WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioavailable hexavalent chromium

  1. Hexavalent Chromium Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is developing an updated IRIS assessment of hexavalent chromium. This assessment will evaluate the potential health effects of hexavalent chromium from oral and inhalation exposures. An important component of determining the cancer causing potential of ingested hexavalent chr...

  2. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  3. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  4. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna Catarina da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. With this in mind, and because chromium and lead are two of the most toxic heavy metals frequently detected as soil contaminants in the Portuguese territory, the study and development of few remediation techniques and the indissociable description of the sorption and migration of...

  5. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  6. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Hexavalent Chromium Assessment In Feb 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS hexavalent chromium assessment. Based on the recommendations of the external peer review panel, which met in May 2011 to review the dra...

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  8. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    OpenAIRE

    Priti Sharma; Vipin Bihari; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108)...

  9. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  10. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  11. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  12. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of...) approval of the information collection requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium Standards for... requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Standards for General Industry (29 CFR...

  13. 40 CFR 749.68 - Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cooling Systems § 749.68 Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems. (a... distribution in commerce of hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals for use in cooling systems. (d... holds hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals for use in cooling systems. (6) Cooling...

  14. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE CONSULTATION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Septemeber 30, 2010, the draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenc...

  15. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS Case 2009-D004) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition... requirements for minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in defense weapon systems, subsystems, components, and other items. The proposed rule prohibits the delivery of items containing hexavalent...

  16. Investigation of hexavalent chromium removal from Synthetic wastewater by using Peaganum

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Taghizadeh; Maryam khodadadi; Taher Shahriary; Hadighe Dorri; mahla zaferanieh; rasoul khosravi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Discharge of industrial wastewater containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can have harmful effects to the types of organisms. So, chromium should remove before discharging to the environment with an effective method. The purpose of this study of is hexavalent chromium removed with Peganum harmala granular seeds(PGS).   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, The removal of hexavalent chromium with using PGS, with changes in time, pH, adsorbent dose,...

  17. Optimization and Modeling of Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Aqueous Solution Via Adsorption on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Gholipour; Hassan Hashemipour Rafsanjani; Ataollah Soltani Goharrizi

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium and its derivatives are potential pollutant due to their mortal affects. Therefore, It is essential to remove these components from wastewaters before disposal. Adsorption can be effective and versatile method for removing of hexavalent chromium. In this article, removal of hexavalent chromium via adsorption on multiwalled carbon nanotubes was investigated as a function of adsorbent dosage, initial solution pH, initial Cr(VI) concentrations, contact time and temperature. T...

  18. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium : sorption, migration and remediation

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna

    2011-01-01

    The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. In this work, a representative sample of a typical loamy sand soil was collected in Porto, Portugal, in a zone of intensive agriculture activity. This soil was used for a series of tests concerning the adsorption, transport and fate of hexavalent chromium. The adsorption equilibrium and sorption kinetics were evaluated through the fitting of several m...

  19. Bioleaching of hexavalent chromium from soils using acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna; Rodrigues, Joana; Queiroz, A.M.; Tavares, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The continuous and growing degradation of the environment, due to several anthropogenic activities, is a main concern of the scientific community. Consequently, the development of low cost techniques to clean air, water and soils are under intense investigation. In this study, the focused problem is the soil contamination by hexavalent chromium, which is known for its several industrial applications - production of stainless steel, textile dyes, wood preservation and leather tanning - its hig...

  20. Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Medium with Opuntia Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    José A. Fernández-López; Angosto, José M.; María D. Avilés

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Opuntia cladodes and ectodermis from cactus fruits was investigated. Both types of biomass are considered low-cost, natural, and ecofriendly biosorbents. Batch experiments were carried out to determine Cr(VI) biosorption capacity and the efficiency of the biosorption process under different pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and sorbent dosage. The biosorption of Cr(VI) by Opuntia biomass was highly pH dependent, favoring higher ...

  1. FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partitioning of chromium (Cr) in combustion systems was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical predictions were based on chemical equilibrium and suggested that hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was favored by the presence of chlorine (Cl) and diminished by the...

  2. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Viable Cells of Chromium Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Chromite Mining Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Satarupa Dey; Baishali Pandit; A. K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is of serious concern for its toxicity as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Bacterial chromate reduction is a cost-effective technology for detoxification as well as removal of Cr(VI) from polluted environment. Chromium resistant and reducing bacteria, belonging to Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, and Corynebacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden and seepage samples of Orissa, India, were found to tolerate 12–18 mM Cr(VI...

  3. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  4. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to Commercial Items (DFARS Case... hexavalent chromium. DATES: Comment Date: Comments on the proposed rule should be submitted in writing to the.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background DoD published a final rule at in the Federal Register at 76 FR 25569...

  5. 77 FR 39141 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to Commercial Items (DFARS Case... material containing hexavalent chromium. DATES: Effective Date: June 29, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... published a final rule (DFARS Case 2009-D004) in the Federal Register at 76 FR 25569 on May 5, 2011,...

  6. 75 FR 69064 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the... period on September 30, 2010 (75 FR 60454) for the external review draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

  7. ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

    2012-01-30

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  8. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan-Bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment ...

  9. Hexavalent chromium effects on carbon assimilation in Selenastrum capricornutum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the difficulties in assessing toxic substances such as metals and complex organic compounds is the duration of the necessary tests. It would be beneficial to have available standardized tests of short duration that would allow a reduction in necessary manpower and overall cost as well as provide a method to evaluate chemicals that are readily degraded (i.e., within a few hours). One method available is the short-term photosynthesis response of algae to a given toxicant. Photosynthesis is not only a critical physiological response but is also one for which standard, accurate methods are available. The 14C method has been used to study the effects of chromium on algae. More recently, it was proposed that the 14C method be used to measure short-term photosynthetic response as a standard algal bioassay. The present study was designed to further evaluate, via photosynthetic response, the potential effects of hexavalent chromium on Selenastrum capricornutum

  10. Statistical screening of hexavalent chromium biosorption by Sargassum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Rezaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the statistical screening of hexavalent chromium, Cr (VI, from an aqueous solution using brown seaweed Sargassum as a biosorbent. The biosorption process conditions were evaluated with the statistical screening followed by Plackett-Burman design. The effect of solution pH, contact time, initial chromium and nitrate concentrations were studied. The experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Plackett-Burman design showed the contact time and pH are the most important parameters influencing the Cr (VI biosorption onto Sargassum. The optimum pH, contact time, the initial biosorbent dosage and initial Cr (VI and nitrate concentration were found to be 3, 120 min, 1.3 g, 50 mg/L and 1000 mg/L, respectively. The results indicated that the Freundlich model was the most suitable for Cr (VI biosorption onto Sargassum.

  11. Removal of hexavalent chromium of contaminated soil by coupling electrokinetic remediation and permeable reactive biobarriers

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna; Pazos, M.; Tavares, M. T.; Sanromán, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this study, a novel and ecological alternative have been developed to treat soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium coupling two well-known systems: electrokinetic remediation and permeable reactive biobarriers. The electric field promotes the electromigration of the hexavalent chromium oxyanions towards the anode. The biobarriers were placed before the anode electrode, in order to promote the reduction and retention of the chromium migrating in its direction. Thus, this t...

  12. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  13. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  14. Eolian transport of geogenic hexavalent chromium to ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Clark, D.; Imes, J.L.; Councell, T.B.

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual model of eolian transport is proposed to address the widely distributed, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) observed in ground water in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Concentrations (30 to more than 1000 μg/L Cr+6) extend over thousands of square kilometers of ground water systems. It is hypothesized that the Cr is derived from weathering of chromium-rich pyroxenes and olivines present in ophiolite sequence of the adjacent Oman (Hajar) Mountains. Cr+3 in the minerals is oxidized to Cr+6 by reduction of manganese and is subsequently sorbed on iron and manganese oxide coatings of particles. When the surfaces of these particles are abraded in this arid environment, they release fine, micrometer-sized, coated particles that are easily transported over large distances by wind and subsequently deposited on the surface. During ground water recharge events, the readily soluble Cr+6 is mobilized by rain water and transported by advective flow into the underlying aquifer. Chromium analyses of ground water, rain, dust, and surface (soil) deposits are consistent with this model, as are electron probe analyses of clasts derived from the eroding Oman ophiolite sequence. Ground water recharge flux is proposed to exercise some control over Cr+6 concentration in the aquifer.

  15. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium by a cyanobacterial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dhara; Vankar, Padma S.; Srivastava, Sarvesh Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The study comprises the use of cyanobacterial mat (collected from tannery effluent site) to remove hexavalent chromium. This mat was consortium of cyanobacteria/blue-green algae such as Chlorella sp., Phormidium sp. and Oscillatoria sp. The adsorption experiments were carried out in batches using chromium concentrations 2-10, 15-30 and 300 ppm at pH 5.5-6.2. The adsorption started within 15 min; however, 96 % reduction in metal concentration was observed within 210 min. The adsorption phenomenon was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. This biosorption fitted Freundlich adsorption isotherm very well. It was observed that the best adsorption was at 4 ppm, and at 25 ppm in the chosen concentration ranges. Scanning electron micrograph showed the physiology of mat, indicating sites for metal uptake. The main focus was collection of the cyanobacterial mat from local environments and its chromium removal potential at pH 5.5-6.2.

  16. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to American alligator cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-02-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is a known human carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. We measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in American alligator cells derived from scute tissue. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to alligator cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that alligators may be used as a model for assessing the effects of environmental Cr(VI) contamination as well as for other metals of concern. PMID:26730726

  17. Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) to its trivalent state (Cr{sup +3}) is showing promising results in treating ground water at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Main Site. An electrolytic cell using stainless-steel and brass electrodes has been found to offer the most efficient reduction while yielding the least amount of precipitate. Trials have successfully lowered concentrations of Cr{sup +6} to below 11 parts per billion (micrograms/liter), the California state standard. We ran several trials to determine optimal voltage for running the cell; each trial consisted of applying a voltage between 6V and 48V for ten minutes through samples obtained at Treatment Facility C(TFC). No conclusive data has been obtained yet.

  18. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJENDRA S DONGRE

    2016-06-01

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m$^2$ g$^{−1}$ and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on chitosan evidenced from FTIR and SEM that impart maximum adsorption at pH 4, agitation with 200 rpm for 180 min. Adsorption studies revealed intraparticle diffusion models and best-fitted kinetics was pseudo 2nd order one. A wellfitted Langmuir isotherm model suggested monolayer adsorption with an adsorption capacity ($q_m$) of 105.6 mg g$^{−1}$ and $R^2 = 0.945$. Sorption mechanisms based on metal ionic interactions, intrusion/diffusion and chemisorptions onto composite. This graphite chitosan binary composite improve sorbent capacity for Cr(VI).

  19. Hexavalent chromium stimulation of riboflavin synthesis in flavinogenic yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovych, D; Kszeminska, H; Babjak, L; Kaszycki, P; Koloczek, H

    2001-03-01

    Flavinogenic yeast overproduce riboflavin (RF) in iron-deprived media. In optimal growth media supplemented with Fe, hexavalent chromium 'Cr (VI)' treatment led to elevated RF synthesis in all cases of 37 flavinogenic strains studied. The level of RF production exceeded the rate observed at iron-deficient conditions. At sublethal Cr concentrations the RF oversynthesis over time correlated well with the growth-inhibitory adaptational period as manifested by the prolonged lag phase. The consecutive logarithmic biomass growth was accompanied by a drop in RF biosynthesis. Cr (VI)-induced RF overproduction was not a result of cellular iron level decrease. The treatment of yeast with Cr (VI) led to the stimulation of GTP-cyclohydrolase and RF-synthase activities, the key enzymes of the RF biosynthesis pathway. PMID:11368272

  20. Assessing uncertainty in published risk estimates using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  1. Assessing model uncertainty using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example [Abstract 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  2. Ferrous sulphate mono and heptahydrate reduction of hexavalent chromium in cement: effectiveness and storability

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde, J. L.; Lobato, J.; I. Fernández; Marijuán, L.; Pérez-Mohedano, S.; Talero, R.

    2005-01-01

    In Community legislation, substances containing hexavalent chromium are classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic and sensitizing. In cement, hexavalent chromium intensifies sensitization and may set off severe allergic reactions in workers in routine contact with the product, whether in the factory or on construction sites. The allergic or contact dermatitis causes is a very painful disease that may lead to permanent worker disability. According to Directive 2003/53/EC of the European Parliament...

  3. Efficacy of Agricultural Wastes in the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium- A Review.

    OpenAIRE

    N Muthulakshmi Andal; S. Charulatha

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium is a major pollutant released during several industrial operations. It is also reported as one of the metals known to be carcinogenic and has an adverse potential to modify the DNA transcription process. The removal of hexavalent chromium has been studied by various authors employing adsorbents developed from waste agro by-products to assess their adsorption characteristics. This paper focuses on the comparison of some agro based products in the removal of Cr(VI) ions. An ...

  4. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Qasim

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time....

  5. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-08-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

  6. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. PMID:26908176

  7. Treatment of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) in tanning effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most common chemical used in chrome tanning is basic chromium sulphate (BCS). Manufacturing of BCS involves many steps producing liquid waste. Waste generated at every stage contains Cr (VI), which must be reduced to Cr (III) before being disposed to the environment. Different methods were studied for the reduction of toxic Cr (III). Pickle liquor (waste of electroplating industry) can also be used for the reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr (vi) along with other reducing materials / chemicals. In an electroplating process metal is treated with HCl or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to remove scales and rust, the pickled items are then washed with water, washing contains FeCl/sub 2/ or fees/sub 4/ respectively called pickle liquor. During waste treatment pH adjustment to 6.0 - 9.0 and settling the sludge, is discharged to the lagoon. The sludge obtained is dried and disposed off in landfills. Other reducing agents like sodium bisulphite and sulfur dioxide were also studied, but pickle liquor was found to be more effective and economical. (author)

  8. Natural and induced reduction of hexavalent chromium in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leita, Liviana; Margon, Alja; Sinicco, Tania; Mondini, Claudio; Valentini, Massimiliano; Cantone, Pierpaolo

    2013-04-01

    Even though naturally elevated levels of chromium can be found naturally in some soils, distressing amounts of the hexavalent form (CrVI) are largely restricted to sites contaminated by anthropogenic activities. In fact, the widespread use of chromium in various industries and the frequently associated inadequate disposal of its by-products and wastes have created serious environmental pollution problems in many parts of the world. CrVI is toxic to plants, animals and humans and exhibits also mutagenic effects. However, being a strong oxidant, CrVI can be readily reduced to the much less harmful trivalent form (CrIII) when suitable electron donors are present in the environment. CrIII is relatively insoluble, less available for biological uptake, and thus definitely less toxic for web-biota. Various electron donors in soil can be involved in CrVI reduction in soil. The efficiency of CrVI reducing abiotic agents such as ferrous iron and sulphur compounds is well documented. Furthermore, CrVI reduction is also known to be significantly enhanced by a wide variety of cell-produced monosaccharides, including glucose. In this study we evaluated the dynamics of hexavalent chromium (CrVI) reduction in contaminated soil amended or not with iron sulphate or/and glucose and assessed the effects of CrVI on native or glucose-induced soil microbial biomass size and activity. CrVI negatively affected both soil microbial activity and the size of the microbial biomass. During the incubation period, the concentration of CrVI in soil decreased over time whether iron sulphate or/and glucose was added or not, but with different reduction rates. Soil therefore displayed a natural attenuation capacity towards chromate reduction. Addition of iron sulphate or/and glucose, however, increased the reduction rate by both abiotic and biotic mechanisms. Our data suggest that glucose is likely to have exerted an indirect role in the increased rate of CrVI reduction by promoting growth of

  9. Oral ingestion of hexavalent chromium through drinking water and cancer mortality in an industrial area of Greece - An ecological study

    OpenAIRE

    Stoltidis Melina; Kouroutou Paraskevi; Christoforidou Eleni; Christophi Costas A; Petralias Athanassios; Linos Athena; Veloudaki Afroditi; Tzala Evangelia; Makris Konstantinos C; Karagas Margaret R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen when inhaled, but its carcinogenic potential when orally ingested remains controversial. Water contaminated with hexavalent chromium is a worldwide problem, making this a question of significant public health importance. Methods We conducted an ecological mortality study within the Oinofita region of Greece, where water has been contaminated with hexavalent chromium. We calculated gender, age, and period standardized mortality rati...

  10. Development of a hexavalent chromium ISFET sensor with a polymeric membrane including tributylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a first report on chromium ISFET (ion-sensitive field effect transistor) based on a polymeric membrane (siloprene) including an ionophore (tributylphosphate) sensitive for hexavalent chromium. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pH was studied; its value is minimum in a pH interval from 5.5 to 7.5. The sensitivity for hexavalent chromium was found to be 15 mV/loga Cr6+ in the range of 10-4 to 10-2 M. The detection limit was found to be 10-5 M. The studied interfering ions are Pb(II) and Cd(II) that do not represent a great perturbation upon the response for hexavalent chromium

  11. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70 °C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to 1.9 μM h-1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature subsurface radioactive waste disposal

  12. Sister chromatid exchange analysis in lymphocytes of workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaya, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Hata, H.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis in lymphocytes as an indicator for mutagenic effects after in vivo exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr), SCE frequency was analysed in lymphocytes of 44 Cr platers occupationally exposed to hexavalent Cr and 47 controls. Although urinary Cr analysis confirmed that the Cr platers were exposed to Cr, no effects of the exposure on SCE frequency were found. Smokers, both Cr platers and controls, had a significantly higher S...

  13. Hexavalent chromium-resistant bacteria isolated from river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luli, G W; Talnagi, J W; Strohl, W R; Pfister, R M

    1983-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen and mutagen; however, the actual mechanisms of Cr toxicity are unknown. Two approaches were used to isolate Cr(VI)-resistant bacteria from metal-contaminated river sediments. Diluted sediments were plated directly onto a peptone-yeast extract (PYE) medium containing 0 to 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Approximately 8.4 x 10(5) CFU g-1 were recovered on 0 microgram of Cr(VI) ml-1, whereas 4.0 x 10(2) CFU g-1 were recovered on PYE plus 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Alternatively, continuous culture enrichment techniques were employed using PYE and 100 micrograms Cr(VI) ml-1 input at dilution rates of 0.02 and 0.10 h-1. After six residence periods, 10(9) CFU were recovered on PYE agar containing 0 microgram of Cr(VI) ml-1 and 10(7) CFU on PYE agar plus 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Of 89 isolates obtained by direct plating onto PYE, 47% were resistant to 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1, and 29% were resistant to 250 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. When the same isolates were plated onto PYE containing Cr(III), 88% were resistant to 100 micrograms ml-1 but only 2% were resistant to 250 micrograms ml-1. Cr, Co, Sb, and Zn were found in significantly higher concentrations at an industry-related contaminated site than at a site 11 km downstream. Total Cr in the sediments at the contaminated site averaged 586 micrograms (dry weight) g-1, and the downstream site averaged 71 micrograms (dry weight) g-1. The Cr recovered from acid-digested Ottawa River sediment samples was predominantly hexavalent. Five acid digestion procedures followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy were compared and found to be 30 to 70% efficient for recovery of Cr relative to neutron activation analysis. A population of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria was recovered from sediments containing elevated levels of Cr.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6639032

  14. Microbial reduction of hexavalent Chromium under vadose zone conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, D S.(unknown); Brockman, Fred J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bowman, Robert (VISITORS); Kieft, Thomas L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium[Cr(VI)] is a common constituent of wastes associated with nuclear reactor operation and fuel processing. Improper disposal at facilities in arid and semi-arid regions has led to contamination of underlying vadose zones and aquifers. The objectives of this study were to assess the potential for immobilizing Cr(VI) contamination using a native microbial community to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to insoluble Cr(III) under conditions similar to those found in the vadose zone, and to evaluate the potential for enhancing biological reduction of Cr(VI) through the addition of nutrients. Batch microcosm and unsaturated flow column experiments were performed. Native microbial communities in subsurface sediments with no prior Cr(VI) exposure were shown to be capable of Cr(VI) reduction. In both the batch and column experiments, Cr(VI) reduction and loss from the aqueous phase were enhanced by adding high levels of both nitrate (NO3-) and organic carbon (molasses). Nutrient amendments resulted in up to 87% Cr(VI) reduction in unsaturated batch experiments. Molasses and nitrate additions to 15-cm length unsaturated flow columns receiving 65 mg L-1 Cr(VI) resulted in microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of 10% of the Cr during a 45-day experiment. All of the immobilized Cr was in the form of Cr (III), as shown by XANES analysis. This suggests that biostimulation of microbial Cr(VI) reduction in vadose zones by nutrient amendment is a promising strategy; and that immobilization of close to 100% of Cr contamination could be achieved in a thick vadose zone with longer flow paths and longer contact times than in this experiment.

  15. Histopathological and biochemical changes in rat thyroid following acute exposure to hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Tariq; Zia Quresh, Irfan; Javed Iqbal, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Chromium in hexavalent form is highly toxic and a known carcinogen, although its effects on thyroid structure and function are relatively unexplored. Workers in an industrial environment can be, at times, exposed to this form of chromium. The present study was, therefore, designed using laboratory rats as a model system to investigate the effect on thyroid structure and function following two acute intraperitoneal doses of 30 mg/kg b.w. potassium dichromate administere...

  16. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by a Paecilomyces sp. Fungal Strain Isolated from Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Cárdenas-González, Juan F.; Ismael Acosta-Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    A resistant and capable fungal strain in removing hexavalent chromium was isolated from an environment near of Chemical Science Faculty, located in the city of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. The strain was identified as Paecilomyces sp., by macro- and microscopic characteristics. Strain resistance of the strain to high Cr (VI) concentrations and its ability to reduce chromium were studied. When it was incubated in minimal medium with glucose, another inexpensive commercial carbon source like unrefi...

  17. Hexavalent chromium and its effect on health: possible protective role of garlic (Allium sativum Linn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kusal K; Dhundasi, Salim A; Das, Swastika N

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium or chromium (VI) is a powerful epithelial irritant and a confirmed human carcinogen. This heavy metal is toxic to many plants, aquatic animals, and bacteria. Chromium (VI) which consists of 10%-15% total chromium usage, is principally used for metal plating (H2Cr2O7), as dyes, paint pigments, and leather tanning, etc. Industrial production of chromium (II) and (III) compounds are also available but in small amounts as compared to chromium (VI). Chromium (VI) can act as an oxidant directly on the skin surface or it can be absorbed through the skin, especially if the skin surface is damaged. The prooxidative effects of chromium (VI) inhibit antioxidant enzymes and deplete intracellular glutathione in living systems and act as hematotoxic, immunotoxic, hepatotoxic, pulmonary toxic, and nephrotoxic agents. In this review, we particularly address the hexavalent chromium-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and increased lipid peroxidation in humans and animals, and the possible role of garlic (Allium sativum Linn) as a protective antioxidant. PMID:22865357

  18. Operation and routine maintenance of the automatic monitor for hexavalent chromium in Columbia River water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alton, D.W.

    1969-01-20

    A Technicon Autoanalyzer for hexavalent chromium has been installed at the Automatic Columbia River Monitoring Station located along the west bank of the Columbia River. The sample water is delivered to the building by a deep well jet pump for continuous monitoring for gross gamma, {sup 131}I, hexavalent chromium, and for emergency water samples. An alarm system indicates unusually high activity levels. The unit was installed to detect hexavalent chromium which reaches the river as a result of cooling water treatment for the production reactors upstream, and via groundwater as a result of waste disposal practices at the 300 Area. The detection of the Cr{sup +6} ion is based upon its reaction with diphenylcarbazide to produce a reddish-violet color in slightly acid solutions. The degree of color is indicated by light absorption in the calorimeter which is plotted on the recorder and is directly related to the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the river water. Although designed to operate continuously and automatically, routine inspection is required to assure proper functioning of all components and to perform the required maintenance and pick up of recorded data. The following data is to provide general information relevant to the operation and maintenance of the system.

  19. An assessment of the environmental toxicity of hexavalent chromium in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putte, van der I.

    1981-01-01

    At present chromium is a common contaminant in surface waters in many countries. In water the metal may be present in the trivalent form (CrIII) or in the hexavalent form (CrVI), the latter of which is more toxic to aquatic organisms.The investigations presented in this thesis were aimed at a thorou

  20. MODELING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REDUCTION IN GROUND- WATER IN FIELD-SCALE TRANSPORT AND LABORATORY BATCH EXPERIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A plausible and consistent model is developed to obtain a quantitative description of the gradual disappearance of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from groundwater in a small-scale field tracer test and in batch kinetic experiments using aquifer sediments under similar chemical cond...

  1. Characterisation of exposure to total and hexavalent chromium of welders using biological monitoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Heussen, G.A.; Peer, P.G.M.; Verbist, K.; Anzion, R.; Willems, J.

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation exposure to total and hexavalent chromium (TCr and HCr) was assessed by personal air sampling and biological monitoring in 53 welders and 20 references. Median inhalation exposure levels of TCr were 1.3, 6.0, and 5.4 microg/m(3) for welders of mild steel (MS, <5% alloys), high alloy st

  2. Isolation, identification and characterization of indigenous fungi for bioremediation of hexavalent chromium, nickel and cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernahadini, Nelis; Suhandono, Sony; Choesin, Devi N.; Chaerun, Siti K.; Kadarusman, Ade

    2014-03-01

    Waste from nickel mining of Sorowako in South Sulawesi contains hexavalent chromium, nickel and cobalt metals in high concentration and may have a negative impact to the environment. Common waste treatment systems such as chemical treatment using a reducing reagent may still have a negative impact. Bioremediation using fungi or bacteria becomes more popular because it is an environmentally friendly alternative. The purposes of this study are to isolate and identify indigenous fungi that are resistant to heavy metals (hexavalent chromium, nickel, and cobalt) and are capable of reducing the concentration of metals in mining wastes. Ten fungal isolates were successfully isolated from the soils and pond sediments in the area of nickel mining in Sorowako. Selection of superior isolate was carried out by growing all the isolates on PDA medium, which contained all of the three metals. One superior isolate was identified to be able to grow on medium with concentrations of 6400 ppm hexavalent chromium, 200 ppm nickel and 50 ppm cobalt. Molecular identification and phylogenetic studies of the isolate using fungal PCR primers developed to amplify the ITS (internal transcribed spacer) region showed that the isolate sequence was very close to Trichoderma atroviride with 99.8% similarity. Optimum incubation time for the uptake of hexavalent chromium was 3 days, nickel and cobalt was 5 days, respectively, with an optimum pH of 4.

  3. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by barium ion cross-linked alginate beads

    OpenAIRE

    Uzaşçı Sesil; Tezcan Filiz; Bedia Erim F.

    2014-01-01

    Barium ion cross-linked alginate beads have shown great affinity to toxic hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution, contrary to the traditional calcium alginate beads. The adsorption experiments were carried out by the batch contact method. The optimal pH for removal was found to be pH 4. The equilibrium was established in 4 h and the removal efficiency of chromium (VI) was found as 95%. The adsorption data fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum chromium (VI) adsorpt...

  4. INJECTION OF A FERROUS SULFATE/SODIUM DITHIONITE REDUCTANT FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    An in situ pilot study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a ferrous iron-based reductant solution in treating hexavalent chromium within a saturated zone source area at a former industrial site in Charleston, South Carolina (USA). The hexavalent source area, consisting...

  5. Assessing uncertainty in published risk estimates using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example [Presentation 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  6. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphating processes are widely used in industry as surface treatments for metals, especially for low thickness plates, improving the adhesion between the metallic surface and the paint coating, and increasing the durability of paint systems against corrosion attacks. The tricationic phosphates containing zinc, nickel and manganese are commonly applied on steel. There is much discussion about the replacement of nickel by another element in order to have an environmentally friendly phosphating process. Niobium as a replacement for nickel has been evaluated. The most significant environmental impacts of phosphating processes are related to the presence of nickel and hexavalent chromium used in the process, this last as a passivation treatment. Nickel and hexavalent chromium are harmful to human and environment leading to contamination of water and soil. In the present study phosphate layers containing zinc, manganese and niobium have been evaluated and characterized on galvanized steel, and the results were compared with phosphates containing zinc, manganese and nickel, or a bicationic phosphate layer with zinc and manganese. Although the use of hexavalent chromium is not recommended worldwide, it is still used in processes for sealing the porosity of phosphate layers. This element is carcinogenic and has been associated with various diseases. Due to the passivation characteristics of niobium, this study also evaluated the tricationic bath containing niobium ammonium oxalate as a passivation treatment. The results showed that it could act as a replacement for the hexavalent chromium. The results of the present study showed that formulations containing niobium are potential replacements for hexavalent chromium and similar corrosion protection was obtained for the phosphate containing nickel or that with niobium. The morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy, gravimetric tests, porosity and adhesion evaluation results indicated that the phosphate

  7. Impairment of Bony Crypt Development Associated With Hexavalent Chromium Exposure During Tooth Eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Luciana M; Lewicki, Marianela; De Lucca, Romina C; Ubios, Ángela M

    2015-12-01

    Improperly treated hexavalent chromium-containing industrial wastes contaminate drinking water, potentially affecting children taking breast milk or baby bottles prepared with infant formula. Thus, the aim of the present work was to determine the effect of this toxic on bone activity in the developing alveolus during tooth eruption of suckling Wistar rats intoxicated with potassium dichromate. Experimental animals received a daily dose of 12.5mg/kg body weight of potassium dichromate by gavage for 10 days; controls received an equivalent volume of saline solution. Histologic and histomorphometric studies of the mandible were performed. The data were statistically analyzed using Student's t test; statistical significance was set at a value of p hexavalent chromium is the result of a lower rate of bone remodeling in the developing alveolus. The obtained results show the importance of controlling toxic substances in drinking water, since their effects may alter the growth and development of subjects who were exposed during early infancy. PMID:27095619

  8. Soil humic acids may favour the persistence of hexavalent chromium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between hexavalent chromium Cr(VI), as K2CrO4, and standard humic acids (HAs) in bulk solution was studied using three complementary analytical methods: UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and differential pulse stripping voltammetry. The observed UV-Vis and X-ray absorption spectra showed that, under our experimental conditions, HAs did not induce reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent chemical form. The interaction between Cr(VI) and HAs has rather led to the formation of Cr(VI)-HAs micelles via supramolecular chemical processes. The reported results could contribute towards explaining the relative persistence of ecotoxic hexavalent chromium in soils. - Humic acids (HAs) did not induce reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent chemical form, as the interaction between Cr(VI) and HAs rather led to the formation of Cr(VI)-HAs micelles via supramolecular chemical processes.

  9. Combined remediation technology for the reduction and bioleaching of hexavalent chromium from soils using acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, B.; Rodrigues, Joana Lúcia; Mendes, T.S.; Queiroz, A.M.; Tavares, T

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of soils due to the release of effluents or deposition of wastes containing hexavalent chromium has been arising serious environmental problems. Therefore, the development of cost effectiveness but also ecological cleaning techniques is a matter of great concern among the scientific community. Bioremediation is attracting more and more attention due to its efficiency, low impact in the ecosystems and low cost. In particular, this study approaches a bioleaching tec...

  10. HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS SPENT BIOMASS.

    OpenAIRE

    D.CAROL; S.J.Kingsley; VINCENT, S

    2012-01-01

    The Pleurotus ostreatus spent biomass after the harvest, is a waste which was used as a potential sorbent after coating it with chitosan an deacetylated derivative from chitin the most abundant carbohydratesecond to cellulose .The study is an attempt to elaborate and justify the optional utility of Spent Pleurotus ostreatus biomass for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous industrial effluents. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, biosorbent dosage, biosorbent dosage, initial ...

  11. Hexavalent chromium induces apoptosis in male somatic and spermatogonial stem cells via redox imbalance

    OpenAIRE

    Joydeep Das; Min-Hee Kang; Eunsu Kim; Deug-Nam Kwon; Yun-Jung Choi; Jin-Hoi Kim

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], an environmental toxicant, causes severe male reproductive abnormalities. However, the actual mechanisms of toxicity are not clearly understood and have not been studied in detail. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the mechanism of reproductive toxicity of Cr(VI) in male somatic cells (mouse TM3 Leydig cells and TM4 Sertoli cells) and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) because damage to or dysfunction of these cells can directly affect spermatogenesis...

  12. Transcriptomic Analysis of Cultured Whale Skin Cells Exposed to Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)

    OpenAIRE

    Pabuwal, Vagmita; Boswell, Mikki; Pasquali, Amanda; Wise, Sandra S.; Kumar, Suresh; Shen, Yingjia; Garcia, Tzintzuni; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, John Pierce; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ronald B.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is known to produce cytotoxic effects in humans and is a highly toxic environmental contaminant. Interestingly, it has been shown that free ranging sperm whales (Phyester macrocephalus) may have exceedingly high levels of Cr in their skin. Also, it has been demonstrated that skin cells from whales appear more resistant to both cytotoxicity and clastogenicity upon Cr exposure compared to human cells. However, the molecular genetic mechanisms employed in whale skin ce...

  13. The Growth of Gypsum in the Presence of Hexavalent Chromium: A Multiscale Study

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Morales; José Manuel Astilleros; Emilio Matesanz; Lurdes Fernández-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    The sorption of dissolved inorganic pollutants into the structure of minerals is an important process that controls the mobility and fate of these pollutants in the Earth’s crust. It also modifies the surface structure and composition of the host mineral, affecting its crystallization kinetics. Here, we investigate the effect of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), on the nucleation and growth of gypsum by conducting two types of experiments: (i) in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations of ...

  14. Testicular Cycle of Colisa fasciatus (Bl. and Schn.) under Hexavalent Chromium Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Anuradha Shukla; J.P. Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Healthy specimens of Colisa fasciatus exposed to sub lethal concentration of hexavalent chromium (4.8 mg/L) for 15 days revealed no significant alterations in any testicular architecture during its different phases. However, 30 days exposure revealed distarded shape of lobule and lobular wall, scattered interstitial leydig cells during preparatory phase of testicular cycle where as during spawning phase of testicular cycle, dissolution of germinal epithelium, reduced intra lobular spaces and ...

  15. Iron(II) modified natural zeolites for hexavalent chromium removal from contaminated water

    OpenAIRE

    Lofù Antonio; Mastrorilli Piero; Dell’Anna Maria Michela; Mali Matilda; Sisto Raffaello; Vignola Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Three different types of Fe(II)-modified natural zeolites were tested as supports in continuous-flow columns for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated water. The natural zeolites chosen as support were commercially available Zeosand (80% clinoptilolite), ATZ (79% phillipsite/chabazite), and ZS-55RW (90% Chabazite). All the examined modified zeolites turned out active for hexavalent chromium abatement, lowering its concentration below the European regulation level, even at relatively high flow ...

  16. Absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral range of hexavalent chromium aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Spadoni, Lorenzo

    1999-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of performing direct absorption spectroscopy of Hexavalent Chromium aqueous solutions, absorption measurements were performed at the dual- beam spectrophotometer in the 250 - 850 nm spectral range, with 10 mm and 100 mm path lengths. Low concentration (26 - 520 (mu) g/l) (and high concentration (2.6 - 52 mg/l) solutions were analyzed, showing that it is possible to implement a basic instrumentation for risk condition monitoring and a more advanced instrumentation for quantitative measurements.

  17. Effects of hexavalent chromium on bone growth in juveniles Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rafael; Alpoim, C; Cabrita, AS; Capela e Silva, F

    2012-01-01

    Workers at industrial settings, as well as the population in general is at risk of health problems caused by contaminating wastes, inadequate treated for their safe disposal. As result, certain toxic substances, such as hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds, contaminate tap water and have reached the general population including children. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of Cr(VI), in the form of potassium dichromate, on body and bone development in suckling Wistar ra...

  18. A Comparative Survey on Parameters Influencing on Hexavalent Chromium Measurement as an Occupational Carcinogen

    OpenAIRE

    A. Tirgar; F. Golbabaie; S.J. Shahtaheri; K. Nori; J. Hamedi; Ganjali, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Hexavalent chromium, Cr+6, is a very harmful pollutant and a relatively unstable compound that is present in many industries. It is a known human respiratory carcinogen and occupational exposure to this chemical is associated with different health hazards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four parameters including: type of sampling head, sampling height from the surface of electroplating solution, sampling duration, and sample storage duration...

  19. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  20. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  1. Optimization and Modeling of Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Aqueous Solution Via Adsorption on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Gholipour

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium and its derivatives are potential pollutant due to their mortal affects. Therefore, It is essential to remove these components from wastewaters before disposal. Adsorption can be effective and versatile method for removing of hexavalent chromium. In this article, removal of hexavalent chromium via adsorption on multiwalled carbon nanotubes was investigated as a function of adsorbent dosage, initial solution pH, initial Cr(VI concentrations, contact time and temperature. The batch experiments were conducted at 3 different temperatures (17, 27 and 37ºC and shows that Cr (VI removal obeys pseudo-second order rate equation. Rate constant (K values in 3 temperatures, pre-exponential factor and adsorption activation energy (E was also obtained. The sorption data fitted well with Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (ΔGº, enthalpy (ΔHº and entropy (ΔSº for Cr(VI adsorption were estimated and Results suggest that the adsorption process is a spontaneous and endothermic.

  2. HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS SPENT BIOMASS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.CAROL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pleurotus ostreatus spent biomass after the harvest, is a waste which was used as a potential sorbent after coating it with chitosan an deacetylated derivative from chitin the most abundant carbohydratesecond to cellulose .The study is an attempt to elaborate and justify the optional utility of Spent Pleurotus ostreatus biomass for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous industrial effluents. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, biosorbent dosage, biosorbent dosage, initial metal concentration, temperature and sorption time is very striking from the obtained results .The Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the data of Cr (VI sorption capacity of Spent Pleurotus biomass. The intraparticle diffusion plot suggest that the sorption process proceeds by surface adsorption alone in case of activated spentbiomass but when coated with chitosan the process is sorption along with intra particle diffusion or pore diffusion. The overall adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous innature.EDX analysis indicated the presence of hexavalent chromium ions on the surface of chitosan coated spent Pleurotus biomass. The resultssuggest that the enhanced spent biomass could be employed as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium from industrial effluents as well as from contaminated water sources.

  3. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  4. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by barium ion cross-linked alginate beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzaşçı Sesil

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Barium ion cross-linked alginate beads have shown great affinity to toxic hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution, contrary to the traditional calcium alginate beads. The adsorption experiments were carried out by the batch contact method. The optimal pH for removal was found to be pH 4. The equilibrium was established in 4 h and the removal efficiency of chromium (VI was found as 95%. The adsorption data fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum chromium (VI adsorption capacity determined from Langmuir isotherm was 36.5 mg/g dry alginate beads. Our study suggests that barium alginate beads can be used as cost-effective and efficient adsorbents for the removal of chromium (VI from contaminated waters.

  5. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Roy; Ayan Das; Nirmal Paul

    2013-01-01

    Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr) may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III) and Cr (VI) are signifi...

  6. Genotoxicity of Tri- and Hexavalent Chromium Compounds In Vivo and Their Modes of Action on DNA Damage In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijia Fang; Min Zhao; Hong Zhen; Lifeng Chen; Ping Shi; Zhiwei Huang

    2014-01-01

    Chromium occurs mostly in tri- and hexavalent states in the environment. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are extensively used in diverse industries, and trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] salts are used as micronutrients and dietary supplements. In the present work, we report that they both induce genetic mutations in yeast cells. They both also cause DNA damage in both yeast and Jurkat cells and the effect of Cr(III) is greater than that of Cr(VI). We further show that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ca...

  7. RICE BRAN CARBON: AN ALTERNATIVE TO COMMERCIAL ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THE REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Hadi Hasan; Deeksha Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    Rice bran carbon (RBC) prepared from rice bran (an agricultural waste) was successfully utilized for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. The potentiality of RBC was tested and compared with commercial activated carbon (CAC), and it was found that RBC removed 95% of hexavalent chromium at pH 2, 1000 µM Cr(VI) concentration, temperature 30 oC, and adsorbent dose of 2 g/L. The maximum uptake of total chromium obtained by applying the Langmuir isotherm model was 138.88 mg/g ...

  8. Release of Hexavalent Chromium by Ash and Soils in Wildfire-Impacted Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Adams, Monique

    2008-01-01

    The highly oxidizing environment of a wildfire has the potential to convert any chromium present in the soil or in residential or industrial debris to its more toxic form, hexavalent chromium, a known carcinogen. In addition, the highly basic conditions resulting from the combustion of wood and wood products could result in the stabilization of any aqueous hexavalent chromium formed. Samples were collected from the October 2007 wildfires in Southern California and subjected to an array of test procedures to evaluate the potential effects of fire-impacted soils and ashes on human and environmental health. Soil and ash samples were leached using de-ionized water to simulate conditions resulting from rainfall on fire-impacted areas. The resulting leachates were of high pH (10-13) and many, particularly those of ash from burned residential areas, contained elevated total chromium as much as 33 micrograms per liter. Samples were also leached using a near-neutral pH simulated lung fluid to model potential chemical interactions of inhaled particles with fluids lining the respiratory tract. High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry was used to separate and detect individual species (for example, Cr+3, Cr+6, As+3, As+5, Se+4, and Se+6). These procedures were used to determine the form of the chromium present in the de-ionized water and simulated lung fluid leachates. The results show that in the de-ionized water leachate, all of the chromium present is in the form of Cr+6, and the resulting high pH tends to stabilize Cr+6 from reduction to Cr+3. Analysis of the simulated lung fluid leachates indicates that the predominant form of chromium present in the near-neutral pH of lung fluid would be Cr+6, which is of concern due to the high possibility of inhalation of the small ash and soil particulates, particularly by fire or restoration crews.

  9. Chronic occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium causes DNA damage in electroplating workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Xiao-Bin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational exposure to chromium compounds may result in adverse health effects. This study aims to investigate whether low-level hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI exposure can cause DNA damage in electroplating workers. Methods 157 electroplating workers and 93 control subjects with no history of occupational exposure to chromium were recruited in Hangzhou, China. Chromium levels in erythrocytes were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes was evaluated with the alkaline comet assay by three parameters: Olive tail moment, tail length and percent of DNA in the comet tail (tail DNA%. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were measured by ELISA. Results Chromium concentration in erythrocytes was about two times higher in electroplating workers (median: 4.41 μg/L than that in control subjects (1.54 μg/L, P P P P Conclusion The findings in this study indicated that there was detectable chromium exposure in electroplating workers. Low-level occupational chromium exposure induced DNA damage.

  10. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  11. An Evaluation of Welding Processes to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium Exposures and Reduce Costs by Using Better Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    A group of stainless steel arc welding processes was compared for emission rates of fume and hexavalent chromium, and costs per meter length of weld. The objective was to identify those with minimal emissions and also compare relative labor and consumables costs. The selection included flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), shielded-metal arc welding (SMAW), and multiple gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, and fume generation rates and hexavalent chr...

  12. Anticlastogenic Effect of Redistilled Cow's Urine Distillate in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes Challenged With Manganese Dioxide and Hexavalent Chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DIPANWITA DUTTA; S.SARAVANA DEVI; K. KRISHNAMURTHI; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the anticlastogenic effect of redistilled cow's urine distillate (RCUD) in human peripheral lymphocytes (HLC) challenged with manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium. Methods The anticlastogenic activity of redistilled cow's urine distillate was studied in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (HPNLs) and human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro challenged with manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium as established genotoxicants and clastogens which could cause induction of DNA strand break, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus. Three different levels of RCUD: 1 μL/mL, 50 μL/mL and 100μL/mL, were used in the study. Results Manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium caused statistically significant DNA strand break, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus formation, which could be protected by redistilled cow's urine distillate. Conclusion The redistilled cow's urine distillate posseses strong antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic properties against HPNLs and HLC treated with Cr+6 and MnO2. This property is mainly due to the antioxidants present in RCUD.

  13. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a novel powder prepared from Colocasia esculenta leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakkeeran, E; Saranya, N; Giri Nandagopal, M S; Santhiagu, A; Selvaraju, N

    2016-08-01

    In this study, batch removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by powdered Colocasia esculenta leaves was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of adsorption of Cr(VI) at different pH values, initial concentrations, agitation speeds, temperatures, and contact times. The biosorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer analysis. The biosorptive capacity of the adsorbent was dependent on the pH of the chromium solution in which maximum removal was observed at pH 2. The adsorption equilibrium data were evaluated for various adsorption isotherm models, kinetic models, and thermodynamics. The equilibrium data fitted well with Freundlich and Halsey models. The adsorption capacity calculated was 47.62 mg/g at pH 2. The adsorption kinetic data were best described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thus, Colocasia esculenta leaves can be considered as one of the efficient and cheap biosorbents for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26853060

  14. Toxic hexavalent chromium reduction by Bacillus pumilis, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans and Exiguobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Fatima; Faisal, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Three bacterial strains Bacillus pumilis, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans and Exiguobacterium were investigated when grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium at 500 μg/mL Cr(VI). The hexavalent chromium reduction was measured by growing the strains in DeLeo and Ehrlich (1994) medium at 200 and 400 μg/mL K2CrO4. The optimal Cr (VI) reduction by strains B. pumilis, Exigubacterium and C. cellulans was 51%, 39%, and 41%, respectively, at an initial K2CrO4 concentration of 200 μg/mL at pH 3 and temperature 37°C. At an initial chromate concentration of 400 μg/mL, the Cr(VI) reduction by strains B. pumilis, Exigubacterium and C. cellulans was 24%, 19%, and 18%, respectively at pH 3 at 37°C after 24 h. These strains have ability to reduce toxic hexavalent chromium to the less mobile trivalent chromium at a wide range of different environmental conditions and can be useful for the treatment of contaminated wastewater and soils.

  15. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Brent C. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Constant, Stephanie L. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Patierno, Steven R. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); GW Cancer Institute, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Jurjus, Rosalyn A. [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Ceryak, Susan M., E-mail: phmsmc@gwumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  16. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  17. Modulation of histone methylation and MLH1 gene silencing by hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hong; Zhou, Xue; Chen, Haobin; Li, Qin; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a mutagen and carcinogen, and occupational exposure can lead to lung cancers and other adverse health effects. Genetic changes resulting from DNA damage has been proposed as an important mechanism that mediates chromate's carcinogenicity. Here we show that chromate exposure of human lung A549 cells increased global levels of di- and tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 4 (H3K4) but decreased the levels of tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K...

  18. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  19. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium based on modified Y zeolites obtained by alkali-treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Hugo de; Silva, Bruna Andreia Nogueira Airosa; Quintelas, C.; Pereira, M.F.R.; Neves, Isabel C.; Tavares, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    The structural modification of external surface of NaY was investigated in order to enhance efficient biosorption systems consisting of a bacterial biofilm, Arthrobacter viscosus, supported on that zeolite, for removing hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The supported bacterial biofilm reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and this cation is then retained in the zeolite by ion exchange. NaY zeolite was modified by alkali-treatments using NaOH 2.0 M, with two different contact periods of...

  20. Ferrous sulphate mono and heptahydrate reduction of hexavalent chromium in cement: effectiveness and storability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde, J. L.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In Community legislation, substances containing hexavalent chromium are classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic and sensitizing. In cement, hexavalent chromium intensifies sensitization and may set off severe allergic reactions in workers in routine contact with the product, whether in the factory or on construction sites. The allergic or contact dermatitis causes is a very painful disease that may lead to permanent worker disability. According to Directive 2003/53/EC of the European Parliament and the Council, Governments of all member countries will be required to prohibit the marketing and use, as of 17 January 2005, of any cement or cement preparation containing more than 2 ppm of chromium (VI. Hexavalent chromium can be reduced with ferrous sulphate to trivalent chromium, which is water-insoluble and therefore innocuous to the skin. The present paper reports the effects of adding ferrous sulphate mono- or heptahydrate to a commercial cement and the storage time of the mix on the concentration of hexavalent chromium. The salts studied were found to effectively reduce hexavalent chromium in cement for at least three months.

