosen based on these estimates to achieve a specific overall power. The proposed procedure controls the power in all considered scenarios except for very low first stage sample sizes. The false discovery rate (FDR) is controlled despite of the data dependent choice of sample size. The two-stage design can be a useful tool to determine the sample size of high-dimensional studies if in the planning phase there is high uncertainty regarding the expected effect sizes and variability.

  12. Process control of high rate microcrystalline silicon based solar cell deposition by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilper, T.; Donker, M.N. van den; Carius, R.; Rech, B.; Braeuer, G.; Repmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon thin-film solar cells based on microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) were prepared in a 30 x 30 cm 2 plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor using 13.56 or 40.68 MHz plasma excitation frequency. Plasma emission was recorded by optical emission spectroscopy during μc-Si:H absorber layer deposition at deposition rates between 0.5 and 2.5 nm/s. The time course of SiH * and H β emission indicated strong drifts in the process conditions particularly at low total gas flows. By actively controlling the SiH 4 gas flow, the observed process drifts were successfully suppressed resulting in a more homogeneous i-layer crystallinity along the growth direction. In a deposition regime with efficient usage of the process gas, the μc-Si:H solar cell efficiency was enhanced from 7.9 % up to 8.8 % by applying process control

  13. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Balcova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd, it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2 genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  14. Increasing the response rate of text messaging data collection: a delayed randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Wang, Wei; Wu, Qiong; van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Chen, Li; Du, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yanfeng; Rudan, Igor; Car, Josip

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of multiple interventions on increasing the response rate of text messaging for longitudinal data collection. Methods Our cohort included 283 caregivers of children aged 6–12 months who were participating in an anemia program in rural China. Using text messages to collect data on anemia medication adherence, we conducted a delayed randomized controlled trial to test multiple interventions (an additional four reminders; a ¥5.0 (US$0.79) credit reward for replying; and a feedback text message). After a 6-week pilot study with week 7 as the baseline measurement, we randomly allocated all participants into two groups: group 1 (n = 142) and group 2 (n = 141). During weeks 8–11, we introduced the interventions to group 1, and in weeks 12–15 the intervention was introduced to both groups. We compared the response rates between groups and explored factors affecting the response rate. Results During weeks 8–11, the response rates in group 1 increased and were significantly higher than in group 2 (p0.05) and slightly decreased in group 1. Younger participants or participants who had children with lower hemoglobin concentration were more likely to reply (p = 0.02). Sending four reminders on the second day contributed to only 286 (11.7%) extra text messages. Discussion Our study showed that multiple interventions were effective in increasing response rate of text messaging data collection in rural China. Conclusions Larger multi-site studies are needed to find the most effective way of using these interventions to allow usage of text messaging data collection for health research. PMID:25332355

  15. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  16. Development of master slave system for interventional radiology with force-rate control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Masaru; Zobel, P.B.; Claudio, P.D.; Mohri, Makoto; Komeda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a master-slave system for a catheter-guided operation, which is performed by using radiology, through the vascular system. When the master-slave system is used, the surgeon is not exposed to x-rays during the operation. The master tool is managed by an operator away from the slave tool, which is near the patient. The system must provide a realistic picture to the surgeon, particularly in term of force information because this operation is performed by observing three-dimensional fields on a two-dimensional monitor. In this paper, we describe the development of a master slave system that involves the use of force-rate control for guiding the catheter without using force sensors. The master tool has a force-display function. This system can be controlled by force and velocity controlling; hence, this system realized an innovative mechanism and algorism. Finally, the preliminary experiment indicated that the new control method was effective. Further, the force display was stable and achieved fast response. (author)

  17. Salivary flow rate and oral findings in Prader-Willi syndrome: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeves, Ronnaug; Nordgarden, Hilde; Storhaug, Kari; Sandvik, Leiv; Espelid, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex multisystemic genetic disorder. AIM. The objective of this study was to provide a systematic assessment of whole saliva secretion and oral manifestations associated with PWS. DESIGN. Fifty individuals (5-40 years) with PWS and an age- and sex-matched control group were included. Whole saliva was collected. All participants underwent an anamnestic interview. Radiological and dental clinical examinations were carried out to identify hypodontia, dental caries, enamel defects and gingival inflammation. RESULTS. Mean whole salivary flow rate was 0.12 ± 0.11 mL/min in the study group compared with 0.32 ± 0.20 mL/min in the control group (P 19 years was significantly lower in PWS (P = 0.04) compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of dental caries in the primary dentition or in the frequency of enamel defects in the permanent dentition between the two groups. Median Gingival Index was significantly higher in the Prader-Willi group compared with the controls (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS. Low salivary flow is a consistent finding in PWS. Nevertheless, despite dry mouth and dietary challenges, dental caries is not increased in Norwegian individuals with PWS. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Controle de plantas daninhas em soja com doses reduzidas de herbicidas Soybean weed control with reduced rates of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson G. Fleck

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available doses reduzidas dos herbicidas haloxyfop-methyl e sethoxydim para controlar papuã [Brachiaria plantaginea (Link Hitchc.] na cultura da soja [Glycine max (L. Merrill. Haloxyfop-methyl foi testado nas doses de 120, 90, 60 e 30+30 g/ha; já sethoxydim o foi nas doses de 220, 165, 110 e 55+55 g/ha. A pulverização dos herbicidas ocorreu 15 dias após a semeadura da soja; nesta ocasião, a maioria das plantas de papuã encontravam-se no estádio de três a quatro folhas. Os tratamentos herbicidas com doses reduzidas em aplicações seqüenciais, tiveram a segunda pulverização realizada 11 dias após a primeira aplicação. Foi obtido controle ao redor de 95% para todos os tratamentos, com pequenas variações não significativas. O rendimento de grãos de soja foi equivalente entre a testemunha capinada e os tratamentos haloxyfop-methyl a 90 e 60 g/ha, sethoxydim a 220, 110 e 55+55 g/ha. Os demais tratamentos foram semelhantes entre si, superando a testemunha infestada, a qual apresentou o menor rendimento de grãos. Os resultados evidenciam a viabilidade da utilização de doses reduzidas, as quais podem alcançar patamares de produtividade tão elevados quanto aqueles obtidos com doses plenas.During the 1993/94 growing season, it was carried out a field experiment at the Agronomic Experimental Station of Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, in Eldorado do Sul, RS, Brazil, in order to evaluate the possibility of using reduced rates of the herbicides haloxyfop-methyl and sethoxydim for Alexandergrass [Brachiaria plafitaginea (Link Hitchc.] control in soybeans. Haloxyfop-methyl was tested at 120, 90, 60, and 30+30 g/ha, where as sethoxydim was at rates, of 220, 165, 110, and 55+55 g/ha. Herbicide spraying occurred 15 days after soybean sowing; at this time Alexandergrass plants ranged from one leaf to one tiller. Herbicide treatments using reduced rates in sequential applications had the second spraying accomplished 11 days after the first one

  19. Response rates in case-control studies of cancer by era of fieldwork and by characteristics of study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengting; Richardson, Lesley; Campbell, Sally; Pintos, Javier; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2018-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to describe time trends in response rates in case-control studies of cancer and identify study design factors that influence response rate. We reviewed 370 case-control studies of cancer published in 12 journals during indicator years in each of the last four decades. We estimated time trends of response rates and reasons for nonresponse in each of the following types of study subjects: cases, medical source controls, and population controls. We also estimated response rates according to characteristics of study context. Median response rates among cases and population controls were between 75% and 80% in the 1970s. Between 1971 and 2010, study response rates declined by 0.31% per year for cases and 0.78% for population controls. Only a minority of studies reported reasons for nonparticipation; subject refusal was the most common reported reason. Studies conducted in North America had lower median response rates than studies conducted in Europe. In-person and telephone interviews elicited higher response rates than mail questionnaires. Response rates from case-control studies of cancer have declined, and this could threaten the validity of results derived from these studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Peter M.; Menge, Duncan N.L.; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    New techniques have identified a wide range of organisms with the capacity to carry out biological nitrogen fixation (BNF)—greatly expanding our appreciation of the diversity and ubiquity of N fixers—but our understanding of the rates and controls of BNF at ecosystem and global scales has not advanced at the same pace. Nevertheless, determining rates and controls of BNF is crucial to placing anthropogenic changes to the N cycle in context, and to understanding, predicting and managing many aspects of global environmental change. Here, we estimate terrestrial BNF for a pre-industrial world by combining information on N fluxes with 15N relative abundance data for terrestrial ecosystems. Our estimate is that pre-industrial N fixation was 58 (range of 40–100) Tg N fixed yr−1; adding conservative assumptions for geological N reduces our best estimate to 44 Tg N yr−1. This approach yields substantially lower estimates than most recent calculations; it suggests that the magnitude of human alternation of the N cycle is substantially larger than has been assumed.

  1. Trends in Drug Utilization, Glycemic Control, and Rates of Severe Hypoglycemia, 2006-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipska, Kasia J; Yao, Xiaoxi; Herrin, Jeph; McCoy, Rozalina G; Ross, Joseph S; Steinman, Michael A; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Gill, Thomas M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Shah, Nilay D

    2017-04-01

    To examine temporal trends in utilization of glucose-lowering medications, glycemic control, and rate of severe hypoglycemia among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Using claims data from 1.66 million privately insured and Medicare Advantage patients with T2DM from 2006 to 2013, we estimated the annual 1 ) age- and sex-standardized proportion of patients who filled each class of agents; 2 ) age-, sex-, race-, and region-standardized proportion with hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) use increased for metformin (from 47.6 to 53.5%), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (0.5 to 14.9%), and insulin (17.1 to 23.0%) but declined for sulfonylureas (38.8 to 30.8%) and thiazolidinediones (28.5 to 5.6%; all P use of glucose-lowering drugs has changed dramatically among patients with T2DM. Overall glycemic control has not improved and remains poor among nearly a quarter of the youngest patients. The overall rate of severe hypoglycemia remains largely unchanged. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. On Optimizing H. 264/AVC Rate Control by Improving R-D Model and Incorporating HVS Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Gangyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art JVT-G012 rate control algorithm of H.264 is improved from two aspects. First, the quadratic rate-distortion (R-D model is modified based on both empirical observations and theoretical analysis. Second, based on the existing physiological and psychological research findings of human vision, the rate control algorithm is optimized by incorporating the main characteristics of the human visual system (HVS such as contrast sensitivity, multichannel theory, and masking effect. Experiments are conducted, and experimental results show that the improved algorithm can simultaneously enhance the overall subjective visual quality and improve the rate control precision effectively.

  3. Centrioles regulate centrosome size by controlling the rate of Cnn incorporation into the PCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, Paul T; Brunk, Kathrin; Dobbelaere, Jeroen; Dix, Carly I; Lucas, Eliana P; Raff, Jordan W

    2010-12-21

    centrosomes are major microtubule organizing centers in animal cells, and they comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by an amorphous pericentriolar material (PCM). Centrosome size is tightly regulated during the cell cycle, and it has recently been shown that the two centrosomes in certain stem cells are often asymmetric in size. There is compelling evidence that centrioles influence centrosome size, but how centrosome size is set remains mysterious. we show that the conserved Drosophila PCM protein Cnn exhibits an unusual dynamic behavior, because Cnn molecules only incorporate into the PCM closest to the centrioles and then spread outward through the rest of the PCM. Cnn incorporation into the PCM is driven by an interaction with the conserved centriolar proteins Asl (Cep152 in humans) and DSpd-2 (Cep192 in humans). The rate of Cnn incorporation into the PCM is tightly regulated during the cell cycle, and this rate influences the amount of Cnn in the PCM, which in turn is an important determinant of overall centrosome size. Intriguingly, daughter centrioles in syncytial embryos only start to incorporate Cnn as they disengage from their mothers; this generates a centrosome size asymmetry, with mother centrioles always initially organizing more Cnn than their daughters. centrioles can control the amount of PCM they organize by regulating the rate of Cnn incorporation into the PCM. This mechanism can explain how centrosome size is regulated during the cell cycle and also allows mother and daughter centrioles to set centrosome size independently of one another.

  4. Ouroboros - Playing A Biochemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Rodrigues

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ouroboros: Playing A Biochemical RODRIGUES,D.T.1,2;GAYER, M.C.1,2; ESCOTO, D.F.1; DENARDIN, E.L.G.2, ROEHRS, R.1,2 1Interdisciplinary Research Group on Teaching Practice, Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil 2Laboratory of Physicochemical Studies and Natural Products, Post Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil Introduction: Currently, teachers seek different alternatives to enhance the teaching-learning process. Innovative teaching methodologies are increasingly common tools in educational routine. The use of games, electronic or conventional, is an effective tool to assist in learning and also to raise the social interaction between students. Objective: In this sense our work aims to evaluate the card game and "Ouroboros" board as a teaching and learning tool in biochemistry for a graduating class in Natural Sciences. Materials and methods: The class gathered 22 students of BSc in Natural Sciences. Each letter contained a question across the board that was drawn to a group to answer within the allotted time. The questions related concepts of metabolism, organic and inorganic chemical reactions, bioenergetics, etc.. Before the game application, students underwent a pre-test with four issues involving the content that was being developed. Soon after, the game was applied. Then again questions were asked. Data analysis was performed from the ratio of the number of correct pre-test and post-test answers. Results and discussion: In the pre-test 18.1% of the students knew all issues, 18.1% got 3 correct answers, 40.9% answered only 2 questions correctly and 22.7% did not hit any. In post-test 45.4% answered all the questions right, 31.8% got 3 questions and 22.7% got 2 correct answers. The results show a significant improvement of the students about the field of content taught through the game. Conclusion: Generally, traditional approaches of chemistry and biochemistry are abstract and complex. Thus, through games

  5. Regression and local control rates after radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulsteijn, Leonie T. van; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Coremans, Ida E.M.; Smit, Johannes W.A.; Jansen, Jeroen C.; Dekkers, Olaf M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary treatment goal of radiotherapy for paragangliomas of the head and neck region (HNPGLs) is local control of the tumor, i.e. stabilization of tumor volume. Interestingly, regression of tumor volume has also been reported. Up to the present, no meta-analysis has been performed giving an overview of regression rates after radiotherapy in HNPGLs. The main objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess regression of tumor volume in HNPGL-patients after radiotherapy. A second outcome was local tumor control. Design of the study is systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier and references of key articles were searched in March 2012 to identify potentially relevant studies. Considering the indolent course of HNPGLs, only studies with ⩾12 months follow-up were eligible. Main outcomes were the pooled proportions of regression and local control after radiotherapy as initial, combined (i.e. directly post-operatively or post-embolization) or salvage treatment (i.e. after initial treatment has failed) for HNPGLs. A meta-analysis was performed with an exact likelihood approach using a logistic regression with a random effect at the study level. Pooled proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Fifteen studies were included, concerning a total of 283 jugulotympanic HNPGLs in 276 patients. Pooled regression proportions for initial, combined and salvage treatment were respectively 21%, 33% and 52% in radiosurgery studies and 4%, 0% and 64% in external beam radiotherapy studies. Pooled local control proportions for radiotherapy as initial, combined and salvage treatment ranged from 79% to 100%. Radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas results in excellent local tumor control and therefore is a valuable treatment for these types of tumors. The effects of radiotherapy on regression of tumor volume remain ambiguous, although the data suggest that regression can

  6. Heart rate control with adrenergic blockade: Clinical outcomes in cardiovascular medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Feldman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available David Feldman1, Terry S Elton2, Doron M Menachemi3, Randy K Wexler41Heart Failure/Transplant and VAD Programs, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; 2Division of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; 3Heart Failure Services, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, The Heart Institute, Sakler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Holon, Israel; 4Department of Clinical Family Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: The sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating various cardiovascular parameters including heart rate (HR and HR variability. Aberrant sympathetic nervous system expression may result in elevated HR or decreased HR variability, and both are independent risk factors for development of cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. Epidemiologic studies have established that impaired HR control is linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One successful way of decreasing HR and cardiovascular mortality has been by utilizing β-blockers, because their ability to alter cell signaling at the receptor level has been shown to mitigate the pathogenic effects of sympathetic nervous system hyperactivation. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that β-blocker-mediated HR control improvements are associated with decreased mortality in postinfarct and heart failure patients. Although improved HR control benefits have yet to be established in hypertension, both traditional and vasodilating β-blockers exert positive HR control effects in this patient population. However, differences exist between traditional and vasodilating β-blockers; the latter reduce peripheral vascular resistance and exert neutral or positive effects on important metabolic parameters. Clinical evidence suggests that attainment of HR control is an important treatment objective for patients with cardiovascular

  7. Female fibromyalgia patients: lower resting metabolic rates than matched healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John C; Yellin, Jackie; Honeyman-Lowe, Gina

    2006-07-01

    Many features of fibromyalgia and hypothyroidism are virtually the same, and thyroid hormone treatment trials have reduced or eliminated fibromyalgia symptoms. These findings led the authors to test the hypothesis that fibromyalgia patients are hypometabolic compared to matched controls. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured by indirect calorimetry and body composition by bioelectrical impedance for 15 fibromyalgia patients and 15 healthy matched controls. Measured resting metabolic rate (mRMR) was compared to percentages of predicted RMR (pRMR) by fat-free weight (FFW) (Sterling-Passmore: SP) and by sex, age, height, and weight (Harris-Benedict: HB). Patients had a lower mRMR (4,306.31+/-1077.66 kJ vs 5,411.59+/-695.95 kJ, p=0.0028) and lower percentages of pRMRs (SP: -28.42+/-15.82% vs -6.83+/-12.55%, pBMI) best accounted for variability in controls' RMRs, age and fat weight (FW) did for patients. In the patient group, TSH level accounted for 28% of the variance in pain distribution, and free T3 (FT3) accounted for 30% of the variance in pressure-pain threshold. Patients had lower mRMR and percentages of pRMRs. The lower RMRs were not due to calorie restriction or low FFW. Patients' normal FFW argues against low physical activity as the mechanism. TSH, FT4, and FT3 levels did not correlate with RMRs in either group. This does not rule out inadequate thyroid hormone regulation because studies show these laboratory values do not reliably predict RMR.