    Las sustancias que contienen cromo hexavalente están clasificadas en la legislación comunitaria como sustancias carcinogénicas, mutagénicas y sensibilizantes. El cromo hexavalente del cemento potencia la sensibilización y provoca graves reacciones alérgicas que sufren bastante a menudo los trabajadores que lo manipulan habitualmente, ya sea en fábrica o en el sector de la construcción. La dermatitis alérgica o de contacto que produce es muy dolorosa y puede dejar a los trabajadores en estado de discapacidad. La Directiva 2003/53/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo, exige a los Gobiernos de los países miembros, que a partir del 17 de enero de 2005, prohiban el uso y la comercialización de todos aquellos cementos y preparados que contengan cemento, cuyo contenido en cromo (VI soluble, una vez hidratados

  1. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by Litchi chinensis Sonn Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Acosta-Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: We studied the Chromium (VI removal capacity in aqueous solution by the litchi peel. Approach: We use the diphenylcarbazide method to evaluate the metal concentration. Results: The highest biosorption of the metal (50 mg L-1 occurs within 6 min, at pH of 1 and 28°C. According to temperature, the highest removal was observed at 40 and 50°C, in 45 min, when the metal (1 g L-1 was completely adsorbed. At the analyzed concentrations of Cr (VI, litchi peel, showed excellent removal capacity, besides it removes efficiently the metal in situ (100% removal, 5 days of incubation, 5 and 10 g of biomass. After 1 h of incubation the studied biomass reduces 1.0 g of Cr (VI with the simultaneous production of Cr (III. Conclusion: The shell can be used to eliminate it from industrial wastewater."

  2. Laboratory scale electrokinetic remediation of hexavalent chromium from contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan hosts a variety of waste soils around industrial sites located in and around large population centers. Clean up of these waste soils is essential to save potable groundwater reserves beneath these waste soils. Among several waste remediation approaches, the electrokinetic remediation (EKR) technology has fast emerged as a reliable, powerful and highly prominent candidate for effective in situ removal of soluble and leachable toxic species of metals, radionuclides, organics from contaminated soils and water environment. This paper presents results of the first laboratory trial experiment performed at PINSTECH, Islamabad, Pakistan to demonstrate applicability of EKR approach for removal of aqueous phase chromium from silty clay soil around Islamabad. The electro osmotic flow rate was 3.13 ml/hour while the mass balance calculations revealed that the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) was 44.58% for the experimental soil during a period of 24 hours of electro remediation. (author)

  3. Efficacy of Agricultural Wastes in the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium- A Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Muthulakshmi Andal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent Chromium is a major pollutant released during several industrial operations. It is also reported as one of the metals known to be carcinogenic and has an adverse potential to modify the DNA transcription process. The removal of hexavalent chromium has been studied by various authors employing adsorbents developed from waste agro by-products to assess their adsorption characteristics. This paper focuses on the comparison of some agro based products in the removal of Cr(VI ions. An extensive list of agricultural based products such as Coconut Coir, Prunus amygdalus, Cissus quadrangularis, Soapnut Acacia, Justicia adhatoda, Bhringraj, Aerva lanata, Trianthema portulacastrum, Tephrosia purpurea, Solanum nigrum, Datura metel, Cleome viscose, Asparagus racemosus for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions and the discharged effluents from industries are reviewed in this work. As chemically modified adsorbents exhibit higher adsorption capacity, a number of chemicals have been utilized for the required modifications of the adsorbent materials in the research articles. The results declared by the authors have been compared and summarized for further probe into the extensive utilization of the employed materials.

  4. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solution by Using Adsorption onto Commerical Iron Powder; Study of Equilibrium and Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    A.R Rahmani; R. Noorozi; M.T. Samadi; M Shirzad Siboni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Industrial wastewaters including heavy metals, are one of the important sources of environmental pollution. Heavy metals such as chromium is found in plating wastewater and is harmful for human health and environment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate adsorption of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) from aqueous solution onto commerical Iron powder as an effective, faster ,and cheaper adsorbent. Materials & Methods: This research was an experimental- labla...

  5. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Hexavalent Chromium in Steller Sea Lion Lung Fibroblasts Compared to Human Lung Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, John Pierce; Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; LaCerte, Carolyne; Shaffiey, Fariba; Aboueissa, AbouEl-Makarim

    2010-01-01

    In this study we directly compared soluble and particulate chromate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human (Homo sapiens) and sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) lung fibroblasts. Our results show that hexavalent chromium induces increased cell death and chromosome damage in both human and sea lion cells with increasing intracellular chromium ion levels. The data further indicate that both sodium chromate and lead chromate are less cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea lion cells than human cells, based o...

  6. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by agricultural waste biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions onto different agricultural wastes, viz., sugarcane bagasse, maize corn cob and Jatropha oil cake under various experimental conditions has been studied. Effects of adsorbent dosage, Cr(VI) concentration, pH and contact time on the adsorption of hexavalent chromium were investigated. The concentration of chromium in the test solution was determined spectrophotometrically. FT-IR spectra of the adsorbents (before use and after exhaustion) were recorded to explore number and position of the functional groups available for the binding of chromium ions on to studied adsorbents. SEMs of the adsorbents were recorded to explore the morphology of the studied adsorbents. Maximum adsorption was observed in the acidic medium at pH 2 with a contact time of 60 min at 250 rpm stirring speed. Jatropha oil cake had better adsorption capacity than sugarcane bagasse and maize corn cob under identical experimental conditions. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms was tested. The results showed that studied adsorbents can be an attractive low cost alternative for the treatment of wastewaters in batched or stirred mode reactors containing lower concentrations of chromium

  7. Nanoscale zero-valent iron application for in situ reduction of hexavalent chromium and its effects on indigenous microorganism populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Lhotský, O.; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    485-486, č. 2 (2014), s. 739-747. ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218; GA MŠk ED0005/01/01; GA TA ČR TA01021792 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : nanoparticles * hexavalent chromium * bioremediation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.099, year: 2014

  8. Oral ingestion of hexavalent chromium through drinking water and cancer mortality in an industrial area of Greece - An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoltidis Melina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen when inhaled, but its carcinogenic potential when orally ingested remains controversial. Water contaminated with hexavalent chromium is a worldwide problem, making this a question of significant public health importance. Methods We conducted an ecological mortality study within the Oinofita region of Greece, where water has been contaminated with hexavalent chromium. We calculated gender, age, and period standardized mortality ratios (SMRs for all deaths, cancer deaths, and specific cancer types of Oinofita residents over an 11-year period (1999 - 2009, using the greater prefecture of Voiotia as the standard population. Results A total of 474 deaths were observed. The SMR for all cause mortality was 98 (95% CI 89-107 and for all cancer mortality 114 (95% CI 94-136. The SMR for primary liver cancer was 1104 (95% CI 405-2403, p-value Conclusions Elevated cancer mortality in the Oinofita area of Greece supports the hypothesis of hexavalent chromium carcinogenicity via the oral ingestion pathway of exposure. Further studies are needed to determine whether this association is causal, and to establish preventive guidelines and public health recommendations.

  9. Synergy between hexavalent chromium ions and TiO2 nanoparticles inside TUD-1 in the photocatalytic oxidation of propane, a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Mohamed S.

    2016-02-01

    Siliceous TUD-1 mesoporous material was bi-functionalized by titanium dioxide nanoparticles and hexavalent chromium ions. The synthesis was carried out by one-pot procedure based on sol-gel technique. The photocatalytic performance of the prepared material was evaluated in the oxidation of propane under the illumination of ultraviolet light (wavelength = 360 nm) and monitored by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared material exhibited an extra-ordinary activity than the reference samples that contain either hexavalent chromium ions or titanium dioxide nanoparticles only, confirming the true synergy between hexavalent chromium and tetravalent titanium ions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

  10. An evaluation of in vivo models for toxicokinetics of hexavalent chromium in the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6) is a drinking water contaminant that has been detected in most of the water systems throughout the United States. In 2-year drinking water bioassays, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female rats and mice. Because reduction of Cr6 to trivalent chromium (Cr3) is an important detoxifying step in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract prior to systemic absorption, models have been developed to estimate the extent of reduction in humans and animals. The objective of this work was to use a revised model of ex vivo Cr6 reduction kinetics in gastric juice to analyze the potential reduction kinetics under in vivo conditions for mice, rats and humans. A published physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was adapted to incorporate the new reduction model. This paper focuses on the toxicokinetics of Cr6 in the stomach compartment, where most of the extracellular Cr6 reduction is believed to occur in humans. Within the range of doses administered by the NTP bioassays, neither the original nor revised models predict saturation of stomach reducing capacity to occur in vivo if applying default parameters. However, both models still indicate that mice exhibit the lowest extent of reduction in the stomach, meaning that a higher percentage of the Cr6 dose may escape stomach reduction in that species. Similarly, both models predict that humans exhibit the highest extent of reduction at low doses. - Highlights: • We outline a new in vivo model for hexavalent chromium reduction in the stomach. • We examine in vivo reduction for mice, rats, and humans under varying conditions. • Species differences in toxicokinetics may explain susceptibility. • We show that a simplified stomach reduction model is adequate for extrapolation. • Internal dose uncertainties still exist

  11. Survey of Nano filtration Performance for Hexavalent Chromium Removal fromWater Containing Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh.R Moussavi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Geological situation and/or anthropogenic contamination contain an increased concentration of ions such as hexavalent chromium as well as some other dissolved components such as sulfate in the upper of the establishedMCLs (50µg/L. In this paper, simultaneous removal of Cr (VI and sulfate from water was investigated using nanofiltration as a promising method for reaching drinking water standards."nMaterials and Methods: For varying pressure, pH , anion and cation solution effect, Sulfate and Cr (VI concentration which have chosen were levels found in drinking water sources (Cr=0.1- 0.5mg/L and (SO4-2= 100-800mg/L.Experiments were performed using NaCl, Na2SO4,K2 Cr2O7and anhydrous CrCl3. 6H2O which prepared with de mineralized water on procedure detailed in standard methods. All salts were purchased from Merck Corporation with purity over 99'."nResults: The results for hexavalent chromium experiments showed that when the concentration decreases, the chromate anions were given a better retention to 4 bars (96'. But when the concentration increases, concentration polarization led to increased removal of Cr (VI (98'. For Cr (III the influences of the ionic strength as well as the concentrations were strongly dependant on rejection but operating pressure were found weak. In addition, with increasing total dissolved solids, perfect rejection of chromium was seen. The effect of pH showed that better retention was obtained at natural and basic pH."nConclusion: This study indicates that the nature of anions and cations, driven pressure and pH have significant effect on nano filtration operation. Research findings show that it seems nano filtration is a very good promising method of simultaneous removal of Cr (VI and sulfate from water.

  12. An evaluation of in vivo models for toxicokinetics of hexavalent chromium in the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasso, A.F., E-mail: sasso.alan@epa.gov; Schlosser, P.M., E-mail: schlosser.paul@epa.gov

    2015-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6) is a drinking water contaminant that has been detected in most of the water systems throughout the United States. In 2-year drinking water bioassays, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female rats and mice. Because reduction of Cr6 to trivalent chromium (Cr3) is an important detoxifying step in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract prior to systemic absorption, models have been developed to estimate the extent of reduction in humans and animals. The objective of this work was to use a revised model of ex vivo Cr6 reduction kinetics in gastric juice to analyze the potential reduction kinetics under in vivo conditions for mice, rats and humans. A published physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was adapted to incorporate the new reduction model. This paper focuses on the toxicokinetics of Cr6 in the stomach compartment, where most of the extracellular Cr6 reduction is believed to occur in humans. Within the range of doses administered by the NTP bioassays, neither the original nor revised models predict saturation of stomach reducing capacity to occur in vivo if applying default parameters. However, both models still indicate that mice exhibit the lowest extent of reduction in the stomach, meaning that a higher percentage of the Cr6 dose may escape stomach reduction in that species. Similarly, both models predict that humans exhibit the highest extent of reduction at low doses. - Highlights: • We outline a new in vivo model for hexavalent chromium reduction in the stomach. • We examine in vivo reduction for mice, rats, and humans under varying conditions. • Species differences in toxicokinetics may explain susceptibility. • We show that a simplified stomach reduction model is adequate for extrapolation. • Internal dose uncertainties still exist.

  13. Characterization of TBP containing polysiloxane membrane/insulator/semiconductor structures for hexavalent chromium detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zazoua, A. [Universite de Jijel, BP 98, Ouled Aissa, 18000 Jijel (Algeria); Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Kherrat, R.; Samar, M.H. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Errachid, A. [Laboratori de Nanobioenginyeria-IBEC, CIBER, Parc Cientific de Barcelona (PCB)-Departament d' Electronica. Universitat de Barcelona, C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jaffrezic-Renault, N. [LSA - UMR 5180 CNRS - Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)], E-mail: nicole.jaffrezic@univ-lyon1.fr; Bessueille, F.; Leonard, D. [LSA - UMR 5180 CNRS - Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    A hexavalent chromium-sensitive EMIS sensor (electrolyte membrane insulator semiconductor sensor) is prepared by deposition of a tributylphosphate (TBP) ionophore-containing siloprene membrane on a Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} structure. The developed EMIS sensor was studied by means of impedance spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and FT-IR spectroscopy. From the flat-band shift of the EMIS structure, the nersntian response to the anionic species Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup -} was demonstrated. The linear range of detection is 10{sup -4} M to 10{sup -1} M and the detection limit is 10{sup -5} M. Sulfate and chloride anions are shown not to be interfering whereas carbonate ions present a pK{sup pot} equal to 0.19.

  14. Assessment of Hexavalent Chromium Natural Attenuation for the Hanford Site 100 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sahajpal, Rahul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhong, Lirong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) plumes are present in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. Remediation efforts are under way with objectives of restoring the groundwater to meet the drinking-water standard (48 µg/L) and protecting the Columbia River by ensuring that discharge of groundwater to the river is below the surface-water quality standard (10 µg/L). Current remedies include application of Pump-and-Treat (P&T) at the 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K Areas and Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) at the 100-F/IU Area. Remedy selection is still under way at the other 100 Areas. Additional information about the natural attenuation processes for Cr(VI) is important in all of these cases. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate and quantify natural attenuation mechanisms using 100 Area sediments and groundwater conditions.

  15. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian [Yangtze Normal Univ., Fuling (China)

    2012-11-15

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly.

  16. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by calcined Zn/Al-LDHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Duo; Zhao, Yun-Peng; Li, Shi-Feng; Fan, Xing; Wei, Xian-Yong; Zong, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Zn/Al-layered double hydroxides (Zn/Al-LDHs) were synthesized by a co-precipitation method and characterized with X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Then the hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) adsorption experiments on calcined Zn/Al-LDHs were carried out to analyze the effects of pH, temperature, adsorption time, initial Cr(VI) concentration and adsorbent dosage on the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) on calcined Zn/Al-LDHs under optimal conditions was found to be over 120 mg/g. The kinetic and isotherm of Cr(VI) adsorption on calcined Zn/Al-LDHs can be described with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm, respectively. PMID:27387001

  17. Iron(II modified natural zeolites for hexavalent chromium removal from contaminated water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofù Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three different types of Fe(II-modified natural zeolites were tested as supports in continuous-flow columns for the treatment of Cr(VI contaminated water. The natural zeolites chosen as support were commercially available Zeosand (80% clinoptilolite, ATZ (79% phillipsite/chabazite, and ZS-55RW (90% Chabazite. All the examined modified zeolites turned out active for hexavalent chromium abatement, lowering its concentration below the European regulation level, even at relatively high flow rates (40 mL/h, linear velocity 15 cm/h. Zeosand, having a broader pH range of stability, was found to be the best one in terms of both Fe(II uptake (0.54 wt% and Cr removal (90 mg Cr/Kg zeolite.

  18. AN IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER: VOLUME 3 MULTICOMPONENT REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive transport modeling has been conducted to describe the performance of the permeable reactive barrier at the Coast Guard Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC. The reactive barrier was installed to treat groundwater contaminated by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated org...

  19. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium onto montmorillonite modified with hydroxyaluminum and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum hydroxypolycation and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) were chosen to synthesize inorganic-organic pillared montmorillonite. Three different methods were employed for the intercalation. The characteristics of natural and modified montmorillonite were determined with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS), and zeta potential. It was found that aluminum hydroxypolycation and CTMAB had either entered the interlayer or sorbed on the external surface of the clay. Different intercalation orders can result in different structures. Batch adsorption of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) onto modified montmorillonite was also investigated. The experimental data revealed that if aluminum hydroxypolycation was intercalated before CTMAB, the adsorption capacity was better than that of intercalated simultaneously or CTMAB pre-intercalated. The pH of the solution and environmental temperature had significant influences on the adsorption of Cr6+. The optimal pH for the removal was about 4, and the temperature of 298 K was best suitable. All adsorption processes were rapid during the first 5 min and reached equilibrium in 20 min. The adsorption kinetics can be described quite well by pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption rates of ACM, CAM and ACCOM were 3.814, 0.915, and 3.143 mg/g/min, respectively. The adsorption capacities of Cr6+ at 298 K on ACM, CAM, and ACCOM inferred from the Langmuir model were 11.970, 6.541, and 9.090 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption of Cr6+ on modified montmorillonite was mainly induced by the surface charge and the complexation reaction between CTMA+ and hexavalent chromium species at the edge of the clay particle.

  20. Utilization of Water Hyacinth (Eichhorniacrassipes for Phytoremediation of Hexavalent Chromium in Simulated Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common sources of contamination in surface water is the discharge of waste water containing heavy metals from different industrial applications.Methods in the removal of contaminants like hexavalent chromium, Cr+6 ,that are available nowadays are too costly and difficult to operate efficiently. A new approach to solve such problem is Phytoremediation or the use of green plants in the removal of contaminants from wastewater that contains heavy metals.In this study, the effectiveness of water hyacinth (Eichhorniacrassipes was evaluated for its capability in removing hexavalent chromium from simulated wastewater.The effect of a co-ion, specifically Cu2+ ions, on the percentage removal of Cr6+ was also studied. Diphenyl carbazide colorimetric method was used to quantify the amount of Cr6+ left after treatment with water hyacinth.The percentage removal of Cr6+ was determined under varying conditions. The parameters varied were concentration of Cr6+ (3, 6, & 9 mg/L, contact time (4, 8, and 12 days and concentration of Cu2+ (0, 4, and 8 mg/L. Results showed that the percentage removal of Cr6+ is directly proportional to the initial concentration of Cr6+ and contact time but inversely proportional to the concentration of co-ions which is Cu2+ ions. Results and statistical data showed that the optimum condition for phytoremediation of Cr6+ using water hyacinth is 12 days of contact time, and initial concentrations of 9 mg/L and 4 mg/L of Cr6+ and Cu2+ respectively.Overall results indicated that Eichhorniacrassipes can be used for phytoremediation of Cr+6contaminated wastewater.

  1. The effects of water rock interaction and the human activities on the occurrence of hexavalent chromium in waters. The case study of the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Perraki, Maria; Stamatis, George; Gartzos, Efthimios

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals, particularly of the toxic hexavalent chromium, are recorded in surface and ground waters in many areas, and constitute one of the most severe environmental problems nowadays. The natural genesis of chromium is associated with the geological environment (peridotites and serpentintites). Chromium is structured in many minerals, mainly in spinel (e.g. chromite), in silicate minerals such as phyllosilicate serpentine minerals, chlorite, talc and chain-silicate minerals of pyroxene and amphibole group. Chromium is found in two forms in soils, waters and rocks, the hexavalent and the trivalent one. The relation between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) strongly depends on pH and oxidative properties of the area; however, in most cases, Cr(III) is the dominating variant. The natural oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium can be achieved by manganese oxides, H2O2, O2 gas and oxy-hydroxides of trivalent iron. Anthropogenic factors may also cause the process of chromium's oxidation. In the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium were recently measured in spring- and drill- waters. In this work, we study the effect of the geological environment and of the anthropogenic activities on the water quality with emphasis on chromium. A detailed geochemical, petrological and mineralogical study of rocks and soils was carried out by means of optical microscopy, XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS. Ground and surface water samples were physically characterized and hydrochemically studied by means of ICP and AAF. Combined result evaluation indicates a natural source for the trivalent chromium in waters, attributed to the alteration of Cr-bearing minerals of the ultramafic rocks. However the oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium results from anthropogenic activities, mainly from intensive agricultural activities and the extensive use of fertilizers and pesticides causing nitrate pollution in groundwater. It has been shown

  2. RICE BRAN CARBON: AN ALTERNATIVE TO COMMERCIAL ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THE REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hadi Hasan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice bran carbon (RBC prepared from rice bran (an agricultural waste was successfully utilized for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. The potentiality of RBC was tested and compared with commercial activated carbon (CAC, and it was found that RBC removed 95% of hexavalent chromium at pH 2, 1000 µM Cr(VI concentration, temperature 30 oC, and adsorbent dose of 2 g/L. The maximum uptake of total chromium obtained by applying the Langmuir isotherm model was 138.88 mg/g for RBC, which was found comparable to that obtained by utilizing CAC (116.28 mg/g at 40 oC. The removal of Cr(VI was found maximum at a proton to chromium ratio of 10 and chromium to carbon ratio of 0.052, and these ratios were found to be applicable over a range of Cr(VI concentrations. The removal of Cr(VI, at low pH (< 2.0, was not only due to sorption of Cr(VI but also because of reduction of Cr(VI into less toxic Cr(III, which was also adsorbed on the surface of the sorbent. The rate of reduction removal of Cr(VI followed pseudo-first order kinetics, whereas the sorption of total chromium followed pseudo-second order kinetics for both the types of activated carbons.

  3. Studies on atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis of hexavalent chromium in waste water by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption spectrophotometric(AAS) determination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in a waste water was studied. Cr(VI) was extracted with p-xylene from the wastewater, in the way of ion pair formation with anion exchanger aliquat-336(tri-caprylmethyl ammonium chloride). 100ml waste water, after organic materials were extracted out with toluene, was acidified with conc. HCl adjusting the medium to pH 0.5 and 20ml of p-xylene containing 0.01M aliguat-336 was used to extract Cr(VI) from the acidified solution. The absorbance of chromium was measured with air-acetylene flame at 357.9nm. Standard addition method was used in the determining concentration of Cr(VI) extracted. No interference has been found in the extraction of Cr(VI) by the Al(III), Fe(III) and Cr(III) ion presented. However, Fe(II) decreased the absorbance of Cr(VI), due to the fact Fe(II) reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The contained organic material was removed prior to extracting process, since it may reduced the absorbance of Cr(VI). The recovery of added Cr(VI) was over 96%, which seems to be promising and the relative standard deviation was 3.95%. (Author)

  4. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by granular and powdered Peganum Harmala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Rasoul; Fazlzadehdavil, Mehdi; Barikbin, Behnam; Taghizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, batch removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by granular and powdered seeds of Peganum Harmala was investigated. The Peganum Harmala seeds were collected and after beating slowly, separating and cleaning the Harmala seeds done using a sieve. Batch adsorption studies were performed in 100 ml Erlenmeyer flasks inside an incubator container. The main process parameters considered were pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration for PPH and GPH, adsorbent dose, and contact time. Cr(VI) was measured at a wavelength of 540 nm using a UV-vis T80+ spectrophotometer. The adsorption data were fitted well by Freundlich isotherm. The result shows that the maximum removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 1.5 for both adsorbents. Also, by increase adsorption dose, adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) decreased but the chromium adsorption rate increased. The mount of adsorbed Cr(VI) onto both adsorbents increased with an increase in the contact time but by increases initial concentration of Cr(VI), the mount of adsorbed Cr(VI) onto both adsorbents decreased. The results indicate that the powdered Peganum Harmala can be effective adsorbent than the granular Peganum Harmala for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  5. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using L-Cysteine Capped Nickel Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razium Ali Soomro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the highly toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI into less toxic chromium Cr(III species by using nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs as catalysts in order to provide safety to the aqueous environment. In the first phase Ni NPs were synthesized in ethylene glycol and capped with l-cysteine by a modified microwave irradiation method using NaOH as the accelerator. The formed Ni NPs were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the second phase the formed Ni NPs were immobilized on glass surfaces and employed as catalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI ions. According to observations, 99% reduction of Cr(VI ions was achieved in the presence of 0.5 mg of Ni NPs catalyst in just five minutes as compared to nickel powder that showed only 16% reduction in 15 minutes. The study has a great impact on the aqueous pollution control of Cr(VI especially caused by the discharge of waste water from several industries utilizing Cr(VI containing salt as one of the essential gradients.

  6. Two fold modified chitosan for enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium from simulated wastewater and industrial effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahu, S S; Shekhawat, A; Saravanan, D; Jugade, R M

    2016-08-01

    Ionic solid (Ethylhexadecyldimethylammoniumbromide) impregnated phosphated chitosan (ISPC) was synthesized and applied for enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium from industrial effluent. The compound obtained was extensively characterized using instrumental techniques like FT-IR, TGA-DTA, XRD, SEM, BET and EDX. ISPC showed high adsorption capacity of 266.67mg/g in accordance with Langmuir isotherm model at pH 3.0 due to the presence of multiple sites which contribute for ion pair and electrostatic interactions with Cr(VI) species. The sorption kinetics and thermodynamic studies revealed that adsorption of Cr(VI) followed pseudo-second-order kinetics with exothermic and spontaneous behaviour. Applicability of ISPC for higher sample volumes was discerned through column studies. The real chrome plating industry effluent was effectively treated with total chromium recovery of 94%. The used ISPC was regenerated simply by dilute ammonium hydroxide treatment and tested for ten adsorption-desorption cycles with marginal decrease in adsorption efficiency. PMID:27112874

  7. WATER HYACINTH BIOMASS (WHB FOR THE BIOSORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM: OPTIMIZATION OF PROCESS PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hadi Hasan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes biomass has been used for many years for the remediation of heavy metals. The present study successfully utilizes the dried powdered biomass of the aerial part (stem and leaves of water hyacinth for biosorption of hexavalent chromium. The effect of various parameters (viz. pH, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on the removal of Cr(VI was studied by conducting only 15 sets of sorption runs using Box-Behnken Design (BBD. The pH had a negative and temperature and concentration had positive effects on uptake of chromium. The predicted results (obtained using an empirical linear polynomial model were found to be in good agreement (R2 = 99.8% with the experimental results. The predicted maximum removal of Cr(VI (91.5181 mg/g can be achieved at pH 2.0, initial metal ion concentration 300 mg/L, and temperature 40 °C. The sorption capacity of sorbent was also calculated using a Langmuir sorption isotherm model and was found to be 101 mg/g at 40 C and pH 2.0.

  8. Application of dolochar in the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Dolochar - a waste material from sponge iron industry, is put to test as an adsorbent for removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. The sample consists of lots of voids and pores. Batch adsorption experiments have indicated that, higher pH and temperature enhances sorption for cadmium ions. The adsorption for chromium is found better at acidic pH in comparison to alkaline pH. The adsorption is well fitted to Langmuir isotherm model compared to the Freundlich model indicating monolayer adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption better fit to pseudo second order model.. Display Omitted Highlights: → Dolochar, a waste material is generated during the production of sponge iron. → Dolochar consists of metallic iron, carbon, and lime bearing phases along with lots of voids and pores. → It was found to be an good adsorbent for the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. → The adsorption follows Langmuir isotherm and kinetics of adsorption better fit of pseudo second order model. - Abstract: Dolochar, a waste material generated in sponge iron industry, is processed and put to test as an adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The dolochar samples were characterised to determine the different phases and their distribution by reflection microscopy. The analysis indicated that the sample consists of metallic iron, fused carbon, and Ca-Mg bearing phases (Ca-Mg-silicate-oxide) along with lots of voids and pores. The fixed carbon (FC) content of the material is 13.8% with a Langmuir surface area of 81.6 m2/g and micropore area of 34.1 m2/g. Batch adsorption experiments have been conducted to study the sorption behaviour of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions on dolochar as a function of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosages, pH and temperature. It is observed that higher pH and temperature enhances sorption of Cd(II) ions. In contrast, the adsorption for Cr(VI) is

  9. Sorptive removal of trivalent and hexavalent chromium from binary aqueous solutions by composite alginate-goethite beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, N K; Charalambous, Ch

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the removal of hexavalent and trivalent chromium ions from binary aqueous solutions by composite alginate-goethite beads was investigated in a batch mode. Equilibrium sorption experiments were carried out at different temperatures and pH values. The data were correlated with Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The thermodynamic parameters calculated were: change in free energy, in enthalpy, in entropy and the heat of adsorption. The influence of mixing rate, sorbent concentration and sorbent particle size was studied at kinetic runs. The effective diffusion coefficients were evaluated by employing the homogeneous diffusion model and the shrinking core model for hexavalent and trivalent chromium, respectively. Desorption experiments were conducted by employing various eluants showed that the loaded material could be regenerated satisfactorily. PMID:16233908

  10. Field screening for hexavalent chromium in soil: A fast-turnaround field method based on water extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium dichromate has been identified as a contaminant of concern at several waste sites on the Hanford Site. Although chromium standards for soil are typically stated in terms of total chrome, much of the toxicity and carcinogenicity are attributed to the hexavalent state, which typically exists as a relatively mobile anion. Investigation and removal of crushed drums potentially containing residual sodium dichromate required a field test for hexavalent chromium to support characterization and remediation activities. Previous experience with a commercially available field test kit had been unsuccessful. This stimulated an effort to determine potential sources of error in the field test and led to a number of modifications that significantly improved the reliability of the test

  11. Biological Monitoring of Hexavalent Chromium and Serum Levels of the Senescence Biomarker Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin in Welders

    OpenAIRE

    Vassilios Makropoulos; Gonos, Efstathios S.; Magda Lourda; Trougakos, Ioannis P.; Xenophon Cominos; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.

    2008-01-01

    Welding fumes contain metals and other toxic substances known or strongly suspected to be related with oxidative stress and premature cellular senescence. Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin (ApoJ/CLU) is a glycoprotein that is differentially regulated in various physiological and disease states including ageing and age-related diseases. In vitro data showed that exposure of human diploid fibroblasts to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) resulted in premature senescence and significant upregulation of the A...

  12. Effects of Dentifrice Containing Hydroxyapatite on Dentinal Tubule Occlusion and Aqueous Hexavalent Chromium Cations Sorption: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Peiyan Yuan; Xiaoqing Shen; Jing Liu; Yarong Hou; Manqun Zhu; Jiansheng Huang; Pingping Xu

    2012-01-01

    In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr(6+)) solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr(6+) from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA w...

  13. Adsorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solution Using Chemically Activated Carbon Prepared from Locally Available Waste of Bamboo (Oxytenanthera abyssinica)

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Tamirat; Siraj, Khalid; Kitte, Shimeles Addisu

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the adsorption of Hexavalent Chromium from aqueous solutions using activated carbon prepared from bamboo (Oxytenanthera abyssinica) waste by KOH activation heating in an electrical furnace at 1073 K for 3 hrs. Batch adsorption experiments were also carried out as a function of pH, contact time, initial concentration of the adsorbate, adsorbent dosage, and temperature of the solution. Kinetic studies of the data showed that the adsorption follows the pseudo-second-order k...

  14. Hexavalent chromium reduction by chromate-resistant haloalkaliphilic Halomonas sp. M-Cr newly isolated from tannery effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Mabrouk, Mona E.M.; Arayes, Mervat A.; Sabry, Soraya A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed to isolate and characterize a chromate-resistant bacterium from tannery effluent, able to reduce Cr(VI) aerobically at high pH and salinity. Environmental contamination by hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), presents a serious public health problem. Enrichment led to the isolation of 12 bacteria displaying different degrees of chromate reduction. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence comparison indicated that the most potent strain b...

  15. Elevated Frequencies of Micronuclei and other Nuclear Abnormalities of Chrome Plating Workers Occupationally Exposed to Hexavalent Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the potential cytogenetic damage associated with occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium by using micronuclei (MN) as a biomarker. Methods This was a cross-sectional study and all participants were males. Both the exposed and control individuals were selected from Coimbatore, Southern India. Exfoliated buccal cells from 44 chrome plating work...

  16. On the removal of hexavalent chromium from a Class F fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, F E; Rezaee, M; Honaker, R Q; Hower, J C

    2016-05-01

    Coarse and fine samples of a Class F fly ash obtained from commercial combustion of Illinois bituminous coal have been exposed to two long-term leaching tests designed to simulate conditions in waste impoundments. ICP-AES analysis indicated that the coarse and fine fly ash samples contained 135 and 171mg/kg Cr, respectively. Measurements by XAFS spectroscopy showed that the ash samples originally contained 5 and 8% of the chromium, respectively, in the hexavalent oxidation state, Cr(VI). After exposure to water for more than four months, the percentage of chromium as Cr(VI) in the fly-ash decreased significantly for the coarse and fine fly-ash in both tests. Combining the XAFS data with ICP-AES data on the concentration of chromium in the leachates indicated that, after the nineteen-week-long, more aggressive, kinetic test on the coarse fly ash, approximately 60% of the Cr(VI) had been leached, 20% had been reduced to Cr(III) and retained in the ash, and 20% remained as Cr(VI) in the ash. In contrast, during the six-month-long baseline test, very little Cr was actually leached from either the coarse or the fine fly-ash (<0.1mg/kg); rather, about 66% and 20%, respectively, of the original Cr(VI) in the coarse and fine fly-ash was retained in the ash in that form, while the remainder, 34% and 80%, respectively, was reduced and retained in the ash as Cr(III). The results are interpreted as indicating that Cr(VI) present in Class F fly-ash can be reduced to Cr(III) when in contact with water and that such chemical reduction can compete with physical removal of Cr(VI) from the ash by aqueous leaching. PMID:26951722

  17. Chemodynamics of chromium reduction in soils: Implications to bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Examined the effects of sorption, pH and C sources on Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity. • The rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and pH. • The proton dynamics in Cr(VI) reduction was assessed in relation to remediation. • A novel black carbon showed the highest reduction rate of Cr(VI) in soils. • Black carbon decreased the bioavailability and phytotoxicity of Cr(VI) in soils. -- Abstract: Chromium toxicity in soils can be mitigated by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) which is influenced by the presence of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution, and the supply of protons and electrons. In this study, the effects of Cr(VI) adsorption (i.e. availability of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution), soil pH (i.e. supply of protons) and three electron donor carbon sources [black carbon (BC), chicken manure biochar (CMB) and cow manure (CM)] on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in soils were investigated. The results indicated that the rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and soil pH, which is attributed to decreased supply of free Cr(VI) ions and protons, respectively. Among the three different amendments tested, BC showed the highest rate of Cr(VI) reduction followed by CM and CMB. Furthermore, addition of BC, CM and CMB decreased the bioavailability of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils. The high efficiency of BC on Cr(VI) reduction was due to the electron donor's functional groups such as phenolic, hydroxyl, carbonyl and amides. The study demonstrated that free form of Cr(VI) ions in soil solution and carbon amendments enriched with acidic functional groups favored the reduction of Cr(VI), thereby mitigating its bioavailability and toxicity in contaminated soils

  18. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  19. Evaluation of extraction methods for hexavalent chromium determination in dusts, ashes, and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Wilson, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the difficulties in performing speciation analyses on solid samples is finding a suitable extraction method. Traditional methods for extraction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in soils, such as SW846 Method 3060A, can be tedious and are not always compatible with some determination methods. For example, the phosphate and high levels of carbonate and magnesium present in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method 3060A digestion for Cr(VI) were found to be incompatible with the High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) detection method used by our laboratory. Modification of Method 3060A by eliminating the use of the phosphate buffer provided improved performance with the detection method, however dilutions are still necessary to achieve good chromatographic separation and detection of Cr(VI). An ultrasonic extraction method using a 1 mM Na2CO3 - 9 mM NaHCO3 buffer solution, adapted from Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Method ID215, has been used with good results for the determination of Cr(VI) in air filters. The average recovery obtained for BCR-545 - Welding Dust Loaded on Filter (IRMM, Belgium) using this method was 99 percent (1.2 percent relative standard deviation) with no conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) during the extraction process. This ultrasonic method has the potential for use with other sample matrices, such as ashes and soils. Preliminary investigations using NIST 2701 (Hexavalent Chromium in Contaminated Soil) loaded onto quartz filters showed promising results with approximately 90 percent recovery of the certified Cr(VI) value. Additional testing has been done using NIST 2701 and NIST 2700 using different presentation methods. Extraction efficiency of bulk presentation, where small portions of the sample are added to the bottom of the extraction vessel, will be compared with supported presentation, where small portions of the sample are loaded onto a

  20. Selected science: an industry campaign to undermine an OSHA hexavalent chromium standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurie Peter

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI has been associated with increased lung cancer risk for more than 50 years, the chemical is not currently regulated by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA on the basis of its carcinogenicity. The agency was petitioned in 1993 and sued in 1997 and 2002 to lower the workplace Cr(VI exposure limit, resulting in a court order to issue a final standard by February 2006. Faced with the threat of stronger regulation, the chromium industry initiated an effort to challenge the scientific evidence supporting a more protective standard. This effort included the use of "product defense" consultants to conduct post hoc analyses of a publicly-funded study to challenge results viewed unfavorably by the industry. The industry also commissioned a study of the mortality experience of workers at four low-exposure chromium plants, but did not make the results available to OSHA in a timely manner, despite multiple agency requests for precisely these sorts of data. The commissioned study found a statistically significant elevation in lung cancer risk among Cr(VI-exposed workers at levels far below the current standard. This finding changed when the multi-plant cohort was divided into two statistically underpowered components and then published separately. The findings of the first paper published have been used by the chromium industry to attempt to slow OSHA's standard setting process. The second paper was withheld from OSHA until it was accepted for publication in a scientific journal, after the rulemaking record had closed. Studies funded by private sponsors that seek to influence public regulatory proceedings should be subject to the same access and reporting provisions as those applied to publicly funded science. Parties in regulatory proceedings should be required to disclose whether the studies were performed by researchers who had the right to present their findings without the

  1. A Comparative Survey on Parameters Influencing on Hexavalent Chromium Measurement as an Occupational Carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tirgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hexavalent chromium, Cr+6, is a very harmful pollutant and a relatively unstable compound that is present in many industries. It is a known human respiratory carcinogen and occupational exposure to this chemical is associated with different health hazards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four parameters including: type of sampling head, sampling height from the surface of electroplating solution, sampling duration, and sample storage duration on Cr+6 mist monitoring.Materials & Methods: To evaluate the influence of the main parameters as an experimental study, the 24 factorial design was applied at constant electroplating condition. A chromium electroplating bath with the ability to produce homogenous mist was used to create Cr+6 mist in laboratory setting. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 7600 was used to determine the Cr+6 concentration. Results: The results of 48 Cr+6 mist samples showed that Cr+6 concentration was higher: (1 for sampling by closed-face filter cassettes than for sampling by open-face filter cassettes (P<0.001; (2 for samples collected at 35 cm above the electroplating solution surface than for samples collected at 50 cm (P <0.001; (3 for sampling duration of 30 minutes than for sampling duration of 180 minutes (P <0.001; and, (4 for samples extracted immediately after sampling than for samples with delayed extraction (24 hours after sampling (P <0.001. Conclusion: It is concluded that the accuracy of Cr+6 mist sampling in electroplating shops will be enhanced when: (1 a closed-face filter cassette is used to prevent liquid splash contamination; (2 the sampling height is suitable as determined by further research; (3 the sampling duration is short (approximately 30 minutes; and, (4 the extraction of the Cr+6 sample is performed as soon as the sampling is completed.

  2. Hexavalent chromium removal and bioelectricity generation by Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 under different oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Chen, Ching-Kuo; Hsieh, Min-Chi; Lin, Ssu-Ting; Ho, Kuo-Ying; Li, Jo-Wei; Lin, Chia-Pei; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Bioremediation is an environmentally friendly method of reducing heavy metal concentration and toxicity. A chromium-reducing bacterial strain, isolated from the vicinity of an electroplate factory, was identified as Ochrobactrum sp. YC211. The efficiency and capacity per time of Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal under anaerobic conditions were superior to those under aerobic conditions. An acceptable removal efficiency (96.5 ± 0.6%) corresponding to 30.2 ± 0.8 mg-Cr (g-dry cell weight-h)(-1) was achieved by Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 at 300 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). A temperature of 30°C and pH 7 were the optimal parameters for Cr(VI) removal. By examining reactivated cells, permeabilized cells, and cell-free extract, we determined that Cr(VI) removal by Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 under anaerobic conditions mainly occurred in the soluble fraction of the cell and can be regarded as an enzymatic reaction. The results also indicated that an Ochrobactrum sp. YC211 microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an anaerobic anode was considerably superior to that with an aerobic anode in bioelectricity generation and Cr(VI) removal. The maximum power density and Cr(VI) removal efficiency of the MFC were 445 ± 3.2 mW m(-2) and 97.2 ± 0.3%, respectively. Additionally, the effects of coexisting ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), SO4(2-), and Cl(-)) in the anolyte on the MFC performance and Cr(VI) removal were nonsignificant (P > 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report to compare Cr(VI) removal by different cells and MFC types under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:26889692

  3. Hexavalent chromium removal in contaminated water using reticulated chitosan micro/nanoparticles from seafood processing wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Jimena Bernadette; Sequeiros, Cynthia; Zaritzky, Noemi E

    2015-12-01

    Chitosan particles (CH) were obtained from seafood processing wastes (shrimp shells) and physicochemically characterized; deacetylation degree of CH was measured by Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and potentiometric titration; polymer molecular weight was determined by intrinsic viscosity measurements. Reticulated micro/nanoparticles of chitosan (MCH) with an average diameter close to 100nm were synthesized by ionic gelation of chitosan using tripolyphosphate (TPP), and characterized by SEM, size distribution and Zeta-potential. Detoxification capacities of CH and MCH were tested analyzing the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from contaminated water, at different initial chromium concentrations. The effect of pH on adsorption capacity of CH and MCH was experimentally determined and analyzed considering the Cr(VI) stable complexes (anions) formed, the presence of protonated groups in chitosan particles and the addition of the reticulating agent (TPP). Chitosan crosslinking was necessary to adsorb Cr(VI) at pH<2 due to the instability of CH particles in acid media. Langmuir isotherm described better than Freundlich and Temkin equations the equilibrium adsorption data. Pseudo-second order rate provided the best fitting to the kinetic data in comparison to pseudo-first order and Elovich equations. Chemical analysis to determine the oxidation state of the adsorbed Cr, showed that Cr(VI) was adsorbed on CH particles without further reduction; in contrast Cr(VI) removed from the solution was reduced and bound to the MCH as Cr(III). The reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to the less or nontoxic Cr(III) by the reticulated chitosan micro/nanoparticles can be considered a very efficient detoxification technique for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated water. PMID:26151484

  4. Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium at gold nanoparticles modified titania nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (EDAS) silicate supported titanium dioxide nanotubes-gold ((TiO2 NTs-Au)NCM) nanocomposite material (EDAS/(TiO2 NTs-Au)NCM) was prepared by deposition–precipitation method and characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, transmission electron micrographs, scanning electron micrographs and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra analysis. The photocatalytic activity of the EDAS/(TiO2 NTs-Au)NCM in the film form was investigated towards the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) into trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) in the presence of oxalic acid as an electron donor. The EDAS/(TiO2 NTs-Au)NCM film exhibited higher photocatalytic activity when compared to the photocatalytic activities of pristine TiO2 nanoparticles and TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs) which can be attributed to the effective photoinduced interfacial charge transfer from the (TiO2 NTs-Au)NCM to Cr(VI) through Au nanoparticles (Aunps). The Aunps present in the TiO2 NTs act as an electron sink for the photogenerated electrons that minimizes the charge recombination process at the TiO2 NTs. The Aunps on the TiO2 NTs surface facilitates the transfer of photogenerated electrons to the Cr(VI) leading to the formation of Cr(III) ions. - Highlights: • Gold modified titania nanotubes are used to design solid-phase photocatalyst. • Gold nanoparticles deposition increases the surface area of titania nanotubes. • Gold on titania nanotubes improves the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI). • The holes produced at the titania nanotubes are scavenged by oxalic acid. • Gold modified titania nanotubes is a potential candidate for treatment of heavy metals

  5. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu [Tetra Tech, Inc. (United States); Emery, Jerry A. [Energy Solutions, Inc. (United States); Gaston, Clyde [LATA-SHARP Remediation Services - LSRS (United States); Queen, David C. [U.S. DOE-ORO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in

  6. Morphological and transcriptional responses of Lycopersicon esculentum to hexavalent chromium in agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Guo; Hou, Jing; Liu, Xin-Hui; Cui, Bao-Shan; Bai, Jun-Hong

    2016-07-01

    The carcinogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic effects of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) on living organisms through the food chain raise the immediate need to assess the potential toxicological impacts of Cr(VI) on human health. Therefore, the concentration-dependent responses of 12 Cr(VI)-responsive genes selected from a high-throughput Lycopersicon esculentum complementary DNA microarray were examined at different Cr concentrations. The results indicated that most of the genes were differentially expressed from 0.1 mg Cr/kg soil, whereas the lowest-observable-adverse-effect concentrations of Cr(VI) were 1.6 mg Cr/kg soil, 6.4 mg Cr/kg soil, 3.2 mg Cr/kg soil, and 0.4 mg Cr/kg soil for seed germination, root elongation, root biomass, and root morphology, respectively, implying that the transcriptional method was more sensitive than the traditional method in detecting Cr(VI) toxicity. Dose-dependent responses were observed for the relative expression of expansin (p = 0.778), probable chalcone-flavonone isomerase 3 (p = -0.496), and 12S seed storage protein CRD (p = -0.614); therefore, the authors propose the 3 genes as putative biomarkers in Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1751-1758. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627465

  7. INFLUENCE OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INITIAL CONCENTRATION ON RETARDATION FACTOR AND CONTAMINANT VELOCITY IN A SOIL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. SHIVA PRASHANTH KUMAR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sources of soil and ground water contamination are many and include many folds of accidental spills and leaks of toxic and hazardous chemicals. Preparation of ground water contamination model needs good understanding of the behavior of contaminant transport through soil media for predicting the level of contamination of ground water in the near future at the intended site conditions. Sorption is a natural process; due to its presence, the contaminant can move slowly as compared to the ground water and hence the effects of sorption must be taken into consideration while predicting the travel time of the contaminant to reach the ground water sources. This paper discusses the results of column test studies carried out in the laboratory under controlled conditions about the spreading of contaminant (Hexavalent chromium, Cr (VI through the clay mixed red soil at two different initial concentrations (800 mg/L and 4200 mg/L. The variations of the contaminant flow velocity and retardation factor for two different initial concentrations of contaminant were brought out and discussed. The contaminant flow velocity drastically coming down for a relative concentration of 0 to 0.2 and beyond this range, the contaminant flow velocity value is decreasing in a slow rate for both the lower and higher initial contaminant concentrations tested. At the lower relative concentration, the higher retardation factor was observed and it may be due to slowly filling the available sorption sites in the soil column.

  8. Hexavalent chromium reduction and energy recovery by using dual-chambered microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Praveena; Nambi, Indumathi M

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology is utilized to treat hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from wastewater and to generate electricity simultaneously. The Cr(VI) is bioelectrochemically reduced to non-toxic Cr(III) form in the presence of an organic electron donor in a dual-chambered MFC. The Cr(VI) as catholyte and artificial wastewater inoculated with anaerobic sludge as anolyte, Cr(VI) at 100 mg/L was completely removed within 48 h (initial pH value 2.0). The total amount of Cr recovered was 99.87% by the precipitation of Cr(III) on the surface of the cathode. In addition to that 78.4% of total organic carbon reduction was achieved at the anode chamber within 13 days of operation. Furthermore, the maximum power density of 767.01 mW/m² (2.08 mA/m²) was achieved by MFCs at ambient conditions. The present work has successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using MFCs for simultaneous energy production from wastewater and reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to non-toxic Cr(III). PMID:25714633

  9. Removal of hexavalent chromium by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deliang; Ding, Ying; Li, Lingling; Chang, Zhixian; Rao, Zhengyong; Lu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solution by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was studied. The optimum operation parameters, such as CTAB concentration, pH values, contact time, and initial Cr(VI) concentration, were investigated. The best concentration of CTAB for modifying red mud was found to be 0.50% (mCTAB/VHCl,0.6 mol/L). The lower pH (removal of Cr(VI). Red mud activated with CTAB can greatly improve the removal ratio of Cr(VI) as high as four times than that of original red mud. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 30 min under the initial Cr(VI) concentration of 100 mg L(-1). The isotherm data were analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on activated red mud fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was estimated as 22.20 mg g(-1) (Cr/red mud). The adsorption process could be well described using the pseudo-second-order model. The result shows that activated red mud is a promising agent for low-cost water treatment. PMID:25299348

  10. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  11. Hexavalent chromium removal performance of anionic functionalized monolithic polymers: column adsorption, regeneration and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlik, Necla; Keskinler, Bülent; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2016-01-01

    Anionic functionalized monolithic macro-porous polymers were used for the removal of hexavalent chromium(VI) anions from aqueous solution in column experiments. At a flux of 1.0 cm min and 30 mg Cr(VI) L(-1) feed concentration, breakthrough capacity and apparent capacity were 0.066 g Cr(VI) g(-1) anionic monolith and 0.144 g Cr(VI) g(-1) anionic monolith, respectively. The degree of column utilization was found to lie in the range 41-46%. Two kinetic models, theoretical and Thomas models, were applied to experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column useful for process design. The simulation of the whole breakthrough curve was effective with the models. At a flux of 1.0 cm min and 30 mg Cr(VI) L(-1) feed concentration, the dispersion coefficient and adsorption equilibrium constant (K) were 3.14 × 10(-7) m s(-1) and 3,840, respectively. Also, Thomas model parameters k1 (rate constant of adsorption) and qm (equilibrium solid-phase concentration of sorbed solute) were 1.08 × 10(-3) L mg(-1) min(-1) and 0.124 g g(-1), respectively. After reaching equilibrium adsorption capacity, the monoliths were regenerated using 1 N HCl and were subsequently re-tested. It was found that the regeneration efficiency reduced from 98% after second usage to 97% after the third usage. PMID:27003067

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of hexavalent chromium removal by basic oxygen furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chong; Jiao, Yanan; Wu, Qianqian; Yang, Wangjin; Yang, He; Xue, Xiangxin

    2016-08-01

    Basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) has the potential to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from wastewater by a redox process due to the presence of minerals containing Fe(2+). The effects of the solution pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, BOFS dosage, BOFS particle size, and temperature on the removal of Cr(VI) was investigated in detail through batch tests. The chemical and mineral compositions of fresh and reacted BOFS were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) system and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The results show that Cr(VI) in wastewater can be efficiently removed by Fe(2+) released from BOFS under appropriate acidic conditions. The removal of Cr(VI) by BOFS significantly depended on the parameters mentioned above. The reaction of Cr(VI) with BOFS followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Fe(2+) responsible for Cr(VI) removal was primarily derived from the dissolution of FeO and Fe3O4 in BOFS. When H2SO4 was used to adjust the solution acidity, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) could be formed and become an armoring precipitate layer on the BOFS surface, hindering the release of Fe(2+) and the removal of Cr(VI). Finally, the main mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by BOFS was described using several consecutive reaction steps. PMID:27521937

  13. Evaluation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes performance in adsorption and desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholipour Mina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs has been investigated as a function of adsorbent dosage, initial Cr(VI concentration, initial pH, contact time and temperature. Low pH, low initial concentrations of Cr(VI, increasing contact time and high temperature were found as optimal conditions. A comparison of kinetics models applied to the adsorption of Cr(VI ions on the MWCNTs was evaluated for the pseudo first-order, the pseudo second-order, and Elovich kinetics models, respectively. Pseudo second-order kinetics model was found to correlate the experimental data well. Equilibrium isotherms were measured experimentally and results show that data were fitted well by the BET model. Thermodynamic parameters were estimated and results suggest that the adsorption process is spontaneous, physical and endothermic. The reversibility of Cr(VI adsorption onto MWCNTs by desorption process and the effect of operating factors such as regeneration solution characteristics, contact time and temperature on this process was investigated. Results show that MWCNTs are effective Cr(VI adsorbents and can be reused through many cycles of regeneration without any high decreasing in their performance.

  14. Assessment of hexavalent chromium release in Malaysian electric arc furnace steel slag for fertilizer usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankole, L. K.; Rezan, S. A.; Sharif, N. M.

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the leaching of hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) from electric arc furnace steel slag as Cr (VI) is classified as human carcinogen. Batch leaching tests were performed for 16 days. The lixiviants used were alkaline, de-ionized and rain water. After 16 days, Cr (VI) was found to be highest in alkaline water (0.03 mg/L) and lowest in de-ionized water (0.01 mg/L). Besides the lixiviants used, slag stirring speed and liquid to solid ratio also affect Cr (VI) released. The experimental work was complimented with slag characterization using XRF, XRD and SEM/EDX analysis. The leaching process was also simulated via Factsage software to calculate isothermal pourbaix diagrams. The Cr (VI) released was low and below the threshold of 0.1 mg/L set for public water systems. Recycle the slag as fertilizer should be considered safe as it does not exceed the safety limit set for Cr (VI) dissolution.

  15. The Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Controllable Mesoporous Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorrada Loryuenyong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania (TiO2 nanoparticles with periodical mesopore size (up to 150 Å have successfully been synthesized by sol-gel template method, using titanium(IV tetraisopropoxide as a starting precursor and isopropanol as a solvent. Different quantities of activated carbon (0%, 5%, and 10% by weight were used as templates to control the porosity and particle size of titania nanoparticles. The templates were completely removed during the calcination in air at 500°C for 3 hr. The results showed that the specific surface area of titania is increased with increasing activated carbon content. The optical bandgap of synthesized titania exhibits a blue shift by 0.3–0.6 eV when compared to the reported value for the bulk anatase and rutile phases. The photocatalytic activity of porous titania is determined with its reduction efficiency of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+. The reduction efficiency is optimized under ultraviolet illumination.

  16. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of hexavalent chromium based on updated mortality for Painesville chromate production workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Deborah M; Suh, Mina; Mittal, Liz; Hirsch, Shawn; Valdes Salgado, Raydel; Bartlett, Chris; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Rohr, Annette; Crump, Kenny

    2016-01-01

    The exposure-response for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-induced lung cancer among workers of the Painesville Ohio chromate production facility has been used internationally for quantitative risk assessment of environmental and occupational exposures to airborne Cr(VI). We updated the mortality of 714 Painesville workers (including 198 short-term workers) through December 2011, reconstructed exposures, and conducted exposure-response modeling using Poisson and Cox regressions to provide quantitative lung cancer risk estimates. The average length of follow-up was 34.4 years with 24,535 person-years at risk. Lung cancer was significantly increased for the cohort (standardized mortality ratio (SMR)=186; 95% confidence interval (CI) 145–228), for those hired before 1959, those with >30-year tenure, and those with cumulative exposure >1.41 mg/m3-years or highest monthly exposures >0.26 mg/m3. Of the models assessed, the linear Cox model with unlagged cumulative exposure provided the best fit and was preferred. Smoking and age at hire were also significant predictors of lung cancer mortality. Adjusting for these variables, the occupational unit risk was 0.00166 (95% CI 0.000713–0.00349), and the environmental unit risk was 0.00832 (95% CI 0.00359–0.0174), which are 20% and 15% lower, respectively, than values developed in a previous study of this cohort. PMID:26669850

  17. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Macadamia nutshell powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakade, Vusumzi Emmanuel; Ntuli, Themba Dominic; Ofomaja, Augustine Enakpodia

    2016-04-01

    Macadamia nutshell biosorbents treated in three different activating agents [raw Macadamia nutshell powder (RMN), acid-treated Macadamia nutshell (ATMN) and base-treated Macadamia nutshell (BTMN)] were investigated for the adsorption of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra of free and Cr(VI)-loaded sorbents as well as thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the acid and base treatments modified the surface properties of the sorbent. Surface characteristics were also evaluated by the scanning electron microscopy and surface area analyzer. The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Cr(VI) by sorbents were pH 2, contact time 10 h, adsorbent mass 0.2 g and concentration 100 mg L-1. The equilibrium data were fitted into the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherms, and no single model could clearly explain the sorption mechanism. Maximum binding capacities of 45.23, 44.83 and 42.44 mg g-1 for RMN, ATMN and BTMN, respectively, were obtained. The kinetic data were analyzed using the pseudo-first, pseudo-second and Elovich kinetic models, and it was observed that the pseudo-second-order model produced the best fit for the experimental data. Macadamia nutshell sorbents showed potential as low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  18. Effect of Hexavalent Chromium on Electron Leakage of Respiratory Chain in Mitochondria Isolated from Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the present study, we explored reactive axygen species (ROS production in mitochondria, the mechanism of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI hepatotoxicity, and the role of protection by GSH. Methods: Intact mitochondria were isolated from rat liver tissues and mitochondrial basal respiratory rates of NADH and FADH2 respiratory chains were determined. Mitochondria were treated with Cr(VI, GSH and several complex inhibitors. Mitochondria energized by glutamate/malate were separately or jointly treated with Rotenone (Rot, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI and antimycinA (Ant, while mitochondria energized by succinate were separately or jointly treated with Rot, DPI ‚ thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA and Ant. Results: Cr(VI concentration-dependently induced ROS production in the NADH and FADH2 respiratory chain in liver mitochondria. Basal respiratory rate of the mitochondrial FADH2 respiratory chain was significantly higher than that of NADH respiratory chain. Hepatic mitochondrial electron leakage induced by Cr(VI from NADH respiratory chain were mainly from ubiquinone binding sites of complex I and complex III. Conclusion: Treatment with 50µM Cr(VI enhances forward movement of electrons through FADH2 respiratory chain and leaking through the ubiquinone binding site of complex III. Moreover, the protective effect of GSH on liver mitochondria electron leakage is through removing excess H2O2 and reducing total ROS.

  19. Application of phytogenic zerovalent iron nanoparticles in the adsorption of hexavalent chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavi, Vemula; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; Reddy, Ambavaram Vijaya Bhaskar; Ravindra Reddy, B.; Madhavi, Gajulapalle

    2013-12-01

    Zerovalent iron nanoparticles (ZVNI) were synthesized using a rapid, single step and completely green synthetic method from the leaf extracts of Eucalyptus globules and were characterized using the techniques Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Zeta potential measurement. The FT-IR analysis reveals that the polyphenolic compounds present in the leaf extract may be responsible for the reduction and stabilization of the ZVNI. These nanoparticles were utilized for the adsorption of hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) and the concentration of Cr (VI) was determined using UV-Vis spectrometer after treating with ZVNI. Response and surface contour plots were drawn with the help of Mini-tab software to explain the adsorption of Cr (VI). The adsorption efficiency of Cr (VI) reaches to the highest value (98.1%) when the reaction time was about 30 min. and the ZVNI dosage was 0.8 g/L. The effective parameters such as adsorbent (ZVNI) dosage, initial Cr (VI) concentration and the kinetics were also examined.

  20. The Growth of Gypsum in the Presence of Hexavalent Chromium: A Multiscale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Morales

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of dissolved inorganic pollutants into the structure of minerals is an important process that controls the mobility and fate of these pollutants in the Earth’s crust. It also modifies the surface structure and composition of the host mineral, affecting its crystallization kinetics. Here, we investigate the effect of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, on the nucleation and growth of gypsum by conducting two types of experiments: (i in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM observations of the growth of gypsum {010} surfaces in the presence of Cr(VI and (ii gypsum precipitation experiments by mixing aqueous solutions containing variable amounts of Cr(VI. Gypsum precipitation is progressively delayed when occurring from solutions bearing increasing Cr(VI concentrations. Chemical analyses of gypsum precipitates show that gypsum incorporates small Cr(VI amounts that correlate with the content of this ion in the aqueous solution. Gypsum cell parameters variation reflects this incorporation. At the molecular scale, Cr(VI induces a slowdown of step advance rates on gypsum {010} surfaces accompanied by the roughening of nanostep edges and the so-called “template effect”. This effect involves the reproduction of the original nanotopography after the completion of individual advancing monolayers and appears as a general nanoscale phenomenon occurring during growth of solid solutions from aqueous solutions even in the case of compositionally-restricted solid solutions.

  1. Assessment of polyphenol coated nano zero valent iron for hexavalent chromium removal from contaminated waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystrioti, C; Sparis, D; Papasiopi, N; Xenidis, A; Dermatas, D; Chrysochoou, M

    2015-03-01

    Alternative plant extracts were examined as raw materials for the synthesis of nZVI from ferric solutions. Four plants were selected for evaluation, i.e. Camellia sinensis (green tea, GT), Syzygium aromaticum (clove, CL), Mentha spicata (spearmint, SM) and Punica granatum (pomegranate, PG). Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that the reduction of Fe(III) with the herb extracts is not complete. Using the GT extract, approximately 28 mM of the initial 66 mM of Fe (42.4 %) are reduced to the elemental state Fe(0). The highest reduction of Fe(III), about 53 %, was achieved with PG and the lowest, only 15.6 %, with the SM extract. Additional batch experiments have been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of nZVI, synthesized with GT, CL, SM and PG, for the removal of hexavalent chromium from a 0.96 mM solution. The highest reduction of Cr(VI) (96 %) was obtained using the nZVI suspension produced with PG juice. The other three nZVI suspensions, i.e. CL-nZVI, GT-nZVI, and SM-nZVI, had a comparable effectiveness corresponding to 70 % reduction of chromate. PMID:25512186

  2. Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Alok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing. Human exposure to this toxic metal ion not only causes potential human health hazards but also affects other life forms. The World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency have determined that Cr(VI compounds are known human carcinogens. The Sukinda valley in Jajpur District, Orissa, is known for its deposit of chromite ore, producing nearly 98% of the chromite ore in India and one of the prime open cast chromite ore mines in the world (CES, Orissa Newsletter. Materials and Methods: Our investigation involved microbial remediation of Cr(VI without producing any byproduct. Bacterial cultures tolerating high concentrations of Cr were isolated from the soil sample collected from the chromite-contaminated sites of Sukinda, and their bioaccumulation properties were investigated. Strains capable of growing at 250 mg/L Cr(VI were considered as Cr resistant. Results: The experimental investigation showed the maximum specific Cr uptake at pH 7 and temperature 30oC. At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation. The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei. Conclusion: Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI.

  3. Assessment of hexavalent chromium release in Malaysian electric arc furnace steel slag for fertilizer usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the leaching of hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) from electric arc furnace steel slag as Cr (VI) is classified as human carcinogen. Batch leaching tests were performed for 16 days. The lixiviants used were alkaline, de-ionized and rain water. After 16 days, Cr (VI) was found to be highest in alkaline water (0.03 mg/L) and lowest in de-ionized water (0.01 mg/L). Besides the lixiviants used, slag stirring speed and liquid to solid ratio also affect Cr (VI) released. The experimental work was complimented with slag characterization using XRF, XRD and SEM/EDX analysis. The leaching process was also simulated via Factsage software to calculate isothermal pourbaix diagrams. The Cr (VI) released was low and below the threshold of 0.1 mg/L set for public water systems. Recycle the slag as fertilizer should be considered safe as it does not exceed the safety limit set for Cr (VI) dissolution

  4. Persistent hexavalent chromium exposure impaired the pubertal development and ovarian histoarchitecture in wistar rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Jawahar B; Stanley, Jone A; Sekar, Pasupathi; Princess, Rajendran A; Sebastian, Maria S; Aruldhas, Michael M

    2014-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (CrVI) is a highly toxic metal and a major environmental pollutant. Several studies indicate that CrVI exposure adversely affects reproductive function. We reported that maternal Cr exposure resulted in Cr accumulation in the reproductive organs of female offsprings. CrVI can cross the placental barrier and also can be passed through breastfeeding. The present investigation aimed to determine the persistent (in utero through puberal period) CrVI exposure-induced toxic effects on the reproductive functions of mother and the offspring. Induction of oxidative stress is one of the plausible mechanisms behind Cr-induced cellular deteriorations. Mother rats exposed to CrVI showed reduced reproductive outcome, while the offsprings showed higher accumulation of Cr in ovary, altered steroid, and peptide hormones. Specific activities of antioxidant enzymes were decreased and associated with increased levels of H2 O2 , and lipid peroxidation. CrVI exposure also damaged the ovarian histoarchitecture in various age groups studied. CrVI exposure also delayed the sexual maturation. Results from the present investigation suggest that CrVI exposure from in utero through puberal period significantly damaged the pubertal development through altered antioxidants, anemia, and altered hormone levels. These changes were associated with damaged ovarian histoarchitecture and extended estrous cycle in developing Wistar rats. PMID:22936640

  5. Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend Beads for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hyo Won; Shin, Munju; Yun, Haesung; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend beads were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for bead preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin bead adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend beads showed higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the beads, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI) occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI) adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI) ions were recovered from the Cr(VI) adsorbed sericin/lignin beads in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin beads could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI) ions in industrial wastewater. PMID:27598142

  6. Chemodynamics of chromium reduction in soils: Implications to bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choppala, Girish [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia); Bolan, Nanthi, E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia); Seshadri, Balaji [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Examined the effects of sorption, pH and C sources on Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity. • The rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and pH. • The proton dynamics in Cr(VI) reduction was assessed in relation to remediation. • A novel black carbon showed the highest reduction rate of Cr(VI) in soils. • Black carbon decreased the bioavailability and phytotoxicity of Cr(VI) in soils. -- Abstract: Chromium toxicity in soils can be mitigated by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) which is influenced by the presence of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution, and the supply of protons and electrons. In this study, the effects of Cr(VI) adsorption (i.e. availability of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution), soil pH (i.e. supply of protons) and three electron donor carbon sources [black carbon (BC), chicken manure biochar (CMB) and cow manure (CM)] on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in soils were investigated. The results indicated that the rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and soil pH, which is attributed to decreased supply of free Cr(VI) ions and protons, respectively. Among the three different amendments tested, BC showed the highest rate of Cr(VI) reduction followed by CM and CMB. Furthermore, addition of BC, CM and CMB decreased the bioavailability of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils. The high efficiency of BC on Cr(VI) reduction was due to the electron donor's functional groups such as phenolic, hydroxyl, carbonyl and amides. The study demonstrated that free form of Cr(VI) ions in soil solution and carbon amendments enriched with acidic functional groups favored the reduction of Cr(VI), thereby mitigating its bioavailability and toxicity in contaminated soils.

  7. Reduction and immobilization of hexavalent chromium by microbially reduced Fe-bearing clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10, 20, and 30 °C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10 °C, though at 30 °C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  8. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  9. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  10. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health

  11. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S., E-mail: sandra.wise@maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Xie, Hong, E-mail: hongxie@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Fukuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomofukuda009@gmail.com [Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Second Research Building, Rm 112, 1-1 Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Douglas Thompson, W., E-mail: dougt@usm.maine.edu [Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  12. Prolonged Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exposure Suppresses Homologous Recombination Repair in Human Lung Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Cynthia L; Qin, Qin; Kelly, Deborah F; Prakash, Rohit; Vanoli, Fabio; Jasin, Maria; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-09-01

    Genomic instability is one of the primary models of carcinogenesis and a feature of almost all cancers. Homologous recombination (HR) repair protects against genomic instability by maintaining high genomic fidelity during the repair of DNA double strand breaks. The defining step of HR repair is the formation of the Rad51 nucleofilament, which facilitates the search for a homologous sequence and invasion of the template DNA strand. Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a human lung carcinogen, induces DNA double strand breaks and chromosome instability. Since the loss of HR repair increases Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability, we investigated the effect of extended Cr(VI) exposure on HR repair. We show acute (24 h) Cr(VI) exposure induces a normal HR repair response. In contrast, prolonged (120 h) exposure to particulate Cr(VI) inhibited HR repair and Rad51 nucleofilament formation. Prolonged Cr(VI) exposure had a profound effect on Rad51, evidenced by reduced protein levels and Rad51 mislocalization to the cytoplasm. The response of proteins involved in Rad51 nuclear import and nucleofilament formation displayed varying responses to prolonged Cr(VI) exposure. BRCA2 formed nuclear foci after prolonged Cr(VI) exposure, while Rad51C foci formation was suppressed. These results suggest that particulate Cr(VI), a major chemical carcinogen, inhibits HR repair by targeting Rad51, causing DNA double strand breaks to be repaired by a low fidelity, Rad51-independent repair pathway. These results further enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanism of Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability and thus, carcinogenesis. PMID:27449664

  13. Modulation of histone methylation and MLH1 gene silencing by hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a mutagen and carcinogen, and occupational exposure can lead to lung cancers and other adverse health effects. Genetic changes resulting from DNA damage have been proposed as an important mechanism that mediates chromate's carcinogenicity. Here we show that chromate exposure of human lung A549 cells increased global levels of di- and tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 4 (H3K4) but decreased the levels of tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) and di-methylated histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2). Most interestingly, H3K9 dimethylation was enriched in the human MLH1 gene promoter following chromate exposure and this was correlated with decreased MLH1 mRNA expression. Chromate exposure increased the protein as well as mRNA levels of G9a a histone methyltransferase that specifically methylates H3K9. This Cr(VI)-induced increase in G9a may account for the global elevation of H3K9 dimethylation. Furthermore, supplementation with ascorbate, the primary reductant of Cr(VI) and also an essential cofactor for the histone demethylase activity, partially reversed the H3K9 dimethylation induced by chromate. Thus our studies suggest that Cr(VI) may target histone methyltransferases and demethylases, which in turn affect both global and gene promoter specific histone methylation, leading to the silencing of specific tumor suppressor genes such as MLH1.

  14. Adsorption characteristics of hexavalent chromium on HCB/TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO2. • Its adsorption performance of Cr(VI) was investigated. • The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g−1 in an acidic medium. • The value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents. - Abstract: Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO2 and its adsorption ability of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), and removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The samples were characterized by Power X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) which showed that the TiO2 was deposited on the surface of HCB. FTIR was used to identify the changes of the surface functional groups before and after adsorption. Potentiometric titration method was used to characterize the zero charge (pHpzc) characteristics of the surface of HCB/TiO2 which showed more acidic functional groups containing. Batch experiments showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, contact time and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for the Cr(VI) adsorption studies. The Freundlich isotherm model better reflected the experimental data better. Cr(VI) adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model, which illustrated chemical adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG), changes in enthalpy change (ΔH) and changes in entropy change (ΔS) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy occurred at temperature range of 25–45 °C, so Cr(VI) adsorption by HCB/TiO2 is spontaneous. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity could maintain 80% after five cycles. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g−1 in an acidic medium, of which the value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents

  15. About the performance of Sphaerotilus natans to reduce hexavalent chromium in batch and continuous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hexavalent chromium biological reduction constitutes a safe and economical detoxification procedure of wastewaters containing Cr(VI). However, little research has been done to evaluate Cr(VI) tolerance and reduction capacity of microbial cultures under different growth conditions. The aims of this work were (a) to evaluate the capacity of Sphaerotilus natans to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in a continuous system limited in carbon and energy source or in nitrogen source, (b) to evaluate the toxic effect of Cr(VI) on this microorganism, (c) to carry out a complete analysis of Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans not only in continuous regime but also in batch system, and (d) to model the obtained results mathematically. S. natans exhibited great resistance to Cr(VI) (19-78 mg l-1) and optimal growth in continuous and batch systems using a mineral medium supplemented only with citric acid as organic substrate. In carbon- and energy-limited continuous systems, a maximum percentual decrease in Cr(VI) by 13% was reached for low influent Cr(VI) concentration (4.3-5.32 mgCr(VI) l-1); the efficiency of the process did not notoriously increase as the length of cellular residence time was increased from 4.16 to 50 h. A nitrogen-limited continuous operation with a cellular residence time of 28.5 h resulted in a Cr(VI) decrease of approximately 26-32%. In batch system, a mathematical model allowed to predict the Cr(VI) concentration as a function of time and the ratio between the initial Cr(VI) concentration and that of the biomass. High concentrations of initial Cr(VI) and biomass produced the highest performance of the process of Cr(VI) reduction reached in batch system, aspects which should be considered in detoxification strategies of wastewaters.

  16. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Xu; Xu Liu; Yijiao Chen; Ke Zhang; Heng Xu

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 5...

  17. Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium at gold nanoparticles modified titania nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Ramaraj, Ramasamy, E-mail: ramarajr@yahoo.com

    2013-09-16

    N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (EDAS) silicate supported titanium dioxide nanotubes-gold ((TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM}) nanocomposite material (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM}) was prepared by deposition–precipitation method and characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, transmission electron micrographs, scanning electron micrographs and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra analysis. The photocatalytic activity of the EDAS/(TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM} in the film form was investigated towards the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) into trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) in the presence of oxalic acid as an electron donor. The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM} film exhibited higher photocatalytic activity when compared to the photocatalytic activities of pristine TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs) which can be attributed to the effective photoinduced interfacial charge transfer from the (TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM} to Cr(VI) through Au nanoparticles (Au{sub nps}). The Au{sub nps} present in the TiO{sub 2} NTs act as an electron sink for the photogenerated electrons that minimizes the charge recombination process at the TiO{sub 2} NTs. The Au{sub nps} on the TiO{sub 2} NTs surface facilitates the transfer of photogenerated electrons to the Cr(VI) leading to the formation of Cr(III) ions. - Highlights: • Gold modified titania nanotubes are used to design solid-phase photocatalyst. • Gold nanoparticles deposition increases the surface area of titania nanotubes. • Gold on titania nanotubes improves the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI). • The holes produced at the titania nanotubes are scavenged by oxalic acid. • Gold modified titania nanotubes is a potential candidate for treatment of heavy metals.

  18. Assessment of the mode of action for hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer following inhalation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • No published or well recognized MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. • MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer was conducted to inform risk assessment. • Cr(VI) epidemiologic, toxicokinetic, toxicological, mechanistic data were evaluated. • Weight of evidence does not support a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. • Non-linear approaches should be considered for evaluating Cr(VI) lung cancer risk. - Abstract: Inhalation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is associated with increased lung cancer risk among workers in several industries, most notably chromate production workers exposed to high concentrations of Cr(VI) (≥100 μg/m3), for which clear exposure–response relationships and respiratory irritation and tissue damage have been reported. Data from this industry are used to assess lung cancer risk associated with environmental and current occupational exposures, occurring at concentrations that are significantly lower. There is considerable uncertainty in the low dose extrapolation of historical occupational epidemiology data to assess risk at current exposures because no published or well recognized mode of action (MOA) for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. We conducted a MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer evaluating toxicokinetic and toxicological data in humans and rodents and mechanistic data to assess plausibility, dose–response, and temporal concordance for potential MOAs. Toxicokinetic data support that extracellular reduction of Cr(VI), which limits intracellular absorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced toxicity, can be overwhelmed at high exposure levels. In vivo genotoxicity and mutagenicity data are mostly negative and do not support a mutagenic MOA. Further, both chronic bioassays and the epidemiologic literature support that lung cancer occurs at exposures that cause tissue damage. Based on this MOA analysis, the overall weight of evidence supports a MOA involving deposition and accumulation of

  19. 六价铬污染与健康损害研究进展%Progress in hexavalent chromium pollution and health damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨阳; 许群

    2012-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is classified as a human carcinogen , based on increased incidences of lung cancers in animals and occupational people after inhalation exposures. However, the current health effect research which focus on the digested tract of exposure to Hexavalent chromium pollution is limited. This paper reviews that after the latest exposures to hexavalent chromium through ingestion , the effect on the occurrence of the digestive system tumors, the impact of development of the skeletal system, the effects of blood system and histiocytic infiltration, tissue distribution of hexavalent chromium in the liver and kidney, the impact of allergic asthma ,the skin after direct contact impact, meanwhile the molecular mechanism of chromium metabolism is also discussed briefly.%六价铬经消化道摄入途径暴露后,对消化系统肿瘤的发生、骨骼系统的发育、血液系统、组织细胞浸润、铬在肝肾组织分布及过敏性哮喘等的影响,同时讨论经皮肤直接接触后作用的影响及铬在体内代谢的分子机制.

  20. Oral bioavailability of chromium from a specific site.

    OpenAIRE

    Witmer, C M; Harris, R.; Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil from a specific site in New Jersey indicated a low level of sodium and chromium present as a calcium compound. Chromium was then administered orally to young, mature male rats at a level of 240 micrograms/kg for 14 days as chromium-contaminated soil, as CaCrO4, and as an equimolar mixture of the soil and calcium salts for 14 days. The rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosing, and tissues were taken immediately for chromium analysis. Blood, muscle, and liver contained ...

  1. Chronic exposure to sublethal hexavalent chromium affects organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile of a teleost, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of chronic exposures (one and two months) to sublethal doses of hexavalent chromium (2 and 4 mg/L potassium dichromate) on organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile were investigated and their overall impact on growth and behavior of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus was elucidated. Histopathological lesions were distinct in the vital organs gill, kidney and liver. The gill lamellae became lifted, fused, and showed oedema. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of lamellar epithelial cells were distinct with desquamation. Hypertrophy of epithelial cells of renal tubules and reduction in tubular lumens were observed in the trunk kidney. The atrophy of the head kidney interrenal cells and decreased serum cortisol level indicated exhaustion of interrenal activity. Hepatocyte vacuolization and shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis and increase of sinusoidal spaces were observed in the liver. Abnormal behavioral patterns and reduced growth rate were also noticed in the exposed fish. The chronic hexavalent chromium exposure thus by affecting histopathology of gill, kidney (including interrenal tissue) and liver could impair the vital functions of respiration, excretion, metabolic regulation and maintenance of stress homeostasis which in the long-run may pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  2. Hexavalent chromium reduction in contaminated soil: A comparison between ferrous sulphate and nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, L; Gueye, M T; Petrucci, E

    2015-01-01

    Iron sulphate (FeSO4) and colloidal nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reducing agents were compared, with the aim of assessing their effectiveness in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal from a contaminated industrial soil. Experiments were performed on soil samples collected from an industrial site where a nickel contamination, caused by a long-term productive activity, was also verified. The influence of reducing agents amount with respect to chromium content and the effectiveness of deoxygenation of the slurry were discussed. The soil was fully characterized before and after each test, and sequential extractions were performed to assess chemico-physical modifications and evaluate metals mobility induced by washing. Results show that both the reducing agents successfully lowered the amount of Cr(VI) in the soil below the threshold allowed by Italian Environmental Regulation for industrial reuse. Cr(VI) reduction by colloidal nZVI proved to be faster and more effective: the civil reuse of soil [Cr(VI)<2mg/kg] was only achieved using colloidal nZVI within 60min adopting a nZVI/Cr(VI) molar ratio of 30. The reducing treatment resulted in an increase in the amount of chromium in the oxide-hydroxide fraction, thus confirming a mechanism of chromium-iron hydroxides precipitation. In addition, a decrease of nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) content in soil was also observed when acidic conditions were established. PMID:25139286

  3. The role of EDTA in phytoextraction of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by two willow trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2008-04-01

    Effects of the synthetic chelator ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) on uptake and internal translocation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by plants were investigated. Two different concentrations of EDTA were studied for enhancing the uptake and translocation of Cr from the hydroponic solution spiked with K(2)CrO(4) or CrCl(3) maintained at 24.0 +/- 1 degrees C. Faster removal of Cr(3+) than Cr(6+) by hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz x Salix alba L.) from the plant growth media was observed. Negligible effect of EDTA on the uptake of Cr(6+) was found, but significant decrease of the Cr concentration in roots was measured. Although the translocation of Cr(6+) within plant materials was detected in response to EDTA concentration, the amount of Cr(6+) translocated to the lower stems was considerably small. EDTA in the nutrient media showed a negative effect on the uptake of Cr(3+ )by hybrid willows; the removal rates of Cr(3+ )were significantly decreased. Translocation of Cr(3+) into the stems and leaves was undetectable, but roots were the exclusive sink for Cr(3+) accumulation. Weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) showed lower removal rates for both chemical forms of Cr than hybrid willows. Although EDTA had a minor effect on Cr(6+ )uptake by weeping willows, positive effect on Cr(6+ )translocation within plant materials was observed. It was also determined that EDTA in plant growth media significantly decreased the amount of Cr(3+) taken up by plants, but significantly increased Cr(3+) mobilization from roots to stems. Results indicated that EDTA was unable to increase the uptake of Cr(6+) by both plant species, but translocation of Cr(6+)-EDTA within plant materials was possible. Addition of EDTA in the nutrient media showed a strong influence on the uptake and translocation of Cr(3+) in both willows. Cr(3+)-EDTA in tissues of weeping willows was more mobile than that in hybrid willows. The information has important implications for the use of metal

  4. Estimating historical occupational exposure to airborne hexavalent chromium in a chromate production plant: 1940--1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, D M; Panko, J P; Liebig, E W; Paustenbach, D J

    2004-11-01

    This article presents a retrospective exposure assessment for 493 workers who were occupationally exposed to airborne hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), at a Painesville, Ohio, chromate production plant from 1940-1972. Exposure estimates were reconstructed using a job-exposure matrix approach that related job titles with area monitoring data from 21 industrial hygiene surveys conducted from 1943 to 1971. No personal monitoring data were collected. Specifically, airborne Cr(VI) concentration profiles for 22 areas of the plant, termed job-exposure group (JEG) areas, were constructed for three distinct time periods (1940-1949, 1950-1964, and 1965-1972), with cut points based on known major plant and process changes. Average airborne Cr(VI) concentrations were the highest for the bridge crane operators (5.5 mg/m3) prior to 1965, although only four cohort members held this job title. Airborne concentrations for the rest of the production areas of the plant ranged from 1.9 mg/m3 for packers in the 1940s to 0.012 mg/m3 for ore mill operators after 1964. For nearly all JEG areas, exposures decreased over time, particularly after 1964. For example, average airborne concentrations in production areas of the plant decreased from 0.72 mg/m3 in the 1940s to 0.27 mg/m3 from 1950 to 1964, and the average was 0.039 mg/m3 after 1964. Former workers were interviewed to determine activity patterns in the plant by job title. This information was combined with Cr(VI) monitoring data to calculate cumulative occupational exposure for each worker. Cumulative exposures ranged from 0.003 to 23 (mg/m3) x years. The highest monthly 8-hour average exposure concentration for each worker ranged from 0.003 to 4.1 mg/m3. These exposure estimates have been combined with mortality data for this cohort to assess the lung cancer risk associated with inhaled Cr(VI), and a positive dose-response relationship was observed for increases in lung cancer mortality with measures of cumulative exposure and highest

  5. Cancer mortality in a Chinese population exposed to hexavalent chromium in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, J.J.; Sedman, R.M.; Reynolds, S.D.; Sherman, C.D.; Li, L.-H.; Howd, R.A.; Sandy, M.S.; Zeise, L.; Alexeeff, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1987, investigators in Liaoning Province, China, reported that mortality rates for all cancer, stomach cancer, and lung cancer in 1970-1978 were higher in villages with hexavalent chromium (Cr)-contaminated drinking water than in the general population. The investigators reported rates, but did not report statistical measures of association or precision. METHODS: Using reports and other communications from investigators at the local Jinzhou Health and Anti-Epidemic Station, we obtained data on Cr contamination of groundwater and cancer mortality in 9 study regions near a ferrochromium factory. We estimated:(1) person-years at risk in the study regions, based on census and population growth rate data, (2) mortality counts, based on estimated person-years at risk and previously reported mortality rates, and (3) rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The all-cancer mortality rate in the combined 5 study regions with Cr-contaminated water was negligibly elevated in comparison with the rate in the 4 combined study regions without contaminated water (rate ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval = 0.86-1.46), but was somewhat more elevated in comparison with the whole province (1.23; 0.97-1.53). Stomach cancer mortality in the regions with contaminated water was more substantially elevated in comparison with the regions without contaminated water (1.82; 1.11-2.91) and the whole province (1.69; 1.12-2.44). Lung cancer mortality was slightly elevated in comparison with the unexposed study regions (1.15; 0.62-2.07), and more strongly elevated in comparison with the whole province (1.78; 1.03-2.87). Mortality from other cancers combined was not elevated in comparison with either the unexposed study regions (0.86; 0.53-1.36) or the whole province (0.92; 0.58-1.38). CONCLUSIONS: While these data are limited, they are consistent with increased stomach cancer risk in a population exposed to Cr in drinking water. ?? 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of hexavalent chromium on HCB/TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yonggang, E-mail: 13502182420@163.com

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO{sub 2}. • Its adsorption performance of Cr(VI) was investigated. • The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g{sup −1} in an acidic medium. • The value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents. - Abstract: Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO{sub 2} and its adsorption ability of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), and removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The samples were characterized by Power X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) which showed that the TiO{sub 2} was deposited on the surface of HCB. FTIR was used to identify the changes of the surface functional groups before and after adsorption. Potentiometric titration method was used to characterize the zero charge (pH{sub pzc}) characteristics of the surface of HCB/TiO{sub 2} which showed more acidic functional groups containing. Batch experiments showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, contact time and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for the Cr(VI) adsorption studies. The Freundlich isotherm model better reflected the experimental data better. Cr(VI) adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model, which illustrated chemical adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG), changes in enthalpy change (ΔH) and changes in entropy change (ΔS) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy occurred at temperature range of 25–45 °C, so Cr(VI) adsorption by HCB/TiO{sub 2} is spontaneous. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity could maintain 80% after five cycles. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g{sup −1} in an acidic medium, of which the value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents.

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of cultured whale skin cells exposed to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabuwal, Vagmita; Boswell, Mikki; Pasquali, Amanda; Wise, Sandra S; Kumar, Suresh; Shen, Yingjia; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Lacerte, Carolyne; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ronald B

    2013-06-15

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is known to produce cytotoxic effects in humans and is a highly toxic environmental contaminant. Interestingly, it has been shown that free ranging sperm whales (Phyester macrocephalus) may have exceedingly high levels of Cr in their skin. Also, it has been demonstrated that skin cells from whales appear more resistant to both cytotoxicity and clastogenicity upon Cr exposure compared to human cells. However, the molecular genetic mechanisms employed in whale skin cells that might lead to Cr tolerance are unknown. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms of Cr(VI) tolerance and to illuminate global gene expression patterns modulated by Cr, we exposed whale skin cells in culture to varying levels of Cr(VI) (i.e., 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μg/cm²) followed by short read (100 bp) next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq reads from all exposures (≈280 million reads) were pooled to generate a de novo reference transcriptome assembly. The resulting whale reference assembly had 11K contigs and an N50 of 2954 bp. Using the reads from each dose (0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μg/cm²) we performed RNA-seq based gene expression analysis that identified 35 up-regulated genes and 19 down-regulated genes. The experimental results suggest that low dose exposure to Cr (1.0 μg/cm²) serves to induce up-regulation of oxidative stress response genes, DNA repair genes and cell cycle regulator genes. However, at higher doses (5.0 μg/cm²) the DNA repair genes appeared down-regulated while other genes that were induced suggest the initiation of cytotoxicity. The set of genes identified that show regulatory modulation at different Cr doses provide specific candidates for further studies aimed at determination of how whales exhibit resistance to Cr toxicity and what role(s) reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play in this process. PMID:23584427

  8. Measurement of Soluble and Total Hexavalent Chromium in the Ambient Airborne Particles in New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lihui; Yu, Chang Ho; Hopke, Philip K.; Lioy, Paul J.; Buckley, Brian T.; Shin, Jin Young; Fan, Zhihua (Tina)

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is a known pulmonary carcinogen and may have both soluble and insoluble forms. The sum of the two forms is defined as total Cr(VI). Currently, there were no methods suitable for large-scale monitoring of total Cr(VI) in ambient PM. This study developed a method to measure total Cr(VI) in ambient PM. This method includes PM collection using a Teflon filter, microwave extraction with 3% Na2CO3-2% NaOH at 95°C for 60 minutes, and Cr(VI) analysis by 1,5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetry at 540 nm. The recoveries of total Cr(VI) were 119.5 ± 10.4% and 106.3 ± 16.7% for the Cr(VI)-certified reference materials, SQC 012 and SRM 2700, respectively. Total Cr(VI) in the reference urban PM (NIST 1648a) was 26.0 ± 3.1 mg/kg (%CV = 11.9%) determined by this method. The method detection limit was 0.33 ng/m3. This method and the one previously developed to measure ambient Cr(VI), which is soluble in pH ~9.0 aqueous solution, were applied to measure Cr(VI) in ambient PM10 collected from three urban areas and one suburban area in New Jersey. The total Cr(VI) concentrations were 1.05–1.41 ng/m3 in the winter and 0.99–1.56 ng/m3 in the summer. The soluble Cr(VI) concentrations were 0.03–0.19 ng/m3 in the winter and 0.12–0.37 ng/m3 in the summer. The summer mean ratios of soluble to total Cr(VI) were 14.3–43.7%, significantly higher than 4.2–14.4% in the winter. The winter concentrations of soluble and total Cr(VI) in the suburban area were significantly lower than in the three urban areas. The results suggested that formation of Cr(VI) via atmospheric chemistry may contribute to the higher soluble Cr(VI) concentrations in the summer. PMID:26120324

  9. AN IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER: VOLUME 1 DESIGN AND INSTALLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 46 m long, 7.3 m deep, and 0.6 m wide permeable subsurface reactive wall was installed at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Support Center, near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in June 1996. The reactive wall was designed to remediate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] contaminated ground ...

  10. AN IN SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER:VOLUME 2 PERFORMANCE MONITORING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 46 m long, 7.3 m deep, and 0.6 m wide permeable subsurface reactive wall was installed at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Support Center, near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in June 1996. The reactive wall was designed to remediate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] contaminated ground ...

  11. A revised model of ex-vivo reduction of hexavalent chromium in human and rodent gastric juices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, Paul M., E-mail: schlosser.paul@epa.gov; Sasso, Alan F.

    2014-10-15

    Chronic oral exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) in drinking water has been shown to induce tumors in the mouse gastrointestinal (GI) tract and rat oral cavity. The same is not true for trivalent chromium (Cr-III). Thus reduction of Cr-VI to Cr-III in gastric juices is considered a protective mechanism, and it has been suggested that the difference between the rate of reduction among mice, rats, and humans could explain or predict differences in sensitivity to Cr-VI. We evaluated previously published models of gastric reduction and believe that they do not fully describe the data on reduction as a function of Cr-VI concentration, time, and (in humans) pH. The previous models are parsimonious in assuming only a single reducing agent in rodents and describing pH-dependence using a simple function. We present a revised model that assumes three pools of reducing agents in rats and mice with pH-dependence based on known speciation chemistry. While the revised model uses more fitted parameters than the original model, they are adequately identifiable given the available data, and the fit of the revised model to the full range of data is shown to be significantly improved. Hence the revised model should provide better predictions of Cr-VI reduction when integrated into a corresponding PBPK model. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) reduction in gastric juices is a key detoxifying step. • pH-dependent Cr-VI reduction rates are explained using known chemical speciation. • Reduction in rodents appears to involve multiple pools of electron donors. • Reduction appears to continue after 60 min, although more slowly than initial rates.

  12. A revised model of ex-vivo reduction of hexavalent chromium in human and rodent gastric juices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic oral exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) in drinking water has been shown to induce tumors in the mouse gastrointestinal (GI) tract and rat oral cavity. The same is not true for trivalent chromium (Cr-III). Thus reduction of Cr-VI to Cr-III in gastric juices is considered a protective mechanism, and it has been suggested that the difference between the rate of reduction among mice, rats, and humans could explain or predict differences in sensitivity to Cr-VI. We evaluated previously published models of gastric reduction and believe that they do not fully describe the data on reduction as a function of Cr-VI concentration, time, and (in humans) pH. The previous models are parsimonious in assuming only a single reducing agent in rodents and describing pH-dependence using a simple function. We present a revised model that assumes three pools of reducing agents in rats and mice with pH-dependence based on known speciation chemistry. While the revised model uses more fitted parameters than the original model, they are adequately identifiable given the available data, and the fit of the revised model to the full range of data is shown to be significantly improved. Hence the revised model should provide better predictions of Cr-VI reduction when integrated into a corresponding PBPK model. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) reduction in gastric juices is a key detoxifying step. • pH-dependent Cr-VI reduction rates are explained using known chemical speciation. • Reduction in rodents appears to involve multiple pools of electron donors. • Reduction appears to continue after 60 min, although more slowly than initial rates

  13. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio).  The results of this study indicated that the order of ...

  14. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS) provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg ch...

  15. The toxic effects on the stress and immune responses in juvenile rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile Sebastes schlegelii (mean length 13.7±1.7cm, and mean weight 55.6±4.8g) were exposed for 4 weeks with the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) concentration (0, 30, 60, 120 and 200mg/L). The plasma cortisol and heat shock protein 70 was evaluated as stress indicators. Plasma cortisol was significantly increased in response to the dietary chromium exposure over 120mg/kg at 2 and 4 weeks. Heat shock protein 70 was also notably increased over 120mg/kg at 2 weeks and over 60mg/kg at 4 weeks. In the immune response, immunoglobulin M was considerably increased in the concentration of 240mg/kg at 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg at 4 weeks. Lysozyme activity was considerably induced by the dietary hexavalent chromium exposure. A significant increase in plasma lysozyme activity was observed at 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 60mg/kg after 4 weeks, kidney lysozyme was also increased over 120mg/kg at 2 and 4 weeks. The results demonstrate that dietary Cr exposure can induce a significant stress and immune stimulation. PMID:26991846

  16. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  17. Bionanocomposites based on layered silicates and cationic starch as eco-friendly adsorbents for hexavalent chromium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriche, Yamina; Darder, Margarita; Aranda, Pilar; Semsari, Saida; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2014-07-21

    Functional bionanocomposites based on two layered silicates, the commercial montmorillonite known as Cloisite®Na and a natural bentonite from Algeria, were prepared by intercalation of cationic starch, synthesized with two different degrees of substitution, 0.85 and 0.55. After characterization of the prepared bionanocomposites by XRD and zeta potential measurements, batch studies were conducted to evaluate the adsorption capacity of hexavalent chromium anions from aqueous solution. The adsorption isotherms, adsorption kinetics, and the effect of pH on the process were studied. The removal efficiency was evaluated in the presence of competing anions such as NO3(-), ClO4(-), SO4(2-) and Cl(-). In order to regenerate the adsorbent for its repeated use, the regeneration process was studied in two different extractant solutions, 0.1 M NaCl at pH 10 and 0.28 M Na2CO3 at pH 12. PMID:24658793

  18. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher

  19. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesham, Dean O.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Miller, Charles W.; Meyers, P.; Jaschke, Naomi M.