  8. Symmetry structure in discrete models of biochemical systems: natural subsystems and the weak control hierarchy in a new model of computation driven by interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehaniv, Chrystopher L; Rhodes, John; Egri-Nagy, Attila; Dini, Paolo; Morris, Eric Rothstein; Horváth, Gábor; Karimi, Fariba; Schreckling, Daniel; Schilstra, Maria J

    2015-07-28

    Interaction computing is inspired by the observation that cell metabolic/regulatory systems construct order dynamically, through constrained interactions between their components and based on a wide range of possible inputs and environmental conditions. The goals of this work are to (i) identify and understand mathematically the natural subsystems and hierarchical relations in natural systems enabling this and (ii) use the resulting insights to define a new model of computation based on interactions that is useful for both biology and computation. The dynamical characteristics of the cellular pathways studied in systems biology relate, mathematically, to the computational characteristics of automata derived from them, and their internal symmetry structures to computational power. Finite discrete automata models of biological systems such as the lac operon, the Krebs cycle and p53-mdm2 genetic regulation constructed from systems biology models have canonically associated algebraic structures (their transformation semigroups). These contain permutation groups (local substructures exhibiting symmetry) that correspond to 'pools of reversibility'. These natural subsystems are related to one another in a hierarchical manner by the notion of 'weak control'. We present natural subsystems arising from several biological examples and their weak control hierarchies in detail. Finite simple non-Abelian groups are found in biological examples and can be harnessed to realize finitary universal computation. This allows ensembles of cells to achieve any desired finitary computational transformation, depending on external inputs, via suitably constrained interactions. Based on this, interaction machines that grow and change their structure recursively are introduced and applied, providing a natural model of computation driven by interactions.

  9. Low-protein diet does not alter reproductive, biochemical, and hematological parameters in pregnant Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.V. Barros

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the reproductive, biochemical, and hematological outcomes of pregnant rats exposed to protein restriction. Wistar rat dams were fed a control normal-protein (NP, 17% protein, n=8 or a low-protein (LP, 8% protein, n=14 diet from the 1st to the 20th day of pregnancy. On the 20th day, the clinical signs of toxicity were evaluated. The pregnant rats were then anesthetized and blood samples were collected for biochemical-hematological analyses, and laparotomy was performed to evaluate reproductive parameters. No sign of toxicity, or differences (P>0.05 in body weight gain and biochemical parameters (urea, creatinine, albumin, globulin, and total protein between NP and LP pregnant dams were observed. Similarly, hematological data, including red blood cell count, white blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell distribution width (coefficient of variation, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, % lymphocytes, absolute lymphocyte count, platelet count, and mean platelet volume were similar (P>0.05 at the end of pregnancy. Reproductive parameters (the dam-offspring relationship, ovary mass, placenta mass, number of corpora lutea, implantation index, resorption index, and the pre- and post-implantation loss rates were also not different (P>0.05 between NP and LP pregnant dams. The present data showed that a protein-restricted diet during pregnancy did not alter reproductive, biochemical, and hematological parameters and seems not to have any toxic effect on pregnant Wistar rats.

  10. Factors associated with citation rate of randomised controlled trials in physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Matteo; Landi, Niccolò; Briganti, Gennaro; Lombardi, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of citation rate as a measure of quality of research is strongly criticized and debated, it remain a widely used method to evaluate performances of researchers, articles and journals. The aim of this study was to test which factors are associated with citation rate of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) published on the physiotherapy field. All RCTs abstracted in the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), indexed in Scopus database and published in 2008 were included. PEDro score, language of publication, indexing in PubMed database, type of access to articles, subdiscipline, the number of authors, the country where the study was performed, the type of institution where the study was conducted and the number of centres involved in the study (multicentric vs single-centre). and the 2013 5-year impact factor of the publishing journals were considered as independent variables. Citation rate until December 2013 was extracted from Scopus database and used as dependent variable. Six hundred and nineteen RCTs, published in 283 journals, were included and analysed. The 5-year impact factor was the strongest variable associated with the citation rate and explained approximately 50 % of the variance, and the number of authors explained an additional small part (about 1 %) of variability. The other variables were excluded from the model. The study highlights that 5-year Impact Factor, not accessibility (language of publication, indexing in PubMed database or the type of access to articles) or reported quality (PEDro score), is a strong predictor of the number of citations for RCTs in the physiotherapy field. Our findings support the increasingly widespread idea that citation analysis does not reflect the scientific merit of the cited work, at least in terms of reported quality.The results of this study need to be confirmed with a publication window larger than one year.

  11. Open-Rate Controlled Experiment in E-Mail Marketing Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antun Biloš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The main purpose of this paper is to test the controlled experiment (A/B split methodology in B2C oriented e-mail marketing campaigns. Design/Methodology/Approach – E-mail marketing techniques have been a substantial part of e-marketing methodology since the early Internet days of the mid-1990s. From the very beginning of Internet utilization for business purposes, e-mail was one of the most widely used communication techniques in B2B and B2C markets alike. Due to high volumes of spamming and progression of online communication clutter, some practitioners began to question the usability of e-mail as a marketing communication channel, while others embarked on working on improving the message itself. Efforts were invested into improving message quality, as well as into better understanding user expectations. One of the most commonly used techniques to test specific e-mail message elements is the controlled experiment. Findings and implications – This paper explores several types of controlled experiments in a specific Croatian B2C market. Tests were run to determine subscriber behavior towards several newsletter components, including sending time, sending day, sender’s name, and subject line. Open and click rates for tested campaigns, and several other metrics were investigated using MailChimp software. An N − 1 two-proportion test using an adjusted Wald confidence interval around the difference in the proportions was used for comparing the open-rate measure in the controlled experiments between subjects. Limitation – Controlled experiments (A/B split tests showed a lot of potential as a way of measuring behavior and preferences of subscribers, although several apparent limitations (the data-set scope, comparability issues indicated a clear need for standardization on a managerial and scientific level. Originality – This paper provides an up-to-date e-mail marketing effectiveness literature review, describes and tests the

  12. Spatial patterns and controls of soil chemical weathering rates along a transient hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Mudd, S.M.; Sanderman, J.; Amundson, Ronald; Blum, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hillslopes have been intensively studied by both geomorphologists and soil scientists. Whereas geomorphologists have focused on the physical soil production and transport on hillslopes, soil scientists have been concerned with the topographic variation of soil geochemical properties. We combined these differing approaches and quantified soil chemical weathering rates along a grass covered hillslope in Coastal California. The hillslope is comprised of both erosional and depositional sections. In the upper eroding section, soil production is balanced by physical erosion and chemical weathering. The hillslope then transitions to a depositional slope where soil accumulates due to a historical reduction of channel incision at the hillslope's base. Measurements of hillslope morphology and soil thickness were combined with the elemental composition of the soil and saprolite, and interpreted through a process-based model that accounts for both chemical weathering and sediment transport. Chemical weathering of the minerals as they moved downslope via sediment transport imparted spatial variation in the geochemical properties of the soil. Inverse modeling of the field and laboratory data revealed that the long-term soil chemical weathering rates peak at 5 g m- 2 yr- 1 at the downslope end of the eroding section and decrease to 1.5 g m- 2 yr- 1 within the depositional section. In the eroding section, soil chemical weathering rates appear to be primarily controlled by the rate of mineral supply via colluvial input from upslope. In the depositional slope, geochemical equilibrium between soil water and minerals appeared to limit the chemical weathering rate. Soil chemical weathering was responsible for removing 6% of the soil production in the eroding section and 5% of colluvial influx in the depositional slope. These were among the lowest weathering rates reported for actively eroding watersheds, which was attributed to the parent material with low amount of weatherable

  13. Biochemical changes during aging of soybean seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balešević-Tubić Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical changes that occur in the seed as a result of ageing are very significant for seed quality and longevity. Because of its characteristic composition, processes occurring in the seed of oil crops during storage will be typical as well. Six soybean varieties developed in Institute of field and vegetable crops Novi Sad, submitted to accelerated and natural aging, under controlled and conventional storage conditions were used in these trials. The content of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities were studied. The biochemical processes i.e. lipid peroxidation, as well as the decrease in supeoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities (especially pronounced by applied accelerated aging were caused by both type of aging. The degree of seed damage and the ability of seed to resist the negative consequences of aging were influenced, beside duration of aging period, by type of storage and characteristics of soybean varieties. .

  14. Direct Load Control (DLC) Considering Nodal Interrupted Energy Assessment Rate (NIEAR) in Restructured Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2010-01-01

    is used as the bids from the ACL customers, is utilized to determine the direct monetary compensation to the ACL customers. The proposed scheme was investigated for the PoolCo electricity market. The optimal DLC scheme is determined based on the minimum system operating cost which is comprised......A direct load control (DLC) scheme of air conditioning loads (ACL) considering direct monetary compensation to ACL customers for the service interruption caused by the DLC program is proposed in this paper for restructured power systems. The nodal interrupted energy assessment rate (NIEAR), which...... of the system energy cost, the system spinning reserve cost and the compensation cost to the ACL customers. Dynamic programming (DP) was used to obtain the optimal DLC scheme. The IEEE reliability test system (RTS) was studied to illustrate the proposed DLC scheme....

  15. Computational Modelling and Optimal Control of Ebola Virus Disease with non-Linear Incidence Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaidza, I.; Makinde, O. D.; Okosun, O. K.

    2017-03-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has exposed the need to connect modellers and those with relevant data as pivotal to better understanding of how the disease spreads and quantifying the effects of possible interventions. In this paper, we model and analyse the Ebola virus disease with non-linear incidence rate. The epidemic model created is used to describe how the Ebola virus could potentially evolve in a population. We perform an uncertainty analysis of the basic reproductive number R 0 to quantify its sensitivity to other disease-related parameters. We also analyse the sensitivity of the final epidemic size to the time control interventions (education, vaccination, quarantine and safe handling) and provide the cost effective combination of the interventions.

  16. A magnetically actuated, high momentum rate MEMS pulsed microjet for active flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducloux, O; Viard, R; Talbi, A; Pernod, P; Preobrazhensky, V; Gimeno, L; Merlen, A; Deblock, Y

    2009-01-01

    A small-sized, high momentum rate (>10 −2 N), dynamically actuated microvalve fulfilling the functional specifications for active aerodynamic flow control was designed, fabricated and characterized. The prototype consists of a microfabricated silicon channel pinched by an actuated poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) polymer membrane. Actuation is provided by coupling an inductive driving coil and a NdFeB permanent magnet fixed on the PDMS elastomeric membrane. The development of a specific microfabrication process, and a complete characterization of the fabricated prototypes are presented in this paper. The yield air microjet performances reach 150 m s −1 for an actuation frequency situated in the range [0 Hz–400 Hz] and an outlet area of about 1 mm 2 . Experimental results also show that the use of a vectoring plate placed at the outlet of the microvalve provided not only easier integration of the microsystem, but also improved the penetration of the microjet into the main flow

  17. Control device for the recycling flow rate in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Naoshi; Shida, Toichi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the cavitation in a recycling pump even under the conditions where a recycling pump run-back is inhibited, thereby secure the safety of equipments. Constitution: An AND circuit is disposed to a recycling flow rate control system in a BWR type nuclear power plant that issues an output on the condition that a run-back signal is present together with a contact signal of a scoop pipe locking relay or a contact signal of a scoop pipe locking relay. Then, if a demand for the run-back operation of a nuclear reactor recycling pump is issued, the reactor recycling pump is forcedly tripped. Since the pump can always be tripped upon requirement of run-back even if there are some or other inhibitive factors, generation of the cavitation in recycling system equipments can be prevented thereby prevent the damages in the equipments. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. COMP report: CPQR technical quality control guidelines for low-dose-rate permanent seed brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Radford, Dee-Ann; Eduardo Villarreal-Barajas, J

    2018-03-14

    The Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists (COMP), in close partnership with the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy (CPQR) has developed a series of Technical Quality Control (TQC) guidelines for radiation treatment equipment. These guidelines outline the performance objectives that equipment should meet in order to ensure an acceptable level of radiation treatment quality. The TQC guidelines have been rigorously reviewed and field tested in a variety of Canadian radiation treatment facilities. The development process enables rapid review and update to keep the guidelines current with changes in technology. This article contains detailed performance objectives and safety criteria for low-dose-rate (LDR) permanent seed brachytherapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Biochemical survey for children of A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Chiyoko

    1992-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation has conducted biochemical survey in children of A-bomb survivors, with the purpose of elucidating whether or not the rate of genetic mutation in genital cells is increased. This paper describes the previous surveys done at protein levels. Two kinds of indicators have been used: (1) 'rare mutation type' reflecting base substitution mutation, base deletion, and insertion; (2) 'mutation type' reflecting the decrease of red cell enzyme activity. According to the DS86 dosimetry system, the children population of A-bomb survivors were examined by dividing into the exposed group (n=11,364) of their parents exposed to 0.01 Sv or more and the control group (n=12,297) of those exposed to less than 0.01 Sv. 'Rare mutation type' was detected using electrophoresis in a total of 1,233 children in both groups. Of these children, 2 in the exposed group and 4 in the control group had a new 'mutation', i.e., mutation that was considered to have occurred in genital cells of their parents. Survey for genetic foci has revealed mutation in 2 children in the exposed group and 4 children in the control group, with the rate of mutation being 0.37 x 10 -5 /genetic foci/generation and 0.68 x 10 -5 /genetic foci/generation, respectively. Mutation type reflecting the decrease in red cell enzyme activity was seen in 26 in the exposed group and 21 in the control group. A total of 41 children were found to have been inherited from their parents. In the survey for genetic foci, only one had mutation in the exposed group, with the rate of mutation being 1.7 x 10 -5 /genetic foci/generation. These findings have revealed no evidence of significant difference in the rate of mutation between the exposed and control groups. Finally, the future genetic surveys at molecular levels are briefly discussed. (N.K.)

  20. Evaluation of spatial plan in controlling stream flow rate in Wakung Watershed, Pemalang, Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Y.; Setyasih, I.; Setiawan, M. A.; Christanto, N.

    2018-04-01

    Evaluation study for such a regional spatial plan (RTRW) in Indonesia has not been evaluated for its effectiveness in controlling the surface run off that contributed to streamflow. This necessity can be accomplishsed by applying a modeling approach, such as Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The objectives of this research are 1) to simulate the streamflow of Wakung watershed based on actual landuse, 2) to predict streamflow of Wakung watershed based on RTRW, and 3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the RTRW of Pemalang District in controling streamflow rate at Wakung Watershed. ArcSWAT model was used to determine the erosion rate prediction. The model was then calibrated by using SWATCUP. Model performance were tested by using R2 and ENS. The calibration and validation results showed that R2 and ENS (monthly) > 0.5. The result of SWAT simulation in Wakung sub-watershed reaching 161 - 4950 m3/s/years for W-A scenario (actual landuse and weather data of 2013), for scenario W-R (RTRW and weather data of 2013), 330 - 4919 m3/s/year. The comparison between actual and spatial plan land use data for stream flow is showing that the W-A scenario is lower than the W-R scenario in 19 sub watersheds. This is because there are many plans for adding land use for urban and intensive horticulture land in areas with steep slopes (> 25%). This condition is caused by the demands of fulfilling the needs of settlement and food for people in the Wakung watershed.

  1. Effects of age and physical activity on the autonomic control of heart rate in healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Melo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the aging process and an active life-style on the autonomic control of heart rate (HR were investigated in nine young sedentary (YS, 23 ± 2.4 years, 16 young active (YA, 22 ± 2.1 years, 8 older sedentary (OS, 63 ± 2.4 years and 8 older active (OA, 61 ± 1.1 years healthy men. Electrocardiogram was continuously recorded for 15 min at rest and for 4 min in the deep breathing test, with a breath rate of 5 to 6 cycles/min in the supine position. Resting HR and RR intervals were analyzed by time (RMSSD index and frequency domain methods. The power spectral components are reported in normalized units (nu at low (LF and high (HF frequency, and as the LF/HF ratio. The deep breathing test was analyzed by the respiratory sinus arrhythmia indices: expiration/inspiration ratio (E/I and inspiration-expiration difference (deltaIE. The active groups had lower HR and higher RMSSD index than the sedentary groups (life-style condition: sedentary vs active, P < 0.05. The older groups showed lower HFnu, higher LFnu and higher LF/HF ratio than the young groups (aging effect: young vs older, P < 0.05. The OS group had a lower E/I ratio (1.16 and deltaIE (9.7 bpm than the other groups studied (YS: 1.38, 22.4 bpm; YA: 1.40, 21.3 bpm; OA: 1.38, 18.5 bpm. The interaction between aging and life-style effects had a P < 0.05. These results suggest that aging reduces HR variability. However, regular physical activity positively affects vagal activity on the heart and consequently attenuates the effects of aging in the autonomic control of HR.

  2. Methods for measuring specific rates of mercury methylation and degradation and their use in determining factors controlling net rates of mercury methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramlal, P.S.; Rudd, J.W.M.; Hecky, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A method was developed to estimate specific rates of demethylation of methyl mercury in aquatic samples by measuring the volatile 14 C end products of 14 CH 3 HgI demethylation. This method was used in conjuction with a 203 Hg 2+ radiochemical method which determines specific rates of mercury methylation. Together, these methods enabled us to examine some factors controlling the net rate of mercury methylation. The methodologies were field tested, using lake sediment samples from a recently flooded reservoir in the Southern Indian Lake system which had developed a mercury contamination problem in fish. Ratios of the specific rates of methylation/demethylation were calculated. The highest ratios of methylation/demethylation were calculated. The highest ratios of methylation/demethylation occurred in the flooded shorelines of Southern Indian Lake. These results provide an explanation for the observed increases in the methyl mercury concentrations in fish after flooding

  3. Wavelet denoising method; application to the flow rate estimation for water level control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gee Young; Park, Jin Ho; Lee, Jung Han; Kim, Bong Soo; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2003-01-01

    The wavelet transform decomposes a signal into time- and frequency-domain signals and it is well known that a noise-corrupted signal could be reconstructed or estimated when a proper denoising method is involved in the wavelet transform. Among the wavelet denoising methods proposed up to now, the wavelets by Mallat and Zhong can reconstruct best the pure transient signal from a highly corrupted signal. But there has been no systematic way of discriminating the original signal from the noise in a dyadic wavelet transform. In this paper, a systematic method is proposed for noise discrimination, which could be implemented easily into a digital system. For demonstrating the potential role of the wavelet denoising method in the nuclear field, this method is applied to the steam or feedwater flow rate estimation of the secondary loop. And the configuration of the S/G water level control system is proposed for incorporating the wavelet denoising method in estimating the flow rate value at low operating powers

  4. Using game theory for perceptual tuned rate control algorithm in video coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiancong; Ahmad, Ishfaq

    2005-03-01

    This paper proposes a game theoretical rate control technique for video compression. Using a cooperative gaming approach, which has been utilized in several branches of natural and social sciences because of its enormous potential for solving constrained optimization problems, we propose a dual-level scheme to optimize the perceptual quality while guaranteeing "fairness" in bit allocation among macroblocks. At the frame level, the algorithm allocates target bits to frames based on their coding complexity. At the macroblock level, the algorithm distributes bits to macroblocks by defining a bargaining game. Macroblocks play cooperatively to compete for shares of resources (bits) to optimize their quantization scales while considering the Human Visual System"s perceptual property. Since the whole frame is an entity perceived by viewers, macroblocks compete cooperatively under a global objective of achieving the best quality with the given bit constraint. The major advantage of the proposed approach is that the cooperative game leads to an optimal and fair bit allocation strategy based on the Nash Bargaining Solution. Another advantage is that it allows multi-objective optimization with multiple decision makers (macroblocks). The simulation results testify the algorithm"s ability to achieve accurate bit rate with good perceptual quality, and to maintain a stable buffer level.