    2014-02-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly

  20. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination; Investigacao de tratamentos alternativos de fosfatizacao para eliminacao do niquel e cromo hexavalente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jazbinsek, Luiz Antonio Rossi

    2014-07-01

    The phosphating processes are widely used in industry as surface treatments for metals, especially for low thickness plates, improving the adhesion between the metallic surface and the paint coating, and increasing the durability of paint systems against corrosion attacks. The tricationic phosphates containing zinc, nickel and manganese are commonly applied on steel. There is much discussion about the replacement of nickel by another element in order to have an environmentally friendly phosphating process. Niobium as a replacement for nickel has been evaluated. The most significant environmental impacts of phosphating processes are related to the presence of nickel and hexavalent chromium used in the process, this last as a passivation treatment. Nickel and hexavalent chromium are harmful to human and environment leading to contamination of water and soil. In the present study phosphate layers containing zinc, manganese and niobium have been evaluated and characterized on galvanized steel, and the results were compared with phosphates containing zinc, manganese and nickel, or a bicationic phosphate layer with zinc and manganese. Although the use of hexavalent chromium is not recommended worldwide, it is still used in processes for sealing the porosity of phosphate layers. This element is carcinogenic and has been associated with various diseases. Due to the passivation characteristics of niobium, this study also evaluated the tricationic bath containing niobium ammonium oxalate as a passivation treatment. The results showed that it could act as a replacement for the hexavalent chromium. The results of the present study showed that formulations containing niobium are potential replacements for hexavalent chromium and similar corrosion protection was obtained for the phosphate containing nickel or that with niobium. The morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy, gravimetric tests, porosity and adhesion evaluation results indicated that the phosphate

  1. Lethal and sub-lethal effects on the Asian common toad Duttaphrynus melanostictus from exposure to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Vindhya A K; Weerasena, Jagathpriya; Lakraj, G Pemantha; Perera, Inoka C; Dangalle, Chandima D; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Premawansa, Sunil; Wijesinghe, Mayuri R

    2016-08-01

    Chromium discharged in industrial effluents frequently occurs as an environmental pollutant, but the lethal and sub-lethal effects the heavy metal might cause in animals exposed to it have been insufficiently investigated. Selecting the amphibian Duttaphrynus melanostictus, we carried out laboratory tests to investigate the effects of short and long term exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in both tadpoles and adult toads. The concentrations used were 0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0mg/L, the first three corresponding to field levels. In vitro exposures were also carried out using toad erythrocytes and Cr(VI) concentrations of 0.0015, 0.003, 0.015, 0.03, 0.15mg/L. Mortality, growth retardation, developmental delays and structural aberrations were noted in the metal-treated tadpoles, with increasing incidence corresponding to increase in Cr(VI) level and duration of exposure. Many of the sub-lethal effects were evident with long term exposure to environmentally relevant levels of the toxicant. Changes in selected blood parameters and erythrocyte morphometry were also detected in Cr(VI) exposed toads, indicating anaemic and leucopenic conditions. In the genotoxicity study, DNA damage indicated by comet assay and increased micronuclei frequency, occurred at the low Cr(VI) concentrations tested. The multiple deleterious effects of exposure to chromium signal the need for monitoring and controlling the discharge of chromium to the environment. The dose-dependency and genotoxic effects observed in this widely distributed Asian toad indicates its suitability for monitoring heavy metal pollution in aquatic systems. PMID:27262939

  2. Natural occurrence of hexavalent chromium in serpentinite hosted spring waters from Western Tuscany (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarantini, Laura; Agostini, Samuele; Baneschi, Ilaria; Guidi, Massimo; Natali, Claudio; Tonarini, Sonia

    2013-04-01

    Although many heavy metals acts as micro-nutrients playing essential roles for all living organisms, most of them, when bioavailable in high concentrations, have to be considered potentially toxic. Some of them, such as Cr, and Ni are generally highly concentrated in all ultramafic rocks as well as in serpentines and their weathering products (soils and sediments), that largely outcrop in ophiolite belts, such as those of Central Italy. High Cr (VI) concentrations have been found in some spring waters associated with serpentinite outcrops and in Cecina Valley (Western Tuscany) soils, sediments and ground waters. Thus, we set up a multidisciplinary research program (RESPIRA) financed by Tuscany Region and by European Union, aimed to enhance the understanding of the weathering processes of serpentinite rocks in order to assess the mobility and hence the bioavailability of heavy and toxic metals such Ni and Cr in soils and namely to study the release and mobility of Cr with in the "critical zone" where rocks, soils, meteoric waters and atmospheric gasses interact. Sr-Pb isotopes of serpentinites suggest an interaction with recent, low-T, waters. Three isotopic end-members are identified in soils and sediments: serpentinites, marine limestones and tertiary siliciclastic rocks. Sr isotopic values of ground waters match with the higher values (87Sr/86Sr ≈ 0.7089 - 0.7092) of soils and sediments compositional range. Cr (VI) free and Cr (VI) bearing spring waters, spilling out from the serpentinite outcrops (Santa Luce, Querceto, Montecastelli), display Mg-HCO3 chemical composition 87Sr/86Sr from 0.7074 to 0.7084 (in the serpentinite range). Petrographic and minero-chemical analyses of both rocks and soil samples from the same sites, highlight the occurrence of secondary minerals containing significant Cr contents, such as chlorites (Cr2O3 from 2 to 8 wt%) that can easily release Cr(III). Nerveless the absence of Mn-oxides, considered the more common electron acceptors

  3. Determination of hexavalent chromium in cosmetic products by ion chromatography and postcolumn derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Kyung; Lee, Somi; Park, Jin-Hee; Joo, Kyung-Mi; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Chang, Ih Seop

    2006-05-01

    Chromium hydroxide green [Cr(2)O(OH)(4)] and chromium oxide green (Cr(2)O(3)) are colouring agents for use in cosmetic products. These colourants may contain chromium (VI), which cause skin allergies through percutaneous adsorption on the skin. Eye shadow is a representative cosmetic product in which significant colourants are used. We analysed the chromium (VI) in the eye shadows by ion chromatography and post column derivatization. We optimize conditions of chromium (VI) analysis in eye shadows. During the pretreatment procedure, there are no exchange of chromium (III) to chromium (VI). This method has a limit of quantification for chromium (VI) of 1.0 microg l(-1), recovery rate of 100 +/- 3% and analysis time less than 10 min. This result is 300 times more sensitive than the high-performance liquid chromatography method. We applied the optimized method to analyse 22 eye shadows and 6 colouring agents. 2 out of 22 of the products contained more than 5 mg l(-1). In our previous work, 5 mg l(-1) of Cr represented a threshold level. There was much more Cr(VI) in the colouring agents. The Cr(VI) in one of the colouring agents was 97.6 mg l(-1). PMID:16689807

  4. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium by raw and acid-treated green alga Oedogonium hatei from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), biosorption by raw and acid-treated Oedogonium hatei were studied from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the biosorption properties of the biomass. The optimum conditions of biosorption were found to be: a biomass dose of 0.8 g/L, contact time of 110 min, pH and temperature 2.0 and 318 K respectively. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations could fit the equilibrium data. Under the optimal conditions, the biosorption capacities of the raw and acid-treated algae were 31 and 35.2 mg Cr(VI) per g of dry adsorbent, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto algal biomass was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic under studied conditions. The pseudo-first-order kinetic model adequately describe the kinetic data in comparison to second-order model and the process involving rate-controlling step is much complex involving both boundary layer and intra-particle diffusion processes. The physical and chemical properties of the biosorbent were determined and the nature of biomass-metal ions interactions were evaluated by FTIR analysis, which showed the participation of -COOH, -OH and -NH2 groups in the biosorption process. Biosorbents could be regenerated using 0.1 M NaOH solution, with up to 75% recovery. Thus, the biomass used in this work proved to be effective materials for the treatment of chromium bearing aqueous solutions

  5. Montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol method. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the magnetite nanoparticles without and with montmorillonite support are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the interparticle pores of clays, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the ones without montmorillonite support. Batch tests were carried out to investigate the removal mechanism of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] by these synthesized magnetite nanoparticles. The Cr(VI) uptake was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed the Pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of unsupported and clay-supported magnetite nanoparticles fit well with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations. The montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles showed a much better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite (15.3 mg/g) than unsupported magnetite (10.6 mg/g), and were more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These fundamental results demonstrate that the montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  6. Removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions by the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Fan, Mingde; Yang, Dan; Zhu, Runliang; Ge, Fei; Zhu, JianXi; He, Hongping

    2010-01-15

    Diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol methods, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the unsupported and supported magnetite nanoparticles are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the unsupported ones. The uptake of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The supported magnetite showed a better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite than unsupported magnetite, and was more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These results indicate that the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. PMID:19748178

  7. Distribution and mass balance of hexavalent and trivalent chromium in a subsurface, horizontal flow (SF-h) constructed wetland operating as post-treatment of textile wastewater for water reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibbi, Donatella; Doumett, Saer; Lepri, Luciano; Checchini, Leonardo; Gonnelli, Cristina; Coppini, Ester; Del Bubba, Massimo

    2012-01-15

    In this study, during a two-year period, we investigated the fate of hexavalent and trivalent chromium in a full-scale subsurface horizontal flow constructed wetland planted with Phragmites australis. The reed bed operated as post-treatment of the effluent wastewater from an activated sludge plant serving the textile industrial district and the city of Prato (Italy). Chromium speciation was performed in influent and effluent wastewater and in water-suspended solids, at different depths and distances from the inlet; plants were also analyzed for total chromium along the same longitudinal profile. Removals of hexavalent and trivalent chromium equal to 72% and 26%, respectively were achieved. The mean hexavalent chromium outlet concentration was 1.6 ± 0.9 μg l(-1) and complied with the Italian legal limits for water reuse. Chromium in water-suspended solids was in the trivalent form, thus indicating that its removal from wastewater was obtained by the reduction of hexavalent chromium to the trivalent form, followed by accumulation of the latter inside the reed bed. Chromium in water-suspended solids was significantly affected by the distance from the inlet. Chromium concentrations in the different plant organs followed the same trend of suspended solids along the longitudinal profile and were much lower than those found in the solid material, evidencing a low metal accumulation in P. australis. PMID:22104764

  8. Evaluation of the Exposure–Response Relationship of Lung Cancer Mortality and Occupational Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium Based on Published Epidemiological Data

    OpenAIRE

    van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Mundt, Kenneth A; Luippold, Rose S

    2004-01-01

    Some have suggested a threshold mechanism for the carcinogenicity of exposure to hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI). We evaluated the nature of the exposure–response relationship between occupational exposure to Cr(VI) and respiratory cancer based on results of two recently published epidemiological cohort studies. The combined cohort comprised a total of 2,849 workers employed at two U.S. chromate production plants between 1940 and 1974. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for lung cancer in relat...

  9. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Young Chung; Hyoung-il Kim; Young-Hoon Chung; Myeong Jae Lee; Sung Jong Yoo; Alok D. Bokare; Wonyong Choi; Yung-Eun Sung

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was...

  10. Acute Effects of Hexavalent Chromium on Survival, Oxygen Consumption, Hematological Parameters and Some Biochemical Profiles of the Indian Major Carp, Labeo rohita

    OpenAIRE

    Vutukuru, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to determine the acute toxicity of hexavalent chromium and its toxicological effects on survival, physiological, hematological and biochemical parameters of the widely consumed Indian major carp, Labeo rohita. Short-term acute toxicity tests were performed adopting renewal bioassay technique (USEPA, 1975) over a period of 96h, using different concentrations of potassium dichromate to the fish and the 96 h LC50 value was found to be 111.45 ...

  11. Biosorption system produced from biofilms supported on Faujasite (FAU) zeolite, process for obtaining it and its usage for removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares, M. T.; Neves, Isabel C.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention refers to a biosorption system composed of a bacterial biofilm supported in synthetic zeolites, for usage in various types of industry for the removal of hexavalent chromium, through the retention of metal ions in the biofilm, in solutions with concentrations between 50 and 250 mgCr/L, process for obtaining it and respective usages. This process consists in obtaining a bacterial biofilm of Arthrobacter viscosus, supported on a faujasite (FAU) zeolite. The biofilm promote...

  12. The effect of hexavalent chromium at different pH values on the carbohydrate metabolism of Tilapia sparrmanii (Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    V. Wepener; J. H. J. van Vuuren; H.H. du Preez

    1992-01-01

    The effect of hexavalent chromium at different pH values on the carbohydrate metabolism of Tilapia sparrmanii was investigated. The indicator organisms were exposed to Cr(V1) for short and long-term exposures, after which the blood glucose levels and activities of pyruvate kinase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined. It was found that short-term exposures of Cr(V1) at an acidic medium caused an increase in energy production and glucose concentrati...

  13. Combined abiotic and biotic in-situ reduction of hexavalent chromium in groundwater using nZVI and whey: A remedial pilot test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Pokorný, P.; Lacinová, L.; Černík, M.; Masopustová, Z.; Lhotský, O.; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 300, DEC 2015 (2015), s. 670-679. ISSN 0304-3894 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218 Grant ostatní: Advanced Technologies and Innovation(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0005 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Hexavalent chromium * nZVI * Geofixation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.529, year: 2014

  14. Airborne exposure to inhalable hexavalent chromium in welders and other occupations: Estimates from the German MEGA database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Hauptmann, Kristin; Van Gelder, Rainer; Stamm, Roger; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Zschiesche, Wolfgang; Behrens, Thomas; Weiss, Tobias; Siemiatycki, Jack; Lavoué, Jerome; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate occupational exposure to inhalable hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) using the exposure database MEGA. The database has been compiling Cr(VI) concentrations and ancillary data about measurements at German workplaces. We analysed 3659 personal measurements of inhalable Cr(VI) collected between 1994 and 2009. Cr(VI) was determined spectrophotometrically at 540 nm after reaction with diphenylcarbazide. We assigned the measurements to pre-defined at-risk occupations using the information provided about the workplaces. Two-thirds of the measurements were below the limit of quantification (LOQ) and multiply imputed according to the distribution above LOQ. The 75th percentile value was 5.2 μg/m(3) and the 95th percentile was 57.2 μg/m(3). We predicted the geometric mean for 2h sampling in the year 2000, and the time trend of Cr(VI) exposure in these settings with and without adjustment for the duration of measurements. The largest dataset was available for welding (N = 1898), which could be further detailed according to technique. The geometric means were above 5 μg/m(3) in the following situations: spray painting, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding if applied to stainless steel. The geometric means were between 1 μg/m(3) and 5 μg/m(3) for gas metal arc welding of stainless steel, cutting, hard-chromium plating, metal spraying and in the chemical chromium industry. The exposure profiles described here are useful for epidemiologic and industrial health purposes. Exposure to Cr(VI) varies not only between occupations, but also within occupations as shown for welders. In epidemiologic studies, it would be desirable to collect exposure-specific information in addition to the job title. PMID:25979374

  15. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane;

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  16. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite; Remocion de cromo hexavalente de aguas residuales de teneria utilizando hidrotalcita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez G, S.; Martinez, V.; Bulbulian, S. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  17. Characterization and recovery of hexavalent chromium salts of an environmental liability; Caracterizacion y recuperacion de sales de cromo hexavalente de un pasivo ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel C, A. A.; Isarain C, E. [Centro de Innovacion Aplicada en Tecnologias Competitivas, Omega 201, Fracc. Industrial Delta, 37545 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Maldonado V, M., E-mail: r.cordova.alexander@gmail.com [Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad del Bajio, Bulevard Milenio No. 130, San Carlos la Roncha, 37660 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a diverse group of washing solutions for its use in the recovery of the industrial waste hexavalent chromium, in compliance with the Mexican regulation NOM-147-SEMARNAT/SSA1-2004. The recovery process consisted of a simple random sampling and a physical-chemical characterization with consideration to the high solubility of hexavalent chromium compounds. A test was performed which implemented five different washing solutions (water, sulfuric acid, citric acid, sodium hydroxide, calcium and hydroxide). This was followed by a factorial experimental design to optimize resources with a removal efficiency of 80% and hence a recovery of 33 g/kg as CaCrO{sub 4} (calcium chromate). Chromium hexavalent concentration in the leachate was quantified using UV-Vis spectrometry at a wavelength λ = 540 nm, while the salts recovered by evaporation were characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis, leading to the conclusion that precipitate can be used as raw material, the main elements are Cr, Ca, Fe and Mg, and their concentration depends on the washing solution. (Author)

  18. Hexavalent chromium reduction by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to chromite mine overburden

    OpenAIRE

    Dey Satarupa; A. K. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of overburden samples collected from chromite mining areas of Orissa, India revealed that they are rich in microbial density as well as diversity and dominated by Gram-negative (58%) bacteria. The phenotypically distinguishable bacterial isolates (130) showed wide degree of tolerance to chromium (2–8 mM) when tested in peptone yeast extract glucose agar medium. Isolates (92) tolerating 2 mM chromium exhibited different degrees of Cr+6 reducing activity in chemically d...

  19. Acute and chronic activity of perchlorate and hexavalent chromium contamination on the survival and development of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of water contamination with perchlorate and hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] on the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus were assessed. The chronic (10-day) LC5s values for perchlorate and chromium were 74 ± 8.0 mg/L and 0.41 ± 0.15 mg/L, respectively. Relative Growth Index, a measure of growth and mortality rates in a population, was significantly reduced within 5 days for levels of perchlorate as low as 25 mg/L and for levels of chromium as low as 0.16 mg/L. Neither compound altered wing length of surviving adults. In combination, contaminants were synergistic, causing 14% more mortality than predicted. Acute (24-h) LC5 values for perchlorate and Cr (VI) were 17,000 ± 3200 and 38 ± 1.3 mg/L, respectively. Effects on mosquito larvae in contaminated environments are likely to be observed for Cr (VI) but not for perchlorate, which generally does not occur at levels as high as those shown here to affect larval mosquitoes. - While pollution with hexavalent chromium may adversely affect Culex quinquefasciatus larvae, levels of perchlorate currently in the environment will not impact these insects

  20. Acute and chronic activity of perchlorate and hexavalent chromium contamination on the survival and development of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, Mary A. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)]. E-mail: mary.sorensen@email.ucr.edu; Jensen, Peter D. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Walton, William E. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Trumble, John T. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Effects of water contamination with perchlorate and hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] on the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus were assessed. The chronic (10-day) LC{sub 5}s values for perchlorate and chromium were 74 {+-} 8.0 mg/L and 0.41 {+-} 0.15 mg/L, respectively. Relative Growth Index, a measure of growth and mortality rates in a population, was significantly reduced within 5 days for levels of perchlorate as low as 25 mg/L and for levels of chromium as low as 0.16 mg/L. Neither compound altered wing length of surviving adults. In combination, contaminants were synergistic, causing 14% more mortality than predicted. Acute (24-h) LC{sub 5} values for perchlorate and Cr (VI) were 17,000 {+-} 3200 and 38 {+-} 1.3 mg/L, respectively. Effects on mosquito larvae in contaminated environments are likely to be observed for Cr (VI) but not for perchlorate, which generally does not occur at levels as high as those shown here to affect larval mosquitoes. - While pollution with hexavalent chromium may adversely affect Culex quinquefasciatus larvae, levels of perchlorate currently in the environment will not impact these insects.

  1. Determination and evaluation of hexavalent chromium in power plant coal combustion by-products and cost-effective environmental remediation solutions using acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, H M Skip; Cain, Randy; Huo, Dengwei; Rahman, G M Mizanur

    2005-09-01

    The chromium species leaching from a coal combustion fly ash landfill has been characterized as well as a novel approach to treat leachates rich in hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), by using another natural waste by-product, acid mine drainage (AMD), has been investigated during this study. It is observed that as much as 8% (approximately 10 microg g(-1) in fly ash) of total chromium is converted to the Cr(VI) species during oxidative combustion of coal and remains in the resulting ash as a stable species, however, it is significantly mobile in water based leaching. Approximately 1.23 +/- 0.01 microg g(-1) of Cr(VI) was found in the landfill leachate from permanent deposits of aged fly ash. This study also confirmed the use of AMD, which often is in close proximity to coal combustion by-product landfills, is an extremely effective and economical remediation option for the elimination of hexavalent chromium in fly ash generated leachate. Speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS), as described in EPA Method 6800, was used to analytically evaluate and validate the field application of the ferrous iron and chromate chemistry in the remediation of Cr(VI) runoff. PMID:16121270

  2. Hexavalent chromium reduction by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to chromite mine overburden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Satarupa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological analysis of overburden samples collected from chromite mining areas of Orissa, India revealed that they are rich in microbial density as well as diversity and dominated by Gramnegative (58% bacteria. The phenotypically distinguishable bacterial isolates (130 showed wide degree of tolerance to chromium (2-8 mM when tested in peptone yeast extract glucose agar medium. Isolates (92 tolerating 2 mM chromium exhibited different degrees of Cr+6 reducing activity in chemically defined Vogel Bonner (VB broth and complex KSC medium. Three potent isolates, two belonging to Arthrobacter spp. and one to Pseudomonas sp. were able to reduce more than 50 and 80% of 2 mM chromium in defined and complex media respectively. Along with Cr+6 (MIC 8.6-17.8 mM, the isolates showed tolerance to Ni+2, Fe+3, Cu+2 and Co+2 but were extremely sensitive to Hg+2 followed by Cd+2, Mn+2 and Zn+2. In addition, they were resistant to antibiotics like penicillin, methicillin, ampicillin, neomycin and polymyxin B. During growth under shake-flask conditions, Arthrobacter SUK 1201 and SUK 1205 showed 100% reduction of 2 mM Cr+6 in KSC medium with simultaneous formation of insoluble precipitates of chromium salts. Both the isolates were also equally capable of completely reducing the Cr+6 present in mine seepage when grown in mine seepage supplemented with VB concentrate.

  3. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by the electrochemical ion-exchange process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharnaik, Amit Shivputra; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, the performance of a laboratory-scale plate and frame-type electrochemical ion-exchange (EIX) cell on removal ofhexavalent chromium from synthetic wastewater containing 5 mg/l of Cr(VI) was evaluated under varying applied voltages. Ruthenium dioxide-coated titanium plate (RuO2/Ti) was used as anode and stainless steel plates as cathode. The EIX cell was run at different hydraulic retention time (HRT). Before using in the electrochemical cell, the capacity of ion-exchange resin was evaluated through kinetic and isotherm equilibrium tests in batch mode. The batch kinetic study result showed that the equilibrium time for effective ion exchange with resin is 2 h. The isotherm equilibrium data fit well to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum capacity (qm) of resin calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 71.42 mg/g. Up to 99% of chromium removal was noticed in the EIX cell containing fresh resin at applied voltages of 10 V and higher. Migration of chromium ion to anode chamber was not noticed while performing the experiment with fresh resin. As high as 50% removal of chromium was observed from the middle chamber containing exhausted resin at an applied voltage of 25 V when the influent flow rate was maintained at 45 min of HRT. The performance of the reactor was increased to 72% when the influent flow rate was decreased to maintain at 90 min of HRT. Build-up of chromium in the anode chamber took place when exhausted resin was used in the process. PMID:25145180

  4. Effects of dentifrice containing hydroxyapatite on dentinal tubule occlusion and aqueous hexavalent chromium cations sorption: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyan Yuan

    Full Text Available In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr(6+ solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr(6+ from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr(6+ from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution.

  5. Application of Fe-Cu binary oxide nanoparticles for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saif Ullah; Zaidi, Rumman; Hassan, Saeikh Z; Farooqi, I H; Azam, Ameer

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption process has been used as an effective technique for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. Groundwater remediation by nanoparticles has received interest in recent years. In the present study, a binary metal oxide of Fe-Cu was prepared and used for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effects of initial Cr (VI) concentration, dose of adsorbent, and pH of solution on the removal efficiency of Cr (VI). The prepared nanostructured Fe-Cu binary oxides were able to reduce the concentration of Cr (VI) in aqueous solution. Binary metal oxides nanoparticle exhibited an outstanding ability to remove Cr (VI) due to high surface area, low particle size, and high inherent activity. The percentage removal efficiency of Cr (VI) increased with nanoparticles doses (0.1 g L(-1)-2.5 g L(-1)), whereas it decreased with initial Cr (VI) concentration (1 mg L(-1)-25 mg L(-1)) and with pH (3-9). The Freundlich model was found to be the better fit for adsorption isotherm. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy. It showed that the Fe-Cu binary oxides were formed in single phase. SEM micrograph showed aggregates with many nano-sized particles. UV-visible spectroscopy showed quantum confinement effect. PMID:27386994

  6. Effect of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts on hexavalent chromium removal in biocathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiayuan; Tong, Fei; Yong, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Lixiong; Jia, Honghua; Wei, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Two kinds of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts were used as biocathode electrodes in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-reducing microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The one was fabricated through direct modification, and the other one processed by HNO3 pretreatment of graphite felt before modification. The results showed that two NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts are excellent bio-electrode materials for MFCs, and that a large NaX loading mass, obtained by HNO3 pretreatment (the HNO3-NaX electrode), leads to a superior performance. The HNO3-NaX electrode significantly improved the electricity generation and Cr(VI) removal of the MFC. The maximum Cr(VI) removal rate increased to 10.39±0.28 mg/L h, which was 8.2 times higher than that of the unmodified control. The improvement was ascribed to the strong affinity that NaX zeolite particles, present in large number on the graphite felt, have for microorganisms and Cr(VI) ions. PMID:26852205

  7. Chi-square analysis of the reduction of ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes by hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yuan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the reduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes by hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI using chi-square analysis. Cells were treated with 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 μM Cr(VI for 12, 24, or 36 h. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT experiments and measurements of intracellular ATP levels were performed by spectrophotometry or bioluminescence assays following Cr(VI treatment. The chi-square test was used to determine the difference between cell survival rate and ATP levels. For the chi-square analysis, the results of the MTT or ATP experiments were transformed into a relative ratio with respect to the control (%. The relative ATP levels increased at 12 h, decreased at 24 h, and increased slightly again at 36 h following 4, 8, 16, 32 μM Cr(VI treatment, corresponding to a "V-shaped" curve. Furthermore, the results of the chi-square analysis demonstrated a significant difference of the ATP level in the 32-μM Cr(VI group (P < 0.05. The results suggest that the chi-square test can be applied to analyze the interference effects of Cr(VI on ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes. The decreased ATP levels at 24 h indicated disruption of mitochondrial energy metabolism and the slight increase of ATP levels at 36 h indicated partial recovery of mitochondrial function or activated glycolysis in L-02 hepatocytes.

  8. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium from synthetic and electroplating effluent on chemically modified Swietenia mahagoni shell in a packed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangabhashiyam, S; Nandagopal, M S Giri; Nakkeeran, E; Selvaraju, N

    2016-07-01

    Packed bed column studies were carried out to evaluate the performance of chemically modified adsorbents for the sequestration of hexavalent chromium from synthetic and electroplating industrial effluent. The effects of parameters such as bed height (3-9 cm), inlet flow rate (5-15 mL/min), and influent Cr(VI) concentration (50-200 mg/L) on the percentage removal of Cr(VI) and the adsorption capacity of the adsorbents in a packed bed column were investigated. The breakthrough time increased with increasing bed height and decreased with the increase of inlet flow rate and influent Cr(VI) concentration. The adsorption column models such as Thomas, Adams-Bohart, Yoon-Nelson, and bed depth service time (BDST) were successfully correlated with the experimental data. The Yoon-Nelson and BDST model showed good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied parameter conditions. Results of the present study indicated that the chemically modified Swietenia mahagoni shell can be used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from industrial wastewater in a packed bed column. PMID:27312254

  9. Determination of hexavalent chromium in plastic certified reference materials by X-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Masaki; Matsubayashi, Nobuyuki

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis with transmission mode was used to determine the percentages of hexavalent chromium {Cr(VI)} in total Cr in plastic certified reference materials (CRMs). Cr-K edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were observed and the normalized pre-edge peaks of the spectrum where absorption data was summed was acquired for the determination of Cr(VI). Examination of different number of data point and range of photon energy for summed absorption of the pre-edge peak resulted in reproducible absorption data, though the measurements were carried out at different beam time and beam line. The concentrations of Cr(VI) in the plastic CRMs were also estimated from both the certified value of total Cr and the determined percentage of Cr(VI). The analytical procedure and the estimated concentrations can be useful for the determination of Cr(VI) in plastics with respect to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive.

  10. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey-Horng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI concentration ranges (0.0125–0.3 mg/L and 0.3–5 mg/L. The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (<10%. The use of the biosensor can help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations and the maximum allowable concentration of Cr(VI in water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen.

  11. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guey-Horng; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Liu, Man-Hai; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Hsieh, Min-Chi; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI) concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI) concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI) concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI) concentration ranges (0.0125-0.3 mg/L and 0.3-5 mg/L). The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI) concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (<10%). The use of the biosensor can help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations and the maximum allowable concentration of Cr(VI) in water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI) determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27537887

  12. Determination of hexavalent chromium in plastic certified reference materials by X-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Masaki, E-mail: m-oohata@aist.go.jp [Inorganic Standard Section, Inorganic Analytical Chemistry Division, National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan); Matsubayashi, Nobuyuki [Super-Spectroscopy System Research Group, Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier (RIIF), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis with transmission mode was used to determine the percentages of hexavalent chromium {Cr(VI)} in total Cr in plastic certified reference materials (CRMs). Cr-K edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were observed and the normalized pre-edge peaks of the spectrum where absorption data was summed was acquired for the determination of Cr(VI). Examination of different number of data point and range of photon energy for summed absorption of the pre-edge peak resulted in reproducible absorption data, though the measurements were carried out at different beam time and beam line. The concentrations of Cr(VI) in the plastic CRMs were also estimated from both the certified value of total Cr and the determined percentage of Cr(VI). The analytical procedure and the estimated concentrations can be useful for the determination of Cr(VI) in plastics with respect to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive.

  13. Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI]: a health survey and clinical examination of community inhabitants (Kanpur, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We assessed the health effects of hexavalent chromium groundwater contamination (from tanneries and chrome sulfate manufacturing in Kanpur, India. METHODS: The health status of residents living in areas with high Cr (VI groundwater contamination (N = 186 were compared to residents with similar social and demographic features living in communities having no elevated Cr (VI levels (N = 230. Subjects were recruited at health camps in both the areas. Health status was evaluated with health questionnaires, spirometry and blood hematology measures. Cr (VI was measured in groundwater samples by diphenylcarbazide reagent method. RESULTS: Residents from communities with known Cr (VI contamination had more self-reports of digestive and dermatological disorders and hematological abnormalities. GI distress was reported in 39.2% vs. 17.2% males (AOR = 3.1 and 39.3% vs. 21% females (AOR = 2.44; skin abnormalities in 24.5% vs. 9.2% males (AOR = 3.48 and 25% vs. 4.9% females (AOR = 6.57. Residents from affected communities had greater RBCs (among 30.7% males and 46.1% females, lower MCVs (among 62.8% males and less platelets (among 68% males and 72% females than matched controls. There were no differences in leucocytes count and spirometry parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Living in communities with Cr (VI groundwater is associated with gastrointestinal and dermatological complaints and abnormal hematological function. Limitations of this study include small sample size and the lack of long term follow-up.

  14. Determination of hexavalent chromium in sludge incinerator emissions using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arar, E.J.; Long, S.E. (Technology Applications, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Martin, T.D.; Gold, S. (Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-10-01

    A unique approach is described using ion chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the determination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in wastewater sludge incinerator emissions. Quartz fiber filters, spiked with an isotopically enriched ([sup 50]Cr or [sup 53]Cr) chromate salt, were used to collect emission particulates. The enriched Cr(VI) isotope was used to monitor the reduction of Cr(IV) during sample collection using a pseudo-first-order reaction model and to calculate the rate of deposition of native Cr(VI) on the filters. At the end of the sampling period, the Cr(VI) was extracted from the filters with 0.1 N sodium hydroxide and determined by IC using postcolumn derivatization with 1,5-diphenylcarbohydrazide. To determine the ratio of enriched Cr(VI) to the native Cr(VI) emitted from the incinerator, an additional aliquot of the sample extract was preconcentrated by IC and the isotopic composition of the Cr(VI) fraction determined by ICP-MS. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 figs.

  15. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solution by algal bloom residue derived activated carbon: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hong; Tang Yi; Cai Dongqing; Liu Xianan; Wang Xiangqin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Yu Zengliang, E-mail: zlyu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2010-09-15

    A novel approach to prepare activated carbon from blue-green algal bloom residue has been tried for first time and its adsorption capability to remove hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from aqueous solution has been examined. For this algal bloom residue derived activated carbon, the physical characters regarding adsorption capability were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Batch studies showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for Cr(VI) absorption. It was found that initial pH of 1.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 155.52 mg g{sup -1} in an acidic medium, which is comparable to best result from activated carbons derived from biomass. Therefore, this work put forward a nearly perfect solution which on one hand gets rid of environment-unfriendly algae residue while on the other hand produces high-quality activated carbon that is in return advantageous to environment protection.

  16. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  17. Groundwater remediation of hexavalent chromium along the Columbia River at the Hanford site in Washington state, USA - 59030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site, formerly used for nuclear weapons production, encompasses 1500 square kilometers in southeast Washington State along the Columbia River. A principle threat to the river are the groundwater plumes of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), which affect approximately 9.8 square kilometers, and 4.1 kilometers of shoreline. Cleanup goals are to stop Cr(VI) from entering the river by the end of 2012 and remediate the groundwater plumes to the drinking water standards by the end of 2020. Five groundwater pump-and-treat systems are currently in operation for the remediation of Cr(VI). Since the 1990's, over 13.6 billion L of groundwater have been treated; over 1, 435 kg of Cr(VI) have been removed. This paper describes the unique aspects of the site, its environmental setting, hydrogeology, groundwater-river interface, riverine hydraulic effects, remediation activities completed to date, a summary of the current and proposed pump-and-treat operations, the in situ redox manipulation barrier, and the effectiveness of passive barriers, resins, and treatability testing results of calcium polysulfide, bio-stimulation, and electrocoagulation, currently under evaluation. (authors)

  18. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions using micro zero-valent iron supported by bentonite layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Waseem; Ebadi, Taghi; Fahimifar, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is of particular environmental concern due to its toxicity, mobility, and challenging removal from industrial wastewater. It is a strong oxidizing agent that is carcinogenic and mutagenic and diffuses quickly through soil and aquatic environments. Moreover, it does not form insoluble compounds in aqueous solutions; therefore, separation by precipitation is not feasible. While Cr(VI) oxyanions are very mobile and toxic in the environment, trivalent Cr(III) cations are the opposite and, like many metal cations, Cr(III) forms insoluble precipitates. Thus, reducing Cr(VI)-Cr(III) simplifies its removal from effluent and also reduces its toxicity and mobility. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used to remediate contaminated groundwater with metals, but using ZVI in remediation of contaminated groundwater or wastewater is limited due to its lack of stability, easy aggregation, and difficulty in separation of iron from the treated solution. Thus, the technology used in the present study is developed to address these problems by placing a layer of bentonite after the PRB layer to remove iron from the treated water. The removal rates of Cr(VI) under different values of pH were investigated, and the results indicated the highest adsorption capacity at low pH. PMID:25768212

  19. An Investigation on the Extraction and Quantitation of a Hexavalent Chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Copolymer (ABS) and Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by Ion Chromatography Coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is one of the hazardous substances regulated by the RoHS. The determination of Cr (VI) in various polymers and printed circuit board (PCB) has been very important. In this study, the three different analytical methods were investigated for the determination of a hexavalent chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene copolymer (ABS) and PCB. The results by three analytical methods were obtained and compared. An analytical method by UV-Visible spectrometer has been generally used for the determination of Cr (VI) in a sample, but a hexavalent chromium should complex with diphenylcarbazide for the detection in the method. The complexation did make an adverse effect on the quantitative analysis of Cr (VI) in ABS. The analytical method using diphenylcarbazide was also not applicable to printed circuit board (PCB) because PCB contained lots of irons. The irons interfered with the analysis of hexavalent chromium because those also could complex with diphenylcarbazide. In this study, hexavalent chromiums in PCB have been separated by ion chromatography (IC), then directly and selectively detected by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The quantity of Cr (VI) in PCB was 0.1 mg/kg

  20. Comparative Biosorption Studies of Hexavalent Chromium Ion onto Raw and Modified Palm Branches

    OpenAIRE

    Mona A. Shouman; Nady A. Fathy; Soheir A. Khedr; Amina A. Attia

    2013-01-01

    The waste of palm branches (PB) was tested for its ability to remove chromium (VI) from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Palm branches chemically modified with an oxidizing agent (sulphuric acid) then coated with chitosan and surfactant (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant, HDTMA), respectively, were carried out to improve the removal performance of PB. The results of their Cr (VI) removal performances are pH dependent. The adsorption data could be well interprete...

  1. Removal of hexavalent chromium by new quaternized crosslinked poly(4-vinylpyridines)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New quaternized crosslinked poly(4-vinylpyridines) prepared by nucleophilic substitution reactions of 4-vinylpyridine: divinylbenzene copolymers of gel and porous structure with halogenated compounds such as benzyl chloride and 2-chloracetone, were used to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies were carried out to determine the effect of the initial concentration of Cr(VI), pH, temperature and the presence of sulfate anions. The process was found to be pH and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacities increase with the increase of the initial concentration of Cr(VI) and both resins exhibited the degrees of usage of the exchange capacities higher than 90% and good efficiency in the chromium removal. Equilibrium modeling of the process of Cr(VI) removal was carried out by using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data obeyed these isotherm models. The thermodynamic parameters (free energy change ΔG, enthalpy change ΔS and entropy change ΔH) for the adsorption have been evaluated and therefore, it was showed the spontaneous and endothermic process of the adsorption of Cr(VI) on the pyridine resins. In the competitive adsorption studies, chromate/sulfate revealed the selectivity of the pyridine adsorbents towards chromium ions. At acidic pH the synthesized pyridine resins offer much greater chromate removal capacities compared to alkaline pH. In the competitive adsorption studies, chromate/sulfate revealed the selectivity of the pyridine adsorbents towards chromium ions due to the formation a sandwich arrangement with the chromium anion and functional groups attached to the quaternary nitrogen atom.

  2. A plan for study of hexavalent chromium, CR(VI) in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, California, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Groover, Krishangi

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Hinkley compressor station, in the Mojave Desert 80 miles northeast of Los Angeles, is used to compress natural gas as it is transported through a pipeline from Texas to California. Between 1952 and 1964, cooling water used at the compressor station was treated with a compound containing chromium to prevent corrosion. After cooling, the wastewater was discharged to unlined ponds, resulting in contamination of soil and groundwater in the underlying alluvial aquifer (Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, 2013). Since 1964, cooling-water management practices have been used that do not contribute chromium to groundwater.In 2007, a PG&E study of the natural background concentrations of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in groundwater estimated average concentrations in the Hinkley area to be 1.2 micrograms per liter (μg/L), with a 95-percent upper-confidence limit of 3.1 μg/L (CH2M-Hill, 2007). The 3.1 μg/L upper-confidence limit was adopted by the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) as the maximum background concentration used to map the plume extent. In response to criticism of the study’s methodology, and an increase in the mapped extent of the plume between 2008 and 2011, the Lahontan RWQCB (Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, 2012) agreed that the 2007 PG&E background-concentration study be updated.The purpose of the updated background study is to evaluate the presence of natural and man-made Cr(VI) near Hinkley, Calif. The study also is to estimate natural background Cr(VI) concentrations in the aquifer upgradient and downgradient from the mapped Cr(VI) contamination plume, as well as in the plume and near its margins. The study was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with a technical working group (TWG) composed of community members, the Independent Review Panel (IRP) Manager (Project Navigator, Ltd.), the Lahontan RWQCB, PG&E, and consultants for PG&E.&E.

  3. Assessment of the removal mechanism of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by olive stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Lara, María Ángeles; Calero de Hoces, Mónica; Ronda Gálvez, Alicia; Pérez Muñoz, Antonio; Trujillo Miranda, Ma Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to study the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) by natural olive stone (OS) and to present a sequential-batch process for the removal of total chromium (original Cr(VI) and Cr(III) derived from reduction of Cr(VI) during biosorption at acidic conditions). First, experiments were conducted varying pH from 1 to 4, and showed that a combined effect of biosorption and reduction is involved in the Cr(VI) removal. Then, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and desorption tests were employed to verify the oxidation state of the chromium bound to OS and to elucidate the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) by this material. The goal of these tests was to confirm that Cr(III) is the species mainly absorbed by OS. Finally, the possibility of total chromium removal by biosorption in a sequential-batch process was analyzed. In the first stage, 96.38% of Cr(VI) is removed by OS and reduced to Cr(III). In the second stage, approximately 31% of the total Cr concentration was removed. However, the Cr(III) released in the first stage is not completely removed, and it could suggest that the Cr(III) could be in a hydrated compound or a complex, which could be more difficult to remove under these conditions. PMID:27232404

  4. Hexavalent chromium reduction in a sulfur reducing packed-bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Elemental sulfur can be used as electron acceptor for sulfide production. ► Biogenically produced sulfide reduces Cr(VI) to the much less toxic and immobile form of Cr(III). ► Sulfur packed bioreactor is efficient for Cr(VI) containing wastewater treatment. ► Reduced form of chromium precipitates in the bioreactor. - Abstract: The most commonly used approach for the detoxification of hazardous industrial effluents and wastewaters containing Cr(VI) is its reduction to the much less toxic and immobile form of Cr(III). This study investigates the cleanup of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters using elemental sulfur as electron acceptor, for the production of hydrogen sulfide that induces Cr(VI) reduction. An elemental sulfur reducing packed-bed bioreactor was operated at 28–30 °C for more than 250 days under varying influent Cr(VI) concentrations (5.0–50.0 mg/L) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs, 0.36–1.0 day). Ethanol or acetate (1000 mg/L COD) was used as carbon source and electron donor. The degree of COD oxidation varied between 30% and 85%, depending on the operating conditions and the type of organic carbon source. The oxidation of organic matter was coupled with the production of hydrogen sulfide, which reached a maximum concentration of 750 mg/L. The biologically produced hydrogen sulfide reduced Cr(VI) chemically to Cr(III) that precipitated in the reactor. Reduction of Cr(VI) and removal efficiency of total chromium always exceeded 97% and 85%, respectively, implying that the reduced chromium was retained in the bioreactor. This study showed that sulfur can be used as an electron acceptor to produce hydrogen sulfide that induces efficient reduction and immobilization of Cr(VI), thus enabling decontamination of Cr(VI) polluted wastewaters.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and role of zero-valent iron nanoparticle in removal of hexavalent chromium from chromium-spiked soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium is an important industrial metal used in various products/processes. Remediation of Cr contaminated sites present both technological and economic challenges, as conventional methods are often too expensive and difficult to operate. In the present investigation, Zero-valent iron (Fe0) nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and were tested for removal of Cr(VI) from the soil spiked with Cr(VI). Fe0 nanoparticles were synthesized by the reduction of ferric chloride with sodium borohydride and were characterized by UV–Vis (Ultra violet–Visible) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy. The UV–Vis spectrum of Fe0 nanoparticles suspended in 0.8% Carboxymethyl cellulose showed its absorption maxima at 235 nm. The presence of one band at 3,421 cm−1 ascribed to OH stretching vibration and the second at 1,641 cm−1 to OH bending vibration of surface-adsorbed water indicates the formation of ferrioxyhydroxide (FeOOH) layer on Fe0 nanoparticles. The mean crystalline dimension of Fe0 nanoparticles calculated by XRD (X-ray diffraction) using Scherer equation was 15.9 nm. Average size of Fe0 nanoparticles calculated from TEM (Transmission electron microscopy) images was found around 26 nm. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) also showed approximately the same size. Batch experiments were performed using various concentration of Fe0 nanoparticles for reduction of soil spiked with 100 mg kg−1 Cr(VI). The reduction potential of Fe0 nanoparticles at a concentration of 0.27 g L−1 was found to be 100% in 3 h. Reaction kinetics revealed a pseudo-first order kinetics. Factors like pH, contact time, stabilizer, and humic acid facilitates the reduction of Cr(VI).

  6. Polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole core/shell nanofiber mat for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► PAN nanofibers obtained by electrospinning. ► PAN/PPy core/shell nanofiber membrane was prepared. ► PAN/PPy core/shell nanofiber membrane used for Cr(VI) removal. ► Adsorption capacity remained up to 80% within 5 times cycles. -- Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole (PAN/PPy) core–shell structure nanofibers were prepared via electrospinning followed by in situ polymerization of pyrrole monomer for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. Attenuated total reflections Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results confirmed the presence of the polypyrrole (PPy) layer on the surface of PAN nanofibers. The morphology and structure of the core–shell PAN/PPy nanofibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the core–shell structure can be clearly proved from the SEM and TEM images. Adsorption results indicated that the adsorption capacity increased with the initial solution pH decreased. The adsorption equilibrium reached within 30 and 90 min as the initial solution concentration increased from 100 to 200 mg/L, and the process can be described using the pseudo-second-order model. Isotherm data fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after 5 times usage. The adsorption mechanism was also studied by XPS

  7. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Self-rotating reactor including TiO2 NTs is applied under solar irradiation. • Simultaneously photocatalysis of Cr(VI) and EDCs is observed to be up to 95%. • Photocatalytic reactions of Cr(VI) and EDCs are favorable under acidic pH. • Charge interaction and hole scavenge between TiO2 and pollutants are synergy factors. - Abstract: In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO2 nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO2 nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron–hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions

  8. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngji [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Hyunku [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Her, Namguk [Korea Army Academy at Young-Cheon, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, 135-1 Changhari, Kokyungmeon, Young-cheon, Gyeongbuk 770-849 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeomin [University of South Carolina, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Sohn, Jinsik [Kookmin University, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungpyo [Korea University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jaekyung, E-mail: jyoon@kier.re.kr [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Self-rotating reactor including TiO{sub 2} NTs is applied under solar irradiation. • Simultaneously photocatalysis of Cr(VI) and EDCs is observed to be up to 95%. • Photocatalytic reactions of Cr(VI) and EDCs are favorable under acidic pH. • Charge interaction and hole scavenge between TiO{sub 2} and pollutants are synergy factors. - Abstract: In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO{sub 2} nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron–hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions.

  9. Chromate Reductase YieF from Escherichia coli Enhances Hexavalent Chromium Resistance of Human HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI is a serious environmental pollutant and human toxicant. Mammalian cells are very sensitive to chromate as they lack efficient chromate detoxifying strategy, e.g., chromate-reducing genes that are widely present in prokaryotes. To test whether introduction of prokaryotic chromate-reducing gene into mammalian cells could render higher chromate resistance, an Escherichia coli chromate-reducing gene yieF was transfected into human HepG2 cells. The expression of yieF was measured in stably transfected cells HepG2-YieF by quantitative RT-PCR and found up-regulated by 3.89-fold upon Cr(VI induction. In chromate-reducing ability test, HepG2-YieF cells that harbored the reductase showed significantly higher reducing ability of Cr(VI than HepG2 control cells. This result was further supported by the evidence of increased Cr(VI-removing ability of crude cell extract of HepG2-YieF. Moreover, HepG2-YieF demonstrated 10% higher viability and decreased expression of GSH synthesizing enzymes under Cr(VI stress. Subcellular localization of YieF was determined by tracing GFP-YieF fusion protein that was detected in both nucleus and cytoplasm by laser confocal microscopy. Altogether, this study successfully demonstrated that the expression of a prokaryotic Cr(VI-reducing gene yieF endowed mammalian cell HepG2 with enhanced chromate resistance, which brought new insight of Cr(VI detoxification in mammalian cells.

  10. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. II. Ex vivo gastric reduction modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Christopher R; Suh, Mina; Hays, Sean M; Gürleyük, Hakan; Gerads, Russ; De Flora, Silvio; Parker, William; Lin, Shu; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-09-01

    To extend previous models of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction by gastric fluid (GF), ex vivo experiments were conducted to address data gaps and limitations identified with respect to (1) GF dilution in the model; (2) reduction of Cr(VI) in fed human GF samples; (3) the number of Cr(VI) reduction pools present in human GF under fed, fasted, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-use conditions; and (4) an appropriate form for the pH-dependence of Cr(VI) reduction rate constants. Rates and capacities of Cr(VI) reduction were characterized in gastric contents from fed and fasted volunteers, and from fasted pre-operative patients treated with PPIs. Reduction capacities were first estimated over a 4-h reduction period. Once reduction capacity was established, a dual-spike approach was used in speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry analyses to characterize the concentration-dependence of the 2nd order reduction rate constants. These data, when combined with previously collected data, were well described by a three-pool model (pool 1 = fast reaction with low capacity; pool 2 = slow reaction with higher capacity; pool 3 = very slow reaction with higher capacity) using pH-dependent rate constants characterized by a piecewise, log-linear relationship. These data indicate that human gastric samples, like those collected from rats and mice, contain multiple pools of reducing agents, and low concentrations of Cr(VI) (<0.7 mg/L) are reduced more rapidly than high concentrations. The data and revised modeling results herein provide improved characterization of Cr(VI) gastric reduction kinetics, critical for Cr(VI) pharmacokinetic modeling and human health risk assessment. PMID:27396814

  11. Comparison of in vivo genotoxic and carcinogenic potency to augment mode of action analysis: Case study with hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Bichteler, Anne; Rager, Julia E; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Recent analyses-highlighted by the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment-have identified a correlation between (log) estimates of a carcinogen's in vivo genotoxic potency and in vivo carcinogenic potency in typical laboratory animal models, even when the underlying data have not been matched for tissue, species, or strain. Such a correlation could have important implications for risk assessment, including informing the mode of action (MOA) of specific carcinogens. When in vivo genotoxic potency is weak relative to carcinogenic potency, MOAs other than genotoxicity (e.g., endocrine disruption or regenerative hyperplasia) may be operational. Herein, we review recent in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), following oral ingestion, in relevant tissues and species in the context of the aforementioned correlation. Potency estimates were generated using benchmark doses, or no-observable-adverse-effect-levels when data were not amenable to dose-response modeling. While the ratio between log values for carcinogenic and genotoxic potency was ≥1 for many compounds, the ratios for several Cr(VI) datasets (including in target tissue) were less than unity. In fact, the ratios for Cr(VI) clustered closely with ratios for chloroform and diethanolamine, two chemicals posited to have non-genotoxic MOAs. These findings suggest that genotoxicity may not play a major role in the cancers observed in rodents following exposure to high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water-a finding consistent with recent MOA and adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses concerning Cr(VI). This semi-quantitative analysis, therefore, may be useful to augment traditional MOA and AOP analyses. More case examples will be needed to further explore the general applicability and validity of this approach for human health risk assessment. PMID:27085472

  12. Gene 33/Mig6 inhibits hexavalent chromium-induced DNA damage and cell transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyoung; Li, Cen; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Xu, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human lung carcinogens and environmental/occupational hazards. The molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis appear to be complex and are poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the potential role of Gene 33 (ERRFI1, Mig6), a multifunctional adaptor protein, in Cr(VI)-mediated lung carcinogenesis. We show that the level of Gene 33 protein is suppressed by both acute and chronic Cr(VI) treatments in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells. The inhibition also occurs in A549 lung bronchial carcinoma cells. Cr(VI) suppresses Gene 33 expression mainly through post-transcriptional mechanisms, although the mRNA level of gene 33 also tends to be lower upon Cr(VI) treatments. Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage appears primarily in the S phases of the cell cycle despite the high basal DNA damage signals at the G2M phase. Knockdown of Gene 33 with siRNA significantly elevates Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage in both BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Depletion of Gene 33 also promotes Cr(VI)-induced micronucleus (MN) formation and cell transformation in BEAS-2B cells. Our results reveal a novel function of Gene 33 in Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage and lung epithelial cell transformation. We propose that in addition to its role in the canonical EGFR signaling pathway and other signaling pathways, Gene 33 may also inhibit Cr(VI)-induced lung carcinogenesis by reducing DNA damage triggered by Cr(VI). PMID:26760771

  13. Lactational exposure to hexavalent chromium delays puberty by impairing ovarian development, steroidogenesis and pituitary hormone synthesis in developing Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) is used in a wide range of industries. Cr-VI from chromate industries and atmospheric emissions contribute to the Cr contamination in the environment. Cr is a reproductive metal toxicant that can traverse the placental barrier and cause a wide range of fetal effects including ovotoxicity. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the basic mechanisms involved in Cr(VI)-induced ovotoxicity, and the protective role of vitamin C on ovarian follicular development and function in Cr(VI)-induced reproductive toxicity using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. Lactating rats received potassium dichromate (200 mg/L) with or without vitamin C (500 mg/L), through drinking water from postpartum days 1-21. During postnatal days (PND) 1-21 the pups received Cr(VI) via the mother's milk. Pups from both control and treatment groups were continued on regular diet and water from PND-21 onwards, and euthanized on PND-21, -45 and -65. Cr(VI) decreased steroidogenesis, GH and PRL, increased FSH and did not alter LH. Cr(VI) delayed puberty, decreased follicle number, and extended estrous cycle. Spontaneously immortalized rat granulosa cells were treated with 12.5 μM (IC50) potassium dichromate for 12 and 24 h, with or without vitamin C pre-treatment. Cr(VI) decreased the mRNA expressions of StAR, SF-1, 17β-HSD-1, 17β-HSD-2, FSHR, LHR, ERα and ERβ. Vitamin C pre-treatment protected ovary and granulosa cells from the deleterious effects of Cr(VI) toxicity, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, Cr(VI) toxicity could be a potential risk to the reproductive system in developing females, and vitamin C plays a protective role against Cr(VI)-induced ovotoxicity

  14. Determination of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Concentrations via Ion Chromatography and UV-Vis Spectrophotometry in Samples Collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant, East Texas (USA)

    OpenAIRE

    Onchoke, Kefa K.; Sasu, Salomey A.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a toxic environmental pollutant and carcinogen, was determined in samples collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant (NWWTP) using ion chromatography and UV-visible spectrophotometry (IC, UV-Vis). On reaction with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) Cr+6 forms a 1,5-diphenylcarbazide-Cr(VI) complex, which is then analyzed at 530 nm and 540 nm, respectively. Via ion chromatography Cr(VI) concentrations were in the range of 0.00190±0.0020 an...

  15. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Chung, Young-Hoon; Lee, Myeong Jae; Yoo, Sung Jong; Bokare, Alok D.; Choi, Wonyong; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was confirmed. This concept was also successfully applied to a methanol fuel cell to enhance its performance efficiency and to remove toxic Cr (VI) at the same time.

  16. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Behavior of Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II) metal-organic framework and its application in selective sensing hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Hongmin Ma; Xiaojian Li; Tao Yan; Yan Li; Haiyang Liu; Yong Zhang; Dan Wu; Bin Du; Qin Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II)-β-cyclodextrin (Pb-β-CD) metal-organic framework for detecting hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed. Pb-β-CD shows excellent ECL behavior and unexpected reducing ability towards Au ions. Au nanoparticles could massively form on the surface of Pb-β-CD (Au@Pb-β-CD) without use of any additional reducing agent. In the presence of coreactant K2S2O8, the ECL emission of Pb-β-CD was enhanc...

  17. Characterization of concentration, particle size distribution, and contributing factors to ambient hexavalent chromium in an area with multiple emission sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Huang, Lihui; Shin, Jin Young; Artigas, Francisco; Fan, Zhi-hua (Tina)

    2014-09-01

    Airborne hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a known pulmonary carcinogen and can be emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources, including diesel emissions. However, there is limited knowledge about ambient Cr(VI) concentration levels and its particle size distribution. This pilot study characterized ambient Cr(VI) concentrations in the New Jersey Meadowlands (NJ ML) district, which is close to the heavily trafficked New Jersey Turnpike (NJTPK) as well as Chromium Ore Processing Residue (COPR) waste sites. Monitoring was simultaneously conducted at two sites, William site (∼50 m from NJTPK) and MERI site (∼700 m from NJTPK). The distance between the two sites is approximately 6.2 km. Ambient Cr(VI) concentrations and PM2.5 mass concentrations were concurrently measured at both sites during summer and winter. The summer concentrations (mean ± S.D. [median]), 0.13 ± 0.06 [0.12] ng/m3 at the MERI site and 0.08 ± 0.05 [0.07] ng/m3 at the William site, were all significantly higher than the winter concentrations, 0.02 ± 0.01 [0.02] ng/m3 and 0.03 ± 0.01 [0.03] ng/m3 at the MERI and William sites, respectively. The site difference (i.e., MERI > William) was observed for summer Cr(VI) concentrations; however, no differences for winter and pooled datasets. These results suggest higher Cr(VI) concentrations may be attributed from stronger atmospheric reactions such as photo-oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in the summer. The Cr(VI) distribution as a function of particle size, ranging from 0.18 to 18 μm, was determined at the William site. It was found that Cr(VI) was enriched in the particles less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). This finding suggested potential health concerns, because PM2.5 are easily inhaled and deposited in the alveoli. A multiple linear regression analysis confirmed ambient Cr(VI) concentrations were significantly affected by meteorological factors (i.e., temperature and humidity) and reactive gases/particles (i.e., O3, Fe and Mn).

  18. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr6+). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered and analyzed by inductively-coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr6+. GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, Cold Metal Transfer™, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr6+ ranged from 50 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1 to 270μg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13 to 330μg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50 to 300μg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4 to140 μg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as 5 times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes

  19. Low temperature reduction of hexavalent chromium by a microbial enrichment consortium and a novel strain of Arthrobacter aurescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Vicki S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromium is a transition metal most commonly found in the environment in its trivalent [Cr(III] and hexavalent [Cr(VI] forms. The EPA maximum total chromium contaminant level for drinking water is 0.1 mg/l (0.1 ppm. Many water sources, especially underground sources, are at low temperatures (less than or equal to 15 Centigrade year round. It is important to evaluate the possibility of microbial remediation of Cr(VI contamination using microorganisms adapted to these low temperatures (psychrophiles. Results Core samples obtained from a Cr(VI contaminated aquifer at the Hanford facility in Washington were enriched in Vogel Bonner medium at 10 Centigrade with 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/l Cr(VI. The extent of Cr(VI reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide assay. Resistance to Cr(VI up to and including 1000 mg/l Cr(VI was observed in the consortium experiments. Reduction was slow or not observed at and above 100 mg/l Cr(VI using the enrichment consortium. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI in the 30 and 60 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the consortium was 8 and 17 days, respectively at 10 Centigrade. Lyophilized consortium cells did not demonstrate adsorption of Cr(VI over a 24 hour period. Successful isolation of a Cr(VI reducing organism (designated P4 from the consortium was confirmed by 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI at 10 Centigrade in the 25 and 50 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the isolate P4 was 3 and 5 days, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequence from isolate P4 identified this organism as a strain of Arthrobacter aurescens, a species that has not previously been shown to be capable of low temperature Cr(VI reduction. Conclusion A. aurescens, indigenous to the subsurface, has the potential to be a predominant metal reducer in enhanced, in situ subsurface bioremediation efforts involving Cr(VI and possibly other heavy metals and radionuclides.

  20. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  1. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of total and hexavalent chromium in atmospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method was developed which allow separate determination of Cr(VI) and total Cr from the same minute sample of atmospheric aerosols. Cr(VI) was leached was with 0.1 M Na2CO3 and the total Cr concentrations were determined after acid digestion. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials, CRM 545, Mess-3 and Pacs-2 with good agreement between certified and found values. Cr concentrations in air samples taken around the chromium smelter show concentrations that exceed the maximum allowed levels in 8 h with higher values closer to the smelter. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method for Cr(VI) determination in air samples was found to be 0.2 ng m-3, i.e. lower than offered by the commonly preferred spectrophotometric and colorimetric techniques

  2. Comparative Biosorption Studies of Hexavalent Chromium Ion onto Raw and Modified Palm Branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Shouman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The waste of palm branches (PB was tested for its ability to remove chromium (VI from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Palm branches chemically modified with an oxidizing agent (sulphuric acid then coated with chitosan and surfactant (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant, HDTMA, respectively, were carried out to improve the removal performance of PB. The results of their Cr (VI removal performances are pH dependent. The adsorption data could be well interpreted by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Flory-Huggins isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir model for the chitosan coated oxidized palm branches is 55 mg/mg. The adsorption process could be described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion study revealed that film diffusion might be involved. The biosorbents were successfully regenerated using 1 M HCL solution.

  3. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health risks of too much chromium? Chromium and medication interactions Supplemental sources of chromium Chromium and Healthful Diets References Disclaimer What foods provide chromium? Chromium is widely distributed in the ...

  4. Bioreduction of hexavalent chromium by live and active phanerochaete chrysosporium: kinetics and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the potential of live and active Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white rot fungi, to remove lower Cr(VI) concentration from aqueous solutions was reported for the first time. A medium pH had significant effect on the growth of the fungus and bioremoval of Cr(VI). Substrate inhibition on the growth of Phanerochaete chrysosporium was evident beyond 20 g L-1 of dextrose concentration. A maximum biomass concentration of 15.64 g L-1 was obtained for an initial dextrose concentration of 20 g L-1 in metal free medium at pH 6.0. An increase in Cr(VI) concentration beyond 10 mg L-1 inhibited the growth of the fungi, thereby, reducing the chromium bioremoval efficiency. A maximum reduction efficiency of 98.92% was reported for an initial metal concentration of 10 mg L-1. A mathematical expression for the bioreduction of Cr(VI) considering the organic compounds in the cells was proposed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Bioreduction of hexavalent chromium by live and active phanerochaete chrysosporium: kinetics and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugavelh, Somasundaram; Mohanty, Kaustubha [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2012-07-15

    In this work the potential of live and active Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white rot fungi, to remove lower Cr(VI) concentration from aqueous solutions was reported for the first time. A medium pH had significant effect on the growth of the fungus and bioremoval of Cr(VI). Substrate inhibition on the growth of Phanerochaete chrysosporium was evident beyond 20 g L{sup -1} of dextrose concentration. A maximum biomass concentration of 15.64 g L{sup -1} was obtained for an initial dextrose concentration of 20 g L{sup -1} in metal free medium at pH 6.0. An increase in Cr(VI) concentration beyond 10 mg L{sup -1} inhibited the growth of the fungi, thereby, reducing the chromium bioremoval efficiency. A maximum reduction efficiency of 98.92% was reported for an initial metal concentration of 10 mg L{sup -1}. A mathematical expression for the bioreduction of Cr(VI) considering the organic compounds in the cells was proposed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Medium with the Antibiotic Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xining

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic residue was used as a biosorbent for Cr (VI aqueous solution to investigate its Cr (VI removal capacity. The effect of experimental parameters, such as pH, sorbent dosage, initial metal concentration and contact time were examined and the optimal experimental conditions were determined. The results showed that 88.61 and 95.07% of Cr (VI was removed by using the raw and acid-treated antibiotic residue powder as biosorbent. Maximum removal of Cr (VI ions in aqueous solution was observed at pH 1.0. Biosorption kinetic data were properly fitted with the pseudo-first order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed the Langmuir isotherm adsorption model. Thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process, such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°, were calculated and the results indicated that the overall adsorption process were feasible, spontaneous in nature. Finally, the removal mechanism is discussed by deduction from the experimental results, FTIR and SEM images. The adsorption of Cr (VI coexists with the redox process and the antibiotic residue powder is a potential biosorbent which could be used in treatment of chromium contaminated wastewater.

  7. IN-VITRO BIOREDUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM BY VIABLE WHOLE CELLS OF Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satarupa Dey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A chromium resistant and reducing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 was isolated from chromite mine overburden dumps of Orissa, India. Viable whole cells of this isolate was capable of completely reducing 100 µM Cr(VI in chemically defined MS medium within 28 h of incubation under batch cultivation. Reduction of chromate increased with increased cell density and was maximum at a density of 1010 cells/ml, but the reduction potential of the suspended cells decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration in the medium. Chromate reducing efficiency was promoted when glycerol and glucose was used as electron donors, while the optimum pH and temperature of Cr(VI reduction was found to be 7.0 and 35°C respectively. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Ni, Co and Cd, but not by Cu and Fe. Similarly, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, N,N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide (DCC, sodium azide and sodium fluoride were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while in presence of 2,4 dinitrophenol (2,4 DNP chromate reduction by SUK 1201 cells remained unaffected.

  8. Hexavalent chromium reduction by Acinetobacter haemolyticus isolated from heavy-metal contaminated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, Zainul Akmar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Zainoha [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Surif, Salmijah [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Wan Azlina [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: azlina@kimia.fs.utm.my

    2007-07-19

    Possible application of a locally isolated environmental isolate, Acinetobacter haemolyticus to remediate Cr(VI) contamination in water system was demonstrated. Cr(VI) reduction by A. haemolyticus seems to favour the lower concentrations (10-30 mg/L). However, incomplete Cr(VI) reduction occurred at 70-100 mg/L Cr(VI). Initial specific reduction rate increased with Cr(VI) concentrations. Cr(VI) reduction was not affected by 1 or 10 mM sodium azide (metabolic inhibitor), 10 mM of PO{sub 4} {sup 3-}, SO{sub 4} {sup 2-}, SO{sub 3} {sup 2-}, NO{sub 3} {sup -} or 30 mg/L of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) ions. However, heat treatment caused significant dropped in Cr(VI) reduction to less than 20% only. A. haemolyticus cells loses its shape and size after exposure to 10 and 50 mg Cr(VI)/L as revealed from TEM examination. The presence of electron-dense particles in the cytoplasmic region of the bacteria suggested deposition of chromium in the cells.

  9. Coals as sorbents for the removal and reduction of hexavalent chromium from aqueous waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, J.; Brown, S.D.; Snape, C.E. [University of Miskolc, Miskolc (Hungary). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the potential of coals as a low-cost reactive barrier material for environmental protection applications, with the ability to prevent leaching of toxic Cr(VI) and other transition metals. Depending upon the type of ion and the surface functionalities, the uptake can involve ion sorption, ion exchange, chelation and redox mechanisms with the surface functionalities being considered as partners in electron transfer processes. The capacity for Cr(VI) uptake of low rank coals and oxidized bituminous coals has been found to lie within the range 02-0.6 mM g{sup -1}. Air oxidation of bituminous coals can increase their Cr(VI) removal capacities. The effect of air oxidation of coals on uptake capacity was more pronounced for Cr(VI) than Cr(III) but less than for Hg(II) and the other ions (Ca{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2}) investigated. As previously found for Hg(II), redox mechanisms plays an important role in Cr(VI) uptake, with resultant Cr(III) is exchanged back into solution by hydrogen ions, but some of the sorbed chromium is irreversibly bound to the coal. The reduction of Cr(VI) alone is often considered a satisfactory solution in view of Cr(III) being essentially nontoxic. 56 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Global transcriptome analysis of hexavalent chromium stress responses in Staphylococcus aureus LZ-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Wenyang; Virgo, Nolan; Zou, Luming; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strain LZ-01, isolated from the Lanzhou reaches of the Yellow River, is capable of reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III) aerobically. We employed transcriptome sequencing analysis to identify genes involved in Cr(VI) stress responses in S. aureus LZ-01. Our results showed that 512 of the 2,370 predicted genes displayed up-regulation (>2-fold), and 49 genes were down-regulated (128 genes were annotated to encode proteins involved in cellular processes; 68 were categorized to transport and binding proteins; 26 were involved in DNA repair and 32 were associated with regulatory functions. To further elucidate the Cr(VI) resistance and reduction mechanism, we carried out physiological tests and quantitative PCR analysis. Both RNA-seq and qRT-PCR data showed genes encoding a thioredoxin reductase and main subunits of cytochrome c oxidase complex were up-regulated upon Cr(VI) treatment. Either cadmium or NaN3 treatment could inhibit Cr(VI) reduction which indicates that thioredoxin and cytochrome are involved in Cr(VI) reduction strain LZ-01. 29 ABC-type metal/multidrug transporters and efflux pumps were up-regulated, suggesting that they are involved in Cr(VI) resistance by pumping chromium ions out of cells. The up-regulation of 26 DNA repair genes demonstrate that Cr(VI) is toxic to DNA and those DNA protection proteins need to be responded for Cr(VI) stress. Based on these results, the mechanism of strain LZ-01 resists and reduces Cr(VI) is revealed. PMID:25086489

  11. Determination of hexavalent chromium in exhaled breath condensate and environmental air among chrome plating workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium speciation has attracted attention because of the different toxicity of Cr(III), which is considered relatively non-toxic, and Cr(VI), which can cross cell membranes mainly as a chromate anion and has been classified as a class I human carcinogen. The aims of the present study were to measure soluble Cr(VI) levels in environmental samples, to develop a simple method of quantifying Cr(VI) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and to follow the kinetics of EBC Cr(VI) in chrome plating workers. Personal air samples were collected from 10 chrome platers; EBC was collected from the same workers immediately after the work shift on Tuesday and before the work shift on the following Wednesday. Environmental and EBC Cr(VI) levels were determined by means of colorimetry and electrothermal absorption atomic spectrometry, respectively. The method of detecting Cr(VI) in environmental air was based on the extraction of the Cr(VI)-diphenylcarbazide (Cr(VI)-DPC) complex in 1-butanol, whereas EBC Cr(VI) was determined using a solvent extraction of Cr(VI) as an ion pair with tetrabutylammonium ion, and subsequent direct determination of the complex (Cr(VI)-DPC) in EBC. Kinetic data showed that airborne Cr(VI) was reduced by 50% in airway lining fluid sampled at the end of exposure and that there was a further 50% reduction after about 15 h. The persistence of Cr(VI) in EBC supports the use of EBC in assessing target tissue levels of Cr(VI)

  12. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. I. Chemical reduction and mitigation of mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Flora, Silvio; Camoirano, Anna; Micale, Rosanna T; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Marabotto, Elisa; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the reducing capacity of human gastric fluid from healthy individuals, under fasted and fed conditions, is critical for assessing the cancer hazard posed by ingested hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and for developing quantitative physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models used in risk assessment. In the present study, the patterns of Cr(VI) reduction were evaluated in 16 paired pre- and post-meal gastric fluid samples collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Human gastric fluid was effective both in reducing Cr(VI), as measured by using the s-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method, and in attenuating mutagenicity in the Ames test. The mean (±SE) Cr(VI)-reducing ability of post-meal samples (20.4±2.6μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid) was significantly higher than that of pre-meal samples (10.2±2.3μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid). When using the mutagenicity assay, the decrease of mutagenicity produced by pre-meal and post-meal samples corresponded to reduction of 13.3±1.9 and 25.6±2.8μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid, respectively. These data are comparable to parallel results conducted by using speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Cr(VI) reduction was rapid, with >70% of total reduction occurring within 1min and 98% of reduction is achieved within 30min with post-meal gastric fluid at pH2.0. pH dependence was observed with decreasing Cr(VI) reducing capacity at higher pH. Attenuation of the mutagenic response is consistent with the lack of DNA damage observed in the gastrointestinal tract of rodents following administration of ≤180ppm Cr(VI) for up to 90days in drinking water. Quantifying Cr(VI) reduction kinetics in the human gastrointestinal tract is necessary for assessing the potential hazards posed by Cr(VI) in drinking water. PMID:27404458

  13. Efecto del Cromo Hexavalente y Trivalente sobre el Crecimiento de Escherichia coli ATCC 35218 Effects of Hexavalent and Trivalent Chromium on the Growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 35218

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo R Azario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió el efecto de cromo (VI y (III sobre el crecimiento de Escherichia coli ATCC 35218 con el fin de determinar la toxicidad de estas especies químicas. El estudio fue realizado en dos condiciones experimentales: soluciones unimetal de cromo (III o VI y en soluciones multimetal conteniendo además plomo y cadmio. Se observa que el cromo hexavalente inhibe el crecimiento de Escherichia coli, cuando se encuentra en un rango de concentración de 25 a 100 ppm, similar al de efluentes industriales, y que dicho efecto es potenciado por la presencia de plomo, que per se no modifica la viabilidad bacteriana. Por otro lado, las concentraciones bajas de cromo (VI, 0.05 - 5 ppm no alteran el crecimiento pero producen una estimulación en presencia de plomo o cadmio. La forma trivalente de cromo no modifica el crecimiento bacteriano a concentraciones bajas (25 a 100 ppm pero causa una estimulación a concentraciones más altas (200 a 400 ppm.The effect of chromium (III and (VI on the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 35218 was studied to determine the toxicity of these chemical species. The study was performed in two experimental conditions: single chromium solutions (III or VI and multimetal solutions containing chromium and either lead or cadmium. Hexavalent chromium, at concentrations from 25 to 100 ppm, similar to those found in industrial effluents, inhibits the growth of Escherichia coli. This inhibitory effect is increased by the presence of lead, which does not modify per se the bacterial viability. On the other hand, low concentrations of chromium (VI, 0.05-5 ppm do not alter bacterial growth but cause stimulation in the presence of either lead or cadmium. The trivalent form of chromium does not modify the bacterial growth at low concentrations (25 to 100 ppm but causes stimulation at high concentrations (200 to 400 ppm.

  14. Automated Ground-Water Sampling and Analysis of Hexavalent Chromium using a “Universal” Sampling/Analytical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Venedam

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of a “universal platform” for the deployment of analyticalsensors in the field for long-term monitoring of environmental contaminants were expandedin this investigation. The platform was previously used to monitor trichloroethene inmonitoring wells and at groundwater treatment systems (1,2. The platform was interfacedwith chromium (VI and conductivity analytical systems to monitor shallow wells installedadjacent to the Columbia River at the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, Washington. Agroundwater plume of hexavalent chromium is discharging into the Columbia River throughthe gravels beds used by spawning salmon. The sampling/analytical platform was deployedfor the purpose of collecting data on subsurface hexavalent chromium concentrations atmore frequent intervals than was possible with the previous sampling and analysis methodsemployed a the Site.

  15. Effective adsorption of hexavalent chromium through a three center (3c) co-operative interaction with an ionic liquid and biopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Tetraoctylammoniumbromide impregnated chitosan was prepared by ultrasonication. ► Physico-chemical characterization of the adsorbent was studied in detail. ► The sorbent has an adsorption capacity of 63.69 mg g−1 for chromium(VI). ► The mechanism involves a three center interaction with positive co-operative effect. ► Adsorbent is effectively regenerated with ammonium hydroxide. - Abstract: Biopolymers as well as ionic liquids are known for their potential applications. In this work, we report the utility of chitosan as an excellent platform for impregnating the ionic liquid, tetraoctylammonium bromide by ultrasonication and its subsequent adsorption for chromium(VI). The effective mass transfer due to sonication coupled with the hydrogen bonding interaction between chitosan-ionic liquid and the electrostatic interaction involving the amino groups in chitosan and hexavalent chromium governs this three center (3c) co-operative mechanism. The adsorption followed a pseudo second order kinetics with a Langmuir adsorption capacity of 63.69 mg g−1. Various isotherm models were used to correlate the experimental data and the adsorption process is exothermic with a decreased randomness at the solid–solution interface. The thermodynamics of the spontaneous adsorption process could be explained through a positive co-operative effect between the host (chitosan) and the guest (ionic liquid). The adsorbed chromium(VI) could be converted to ammonium chromate using ammonium hydroxide, thereby regenerating the adsorbent. The method could be translated into action in the form of practical application to a real sample containing chromium.

  16. Stabilisation of nanoscale zero-valent iron with biochar for enhanced transport and in-situ remediation of hexavalent chromium in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huijie; Fang, Zhanqiang; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Fang, Jianzhang; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a biochar-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI@BC) material was used for in situ remediation of hexavalent chromium-contaminated soil. Sedimentation tests and column experiments were used to compare the stability and mobility of nZVI@BC and bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of chromium, toxic effect of chromium and the content of iron were assessed through leaching tests and pot experiments. Sedimentation tests and transport experiments indicated that nZVI@BC with nZVI to BC mass ratio of 1:1 exhibited better stability and mobility than that of bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of Cr(VI) and Crtotal was 100% and 92.9%, respectively, when the soil was treated with 8 g/kg of nZVI@BC for 15 days. Moreover, such remediation effectively reduced the leachability of Fe caused by bare-nZVI. In addition, pot experiments showed that such remediation reduced the phytotoxicity of Cr and the leachable Fe and was favourable for plant growth. PMID:27064615

  17. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an important human carcinogen associated with pulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Exposure to Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell morphological change and malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive, it is also not known if Cr(VI)-induced transformation might accompany with invasive properties to facilitate metastasis. We aimed to study Cr(VI)-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells. The results showed that Cr(VI) at low doses represses E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, enhances mesenchymal marker vimentin expression and transforms the epithelial cell into fibroblastoid morphology. Cr(VI) also increases cell invasion and promotes colony formation. Further studies indicated that Cr(VI) uses multiple mechanisms to repress E-cadherin expression, including activation of E-cadherin repressors such as Slug, ZEB1, KLF8 and enhancement the binding of HDAC1 in E-cadherin gene promoter, but DNA methylation is not responsible for the loss of E-cadherin. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced E-cadherin and vimentin protein expression, attenuates cell invasion in matrigel and colony formation on soft agar. These results demonstrate that exposure to a common human carcinogen, Cr(VI), induces EMT and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells and implicate in cancer metastasis and prevention. - Graphical abstract: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: • We study if Cr(VI) might induce EMT and invasion in epithelial cells. • Cr(VI) induces EMT by altering E-cadherin and vimentin expression. • It also increases cell invasion and promotes oncogenic transformation. • Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced EMT, invasion and

  18. Synthesis, physical properties and application of the zero-valent iron/titanium dioxide heterocomposite having high activity for the sustainable photocatalytic removal of hexavalent chromium in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petala, Eleni; Baikousi, Maria; Karakassides, Michael A; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Filip, Jan; Tuček, Jiří; Vasilopoulos, Konstantinos C; Pechoušek, Jiří; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-04-21

    A magnetic photocatalytic material composed of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) homogeneously distributed over a mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2 matrix has been prepared by a multistage chemical process, including sol-gel technique, wet impregnation, and chemical reduction. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used for the structural and chemical characterization of the magnetic photocatalyst, while bulk magnetization measurements and scanning/transmission electron microscopy were employed to determine the physical and textural properties of the photocatalyst. The synthesized nZVI@TiO2 photocatalyst shows very high efficiency in the removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(vi), from water. The degradation rate follows a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Most importantly, the remarkable efficiency of the photocatalyst is found to be due to the synergistic contributions of both counterparts, nZVI and TiO2, as validated by comparative experiments with neat TiO2 and nZVI@TiO2 under UV-C irradiation and without irradiation. New insights into the mechanism of synergistic degradation of chromium(vi) and suppressed oxidation of nZVI particles in the composite material are proposed and therein discussed. PMID:27035846

  19. Transformed yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) overexpressing rice Tau class glutathione S-transferase (OsGSTU30 and OsGSTU41) shows enhanced resistance to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ankita; Indoliya, Yuvraj; Tiwari, Madhu; Tiwari, Poonam; Srivastava, Dipali; Verma, Pankaj kumar; Verma, Shikha; Gautam, Neelam; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2014-08-01

    Extensive use of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in leather tanning, stainless-steel production, wood preservatives and electroplating industries has resulted in widespread environmental pollution and poses a serious threat to human health. A plant's response to Cr(VI) stress results in growth inhibition and toxicity leading to changes in components of antioxidant systems. In a previous study, we observed that a large number of glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes were up-regulated under Cr(VI) stress in rice. In this study, two rice root-specific Tau class GST genes (OsGSTU30 and OsGSTU41) were introduced into yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Transformed yeast cells overexpressing OsGSTU30 and OsGSTU41 had normal growth, but had much higher levels of GST activities and showed enhanced resistance to Cr(VI) as compared to control cells (transformed with empty vector). Also, a higher accumulation of chromium was found in the transformed yeast cells as compared to the control cells. Manipulation of glutathione biosynthesis by exogenous application of buthionine sulfoximine abolishes the protective effect of OsGSTs against Cr(VI) stress. These results suggest that Tau class OsGSTs play a significant role in detoxification of Cr(VI), probably by chelating and sequestrating glutathione-Cr(VI) complexes into vacuoles. PMID:24968244

  20. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  1. Recovery and reuse of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gayathri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chrome plating industry is one of the highly polluting industries whose effluent mainly consists of chromium(VI. This compound is highly toxic to aquatic life and human health. The rinse water constituents reflect the chrome plating bath characteristics; generally dead tank wash water contains about 1% of the plating bath concentration. Other metals and metal compounds usually considered as toxic can be precipitated out by suitably adjusting the pH of the wastewaters. However, Cr(VI is soluble in almost all pH ranges and therefore an efficient treatment is required for the removal and recovery of chromium, and also for the reuse of wastewaters. The present study aims to recover the chromium by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange for the removal and concentration of chromate ions from the effluent. The different modes of operation like batch recirculation process, batch recirculation process with continuous dipping and continuous process were carried out to remove and recover the chromium from the effluent and the percentage reductions of chromium were found to be 98.69%, 99.18% and 100%, respectively.

  2. Chemical and microbial remediation of hexavalent chromium from contaminated soil and mining/metallurgical solid waste: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhal, B; Thatoi, H N; Das, N N; Pandey, B D

    2013-04-15

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants, and its occurrence is rare in nature. Lower to higher chromium containing effluents and solid wastes released by activities such as mining, metal plating, wood preservation, ink manufacture, dyes, pigments, glass and ceramics, tanning and textile industries, and corrosion inhibitors in cooling water, induce pollution and may cause major health hazards. Besides, natural processes (weathering and biochemical) also contribute to the mobility of chromium which enters in to the soil affecting the plant growth and metabolic functions of the living species. Generally, chemical processes are used for Cr- remediation. However, with the inference derived from the diverse Cr-resistance mechanism displayed by microorganisms and the plants including biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux, bioremediation is emerging as a potential tool to address the problem of Cr(VI) pollution. This review focuses on the chemistry of chromium, its use, and toxicity and mobility in soil, while assessing its concentration in effluents/wastes which becomes the source of pollution. In order to conserve the environment and resources, the chemical/biological remediation processes for Cr(VI) and their efficiency have been summarised in some detail. The interaction of chromium with various microbial/bacterial strains isolated and their reduction capacity towards Cr(VI) are also discussed. PMID:23467183

  3. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Alumina and Modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The development of an effective method regarding chromium removal from the environment is of great importance. Therefore, the present study aimed to examiner magnetic nanoparticles coated with alumina modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB in the removal of Cr6+ through magnetic solid phase extraction method. Materials & Methods: At first, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, coated with alumina, modified with CTAB and characterized with suitable instruments. The factors affecting the process of chromium removal were investigated, including the concentration of CTAB, the pH, the amount of nanoparticles, the sample volume, a proper eluent, the adsorption and desorption time, and the effect of interfering ions. Moreover, the chromium concentration was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS technique. The adsorption isotherm, adsorption capacity, and recoverability of the adsorbent were further examined. Results: The modified magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to be homogeneous, spherical, with a size lower than 20 nanometer having a magnetic property. The optimal conditions for chromium removal entailed 7*10-6 mol/L concentration of CTAB, pH range of 6-8, 0.1 g of the nanoparticles, 10 mL volume of the chromium sample (5 μg mL-1, nitric acid 2 M as a suitable eluent, 15 minutes of adsorption and desorption, and no interference of interfering ions in the process of chromium separation. The process efficiency under optimal conditions was determined to be over 95%, which this process followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption capacity proved to be 23.8 mg/g. Reusing after four times of adsorbent recovering was effective in the chromium removal (80%. The method accuracy for five measurement times was 4.155% and the method’s LOD was 0.081 mg/L. Conclusion: The method enjoys the benefits of convenient preparation of the adsorbent, high selectivity, high accuracy, short process

  4. Escherichia coli NemA is an efficient chromate reductase that can be biologically immobilized to provide a cell free system for remediation of hexavalent chromium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Robins

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium is a serious and widespread environmental pollutant. Although many bacteria have been identified that can transform highly water-soluble and toxic Cr(VI to insoluble and relatively non-toxic Cr(III, bacterial bioremediation of Cr(VI pollution is limited by a number of issues, in particular chromium toxicity to the remediating cells. To address this we sought to develop an immobilized enzymatic system for Cr(VI remediation. To identify novel Cr(VI reductase enzymes we first screened cell extracts from an Escherichia coli library of soluble oxidoreductases derived from a range of bacteria, but found that a number of these enzymes can reduce Cr(VI indirectly, via redox intermediates present in the crude extracts. Instead, activity assays for 15 candidate enzymes purified as His6-tagged proteins identified E. coli NemA as a highly efficient Cr(VI reductase (k(cat/K(M= 1.1×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 with NADH as cofactor. Fusion of nemA to the polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase gene phaC from Ralstonia eutropha enabled high-level biosynthesis of functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate granules displaying stable and active NemA on their surface. When these granules were combined with either Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase or Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase as a cofactor regenerating partner, high levels of chromate transformation were observed with only low initial concentrations of expensive NADH cofactor being required, the overall reaction being powered by consumption of the cheap sacrificial substrates glucose or formic acid, respectively. This system therefore offers promise as an economic solution for ex situ Cr(VI remediation.

  5. Titanium dioxide-gold nanocomposite materials embedded in silicate sol-gel film catalyst for simultaneous photodegradation of hexavalent chromium and methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Ramaraj, Ramasamy

    2012-02-15

    Aminosilicate sol-gel supported titanium dioxide-gold (EDAS/(TiO(2)-Au)(nps)) nanocomposite materials were synthesized by simple deposition-precipitation method and characterized. The photocatalytic oxidation and reduction activity of the EDAS/(TiO(2)-Au)(nps) film was evaluated using hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and methylene blue (MB) dye under irradiation. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was studied in the presence of hole scavengers such as oxalic acid (OA) and methylene blue (MB). The photocatalytic degradation of MB was investigated in the presence and absence of Cr(VI). Presence of Au(nps) on the (TiO(2))(nps) surface and its dispersion in the silicate sol-gel film (EDAS/(TiO(2)-Au)(nps)) improved the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of MB due to the effective interfacial electron transfer from the conduction band of the TiO(2) to Au(nps) by minimizing the charge recombination process when compared to the TiO(2) and (TiO(2)-Au)(nps) in the absence of EDAS. The EDAS/(TiO(2)-Au)(nps) nanocomposite materials provided beneficial role in the environmental remediation and purification process through synergistic photocatalytic activity by an advanced oxidation-reduction processes. PMID:22206972

  6. Effect of trace metals and electron shuttle on simultaneous reduction of reactive black-5 azo dye and hexavalent chromium in liquid medium by Pseudomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Riaz

    2015-11-01

    This study demonstrates the role of electron shuttles and trace metals in the biotransformation of azo dye reactive black-5 and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) that are released simultaneously in tannery effluent. Previously isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida KI was used for the simultaneous reduction of the dye (100 mg L(-1)) and CrVI (2 mg L(-1)) in a mineral salts medium (MSM). Among various trace metals, only Cu(II) had a stimulating effect on the bacterial-mediated reduction process. Application of electron shuttles such as hydroquinone and uric acid at a low concentration (1mM) had a positive effect on the reduction process and caused simultaneous reduction of 100% dye and 97% CrVI in 12-18 h. Mannitol, EDTA and sodium benzoate at all concentrations (ranging from 1 to 9 mM) showed an inhibitory effect on the reduction of reactive black-5 and CrVI. An inverse linear relationship between the velocity of reaction (V) and the concentration [S] of electron shuttles was observed. The results imply that both types and concentration of an electron shuttle and trace metals can affect the simultaneous reduction of reactive black-5 and CrVI. PMID:25556007

  7. Removal of hexavalent chromium ions by Yarrowia lipolytica cells modified with phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ashit; Bankar, Ashok; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Gosavi, Suresh; Zinjarde, Smita

    2013-03-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)], an important ground water pollutant by phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposite-modified cells of Yarrowia lipolytica (NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590), was investigated. Electron microscopy and magnetometer studies indicated an effective modification of yeast cell surfaces by the nanocomposites. The effect of pH, temperature, agitation speed, contact time and initial metal ion concentration on the removal of Cr (VI) was determined. The specific uptake values at pH 2.0 were 186.32 ± 3.17 and 137.31 ± 4.53 mg g- 1 for NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590, respectively, when 1000 mg L- 1 of metal ion concentrations were used. The equilibrium data fitted to Scatchard, Langmuir and linearized Freundlich models suggesting that adsorption played a role in the removal of Cr (VI) ions. The surface modified yeast cells displayed higher values of Langmuir and Scatchard coefficients than the unmodified cells indicating that the former were more efficient in Cr (VI) removal. The enhanced detoxification of Cr (VI) ions by this composite material could be attributed to the reductive power of the Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposites as well the yeast cell surface functional groups.

  8. Apparatus and method for time-integrated, active sampling of contaminants in fluids demonstrated by monitoring of hexavalent chromium in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Isaac B; Driver, Erin M; Halden, Rolf U

    2016-06-15

    Annual U.S. expenditures of $2B for site characterization invite the development of new technologies to improve data quality while reducing costs and minimizing uncertainty in groundwater monitoring. This work presents a new instrument for time-integrated sampling of environmental fluids using in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE). The In Situ Sampler (IS2) is an automated submersible device capable of extracting dissolved contaminants from water (100s-1000smL) over extended periods (hours to weeks), retaining the analytes, and rejecting the processed fluid. A field demonstration of the IS2 revealed 28-day average concentration of hexavalent chromium in a shallow aquifer affected by tidal stresses via sampling of groundwater as both liquid and sorbed composite samples, each obtained in triplicate. In situ SPE exhibited 75±6% recovery and an 8-fold improvement in reporting limit. Relative to use of conventional methods (100%), beneficial characteristics of the device and method included minimal hazardous material generation (2%), transportation cost (10%), and associated carbon footprint (2%). The IS2 is compatible with commercial SPE resins and standard extraction methods, and has been certified for more general use (i.e., inorganics and organics) by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) of the U.S. Department of Defense. PMID:26971208

  9. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Behavior of Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II) metal-organic framework and its application in selective sensing hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongmin; Li, Xiaojian; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Liu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II)-β-cyclodextrin (Pb-β-CD) metal-organic framework for detecting hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed. Pb-β-CD shows excellent ECL behavior and unexpected reducing ability towards Au ions. Au nanoparticles could massively form on the surface of Pb-β-CD (Au@Pb-β-CD) without use of any additional reducing agent. In the presence of coreactant K2S2O8, the ECL emission of Pb-β-CD was enhanced by the formation of Au nanoparticles. Cr(VI) can collisionally quench the ECL behavior of Au@Pb-β-CD/S2O8(2-) system and the detection mechanism was investigated. This ECL sensor is found to have a linear response in the range of 0.01-100 μM and a low detection limit of 3.43 nM (S/N = 3) under the optimal conditions. These results suggest that metal-organic framework Au@Pb-β-CD has great potential in extending the application in the ECL field as an efficient luminophore. PMID:26902375

  10. Optimization of fermentation conditions and properties of an exopolysaccharide from Klebsiella sp. H-207 and application in adsorption of hexavalent chromium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qiang

    Full Text Available The novel exopolysaccharide HZ-7 is produced by Klebsiella sp. H-207, and its fermentation conditions were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM. In this study, the optimized medium consisted of sucrose 31.93 g/L, KNO(3 2.17 g/L and K(2HPO(4 5.47 g/L; while the optimized culture conditions consisted of seed age 13 h, with an inoculum size of 10.6% and incubation temperature of 28.9°C. A maximum HZ-7 yield of about 15.05 g/L was achieved under the optimized conditions using RSM and single-factor experiments. Next the exopolysaccharide HZ-7 was partially purified and characterized. The resulting product showed good properties, such as high concentration of uronic acid (41.67%, low average molecular weight (about 1.94×10(5 Da and porous surface structure, were very advantageous to biosorption. Therefore HZ-7 was applied to absorb hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI. The maximum adsorption efficiency (99.2% which was obtained at an initial pH of 1.0 along with an initial Cr(VI concentration of 20 mg/L, was not affected by ordinary metal ions and temperature. These data suggest Klebsiella sp. H-207 exopolysaccharide will be promising potential for industrial application.

  11. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Behavior of Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II) metal-organic framework and its application in selective sensing hexavalent chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongmin; Li, Xiaojian; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Liu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II)-β-cyclodextrin (Pb-β-CD) metal-organic framework for detecting hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed. Pb-β-CD shows excellent ECL behavior and unexpected reducing ability towards Au ions. Au nanoparticles could massively form on the surface of Pb-β-CD (Au@Pb-β-CD) without use of any additional reducing agent. In the presence of coreactant K2S2O8, the ECL emission of Pb-β-CD was enhanced by the formation of Au nanoparticles. Cr(VI) can collisionally quench the ECL behavior of Au@Pb-β-CD/S2O82− system and the detection mechanism was investigated. This ECL sensor is found to have a linear response in the range of 0.01–100 μM and a low detection limit of 3.43 nM (S/N = 3) under the optimal conditions. These results suggest that metal-organic framework Au@Pb-β-CD has great potential in extending the application in the ECL field as an efficient luminophore. PMID:26902375

  12. Automated Ground-Water Sampling and Analysis of Hexavalent Chromium using a “Universal” Sampling/Analytical System

    OpenAIRE

    Venedam, Richard J.; Hartman, Mary J.; Hoffman, Dave A.; Burge, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    The capabilities of a “universal platform” for the deployment of analytical sensors in the field for long-term monitoring of environmental contaminants were expanded in this investigation. The platform was previously used to monitor trichloroethene in monitoring wells and at groundwater treatment systems (1,2). The platform was interfaced with chromium (VI) and conductivity analytical systems to monitor shallow wells installed adjacent to the Columbia River at the 100-D Area of the Hanford Si...

  13. Physicochemical and biological quality of soil in hexavalent chromium-contaminated soils as affected by chemical and microbial remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yingping; Min, Xiaobo; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and microbial methods are the main remediation technologies for chromium-contaminated soil. These technologies have progressed rapidly in recent years; however, there is still a lack of methods for evaluating the chemical and biological quality of soil after different remediation technologies have been applied. In this paper, microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria and chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate were used for the remediation of soils contaminated with Cr(VI) at two levels (80 and 1,276 mg kg(-1)) through a column leaching experiment. After microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria, the average concentration of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the soils was reduced to less than 5.0 mg kg(-1). Soil quality was evaluated based on 11 soil properties and the fuzzy comprehensive assessment method, including fuzzy mathematics and correlative analysis. The chemical fertility quality index was improved by one grade using microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria, and the biological fertility quality index increased by at least a factor of 6. Chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate, however, resulted in lower levels of available phosphorus, dehydrogenase, catalase and polyphenol oxidase. The result showed that microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria was more effective for remedying Cr(VI)-contaminated soils with high pH value than chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate. In addition, the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method was proven to be a useful tool for monitoring the quality change in chromium-contaminated soils. PMID:23784058

  14. IN-VIVO EVALUATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INDUCED DNA DAMAGE BY ALKALINE COMET ASSAY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CATLA CATLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantha Deivi Arunachalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the acute toxicity of Chromium in fingerlings of Catla catla, an Indian major carp, was evaluated with renewal bioassay method. In vivo studies were designed to assess the extent of Micronucleus Assay, Comet Assay under the exposure of common heavy-metal compounds, namely, Chromium Nitrate, using Catla catla (2n = 20, as a test model. The laboratory acclimatized fishes were divided into four groups. Group I served as positive control and the other three as exposed groups for three different time durations of 7, 14 and 21 days and were subjected to uninterrupted sub lethal concentrations (50% of 96 h LC50. The experiments were planned in such a way that fish from all the groups were sacrificed on the same day. The frequencies of micronuclei and bi-nuclei were evaluated comparatively in peripheral erythrocytes. As a result, it was observed that, the fishes and different tissues showed differential sensitivity to the heavy-metal treatment. A significant increase in the frequencies of micronucleated and binucleated cells and percentage increase in DNA tail (pCatla catla during sub lethal toxicity study was also calculated.