  5. Control of algal production in a high rate algal pond: investigation through batch and continuous experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derabe Maobe, H; Onodera, M; Takahashi, M; Satoh, H; Fukazawa, T

    2014-01-01

    For decades, arid and semi-arid regions in Africa have faced issues related to water availability for drinking, irrigation and livestock purposes. To tackle these issues, a laboratory scale greywater treatment system based on high rate algal pond (HRAP) technology was investigated in order to guide the operation of the pilot plant implemented in the 2iE campus in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso). Because of the high suspended solids concentration generally found in effluents of this system, the aim of this study is to improve the performance of HRAPs in term of algal productivity and removal. To determine the selection mechanism of self-flocculated algae, three sets of sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) and three sets of continuous flow reactors (CFRs) were operated. Despite operation with the same solids retention time and the similarity of the algal growth rate found in these reactors, the algal productivity was higher in the SBRs owing to the short hydraulic retention time of 10 days in these reactors. By using a volume of CFR with twice the volume of our experimental CFRs, the algal concentration can be controlled during operation under similar physical conditions in both reactors.

  6. Biochemical disease-free survival following I-125 prostate implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, David C; Priestley, Joseph B

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the five-year clinical and biochemical results of ultrasound-guided permanent I-125 brachytherapy in early prostate cancer. Biochemical disease-free survival (BDFS) is reported, using PSA follow-up and is compared to the surgical and radiation therapy literature. Materials and Methods: From 12/88 through 12/93, ultrasound-guided brachytherapy was preplanned with I-125 and delivered 16,000 cGy as the sole treatment in 499 patients. All were clinically staged as T1 or T2 - N0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Within the first year, 19 patients were lost to follow-up and have been excluded from further study. The remaining 480 patients form the basis of this report. Clinical status and PSA values were systematically recorded before and after treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months (3-70) the actuarial clinical local control is 83%. Both stage and grade are shown to predict for this endpoint. Actuarial BDFS is also correlated with stage, grade, and PSA at presentation. Biochemical disease-free survival at five years is 94% for T1, 70% for unilateral T2, and 34% for T2c tumors. Grade is also predictive, ranging from 85% in low-grade tumors to 30% in high-grade tumors. In a multivariate analysis, the pretreatment PSA is most highly correlated (p < 0.0001). Patients with a normal pretreatment PSA enjoyed 93% BDFS, while those presenting with PSA > 10 had a BDFS of 40%. Complications have been few, with severe urinary urgency or dysuria in 4% and both incontinence and proctitis seen in 1%. Conclusion: While biochemical disease-free survival reports in the literature are immature and have short follow-up, our data compares favorably with studies following radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Further follow-up of this cohort is required. The complication rate is low and patient acceptance excellent. Permanent implantation of I-125 as the sole treatment for early prostate cancer is a viable alternative for patients with

  7. Biochemical disease-free survival following I-125 prostate implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, David C.; Priestley, Joseph B.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the five-year clinical and biochemical results of ultrasound-guided permanent I-125 brachytherapy in early prostate cancer. Biochemical disease-free survival (BDFS) is reported, using PSA follow-up and is compared to the surgical and radiation therapy literature. Materials and Methods: From 12/88 through 12/93, ultrasound-guided brachytherapy was preplanned with I-125 and delivered 16,000 cGy as the sole treatment in 499 patients. All were clinically staged as T1 or T2 - N0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Within the first year, 19 patients were lost to follow-up and have been excluded from further study. The remaining 480 patients form the basis of this report. Clinical status and PSA values were systematically recorded before and after treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months (3-70) the actuarial clinical local control is 83%. Both stage and grade are shown to predict for this endpoint. Actuarial BDFS is also correlated with stage, grade, and PSA at presentation. Biochemical disease-free survival at five years is 94% for T1, 70% for unilateral T2, and 34% for T2c tumors. Grade is also predictive, ranging from 85% in low-grade tumors to 30% in high-grade tumors. In a multivariate analysis, the pretreatment PSA is most highly correlated (p 10 had a BDFS of 40%. Complications have been few, with severe urinary urgency or dysuria in 4% and both incontinence and proctitis seen in 1%. Conclusion: While biochemical disease-free survival reports in the literature are immature and have short follow-up, our data compares favorably with studies following radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Further follow-up of this cohort is required. The complication rate is low and patient acceptance excellent. Permanent implantation of I-125 as the sole treatment for early prostate cancer is a viable alternative for patients with early stage and low- to moderate-grade cancers. The PSA provides significant prognostic information and

  8. Energy Storage Requirements for PV Power Ramp Rate Control in Northern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Schnabel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV generators suffer from fluctuating output power due to the highly fluctuating primary energy source. With significant PV penetration, these fluctuations can lead to power system instability and power quality problems. The use of energy storage systems as fluctuation compensators has been proposed as means to mitigate these problems. In this paper, the behavior of PV power fluctuations in Northern European climatic conditions and requirements for sizing the energy storage systems to compensate them have been investigated and compared to similar studies done in Southern European climate. These investigations have been performed through simulations that utilize measurements from the Tampere University of Technology solar PV power station research plant in Finland. An enhanced energy storage charging control strategy has been developed and tested. Energy storage capacity, power, and cycling requirements have been derived for different PV generator sizes and power ramp rate requirements. The developed control strategy leads to lesser performance requirements for the energy storage systems compared to the methods presented earlier. Further, some differences on the operation of PV generators in Northern and Southern European climates have been detected.

  9. Controlling low-rate signal path microdischarge for an ultra-low-background proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, E.K.; Aalseth, C.E.; Bonicalzi, R.M.; Day, A.R.; Hoppe, E.W.; Keillor, M.E.; Myers, A.W.; Overman, C.T.; Seifert, A.

    2013-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) made of high purity copper. These detectors are part of an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) in the newly constructed shallow underground laboratory at PNNL (at a depth of ∼30 m water-equivalent). To control backgrounds, the current preamplifier electronics are located outside the ULBCS shielding. Thus the signal from the detector travels through ∼1 m of cable and is potentially susceptible to high voltage microdischarge and other sources of electronic noise. Based on initial successful tests, commercial cables and connectors were used for this critical signal path. Subsequent testing across different batches of commercial cables and connectors, however, showed unwanted (but still low) rates of microdischarge noise. To control this noise source, two approaches were pursued: first, to carefully validate cables, connectors, and other commercial components in this critical signal path, making modifications where necessary; second, to develop a custom low-noise, low-background preamplifier that can be integrated with the ULBPC and thus remove most commercial components from the critical signal path. This integrated preamplifier approach is based on the Amptek A250 low-noise charge-integrating preamplifier module. The initial microdischarge signals observed are presented and characterized according to the suspected source. Each of the approaches for mitigation is described, and the results from both are compared with each other and with the original performance seen with commercial cables and connectors. (author)

  10. Role of resting metabolic rate and energy expenditure in hunger and appetite control: a new formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, John E; Caudwell, Phillipa; Gibbons, Catherine; Hopkins, Mark; Naslund, Erik; King, Neil; Finlayson, Graham

    2012-09-01

    A long-running issue in appetite research concerns the influence of energy expenditure on energy intake. More than 50 years ago, Otto G. Edholm proposed that "the differences between the intakes of food [of individuals] must originate in differences in the expenditure of energy". However, a relationship between energy expenditure and energy intake within any one day could not be found, although there was a correlation over 2 weeks. This issue was never resolved before interest in integrative biology was replaced by molecular biochemistry. Using a psychobiological approach, we have studied appetite control in an energy balance framework using a multi-level experimental system on a single cohort of overweight and obese human subjects. This has disclosed relationships between variables in the domains of body composition [fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM)], metabolism, gastrointestinal hormones, hunger and energy intake. In this Commentary, we review our own and other data, and discuss a new formulation whereby appetite control and energy intake are regulated by energy expenditure. Specifically, we propose that FFM (the largest contributor to resting metabolic rate), but not body mass index or FM, is closely associated with self-determined meal size and daily energy intake. This formulation has implications for understanding weight regulation and the management of obesity.

  11. Role of resting metabolic rate and energy expenditure in hunger and appetite control: a new formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Blundell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A long-running issue in appetite research concerns the influence of energy expenditure on energy intake. More than 50 years ago, Otto G. Edholm proposed that “the differences between the intakes of food [of individuals] must originate in differences in the expenditure of energy”. However, a relationship between energy expenditure and energy intake within any one day could not be found, although there was a correlation over 2 weeks. This issue was never resolved before interest in integrative biology was replaced by molecular biochemistry. Using a psychobiological approach, we have studied appetite control in an energy balance framework using a multi-level experimental system on a single cohort of overweight and obese human subjects. This has disclosed relationships between variables in the domains of body composition [fat-free mass (FFM, fat mass (FM], metabolism, gastrointestinal hormones, hunger and energy intake. In this Commentary, we review our own and other data, and discuss a new formulation whereby appetite control and energy intake are regulated by energy expenditure. Specifically, we propose that FFM (the largest contributor to resting metabolic rate, but not body mass index or FM, is closely associated with self-determined meal size and daily energy intake. This formulation has implications for understanding weight regulation and the management of obesity.

  12. Control of the flow rate in decreasing of the water load of peat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The retention capacity and control of the flow rate was studied in the Aqua-Peat research. The sedimentation ability of solid matter (peat particles), erosion, migration of the solid matter, and the functioning of the retention pipes located in the strip ditches and the sedimentation basins were measured in the research. Detection was also supplemented by laboratory scale models and by measurements made using them. A model, describing the solid matter erosion and migration on the mire, was compiled on the basis of the results. Migration of the solid matter is possible to reduce by pounding the water into the ditching. So there is more time for particles to settle before migration into watercources. By this method it is possible to reduce the solid matter loads caused by heavy rains and power-flows even by 88 %. If the flow control system is equipped with retainers and settling basins, the solid matter retention capacity can rise up to 93-97 %. The results have shown that the retention pipe retainers play more important role in reduction of solid matter load than sedimentation basins. A follow-up study was made using several types of retainers. A 5 cm thick siphon pipe appeared to be the best. The final selection of the retention pipes has, however, to be made as a compromise between the functioning of the drying process, production possibilities and solid matter retention. (1 ref., 2 figs.)

  13. Power grid current harmonics mitigation drawn on low voltage rated switching devices with effortless control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Hugo S.; Anunciada, Victor; Borges, Beatriz V. [Power Electronics Group, Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Tecnico - Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-01-15

    The great majority of the existing hybrid active power filter solutions is normally focused in 3{phi} systems and, in general, concentrates its domain of application in specific loads with deterministic behavior. Because common use grids do not exhibit these characteristics, it is mandatory to develop solutions for more generic scenarios, encouraging the use of less classical hybrid solutions. In fact, due to the widely use of switch mode converters in a great variety of consumer electronics, the problematic of mains current harmonic mitigation is no longer an exclusive matter of 3{phi} systems. The contribution of this paper is to present a shunt hybrid active power filter topology, initially conceived to work in 1{phi} domestic grids, able to operate the inverter at a voltage rate that can be lower than 10% of the mains voltage magnitude, even under nonspecific working conditions. In addition, the results shown in this paper demonstrate that this topology can, without lack of generality, be suitable to medium voltage (1{phi} or 3{phi}) systems. A new control approach for the proposed topology is discussed in this paper. The control method exhibits an extremely simple architecture requiring single point current sensing only, with no need for any kind of reference. Its practical implementation can be fulfilled by using very few, common use, operational amplifiers. The principle of operation, design criteria, simulation predictions and experimental results are presented and discussed. (author)

  14. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V.; Salinas, B.; Hernández O., O.; Santillán B., L.; Molero M., C.; Montoya M., J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ⩽ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%.

  15. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Tovar M, V.; Salinas, B.; Hernandez O, O.; Santillan B, L.; Molero M, C.; Montoya M, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm < ± 1.0 mm; the confidence limit Δ, is in the emergency level, Δ=3.2 mm. c) verification of absorbed dose to water DW, given by the hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ≤ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%

  16. Greenhouse gas emission controls : differentiated vs. flat rate targets : impacts and concerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydanek, D.

    1997-01-01

    Continuing the discussion on differentiation in greenhouse gas emission targets and timetables for all nations, the different implications of differentiation vs. flat rate controls were examined. A scenario of how different targets for different countries based on national circumstances might be implemented, was presented. Implications of differentiation for the Dow Chemical Company were also reviewed. For more than 20 years, Dow has practiced leading edge energy efficiency in environmental management systems and has committed to a series of environmental, health and safety goals. The company believes that at the international level, fully differentiated targets and timetables need to be negotiated, party by party, by the 150 nations who agreed to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by year 2000. It was suggested that a strong disincentive exists to delivering energy efficiency beyond compliance. It was predicted that despite efficiency, the energy intensive assets in place today in Annex I countries will be disadvantaged and prematurely retired as the costs of greenhouse gas emission controls grow and exert pressure to move productive capacity offshore

  17. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Haga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-11-11

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59-95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40-1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p =0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p =0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications.

  18. Cycling before and after Exhaustion Differently Affects Cardiac Autonomic Control during Heart Rate Matched Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weippert

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During cycling before (PRE and after exhaustion (POST different modes of autonomic cardiac control might occur due to different interoceptive input and altered influences from higher brain centers. We hypothesized that heart rate variability (HRV is significantly affected by an interaction of the experimental period (PRE vs. POST and exercise intensity (HIGH vs. LOW; HIGH = HR > HR at the lactate threshold (HRLT, LOW = HR ≤ HRLT despite identical average HR.Methods: Fifty healthy volunteers completed an incremental cycling test until exhaustion. Workload started with 30 W at a constant pedaling rate (60 revolutions · min−1 and was gradually increased by 30 W · 5 min−1. Five adjacent 60 s inter-beat (R-R interval segments from the immediate recovery period (POST 1–5 at 30 W and 60 rpm were each matched with their HR-corresponding 60 s-segments during the cycle test (PRE 1–5. An analysis of covariance was carried out with one repeated-measures factor (PRE vs. POST exhaustion, one between-subject factor (HIGH vs. LOW intensity and respiration rate as covariate to test for significant effects (p < 0.050 on the natural log-transformed root mean square of successive differences between adjacent R-R intervals (lnRMSSD60s.Results: LnRMSSD60s was significantly affected by the interaction of experimental period × intensity [F(1, 242 = 30.233, p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.111]. LnRMSSD60s was higher during PRE compared to POST at LOW intensity (1.6 ± 0.6 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6 ms; p < 0.001. In contrast, at HIGH intensity lnRMSSD60s was lower during PRE compared to POST (1.0 ± 0.4 vs. 1.2 ± 0.4 ms; p < 0.001.Conclusion: Identical net HR during cycling can result from distinct autonomic modulation patterns. Results suggest a pronounced sympathetic-parasympathetic coactivation immediately after the cessation of peak workload compared to HR-matched cycling before exhaustion at HIGH intensity. On the opposite, at LOW intensity cycling, a stronger coactivational

  19. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Haga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59–95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40–1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications

  20. Does intensity of rate-control influence outcome in atrial fibrillation? An analysis of pooled data from the RACE and AFFIRM studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Wyse, D. George; Chandler, Mary L.; Cooper, Howard A.; Olshansky, Brian; Hagens, Vincent E.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Aims The AFFIRM and RACE studies showed that rate control is an acceptable treatment strategy for atrial, fibrillation (AF). We examined whether strict rate control offers benefit over more lenient rate control. Methods and Results We compared the outcome of patients enrolled in the rate-control

  1. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Estimating the Expected Dropout Rates in Randomized Controlled Trials on Yoga Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger; Haller, Heidemarie; Dobos, Gustav; Lauche, Romy

    2016-01-01

    A reasonable estimation of expected dropout rates is vital for adequate sample size calculations in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Underestimating expected dropouts rates increases the risk of false negative results while overestimating rates results in overly large sample sizes, raising both ethical and economic issues. To estimate expected dropout rates in RCTs on yoga interventions, MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, IndMED, and the Cochrane Library were searched through February 2014; a total of 168 RCTs were meta-analyzed. Overall dropout rate was 11.42% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 10.11%, 12.73%) in the yoga groups; rates were comparable in usual care and psychological control groups and were slightly higher in exercise control groups (rate = 14.53%; 95% CI = 11.56%, 17.50%; odds ratio = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.98; p = 0.03). For RCTs with durations above 12 weeks, dropout rates in yoga groups increased to 15.23% (95% CI = 11.79%, 18.68%). The upper border of 95% CIs for dropout rates commonly was below 20% regardless of study origin, health condition, gender, age groups, and intervention characteristics; however, it exceeded 40% for studies on HIV patients or heterogeneous age groups. In conclusion, dropout rates can be expected to be less than 15 to 20% for most RCTs on yoga interventions. Yet dropout rates beyond 40% are possible depending on the participants' sociodemographic and health condition.

  2. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Estimating the Expected Dropout Rates in Randomized Controlled Trials on Yoga Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Cramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A reasonable estimation of expected dropout rates is vital for adequate sample size calculations in randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Underestimating expected dropouts rates increases the risk of false negative results while overestimating rates results in overly large sample sizes, raising both ethical and economic issues. To estimate expected dropout rates in RCTs on yoga interventions, MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, IndMED, and the Cochrane Library were searched through February 2014; a total of 168 RCTs were meta-analyzed. Overall dropout rate was 11.42% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 10.11%, 12.73% in the yoga groups; rates were comparable in usual care and psychological control groups and were slightly higher in exercise control groups (rate = 14.53%; 95% CI = 11.56%, 17.50%; odds ratio = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.98; p=0.03. For RCTs with durations above 12 weeks, dropout rates in yoga groups increased to 15.23% (95% CI = 11.79%, 18.68%. The upper border of 95% CIs for dropout rates commonly was below 20% regardless of study origin, health condition, gender, age groups, and intervention characteristics; however, it exceeded 40% for studies on HIV patients or heterogeneous age groups. In conclusion, dropout rates can be expected to be less than 15 to 20% for most RCTs on yoga interventions. Yet dropout rates beyond 40% are possible depending on the participants’ sociodemographic and health condition.

  3. Impact of village-based health education of tobacco control on the current smoking rate in Chinese rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-miao; Xiong, Wei-ning; Xie, Jun-gang; Liu, Xian-sheng; Zhao, Jian-ping; Zhang, Zhen-xiang; Xu, Yong-jian

    2016-02-01

    The number of smokers in Chinese rural areas is more than 200 million, which is twice that in cities. It is very significant to carry out tobacco control interventions in rural areas. We performed this community intervention study to evaluate the efficacy of village-based health education of tobacco control on the male current smoking rate in rural areas. The population of this study was the males above 15 years old from 6 villages in rural areas. The villages were randomly assigned to intervention group or control group (3 villages in each group). Self-designed smoking questionnaire was applied. The intervention group received the village-based health education of tobacco control for one year. The primary outcome measurement was the male current smoking rate. In the baseline investigation, completed surveys were returned by 814 male residents from the control group and 831 male residents from the intervention group. The male current smoking rate in the control group and the intervention group was 61.2% and 58.5%, respectively, before intervention. There was no significant difference between these two groups (P>0.05). After one-year intervention, the current smoking rate in the intervention group (51.2%) was significantly lower than that in the control group (62.8%) (Peducation of tobacco control was effective in lowering the male current smoking rate in rural areas, which could be a suitable and feasible way for tobacco control in the Chinese rural areas.

  4. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  5. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  6. False discovery rate control incorporating phylogenetic tree increases detection power in microbiome-wide multiple testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jian; Cao, Hongyuan; Chen, Jun

    2017-09-15

    Next generation sequencing technologies have enabled the study of the human microbiome through direct sequencing of microbial DNA, resulting in an enormous amount of microbiome sequencing data. One unique characteristic of microbiome data is the phylogenetic tree that relates all the bacterial species. Closely related bacterial species have a tendency to exhibit a similar relationship with the environment or disease. Thus, incorporating the phylogenetic tree information can potentially improve the detection power for microbiome-wide association studies, where hundreds or thousands of tests are conducted simultaneously to identify bacterial species associated with a phenotype of interest. Despite much progress in multiple testing procedures such as false discovery rate (FDR) control, methods that take into account the phylogenetic tree are largely limited. We propose a new FDR control procedure that incorporates the prior structure information and apply it to microbiome data. The proposed procedure is based on a hierarchical model, where a structure-based prior distribution is designed to utilize the phylogenetic tree. By borrowing information from neighboring bacterial species, we are able to improve the statistical power of detecting associated bacterial species while controlling the FDR at desired levels. When the phylogenetic tree is mis-specified or non-informative, our procedure achieves a similar power as traditional procedures that do not take into account the tree structure. We demonstrate the performance of our method through extensive simulations and real microbiome datasets. We identified far more alcohol-drinking associated bacterial species than traditional methods. R package StructFDR is available from CRAN. chen.jun2@mayo.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Does Not Substitute for Asthma Steroid Controller Medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul M; Irvin, Charles G; Lu, Shou-En; Scardella, Anthony; Roehmheld-Hamm, Beatrix; Aviles-Velez, Milisyaris; Graves, Jessica; Vaschillo, Evgeny G; Vaschillo, Bronya; Hoyte, Flavia; Nelson, Harold; Wamboldt, Frederick S

    2018-03-01

    Despite previous findings of therapeutic effects for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) on asthma, it is not known whether HRVB can substitute either for controller or rescue medication, or whether it affects airway inflammation. Sixty-eight paid volunteer steroid naïve study participants with mild or moderate asthma were given 3 months of HRVB or a comparison condition consisting of EEG alpha biofeedback with relaxing music and relaxed paced breathing (EEG+), in a two-center trial. All participants received a month of intensive asthma education prior to randomization. Both treatment conditions produced similar significant improvements on the methacholine challenge test (MCT), asthma symptoms, and asthma quality of life (AQOL). MCT effects were of similar size to those of enhanced placebo procedures reported elsewhere, and were 65% of those of a course of a high-potency inhaled steroid budesonide given to a sub-group of participants following biofeedback training. Exhaled nitric oxide decreased significantly only in the HRVB group, 81% of the budesonide effect, but with no significant differences between groups. Participants reported becoming more relaxed during practice of both techniques. Administration of albuterol after biofeedback sessions produced a large improvement in pulmonary function test results, indicating that neither treatment normalized pulmonary function as a potent controller medication would have done. Impulse oscillometry showed increased upper airway (vocal cord) resistance during biofeedback periods in both groups. These data suggest that HRVB should not be considered an alternative to asthma controller medications (e.g., inhaled steroids), although both biofeedback conditions produced some beneficial effects, warranting further research, and suggesting potential complementary effects. Various hypotheses are presented to explain why HRVB effects on asthma appeared smaller in this study than in earlier studies. Clinical Trial

  8. A randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of Pycnogenol and Bacopa CDRI08 herbal medicines on cognitive, cardiovascular, and biochemical functioning in cognitively healthy elderly people: the Australian Research Council Longevity Intervention (ARCLI study protocol (ANZCTR12611000487910

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stough Con K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major challenges associated with our ageing population is the increasing incidence of age-associated cognitive decline, which has significant implications for an individual's ability to lead a productive and fulfilling life. In pure economic terms the costs of ageing reflects decreased productivity and engagement with the workforce. The maintenance of brain health underpinning intact cognition is a key factor to maintaining a positive, engaged, and productive lifestyle. In light of this, the role of diet, including supplementation with nutritional and even pharmacological interventions capable of ameliorating the neurocognitive changes that occur with age constitute vital areas of research. Methods In order to reduce cognitive ageing, the ARC longevity intervention (ARCLI was developed to examine the effects of two promising natural pharmacologically active supplements on cognitive performance. ARCLI is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 3-arm clinical trial in which 465 participants will be randomized to receive an extract of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI08 300 mg/day, Pycnogenol (150 mg/day, or placebo daily for 12 months. Participants will be tested at baseline and then at 3, 6 and 12 months post-randomization on a wide battery of cognitive, neuropsychological and mood measures, cardiovascular (brachial and aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressures as well as arterial stiffness, biochemical (assays to measure inflammation, oxidative stress and safety as well as genetic assessments (telomere length and several Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. The primary aim is to investigate the effects of these supplements on cognitive performance. The secondary aims are to explore the time-course of cognitive enhancement as well as potential cardiovascular and biochemical mechanisms underpinning cognitive enhancement over the 12 months of administration. ARCLI will represent one of the largest and most comprehensive

  9. Impact on caesarean section rates following injections of sterile water (ICARIS): a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nigel; Mårtensson, Lena B; Homer, Caroline; Webster, Joan; Gibbons, Kristen; Stapleton, Helen; Dos Santos, Natalie; Beckmann, Michael; Gao, Yu; Kildea, Sue

    2013-05-03

    Sterile water injections have been used as an effective intervention for the management of back pain during labour. The objective of the current research is to determine if sterile water injections, as an intervention for back pain in labour, will reduce the intrapartum caesarean section rate. A double blind randomised placebo controlled trialSetting: Maternity hospitals in AustraliaParticipants: 1866 women in labour, ≥18 years of age who have a singleton pregnancy with a fetus in a cephalic presentation at term (between 37 + 0 and 41 + 6 weeks gestation), who assess their back pain as equal to or greater than seven on a visual analogue scale when requesting analgesia and able to provide informed consent. Participants will be randomised to receive either 0.1 to 0.3 millilitres of sterile water or a normal saline placebo via four intradermal injections into four anatomical points surrounding the Michaelis' rhomboid over the sacral area. Two injections will be administered over the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) and the remaining two at two centimetres posterior, and one centimetre medial to the PSIS respectively. Proportion of women who have a caesarean section in labour.Randomisation: Permuted blocks stratified by research site.Blinding (masking):Double-blind trial in which participants, clinicians and research staff blinded to group assignment. Funded by the National Health and Medical Research CouncilTrial registration:Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (No ACTRN12611000221954). Sterile water injections, which may have a positive effect on reducing the CS rate, have been shown to be a safe and simple analgesic suitable for most maternity settings. A procedure that could reduce intervention rates without adversely affecting safety for mother and baby would benefit Australian families and taxpayers and would reduce requirements for maternal operating theatre time. Results will have external validity, as the technique may be easily applied to

  10. Multidimensional biochemical information processing of dynamical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Cells receive signaling molecules by receptors and relay information via sensory networks so that they can respond properly depending on the type of signal. Recent studies have shown that cells can extract multidimensional information from dynamical concentration patterns of signaling molecules. We herein study how biochemical systems can process multidimensional information embedded in dynamical patterns. We model the decoding networks by linear response functions, and optimize the functions with the calculus of variations to maximize the mutual information between patterns and output. We find that, when the noise intensity is lower, decoders with different linear response functions, i.e., distinct decoders, can extract much information. However, when the noise intensity is higher, distinct decoders do not provide the maximum amount of information. This indicates that, when transmitting information by dynamical patterns, embedding information in multiple patterns is not optimal when the noise intensity is very large. Furthermore, we explore the biochemical implementations of these decoders using control theory and demonstrate that these decoders can be implemented biochemically through the modification of cascade-type networks, which are prevalent in actual signaling pathways.

  11. Biomineralization-inspired synthesis of chitosan/hydroxyapatite biocomposites based on a novel bilayer rate-controlling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing-Xiao; Ran, Jia-Bing; Chen, Si; Shen, Xin-Yu; Tong, Hua

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare sophisticated biomaterials using a biomimetic approach, a deeper understanding of biomineralization is needed. Of particular importance is the control and regulation of the mineralization process. In this study, a novel bilayer rate-controlling model was designed to investigate the factors potentially influencing mineralization. In the absence of a rate-controlling layer, nano-scale hydroxyapatite (HA) crystallites exhibited a spherical morphology, whereas, in the presence of a rate-controlling layer, HA crystallites were homogeneously dispersed and spindle-like in structure. The mineralization rate had a significant effect on controlling the morphology of crystals. Furthermore, in vitro tests demonstrated that the reaction layer containing spindle-like HA crystallites possessed superior biological properties. These results suggest that a slow mineralization rate is required for controlling the morphology of inorganic crystallites, and consumption by the rate-controlling layer ensured that the ammonia concentration remained low. This study demonstrates that a biomimetic approach can be used to prepare novel biomaterials containing HA crystallites that have different morphologies and biological properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  13. Control of the heart rate of rat embryos during the organogenic period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie HE

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Helen E Ritchie,1 Carolina Ragnerstam,2 Elin Gustafsson,2 Johanna M Jonsson,2 William S Webster2 1Discipline of Biomedical Science, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 2Department of Anatomy and Histology, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: The aim of this study was to gain insight into whether the first trimester embryo could control its own heart rate (HR in response to hypoxia. The gestational day 13 rat embryo is a good model for the human embryo at 5–6 weeks gestation, as the heart is comparable in development and, like the human embryo, has no functional autonomic nerve supply at this stage. Utilizing a whole-embryo culture technique, we examined the effects of different pharmacological agents on HR under normoxic (95% oxygen and hypoxic (20% oxygen conditions. Oxygen concentrations ≤60% caused a concentration-dependent decrease in HR from normal levels of ~210 bpm. An adenosine agonist, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activator and KATP channel opener all caused bradycardia in normoxic conditions; however, putative antagonists for these systems failed to prevent or ameliorate hypoxia-induced bradycardia. This suggests that the activation of one or more of these systems is not the primary cause of the observed hypoxia-induced bradycardia. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation also decreased HR in normoxic conditions, highlighting the importance of ATP levels. The β-blocker metoprolol caused a concentration-dependent reduction in HR supporting reports that β1-adrenergic receptors are present in the early rat embryonic heart. The cAMP inducer colforsin induced a positive chronotropic effect in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Overall, the embryonic HR at this stage of development is responsive to the level of oxygenation, probably as a consequence of its influence on ATP production. Keywords: embryonic heart rate, embryo, bradycardia, in vitro, ATP, hypoxia

  14. Dynamic Maternal Gradients Control Timing and Shift-Rates for Drosophila Gap Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verd, Berta; Crombach, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Pattern formation during development is a highly dynamic process. In spite of this, few experimental and modelling approaches take into account the explicit time-dependence of the rules governing regulatory systems. We address this problem by studying dynamic morphogen interpretation by the gap gene network in Drosophila melanogaster. Gap genes are involved in segment determination during early embryogenesis. They are activated by maternal morphogen gradients encoded by bicoid (bcd) and caudal (cad). These gradients decay at the same time-scale as the establishment of the antero-posterior gap gene pattern. We use a reverse-engineering approach, based on data-driven regulatory models called gene circuits, to isolate and characterise the explicitly time-dependent effects of changing morphogen concentrations on gap gene regulation. To achieve this, we simulate the system in the presence and absence of dynamic gradient decay. Comparison between these simulations reveals that maternal morphogen decay controls the timing and limits the rate of gap gene expression. In the anterior of the embyro, it affects peak expression and leads to the establishment of smooth spatial boundaries between gap domains. In the posterior of the embryo, it causes a progressive slow-down in the rate of gap domain shifts, which is necessary to correctly position domain boundaries and to stabilise the spatial gap gene expression pattern. We use a newly developed method for the analysis of transient dynamics in non-autonomous (time-variable) systems to understand the regulatory causes of these effects. By providing a rigorous mechanistic explanation for the role of maternal gradient decay in gap gene regulation, our study demonstrates that such analyses are feasible and reveal important aspects of dynamic gene regulation which would have been missed by a traditional steady-state approach. More generally, it highlights the importance of transient dynamics for understanding complex regulatory

  15. Controlling growth rate anisotropy for formation of continuous ZnO thin films from seeded substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R H; Slamovich, E B; Handwerker, C A

    2013-01-01

    Solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films are promising candidates for low-temperature-processable active layers in transparent thin film electronics. In this study, control of growth rate anisotropy using ZnO nanoparticle seeds, capping ions, and pH adjustment leads to a low-temperature (90 ° C) hydrothermal process for transparent and high-density ZnO thin films. The common 1D ZnO nanorod array was grown into a 2D continuous polycrystalline film using a short-time pure solution method. Growth rate anisotropy of ZnO crystals and the film morphology were tuned by varying the chloride (Cl − ) ion concentration and the initial pH of solutions of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), and the competitive adsorption effects of Cl − ions and HMTA ligands on the anisotropic growth behavior of ZnO crystals were proposed. The lateral growth of nanorods constituting the film was promoted by lowering the solution pH to accelerate the hydrolysis of HMTA, thereby allowing the adsorption effects from Cl − to dominate. By optimizing the growth conditions, a dense ∼100 nm thickness film was fabricated in 15 min from a solution of [Cl − ]/[Zn 2+ ] = 1.5 and pH= 4.8 ± 0.1. This film shows >80% optical transmittance and a field-effect mobility of 2.730 cm 2 V −1 s −1 at zero back-gate bias. (paper)

  16. New Biochemical Pathway May Control Erection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Mills

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty million men in the U.S. suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED defined by their inability to achieve or maintain a penile erection sufficient for intercourse. An unestimated number of women also suffer from sexual dysfunction resulting from many of the same causes that lead to ED in men. There are a variety of treatments available for ED including intracavernosal injection, transurethral therapy, surgery, vacuum therapy, and oral medication. Unfortunately, not all patients benefit from these currently available forms of therapy, and side effects are not uncommon. Sildenafil (Viagra has been a highly successful drug for the treatment of ED but it does not work in all men [5]. Some may experience a variety of side effects, and Viagra is contraindicated to some cardiac medications. These problems point to the need for new and different approaches to the treatment of sexual problems.

  17. Evaluation of Salivary Glucose, IgA and Flow Rate in Diabetic Patients: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bakianian Vaziri, P.; Vahedi, M.; Mortazavi, H.; Abdollahzadeh, Sh.; Hajilooi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An association between diabetes mellitus and alterations in the oral cavity has been noted. In this study, we evaluated differences between salivary IgA, glucose and flow rate in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with type 1 diabetes, 40 patients with type 2 diabetes and 40 healthy controls were selected. Whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected by the standard method and the salivary flow rate was determined. Nephelomet...

  18. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; Sohns, Jan M.; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M.; Derlin, Thorsten; Klot, Christoph A. von; Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans; Wester, Hans-Juergen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T. 240 patients who underwent a ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to 0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study. (orig.)

  19. Biochemical reactions of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of mercury, strontium chloride, GMDA, trichlorfon as well as some radionuclides ( 89 Sr, 137 Cs, 203 Hg) were studied on rats. Changes in biochemical parameters (histamine content, activity of cholinesterase and histaminase) are noted. Most noticeable changes were observed in enzymatic activity. Distortion of enzymatic systems and accumulation of intermediate exchange and decay products of tissues in excess quantities affecting other systems can be the reason for changes in the organism. The observed changes in biochemical parameters should be necessarily taken into account at hygienic regulations of harmful effects of enviroment

  20. Controls on Arctic sea ice from first-year and multi-year ice survival rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, K.; Bitz, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Thompson, L.

    2009-12-01

    The recent decrease in Arctic sea ice cover has transpired with a significant loss of multi-year (MY) ice. The transition to an Arctic that is populated by thinner first-year (FY) sea ice has important implications for future trends in area and volume. We develop a reduced model for Arctic sea ice with which we investigate how the survivability of FY and MY ice control various aspects of the sea-ice system. We demonstrate that Arctic sea-ice area and volume behave approximately as first-order autoregressive processes, which allows for a simple interpretation of September sea-ice in which its mean state, variability, and sensitivity to climate forcing can be described naturally in terms of the average survival rates of FY and MY ice. This model, used in concert with a sea-ice simulation that traces FY and MY ice areas to estimate the survival rates, reveals that small trends in the ice survival rates explain the decline in total Arctic ice area, and the relatively larger loss of MY ice area, over the period 1979-2006. Additionally, our model allows for a calculation of the persistence time scales of September area and volume anomalies. A relatively short memory time scale for ice area (~ 1 year) implies that Arctic ice area is nearly in equilibrium with long-term climate forcing at all times, and therefore observed trends in area are a clear indication of a changing climate. A longer memory time scale for ice volume (~ 5 years) suggests that volume can be out of equilibrium with climate forcing for long periods of time, and therefore trends in ice volume are difficult to distinguish from its natural variability. With our reduced model, we demonstrate the connection between memory time scale and sensitivity to climate forcing, and discuss the implications that a changing memory time scale has on the trajectory of ice area and volume in a warming climate. Our findings indicate that it is unlikely that a “tipping point” in September ice area and volume will be

  1. Output Information Based Fault-Tolerant Iterative Learning Control for Dual-Rate Sampling Process with Disturbances and Output Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfeng Tao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For a class of single-input single-output (SISO dual-rate sampling processes with disturbances and output delay, this paper presents a robust fault-tolerant iterative learning control algorithm based on output information. Firstly, the dual-rate sampling process with output delay is transformed into discrete system in state-space model form with slow sampling rate without time delay by using lifting technology; then output information based fault-tolerant iterative learning control scheme is designed and the control process is turned into an equivalent two-dimensional (2D repetitive process. Moreover, based on the repetitive process stability theory, the sufficient conditions for the stability of system and the design method of robust controller are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs technique. Finally, the flow control simulations of two flow tanks in series demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Reflex control of heart rate in normal subjects in relation to age: a data base for cardiac vagal neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, W.; van Brederode, J. F.; de Rijk, L. G.; Borst, C.; Dunning, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the heart rate changes induced by forced breathing and by standing up in 133 healthy subjects in the age range 10-65 years in order to establish a data base for studies on parasympathetic heart rate control in autonomic neuropathy. Test results declined with age. Log-transformation was

  3. Rate of Torque Development and Feedforward Control of the Hip and Knee Extensors: Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns-Reider, Kristen M; Powers, Christopher M

    2017-10-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether women demonstrate decreased rate of torque development (RTD) of the hip and knee extensors and altered onset timing of the vastus lateralis and gluteus maximus during a drop-jump task when compared with men. On average, women demonstrated significantly lower normalized RTD of the hip extensors (women: 11.6 ± 1.3 MVT.s -1 , men: 13.1 ± 0.9 MVT.s -1 ; p ≤ .01); however, there was no significant difference in knee extensor RTD. Women also demonstrated significantly earlier activation of their vastus lateralis (women: 206.0 ± 130.6 ms, men: 80.9 ± 69.6 ms; p ≤ .01) and gluteus maximus (women: 85.7 ± 58.6 ms, men: 54.5 ± 35.4 ms; p = .02). In both men and women, there was a significant negative correlation between the hip extensor RTD and the vastus lateralis electromyographic onset time (men: r = -.386, p = .046; women: r = -.531, p = .008). The study findings suggest that women may utilize a feedforward control strategy in which they activate their knee extensors earlier than men to compensate for deficits in hip extensor RTD. The impaired capacity to rapidly stabilize the hip and knee joints during dynamic maneuvers may contribute to the increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury observed in women.