  15. Facile Synthesis of n-type (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2/p-type Ag2S Nanocomposite for Visible Light Photocatalytic Reduction To Detoxify Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Hairus; Kuo, Dong-Hau

    2015-12-01

    n-type (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2/p-type Ag2S nanocomposites with 10%, 20%, and 30% Ag2S loading were successfully synthesized via the simple solvothermal and sol gel methods. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized, and their visible light photocatalytic reductions were tested for detoxification of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). The results showed only 20 mg of the as-prepared nanocomposites could reduce 100 mL of 20 ppm potassium dichromate by almost 100% in less than 90 min without adding any hole scavenger agents and pH adjustment (pH = 7). The good photocatalytic reduction was related to the narrower bandgap of (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2 solid solution because of the hybridized orbitals of Ag, In, Zn, and S and low recombination rate of photogenerated electron and hole pairs due to the effectiveness of p-type Ag2S and n-type (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2 nanoheterojunctions. This work not only gives a contribution to the creation of visible light photocatalysis for wide-bandgap semiconductors, but also extends our technological viewpoints in designing highly efficient metal sulfide photocatalyst. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first finding of a high photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium under visible light illumination by simultaneously using both concepts of p-n nanoheterojunction and solid solution in our photocatalyst design. In this present work, these concepts were used to replace the use of hole scavenger agents, which were commonly used by many other works to retard the recombination rate of photoinduced electron and hole pairs for photodegradation of hexavalent chromium. PMID:26575792

  16. Determination of trace amounts of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters by dispersive microsolid-phase extraction using modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes combined with total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology based on the combination of dispersive microsolid-phase extraction (DMSPE) with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is proposed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with the anionic exchanger tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) were used as solid sorbents. After the sorption process of Cr(VI) on the modified MWCNTs, the aqueous sample was separated by centrifugation and the loaded MWCNTs were suspended using a small volume of an internal standard solution and analyzed directly by a benchtop TXRF spectrometer, without any elution step. Parameters affecting the extraction process (pH and volume of the aqueous sample, amount of MWCNTs, extraction time) and TXRF analysis (volume of internal standard, volume of deposited suspension on the reflector, drying mode, and instrumental parameters) have been carefully evaluated to test the real capability of the developed methodology for the determination of Cr(VI) at trace levels. Using the best analytical conditions, it was found that the minimum Cr(VI) content that can be detected in an aqueous solution was 3 μg L−1. This value is almost 20 times lower than the maximum hexavalent chromium content permissible in drinking waters, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Recoveries for spiked tap and mineral water samples were, in most cases, in the range of 101–108% which demonstrates the suitability of the TXRF methodology for monitoring Cr(VI) at trace levels in drinking water samples. - Highlights: • A method using DMSPE and TXRF is proposed for Cr(VI) determination in water. • CNTs modified with a commercial anionic exchanger are used for the DMSPE. • The detection limit for hexavalent chromium is 3 μg L−1. • Accuracy and precision are suitable for the analysis of tap and mineral waters

  17. Determination of trace amounts of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters by dispersive microsolid-phase extraction using modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes combined with total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadir, Z. [Department of Chemistry, Giresun University, Giresun (Turkey); Bulut, V.N. [Macka Vocational School, Karadeniz Technical University, Macka, Trabzon (Turkey); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Girona, Girona (Spain); Soylak, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri (Turkey); Marguí, E., E-mail: eva.margui@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Girona, Girona (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    A methodology based on the combination of dispersive microsolid-phase extraction (DMSPE) with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is proposed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with the anionic exchanger tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) were used as solid sorbents. After the sorption process of Cr(VI) on the modified MWCNTs, the aqueous sample was separated by centrifugation and the loaded MWCNTs were suspended using a small volume of an internal standard solution and analyzed directly by a benchtop TXRF spectrometer, without any elution step. Parameters affecting the extraction process (pH and volume of the aqueous sample, amount of MWCNTs, extraction time) and TXRF analysis (volume of internal standard, volume of deposited suspension on the reflector, drying mode, and instrumental parameters) have been carefully evaluated to test the real capability of the developed methodology for the determination of Cr(VI) at trace levels. Using the best analytical conditions, it was found that the minimum Cr(VI) content that can be detected in an aqueous solution was 3 μg L{sup −1}. This value is almost 20 times lower than the maximum hexavalent chromium content permissible in drinking waters, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Recoveries for spiked tap and mineral water samples were, in most cases, in the range of 101–108% which demonstrates the suitability of the TXRF methodology for monitoring Cr(VI) at trace levels in drinking water samples. - Highlights: • A method using DMSPE and TXRF is proposed for Cr(VI) determination in water. • CNTs modified with a commercial anionic exchanger are used for the DMSPE. • The detection limit for hexavalent chromium is 3 μg L{sup −1}. • Accuracy and precision are suitable for the analysis of tap and mineral waters.

  18. Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Down-Regulates Acetylation of Histone H4 at Lysine 16 through Induction of Stressor Protein Nupr1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Danqi; Kluz, Thomas; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoru; Sun, Hong; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The environmental and occupational carcinogen Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) has been shown to cause lung cancer in humans when inhaled. In spite of a considerable research effort, the mechanisms of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Nupr1 (nuclear protein 1) is a small, highly basic, and unfolded protein with molecular weight of 8,800 daltons and is induced by a variety of stressors. Studies in animal models have suggested that Nupr1 is a key factor in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers, with little known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we report that the level of Nupr1 is significantly increased in human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells following exposure to Cr(VI) through epigenetic mechanisms. Interestingly, Cr(VI) exposure also results in the loss of acetylation at histone H4K16, which is considered a ‘hallmark’ of human cancer. Cr(VI)-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation appears to be caused by the induction of Nupr1, since (a) overexpression of Nupr1 decreased the levels of both H4K16 acetylation and the histone acetyltransferase MOF (male absent on the first; also known as Kat8, Myst 1), which specifically acetylates H4K16; (b) the loss of acetylation of H4K16 upon Cr(VI) exposure is greatly compromised by knockdown of Nupr1. Moreover, Nupr1-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation correlates with the transcriptional down-regulation at several genomic loci. Notably, overexpression of Nupr1 induces anchorage-independent cell growth and knockdown of Nupr1 expression prevents Cr(VI)-induced cell transformation. We propose that Cr(VI) induces Nupr1 and rapidly perturbs gene expression by downregulating H4K16 acetylation, thereby contributing to Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:27285315

  19. Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Down-Regulates Acetylation of Histone H4 at Lysine 16 through Induction of Stressor Protein Nupr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Danqi; Kluz, Thomas; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoru; Sun, Hong; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The environmental and occupational carcinogen Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) has been shown to cause lung cancer in humans when inhaled. In spite of a considerable research effort, the mechanisms of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Nupr1 (nuclear protein 1) is a small, highly basic, and unfolded protein with molecular weight of 8,800 daltons and is induced by a variety of stressors. Studies in animal models have suggested that Nupr1 is a key factor in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers, with little known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we report that the level of Nupr1 is significantly increased in human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells following exposure to Cr(VI) through epigenetic mechanisms. Interestingly, Cr(VI) exposure also results in the loss of acetylation at histone H4K16, which is considered a 'hallmark' of human cancer. Cr(VI)-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation appears to be caused by the induction of Nupr1, since (a) overexpression of Nupr1 decreased the levels of both H4K16 acetylation and the histone acetyltransferase MOF (male absent on the first; also known as Kat8, Myst 1), which specifically acetylates H4K16; (b) the loss of acetylation of H4K16 upon Cr(VI) exposure is greatly compromised by knockdown of Nupr1. Moreover, Nupr1-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation correlates with the transcriptional down-regulation at several genomic loci. Notably, overexpression of Nupr1 induces anchorage-independent cell growth and knockdown of Nupr1 expression prevents Cr(VI)-induced cell transformation. We propose that Cr(VI) induces Nupr1 and rapidly perturbs gene expression by downregulating H4K16 acetylation, thereby contributing to Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:27285315

  20. Methylation levels of P16 and TP53 that are involved in DNA strand breakage of 16HBE cells treated by hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guiping; Li, Ping; Li, Yang; Wang, Tiancheng; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Wenxiao; Jia, Guang

    2016-05-13

    The correlations between methylation levels of p16 and TP53 with DNA strand breakage treated by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] remain unknown. In this research, Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells) in vitro and bioinformatics analysis were used to analyze the epigenetic role in DNA damage and potential biomarkers. CCK-8 and single cell gel electrophoresis assay were chosen to detect the cellular biological damage. MALDI-TOF-MS was used to detect the methylation levels of p16 and TP53. qRT-PCR was used to measure their expression levels in different Cr(VI) treatment groups. The transcription factors with target sequences of p16 and TP53 were predicted using various bioinformatics software. The findings showed that the cellular toxicity and DNA strand damage were Cr(VI) concentration dependent. The hypermethylation of CpG1, CpG31 and CpG32 of p16 was observed in Cr(VI) treated groups. There was significant positive correlation between the CpG1 methylation level of p16 and cell damage. In Cr(VI) treated groups, the expression level of p16 was lower than that in control group. The expression level of TP53 increased when the Cr(VI)concentration above 5μM. About p16, there was significant negative correlation between the CpG1 methylation levels with its expression level. A lot of binding sites for transcription factors existed in our focused CpG islands of p16. All the results suggested that the CpG1 methylation level of p16 could be used as a biomarker of epigenetic effect caused by Cr(VI) treatment, which can enhance cell damage by regulating its expression or affecting some transcription factors to combine with their DNA strand sites. PMID:27005777

  1. Hexavalent chromium-induced differential disruption of cortical microtubules in some Fabaceae species is correlated with acetylation of α-tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Michalopoulou, Vasiliki A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the cortical microtubules (MTs) of five species of the Fabaceae family (Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Vigna sinensis, Vigna angularis, and Medicago sativa) were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after immunolocalization of total tubulin with conventional immunofluorescence techniques and of acetylated α-tubulin with the specific 6-11B-1 monoclonal antibody. Moreover, total α-tubulin and acetylated α-tubulin were quantified by Western immunoblotting and scanning densitometry. Results showed the universality of Cr(VI) detrimental effects to cortical MTs, which proved to be a sensitive and reliable subcellular marker for monitoring Cr(VI) toxicity in plant cells. However, a species-specific response was recorded, and a correlation of MT disturbance with the acetylation status of α-tubulin was demonstrated. In V. faba, MTs were depolymerized at the gain of cytoplasmic tubulin background and displayed low α-tubulin acetylation, while in P. sativum, V. sinensis, V. angularis, and M. sativa, MTs became bundled and changed orientation from perpendicular to oblique or longitudinal. Bundled MTs were highly acetylated as determined by both immunofluorescence and Western immunoblotting. Tubulin acetylation in P. sativum and M. sativa preceded MT bundling; in V. sinensis it followed MT derangement, while in V. angularis the two phenomena coincided. Total α-tubulin remained constant in all treatments. Should acetylation be an indicator of MT stabilization, it is deduced that bundled MTs became stabilized, lost their dynamic properties, and were rendered inactive. Results of this report allow the conclusion that Cr(VI) toxicity disrupts MTs and deranges the MT-mediated functions either by depolymerizing or stabilizing them. PMID:26015161

  2. Hexavalent chromium targets mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I to induce reactive oxygen species-dependent caspase-3 activation in L-02 hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang; Li, Yanhong; Dai, Lu; Deng, Yuanyuan; Zou, Yue; Li, Peng; Yang, Yuan; Zhong, Caigao

    2012-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which is used for various industrial applications, such as leather tanning and chroming, can cause a number of human diseases including inflammation and cancer. Cr(VI) exposure leads to severe damage to the liver, but the mechanisms involved in Cr(VI)-mediated toxicity in the liver are unclear. The present study provides evidence that Cr(VI) enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation by inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (MRCC) I. Cr(VI) did not affect the expression levels of antioxidative proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and thioredoxin (Trx), indicating that the antioxidative system was not involved in Cr(VI)-induced ROS accumulation. We found that ROS mediated caspase-3 activation partially depends on the downregulation of the heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and 90. In order to confirm our hypothesis that ROS plays a key role in Cr(VI)-mediated cytotoxicity, we used N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to inhibit the accumulation of ROS. NAC successfully blocked the inhibition of HSP70 and HSP90 as well as the activation of caspase-3, suggesting that ROS is essential in Cr(VI)-induced caspase-3 activation. By applying different MRCC substrates as electron donors, we also confirmed that Cr(VI) could accept the electrons leaked from MRCC I and the reduction occurs at MRCC I. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Cr(VI) induces ROS-dependent caspase-3 activation by inhibiting MRCC I activity, and MRCC I has been identified as a new target and a new mechanism for the apoptosis-inducing activity displayed by Cr(VI). PMID:22710416

  3. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16m(2)g(-1) is obtained at 900°C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50mgL(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water. PMID:25898797

  4. Use of RSM modeling for optimizing decolorization of simulated textile wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 capable of simultaneous removal of reactive dyes and hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Zahid; Hussain, Sabir; Ahmad, Tanvir; Nadeem, Habibullah; Imran, Muhammad; Khalid, Azeem; Abid, Muhammad; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Remediation of colored wastewater loaded with dyes and metal ions is a matter of interest nowadays. In this study, 220 bacteria isolated from textile wastewater were tested for their potential to decolorize each of the four reactive dyes (reactive red-120, reactive black-5, reactive yellow-2, and reactive orange-16) in the presence of a mixture of four different heavy metals (Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd) commonly found in textile effluents. Among the tested bacteria, the isolate ZM130 was found to be the most efficient in decolorizing reactive dyes in the presence of the mixture of heavy metals and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The strain ZM130 was highly effective in simultaneously removing hexavalent chromium (25 mg L(-1)) and the azo dyes (100 mg L(-1)) from the simulated wastewater even in the presence of other three heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd). Simultaneous removal of chromium and azo dyes ranged as 76.6-98.7 % and 51.9-91.1 %, respectively, after 180 h incubation. On the basis of quadratic polynomial equation and response surfaces given by the response surface methodology (RSM), optimal salt content, pH, carbon co-substrate content, and level of multi-metal mixtures for decolorization of reactive red-120 in a simulated textile wastewater by the strain ZM130 were predicted to be 19.8, 7.8, and 6.33 g L(-1) and a multi-metal mixture (Cr 13.10 mg L(-1), Pb 26.21 mg L(-1), Cd 13.10 mg L(-1), Zn 26.21 mg L(-1)), respectively. Moreover, the strain ZM130 also exhibited laccase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced)-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (NADH-DCIP reductase) activity during the decolorization of reactive red-120. However, the laccase activity was found to be maximum in the presence of 300 mg L(-1) of the dye as compared to other concentrations. Hence, the isolation of this strain might serve as a potential bio-resource required for developing the strategies aiming at bioremediation of the

  5. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate hexavalent chromium in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie L; Wise, Sandra S; Xie, Hong; Zhu, Cairong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-12-01

    Chromium is both a global marine pollutant and a known human health hazard. In this study, we compare the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of both soluble and particulate chromate in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that both soluble and particulate Cr(VI) induce concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular Cr ion concentrations in both human and hawksbill sea turtle fibroblasts. Based on administered concentration, particulate and soluble Cr(VI) were more cytotoxic and clastogenic to human cells than sea turtle cells. When the analysis was based on the intracellular concentration of Cr, the data showed that the response of both species was similar. The one exception was the cytotoxicity of intracellular Cr ions from soluble Cr(VI), which caused more cytotoxicity in sea turtle cells (LC50=271μM) than that of human cells (LC50=471μM), but its clastogenicity was similar between the two species. Thus, adjusting for differences in uptake indicated that the explanation for the difference in potency was mostly due to uptake rather than differently affected mechanisms. Overall these data indicate that sea turtles may be a useful sentinel for human health responses to marine pollution. PMID:26440299

  6. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Reticulated N-Doped Carbonaceous Submicron Spheres for Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiawei; Long, Yuan; Wang, Yiyan; Wei, Chaoliang; Zhan, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article described a facile one-step method to prepare reticulated N-doped carbonaceous submicron spheres. Through a simple aerosol-assisted technology, glucosamine sulfate used as a carbon source was aerosolized and carbonized to functionalized carbonaceous submicron spheres. The electrostatic attraction between protonated amino groups and sulfate in the aerosol droplets induced a self-assembly and led to the formation of reticular structure, avoiding the use of templates. Compared to bare carbonaceous materials produced from glucose, reticulated N-doped carbonaceous spheres exhibit higher efficiency in the removal of Cr(VI), where the doping of element nitrogen led to electrostatic attraction between protonated nitrogen and chromium ions, and reticulated structure created relatively higher surface area and pore volume, facilitating materials to contact with Cr(VI) ions. XPS characterization proved these novel N-doped carbonaceous materials could effectively transform Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III) because of the surface reducing groups. For the practical application, several factors including the initial pH, materials dosage and recycle numbers on the removal performance were studied. PMID:27299376

  7. Natural occurrence of hexavalent chromium in a sedimentary aquifer in Urânia, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bourotte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous concentrations of hexavalent chromium have been detected in ground-water of the Adamantina Aquifer inat least 54 municipalities located in the northwestern region of the State of São Paulo, southeast Brazil, occasionallyexceeding the permitted limit for human consumption (0.05 mg.L-1. An investigation was conducted in the municipality of Urânia, where the highest concentrations of chromium were detected regionally. It was defined that the originof this contamination is natural, since high concentrations of chromium were detected in aquifer sandstones (averageof 221 ppm and also in pyroxenes (6000 ppm, one of the main heavy minerals found in the sediments. Besides, noother possible diffuse or point sources of contamination were observed in the study area. Stratification of ground-waterquality was observed and the highest concentrations of Cr6+ were detected at the base of the aquifer (0.12 mg.L-1,where ground-water shows elevated values for redox potential (472.5 mV and pH (8.61. The origin of Cr6+ in water may be associated with the weathering of pyroxene (augite, followed by the oxidation of Cr3+ by manganese oxides. The highest concentrations of Cr6+ are probably related to desorption reactions, due to the anomalous alkaline pHfound in ground-water at the base of the aquifer.Concentrações anômalas de cromo hexavalente foram detectadas em águas subterrâneas do Aqüífero Adamantina em pelo menos 54 municipalidades localizadas na região noroeste do Estado de São Paulo, sudeste do Brasil, algumas vezes ultrapassando o limite máximo permitido para consumo humano (0,05 mg.L-1. Um estudo foi realizado no município de Urânia, onde as mais elevadas concentrações de cromo da região foram detectadas. A origem da contaminação foi definida como natural, pois foram detectadas concentrações de cromonos arenitos do aqüífero (média 221 ppm e em piroxênios (6000 ppm, um dos principais minerais pesados encontrados nos sedimentos

  8. Root uptake and reduction of hexavalent chromium by aquatic macrophytes as assessed by high-resolution X-ray emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Martin, Neiva; Stutz, Guillermo; Tirao, German; Palácio, Soraya M; Rizzutto, Márcia A; Módenes, Aparecido N; Silva, Fernando G; Szymanski, Nayara; Kroumov, Alexander D

    2009-09-01

    Aquatic macrophytes Salvinia auriculata, Pistia stratiotes and Eichhornia crassipes were chosen to investigate the Cr(VI) reduced by root-based biosorption in a chromium uptake experiment, using a high-resolution XRF technique. These plants were grown in hydroponics medium supplied with non-toxic Cr concentrations during a 27-day metal uptake experiment. The high-resolution Cr-Kbeta fluorescence spectra for dried root tissues and Cr reference material (100% Cr, Cr(2)O(3), and CrO(3)) were measured using an XRF spectrometer. For all species of aquatic plant treated with Cr(VI), the energy of the Cr-Kbeta(2,5) line was shifted around 8 eV below the same spectral line identified for the Cr(VI) reference, but it was also near to the line identified for the Cr(III) reference. Moreover, there was a lack of the strong Cr-Kbeta'' line assigned to the Cr(VI) reference material within the Cr(VI)-treated plant spectra, suggesting the reduction of Cr(VI) for other less toxic oxidation states of Cr. As all Cr-Kbeta spectra of root tissue species were compared, the peak energies and lineshape patterns of the Cr-Kbeta(2,5) line are coincident for the same aquatic plant species, when they were treated with Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Based on the experimental evidence, the Cr(VI) reduction process has happened during metal biosorption by these plants. PMID:19595427

  9. Determination of trace amounts of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters by dispersive microsolid-phase extraction using modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes combined with total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadir, Z.; Bulut, V. N.; Hidalgo, M.; Soylak, M.; Marguí, E.

    2015-05-01

    A methodology based on the combination of dispersive microsolid-phase extraction (DMSPE) with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is proposed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with the anionic exchanger tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) were used as solid sorbents. After the sorption process of Cr(VI) on the modified MWCNTs, the aqueous sample was separated by centrifugation and the loaded MWCNTs were suspended using a small volume of an internal standard solution and analyzed directly by a benchtop TXRF spectrometer, without any elution step. Parameters affecting the extraction process (pH and volume of the aqueous sample, amount of MWCNTs, extraction time) and TXRF analysis (volume of internal standard, volume of deposited suspension on the reflector, drying mode, and instrumental parameters) have been carefully evaluated to test the real capability of the developed methodology for the determination of Cr(VI) at trace levels. Using the best analytical conditions, it was found that the minimum Cr(VI) content that can be detected in an aqueous solution was 3 μg L- 1. This value is almost 20 times lower than the maximum hexavalent chromium content permissible in drinking waters, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Recoveries for spiked tap and mineral water samples were, in most cases, in the range of 101-108% which demonstrates the suitability of the TXRF methodology for monitoring Cr(VI) at trace levels in drinking water samples.

  10. Titanium dioxide-gold nanocomposite materials embedded in silicate sol-gel film catalyst for simultaneous photodegradation of hexavalent chromium and methylene blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandikumar, Alagarsamy [Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Ramaraj, Ramasamy, E-mail: ramarajr@yahoo.com [Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Aminosilicate sol-gel supported TiO{sub 2}-Au nanocomposite material photocatalyst was prepared by deposition-precipitation method and used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of methyelene blue dye and Cr(VI) ions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} is used to design the solid-phase thin film photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au promotes the interfacial electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Cr(VI) to form Cr(III). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The holes produced at the TiO{sub 2} oxidize the MB dye. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} film was used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of toxic molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photoinduced simultaneous redox process provides dual benefit for the environment remediation. - Abstract: Aminosilicate sol-gel supported titanium dioxide-gold (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps}) nanocomposite materials were synthesized by simple deposition-precipitation method and characterized. The photocatalytic oxidation and reduction activity of the EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} film was evaluated using hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and methylene blue (MB) dye under irradiation. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was studied in the presence of hole scavengers such as oxalic acid (OA) and methylene blue (MB). The photocatalytic degradation of MB was investigated in the presence and absence of Cr(VI). Presence of Au{sub nps} on the (TiO{sub 2}){sub nps} surface and its dispersion in the silicate sol-gel film (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps}) improved the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of MB due to the effective interfacial electron transfer from the conduction band of the TiO{sub 2} to Au{sub nps} by minimizing the charge recombination process when compared to the TiO{sub 2} and (TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} in the absence of EDAS. The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} nanocomposite materials provided

  11. Titanium dioxide–gold nanocomposite materials embedded in silicate sol–gel film catalyst for simultaneous photodegradation of hexavalent chromium and methylene blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Aminosilicate sol–gel supported TiO2–Au nanocomposite material photocatalyst was prepared by deposition–precipitation method and used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of methyelene blue dye and Cr(VI) ions. Highlights: ► The EDAS/(TiO2–Au)nps is used to design the solid-phase thin film photocatalyst. ► Au promotes the interfacial electron transfer from TiO2 to Cr(VI) to form Cr(III). ► The holes produced at the TiO2 oxidize the MB dye. ► The EDAS/(TiO2–Au)nps film was used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of toxic molecules. ► The photoinduced simultaneous redox process provides dual benefit for the environment remediation. - Abstract: Aminosilicate sol–gel supported titanium dioxide–gold (EDAS/(TiO2–Au)nps) nanocomposite materials were synthesized by simple deposition–precipitation method and characterized. The photocatalytic oxidation and reduction activity of the EDAS/(TiO2–Au)nps film was evaluated using hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and methylene blue (MB) dye under irradiation. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was studied in the presence of hole scavengers such as oxalic acid (OA) and methylene blue (MB). The photocatalytic degradation of MB was investigated in the presence and absence of Cr(VI). Presence of Aunps on the (TiO2)nps surface and its dispersion in the silicate sol-gel film (EDAS/(TiO2–Au)nps) improved the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of MB due to the effective interfacial electron transfer from the conduction band of the TiO2 to Aunps by minimizing the charge recombination process when compared to the TiO2 and (TiO2–Au)nps in the absence of EDAS. The EDAS/(TiO2–Au)nps nanocomposite materials provided beneficial role in the environmental remediation and purification process through synergistic photocatalytic activity by an advanced oxidation–reduction processes.

  12. The impact of humic acid on chromium phytoextraction by aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalčíková, Gabriela; Zupančič, Marija; Jemec, Anita; Gotvajn, Andreja Žgajnar

    2016-03-01

    Studies assessing chromium phytoextration from natural waters rarely consider potential implications of chromium speciation in the presence of ubiquitous humic substances. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of environmentally relevant concentration of humic acid (TOC = 10 mg L(-1)) on chromium speciation (Cr = 0.15 mg L(-1)) and consequently on phytoextraction by aquatic macrophyte duckweed Lemna minor. In absence of humic acid, only hexavalent chromium was present in water samples and easily taken up by L. minor. Chromium uptake resulted in a significant reduction of growth rate by 22% and decrease of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b contents by 48% and 43%, respectively. On the other hand, presence of humic acid significantly reduced chromium bioavailability (57% Cr uptake decrease) and consequently it did not cause any measurable effect to duckweed. Such effect was related to abiotic reduction of hexavalent chromium species to trivalent. Hence, findings of our study suggest that presence of humic acid and chromium speciation cannot be neglected during phytoextraction studies. PMID:26766370

  13. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carette, Diane [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène, E-mail: marie-helene.durand@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Prisant, Nadia [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Segretain, Dominique [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kallistem SAS Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 μg/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ► Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ► Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ► Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 μg/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ► Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ► Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  14. Chromium in kale, wheat, and eggs: intrinsic labeling and bioavailability to rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retention of 51Cr was measured in rats fed 3-g test meals containing 63% sucrose, 10% corn oil, and 27% of a test food radiolabeled intrinsically or extrinsically. The test foods were egg yolk, kale, and wheat radiolabeled intrinsically and egg yolk, kale, wheat, and casein radiolabeled extrinsically. Five-week-old male rats were fed a Cr-deficient semisynthetic diet for 2 weeks prior to and 9 days following the 3-g test meals containing 51Cr-labeled foods. By day 9, only 1.1-2.3% of the 51Cr in the test meal remained in the animal. Retention of 51Cr from casein (2.3%) was not significantly different from retention from egg yolk (1.7%) but was significantly higher than that from kale (1.1%) and from wheat (1.5%). These differences may have reflected dietary Cr content rather than a difference in form. There were no significant differences in the retention of 51Cr due to method of labeling. Preparation of foods intrinsically labeled with 51Cr was difficult because of a root-shoot barrier in the case of plants and poor absorption or tissue retention by animals. Several approaches to endogenous labeling were attempted. An aqueous extract of kale subjected to gel permeation chromatography showed a low molecular weight chromium complex similar to that found in alfalfa. (M/sub r/ 2900)

  15. Effect of chromium on accumulation and antioxidants in Cucumis utillissimus L.: Response under enhanced bioavailability condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geetgovind Sinam; Sarita Sinha; Shekhar Mallick

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the accumulation of Ct(VI) and biochemical changes (total chlorophyll, carotenoid, protein, malondialdehyde (MDA) and cysteine contents) and roles of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX)) in tolerance to metal induced stress in Cucumis utillissimus L. grown in Cr contaminated soil (CS) with garden soil (GS). Furthermore, Cr bioavailability was enhanced by ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) addition to the soil to forecast the plant's accumulation pattern at elevated Cr environment. Accumulation of Cr in the leaves of the plant increased with increase in substrate metals concentration. It further increased with the addition of EDTA by 1437% and 487% in GS and CS, respectively at the highest treatment level. The lipid peroxidation increased proportionately with increase in Cr accumulation in the leaves. All the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPX and APX) and the level of cysteine increased with dose dependant manner. SOD and cysteine were observed to be higher in the GS than in CS, but APX and GPX were found to be higher in CS than in GS. The increase in GPX and APX activities with the increase in Cr concentration could be assumed that these two enzymes have a major role in the defense mechanism towards stress induced by Cr in C. utillissimus.

  16. Distribuição e biodisponibilidade de crômio em solos contaminados por resíduos de couro Distribution and bioavailability of chromium in contaminated soils by tannery residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of soil, water and sediment were collected and analyzed in order to evaluate chromium contamination due to deposition of tannery residues onto soils under different management regimes. The results showed that soils used for sugar cane cultivation were not adversely impacted. However, in the case of mango plantations, variable concentrations of chromium were measured in the soil profile, with 22.2% of values being higher than permitted legal limits, and 38.9% being at levels requiring remediation. Concentrations of bioavailable chromium were lower than the detection limit of the method (0.01 mg of chromium kg-1 of soil, indicating that all of the chromium present in the samples was either complexed or in an insoluble form. Chromium concentrations measured in samples of water and sediments were indicative of low mobility of the metal in soils. The main cause of differences found between soil samples obtained from different cultivations was the type of soil management.

  17. Short-term toxicity of hexavalent-chromium to epipsammic diatoms of a microtidal estuary (Río de la Plata): Responses from the individual cell to the community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Diatom's nuclear abnormalities were significantly higher as consequence of chromium exposure. •Diatoms and chlorophytes increased in treatment microcosms. •Nitzschia palea proportion increased significantly in the treatment microcosms. -- Abstract: Diatoms are an integral and often dominant component of the benthic microalgal assemblage in estuarine and shallow coastal environments. Different toxic substances discharged into these ecosystems persist in the water, sediments, and biota for long periods. Among these pernicious agents, the toxicity in diatoms by metal is linked to different steps in the transmembrane and internal movements of the toxicant, causing perturbations in the normal structural and functional cellular components. These changes constitute an early, nontaxonomic warning signal that could potentially serve as an indicator of this type of pollution. The aim of this work was to study the environment-reflecting short-term responses at different levels of organization of epipsammic diatoms from the Río de la Plata estuary, Argentina that had been exposed to hexavalent chromium within experimental microcosms. To this end we monitored: (i) changes in the proportion of the diatoms in relation to other algal groups at the biofilm community level; (ii) shifts in species composition at the diatom-assemblage level; (iii) projected changes in the densities of the most representative species at the population level through comparison of relative growth rates and generation times; and (iv) the cytological changes at the cellular and subcellular levels as indicated by the appearance of teratological effects on individuals and nuclear alterations. The epipsammic biofilms were exposed for 96 h to chromium at a concentration similar to that measured in highly impacted sites along the coast (80 μg L−1). Chromium pollution, at this concentration and short exposure time did not affect the algal biomass and density of these mature biofilms. The

  18. IN-VIVO EVALUATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INDUCED DNA DAMAGE BY ALKALINE COMET ASSAY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CATLA CATLA

    OpenAIRE

    Kantha Deivi Arunachalam; Sathesh Kumar Annamalai; Jaya Krishna Kuruva

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the acute toxicity of Chromium in fingerlings of Catla catla, an Indian major carp, was evaluated with renewal bioassay method. In vivo studies were designed to assess the extent of Micronucleus Assay, Comet Assay under the exposure of common heavy-metal compounds, namely, Chromium Nitrate, using Catla catla (2n = 20), as a test model. The laboratory acclimatized fishes were divided into four groups. Group I served as positive control and the other three as exposed group...

  19. Application of natural adsorbent from silver impregnated Arachis hypogaea based thereon in the processes of hexavalent chromium for the purification of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different industries generate huge amounts of chromium, both in solid and liquid form which leached out and find their way to the aquifers. Here we report the removal of Cr(VI) by the silver impregnated activated carbon developed from agricultural waste material at pH 3 from drinking water. Result revealed that adsorption of chromium(VI) on silver impregnated groundnut husk carbon was endothermic in nature. Thermodynamic parameters such as the entropy change, enthalpy change and Gibbs free energy change were found to be 1.68 kJ mol-1 K-1, 0.46 kJ mol-1 and -4.38 kJ mol-1, respectively. The measured adsorption kinetics is well described by a pseudo first-order kinetic model. The effect of flow rate, column depth and initial concentration of chromium(VI) on the removal of chromium by the impregnated adsorbent is presented. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Electron Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) and FTIR analysis show that the silver is impregnated on the surface. Shifts in the FTIR spectra suggest that dichromate binding occurs with silver and other functional groups and that silver treated groundnut husk carbon removes chromium. The 96 h static acute toxicity test was conducted to ensure the safe disposal of the used adsorbent.

  20. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matri...

  1. Effect of Ionic and Chelate Assisted Hexavalent Chromium on Mung Bean Seedlings (Vigna radiata L. wilczek. var k-851) During Seedling Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Cr +6 with and without chelating agents were assessed in mung bean seedlings grown hydroponically. It was noted that the growth parameters showed a declining trend with increasing Cr +6 concentrations without chelate application. Among the seedlings grown with chelated chromium complexes, Cr +6–DTPA (10µM) showed highest growth rate of roots as well as shoots. At higher concentration of Chromium i.e. Cr +6 (100µM), there exhibited high chlorophyll content in mung bean leaves whe...

  2. Antigenotoxic and Apoptotic Activity of Green Tea Polyphenol Extracts on Hexavalent Chromium-Induced DNA Damage in Peripheral Blood of CD-1 Mice: Analysis with Differential Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen García-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the modulating effects of green tea polyphenols on genotoxic damage and apoptotic activity induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI] in CD-1 mice. Animals were divided into the following groups: (i injected with vehicle; (ii treated with green tea polyphenols (30 mg/kg via gavage; (iii injected with CrO3 (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally; (iv treated with green tea polyphenols in addition to CrO3. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCEs obtained from peripheral blood at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed by differential acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB staining. Treatment of green tea polyphenols led to no significant changes in the MN-PCEs. However, CrO3 treatment significantly increased MN-PCEs at 24 and 48 h after injection. Green tea polyphenols treatment prior to CrO3 injection led to a decrease in MN-PCEs compared to the group treated with CrO3 only. The average of apoptotic cells was increased at 48 h after treatment compared to control mice, suggesting that apoptosis could contribute to eliminate the DNA damaged cells induced by Cr (VI. Our findings support the proposed protective effects of green tea polyphenols against the genotoxic damage induced by Cr (VI.

  3. Genome-wide gene expression effects in B6C3F1 mouse intestinal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to hexavalent chromium in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic administration of high doses of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] as sodium dichromate dihydrate (SDD) elicits alimentary cancers in mice. To further elucidate key events underlying tumor formation, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted in B6C3F1 mice. Differential gene expression was examined in duodenal and jejunal epithelial samples following 7 or 90 days of exposure to 0, 0.3, 4, 14, 60, 170 or 520 mg/L SDD in drinking water. Genome-wide microarray analyses identified 6562 duodenal and 4448 jejunal unique differentially expressed genes at day 8, and 4630 and 4845 unique changes, respectively, in the duodenum and jejunum at day 91. Comparative analysis identified significant overlap in duodenal and jejunal differential gene expression. Automated dose–response modeling identified > 80% of the differentially expressed genes exhibited sigmoidal dose–response curves with EC50 values ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L SDD. Only 16 genes satisfying the dose-dependent differential expression criteria had EC50 values 50 of 47 mg/L SDD.

  4. Construction of a subtractive library from hexavalent chromium treated winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) reveals alterations in non-selenium glutathione peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium is released during several industrial processes and has accumulated in some estuarine areas. Its effects on mammals have been widely studied, but relatively little information is available on its effects on fish. Gene expression changes are useful biomarkers that can provide information about toxicant exposure and effects, as well as the health of an organism and its ability to adapt to its surroundings. Therefore, we investigated the effects of Cr(VI) on gene expression in the sediment dwelling fish, winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). Winter flounder ranging from 300 to 360 g were injected i.p. with Cr(VI) as chromium oxide at 25 μg/kg chromium in 0.15N KCl. Twenty-four hours following injections, winter flounder were euthanized with MS-222 and the livers were excised. Half of the livers were used to make cytosol and the other half were used to isolate mRNA for subtractive hybridization. Subtractive clones obtained were spotted onto nylon filters, which revealed several genes with potentially altered expression due to Cr(VI), including an α class GST, 1-Cys peroxiredoxin (a non-selenium glutathione peroxidase), a P-450 2X subfamily member, two elongation factors (EF-1 gamma and EF-2), and complement component C3. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was performed and confirmed that Cr(VI) down-regulated complement component C3, an EST, and two potential glutathione peroxidases, GSTA3 and 1-Cys peroxiredoxin. In addition, cytosolic GSH peroxidase activity was reduced, and silver stained SDS-PAGE gels from glutathione-affinity purified cytosol demonstrated that a 27.1 kDa GSH-binding protein was down-regulated greater than 50%. Taken together, Cr(VI) significantly altered the expression of several genes including two potential glutathione peroxidases in winter flounder

  5. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  6. Photo-oxidation. Of the system chrome hexavalent-4-chlorophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a proposal to eliminate highly toxic chemical components derived from industrial waste, the researchers study the behavior of the compound hexavalent chromium / 4-chlorophenol system when subjected to photo degradation in a photo-reactor compound parabolic cylinder (CPC) to scale pilot. The effect is analyzed in order to determine the operation conditions to reach the highest degradation levels possible. The analyzed variables were pH, concentration of catalyst (TiO2), time of recirculation and the relation of initial concentrations among polluting agents. The factor that most influences the levels of removal reached is the pH, which has a different effect for each of the pollutants. This implies that, theoretically, you cannot adopt a unique group of operation parameters to favor the degradation of both however, in the practice; high levels of degradation of both pollutants are obtained in the optimal point of operation of the chrome. It is also observed that the catalyst concentration does not influence the degradation of the polluting agents significantly, at least for the initial concentrations studied. The recirculation time is closely related to the kinetics of degradation of each polluting agent. Elevated degradation levels are reached in a short time for 4-chlorophenol, while more prolonged recirculation times are required for hexavalent chromium. The relation of initial concentrations of the polluting agents also exerts an opposite effect on the degradation levels reached for each polluting agent; the hexavalent chromium reduction is favored with high initial concentrations of 4-chlorophenol, whereas the oxidation of 4-chlorophenol is favored with high initial hexavalent chromium concentrations, which suggests some synergy between the oxidation-reduction reactions of 4-chlorophenol and hexavalent chromium. Finally, a 97% hexavalent chromium reduction and a 94.9% oxidation of 4-chlorophenol were obtained

  7. Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/p38/Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1α Is Pivotal for Angiogenesis and Tumorigenesis of Malignantly Transformed Cells Induced by Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Park, Youn-Hee; Fai, Leonard Yenwong; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Kondo, Kazuya; Xu, Mei; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2016-07-29

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-containing compounds are well established environmental carcinogens. Most mechanistic investigations of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis focus on oxidative stress and various cellular responses, leading to malignant cell transformation or the first stage of metal-induced carcinogenesis. The development of malignantly transformed cells into tumors that require angiogenesis is the second stage. This study focuses on the second stage, in particular, the role of EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. Our preliminary studies have shown that EGFR is constitutively activated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells, in lung tissue from Cr(VI)-exposed animals, and in lung tumor tissue from a non-smoking worker occupationally exposed to Cr(VI) for 19 years. Using in vitro and in vivo models, the present study has investigated the role of EGFR in angiogenesis of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. The results show that Cr(VI)-transformed cells are angiogenic. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, pro-angiogenic protein matrix metalloproteinase 1, and VEGF are all highly expressed in Cr(VI)-transformed cells, in lung tissue from animals exposed to Cr(VI), and in lung tumor tissue from a non-smoking worker occupationally exposed to Cr(VI) for 19 years. p38 MAPK is also activated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells and in human lung tumor tissue. Inhibition of EGFR reduces p38 MAPK, resulting in decreased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, metalloproteinase 1, and VEGF, leading to suppressions of angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Overall, the present study has demonstrated that EGFR plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. PMID:27226640

  8. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Hasan; Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar; Minami, Hideto; Tauer, Klaus; Gafur, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor

    2016-08-01

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe2O3) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl3 as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl3 functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe2O3. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl2. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water.

  9. Development of analytical procedures for determination of total chromium by quadrupole ICP-MS and high-resolution ICP-MS, and hexavalent chromium by HPLC-ICP-MS, in different materials used in the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seby, F.; Garraud, H. [Ultratraces Analyses Aquitaine, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 avenue du President Angot, 64053, Pau Cedex 9 (France); Gagean, M. [PSA Peugeot Citroen, Centre technique de Belchamp, 25218, Montbeliard Cedex (France); Castetbon, A.; Donard, O.F.X. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, UMR CNRS 5034, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 avenue du President Angot, 64053, Pau Cedex 9 (France)

    2003-10-01

    A European directive was recently adopted limiting the use of hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, and Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. From July 2003 a maximum of 2 g Cr(VI) will be authorised per vehicle in corrosion-preventing coatings of key components. As no standardised procedures are available to check if produced vehicles are in agreement with this directive, the objective of this work was to develop analytical procedures for total chromium and Cr(VI) determination in these materials. The first step of this study was to optimise digestion procedures for total chromium determination in plastic and metallic materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). High resolution (HR) ICP-MS was used to examine the influence of polyatomic interferences on the detection of the {sup 52}Cr{sup +} and {sup 53}Cr{sup +} isotopes. If there was strong interference with m/z 52 for plastic materials, it was possible to use quadrupole ICP-MS for m/z 53 if digestions were performed with HNO{sub 3}+H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. This mixture was also necessary for digestion of chromium from metallic materials. Extraction procedures in alkaline medium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3} buffer solution at pH 8.9) assisted by sonication were developed for determining Cr(VI) in four different corrosion-preventing coatings by HPLC-ICP-MS. After optimisation and validation with the only solid reference material certified for its Cr(VI) content (BCR 545; welding dusts), the efficiency of this extraction procedure for screw coatings was compared with that described in the EN ISO 3613 standard generally used in routine laboratories. For coatings comprising zinc and aluminium passivated in depth with chromium oxides the extraction procedure developed herein enabled determination of higher Cr(VI) concentrations. This was also observed for the screw covered with a chromium passivant layer on zinc-nickel. For coating comprising a chromium passivant layer on alkaline zinc the standardized

  10. Development of analytical procedures for determination of total chromium by quadrupole ICP-MS and high-resolution ICP-MS, and hexavalent chromium by HPLC-ICP-MS, in different materials used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Gagean, M; Garraud, H; Castetbon, A; Donard, O F X

    2003-10-01

    A European directive was recently adopted limiting the use of hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, and Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. From July 2003 a maximum of 2 g Cr(VI) will be authorised per vehicle in corrosion-preventing coatings of key components. As no standardised procedures are available to check if produced vehicles are in agreement with this directive, the objective of this work was to develop analytical procedures for total chromium and Cr(VI) determination in these materials. The first step of this study was to optimise digestion procedures for total chromium determination in plastic and metallic materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). High resolution (HR) ICP-MS was used to examine the influence of polyatomic interferences on the detection of the (52)Cr(+) and (53)Cr(+) isotopes. If there was strong interference with m/ z 52 for plastic materials, it was possible to use quadrupole ICP-MS for m/ z 53 if digestions were performed with HNO(3)+H(2)O(2). This mixture was also necessary for digestion of chromium from metallic materials. Extraction procedures in alkaline medium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3) buffer solution at pH 8.9) assisted by sonication were developed for determining Cr(VI) in four different corrosion-preventing coatings by HPLC-ICP-MS. After optimisation and validation with the only solid reference material certified for its Cr(VI) content (BCR 545; welding dusts), the efficiency of this extraction procedure for screw coatings was compared with that described in the EN ISO 3613 standard generally used in routine laboratories. For coatings comprising zinc and aluminium passivated in depth with chromium oxides the extraction procedure developed herein enabled determination of higher Cr(VI) concentrations. This was also observed for the screw covered with a chromium passivant layer on zinc-nickel. For coating comprising a chromium passivant layer on alkaline zinc the standardized extraction procedure was more efficient

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 419 - Processes Included in the Determination of BAT Effluent Limitations for Total Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Processes Included in the Determination of BAT Effluent Limitations for Total Chromium, Hexavalent Chromium, and Phenolic Compounds (4AAP) A...—Processes Included in the Determination of BAT Effluent Limitations for Total Chromium, Hexavalent...

  12. Mechanism of electron transfer in the bioadsorption of hexavalent chromium within Leersia hexandra Swartz granules by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leersia hexandra Swartz biogranules were used to adsorb Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Batch biosorption experiments showed that the Cr(VI) concentration sharply decreases in the first 15 min. The main functional groups that may be involved in chromium sorption were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) through L. hexandra Sw. Results indicate that Cr(III) is the dominant species on the surface of the biogranules and that the redox reaction can be accomplished within 40 min. The mechanism of electron transfer during Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) was investigated. Protonation of the oxygen-containing groups produces electrostatic-sorption power over Cr(VI). The nitrogen-containing groups serve as the electron-donor groups in the process of reduction-sorption. Moreover, after the complete reduction of Cr(VI), the pH of the suspension significantly increases.