  4. The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Approach to Far-From-Local-Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Metghalchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE method for the description of the time-dependent behavior of dynamical systems in non-equilibrium states is a general, effective, physically based method for model order reduction that was originally developed in the framework of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. A generalized mathematical formulation is presented here that allows including nonlinear constraints in non-local equilibrium systems characterized by the existence of a non-increasing Lyapunov functional under the system’s internal dynamics. The generalized formulation of RCCE enables to clarify the essentials of the method and the built-in general feature of thermodynamic consistency in the chemical kinetics context. In this paper, we work out the details of the method in a generalized mathematical-physics framework, but for definiteness we detail its well-known implementation in the traditional chemical kinetics framework. We detail proofs and spell out explicit functional dependences so as to bring out and clarify each underlying assumption of the method. In the standard context of chemical kinetics of ideal gas mixtures, we discuss the relations between the validity of the detailed balance condition off-equilibrium and the thermodynamic consistency of the method. We also discuss two examples of RCCE gas-phase combustion calculations to emphasize the constraint-dependent performance of the RCCE method.

  5. Capital flows, real exchange rates, and capital controls: What is the scope of liberalization for Tunisia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrakchi Charfi Fatma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an important aspect of Tunisian economic and political decisions related to the opportunity for currency convertibility. Tunisia has established its current currency convertibility and has taken steps to achieve full convertibility of the dinar by gradually removing capital flow obstacles. Theoretical and empirical literature suggests that capital account liberalization generally leads to capital inflow in developing countries, generating an appreciation in the real exchange rate (RER and thus a loss in competitiveness. However, preserving competitiveness is a key challenge for monetary authorities, who have to conciliate these two apparently conflicting purposes. To guide their decisions with respect to the prescribed procedure for capital liberalization, we need to evaluate the impact of each capital component flow on the RER. The question is addressed by analyzing impulse response functions (IRF resulting from a VAR model, covering 1970 to 2010 and gathering the RER, its fundamental determinants, monetary variables and an estimated capital control (CC variable. Results show that a relaxation of CC overappreciates the RER to its long-term level, and liberalizing portfolio investment is the most compromising for competitiveness.

  6. Serial correlation of quality control data--on the use of proper control charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, P; Zhang, Nevin

    2004-01-01

    Biochemical quality control (QC) data have been reported to be autocorrelated. Serial correlation may increase the rate of false alarms if the traditional exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control chart to monitoring the process mean is used. False alarms are the focus of this paper......, where an alarm is defined as the occurrence of a QC value outside the three standard deviation control limits....

  7. Designing adaptive integral sliding mode control for heart rate regulation during cycle-ergometer exercise using bio-feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argha, Ahmadreza; Su, Steven W; Nguyen, Hung; Celler, Branko G

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers our developed control system which aims to regulate the exercising subjects' heart rate (HR) to a predefined profile. The controller would be an adaptive integral sliding mode controller. Here it is assumed that the controller commands are interpreted as biofeedback auditory commands. These commands can be heard and implemented by the exercising subject as a part of the control-loop. However, transmitting a feedback signal while the pedals are not in the appropriate position to efficiently exert force may lead to a cognitive disengagement of the user from the feedback controller. To address this problem this paper will employ a different form of control system regarding as "actuator-based event-driven control system". This paper will claim that the developed event-driven controller makes it possible to effectively regulate HR to a predetermined HR profile.

  8. Biochemical basis for the action of radioprotective drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romantsev, E.F.; Blokhina, V.D.; Zhulanova, Z.I.; Koshcheenko, N.N.; Filippovich, I.V.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis of complex biochemical mechanism of action of radioprotective drugs is described. Shortly after injection of radioprotective aminothiols into animals the inhibition of radiosensitive biochemical processes: DNA and RNA synthesis, protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation has been observed. The molecular mechanism of these phenomena consists of radioprotectors ability to form adsorption, thioester, amide, and disulphide bonds with appropriate enzymes. The curve reflecting the formation and breakdown of mixed disulphides between radioprotectors and proteins coincides well with that reflecting the radioprotective effect dependence on time. The radiobiological significance of molecular interactions observed may be interpreted as the diminution in ''spoiled'' molecules formation (inhibition of replication) and elevation in repartion rate. The inhibition of biochemical processes has the reversible nature and last for short time. The drugs acting according to so-called oxygen effect protect also by means of biochemical mechanisms. The molecular mechanism is mediated through their ability to bind to receptors, and biologically important molecules and macromolecules. As a result the inhibition of radiosensitive processes occurs, the ''spoiled'' molecules number is diminished and reparation takes place more easily. The idea on the complex biochemical mechanism of action of radioprotectors correlates with the proposal on complex biochemical mechanism responsible for interphase death occured after irradiation

  9. Effects of glycemic control on saliva flow rates and protein composition in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, M W; Dodds, A P

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether improvements in the level of diabetic control in a group of subjects with poorly controlled non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus influence salivary output and composition. Repeated whole unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva samples were collected from diabetic patients attending an outpatient diabetes education program and a matched nondiabetic control group. Saliva was analyzed for flow rates, parotid protein concentration and composition, and amylase activity. Subjective responses to questions about salivary hypofunction were tested. There were no significant differences in whole unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates or stimulated parotid protein concentration and composition between diabetics and the control group. Amylase activity was higher in diabetics and decreased with improved glycemic control. Subjects reporting taste alterations had higher mean blood glucose levels than subjects with normal taste sensation. Poorly controlled non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus has no influence on saliva output, although amylase activity may be elevated, and there may be taste alterations.

  10. Circadian Clocks: Unexpected Biochemical Cogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tetsuya; Mchaourab, Hassane; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-10-05

    A circadian oscillation can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins that cycles with a period of ∼ 24 h. Two recent studies provide surprising biochemical answers to why this remarkable oscillator has such a long time constant and how it can switch effortlessly between alternating enzymatic modes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Circadian Clocks: Unexpected Biochemical Cogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Tetsuya; Mchaourab, Hassane; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    A circadian oscillation can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins that cycles with a period of ~24 h. Two recent studies provide surprising biochemical answers to why this remarkable oscillator has such a long time constant and how it can switch effortlessly between alternating enzymatic modes.

  12. Induced abortion on demand and birth rate in Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group in Finnmark, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Norum

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this study was to analyze the birth and induced abortion on demand (IAD rate among women in Sami-speaking communities and a control group in Finnmark County, Norway. Methods. The 6 northern municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (study group were matched with a control group of 9 municipalities. Population data (numbers, sex and age were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data on birth rate and IAD during the time period 1999–2009 were derived from the Medical Birth Registry (MBR of Norway. Data on number of women in fertile age (15–44 years were obtained from Statistics Norway. Between 2001 and 2008, this age group was reduced by 12% (Sami and 23% (controls, respectively. Results. Finnmark County has a high IAD rate and 1 in 4 pregnancies (spontaneous abortions excluded ended in IAD in the study and control groups. The total fertility rate per woman was 1.94 and 1.87 births, respectively. There was no difference between groups with regard to the IAD/birth ratio (P=0.94 or general fertility rate GFR (P=0.82. Conclusions. Women in the Sami-majority area and a control group in Finnmark County experienced a similar frequency of IAD and fertility rate.

  13. Evaluation of salivary glucose, IgA and flow rate in diabetic patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakianian Vaziri, P; Vahedi, M; Mortazavi, H; Abdollahzadeh, Sh; Hajilooi, M

    2010-01-01

    An association between diabetes mellitus and alterations in the oral cavity has been noted. In this study, we evaluated differences between salivary IgA, glucose and flow rate in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. Forty patients with type 1 diabetes, 40 patients with type 2 diabetes and 40 healthy controls were selected. Whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected by the standard method and the salivary flow rate was determined. Nephelometric and Pars method were used to measure salivary IgA and salivary glucose concentrations, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-square and t test. There were no significant differences in salivary IgA and glucose concentrations between type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and their matched control subjects (P>0.05). Salivary flow rate was significantly lower in diabetic patients (Pdiabetic patients than the controls. Determination of salivary constituents may be useful in the description and management of oral findings in diabetic patients.

  14. The Combined Effect of Long Working Hours and Low Job Control on Self-Rated Health: An Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Sik; Ju, Young-Su; Paek, Domyung; Kim, Hyunjoo; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effects of long working hours and low job control on self-rated health. We analyzed employees' data obtained from the third Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS). Multiple survey logistic analysis and postestimation commands were employed to estimate the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). The odds ratio (OR) for poor self-rated health was 1.24 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.13 to 1.35] for long working hours, 1.04 (95% CI: 0.97 to 1.13) for low job control, and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.33 to 1.62) for both long working hours and low job control. The RERI was 0.18 (95% CI: 0.02 to 0.34). These results imply that low job control may increase the negative influence of long working hours on self-rated health.

  15. Biochemical parameters in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, R M; Lazarus, J M

    1988-03-01

    We analyzed biochemical data derived from 911 patients with renal insufficiency observed at our institution for periods up to 7 years. During early renal failure (RF) (creatinine less than 5 mg/dL), the rate of change of hematocrit, total CO2 (tCO2) and urea per unit change of creatinine was significantly higher than during moderate (creatinine between 5 and 10 mg/dL) or advanced (creatinine greater than 10 mg/dL) RF. For example, the rate of change of hematocrit (%, volume/volume [v/v]) was (mean +/- SEM) -2.15 +/- 0.15% for each 1 mg/dL increase in creatinine in the range of creatinine less than 5 mg/dL, whereas for the range of creatinine greater than 10 mg/dL, the rate of change was only -0.48 +/- 0.06% (P less than 0.001). Similarly, the rate of change of tCO2 was -1.68 +/- 0.09 mEq/L for each 1 mg/dL increment in creatinine concentration during early RF, and -0.19 +/- 0.09 mEq/L per unit increase in creatinine during advanced RF (P less than 0.001). Chloride concentration initially increased as a function of creatinine in early RF, but decreased in advanced RF, whereas the anion gap increased throughout the course of RF. Mean serum phosphate concentration also increased steadily, but remained below the upper range of normal (4.7 mg/dL) during early RF without the use of phosphate binders. These data suggest that different biochemical parameters change at different rates as a function of the severity of renal dysfunction, and that although phosphate retention may occur, hyperphosphatemia is not a hallmark of early RF.

  16. Effect of omega 3 fatty acids plus low-dose aspirin on both clinical and biochemical profiles of patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes: a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakeel, N M; Hazaa, H H

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was, first, to investigate the effect of omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids plus low-dose aspirin with closed debridement in the treatment of patients with periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and second, to estimate the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-3 (MCP-3) in response to the supposed modulatory therapy. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 DM were equally divided into groups 1 (patients received ω3 plus low-dose aspirin for 6 mo) and 2 (patients received placebo during the same period). Evaluation was done clinically (pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, gingival index and plaque index) and biochemically by estimating levels of interleukin 1β and MCP-3 in gingival crevicular fluid, plus investigating the effect of treatment on glycemic control by levels of glycated hemoglobin A1c in serum. All data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 mo after treatment. Subjects of group 1 showed a highly significant reduction in pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, gingival index (p ≤ 0.01) after 3 and 6 mo compared to group 2. Glycated hemoglobin A1c levels showed a reduction in both groups at the end of the study period, with a non-significant difference (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the treatment protocol showed a significant reduction in levels of MCP-3 and interleukin 1β at 3 and 6 mo compared to the placebo group. Within the limits of the present study, ω3 plus low-dose aspirin proved effective as an adjunct to closed periodontal therapy in the management of patients with periodontitis and type 2 DM. Moreover, MCP-3 was proven to be effective both in the pathogenesis of the disease and as a biomarker in evaluating the response to periodontal treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Adherence rates to ferric citrate as compared to active control in patients with end stage kidney disease on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Diana; McFadden, Molly; Dwyer, Jamie P; Umanath, Kausik; Aguilar, Erwin; Yagil, Yoram; Greco, Barbara; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B; Greene, Tom; Goral, Simin

    2017-04-01

    Oral phosphate binders are the main stay of treatment of hyperphosphatemia. Adherence rates to ferric citrate, a recently approved phosphate binder, are unknown. We conducted a post-hoc analysis to evaluate whether adherence rates were different for ferric citrate vs. active control in 412 subjects with end stage kidney disease (ESKD) who were randomized to ferric citrate vs. active control (sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate). Adherence was defined as percent of actual number of pills taken to total number of pills prescribed. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics including gender, race/ethnicity, and age between the ferric citrate and active control groups. Baseline phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone levels were similar. Mean (SD) adherence was 81.4% (17.4) and 81.7% (15.9) in the ferric citrate and active control groups, respectively (P = 0.88). Adherence remained similar between both groups after adjusting for gender, race/ethnicity, age, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and diabetic nephropathy (mean [95% CI]: 81.4% [78.2, 84.6] and 81.5% [77.7, 85.2] for ferric citrate and active control, respectively). Gender, race/ethnicity, age, and diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy did not influence adherence to the prescribed phosphate binder. Subjects with CVD had lower adherence rates to phosphate binder; this was significant only in the active control group. Adherence rates to the phosphate binder, ferric citrate, were similar to adherence rates to active control. Similar adherence rates to ferric citrate are notable since tolerance to active control was an entry criteria and the study was open label. Gender, race/ethnicity, nor age influenced adherence. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  18. Study of the buffering capacity, pH and salivary flow rate in type 2 well-controlled and poorly controlled diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Maria José; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Kehrig, Ruth; Leite, Mariana Ferreira; Nicolau, José

    2007-01-01

    This study measured the flow rate, pH and buffering capacity of saliva from well- and poorly metabolically controlled Type 2 diabetic patients in three cities of the southern part of Brazil, compared with healthy individuals from the same cities. Whole saliva was collected by mechanical stimulation and buffering capacity and glucose level were measured. Blood was collected after 12 hours fasting and glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin concentrations were determined. The data were analysed by one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls (alpha= 0.05). The flow rate was lower in the Type 2 diabetic patients, regardless of whether they were well or poorly metabolically controlled, compared with healthy individuals (p Salivary glucose concentration was higher in both diabetic patient groups, i.e. well and poorly metabolically controlled, than in the control (p salivary flow rate or the salivary glucose concentration.

  19. Modeling the Influence of Diffusion-Controlled Reactions and Residual Termination and Deactivation on the Rate and Control of Bulk ATRP at High Conversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Rabea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In high-conversion atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, all the reactions, such as radical termination, radical deactivation, dormant chain activation, monomer propagation, etc. could become diffusion controlled sooner or later, depending on relative diffusivities of the involved reacting species. These diffusion-controlled reactions directly affect the rate of polymerization and the control of polymer molecular weight. A model is developed to investigate the influence of diffusion-controlled reactions on the high conversion ATRP kinetics. Model simulation reveals that diffusion-controlled termination slightly increases the rate, but it is the diffusion-controlled deactivation that causes auto-acceleration in the rate (“gel effect” and loss of control. At high conversions, radical chains are “trapped” because of high molecular weight. However, radical centers can still migrate through (1 radical deactivation–activation cycles and (2 monomer propagation, which introduce “residual termination” reactions. It is found that the “residual termination” does not have much influence on the polymerization kinetics. The migration of radical centers through propagation can however facilitate catalytic deactivation of radicals, which improves the control of polymer molecular weight to some extent. Dormant chain activation and monomer propagation also become diffusion controlled and finally stop the polymerization when the system approaches its glass state.

  20. Effects of Moxa (Folium Artemisiae argyi Smoke Exposure on Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Young Adults: A Randomized, Controlled Human Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxue Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the effects of the moxa smoke on human heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV. Methods. Fifty-five healthy young adults were randomly divided into experimental (n=28 and control (n=27 groups. Experimental subjects were exposed to moxa smoke (2.5 ± 0.5 mg/m3 twice for 25 minutes in one week. ECG monitoring was performed before, during, and after exposure. Control subjects were exposed to normal indoor air in a similar environment and similarly monitored. Followup was performed the following week. Short-term (5 min HRV parameters were analyzed with HRV analysis software. SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Results. During and after the first exposure, comparison of percentage changes or changes in all parameters between groups showed no significant differences. During the second exposure, percentage decrease in HR, percentage increases in lnTP, lnHF, lnLF, and RMSSD, and increase in PNN50 were significantly greater in the experimental group than in control. Conclusion. No significant adverse HRV effects were associated with this clinically routine 25-minute exposure to moxa smoke, and the data suggests that short-term exposure to moxa smoke might have positive regulating effects on human autonomic function. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  1. Effect of Aging and Priming on Physiological and Biochemical Traits of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman AMANPOUR-BALANEJI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging and deterioration (artificial aging are the most effective factors on the seed vigour. In order to study the changes in physiological and biochemical characteristics of common bean under aging and priming treatments a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design conducted with three replications. Seed aging (control, 90 and 80% of control germination and seed invigoration with priming including control, hydro (distilled water, osmo (PEG 6000, hormone (gibberellic acid and halo (NaCl priming were considered as experimental factors. Results showed that osmo-priming had the ability to relatively ameliorate the aging effect and recover some of the seed aspects like germination rate, protein and phytin content for invigorate germination and seedling establishment. Priming indirectly increased seed vigour via germination rate and it can provide homogeny of emergence in the field and obtaining appropriate plant population.

  2. Biochemical failure after radical external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Satoshi; Imada, Hajime; Kato, Fumio; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Ohguri, Takayuki; Nakano, Keita; Korogi, Yukunori

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biochemical failures after radical external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A total of 143 patients with prostate cancer (5 cases in stage A2, 95 in stage B and 43 in stage C; 18 in low risk group, 37 in intermediate risk group, 67 in high risk group and 21 in unknown group) were included in this study. Patients of stage A2 and B underwent external irradiation of 46 Gy to the prostate gland and seminal vesicle and additional 20 Gy to the prostate gland, while patients of stage C underwent external irradiation of 66 Gy to the prostate gland and seminal vesicle including 46 Gy to the pelvis. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was done in 66 cases, and long-term hormonal therapy in 75 cases; two cases were treated with radiation therapy alone. The 3-year relapse free survival rates by stage A2, B and C were 100%, 96.7% and 88.1%, respectively. The 3-year relapse free survival rates by low, intermediate and high risk groups were 100%, 92.3% and 89.7%, respectively. Biochemical failure was noted in nine cases during the average observation term of 32.2 months; in this group the median of prostate specific antigen (PSA) value was 2.6 ng/ml, the doubling time was 8.6 months, and the term of biochemical failure was 33.2 months. Six of eight cases with biochemical failure were the neoadjuvant hormonal therapy group, but biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) curve showed no significant difference between neoadjuvant and long-term hormonal groups. It is supposed that unnecessary hormonal therapies were performed based on the nonspecific diagnosis of biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy in our group of patients. A precise criterion of biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is necessary. (author)

  3. [Technical complications rates and plaque control of fixed dental prostheses in patients treated for periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yesi; Meng, Huanxin; Han, Jie; Pan, Shaoxia; Zhang, Li; Shi, Dong

    2016-02-01

    To compare the incidence of technical complications of implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in Chinese patients with a history of moderate or severe periodontitis and periodontally healthy patients(PHP) and analyze the effects of interproximal papillae patterns on food impaction and efficacy of plaque control. A total of 103 partially edentulous patients treated with implant-supported fixed dental prostheses between December 2009 and December 2012 for a minimum 1-year follow-up period were recruited from Department of Periodontology, Peking University, School and Hospital of Stomatology. Based on the initial periodontal examination, the participants were divided into three groups: 30 PHP, 36 moderate periodontally compromised patients(mPCP) and 37 severe periodontally compromised patients(sPCP). Implant survival/loss, technical complications, plaque index, papilla index, food impaction and degree of proximal contact tightness of each patient were assessed around the implants at follow-up. According to the implant papilla index, the implants were divided into two groups: the "filling" group with the mesial and distal aspects with papilla index=3 and the "no filling" group with at least one aspect with papilla indextechnical complications were analyzed. Comparisons of the incidence of technical complications were performed between the patients with different periodontal conditions with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. The influences of the interproximal papillae loss on food impaction and efficacy of plaque control were estimated with chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. The total implant survival rate was 100%(162/162) for all three groups. Technical complications were as following: veneer fractures(1.9%, 3/162), abutment screw loosening(1.9%, 3/162), prosthetic screw loosening(3.1%, 5/162) and decementation(3.1%, 5/162) in all subjects. No implant/screw fracture was noted. The incidence of technical complications in sPCP, mPCP and PHP did not yield

  4. Rate setting and regulatory control of the radionuclides content in foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandala, N. K.; Savskin, M. N.; Petukhova, E. V.; Novikova, N. Y.; Titov, A. V.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of rate setting, standardisation and regulatory control of the radionuclides content in foodstuffs consists in the following: ? the normative standards concern to 90Sr and 137Cs as biologically significant radionuclides; ? the internal exposure dose from ingestion intake of radionuclides with food should not exceed meaning of 1 mSv a-1 which is the intervention exception level concerning trading foodstuffs; ? for few consumed foodstuffs (wild berries, mushrooms, teas) is established, that the dose caused by their consumption is outside of dose limits of 1 mSv a-1 and it should not exceed 1 % for each product; ? the nutrition structure of population including seven basic components of a diet (bread and grain products, dairy products, potatoes, vegetables, meat, fish, fruit and berries) is taken into account as a source of ingestion intake of the radionuclides; ? The conformity to the established standard is determined on a parameter ?f the summary contents of 90Sr and 137Cs in foodstuff. With the purpose of the operative control of an internal exposure of population the permissible levels of specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs in more than 120 kinds of foodstuff were developed. These standards are obligatory in Russia for domestic and imported foodstuffs. So, permissible levels of specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs in bread make, accordingly, 20 and 40 Bq kg-1; in milk - 25 and 100 Bq kg-1; in meat - 50 and 160 Bq kg-1; in potatoes and vegetables - 40 and 120 Bq kg-1. Monitoring of contamination of foodstuffs by 137Cs and 90Sr is one of the basic measures on maintenance of radiation safety of population in Russia. State system of sanitary-epidemiological control carries out constant supervision over the content of the radionuclides in food production. By the carried out researches was shown that true levels of the contents of 90Sr or 137Cs in the main foodstuffs in territory of Russia, except for the territories, injures of the radiation accidents, make

  5. Complexity Control of Fast Motion Estimation in H.264/MPEG-4 AVC with Rate-Distortion-Complexity optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Mo; Forchhammer, Søren; Aghito, Shankar Manuel

    2007-01-01

    A complexity control algorithm for H.264 advanced video coding is proposed. The algorithm can control the complexity of integer inter motion estimation for a given target complexity. The Rate-Distortion-Complexity performance is improved by a complexity prediction model, simple analysis of the pa...... statistics and a control scheme. The algorithm also works well for scene change condition. Test results for coding interlaced video (720x576 PAL) are reported.......A complexity control algorithm for H.264 advanced video coding is proposed. The algorithm can control the complexity of integer inter motion estimation for a given target complexity. The Rate-Distortion-Complexity performance is improved by a complexity prediction model, simple analysis of the past...

  6. Expert ratings of job demand and job control as predictors of injury and musculoskeletal disorder risk in a manufacturing cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Linda F; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Slade, Martin D; Galusha, Deron; Cullen, Mark R

    2016-04-01

    To examine associations between workplace injury and musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risk and expert ratings of job-level psychosocial demand and job control, adjusting for job-level physical demand. Among a cohort of 9260 aluminium manufacturing workers in jobs for which expert ratings of job-level physical and psychological demand and control were obtained during the 2 years following rating obtainment, multivariate mixed effects models were used to estimate relative risk (RR) of minor injury and minor MSD, serious injury and MSD, minor MSD only and serious MSD only by tertile of demand and control, adjusting for physical demand as well as other recognised risk factors. Compared with workers in jobs rated as having low psychological demand, workers in jobs with high psychological demand had 49% greater risk of serious injury and serious MSD requiring medical treatment, work restrictions or lost work time (RR=1.49; 95% CI 1.10 to 2.01). Workers in jobs rated as having low control displayed increased risk for minor injury and minor MSD (RR=1.45; 95% CI 1.12 to 1.87) compared with those in jobs rated as having high control. Using expert ratings of job-level exposures, this study provides evidence that psychological job demand and job control contribute independently to injury and MSD risk in a blue-collar manufacturing cohort, and emphasises the importance of monitoring psychosocial workplace exposures in addition to physical workplace exposures to promote worker health and safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. The contribution of mulches to control high soil erosion rates in vineyards in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena; José Marqués, María; Novara, Agata

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion take place in degraded ecosystem where the lack of vegetation, drought, erodible parent material and deforestation take place (Borelli et al., 2013; Haregeweyn et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). Agriculture management developed new landscapes (Ore and Bruins, 2012) and use to trigger non-sustainable soil erosion rates (Zema et al., 2012). High erosion rates were measured in agriculture land (Cerdà et al., 2009), but it is also possible to develop managements that will control the soil and water losses, such as organic amendments (Marqués et al., 2005), plant cover (Marqués et al., 2007) and geotextiles (Giménez Morera et al., 2010). The most successful management to restore the structural stability and the biological activity of the agriculture soil has been the organic mulches (García Orenes et al; 2009; 2010; 2012). The straw mulch is also very successful on bare fire affected soil (Robichaud et al., 2013a; 2013b), which also contributes to a more stable soil moisture content (García-Moreno et al., 2013). The objective of this research is to determine the impact of two mulches: wheat straw and chipped branches, on the soil erosion rates in a rainfed vineyard in Eastern Spain. The research site is located in the Les Alcusses Valley within the Moixent municipality. The Mean annual temperature is 13 ºC, and the mean annual rainfall 455 mm. Soil are sandy loam, and are developed at the foot-slope of a Cretaceous limestone range, the Serra Grossa range. The soils use to be ploughed and the features of soil erosion are found after each thunderstorm. Rills are removed by ploughing. Thirty rainfall simulation experiments were carried out in summer 2011 during the summer drought period. The simulated rainfall lasted during 1 hour at a 45 mmh-1 intensity on 1 m2 plots (Cerdà and Doerr, 2010; Cerdà and Jurgensen 2011). Ten experiments were carried out on the control plots (ploughed), 10 on straw mulch covered plots, and 10 on chipped branches covered

  8. Rhythm- and Rate-Controlling Effects of Dronedarone in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (from the ATHENA Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Page, Richard L; Connolly, Stuart J; Crijns, Harry J G M

    2011-01-01

    Dronedarone is a multi-channel-blocking drug for the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL) with rate- and rhythm-controlling properties. A Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Parallel Arm Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Dronedarone 400 mg b.i.d. for the Prevent......Dronedarone is a multi-channel-blocking drug for the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL) with rate- and rhythm-controlling properties. A Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Parallel Arm Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Dronedarone 400 mg b...... classified as having permanent AF or AFL. All electrical cardioversions were documented. The use of rate-controlling medications was equally distributed in the 2 treatment groups. The median time to first AF or AFL recurrence of patients in sinus rhythm at baseline was 498 days in placebo patients and 737......, dronedarone demonstrated both rhythm- and rate-controlling properties in ATHENA. These effects are likely to contribute to the reduction of important clinical outcomes observed in this trial....

  9. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of endometrial injury on implantation and clinical pregnancy rates during the first ICSI cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maged, Ahmed M; Rashwan, Hamsa; AbdelAziz, Suzy; Ramadan, Wafaa; Mostafa, Walaa A I; Metwally, Ahmed A; Katta, Maha

    2018-02-01

    To assess whether endometrial injury in the cycle preceding controlled ovarian hyperstimulation during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) improves the implantation and pregnancy rates. Between January 1, 2016, and March 31, 2017, a randomized controlled trial was conducted at a center in Egypt among 300 women who met inclusion criteria (first ICSI cycle, aged endometrial scratch in the cycle preceding controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (n=150) or to a control group (n=150). Only data analysts were masked to group assignment. The primary outcomes were the implantation and clinical pregnancy rates at 14 days and 4 weeks after embryo transfer, respectively. Analyses were by intention to treat. The implantation rate was significantly higher in the endometrial scratch group (41.3% [90/218]) than in the control group (30.0% [63/210]; Pendometrial scratch group (44.2% [61/138]) than in the control group (30.4% [41/135]; PEndometrial injury in the cycle preceding the stimulation cycle improved implantation and pregnancy rates during ICSI. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT02660125. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  10. Rate bounded linear parameter varying control of a wind turbine in full load operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck; Stoustrup, Jakob; Brath, Per

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the control of wind turbines using an LPV design technique. The controller design is done by a combination of a method that uses elimination of controller variables and a method using a congruent transformation followed by a change of variables. An investigation is performed ...

  11. Controlling the Release of Indomethacin from Glass Solutions Layered with a Rate Controlling Membrane Using Fluid-Bed Processing. Part 1: Surface and Cross-Sectional Chemical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereymaker, Aswin; Scurr, David J; Steer, Elisabeth D; Roberts, Clive J; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2017-04-03

    Fluid bed coating has been shown to be a suitable manufacturing technique to formulate poorly soluble drugs in glass solutions. Layering inert carriers with a drug-polymer mixture enables these beads to be immediately filled into capsules, thus avoiding additional, potentially destabilizing, downstream processing. In this study, fluid bed coating is proposed for the production of controlled release dosage forms of glass solutions by applying a second, rate controlling membrane on top of the glass solution. Adding a second coating layer adds to the physical and chemical complexity of the drug delivery system, so a thorough understanding of the physical structure and phase behavior of the different coating layers is needed. This study aimed to investigate the surface and cross-sectional characteristics (employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS)) of an indomethacin-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) glass solution, top-coated with a release rate controlling membrane consisting of either ethyl cellulose or Eudragit RL. The implications of the addition of a pore former (PVP) and the coating medium (ethanol or water) were also considered. In addition, polymer miscibility and the phase analysis of the underlying glass solution were investigated. Significant differences in surface and cross-sectional topography of the different rate controlling membranes or the way they are applied (solution vs dispersion) were observed. These observations can be linked to the polymer miscibility differences. The presence of PVP was observed in all rate controlling membranes, even if it is not part of the coating solution. This could be attributed to residual powder presence in the coating chamber. The distribution of PVP among the sample surfaces depends on the concentration and the rate controlling polymer used. Differences can again be linked to polymer miscibility. Finally, it was shown that the underlying glass solution layer

  12. Extreme soil erosion rates in citrus slope plantations and control strategies. A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Ángel González Peñaloza, Félix; Pereira, Paulo; Reyes Ruiz Gallardo, José; García Orenes, Fuensanta; Burguet, María

    2013-04-01

    Soil Erosion is a natural process that shapes the Earth. Due to the impact of agriculture, soil erosion rates increase, landforms show gullies and rills, and soils are depleted. In the Mediterranean, wheat, olive and vineyards were the main agriculture products, but new plantations are being found in sloping terrain due to the drip-irrigation. This new strategy results in the removal of the traditional terraces in order to make suitable for mechanization the agriculture plantation. Citrus is a clear example of the impact of the new chemical agriculture with a high investment in herbicides, pesticides, mechanisation, land levelling and drip computer controlled irrigation systems. The new plantation of citrus orchards is found in the Mediterranean, but also in California, Florida, China and Brazil. Chile, Argentina, and South Africa are other producers that are moving to an industrial production of citrus. This paper shows how the citrus plantations are found as one of the most aggressive plantation due to the increase in soil erosion, and how we can apply successful control strategies. The research into the high erosion rates of citrus orchard built on the slopes are mainly found in China (Wu et al., 1997; Xu et al., 2010; Wang et al., 2011; Wu et al., 2011; Liu et al., 2011; Lü et al., 2011; Xu et al., 2012) and in the Mediterranean (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2008; 2009; Cerdà et al., 2009a; 2009b; Cerdà et al., 2011; 2012) Most of the research done devoted to the measurements of the soil losses but also some research is done related to the soil properties (Lu et al., 1997; Lü et al., 2012; Xu et al., 2012) and the impact of cover crops to reduce the soil losses (Lavigne et al., 2012; Le Bellec et al., 2012) and the use of residues such as dried citrus peel in order to reduce the soil losses. There are 116 million tonnes of citrus produced yearly, and this affects a large surface of the best land. The citrus orchards are moving from flood irrigated to drip

  13. An inventory model of instantaneous deteriorating items with controllable deterioration rate for time dependent demand and holding cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar Mishra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper to develop an inventory model for instantaneous deteriorating items with the consideration of the facts that the deterioration rate can be controlled by using the preservation technology (PT and the holding cost & demand rate both are linear function of time which was treated as constant in most of the deteriorating inventory model. Design/methodology/approach: Developed the mathematical equation of deterministic deteriorating inventory model in which demand rate and holding cost both is linear function of time, deterioration rate is constant, backlogging rate is variable and depend on the length of the next replenishment, shortages are allowed and partially backlogged and obtain an analytical solution which optimizes the total cost of the proposed inventory model. Findings: The model can be applied for optimizing the total inventory cost of deteriorating items inventory for such business enterprises where they use the preservation technology to control the deterioration rate under other assumptions of the model. Originality/value: The inventory system for deteriorating items has been an object of study for a long time, but little is known about the effect of investing in reducing the rate of product deterioration and their significant impact in the business. The proposed model is effective as well as efficient for the business organization that uses the preservation technology to reduce the deterioration rate of the instantaneous deteriorating items of the inventory.

  14. Heroin and cocaine abusers have higher discount rates for delayed rewards than alcoholics or non-drug-using controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Kris N; Petry, Nancy M

    2004-04-01

    To test a prediction of the discounting model of impulsiveness that discount rates would be positively associated with addiction. The delay-discount rate refers to the rate of reduction in the present value of a future reward as the delay to that reward increases. We estimated participants' discount rates on the basis of their pattern of choices between smaller immediate rewards ($11-80) and larger, delayed rewards ($25-85; at delays from 1 week to 6 months) in a questionnaire format. Participants had a one-in-six chance of winning a reward that they chose on one randomly selected trial. Heroin (n = 27), cocaine (n = 41) and alcohol (n = 33) abusers and non-drug-using controls (n = 44) were recruited from advertisements. They were tested in a drug abuse research clinic at a medical school. On average, the cocaine and heroin groups had higher rates than controls (both P rates for heroin abusers (P = 0.03), but not for cocaine or alcohol abusers (both P > 0.50). These data suggest that discount rates vary with the preferred drug of abuse, and that high discount rates should be considered in the development of substance abuse prevention and treatment efforts.

  15. Multi-rate h2 tracking control with mixed continuous-discrete performance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahane, A.C.; Palmor, Z.J.; Mirkin, L.

    1998-01-01

    Control goals defined both in continuous and discrete time arise naturally in many sampled-data tracking control problems. The design methods found in the literature deal with each kind of those control goals separately, over-emphasizing one kind at the expense of the other. We formulate and solve these tracking control problems as an H2 optimization problem with a mixed continuous/discrete performance criterion. It is argued that the proposed setup enables tradeoff between the various control goals in a natural manner and thus leads to better tracking characteristics

  16. Kinematic rate control of simulated robot hand at or near wrist singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, K.; Houck, J. A.; Carzoo, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A robot hand should obey movement commands from an operator on a computer program as closely as possible. However, when two of the three rotational axes of the robot wrist are colinear, the wrist loses a degree of freedom, and the usual resolved rate equations (used to move the hand in response to an operator's inputs) are indeterminant. Furthermore, rate limiting occurs in close vicinity to this singularity. An analysis shows that rate limiting occurs not only in the vicinity of this singularity but also substantially away from it, even when the operator commands rotational rates of the robot hand that are only a small percentage of the operational joint rate limits. Therefore, joint angle rates are scaled when they exceed operational limits in a real time simulation of a robot arm. Simulation results show that a small dead band avoids the wrist singularity in the resolved rate equations but can introduce a high frequency oscillation close to the singularity. However, when a coordinated wrist movement is used in conjunction with the resolved rate equations, the high frequency oscillation disappears.