  13. Effects of Simulated Acid Rain on the Migration and Transformation of Hexavalent Chromium in a Water Spinach-soil System%模拟酸雨对空心菜-土壤系统中六价铬迁移转化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈桂葵; 李志鹏; 陈恋; 刘明中; 黎华寿

    2013-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of acid rain on the distribution, migration and transformation of hexavalent chromium in a water spinach(Ipomoea aquatica) soil system. Results showed that the amount of total chromium in water spinach treated with simulated acid rain was significantly higher than those without acid rain. The content of chromium in the underground part of water spinach was significantly higher than it in the aboveground part in treatments with simulated acid rain. While water spinach could survive and grow normally in soil with 100 mg·kg-1 chromium, they couldn't survive in soil with chromium up to 200 mg·kg-1. Valences of more than 97.0% added hexavalent chromium was changed. The majority portion of the chromium was remained in soil. Only very small portion was absorbed by water spinach. The simulated acid rain could significantly enhance the absorption rate of chromium by water spinach. The amount of absorbed chromium in treatments with acid rain was 2.6 to 5 times as those in the treatments without acid rain. The chromium enrichment coefficients were 2.2 and 4.6 for the aboveground part and the underground part of water spinach respectively by comparing the treatments with and without acid rain. The research result shows that acid rain increases the risk of crop grown in soil contaminated by chromium especially through the absorption of chromium by root system. Hence, agricultural food safety problem in chromium polluted area will be enhanced by acid rain.%通过盆栽试验,研究了模拟酸雨条件下六价铬在土壤和空心菜之间的分布、迁移和转化规律.结果发现,酸雨处理显著提高了空心菜体内铬的含量,其中空心菜地下部的铬含量显著高于其地上部;空心菜在100 mg·kg-1的铬处理下仍然可以正常生长,但当土壤中的铬达到200 mg· kg-1时,空心菜生长数天后即全部死亡;添加到土壤中的六价铬97.0%以上已经转化成其他形态而留

  14. Highly efficient and recyclable triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts for degradation of organic pollutants and reduction of hexavalent chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianwei; Zhang, Yunxia; Xu, Sichao; Wang, Shuan; Ding, Hualin; Pan, Shusheng; Wang, Guozhong; Li, Guanghai; Zhao, Huijun

    2014-04-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2 (P25), pure TiO2 microspheres, Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 and annealed Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanocomposites, the as-obtained amorphous triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 hierarchical nanospheres exhibit a markedly enhanced visible light or sunlight photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of methylene blue and photoreduction of hexavalent chromium ions in wastewater. The outstanding photocatalytic activities of the plasmonic photocatalyst are mainly due to the enhanced light harvesting, reduced transport paths for both mass and charge transport, reduced recombination probability of photogenerated electrons/holes, near field electromagnetic enhancement and efficient scattering from the plasmonic nanostructure, increased surface-to-volume ratio and active sites in three dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructures, and improved photo/chemical stability. More importantly, the hierarchical nanostructured Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts could be easily collected and separated by applying an external magnetic field and reused at least five times without any appreciable reduction in photocatalytic efficiency. The enhanced photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability, in combination with the magnetic recyclability, make these multifunctional nanostructures promising candidates to remediate aquatic contaminants and meet the demands of future environmental issues.Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2

  15. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  16. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  17. Germination and sporophytic development of Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman (Marsileaceae in the presence of hexavalent chromium Germinação e desenvolvimento esporofítico de Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman (Marsileaceae na presença de cromo hexavalente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Kieling-Rubio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman is a heterosporous fern, growing in aquatic environments and surrounding wetlands, which is assumed to be threatened by increasing water pollution and disappearance of its natural habitats. Among contaminants, hexavalent chromium - Cr(VI - is known to be present in effluents from some leather tanning factories. Megaspore germination tests were performed using Meyer's solution, at concentrations 0 (control, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 80 mg.L-1, from a standard solution of Titrisol® 1000 mg.L-1. The primary development of apomictic sporophytes was studied using solutions containing 0.025 to 4.8 mg.L-1 of Cr(VI. The experiments were conducted in a growth chamber at 24 ± 1 ºC and for a 12-hour photoperiod under fluorescent lights, providing a nominal irradiance of 77 µmol.m-2/s. Significant differences in megaspore germination, with subsequent sporophytic development, were verified from 0.5 mg.L-1 Cr(VI concentration onwards. Growth of primary root and primary and secondary leaves was significantly reduced at 3.2 mg.L-1 Cr(VI concentration or higher. Considering the pollution from Cr(VI in some areas of R. diphyllum natural occurrence, these data indicate that low reproductive rates and disappearance of populations are likely to occur in these situations.Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman é uma filicínea heterosporada que se desenvolve em ambientes aquáticos e áreas úmidas circundantes, sendo considerada ameaçada pelo aumento da poluição e desaparecimento dos seus hábitats naturais. Entre os contaminantes, o cromo hexavalente - Cr(VI - é conhecido por estar presente nos efluentes de algumas indústrias de curtimento de couro. Testes de germinação foram realizados em meio líquido de Meyer, com concentrações de 0(controle; 0,1; 0,5; 1; 5; 10; 15; 20; 30; 50; e 80 mg.L-1 de Cr(VI, a partir de uma solução padrão de Titrisol® a 1000 mg.L-1. O desenvolvimento primário dos esporófitos apom

  18. Skin permeation and cutaneous hypersensitivity as a basis for making risk assessments of chromium as a soil contaminant.

    OpenAIRE

    Bagdon, R E; Hazen, R E

    1991-01-01

    A literature review of experimental and human exposure studies of skin permeation and cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions evoked by chromium was carried out to provide a basis for making a risk assessment of chromium as a soil contaminant. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that 1 to 4% of the applied dose of hexavalent and trivalent chromium to guinea pig skin penetrated skin within 5 to 24 hr after application. Ultrastructural investigations showed that hexavalent chromium localized...

  19. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  20. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Pretreatments Only Final Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (hex chrome or CR(VI)) is a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self-healing and corrosion-resistant properties. The replacement of hex chrome in the processing of aluminum for aviation and aerospace applications remains a goal of great significance. Aluminum is the major manufacturing material of structures and components in the space flight arena. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are engaged in a collaborative effort to test and evaluate alternatives to hexavalent chromium containing corrosion coating systems. NASA and ESA share common risks related to material obsolescence associated with hexavalent chromium used in corrosion-resistant coatings.

  1. ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM HARD CHROMIUM PLATING OPERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The University of Central Florida Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is investigating methods for improved estimation of chemical releases which require reporting under provisions of SARA Title III (Toxic Release Inventory, Form R). This paper describes results fr...

  2. Nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of chromium compounds in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborda, R.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Nunez, A.

    1986-03-01

    The nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and cardiotoxic actions of hexavalent chromium compounds, as well as their effects on lung, blood and circulation may contribute to the fatal outcome of chromium intoxication. Although trivalent chromium have been regarded as relatively biologically inert, there are a few salts of chromium III that have been found to be carcinogenic when inhaled, ingested or brought in contact with the tissues. Sensitive persons and industry workers have been subjects of dermatitis, respiratory tract injuries and digestive ulcers due to chromium compounds. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds on rats measuring the transaminases (GOT and GPT), urea and creatinine levels in serum of chromium poisoned animals at different times.

  3. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  4. Abatement of Chromium Emissions from Steelmaking Slags - Cr Stabilization by Phase Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Albertsson, Galina

    2013-01-01

    Chromium is an important alloying element in stainless steel but also environmentally harmful element. A number of mineralogical phases present in the slag matrix can contain chromium and lead to chromium leaching. Chromium in slag if not stabilized, could oxidize to the cancerogenic hexavalent state, and leach out if exposed to acidic and oxygen rich environment. Other environmental concerns are slag dusting and chromium escape to the atmosphere. Despite the fact that there is a certain risk...

  5. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics: Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. Evaluate the ability of hexavalent chrome free pretreated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals, and maintain that seal while being subjected to harsh environmental conditions. Assess the performance of trivalent chromium pretreatments against a known control hexavalent chrome pretreatment before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. It is known that environmental testing causes a decrease in shielding effectiveness when hexavalent chrome pretreatments are used (Alodine 1200s). Need to determine how shielding effectiveness will be affected with the use of hexavalent chrome free pretreatments. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings. The formation of corrosion will be evaluated between the mating surfaces and gasket to assess the corrosion resistant properties of the pretreatments, comparing the hexavalent control to the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments.

  6. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L) of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper). The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such...

  7. Identification of Chromium Resistant Bacteria from Dry Fly Ash Sample of Mejia MTPS Thermal Power Plant, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Roopali; Mukherjee, Pritam; Roy, Madhumita

    2016-02-01

    Eight chromium resistant bacteria were isolated from a dry fly ash sample of DVC-MTPS thermal power plant located in Bankura, West Bengal, India. These isolates displayed different degrees of chromate reduction under aerobic conditions. According to 16S rDNA gene analysis, five of them were Staphylococcus, two were Bacillus and one was Micrococcus. The minimum inhibitory concentration towards chromium and the ability to reduce hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium was highest in Staphylococcus haemolyticus strain HMR17. All the strains were resistant to multiple heavy metals (As, Cu, Cd, Co, Zn, Mn, Pb and Fe) and reduced toxic hexavalent chromium to relatively non toxic trivalent chromium even in the presence of these multiple heavy metals. All of them showed resistance to different antibiotics. In a soil microcosm study, S. haemolyticus strain HMR17 completely reduced 4 mM hexavalent chromium within 7 days of incubation. PMID:26602566

  8. Performance of Laterite Soil Grains as Adsorbent in the Removal of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Syama I J; Arun Kumar Thalla; Manu D S

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the efficiency of laterite grains (LG) and acid activated laterite grains (AALG) as an adsorbent for removal hexavalent chromium and ferric ion from synthetic wastewater, under laboratory conditions. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium and ferric ion from synthetic wastewater is examined by batch and column studies wherein it is found to be dependent on pH, Contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial adsorbate concentration. Percentage removal enhances with the ...

  9. A novel method for fast enrichment and monitoring of hexavalent and trivalent chromium at the ppt level with modified silica MCM-41 and its determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganjali Mohammad Reza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium(III at the ng L-1 level was extracted using partially silylated MCM-41 modified by a tetraazamacrocyclic compound (TAMC and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emision spectrometry (ICP OES. The extraction time and efficiency, pH and flow rate, type and minimum amount of stripping acid, and break- through volume were investigated. The method's enrichment factor and detection limit are 300 and 45.5 pg mL-1, respectively. The maximum capacity of the 10 mg of modified silylated MCM-41 was found to be 400.5?4.7 µg for Cr(III. The method was applied to the determination of Cr(III and Cr(VI in the wastewater of the chromium electroplating industry and in environmental and biological samples (black tea, hot and black pepper.

  10. Relating the sediment phase speciation of arsenic, cadmium, and chromium with their bioavailability for the deposit-feeding polychaete Nereis succinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Zofia; Fisher, Nicholas S

    2011-03-01

    We studied the influence of sediment geochemistry on bioavailability of As, Cd, and Cr in deposit-feeding polychaetes. Metal phase speciation in sediments was determined with a sequential extraction scheme, and assimilation efficiencies (AEs) of ingested metals were determined by pulse-chase feeding experiments using γ-emitting isotopes. Worms were fed sediments collected from geochemically diverse estuaries that were labeled by sorbing dissolved radiotracers or mixing with radiolabeled algae. Uptake of sediment-bound metals was compared with that from labeled algae or goethite. Metal AEs showed a positive relationship with the exchangeable and carbonate sedimentary fractions, whereas metals in iron and manganese oxides and acid-volatile sulfides, or in pyrite and other refractory material, were inversely correlated with AEs. Arsenic was most bioavailable from algae (72%), less from sediments mixed with algae (24-70%) and least from sediments labeled directly (1-12%). Arsenic AEs in sediments labeled directly showed a positive correlation with sedimentary Mn and Al and negative correlation with Fe. Cadmium AEs were positively correlated with salinity and negatively correlated with sedimentary organic C. The AEs of Cr from sediments or algae were less than 5%, but they were 34% from pure goethite. By quantifying the relationship of metal speciation in sediments with their bioavailability for deposit-feeding polychaetes, the present study provides new insight into understanding metal bioaccumulation in benthic invertebrates. PMID:21154840

  11. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  12. Effects of UV light and chromium ions on wood flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual and simultaneous effect of UV light and chromium ions was investigated by spectrophotometric methods on inert surfaces impregnated with quercetin or robinetin. The UV-VIS spectra of the silica gel plates impregnated with these flavonoids were modified characteristically after irradiating ultraviolet light. Even a half an hour of irradiation has caused irreversible changes in the molecule structure. A certain chemical - presumably complexation - was concluded from the change of spectral bands assigned to flavonoids when impregnated with chromic ions. Hexavalent chromium caused more complex changes in the absorption spectra. The differences in the spectra could indicate either the oxidation and decomposition of flavonoids, or some kind of coordination process and the reduction of hexavalent chromium. The simultaneous application of UV light and chromium ions caused more pronounced effects. The complexation process between chromium(III) and flavonoid was completed

  13. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  14. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients with...... chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  15. Contribution of photoelectron spectrometry and infrared spectrometry to the study of various oxidised forms of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Securate knowledge of internal surface of primary coolant circuits of PWR is required for an estimation of dissolution of used materials and for estimation of decontamination efficiency. The binding energies of various electron levels of chromium were determined by photoelectron spectrometry (ESCA), both for the metal and for certain compounds. Because of the intensities of the signals obtained the 2 p 3/2 level alone can be used for analytical purposes. Owing to a possible interference between this level due to hexavalent chromium and a satellite peak caused by trivalent chromium the method is not able to show up small amounts of chromium VI in chromium III. Simultaneous detection of the hexavalent and trivalent forms was achieved by infrared spectrometry. The problem of revealing traces of chromium VI in surface layers of trivalent chromium oxide has thus been solved

  16. On-line dynamic extraction and automated determination of readily bioavailable hexavalent chromium in solid substrates using micro-sequential injection bead-injection lab-on-valve hyphenated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2006-01-01

    ). The effect of simulated acidic rain on the accessibility of chromate forms for plant uptake was also investigated. The proposed approach offers several advantages over conventional speciation/fractionation protocols in the batch mode, including immediate separation with concomitant preconcentration of...

  17. On-line dynamic extraction and automated determination of readily bioavailable hexavalent chromium in solid substrates using micro-sequential injection bead-injection lab-on-valve hyphenated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2006-01-01

    ). The effect of simulated acidic rain on the accessibility of chromate forms for plant uptake was also investigated. The proposed approach offers several advantages over conventional speciation/fractionation protocols in the batch mode, including immediate separation with concomitant preconcentration...

  18. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  19. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI) FROM INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT BY WILD ANDMUTANT TYPE STRAIN OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ITS IMMOBILIZED FORM

    OpenAIRE

    K Selvam, K Arungandhi, B Vishnupriya, T Shanmuga priya and M Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    Biosorption of chromium was studied by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain. Chromium absorption pattern was observed in all experimental conditions. Hexavalent chromium (VI) was analyzed by diphenyl carbazide method, by oxidizing the trivalent chromium (III). The percentage efficiency of wild type S. cerevisiae and its mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain were 94.8%, 98.7%, 97.4% and 100% respectively. S. cerevisi...

  20. The effect of chromium picolinate on serum cholesterol and apolipoprotein fractions in human subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Press, R. I.; Geller, J.; Evans, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    Chromium has been implicated as a cofactor in the maintenance of normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. A deficiency of chromium results from diets low in biologically available chromium. Picolinic acid, a metabolite of tryptophan, forms stable complexes with transitional metal ions, which results in an improved bioavailability of the metal ion chromium. To determine whether or not chromium picolinate is effective in humans, 28 volunteer subjects were given either chromium tripicolinate (3...

  1. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  2. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (smbullet) Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage (smbullet) Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  3. Enhancing phytoremediation of chromium-stressed soils through plant-growth-promoting bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Munees Ahemad

    2015-01-01

    Chromium, specifically hexavalent chromium is one of the most toxic pollutants that are released into soils by various anthropogenic activities. It has numerous adverse effects not only on plant system but also on beneficial soil microorganisms which are the indicators of soil fertility and health. Recent emergence of phytoremediation as an environmental friendly and economical approach to decontaminate the chromium stressed soils has received wider attention. But major drawback of this proce...

  4. Hexavalent Chromate Reductase Activity in Cell Free Extracts of Penicillium sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Arévalo-Rangel, Damaris L.; Cárdenas-González, Juan F.; Víctor M. Martínez-Juárez; Ismael Acosta-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    A chromium-resistant fungus isolated from contaminated air with industrial vapors can be used for reducing toxic Cr(VI) to Cr(III). This study analyzes in vitro reduction of hexavalent chromium using cell free extract(s) of the fungus that was characterized based on optimal temperature, pH, use of electron donors, metal ions and initial Cr(VI) concentration in the reaction mixture. This showed the highest activity at 37°C and pH 7.0; there is an increase in Cr(VI) reductase activity with addi...

  5. Photocatalytic Removal of Hexavalet Chromium and Divalent Nickel fromAqueous Solution by UV Irradiation in the Presence of Titanium Dioxide Vanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Samarghandi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Industrial wastewater included the heavy metal is one of the important sources of environmental pollution. Hexavalent chromiumand divalent nickel are founded in plating wastewater which is harmful for human health and environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is investigation of photocatalytic removal of hexavalent chromium and divalent nickel from aqueous solution using UV/TiO2 process in a batch system."nMaterials andMethods: At first, reactor was designed. Then, optimumdosage of TiO2 was obtained equal to 1 g/L, with variation TiO2 dosage at constant pH and initial concentrations of hexavalent chromium and divalent nickel. The effect of pH, contact time and initial concentration of hexavalent chromium was studied at the constant amount of TiO2 (1gr/L."nResults: The result showed that photocatalytic removal efficiency increased with increasing reaction time and TiO2 dosage. In addition, it was found that removal efficiency of hexavalent chromium was decreased by increasing initial chromium concentration and pH. But, photocatalytic removal efficiency of nickel ion was increased and decreased by increasing of pH and initial nickel concentration, respectively."nConclusion: The results showed that UV/TiO2 was an effective method in removal of hexavalent chromium and divalent nickel from aqueous solutions

  6. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  7. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  8. Study of the effects of chromium exposure on sulfur metabolic pathways in the model plant Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium is a common contaminant that is more toxic as hexavalent species [Cr(VI)] than trivalent species [Cr(III)]. Some plants absorb chromium and reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III), yet the uptake and reduction mechanisms are still unknown. Sulfur is a constituent of two essential amino acids and plays an ...

  9. Evaluation of chromium speciation and transport characteristics in the Hanford Site 100D and 100H areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, E.C.; Amonette, J.E.; Olivier, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Field and laboratory investigations have been conducted to define the fate and transport characteristics of chromium contamination present in the 100D/H Areas of the Hanford Site. This information is relevant to assessing the impact of the release of hexavalent chromium to the Columbia River. Included in this study was the determination of the concentration and aqueous speciation of chromium in the unconfined acquifer and an assessment of potential changes in speciation as groundwater passes through the river/acquifer transition zone and mixes with the Columbia River. The results of this study indicate that chromium present within the Hanford acquifer is predominantly in the oxidized hexavalent state. Chromium is apparently stable in the oxidized form owing to its lack of organic matter within the acquifer. A portion of the chromium is removed as groundwater passes through the transition zone due to reduction and precipitation associated with sediment/water interaction processes. Chemical data collected from seep water samples, however, suggests, that most of the hexavalent chromium ultimately discharges into the Columbia River. Dilution of hexavalent chromium subsequently occurs during the mixing of groundwater and river water, with relatively little change taking place in speciation.

  10. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dheeba; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and differe...

  11. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III) added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel c...

  12. [Advances in molecular mechanism of bacterial reduction of hexavalent chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dou; Zhao, You-Cai; Song, Li-Yan; Yin, Ya-Jie; Wang, Yang-Qing; Xu, Zhong-Hui

    2014-04-01

    Cr(VI) has been causing serious environmental pollution due to its carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and strong migration. Reduction of Cr( VI) to Cr(III), a precipitation that is much less toxic, is an efficient strategy to control Cr pollution. Within the strategy, bacterial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) has been considered as one of the best bioremediation methods because of its efficiency, environment friendly, and low cost; however, the molecular mechanism remains large unknown. This review summarizes Cr(VI) reduction bacterial species and its application in pollution control, elaborates the pathways of Cr( VI) reduction and functional proteins involved, concludes the molecular mechanism of baterial reduction Cr(VI), and discusses the orientation of the future research. PMID:24946623

  13. Hexavalent chromium removal by waste mycelium of Aspergillus awamori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VELIZAR K. GOCHEV

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Cr(VI removal potential of waste mycelium from the industrial xylanase-producing strain Aspergillus awamori was evaluated. It was determined by FTIR analysis that amino groups from the major fungal wall constituents, chitin and chitosan, played a key role in the metal binding process. The effect of pH, initial ion concentration, temperature and amount of biomass on the removal was also studied. The removal efficiency increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature and amount of biomass. The mechanism of Cr(VI removal by A. awamori can be explained by a two-stage process involving an initial adsorption stage followed by a reducing stage. The removal process was described by a second-order polynomial and the optimal process parameters for attaining Rmax 94.4 % in 48 h were predicted, i.e., pH 1.5 and t = 40 °C. From both economic and ecological points of view, a promising possibility for the utilization of waste industrial mycelium of A. awamori as a low-cost Cr(VI removal agent was proposed.

  14. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics; Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this testing is to determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. This project will evaluate the ability of coated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals. Testing will assess performance of the trivalent chromium coatings against the known control hexavalent chromium MIL-DTL-5541 Type I Class 3 before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings.

  15. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI FROM INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT BY WILD ANDMUTANT TYPE STRAIN OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ITS IMMOBILIZED FORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Selvam, K Arungandhi, B Vishnupriya, T Shanmuga priya and M Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of chromium was studied by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain. Chromium absorption pattern was observed in all experimental conditions. Hexavalent chromium (VI was analyzed by diphenyl carbazide method, by oxidizing the trivalent chromium (III. The percentage efficiency of wild type S. cerevisiae and its mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain were 94.8%, 98.7%, 97.4% and 100% respectively. S. cerevisiae mutant strain and their immobilized form was found to be effective in biosorption of chromium (VI than the wild type forms.

  16. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Pretreatments Only Interim Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA and ESA continue to search for an alternative to hexavalent chromium in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and safety, while typically specifying that performance must be equal to or greater than existing systems. The overall objective of the collaborative effort between NASA TEERM and ESA is to test and evaluate coating systems (pretreatments, pretreatments with primer, and pretreatments with primer and topcoat) as replacements for hexavalent chrome coatings in aerospace applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing promising coatings identified from previous NASA, ESA, Department of Defense (DOD), and other project experience. Additionally, several new materials will be analyzed according to ESA-identified specifications.

  17. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric curre...

  18. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    OpenAIRE

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; LÜTZ-MEINDL, URSULA

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essent...

  19. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Emmanuel Panteris; Maria Fatsiou

    2015-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], the most toxic form provided a...

  20. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  1. Hexavalent-Chrome Free Coatings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The replacement of hexavalent chrome [Cr (VI)] in the processing of aluminum for high-reliability electronics applications in the aviation and aerospace sector...

  2. Developed Fungal-Bacterial Biofilms as A Novel Tool for Bioremoval of Hexavelant Chromium from Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herath, Lasantha; Rajapaksha, R. M. A. U.; Vithanage, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal...

  3. Application of high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) for determination of chromium compounds in the air at the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislawska, Magdalena; Janasik, Beata; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2013-12-15

    The toxicity and bioavailability of chromium species are highly dependable on the form or species, therefore determination of total chromium is insufficient for a complete toxicological evaluation and risk assessment. An analytical method for determination of soluble and insoluble Cr (III) and Cr (VI) compounds in welding fume at workplace air has been developed. The total chromium (Cr) was determined by using quadruple inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) equipped with a dynamic reaction cell (DRC(®)). Soluble trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). A high-speed, reversed-phase CR C8 column (PerkinElmer, Inc., Shelton, CT, USA) was used for the speciation of soluble Cr (III) and soluble Cr (VI). The separation was accomplished by interaction of the chromium species with the different components of the mobile phase. Cr (III) formed a complex with EDTA, i.e. retained on the column, while Cr (VI) existed in the solutions as dichromate. Alkaline extraction (2% KOH and 3% Na2CO3) and anion exchange column (PRP-X100, PEEK, Hamilton) were used for the separation of the total Cr (VI). The results of the determination of Cr (VI) were confirmed by the analysis of the certified reference material BCR CRM 545 (Cr (VI) in welding dust). The results obtained for the certified material (40.2±0.6 g kg(-1)) and the values recorded in the examined samples (40.7±0.6 g kg(-1)) were highly consistent. This analytical method was applied for the determination of chromium in the samples in the workplace air collected onto glass (Whatman, Ø 37 mm) and membrane filters (Sartorius, 0.8 μm, Ø 37 mm). High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is a remarkably powerful and versatile technique for determination of chromium species in welding fume at workplace air. PMID:24209303

  4. Chromium Toxicity Test for Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Using Hanford Site Groundwater: Onsite Early Life-Stage Toxicity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Chamness, Michele A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2001-07-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate site-specific effects for early life-stage (eyed eggs to free swimming juveniles) fall chinook salmon that might be exposed to hexavalent chromium from Hanford groundwater sources. Our exposure conditions included hexavalent chromium obtained from Hanford groundwater wells near the Columbia River, Columbia River water as the diluent, and locally adapted populations of fall chinook salmon. This report describes both a 96-hr pretest using rainbow trout eggs and an early life-stage test beginning with chinook salmon eggs.

  5. Batch, Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies of Chromium (Vi From Aqueous Phase Using Activated Carbon Derived From Lantana Camara Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nithya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Batch experiments have been conducted to determine the maximum adsorption capacity of activated carbon derived from Lantana camara fruit to remove hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. The removal efficiency and uptake capacity of the biosorbent were determined by varying several batch level parameters. Highest removal efficiency of the biosorbent was found to be almost 99% under optimal conditions. Maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was determined to be 86 mg/g. The experimental data best fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm and pseudo second order model. These findings conclude that the selected biosorbent has more promising features in binding hexavalent chromium in aqueous media.

  6. Isolation and characterization of chromium-resistant bacteria from tannery effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Paul, A.K. [Univ. of Calcutta (India)

    1997-04-01

    Chromium (Cr), a transition metal, is one of the major sources of environmental pollution. It is discharged into the environment through the disposal of wastes from industries like leather tanning, metallurgical and metal finishing, textiles and ceramics, pigment and wood preservatives, photographic sensitizer manufacturing, etc. In the environment chromium occurs mainly in trivalent and hexavalent forms. The hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup 6+}) compounds are comparatively much more toxic than those of trivalent chromium (Cr{sup 3+}). The reason for such toxicity appears to be due to its rapid permeability through biological membranes and subsequent interaction with intracellular proteins and nucleic acids. The tanning industry, which commonly utilizes {open_quotes}chrome liquor{close_quotes} in the tanning process, discharges the effluents into the environment containing chrome salts in excess of the maximum permissible limits. Sludge deposition from such effluents, therefore, provides a natural environment for enrichment of chromium-resistant bacteria. Chromium-resistant microorganisms from such chromium-contaminated sediments have been isolated by several investigators. The present study was an attempt to evaluate the status of chromium-resistant bacteria in the tannery effluent sediments of Calcutta-based tanning industries. 14 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  8. Photocatalytic Removal of Hexavalet Chromium and Divalent Nickel fromAqueous Solution by UV Irradiation in the Presence of Titanium Dioxide Vanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    M.R Samarghandi; M Bordbar; A.R Khataee; A.R Rahmani; M.T. Samadi; M Shirzad Siboni

    2010-01-01

    "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Industrial wastewater included the heavy metal is one of the important sources of environmental pollution. Hexavalent chromiumand divalent nickel are founded in plating wastewater which is harmful for human health and environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is investigation of photocatalytic removal of hexavalent chromium and divalent nickel from aqueous solution using UV/TiO2 process in a batch system."nMaterials andMethods: At first, reactor ...

  9. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to

  10. Isolation of Cr(Ⅵ) reducing bacteria from industrial effluents and their potential use in bioremediation of chromium containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Zahoor; Abdul Rehman

    2009-01-01

    The present study is aimed at assessing the ability of Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and Staphylococcus capitis to reduce hexavalent chromium into its trivalent form.Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 could tolerate Cr(Ⅵ) (4800 μg/mL) and S.capitis could tolerate Cr(Ⅵ) (2800 μg/mL).Both organisms were able to resist Cd2+ (50 μg/mL),Cu2+ (200 μg/mL),Pb2+ (800 μg/mL),Hg2+ (50 μg/mL) and Ni2+ (4000 μg/mL).S.capitis resisted Zn2+ at 700 μg/mL while Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 only showed resistance up to 50 μg/mL.Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and S.capitis showed optimum growth at pH 6 and 7,respectively,while both bacteria showed optimum growth at 37℃.Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and S.capitis could reduce 85% and 81% of hexavalent chromium from the medium after 96 h and were also capable of reducing hexavalent chromium 86% and 89%,respectively,from the industrial effluents after 144 h.Cell free extracts of Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and S.capitis showed reduction of 83% and 70% at concentration of 10 μg Cr(Ⅵ)/mL,respectively.The presence of an induced protein having molecular weight around 25 kDa in the presence of chromium points out a possible role of this protein in chromium reduction.The bacterial isolates can be exploited for bioremediation of hexavalent chromium containing wastes,since they seem to have the potential to reduce the toxic hexavalent form to its nontoxic trivalent form.

  11. Interaction of the wood surface with metal ions. Part 3: The effects of light on chromium impregnated wood surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-light changes of untreated and chromium impregnated wood surface were investigated by absorption spectrophotometric methods. The properties of indifferent silicagel and celulose layers were to the behaviour of poplar and black locust surface. Chromic-ion-impregnation had no significant effect on the absorption spectra of these layers. On the other hand, hexavalent chromium was reduced and UV-light caused irreversible wood degradation. Surface treatment caused considerable modification in black locust

  12. Multivariate modeling of chromium-induced oxidative stress and biochemical changes in plants of Pistia stratiotes L.

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Sarita; Basant, Ankita; Malik, Amrita; Singh, Kunwar P.

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical changes in the plants of Pistia stratiotes L., a free floating macrophyte exposed to different concentrations of hexavalent chromium (0, 10, 40, 60, 80 and 160 μM) for 48, 96 and 144 h were studied. Chromium-induced oxidative stress in macrophyte was investigated using the multivariate modeling approaches. Cluster analysis rendered two fairly distinct clusters (roots and shoots) of similar characteristics in terms of their biochemical responses. Discriminant analysis identified as...

  13. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel concurs with its earlier views stating that no evidence was provided supporting the bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. Chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is claimed to be freely soluble in water, however, chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate exists as a weak complex that may influence the bioavailability of chromium(III in the gastrointestinal tract. The Panel re-iterates that because of the complex chemistry of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in aqueous solutions and its limited solubility at pH >5, the bioavailability of chromium(III from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is low. Based on a conservative exposure estimate, the Panel calculated the combined intake of chromium(III from supplements and from foods fortified with chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate, for both adults and children, to be approximately 240 μg chromium(III/day, which is below the value of 250 µg/day established by the WHO for supplemental intake of chromium that should not be exceeded. The Panel noted that the use of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in the form of a premix with lactose, added to foods, would result in an exposure at the mean for adults of approximately 7-37 mg lactose/day (0.12-0.62 μg lactose/kg bw/day and to 36-192 μg lactate/day (0.60-3.20 μg/kg bw/day. Given that subjects with lactose maldigestion will tolerate up to 12 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms, these levels are not of safety concern.

  14. Effet des polyamines sur la réduction du chrome hexavalent par des souches bactériennes et leur résistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahri Joutey, N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of polyamines on the reduction of hexavalent chromium by bacterial strains and their resistance. Polyamines are involved in several functions in bacteria. In this study, we examined the role of polyamines in hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI] reduction by three bacterial strains isolated from sites contaminated by tannery effluents. The strains were identified as Serratia proteamaculans, Leucobacter chromiireducens and Brevibacterium frigoritolerans. The inhibition of polyamine synthesis by α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO caused a decrease in Cr(VI tolerance in the bacterial isolates, indicating the role of endogenous polyamines in resistance to Cr(VI. The exogenous application of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, cadaverine was found to stimulate growth and Cr(VI reduction by the bacterial strains in Luria-Bertani medium. The results show the importance of polyamines in response to heavy metal stresses, especially Cr(VI toxicity.

  15. Chromium in river substrate pore water and adjacent groundwater: 100-D/DR area, Hanford site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the field investigation of groundwater discharging from the 100-D/DR Reactor Area into the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River located in Richland, Washington. This section of the Reach is used by fall chinook salmon as spawning habitat. The field investigation focused on hexavalent chromium in river substrate pore water, river water, riverbank seepage, and the Hanford Site aquifer at the shoreline. These data are used to establish a baseline for chromium concentrations in river substrate pore water and in the aquifer. This baseline will help assess the potential for exposure of ecological receptors to contaminated groundwater discharges and support groundwater remediation services. This groundwater is contaminated with hexavalent chromium at concentrations that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's chronic ambient water quality criterion

  16. Chromium oxidation state mapping in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.; Devès, G.; Susini, J.

    2003-03-01

    The widespread use of chromium in industrial applications such as chemical production of pigments, refractory brick production, tanning, metallurgy, electroplating, and combustion of fuels has lead to human occupational exposure and to its increased introduction into the environment. Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation is not known. Up to now, no microanalytical technique was sensitive enough to allow the observation of chromium distribution, and oxidation state identification, within isolated cells at carcinogenic concentrations. In this experiment, we used successfully the ID-21 X-ray microscope to map Cr(VI) and total Cr distributions in cells exposed in vitro to soluble, and insoluble, Cr(VI) compounds. Exposure to soluble compounds, weak carcinogens, resulted in a homogeneous intracellular distribution of Cr, confirming by in situ measurement that Cr is present in the cell nucleus. Cr(VI) was never detected in cells which suggests a mechanism of rapid intracellular reducticn. On the other hand, exposure to insoluble compounds, strong carcinogens, also resulted in a homogeneous distribution of reduced forms of Cr in cells, and their nucleus. However, in this case, Cr(VI)-rich structures were observed into the cells suggesting that carcinogenicity is enhanced when oxidation reactions due to Cr(VI) chronic exposure are associated to Cr-DNA alterations.

  17. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  18. Wet digestion and differential pulse stripping voltammetry determination of total chromium in the millet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqin LIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The chromium content of millet is measured by HNO3-H2O2 digestion and electrochemical method. In the DTPA-HAc-NaAc system, the oxidation peak current of amalgam formed by hexavalent chrome ion is obtained in the plating mercury electrode, and the pre-treatment technology of wet digestion can meet the electrochemical determination. The optimized detection condition of electrochemical method for hexavalent chrome ion is 130 ℃ of digestion solution, 10 mL hydrogen peroxide, 38 mL nitric acid, and neutral of pH. The linear correlation coefficient of electrochemical method is 0.99, and the recovery of standard addition is 90%~110%. This method can be used to trace chromium (Ⅵ determination in millet.

  19. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  20. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-containing support, (c) activating the chromium-based silica-containing support, (d) chemically reducing the activated chromium-based silica-containing support to produce a precursor catalyst, (e) r...

  1. Bioadsorption and bioaccumulation of chromium trivalent in Cr(III)-tolerant microalgae: a mechanisms for chromium resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, M C; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2013-10-01

    Anthropogenic activity constantly releases heavy metals into the environment. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. While hexavalent chromium uptake in plant cells has been reported that an active process by carrying essential anions, the cation Cr(III) appears to be taken up inactively. Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (Dc1M), an unicellular green alga is a well-studied cell biological model organism. The present study was carried out to investigate the toxic effect of chromium exposures on wild-type Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and Cr(III)-tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) strains of these green algae, and to determine the potential mechanism of chromium resistance. Using cell growth as endpoint to determine Cr(III)-sensitivity, the IC₅₀(₇₂) values obtained show significant differences of sensitivity between wild type and Cr(III)-tolerant cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed significant morphological differences between both strains, such as decrease in cell size or reducing the coefficient of form; and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization and cell wall thickening in the Cr(III)-tolerant strain with respect to the wild-type strain. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/XEDS) revealed that Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium distributed in cell wall (bioadsorption) as well as in cytoplasm, vacuoles, and chloroplast (bio-accumulation). Morphological changes of Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells and the presence of these electron-dense bodies in their cell structures can be understood as a Cr(III) detoxification mechanism. PMID:23810518

  2. ATTENUATION OF CHROMIUM TOXICITY IN MINE WASTE WATER USING WATER HYACINTH

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty M.; H.K. Patra

    2011-01-01

    The mine waste water at South Kaliapani chromite mining area of Orissa (India) showed high levels of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr+6). Cr+6 contaminated mine waste water poses potential threats for biotic community in the vicinity. The current field based phytoremediation study is an in situ approach for attenuation of Cr+6 from mine waste water using water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) weeds by rhizofiltration method. The weeds significantly reduced (up to 54%) toxic concentrations of C...

  3. Reduction of Chromium(VI) by Locally Isolated Pseudomonas sp. C-171

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Mujeeb Ur; GUL, Shereen; HAQ, Mohammad Zahoor UL

    2007-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas sp. C-171 capable of tolerating hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) up to 2000 ppm as potassium dichromate was isolated from domestic sewage. The Cr+6 reduction was checked by growing the isolated strain in a medium containing potassium dichromate as Cr+6 source. The rate of growth of Pseudomonas sp. C-171 decreased with the increase in Cr+6 concentration of the medium. The maximum rate of chromium reduction was observed during the log phase of bacterium growth. The reduction o...

  4. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matt; Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications project is to evaluate and test pretreatments not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  5. The determination of chromium in water samples by neutron activation analysis after preconcentration on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for the determination of chromium in sea- and fresh water. Chromium is concentrated on activated carbon from a neutral solution after a previous reduction of chromate with sodium sulfite at pH 1.5. The adsorption conditions, acidity, concentrations, amount of carbon, stirring-time, sample-volume, salinity, the influence of storage on the ratio of tervalent to hexavalent chromium, were investigated. The final determination of the total chromium content is performed by instrumental neutron-activation analysis. By preconcentration on activated carbon, a differentiation between tervalent and hexavalent chromium is possible. A separate determination of both species is not yet feasible due to the high carbon blank and to the necessity of measuring the adsorption percentage on carbon. The lower limit of determination, which depends on the value of the carbon blank, is 0.05 μg Cr/l with a precision of 20%. The determination is hampered by the considerable blank from the carbon. The use of activated carbon prepared from recrystallized sugar will probably improve the lower limit of determination and possibly allow the determination of chromate. (T.G.)

  6. Effect of chromium on the fatty acid composition of two strains of Euglena gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hexavalent chromium on fatty acid composition was studied in two strains of Euglena gracilis; UTEX 753 (from the Culture Collection of Algae of Texas University, USA) and MAT (isolated from a highly polluted River). Both were grown in photoauxotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions and exposed to two metal concentrations, one below and one above IC5. The high malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (3 to 7-fold) obtained with chromium concentration above IC5, suggested the existence of metal-induced lipid peroxidation. Total lipid content increased only with concentration below IC5, whereas it was inhibited by higher metal concentration. Photoheterotrophic control strains exhibited a significantly higher proportion of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Polyunsaturated acids were most affected by chromium, especially those related to chloroplast structures. Ultra-structure studies showed clear thylakoid disorganization in all treated cells. The results indicate that hexavalent chromium affects levels of fatty acids, especially those related to photosynthetic activity. - Fatty acid evaluation in the presence of chromium in Euglena gracilis grown in different culture conditions

  7. Effect of chromium on the fatty acid composition of two strains of Euglena gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocchetta, Iara [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: rocchetta@bg.fcen.uba.ar; Mazzuca, Marcia [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Conforti, Visitacion [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ruiz, Laura [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Balzaretti, Vilma [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Rios de Molina, Maria del Carmen [Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of hexavalent chromium on fatty acid composition was studied in two strains of Euglena gracilis; UTEX 753 (from the Culture Collection of Algae of Texas University, USA) and MAT (isolated from a highly polluted River). Both were grown in photoauxotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions and exposed to two metal concentrations, one below and one above IC{sub 5}. The high malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (3 to 7-fold) obtained with chromium concentration above IC{sub 5}, suggested the existence of metal-induced lipid peroxidation. Total lipid content increased only with concentration below IC{sub 5}, whereas it was inhibited by higher metal concentration. Photoheterotrophic control strains exhibited a significantly higher proportion of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Polyunsaturated acids were most affected by chromium, especially those related to chloroplast structures. Ultra-structure studies showed clear thylakoid disorganization in all treated cells. The results indicate that hexavalent chromium affects levels of fatty acids, especially those related to photosynthetic activity. - Fatty acid evaluation in the presence of chromium in Euglena gracilis grown in different culture conditions.

  8. Toxicity assessment and geochemical model of chromium leaching from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao; Li, Junguo; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming

    2016-02-01

    AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization) slag is a by-product of the stainless steel refining process. The leaching toxicity of chromium from AOD slag cannot be ignored in the recycling process of the AOD slag. To assess the leaching toxicity of the AOD slag, batch leaching tests have been performed. PHREEQC simulations combined with FactSage were carried out based on the detailed mineralogical analysis and petrophysical data. Moreover, Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system was protracted by HSC 5.0 software to explore the chromium speciation in leachates. It was found that AOD slag leachate is an alkaline and reductive solution. The Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system indicated that trivalent chromium, such as Cr(OH)4(-), is the major chromium species in the experimental Eh-pH region considered. However, toxic hexavalent chromium was released with maximum concentrations of 30 µg L(-1) and 18 µg L(-1) at L/S 10 and 100, respectively, during the earlier leaching stage. It concluded that the AOD slag possessed a certain leaching toxicity. After 10 d of leaching, trivalent chromium was the dominant species in the leachates, which corresponded to the results of PHREEQC simulation. Leaching toxicity of AOD slag is based on the chromium speciation and its transformation. Great attention should be focused on such factors as aging, crystal form of chromium-enriched minerals, and electrochemical characteristics of the leachates. PMID:26583286

  9. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  10. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Leucobacter sp. Strain G161, a Distinct and Effective Chromium Reducer

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Shimei; Ai, Wenjing; Dong, Xinjiao

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence for Leucobacter sp. strain G161 due to its distinct and effective hexavalent chromium reduction under aerobic growth conditions, followed by facultative anaerobic incubation. The draft genome sequence of Leucobacter sp. G161 comprises 3,554,188 bp, with an average G+C content of 65.3%, exhibiting 3,341 protein-coding genes and 55 predicted RNA genes.

  11. Influence of chromium salts on increased lipid peroxidation and differential pattern in antioxidant metabolism in Pistia stratiotes L

    OpenAIRE

    RishiKesh Upadhyay; Sanjib Kumar Panda

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the changing effect of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10mM) of hexavalent and trivalent chromium on different biochemical parameters along with antioxidant enzymes was investigated on water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) in order to know the possible involvement of this metal in oxidative injury, besides the activities of antioxidant enzymes leading to biochemical and oxidative aberration induced by elevated concentrations. Both in roots and shoots, Cr produced a sig...

  12. Thermodynamic Properties of Hexavalent Uranium Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent uranium compounds are of importance as starting materials and as intermediary compounds in the preparation of compounds of nuclear interest. Recent experimental work on the thermodynamic and thermal properties, including phase diagrams, of a number of these compounds is presented and discussed in relation to practical applications. Thermodynamic data are given on the systems UO3-U3O8 and UO2 (NO3)2-H2O, based on calorimetric measurements as well as on vapour pressure measurements. Finally, data of some other materials, including the hydrates of uranium peroxide and UO2Cl2, are discussed. Although many of the thermodynamic data are consistent, a number of inconsistencies still remain to be resolved. On this basis suggestions are given for future work. (author)

  13. A Comprehensive Review on Nickel (II And Chromium VI Toxicities - Possible Antioxidant (Allium Sativum Linn Defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusal K.Das

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity associated with nickel (II and chromium (VI is mainly due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules. Both nickel and chromium can generate free radicals (FR directly from molecular oxygen in a two step process to produce superoxide anion and in continued process, produce highly toxic hydroxyl radical. The pro-oxidative effects are compounded by fact that they also inhibit antioxidant enzymes and deplete intracellular glutathione. Garlic (Allium sativum has played an important dietary and medicinal role throughout the history of mankind. Garlic has the potential to enhance the endogenous antioxidant status in nickel as well as hexavalent chromium induced lipid peroxidation in normal and diabetic rats.

  14. Surface Microstructure and Component Changes of Chromium-resistant Enterobacter Cloacae CYS-25 Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-Yan; CHENG Yang-Jian; ZHENG Jing; YANG Chun-Peng; LI Bin; LI Dong-Song; LIN Zhang; HUANG Feng

    2008-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae CYS-25 strain was isolated from a chromate plant. This bacte-rium was capable of resisting high hexavalent chromium concentration and reducing Cr(Ⅵ) under aerobic condition. CrO42- stimulated the increase of bacterial size and production of compact convex paths containing chromium on the bacterial surface. The increase of bacterial size was caused by integrative growth but not extracellular polymeric substance hyperplasia. IR and SDS-PAGE analyses showed the extraeellular polymeric substance (EPS) components were mainly proteins and had no obvious changes whether the strains were induced by Cr(Ⅵ) or not. The EPS was amorphous and contained trivalent chromium. Under CrO42- growth condition, the extracellular substance of Enterobacter cloacae CYS-25 strains and Cr(Ⅵ) had redox reaction. The products were Cr3+-protein complexes which formed a piece of compact convex paths on the surface of bacteria and prevented Cr(Ⅵ) from entering into cells.

  15. Removal of toxic chromium from wastewater using green alga Ulva lactuca and its activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption of heavy metals can be an effective process for the removal of toxic chromium ions from wastewater. In this study, the batch removal of toxic hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution, saline water and wastewater using marine dried green alga Ulva lactuca was investigated. Activated carbon prepared from U. lactuca by acid decomposition was also used for the removal of chromium from aqueous solution, saline water and wastewater. The chromium uptake was dependent on the initial pH and the initial chromium concentration, with pH ∼1.0, being the optimum pH value. Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were fitted well the equilibrium data for both sorbents. The maximum efficiencies of chromium removal were 92 and 98% for U. lactuca and its activated carbon, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 10.61 and 112.36 mg g-1 for dried green alga and activated carbon developed from it, respectively. The adsorption capacities of U. lactuca and its activated carbon were independent on the type of solution containing toxic chromium and the efficiency of removal was not affected by the replacing of aqueous solution by saline water or wastewater containing the same chromium concentration. Two hours were necessary to reach the sorption equilibrium. The chromium uptake by U. lactuca and its activated carbon form were best described by pseudo second-order rate model. This study verifies the possibility of using inactivated marine green alga U. lactuca and its activated carbon as valuable material for the removal of chromium from aqueous solutions, saline water or wastewater

  16. Chromium speciation in particulate matter samples (Cr(VI)/Cr(III) stability in solutions of leaching agents)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In recent years extensive research was conducted to estimate the bioavailability and toxicity of metals in environmental samples. Substantial health risk could be associated with high particulate matter concentrations in ambient air and with a consumption of contaminated food-stuffs, both accompanied by an occurrence of toxic elements. One of the main causes of exceedance of ambient air quality limit values is traffic, despite emissions reductions. Among other factors, the mobility of an element is usually related to its chemical properties and the toxicity mainly to its oxidation state. Thus, chromium in the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), has long been recognized as a carcinogen and mutagen at low sub-ppm levels. Therefore, in this work, the presence and stability of Cr(VI)/Cr(III) species have been determined in particular matter of urban dust samples (the modified BCR three step sequential extraction procedure). For testing of stability and presence of Cr species a coupled technique connecting on-line HPLC with element-sensitive detector ICP-OES has been used (chromium was detected on line 205,560 nm). The anion exchange column Hamilton PRP-X100 (250 x 4,6 mm, 5 μm, PEEK, (Hamilton, USA)) was used for separation of Cr species. Optimal conditions for the separation were following: mobile phase 50 mmol x l-1 CH3COOH and 10 mmol xl-1 NaClO4 (pH 7.0; flow rate 1.5 ml x min-1), injected 200 μl of the sample, addition of 30 μg x ml-1 CDTA to the sample for a transfer of Cr(III) to anion complex. This combined technique allowed to determine 10 μg of Cr(III) and 13 μg of Cr(VI) in the sample (absolute LOD). It was found out that all three extraction agents used for a fractionation of elements negatively influenced the stability of Cr(VI) species in the solution immediately after their contact with the sample. The quantitatively smallest influence was found for the acetic acid. Probably this is a reason why only species of Cr

  17. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation

  18. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomovskaya, N.S.; Iorga, E.V.; Sheveleva, T.F.; Solov' eva, A.E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation.