  17. Effects of metronome breathing on the assessment of autonomic control using heart rate variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaksma, J; Brouwer, J; vandenBerg, MP; Dijk, WA; Dassen, WRM; Crijns, HJGM; Mulder, Lambertus; Mulder, Gysbertus

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of Heart Rate Variability is a non-invasive quantitative tool to study the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart. Rapid variations in heart rate, related to breathing are primarily mediated by the vagal limb of the autonomic nervous system. The resulting variations in heart

  18. Max-Min Optimality of Service Rate Control in Closed Queueing Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Li; Shihada, Basem

    2013-01-01

    of service rates in closed Jackson networks and all the previous works only involve the first conclusion. Moreover, our result is also valid for both the state-dependent and load-dependent service rates, under both the time-average and customer

  19. Measurement of semiochemical release rates with a dedicated environmental control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heping Zhu; Harold W. Thistle; Christopher M. Ranger; Hongping Zhou; Brian L. Strom

    2015-01-01

    Insect semiochemical dispensers are commonly deployed under variable environmental conditions over a specified period. Predictions of their longevity are hampered by a lack of methods to accurately monitor and predict how primary variables affect semiochemical release rate. A system was constructed to precisely determine semiochemical release rates under...

  20. Improving participation rates by providing choice of participation mode: two randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, N.; Lieshout, J. van; Wensing, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low participation rates reduce effective sample size, statistical power and can increase risk for selection bias. Previous research suggests that offering choice of participation mode can improve participation rates. However, few head-to-head trials compared choice of participation mode

  1. Grade Inflation Rates among Different Ability Students, Controlling for Other Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Spirit, Stephanie; Jones, Kirk E.

    1999-01-01

    Compared grade inflation rates among students of different abilities at an open-admissions public university by examining trends in graduating grade point average from 1983 to 1996. The higher grade inflation rates among low aptitude students suggest that faculty might be using grades to encourage learning among marginal students. (SLD)

  2. Multi-rate sensor fusion-based adaptive discrete finite-time synergetic control for flexible-joint mechanical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Guang-Yue; Ren Xue-Mei; Xia Yuan-Qing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive discrete finite-time synergetic control (ADFTSC) scheme based on a multi-rate sensor fusion estimator for flexible-joint mechanical systems in the presence of unmeasured states and dynamic uncertainties. Multi-rate sensors are employed to observe the system states which cannot be directly obtained by encoders due to the existence of joint flexibilities. By using an extended Kalman filter (EKF), the finite-time synergetic controller is designed based on a sensor fusion estimator which estimates states and parameters of the mechanical system with multi-rate measurements. The proposed controller can guarantee the finite-time convergence of tracking errors by the theoretical derivation. Simulation and experimental studies are included to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. (general)

  3. Effects of fluoride on growth, body composition, and serum biochemical profile in a freshwater teleost, Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianjie; Cao, Jinling; Wang, Jundong; Jia, Ruhui; Xue, Wenjuan; Li, Yundong; Luo, Yongju; Xie, Lingtian

    2013-10-01

    Fluoride is ubiquitously distributed in natural waters. Elevated fluoride may cause histopathological changes and induce oxidative stress in the gills of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The present study further evaluates the effects of fluoride on growth performance, body composition, and biochemical measurements of C. carpio. The results showed that food intake, growth, serum osmolality, body composition, and biochemical measures in the blood were affected by fluoride. Weight gain rate and specific growth rate in the exposed fish decreased compared with those of the control fish. Levels of crude protein and crude lipids were reduced in the fluoride-exposed fish. The major ion levels in the sera of fluoride-exposed fish were severely disturbed, resulting in a lower osmolality. All the biochemical parameters measured in the blood were affected by the exposure to fluoride. Total protein, albumin, globulin, and glucose in fish exposed to 63.6 mg/L, 77.7 mg/L, and 124.4 mg/L were lower than those in the control fish. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were markedly increased in exposed fish compared with control. Taken together, the data showed that exposure to fluoride caused a suite of detrimental effects in C. carpio, which might lead to a decrease in growth and food utilization efficiency. The results of the present study indicated that high levels of fluoride could pose a threat to carp in the field. © 2013 SETAC.

  4. Biochemical Process Development and Integration | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochemical Process Development and Integration Biochemical Process Development and Integration Our conversion and separation processes to pilot-scale integrated process development and scale up. We also Publications Accounting for all sugar produced during integrated production of ethanol from lignocellulosic

  5. Effectiveness of school dental screening on stimulating dental attendance rates in Vikarabad town: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadde Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The school dental screening program has been in existence from the beginning of 20 th century. Its value in encouraging attendance among school children is not fully established. Aim: The aim was to determine the effectiveness of school dental screening on stimulating dental attendance rates among school children in Vikarabad town. Objectives: (a To compare the dental attendance rates between 6-9 and 10-13 years old age groups, among male and female school children in Vikarabad town. (b To identify the type of dental treatment received by the school children. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted among school children aged 6-13 years old from 16 schools that were randomly selected and divided into two groups. Eight schools had a dental screening program (study group = 300 children and had blanket referral cards and 8 schools that did not have the intervention (control group = 300. The dental attendance rates were determined after 3 months of follow-up period by evaluating the blanket referral cards for the study group and by an oral questionnaire for the control group. Results: The dental attendance rate was 27% for the study group and 18% for the control group which is statistically significant. The attendance rate was higher among 10-13 years of children both in test group and control groups. Among the children who visited the dentist, 53% in the control group and 69% from the test group got simple amalgam and glass ionomer cement restorations. Conclusion: The dental attendance rates were improved following school dental screening.

  6. A Southwide Rate Test of Azinphosmethyl (Guthion®) for Cone and Seed Insect Control In Loblolly Pine Seed Orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.C. Mangini; L.R. Barber; R.S. Cameron; G.L. DeBarr; G.R. Hodge; J.B. Jett; W.L. Lowe; J.L. McConnell; J. Nord; J.W. Taylor

    1998-01-01

    A southwide efficiency test of reduced rates of azinphosmethyl (Guthion®) for control of seed and cone insects in loblolly pine seed orchards was conducted in 1992. In each of nine loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seed orchards, an untreated (no protection) check and two of five possible rates of Guthion® (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 lb ai/ac/...

  7. Dynamic changes in biochemical markers of renal function with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thyroid dysfunction is known to cause significant changes in glomerular filtration rate. The present cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate the changes in biochemical markers of renal function in hypothyroid subjects before and after treatment. Thyroid function tests (T3, T4 and TSH levels) were assayed in 385 ...

  8. Biochemical Markers for Assessing Aquatic Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Svobodová

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical markers, specifically enzymes of the first phase of xenobiotic transformation - cytochrome P450 and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD - were used to determine the quantities of persistent organic pollutants (POPs in fish muscle (PCB, HCB, HCH, OCS, DDT. Eight rivers were monitored (Orlice, Chrudimka, Cidlina, Jizera, Vltava, Ohře and Bílina; and the River Blanice was used as a control. The indicator species selected was the chub (Leuciscus cephalus L.. There were no significant differences in cytochrome P450 content between the locations monitored. The highest concentration of cytochrome P450 in fish liver was in the Vltava (0.241 nmol mg-1 protein, and the lowest was in the Orlice (0.120 nmol mg-1 protein. Analysis of EROD activity showed a significant difference between the Blanice and the Vltava (P< 0.05, and also between the Orlice and the Vltava (P< 0.01, the Orlice and the Bílina (P< 0.01, and the Orlice and the Ohře (P< 0.05. The highest EROD activity in fish liver was in the Vltava (576.4 pmol min-1 mg-1 protein, and the lowest was in the Orlice (63.05 pmol min-1 mg-1 protein. In individual locations, results of chemical monitoring and values of biochemical markers were compared. A significant correlation (P< 0.05 was found between biochemical markers and OCS, and PCB. Among the tributaries studied those that contaminated the Elbe most were the Vltava and the Bílina. These tributaries should not be considered the main sources of industrial contamination of the River Elbe, because the most important contamination sources were along the river Elbe itself.

  9. Optimizing the data acquisition rate for a remotely controllable structural monitoring system with parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Wenjuan; Guo, Aihuang; Liu, Yang; Azmi, Asrul Izam; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel technique that optimizes the real-time remote monitoring and control of dispersed civil infrastructures. The monitoring system is based on fiber Bragg gating (FBG) sensors, and transfers data via Ethernet. This technique combines parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling to increase the data acquisition rate in remote controllable structural monitoring systems. The compact parallel operation mode is highly efficient at achieving the highest possible data acquisition rate for the FBG sensor based local data acquisition system. Self-adaptive sampling is introduced to continuously coordinate local acquisition and remote control for data acquisition rate optimization. Key issues which impact the operation of the whole system, such as the real-time data acquisition rate, data processing capability, and buffer usage, are investigated. The results show that, by introducing parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling, the data acquisition rate can be increased by several times without affecting the system operating performance on both local data acquisition and remote process control

  10. Dissipation rate of thiacloprid and its control effect against Bemisia tabaci in greenhouse tomato after soil application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sa; Qiao, Kang; Wang, Hongyan; Zhu, Yukun; Xia, Xiaoming; Wang, Kaiyun

    2014-08-01

    Thiacloprid is a chloronicotinyl insecticide that is quite effective against sucking insects. In this study, when thiacloprid was applied at two different rates (normal rate 15 kg ha(-1) , double rate 30 kg ha(-1) ), the systemic distribution and residue of thiacloprid as well as its control effect against whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) were investigated in greenhouse tomato after soil application. The results showed that thiacloprid was present in the tomato leaves until day 25, and then its amount was less than 0.005 mg kg(-1) and could not be detected. Thiacloprid residue in the tomato stems basically remained at a stable low level throughout the experimental period. Thiacloprid in soil had half-lives of 11.8 and 12.5 days for the normal treatment and the double treatment respectively. The control efficiency of whiteflies was about 90% from day 1 to day 10. This was followed by a slow decline, but efficiency was still higher than 50% until day 21. In addition, no significant differences were noted in the control effect of thiacloprid on whiteflies between the two different rates. Soil application of thiacloprid at the normal rate can effectively control whiteflies, with high efficiency and long persistence. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Deog Yoon

    1999-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  12. Biochemical toxicology of environmental agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruin, A. de

    1976-01-01

    A thorough and up-to-date account of the molecular-biological aspects of harmful agents - both chemical and physical - is given. This current treatise is principally intended to serve as an informative reference work for researchers in various areas of the field. In the pursuit of this aim, a devision of the entire field into 42 chapters has been made. Each chapter starts with a short introductory account dealing with the biochemical essentials of the particular subject. Radiation effects are discussed briefly at the end of each treatise. In order to make the treatise useful as a source book, a substantial collection of pertinent literature references is provided which are numbered in order of citation in the text. Initial chapters are devoted to the metabolic fate of the major classes of xenobiotic compounds. Peripheral topics, closely related to metabolism and dealing with modification of xenobiotic-metabolizing ability, as well as interaction phenomena follow (chs. 5-8). Subjects that draw heavily on the practical field of occupational hygiene are dealt with in chapters 9 and 10. The systematic treatment of how chemical and physical agents interact with the various biochemical and enzymatic systems they encounter during their passage through the organism occupies quantitatively the main part of the book (chs. 11-36). Finally, radiation biochemistry is discussed from the viewpoint of its high degree of scientific advancement, and secondly because the type of biochemical changes produced in vivo by X-rays closely parallel those evoked by chemical agents

  13. Control rod effects on reaction rate distributions in tight pitched PuO2-UO2 fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Okumura, Keisuke; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1991-11-01

    Investigations were made for the heterogeneity effects caused by insertion or withdrawal of a B 4 C control rod on fine structure of reaction rates distributions in a tight pitched PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel assembly. Analysis was carried out by using the VIM and SRAC codes with the libraries based on JENDL-2 for the hexagonal fuel assembly basically corresponding to the PROTEUS-LWHCR experimental core. The reaction rates are affected more remarkably by the withdrawal of the control rod rather than its insertion. The changes of the reaction rates were decomposed into three terms of spectrum shifts, the changes of effective cross sections with fine groups, and their higher order components. From the analysis, it is concluded that most changes of reaction rates are caused by spectral shifts. The SRAC code with fine group constants can predict the distribution of reaction rates and their ratios with the accuracy of about 5 % except for the values related to Pu-242 capture rate, as compared with the VIM results. To increase the accuracy, it is necessary to generate the effective cross sections of the fuel near control rods with consideration of the heterogeneities in the fuel assembly. (author)

  14. Efficacy of topical honey therapy against silver sulphadiazine treatment in burns: A biochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    Nagane, N. S.; Ganu, J. V.; Bhagwat, V. R.; Subramanium, M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal injury is associated with biochemical changes. The present study was undertaken to investigate relation of oxidative free radical generation and related biochemical parameters in burn trauma. The specific aim was to compare the levels of serum lipid peroxide, Ceruloplasmin and Uric Acid in burn patients during treatment with Silver Sulfadiazine Cream and honey therapy. It is a single blind prospective controlled study involving comparison of biochemical changes after treatment with si...

  15. Combining Charge Couple Devices and Rate Sensors for the Feedforward Control System of a Charge Coupled Device Tracking Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Tian, Jing; Zhong, Daijun; Fu, Chengyu

    2016-06-25

    A rate feed forward control-based sensor fusion is proposed to improve the closed-loop performance for a charge couple device (CCD) tracking loop. The target trajectory is recovered by combining line of sight (LOS) errors from the CCD and the angular rate from a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG). A Kalman filter based on the Singer acceleration model utilizes the reconstructive target trajectory to estimate the target velocity. Different from classical feed forward control, additive feedback loops are inevitably added to the original control loops due to the fact some closed-loop information is used. The transfer function of the Kalman filter in the frequency domain is built for analyzing the closed loop stability. The bandwidth of the Kalman filter is the major factor affecting the control stability and close-loop performance. Both simulations and experiments are provided to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose concentration dynamics could not possibly occur in nature. Therefore, development of a thermodynamically consistent approach for estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system is highly desirable. Results We introduce a Bayesian analysis approach for computing thermodynamically consistent estimates of the rate constants of a closed biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry given experimental data. Our method employs an appropriately designed prior probability density function that effectively integrates fundamental biophysical and thermodynamic knowledge into the inference problem. Moreover, it takes into account experimental strategies for collecting informative observations of molecular concentrations through perturbations. The proposed method employs a maximization-expectation-maximization algorithm that provides thermodynamically feasible estimates of the rate constant values and computes appropriate measures of estimation accuracy. We demonstrate various aspects of the proposed method on synthetic data obtained by simulating a subset of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling pathway, and examine its robustness under conditions that violate key assumptions. Software, coded in MATLAB®, which implements all Bayesian analysis techniques discussed in this paper, is available free of charge at http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS%20lab/software.html. Conclusions Our approach provides an attractive statistical methodology for

  17. The biochemical anatomy of cortical inhibitory synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Heller

    Full Text Available Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from the cerebral cortex. We show that these synaptic complexes contain a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, neural cell-scaffolding and adhesion molecules, but that they are entirely lacking in cell signaling proteins. This fundamental distinction between the functions of type 1 and type 2 synapses in the nervous system has far reaching implications for models of synaptic plasticity, rapid adaptations in neural circuits, and homeostatic mechanisms controlling the balance of excitation and inhibition in the mature brain.

  18. Measurement from sun-synchronous orbit of a reaction rate controlling the diurnal NOx cycle in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dudhia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A reaction rate associated with the nighttime formation of an important diurnally varying species, N2O5, is determined from MIPAS-ENVISAT. During the day, photolysis of N2O5 in the stratosphere contributes to nitrogen-catalysed ozone destruction. However, at night concentrations of N2O5 increase, temporarily sequestering reactive NOx NO and NO2 in a natural cycle which regulates the majority of stratospheric ozone. In this paper, the reaction rate controlling the formation of N2O5 is determined from this instrument for the first time. The observed reaction rate is compared to the currently accepted rate determined from laboratory measurements. Good agreement is obtained between the observed and accepted experimental reaction rates within the error bars.

  19. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    , such as Ace2 and Swi6, and stress response regulators, such as Yap1, were also shown to have significantly enriched target sets. Conclusion: Our work, which is the first genome-wide gene expression study to investigate specific growth rate and consider the impact of oxygen availability, provides a more......Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...

  20. Relationship of Employee Attitudes and Supervisor-Controller Ratio to En Route Operational Error Rates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broach, Dana

    2002-01-01

    ...; Rodgers, Mogford, Mogford, 1998). In this study, the relationship of organizational factors to en route OE rates was investigated, based on an adaptation of the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS; Shappell & Wiegmann 2000...

  1. Importance of Geodetically Controlled Topography to Constrain Rates of Volcanism and Internal Magma Plumbing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, S. M.; Garvin, James B.; Quick, Lynnae C.

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of lava flow deposits is a key component of Investigation II.A.1 in the VEXAG Goals, Objectives and Investigations. Because much of the Venus surface is covered in lava flows, characterization of lava flow emplacement conditions(eruption rate and eruption duration) is critical for understanding the mechanisms through which magma is stored and released onto the surface as well as for placing constraints on rates of volcanic resurfacing throughout the geologic record preserved at the surface.

  2. Identification of biological/biochemical marker(s) for preterm delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Poul; Schendel, Diana; Deshpande, Anjali D.

    2001-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity rates are strongly associated with gestational age for delivery: the risk for poor outcome increases as gestational age decreases. Attempts to predict preterm delivery (PTD, spontaneous delivery before 37 weeks' gestation) have been largely unsuccessful...... a nested case-control study of PTD in 84 cases and 400 controls has been performed. The second study is a nested case-control study of 675 PTD cases (equally divided into three gestational age categories of 24-29 weeks' gestation, 30-33 weeks' gestation, and 34-36 weeks' gestation) and 675 controls drawn...... study against PTD. The first phase of the clinical intervention study will be to establish a risk-assessment model based on the "best" combination of biological/biochemical measures and other factors associated with PTD in order to identify pregnant women at very high risk of PTD. The second phase...

  3. The benefits of soft sensor and multi-rate control for the implementation of Wireless Networked Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansano, Raul K; Godoy, Eduardo P; Porto, Arthur J V

    2014-12-18

    Recent advances in wireless networking technology and the proliferation of industrial wireless sensors have led to an increasing interest in using wireless networks for closed loop control. The main advantages of Wireless Networked Control Systems (WNCSs) are the reconfigurability, easy commissioning and the possibility of installation in places where cabling is impossible. Despite these advantages, there are two main problems which must be considered for practical implementations of WNCSs. One problem is the sampling period constraint of industrial wireless sensors. This problem is related to the energy cost of the wireless transmission, since the power supply is limited, which precludes the use of these sensors in several closed-loop controls. The other technological concern in WNCS is the energy efficiency of the devices. As the sensors are powered by batteries, the lowest possible consumption is required to extend battery lifetime. As a result, there is a compromise between the sensor sampling period, the sensor battery lifetime and the required control performance for the WNCS. This paper develops a model-based soft sensor to overcome these problems and enable practical implementations of WNCSs. The goal of the soft sensor is generating virtual data allowing an actuation on the process faster than the maximum sampling period available for the wireless sensor. Experimental results have shown the soft sensor is a solution to the sampling period constraint problem of wireless sensors in control applications, enabling the application of industrial wireless sensors in WNCSs. Additionally, our results demonstrated the soft sensor potential for implementing energy efficient WNCS through the battery saving of industrial wireless sensors.

  4. The Benefits of Soft Sensor and Multi-Rate Control for the Implementation of Wireless Networked Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul K. Mansano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in wireless networking technology and the proliferation of industrial wireless sensors have led to an increasing interest in using wireless networks for closed loop control. The main advantages of Wireless Networked Control Systems (WNCSs are the reconfigurability, easy commissioning and the possibility of installation in places where cabling is impossible. Despite these advantages, there are two main problems which must be considered for practical implementations of WNCSs. One problem is the sampling period constraint of industrial wireless sensors. This problem is related to the energy cost of the wireless transmission, since the power supply is limited, which precludes the use of these sensors in several closed-loop controls. The other technological concern in WNCS is the energy efficiency of the devices. As the sensors are powered by batteries, the lowest possible consumption is required to extend battery lifetime. As a result, there is a compromise between the sensor sampling period, the sensor battery lifetime and the required control performance for the WNCS. This paper develops a model-based soft sensor to overcome these problems and enable practical implementations of WNCSs. The goal of the soft sensor is generating virtual data allowing an actuation on the process faster than the maximum sampling period available for the wireless sensor. Experimental results have shown the soft sensor is a solution to the sampling period constraint problem of wireless sensors in control applications, enabling the application of industrial wireless sensors in WNCSs. Additionally, our results demonstrated the soft sensor potential for implementing energy efficient WNCS through the battery saving of industrial wireless sensors.

  5. Statistical Process Control Charts for Measuring and Monitoring Temporal Consistency of Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, M. Hafidz

    2010-01-01

    Methods of statistical process control were briefly investigated in the field of educational measurement as early as 1999. However, only the use of a cumulative sum chart was explored. In this article other methods of statistical quality control are introduced and explored. In particular, methods in the form of Shewhart mean and standard deviation…

  6. Baroreflex control of heart rate in the broad-nosed caiman Caiman latirostris is temperature dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagensen, Mette K; Abe, Augusto S; Wang, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that ectothermic vertebrates primarily control blood pressure to protect the pulmonary vasculature from oedema caused by high pressure, while endothermic vertebrates control blood pressure to maintain adequate oxygen delivery to the tissues. In the present study we have...

  7. Parasitological and biochemical studies on cutaneous leishmaniasis in Shara'b District, Taiz, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmaa, Qhtan; Al-Shamerii, Salwa; Al-Tag, Mohammed; Al-Shamerii, Adam; Li, Yiping; Osman, Bashir H

    2017-07-04

    The leishmaniasis is a group of diseases caused by intracellular haemoflagellate protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Leishmaniasis has diverse clinical manifestations; cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is the most common form of leishmaniasis which is responsible for 60% of disability-adjusted life years. CL is endemic in Yemen. In Shara'b there is no reference study available to identify the prevalence of endemic diseases and no investigation has been conducted for diagnosing the diseases. This study was conducted in villages for CL which collected randomly. The study aimed at investigating the epidemiological factors of CL in Shara'b by using questioner. Symptoms of lesions in patients suffering from CL, confirmed by laboratory tests, gave a new evidence of biochemical diagnosis in 525 villagers aged between 1 and 60 years old. Venous bloods were collected from 99 patients as well as from 51 control after an overnight fast. The percentage prevalence of CL was found 18.8%. The prevalence rate of infection among males (19.3%) was higher than females (18.40%). Younger age group (1-15) had a higher prevalence rate (20.3%) than the other age groups. Furthermore, the population with no formal education had the higher rate of infection (61% of the total). A significant increase of serum malondialdehyde (P < 0.001) in CL patients was obtained. The highest level of MDA may be due to over production of ROS and RNS results in oxidative stress and the acceleration of lipid peroxidation in CL patients. There were high prevalence rates of CL in Shara'b. The patient who had CL has been found with many changes in some biochemical levels. This study provides a clear indication on the role of MDA as an early biochemical marker of peroxidation damage occurring during CL. Increased uric acid, and catalase activity was provided of free radical.

  8. Quantifying the controls on potential soil production rates: a case study of the San Gabriel Mountains, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Pelletier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The potential soil production rate, i.e., the upper limit at which bedrock can be converted into transportable material, limits how fast erosion can occur in mountain ranges in the absence of widespread landsliding in bedrock or intact regolith. Traditionally, the potential soil production rate has been considered to be solely dependent on climate and rock characteristics. Data from the San Gabriel Mountains of California, however, suggest that topographic steepness may also influence potential soil production rates. In this paper I test the hypothesis that topographically induced stress opening of preexisting fractures in the bedrock or intact regolith beneath hillslopes of the San Gabriel Mountains increases potential soil production rates in steep portions of the range. A mathematical model for this process predicts a relationship between potential soil production rates and average slope consistent with published data. Once the effects of average slope are accounted for, a small subset of the data suggests that cold temperatures may limit soil production rates at the highest elevations of the range due to the influence of temperature on vegetation growth. These results suggest that climate and rock characteristics may be the sole controls on potential soil production rates as traditionally assumed but that the porosity of bedrock or intact regolith may evolve with topographic steepness in a way that enhances the persistence of soil cover in compressive-stress environments. I develop an empirical equation that relates potential soil production rates in the San Gabriel Mountains to the average slope and a climatic index that accounts for temperature limitations on soil production rates at high elevations. Assuming a balance between soil production and erosion rates on the hillslope scale, I illustrate the interrelationships among potential soil production rates, soil thickness, erosion rates, and topographic steepness that result from the

  9. Patients with OCD report lower quality of life after controlling for expert-rated symptoms of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangard, Leila; Fadaei, Vahid; Sajadi, Arezoo; Haghighi, Mohammad; Ahmadpanah, Mohammad; Matinnia, Nasrin; Bajoghli, Hafez; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Lang, Undine; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2017-12-02

    One to three percent of the adult population suffers from obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). Previous studies have also shown that, compared to controls, patients with OCD report a lower QoL. The latter is associated with self-rated symptoms of depression and anxiety. The aim of the present study was to compare the quality of life of OCD patients with that of healthy controls, while introducing expert-rated symptoms of depression and anxiety as covariates. Gender was also taken into account as an additional associated factor. A total of 100 patients diagnosed with OCD (mean age: 32 years; 64% females) and healthy 100 controls (mean age: 31 years; 59% females; no discernible psychiatric disorder) took part in the present cross-sectional study. All participants completed questionnaires covering socio-demographic characteristics and dimensions of QoL. Experts rated participants' symptoms of OCD (Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale), anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale) and depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). Compared to healthy controls, patients with OCD reported a lower QoL, and had higher symptoms of depression and anxiety. This pattern was particularly pronounced among female patients with OCD. QoL was lower in patients with OCD, even when controlling for depression and anxiety. Results from binary logistic regressions showed that female gender, low QoL and higher symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety together predicted status as patient with OCD. Compared to healthy controls, patients with OCD have a poorer quality of life and this is independent of depression or anxiety, and is particularly pronounced among female patients. Thus, treatment of OCD might take into account patients' comorbidities and gender. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffusion-controlled reaction. V. Effect of concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient on reaction rate in graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.; Odian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of diffusion on radiation-initiated graft polymerization has been studied with emphasis on the single- and two-penetrant cases. When the physical properties of the penetrants are similar, the two-penetrant problems can be reduced to the single-penetrant problem by redefining the characteristic parameters of the system. The diffusion-free graft polymerization rate is assumed to be proportional to the upsilon power of the monomer concentration respectively, and, in which the proportionality constant a = k/sub p/R/sub i//sup w//k/sub t//sup z/, where k/sub p/ and k/sub t/ are the propagation and termination rate constants, respectively, and R/sub i/ is the initiation rate. The values of upsilon, w, and z depend on the particular reaction system. The results of earlier work were generalized by allowing a non-Fickian diffusion rate which predicts an essentially exponential dependence on the monomer concentration of the diffusion coefficient, D = D 0 [exp(deltaC/M)], where M is the saturation concentration. A reaction system is characterized by the three dimensionless parameters, upsilon, delta, and A = (L/2)[aM/sup (upsilon--1)//D 0 ]/sup 1/2/, where L is the polymer film thickness. Graft polymerization tends to become diffusion controlled as A increases. Larger values of delta and ν cause a reaction system to behave closer to the diffusion-free regime. Transition from diffusion-free to diffusion-controlled reaction involves changes in the dependence of the reaction rate on film thickness, initiation rate, and monomer concentration. Although the diffusion-free rate is w order in initiation rate, upsilon order in monomer, and independent of film thickness, the diffusion-controlled rate is w/2 order in initiator rate and inverse first-order in film thickness. Dependence of the diffusion-controlled rate on monomer is dependent in a complex manner on the diffusional characteristics of the reaction system. 11 figures, 4 tables

  11. Surface controlled dissolution rates of gypsum in aqueous solutions exhibit nonlinear dissolution kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Alexander A.; Vosbeck, Katrin; Dreybrodt, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The effective dissolution rates of gypsum are determined by mixed kinetics, where the rate constants of dissolution at the surface and the transport constant of molecular diffusion of dissolved material are similar. To obtain the surface reaction rate law it is necessary to know the transport constant. We have determined the surface rate law for monocrystalline selenite by using a rotating disc set-up, where the transport coefficients are well known. As a result, up to a calcium concentration of 0.6 · ceq, we find a nearly linear rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, where cs is the total calcium concentration at the surface and ceq the equilibrium concentration with respect to gypsum, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2, and ksl = 1.1 · 10 -4 mmol cm -2 s -1 ± 15%. We also employed batch-experiments for selenite, alabaster and gypsum rock samples. The result of these experiments were interpreted by using a transport constant determined by NaCl dissolution experiments under similar physical conditions. The batch experiments reveal a dissolution rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, ksl = 1.3 · 10 -4 mmol · cm -2 s -1, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2 for c ≤ 0.94 · ceq. Close to equilibrium a nonlinear rate law, Rs = ks2 (1- cs/ ceq) n2, is observed, where ks2 is in the order of 10 mmol · cm -2 s -1 and n2 ≈ 4.5. The experimentally observed gypsum dissolution rates from the batch experiments could be accurately fitted, with only minor variations of the surface reaction constant obtained from the rotating disk experiment and the transport coefficient from the NaCl dissolution batch experiment. Batch experiments on pure synthetic gypsum, reveal a linear rate law up to equilibrium. This indicates inhibition of dissolution in natural samples close to equilibrium, as is known also for calcite minerals.

  12. [Biochemical principles of early saturnism recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimakuridze, M P; Mansuradze, E A; Zurashvili, D G; Tsimakuridze, M P

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the work is to determine the major sensitive criteria of biochemical indicators that allow timely discovery of negative influence of lead on organism and assist in early diagnosis of primary stages of saturnism. The workers of Georgian typographies, performing technological processes of letterpress printing were observed. Professional groups having contact with lead aerosols (main group of 66 people) and the workers of the same typography not being in touch with the poison (control group of 24 people) were studied. It was distinguished that, protracted professional contact with lead causes moderate increase of lead, coproporphyrin and DALA in daily urine in most cases; it is more clearly evidenced in the professional groups of lead smelters and lino operators and less clearly among typesetter and printers. Upon the checkup of people, having a direct contact with lead, biochemical analysis of urine should be given a preference, especially the determination of quantitative content of lead and coproporphyrin in urine with the aim of revealing the lead carrier, which is one of the first signals for occupational lookout and medical monitoring of the similar contingent.

  13. Synchronous temperature rate control and apparatus for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2015-09-22

    A refrigerator appliance configuration, and associated methods of operation, for an appliance with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The controller, by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system, depending on the appliance configuration, synchronizes alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature.

  14. Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The Effects of Repeated Practice and Rate/Rhythm Control Treatments on Sound Production Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambaugh, Julie L.; Nessler, Christina; Cameron, Rosalea; Mauszycki, Shannon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation was designed to elucidate the effects of repeated practice treatment on sound production accuracy in individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) and aphasia. A secondary purpose was to determine if the addition of rate/rhythm control to treatment provided further benefits beyond those achieved with repeated practice.…

  15. Reduced rates of controlled-release fertilizer lower potential nitrogen leaching from a Wisconsin bare-root tree nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryosuke Fujinuma; Nick J. Balster; Hyung-Kyung. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) typically increases nitrogen (N) fertilizer uptake and lowers N lost from the rooting zone via leaching. However, questions remain as to whether lower rates of CRF could further increase this efficiency, especially in sandy bare-root nurseries in Wisconsin. We hypothesized that: 1) a reduced CRF application at 60 percent of the...

  16. Reproducibility and validity of patient-rated assessment of speech, swallowing, and saliva control in Parkinson’s Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machiel Zwarts; Johanna Kalf; Bastiaan Bloem; George Borm; Marten Munneke; Bert de Swart

    2012-01-01

    To report on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Radboud Oral Motor Inventory for Parkinson's Disease (ROMP), a newly developed patient-rated assessment of speech, swallowing, and saliva control in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). To evaluate reproducibility, 60 patients

  17. Learning control for riser-slug elimination and production-rate optimization for an offshore oil and gas production process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    , (ii) maximizing the production rate at the riser of an offshore production platform, by manipulating a topside choke valve through a learning switching model-free PID controller. The results show good steady-state performance, though a long settling time due to the unknown reference for no slugging...

  18. Theoretical study and control optimization of an integrated pest management predator-prey model with power growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kaibiao; Zhang, Tonghua; Tian, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a pest control predator-prey model, where rate of change in prey density follows a scaling law with exponent less than one and the control is by an integrated management strategy. The aim is to investigate the change in system dynamics and determine a pest control level with minimum control price. First, the dynamics of the proposed model without control is investigated by taking the exponent as an index parameter. And then, to determine the frequency of spraying chemical pesticide and yield releases of the predator, the existence of the order-1 periodic orbit of the control system is discussed in cases. Furthermore, to ensure a certain robustness of the adopted control, i.e., for an inaccurately detected species density or a deviation, the control system could be stabilized at the order-1 periodic orbit, the stability of the order-1 periodic orbit is verified by an stability criterion for a general semi-continuous dynamical system. In addition, to minimize the total cost input in pest control, an optimization problem is formulated and the optimum pest control level is obtained. At last, the numerical simulations with a specific model are carried out to complement the theoretical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced dietary sodium intake increases heart rate. A meta-analysis of 63 randomized controlled trials including 72 study populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eGraudal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs published in the period 1973–2014. 63 of the RCTs including 72 study populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p < 0.00001, corresponding to 2.4% of the baseline heart rate. This effect was independent of baseline blood pressure. In conclusion sodium reduction increases heart rate by as much (2.4% as it decreases blood pressure (2.5%. This side-effect, which may cause harmful health effects, contributes to the need for a revision of the present dietary guidelines.

  20. Measurement and control of the frequency chirp rate of high-order harmonic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauritsson, J.; Johnsson, P.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Kornelis, W.; Biegert, J.; Keller, U.; Gaarde, M.B.; Schafer, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    We measure the chirp rate of harmonics 13 to 23 in argon by cross correlation with a 12 femtosecond probe pulse. Under low ionization conditions, we directly measure the negative chirp due to the atomic dipole phase, and show that an additional chirp on the pump pulse is transferred to the qth harmonic as q times the fundamental chirp. Our results are in accord with simulations using the experimentally measured 815 nm pump and probe pulses. The ability to measure and manipulate the harmonic chirp rate is essential for the characterization and optimization of attosecond pulse trains

  1. Active Choice and Financial Incentives to Increase Rates of Screening Colonoscopy-A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shivan J; Feingold, Jordyn; Vandertuyn, Matthew; Niewood, Tess; Cox, Catherine; Doubeni, Chyke A; Volpp, Kevin G; Asch, David A

    2017-11-01

    Behavioral economic approaches could increase uptake for colorectal cancer screening. We performed a randomized controlled trial of 2245 employees to determine whether an email containing a phone number for scheduling (control), an email with the active choice to opt in or opt out (active choice), or the active choice email plus a $100 incentive (financial incentive) increased colonoscopy completion within 3 months. Higher proportions of participants in the financial incentive group underwent screening (3.7%) than in the control (1.6%) or active choice groups (1.5%) (P = .01 and P < .01). We found no difference in uptake of screening between the active choice and control groups (P = .88). The $100 conditional incentive modestly but significantly increased colonoscopy use. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT02660671. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of ventilator associated pneumonia bundle and statistical process control chart to decrease VAP rate in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadat, Reem; Al-Bardan, Hussam; Mazloum, Mona N; Shamah, Asem A; Eltayeb, Mohamed F E; Marie, Ali; Dakkak, Abdulrahman; Naes, Ola; Esber, Faten; Betelmal, Ibrahim; Kherallah, Mazen

    2012-10-01

    Implementation of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) bundle as a performance improvement project in the critical care units for all mechanically ventilated patients aiming to decrease the VAP rates. VAP bundle was implemented in 4 teaching hospitals after educational sessions and compliance rates along with VAP rates were monitored using statistical process control charts. VAP bundle compliance rates were steadily increasing from 33 to 80% in hospital 1, from 33 to 86% in hospital 2 and from 83 to 100% in hospital 3 during the study period. The VAP bundle was not applied in hospital 4 therefore no data was available. A target level of 95% was reached only in hospital 3. This correlated with a decrease in VAP rates from 30 to 6.4 per 1000 ventilator days in hospital 1, from 12 to 4.9 per 1000 ventilator days in hospital 3, whereas VAP rate failed to decrease in hospital 2 (despite better compliance) and it remained high around 33 per 1000 ventilator days in hospital 4 where VAP bundle was not implemented. VAP bundle has performed differently in different hospitals in our study. Prevention of VAP requires a multidimensional strategy that includes strict infection control interventions, VAP bundle implementation, process and outcome surveillance and education.

  3. Serum biochemical and liver enzymes changes in dogs with single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The serum biochemical changes that occur in dogs with single and conjunct experimental infections of Trypanosoma brucei and Ancylostoma caninum were studied. Four groups (GPI, GPII, GPIII and GPIV) of five dogs each were used for this study. GPI was the uninfected control while GPII, GPIII and GPIV were infected ...

  4. Biochemical characterization of blood plasma of coronary artery ...