  19. Human Folate Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia M. Witthoft

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The vitamin folate is recognized as beneficial health-wise in the prevention of neural tube defects, anemia, cardiovascular diseases, poor cognitive performance, and some forms of cancer. However, suboptimal dietary folate intake has been reported in a number of countries. Several national health authorities have therefore introduced mandatory food fortification with synthetic folic acid, which is considered a convenient fortificant, being cost-efficient in production, more stable than natural food folate, and superior in terms of bioavailability and bioefficacy. Other countries have decided against fortification due to the ambiguous role of synthetic folic acid regarding promotion of subclinical cancers and other adverse health effects. This paper reviews recent studies on folate bioavailability after intervention with folate from food. Our conclusions were that limited folate bioavailability data are available for vegetables, fruits, cereal products, and fortified foods, and that it is difficult to evaluate the bioavailability of food folate or whether intervention with food folate improves folate status. We recommend revising the classical approach of using folic acid as a reference dose for estimating the plasma kinetics and relative bioavailability of food folate.

  20. Bioavailability of Tea Polyphenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tea is a pleasant, popular and safe beverage. Tea provides a dietary source of bioactive components to help humans reduce a wide variety of cancer risks and chronic diseases. The antioxidative activity of green tea-derived polypbenols known as catchins has been extensively studied. The reducfive effect is a synergistic action between EGCG,EGC, ECG, EC, pheophytins a and b, and other components in tealeaves, which are more bioavailable for human body.Green tea has a higher content of catechins than black tea. Green tea extract with hot water has high potential and more efficiencytoreducecancerriskthananyotherteaproductsorpureEGCG. Protein, iron, andotherfoodcomponentsmay interfere with the bioavailability of tea polyphenols. Drinkinggreentea (orpolyphenol-rich tea extract ) also enhances the cancer-preventive activity of some cancer-fighting medication such as Sulindac and Tamoxifen. Further studies are required to determine the bioavailability of green tea and cancer-preventive functionality.

  1. Bioavailability and generic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindel, J S

    1976-01-01

    Although oral drug bioinequivalence has been attributed to a number of causes (excipients, dosage form, variation in dissolution time, and aging) less is known about bioavailability problems of topical medications in ophthalmology. Factors that can alter drug absorption from solutions (pH, partition coefficient, container impurities, contact time, etc.) are noted, and cases in which bioavailability problems should be considered as causes of therapeutic failure are discussed. Various attitudes representing pharmaceutical companies, the federal government, pharmacists, consumers and physicians toward the related problems of bioinequivalence and generic prescribing are examined. Techniques for in vivo and in vitro drug testing and for establishing uniform conditions of drug manufacture and storage can contribute to identification and minimization of bioavailability problems. A rational program based on a combination of such techniques could, ultimately, lead to establishment of the terms "generic equivalency" and "therapeutic equivalency" as synonymous. PMID:13505

  2. NASA TEERM Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.; Rothgeb, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project is to evaluate and test pretreatment coating systems not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders. The technical stakeholders have agreed that this protocol will focus specifically on Class 3 coatings. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), depots, and support contractors have to be prepared to deal with an electronics supply chain that increasingly provides parts with lead-free finishes, some labeled no differently and intermingled with their SnPb counterparts. Allowance of lead-free components presents one of the greatest risks to the reliability of military and aerospace electronics. The introduction of components with lead-free terminations, termination finishes, or circuit boards presents a host of concerns to customers, suppliers, and maintainers of aerospace and military electronic systems such as: 1. Electrical shorting due to tin whiskers 2. Incompatibility of lead-free processes and parameters (including higher melting points of lead-free alloys) with other materials in the system 3. Unknown material properties and incompatibilities that could reduce solder joint reliability

  3. Selective Chromium(VI) Ligands Identified Using Combinatorial Peptoid Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a world-wide water contaminant that is currently without cost-effective and efficient remediation strategies. This is in part due to a lack of ligands that can bind it amid an excess of innocuous ions in aqueous solution. We present herein the design and application of a peptoid-based library of ligand candidates for toxic metal ions. A selective screening process was used to identify members of the library that can bind to Cr(VI) species at neutral pH and in the presence of a large excess of spectator ions. Eleven sequences were identified, and their affinities were compared using titrations monitored with UV-Vis spectroscopy. To identify the interactions involved in coordination and specificity, we evaluated the effects of sequence substitutions and backbone variation in the highest affinity structure. Additional characterization of the complex formed between this sequence and Cr(VI) was performed using NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the ability of the developed sequences to remediate contaminated solutions, the structures were synthesized on a solid-phase resin and incubated with environmental water samples that contained simulated levels of chromium contamination. The synthetic structures demonstrated the ability to reduce the amount of toxic chromium to levels within the range of the EPA contamination guidelines. In addition to providing some of the first selective ligands for Cr(VI), these studies highlight the promise of peptoid sequences as easily-prepared components of environmental remediation materials. PMID:24195610

  4. Hair chromium concentration and chromium excretion in tannery workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, G; Yüzbasiyan, V; Cigdem, S

    1984-01-01

    Hair and urine samples were collected from 34 male tannery workers and from 12 normal adults. Eighteen of the workers dealt directly with chromium and the remaining 16 (controls) worked in the offices and kitchen of the same factory. All were found to be clinically healthy. Chromium was determined by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. When compared with normal adult values, urinary chromium concentration, Cr/Creatinine ratio, daily chromium excretion, and hair chromium, concentrations ...

  5. High-Purity Chromium Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Rudoy, A.; Milman, Yu.; Korzhova, N.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure for producing large-scale chromium ingots by means of induction-arc melting was developed. From the high-purity, low-alloyed chromium ingots obtained, chromium targets were produced by of thermoplastic treatment techniques. The method of electron-beam evaporation of high-purity chromium was also used for production of targets.

  6. SLUDGE ORGANICS BIOAVAILABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. vailable data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. ludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical c...

  7. GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Final Pretreatments Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chrome free pretreatments should be considered for use on Ground Support Equipment (OSE) and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EOSE). Both of the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments (Metalast TCP HF and SurTec 650C) evaluated by this project met, and in some instances exceeded, the requirements ofMIL-DTL-5541 "Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys". For DC resistance measurements, both Metalast TCP HF and SurTec (!50C met initial requirements following assembly and in many cases continued to maintain passing readings for the duration of testing.

  8. Microstructural characterisation of chromium slags

    OpenAIRE

    Burja, J.; F. Tehovnik; Vode, F.; Arh, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this chromium slags that form during melting of chromium alloyed steels are examined. During melting and oxidation of these steel grades a considerable amount of chromium is lost, and gained back with slag reduction. Laboratory experiments were performed to study the mechanism of chromium oxide reduction by silicon. Slags chemistry and phase composition have a strong effect on the steelmaking process. Phase analysis revealed two types of chromium oxides, calcium chromites and chromite spin...

  9. Hexavalent chromium and isocyanate exposures during military aircraft painting under crossflow ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James S; Marlow, David A; Nourian, Fariba; Breay, James; Hammond, Duane

    2016-05-01

    Exposure control systems performance was investigated in an aircraft painting hangar. The ability of the ventilation system and respiratory protection program to limit worker exposures was examined through air sampling during painting of F/A-18C/D strike fighter aircraft, in four field surveys. Air velocities were measured across the supply filter, exhaust filter, and hangar midplane under crossflow ventilation. Air sampling conducted during painting process phases (wipe-down, primer spraying, and topcoat spraying) encompassed volatile organic compounds, total particulate matter, Cr[VI], metals, nitroethane, and hexamethylene diisocyanate, for two worker groups: sprayers and sprayer helpers ("hosemen"). One of six methyl ethyl ketone and two of six methyl isobutyl ketone samples exceeded the short term exposure limits of 300 and 75 ppm, with means 57 ppm and 63 ppm, respectively. All 12 Cr[VI] 8-hr time-weighted averages exceeded the recommended exposure limit of 1 µg/m(3), 11 out of 12 exceeded the permissible exposure limit of 5 µg/m(3), and 7 out of 12 exceeded the threshold limit value of 10 µg/m(3), with means 38 µg/m(3) for sprayers and 8.3 µg/m(3) for hosemen. Hexamethylene diisocyanate means were 5.95 µg/m3 for sprayers and 0.645 µg/m(3) for hosemen. Total reactive isocyanate group-the total of monomer and oligomer as NCO group mass-showed 6 of 15 personal samples exceeded the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive workplace exposure limit of 20 µg/m(3), with means 50.9 µg/m(3) for sprayers and 7.29 µg/m(3) for hosemen. Several exposure limits were exceeded, reinforcing continued use of personal protective equipment. The supply rate, 94.4 m(3)/s (200,000 cfm), produced a velocity of 8.58 m/s (157 fpm) at the supply filter, while the exhaust rate, 68.7 m(3)/s (146,000 cfm), drew 1.34 m/s (264 fpm) at the exhaust filter. Midway between supply and exhaust locations, the velocity was 0.528 m/s (104 fpm). Supply rate exceeding exhaust rate created re-circulations, turbulence, and fugitive emissions, while wasting energy. Smoke releases showing more effective ventilation here than in other aircraft painting facilities carries technical feasibility relevance. PMID:26698920

  10. Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

  11. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by acid modified waste activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2009-11-15

    Fresh activated carbon (AC) and waste activated carbon (WAC) were pretreated by heating with mineral acids (sulfuric acid and nitric acid) at high temperature to prepare several grades of adsorbents to evaluate their performance on Cr(VI) removal from aqueous phase. Effects of temperature, agitation speed and pH were tested, and optimum conditions were evaluated. Kinetic study was performed under optimum conditions with several grades of modified adsorbents to know the rates of adsorption. Batch adsorption equilibrium data followed both, Freuindlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum adsorption capacity (q(max)) of the selected adsorbents treated with sulfuric acid (MWAC 1) and nitric acid (MWAC 2), calculated from Langmuir isotherm are 7.485 and 10.929 mg/g, respectively. Nitric acid treated adsorbent (MWAC 2) was used for column study to determine the constants of bed depth service time (BDST) model for adsorption column design. PMID:19553008

  12. Hexavalent chromium removal in a tannery industry wastewater using rice husk silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study dealt the removal of Cr(VI in a tannery industry wastewater using rice husk silica powder as an adsorbent.The experimental investigations have been carried out by using rice husk silica powder for different adsorption dosage, different contact time and different pH against the initial Cr(VI concentration of 292 mg/L. The maximum percentage removal of Cr(VI in the tannery industrial wastewater (88.3 % was found at an optimum adsorbent dosage of 15 g, contact time of 150 min., and pH of 4.  Further, the experimental data on removal of Cr(VI from tannery industry wastewater was validated with the Cr(VI aqueous solution of same initial concentration of tannery industry waster against the optimum process parameters. The results of the validation experiment showed that the experiments conducted for the removal of Cr(VI in a tannery industry wastewater may be reproducing capability for analyzing various parameters along with Cr(VI based water and industry wastewater.  The experimental data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models.  Isotherm models result indicated that the equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm than Freundlich isotherm, because of higher correlation created between dependent and independent variables. Thus, the adsorption method using rice husk silica powder was used effectively for removing Cr(VI in the tannery industrial wastewater, seems to be an economical and worthwhile alternative over other conventional methods, because of their abundant source, low price, multi-purposes and antimicrobial properties.

  13. Alleviation of toxic hexavalent chromium using indigenous aerobic bacteria isolated from contaminated tannery industry sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Siddhartha; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bansal, Ankur Kumar; Arutchelvan, V; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    In the last decade, much attention has been paid to bioremediation of Cr(VI) using various bacterial species. Cr(VI) remediation by indegeneous bacteria isolated from contaminated sites of a tannery industry located in Tamil Nadu, India, was investigated in this study. Three Cr(VI) resistant bacterial strains (TES-1, TEf-1, and TES-2) were isolated and selected based on their Cr(VI) reduction ability in minimal salt medium. Among these three bacterial strains, TES-1 was found to be most efficient in bioreduction, while TES-2 was only found to be Cr(VI) resistant and showed negligible bioreduction, whereas TEf-1 was observed to be most Cr(VI) tolerant. Potential for bioremediation of TES-1 and TEf-1 was further investigated at different concentrations of Cr(VI) in the range of 50 to 350 mg L(-1). TEf-1 showed prominent synchronous growth throughout the experiment, whereas TES-1 took a longer acclimatization time. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of Cr(VI) for TES-1 and TEf-1 were approximated as 600 mg L(-1) and 750 mg L(-1), respectively. The kinetic behavior of Cr(VI) reduction by TES-1 and TEf-1 exhibited zero- and first-order removal kinetics for Cr(VI), respectively. The most efficient strain TES-1 was identified as Streptomyces sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. PMID:26458110

  14. Effect of Set Potential on Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Electricity Generation from Biocathode Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Liping

    2011-06-01

    Setting a biocathode potential at ?300 mV improved the subsequent performance of an MFC for Cr(VI) reduction compared to a control (no set potential). With this set potential, the startup time was reduced to 19 days, the reduction of Cr(VI) was improved to 19.7 mg/L d, and the maximum power density was increased to 6.4 W/m3 compared to the control (26 days, 14.0 mg/L d and 4.1 W/m3). Set potentials of ?150 mV and ?300 mV also improved system performance and led to similarly higher utilization of metabolic energy gained (PMEG) than set potentials of +200 mV and ?450 mV. We observed putative pili at ?150 and ?300 mV potentials, and aggregated precipitates on bacterial surfaces in both poised and nonpoised controls. These tests show that there are optimal potentials that can be set for developing a Cr(VI) biocathode. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Dispersion of Iron Nanoparticles by Polymer-Based Hybrid Material for Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Wasim Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A gel type acrylic acid resin, based on ethyl acrylate-co-1,7-octadiene, has been synthesized by suspension polymerization at 20% cross-linking and subsequent hydrolysis by H2SO4. Capacity of the resin was observed to be 8.90 meq/g or 3.28 meq/mL. The iron nanoparticles used in this study were synthesized by ferrous sulphate method by using LiBH4 as a reductant and characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, surface area, and electrical properties. Later, the resin was applied for the dispersion of iron nanoparticles over its surface for the reduction of Cr(VI and subsequent adsorption of Fe(III and Cr(III as byproducts. In the column studies the reduction of Cr(VI and the adsorption of Cr(III and Fe(III have been observed up to 240 μmole/L.

  16. Cytogenomics of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+ exposed cells: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Nigam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The altered cellular gene expression profile is being hypothesized as the possible molecular basis navigating the onset or progress of various morbidities. This hypothesis has been evaluated here in respect of Cr 6+ induced toxicity. Several studies using gene microarray show selective and strategic dysregulations of cellular genes and pathways induced by Cr 6+ . Relevant literature has been reviewed to unravel these changes in different test systems after exposure to Cr 6+ and also to elucidate association if any, of the altered cytogenomics with Cr 6+ induced toxicity or carcinogenicity. The aim was to verify the hypothesis for critical role of altered cytogenomics in onset of Cr 6+ induced biological / clinical effects by identifying genes modulated commonly by the toxicant irrespective of test system or test concentrations / doses, and by scrutinizing their importance in regulation of the flow of mechanistically linked events crucial for resultant morbidities. Their probability as biomarkers to monitor the toxicant induced biological changes is speculative. The modulated genes have been found to cluster under the pathways that manage onset of oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis, cell-cycle regulation, cytoskeleton, morphological changes, energy metabolism, biosynthesis, oncogenes, bioenergetics, and immune system critical for toxicity. In these studies, the identity of genes has been found to differ remarkably; albeit the trend of pathways′ dysregulation has been found to remain similar. We conclude that the intensity of dysregulation of genes or pathways involved in mechanistic events forms a sub-threshold or threshold level depending upon the dose and type (including speciation of the toxicant, duration of exposure, type of target cells, and niche microenvironment of cells, and the intensity of sub-threshold or threshold level of the altered cytogenomics paves way in toxicant exposed cells eventually either to opt for reversal to differentiation and growth, or to result in toxicity like dedifferentiation and apoptosis, respectively.

  17. Semi-continuous detection of toxic hexavalent chromium using a sulfur-oxidizing bacteria biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Anup; Oh, Sang-Eun; Kim, Ki Duck; Shin, Beom-Soo

    2012-09-15

    Toxicity testing is becoming a useful tool for environmental risk assessment. A biosensor based on the metabolic properties of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been applied for the detection of toxic chemicals in water. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid under aerobic conditions. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. Five hours after Cr(6+) was added to the SOB biosensor operated in semi-continuous mode (1 min rapid feeding and 29 min batch reaction), a decrease in effluent EC and an increase in pH (from 2-3 to 6) were detected due to Cr(6+) toxicity to SOB. The SOB biosensor is simple; it can detect toxic levels of Cr(6+) on the order of minutes to hours, a useful time scale for early warning detection systems designed to protect the environment from further degradation. PMID:22647672

  18. Effects of combining biological treatment and activated carbon on hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, A M Ferro; Contreras, E M; Zaritzky, N E

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of the present work were: (a) to analyze the Cr(VI) removal by combining activated sludge (AS) with powdered activated carbon (PAC), (b) to analyze the effect of PAC and Cr(VI) on the growth kinetics of activated sludge, and (c) to determine if the combined method (AS-PAC) for Cr(VI) removal can be considered additive or synergistic with respect to the individual processes. Chromate removal was improved by increasing PAC concentrations in both PAC and AS-PAC systems. Cr(VI) removal using the AS-PAC system was higher than using AS or PAC. The increase of Cr(VI) caused longer lag phase and lower observed specific growth rate (μ(obs)), biomass yield (Y(X/S)), and specific growth substrate consumption rate (q(S)) of activated sludge; additionally, PAC did not enhance the growth kinetic parameters (μ(obs), Y(X/S), q(S)). Cr(VI) reduction in AS-PAC system was the result of the additive effect of each individual Cr(VI) removal process. PMID:21123053

  19. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 2: Human, Toxicokinetic, and Mechanistic Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2014, EPA released the second part of draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA w...

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 1: Experimental Animal Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April 2014, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA was interested in...

  1. Determination of hexavalent chromium in ambient air: A story of method induced Cr(III) oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirez, Kristof; Silversmit, Geert; Bleux, Nico; Adriaensens, Elke; Roekens, Edward; Servaes, Kelly; Vanhoof, Chris; Vincze, Laszlo; Berghmans, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    The accuracy of the determination of Cr(VI) in ambient particulate matter remains a challenge from the point of view of minimal Cr species interconversion. Knowledge of this method induced oxidation and reduction is particularly relevant for the determination of Cr(VI) in ambient particulate matter, as the level of observed Cr(III) oxidation (average of 1.7% in this study) can contribute significantly to the monitored range of measured Cr(VI) in PM 10. For Cr concentrations in PM 10 > 10 ng Cr m -3, this method induced oxidation could lead to false positive exceeding of an air quality guideline value of 0.2 ng Cr(VI) m -3 in PM 10. The median daily Cr(VI) concentration in PM 10 measured over a monitoring period of more than 2 months at two locations close to a stainless steel factory amounted to 0.9 ng Cr(VI) m -3 and 0.27 ng Cr(VI) m -3. Average daily Cr(VI)/Cr ratios in PM 10 of 3.5% and 2.6% were measured at these locations. The described monitoring for the determination of Cr(VI) in ambient air via alkaline impregnated filters is sensitive (method detection limit of 0.015 ng Cr(VI) m -3) and reproducible (precision of the method ˜25%). The average Cr(VI) recovery of 75% strongly indicates the effects of ambient sampling conditions and ambient particles on the Cr(VI) recoveries. The stability of the Cr(VI) and the Cr(III) spike on 0.12 M NaHCO 3 impregnated filters observed with XANES, indicates that the alkaline extraction of the filter in combination with the sampled air matrix is likely to induce the Cr conversions. The XANES spectra shows further that a Cr-spinel is the predominant component of Cr in ambient air PM 10 at the monitored locations.

  2. A screening method for detection of hexavalent chromium levels in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora V Franco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and low cost method to determine Cr(VI in soils based upon alkaline metal extraction at room temperature is proposed as a semi-quantitative procedure to be performed in the field. A color comparison with standards with contents of Cr(VI in the range of 10 to 150 mg kg-1 was used throughout. For the different types of soils studied, more than 75% of the fortified soluble Cr(VI were recovered for all levels of spike tested for both the proposed and standard methods. Recoveries of 83 and 99% were obtained for the proposed and the standard methods, respectively, taking into account the analysis of a heavily contaminated soil sample.

  3. Hexavalent chromium reduction by immobilized cells of Bacillus sphaericus AND 303

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Pal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus sphaericus AND 303, a Cr(VI-resistant and reducing bacterium reported from serpentine outcrops of Andaman was evaluated for Cr(VI reduction using immobilized cells under batch culture. Screening of inert matrices for entrapment of whole cells indicated that polyvinyl alchohol-alginate was the most effective one reducing 87.5% of 20 µM Cr(VI in 24 h. The rate of chromate reduction was dependent on initial Cr(VI and biomass concentrations. The PVA cell beads were recycled three times without cell leakage and disintegration. The reduction efficiency was improved in the presence of glucose and glycerol as electron donors leading to complete reduction. However, the presence of additional metal ions was inhibitory to Cr(VI reduction. It could be emphasized that PVA-alginate immobilized cells of B. sphaericus AND 303 could be used as a continuous bioprocess in treating Cr(VI contaminated effluents.

  4. A MIXED CHEMICAL REDUCTANT FOR TREATING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in a chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW). The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5 -11.5), high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg-1) and...

  5. Remediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soil by biochar-supported zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huijie; Fang, Zhanqiang; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Zheng, Liuchun; Cheng, Wen; Fang, Jianzhang; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-11-15

    In this study, a kind of high-efficiency and low-cost biochar-supported zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI@BC) was synthesised and used in the remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The remediation tests indicated that the immobilisation efficiency of Cr(VI) and Crtotal was 100% and 91.94%, respectively, by 8g nZVI@BC per kg soil for 15 d of remediation. Further investigations showed that exchangeable Cr was almost completely converted to Fe-Mn oxides and organic matter. Moreover, nZVI@BC could effectively improve soil fertility and reduce the leachability of Fe caused by nZVI. At the same time, the cabbage mustard growth experiments indicated that the phytotoxicity of Cr(VI) and Fe in the seedlings was effectively decreased by nZVI@BC treatment, and that the cabbage mustard growth was enhanced. PMID:27469041

  6. Removal of hexavalent chromium ions using CuO nanoparticles for water purification applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Chandra, Ramesh; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Verma, Monu

    2016-09-15

    Copper(II) oxide nanoparticles were synthesized at low temperature using cold finger assisted magnetron sputtering technique and were applied as adsorbent for the rapid removal of noxious Cr(VI) ions from the solvent phase. The average size of CuO nanoparticles from TEM analysis was found to be 8nm in addition to this the BET surface area (84.327m(2)/g) was found to be significantly high in comparison to the previously CuO nanoparticles synthesized via green route. The synthesized CuO nanoparticles is crystalline in nature and exhibits monoclinic phase, which was confirmed using various analytical techniques such as SAED, XRD and Raman analysis. The impact of influential parameters including pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, stirring speed, initial Cr(VI) ions concentration, and temperature were optimized using batch adsorption method in order to obtain maximum removal of Cr(VI) ions. From the thermodynamic parameters, the positive value of enthalpy (ΔH) and negative value of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) indicate the endothermic and spontaneous nature of Cr(VI) ions adsorption, respectively. The adsorption kinetics data was well fitted and found to be in good agreement with the pseudo second order kinetic behaviour. PMID:27285779

  7. EVALUATION OF AN ELECTRODIALYTIC PROCESS FOR PURIFICATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This evaluation addresses the waste reduction and economics of an electrodialytic process that can be used to selectively remove impurities that build up in chromic acid solutions with use. The removal of impurities extends the useful life of the chromic acid solution and avoids ...

  8. Bioremoval of hexavalent chromium by A. viscosus supported on Y and ZSM5 zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Bruna Andreia Nogueira Airosa; Neves, Isabel C.; Tavares, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    Este resumo faz parte de: Book of abstracts of the Meeting of the Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 2, Braga, Portugal, 2010. A versão completa do livro de atas está disponível em: http://hdl.handle.net/1822/10968

  9. TRANSPORT AND TRANSFORMATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM THROUGH SOILS AND INTO GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed characterization of the underlying and adjacent soils of a chrome-plating shop was performed to provide information on the extent of soil and aquifer contamination at the site and on the potential for off-site migration and environmental impact. Intact, moist cores wer...

  10. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by crosslinked chitosan-iron(III) in an air-lift reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarchi, Carla Albertina; Rodrigues, Clóvis Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Column experiments were conducted in an airlift reactor containing a certain amount of crosslinked chitosan-iron(III) (Ch-Fe), to examine the effects of adsorbent mass, flow rate, and influent concentrations on Cr(VI) removal. The breakthrough time increased with an increase in Ch-Fe mass, but decreased with an increase in initial Cr(VI) concentration. The exhaustion time decreased with an increase in initial Cr(VI) concentration. The capacity at the breakthrough point increased with an increase in Ch-Fe mass, flow rate, and initial Cr(VI) concentration. The capacity at the exhaustion point increased with an increase in flow rate, but showed no specific trend with an increase in initial Cr(VI) concentration. The bed volumes at breakthrough point increased with an increase in Ch-Fe, flow rate and Cr(VI) concentration. The adsorbent exhaustion decreased with an increase in flow rate and Ch-Fe, but increased with an increase in initial Cr(VI) concentration. Columns with large amounts of Ch-Fe are preferable for obtaining optimal results during the adsorption process. The higher the flow velocity, the better the column performance. The Thomas, Clark and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to the experimental results. Good agreement was observed between the predicted theoretical breakthrough curves and the experimental results. PMID:26901729

  11. Differential physiological responses of two Salvinia species to hexavalent chromium at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Carolina; Chocobar Ponce, Silvana; Pagano, Eduardo; Prado, Fernando E; Rosa, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    In plants of Salvinia rotundifolia and Salvinia minima the effect of two Cr(VI) concentrations (5 and 20mgL(-1)) applied for 7days was assessed by measuring changes in biomass, photosynthetic pigments, Cr accumulation, malondialdehyde (MDA), membrane stability index (MSI), thiols (TT, NPT and PBT), and phenolics (SP and IP). Biomass in S. minima was decreased at highest Cr(VI) concentration, but there were no changes in S. rotundifolia. Metal accumulation was different in both species. S. minima accumulates more metal in fronds, but S. rotundifolia accumulates more metal in lacinias. Results also showed that S. minima translocates more Cr to fronds than S. rotundifolia, but at the whole plant level higher accumulation occurred in this last. Tolerance index (Ti) was higher in S. rotundifolia. Chl b and carotenoids were decreased only upon exposure to high Cr(VI) concentration in both species. Cr(VI) treatment did not enhance MDA accumulation. Cr exposure had no impact on MSI values when comparing with Cr-untreated values. Thiols in fronds and lacinias showed different distribution patterns between species. IP and NPT were higher in S. rotundifolia lacinias that accumulate more Cr than S. minima lacinias. Whilst SP and NPT were higher in S. minima fronds compared with S. rotundifolia ones. This may indicate that these species can cope with Cr(VI) toxicity, either through metal complexation and/or metal reduction or by the scavenging of ROS derived from Cr-induced oxidative stress. Based on Cr accumulation and biomass production, S. rotundifolia seems more suitable to remove Cr(VI) from polluted waters. PMID:27061358

  12. A novel Pseudomonas gessardii strain LZ-E simultaneously degrades naphthalene and reduces hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiying; Wu, Kejia; Khan, Aman; Jiang, Yiming; Ling, Zhenmin; Liu, Pu; Chen, Yong; Tao, Xuanyu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-05-01

    Combined pollutants with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals have been identified as toxic and unmanageable contaminates. In this work, Pseudomonas gessardii strain LZ-E isolated from wastewater discharge site of a petrochemical company degrades naphthalene and reduces Cr(VI) simultaneously. 95% of 10mgL(-1) Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) while 77% of 800mgL(-1) naphthalene was degraded when strain LZ-E was incubated in BH medium for 48h. Furthermore, naphthalene promotes Cr(VI) reduction in strain LZ-E as catechol and phthalic acid produced in naphthalene degradation are able to reduce Cr(VI) abiotically. An aerated bioreactor system was setup to test strain LZ-E's remediation ability. Strain LZ-E continuously remediated naphthalene and Cr(VI) at rates of 15mgL(-1)h(-1) and 0.20mgL(-1)h(-1) of 800mgL(-1) naphthalene and 10mgL(-1) Cr(VI) addition with eight batches in 16days. In summary, strain LZ-E is a potential applicant for combined pollution remediation. PMID:26901089

  13. Oxidative dissolution of pyrite surfaces by hexavalent chromium: Surface site saturation and surface renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew M.; Bouwer, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    In-situ reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III) represents an important natural attenuation process for Cr(VI)-impacted environments. This study investigates the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite, a reduced iron-sulfur mineral ubiquitous in recent estuarine and marine sediments. Pyrite suspensions at surface loadings of 0.28-2.10 m2/L (typical of estuarine or marine sediments) were capable of completely reducing 7-120 μM Cr(VI) on the timescale of minutes to days, with the time to reaction completion decreasing with increasing pyrite loading, decreasing initial Cr(VI) concentration, and decreasing suspension pH. Analysis of metal species (Cr and Fe) and sulfur species in solution and at the mineral surface indicated that Cr(VI) oxidatively dissolved the pyrite surface, releasing ferrous iron and sulfate into solution as the reaction progressed. Surface disulfide groups were postulated as the Cr(VI)-reactive surface entity. Net production or consumption of aqueous Fe(II) was shown to depend upon the relative rates of proton-promoted Fe(II) release, Fe(II) release due to oxidative dissolution of pyrite in the presence of Cr(VI), and Fe(II) consumption due to homogeneous reaction with Cr(VI). Kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite displayed a biphasic pattern, and the time to reaction completion increased dramatically with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentration. Rapid Cr(VI) removal occurred early in the reaction progress, attributable to Cr(VI) loss under an adsorption-limited regime. Slow, approximately zero-order, Cr(VI) removal occurred over the bulk of the time courses, and corresponded to Cr(VI) removal under surface site saturation conditions. Stoichiometric Cr(VI) reduction was able to proceed under surface site limited conditions owing to regeneration of reactive surface sites following desorption/dissolution of oxidized surface products, as demonstrated in repeat Cr(VI)-spiking experiments. The role of surface passivation was evaluated by comparing rates of Cr(VI) reduction in the presence and absence of the Cr(III)-complexing agent citrate. While citrate addition significantly enhanced Cr(III) solubility, rates of Cr(VI) reduction were only marginally accelerated, suggesting that Cr(OH)3(s) coatings did not completely block access of Cr(VI) to reactive surface sites on pyrite. Given the rapid rates of Cr(VI) reduction with pyrite under pH and surface coverage conditions typical of natural environments, we propose that Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite be considered in fate and transport models for Cr in contaminated sediments.

  14. The Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Controllable Mesoporous Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Vorrada Loryuenyong; Natnapin Jarunsak; Thirawich Chuangchai; Achanai Buasri

    2014-01-01

    Titania (TiO2) nanoparticles with periodical mesopore size (up to 150 Å) have successfully been synthesized by sol-gel template method, using titanium(IV) tetraisopropoxide as a starting precursor and isopropanol as a solvent. Different quantities of activated carbon (0%, 5%, and 10% by weight) were used as templates to control the porosity and particle size of titania nanoparticles. The templates were completely removed during the calcination in air at 500°C for 3 hr. The results showed that...

  15. Hexavalent chromium reduction by immobilized cells of Bacillus sphaericus AND 303

    OpenAIRE

    Arundhati Pal; Sudeshna Datta; Amal K. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus sphaericus AND 303, a Cr(VI)-resistant and reducing bacterium reported from serpentine outcrops of Andaman was evaluated for Cr(VI) reduction using immobilized cells under batch culture. Screening of inert matrices for entrapment of whole cells indicated that polyvinyl alchohol-alginate was the most effective one reducing 87.5% of 20 µM Cr(VI) in 24 h. The rate of chromate reduction was dependent on initial Cr(VI) and biomass concentrations. The PVA cell beads were recycled three tim...

  16. Tracing the tracks of genotoxicity by trivalent and hexavalent chromium in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manish; Sharma, Anurag; Negi, M P S; Dwivedi, U N; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2011-05-18

    Mutagen sensitive strains (mus) in Drosophila are known for their hypersensitivity to mutagens and environmental carcinogens. Accordingly, these mutants were grouped in pre- and post-replication repair pathways. However, studying mutants belonging to one particular repair pathway may not be adequate for examining chemical-induced genotoxicity when other repair pathways may neutralize its effect. To test whether both pre-and post-replication pathways are involved and effect of Cr(III)- and Cr(VI)-induced genotoxicity in absence or presence of others, we used double mutant approach in D. melanogaster. We observed DNA damage as evident by changes in Comet assay DNA migration in cells of larvae of Oregon R(+) and single mutants of pre- (mei-9, mus201 and mus210) and post- (mei-41, mus209 and mus309) replication repair pathways and also in double mutants of different combinations (pre-pre, pre-post and post-post replication repair) exposed to increasing concentrations of Cr(VI) (0.0, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 μg/ml) for 48 h. The damage was greater in pre-replication repair mutants after exposure to 5.0 μg/ml Cr(VI), while effects on Oregon R(+) and post replication repair mutants were insignificant. Post-replication repair mutants revealed significant DNA damage after exposure to 20.0 μg/ml Cr(VI). Further, double mutants generated in the above repair categories were examined for DNA damage following Cr(VI) exposure and a comparison of damage was studied between single and double mutants. Combinations of double mutants generated in the pre-pre replication repair pathways showed an indifferent interaction between the two mutants after Cr(VI) exposure while a synergistic interaction was evident in exposed post-post replication repair double mutants. Cr(III) (20.0 μg/ml) exposure to these strains did not induce any significant DNA damage in their cells. The study suggests that both pre- and post-replication pathways are affected in Drosophila by Cr(VI) leading to genotoxicity, which may have consequences for metal-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:21382505

  17. Removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated ground water using zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ritu; Misra, Virendra; Singh, Rana Pratap

    2012-06-01

    Batch experiments were conducted on ground water samples collected from a site contaminated with Cr(VI) to evaluate the redox potential of zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) nanoparticles for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated ground water. For this, various samples of contaminated ground water were allowed to react with various loadings of Fe(0) nanoparticles for a reaction period of 60 min. Data showed 100% reduction of Cr(VI) in all the contaminated ground water samples after treatment with 0.20 gL(-1) of Fe(0) nanoparticles. An increase in the reduction of Cr(VI) from 45% to 100% was noticed with the increase in the loading of Fe(0) nanoparticles from 0.05 to 0.20 gL(-1). Reaction kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction showed pseudo first-order kinetics with rate constant in the range of 1.1 × 10(-3) to 3.9 × 10(-3) min(-1). This work demonstrates the potential utility of Fe(0) nanoparticles in treatment and remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated water source. PMID:21769560

  18. Characteristics and mechanisms of hexavalent chromium removal by biochar from sugar beet tailing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Biochar from sugar beet tailing effectively removed Cr(VI) from solution. → Most of the Cr on the biochar was Cr(III). → Cr(VI) removal was via electrostatic attraction to biochar. → Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) ion and complexation between Cr(III) ion and biochar function groups were also important. → The maximum sorption capacity of biochar for Cr(VI) was123 mg/g. - Abstract: Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions using biochar from sugar beet tailing (SBT) was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, and biochar mass via batch experiments. The surface characteristics of SBT biochar before and after Cr(VI) sorption was investigated with scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies showed that most of the Cr bound to SBT biochar was Cr(III). These results indicated that the electrostatic attraction of Cr(VI) to positively charged biochar surface, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) ion, and complexation between Cr(III) ion and SBT's function groups were probably responsible for Cr(VI) removal by SBT biochar. An initial solution with a pH of 2.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The sorption process can be described by the pseudo-second order equation and Langmuir isotherm. The maximum sorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 123 mg/g under an acidic medium, which was comparable to other low-cost sorbents.

  19. Characteristics and mechanisms of hexavalent chromium removal by biochar from sugar beet tailing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Xiaoling [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ufl.edu [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Li Yuncong [Soil and Water Science Department, Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031-3314 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Biochar from sugar beet tailing effectively removed Cr(VI) from solution. {yields} Most of the Cr on the biochar was Cr(III). {yields} Cr(VI) removal was via electrostatic attraction to biochar. {yields} Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) ion and complexation between Cr(III) ion and biochar function groups were also important. {yields} The maximum sorption capacity of biochar for Cr(VI) was123 mg/g. - Abstract: Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions using biochar from sugar beet tailing (SBT) was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, and biochar mass via batch experiments. The surface characteristics of SBT biochar before and after Cr(VI) sorption was investigated with scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies showed that most of the Cr bound to SBT biochar was Cr(III). These results indicated that the electrostatic attraction of Cr(VI) to positively charged biochar surface, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) ion, and complexation between Cr(III) ion and SBT's function groups were probably responsible for Cr(VI) removal by SBT biochar. An initial solution with a pH of 2.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The sorption process can be described by the pseudo-second order equation and Langmuir isotherm. The maximum sorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 123 mg/g under an acidic medium, which was comparable to other low-cost sorbents.

  20. Mechanism of the reduction of hexavalent chromium by organo-montmorillonite supported iron nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Organo-montmorillonite supported iron nanoparticles were found to be more efficient in the removal of Cr(VI) than unsupported iron nanoparticles. ► The iron nanoparticles were accommodated by the sectional structure of the clay minerals which were helpful to protect the nanoparticles from aggregating. ► XPS and XANES provided some direct information about the reduction mechanisms. ► The structure of the supported iron nanoparticles was stable in the reaction with Cr(VI). - Abstract: Iron nanoparticles exhibit greater reactivity than micro-sized Fe0, and they impart advantages for groundwater remediation. In this paper, supported iron nanoparticles were synthesized to further enhance the speed and efficiency of remediation. Natural montmorillonite and organo-montmorillonite were chosen as supporting materials. The capacity of supported iron nanoparticles was evaluated, compared to unsupported iron nanoparticles, for the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI). The reduction of Cr(VI) was much greater with organo-montmorillonite supported iron nanoparticles and fitted the pseudo-second order equation better. With a dose at 0.47 g/L, a total removal capacity of 106 mg Cr/g Fe0 was obtained. Other factors that affect the efficiency of Cr(VI) removal, such as pH values, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and storage time of nanoparticles were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were used to figure out the mechanism of the removal of Cr(VI). XPS indicated that the Cr(VI) bound to the particle surface was completely reduced to Cr(III) under a range of conditions. XANES confirmed that the Cr(VI) reacted with iron nanoparticles was completely reduced to Cr(III).

  1. Pyrite oxidation by hexavalent chromium: investigation of the chemical processes by monitoring of aqueous metal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoisson, Frédéric; Mullet, Martine; Humbert, Bernard

    2005-11-15

    Pyrite, an iron sulfide, occurs in many soils and sediments, making it an important natural reductant of toxic metal pollutants. This study investigated the processes leading to aqueous Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite in a closed thermostated (25 +/- 0.1 degrees C) system and under an argon atmosphere. Synthetic pyrite suspensions were reacted with a range of Cr(VI) solutions from 0 to 7 x 10(-4) M and at pH 2-8. Metal species concentrations were continuously monitored during a period lasting approximately 20 h. Preliminary experiments carried out in acidic media without Cr(VI) have shown that some pyrite dissolution occurred. Then, metal species concentration changes with time during pyrite oxidation by Cr(VI) solutions exhibited two distinct trends depending on the complete or incomplete Cr(VI) removal. As long as chromate existed in solution, the Cr-(Ill) to Fe(lIl) ratio was found to be an effective parameter to investigate the pyrite reaction stoichiometry with Cr(VI). Experimental values close to 2 suggest that sulfur compounds with oxidation states between 0 and 2 should be formed during pyrite oxidation by Cr(VI). If Cr(VI) was completely reduced from solution, then the pyrite oxidation by Fe(lll) ions took place to generate ferrous ions. PMID:16323772

  2. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  3. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chromium deficiency may be seen as impaired glucose tolerance. It occurs in older people with type 2 ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Minerals Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  4. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromate using permeabilized Brevibacterium sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shimei; Ge, Shichao; Zhou, Maohong; Dong, Xinjiao

    2015-07-01

    Bioremediation has been found to be a useful method for removing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), which is very toxic, from wastewater. Two strains of bacteria that were able to reduce Cr(VI) effectively were isolated from Cr(VI) contaminated soil samples and identified as Brevibacterium sp. K1 and Stenotrophomonas sp. D6, respectively, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Brevibacterium sp. K1 and Stenotrophomonas sp. D6 could grow in Luria-Broth medium containing K2Cr2O7 at 1000 and 1600 mg/L, respectively, and they completely reduced the Cr(VI) in LB medium containing K2Cr2O7 at 200 mg/L within 72 h. Further analyses revealed that permeabilized K1 and D6 cells reduced Cr(VI) more effectively than did the resting cells. Triton X-100 was the best permeabilizing agent that was tested. The permeabilized cells of both strains could completely reduce Cr(VI) in industrial wastewater twice before needing to be replenished. The results suggested that these chromate-reducing bacteria are potential candidates for practical use biotreating industrial effluents containing Cr(VI) with Stenotrophomonas sp. D6 being the more effective bacterium. PMID:25881152

  5. Contribution to the study of the biological properties of compounds labeled with radio-chromium 51Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the radioisotopes commonly used in biology and medicine which are controlled Individually in the Radioelement Departement of the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre before being sent to the users, the author has chosen chromium 51 incorporated in inorganic salts or in organic substrates for a study of the biological properties of the compounds. In the first part, he has compared the pathways followed by the radioactive sodium chromate and chromic chloride mixed with blood or given to the whole animal, the object being to determine whether a reduction of hexavalent chromium occurs, both in vitro and in vivo. In the second part, the author has tried to show the validity of using, various substrates labeled with chromium 51, red cells, haemoglobin, plasma proteins and cytochrome c. The results obtained have contributed to underline the interest of using such compounds for biological applications. (author)

  6. Removal of chromium and toxic ions present in mine drainage by Ectodermis of Opuntia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Hector [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Urena-Nunez, Fernando [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P.18-1027, Col. Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bilyeu, Bryan [University of North Texas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 305310, Denton, TX 76203-5310 (United States); Barrera-Diaz, Carlos [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: cbarrera@uaemex.mx

    2006-08-25

    This work presents conditions for hexavalent and trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using natural, protonated and thermally treated Ectodermis of Opuntia. A removal of 77% of Cr(VI) and 99% of Cr(III) can be achieved. The sorbent material is characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, before and after the contact with the chromium containing aqueous media. The results obtained from the characterization techniques indicate that the metal ion remains on the surface of the sorbent material. The percentage removal is found to depend on the initial chromium concentration and pH. The Cr(VI) and Cr(III) uptake process is maximum at pH 4, using 0.1 g of sorbent per liter of aqueous solution. The natural Ectodermis of Opuntia showed a chromium adsorption capacity that was adequately described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Finally, an actual mine drainage sample that contained Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe Zn, Ni and Pb was tested under optimal conditions for chromium removal and Ectodermis of Opuntia was found to be a suitable sorbent material. The use of this waste material for the treatment of metal-containing aqueous solutions as well as mine drainage is effective and economical.

  7. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg-1 at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg-1. Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

  8. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Liyuan; Huang, Shunhong; Yang, Zhihui; Peng, Bing; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yuehui

    2009-08-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg(-1) at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg(-1). Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag. PMID:19246154

  9. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai Liyuan; Huang Shunhong [School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yang Zhihui, E-mail: yangzh@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng Bing; Huang Yan; Chen Yuehui [School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg{sup -1} at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg{sup -1}. Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

  10. Occupational Exposure to Chromium of Assembly Workers in Aviation Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, G; Castiglia, L; Pieri, M; Novi, C; d'Angelo, R; Sannolo, N; Lamberti, M; Miraglia, N

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft are constructed by modules that are covered by a "primer" layer, which can often contain hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], known carcinogen to humans. While the occupational exposure to Cr(VI) during aircraft painting is ascertained, the exposure assessment of assembly workers (assemblers) requires investigations. Three biological monitoring campaigns (BM-I,II,III) were performed in an aviation industry, on homogeneous groups of assemblers (N = 43) and controls (N = 23), by measuring chromium concentrations in end-shift urine collected at the end of the working week and the chromium concentration difference between end- and before-shift urines. BM-I was conducted on full-time workers, BM-II was performed on workers after a 3-4 day absence from work, BM-III on workers using ecoprimers with lower Cr(VI) content. Samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy and mean values were compared by T-test. Even if Cr concentrations measured during BM-I were lower than Biological Exposure Indices by ACGIH, statistically significant differences were found between urinary Cr concentrations of workers and controls. Despite 3-4 days of absence from work, urinary chromium concentrations measured during BM-II were still higher than references from nonoccupationally exposed populations. In the BM-III campaign, the obtained preliminary results suggested the efficacy of using ecoprimers. The healthcare of workers exposed to carcinogenic agents follows the principle of limiting the exposure to "the minimum technically possible". The obtained results evidence that assemblers of aviation industries, whose task does not involve the direct use of primers containing Cr(VI), show an albeit slight occupational exposure to Cr(VI), that must be carefully taken into consideration in planning suitable prevention measures during risk assessment and management processes. PMID:25793365

  11. Remediation of groundwater contaminated by exa valent chromium. Part 1.: Treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium compounds have been used in several industrial activities and they are often found in soil and groundwater of former industrial sites. Chromium exists in various oxidation states, but the trivalent and hexavalent oxidation ones are of major environmental concern due to their stability in the environment. In particular, Cr(V I) is highly soluble and mobile and is very toxic with mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. The present paper describes the main chemical, physical and toxicological properties of Cr(V I), its fate in the subsoil and both the conventional and innovative technologies for its removal from contaminated groundwater. The paper includes also a brief description of few interesting foreign case studies.

  12. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr6+ mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  13. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza-Quinones, F.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)], E-mail: f.espinoza@terra.com.br; Rizzutto, M.A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao s/n, Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Modenes, A.N.; Palacio, S.M.; Silva, E.A.; Rossi, F.L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr{sup 6+} mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  14. Obtaining decorative chromium plating from trivalent chromium solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Óscar Javier Suárez García

    2010-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a qualitative evaluation, in the laboratory, of different alternatives for assembling and operating a trivalent chromium bath for decorative chromium plating. Different chromium concentration solutions and different complexing agents were used. The initial result of this analysis was that chloride, formate and acetate solutions produced the best results. Solution preparation conditions were evaluated: temperature, chromium III complex formation time and also ...

  15. Chromium in rivers impacted by tannery wastes determined by high performance liquid chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira de Abreu, M.-H.; Vignati, D.; Dominik, J.

    2003-05-01

    The total chromium concentrations by ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS and the redox chromium species have been determined in rivers impacted by untreated wastes from tanneries at Fès (Morocco). The results obtained by two ICP-MS analysis methods showed significantly different chromium values at m/z 53. The higher values obtained with external calibration, can be attributed to matrix effects, especially ^{37}Cl ^{16}O at m/z 53. This is confirmed on the chromatograms by the presence of a peak at 100s with the anomalous ^{52}Cr/^{53}Cr isotopic ratio. The hexavalent chromium was not detected. Two trivalent chromium monomer species, Cr(OH)(H2O)5^{2+} and Cr(H2O)6^{3+}, were present in low concentrations. We suppose that the major part of chromium occurred as Cr(III) polymeric species which were not retained on the column. These Cr(III) forms are usually complexed with Cl^- or/and SO4^{2-}, used as tanning agents.

  16. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate (51Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  17. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  18. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volland, Stefanie, E-mail: Stefanie.Volland@stud.sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Luetz, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.luetz@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Michalke, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.michalke@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Luetz-Meindl, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.luetz-meindl@sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 {mu}M Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  19. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  20. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  1. Micronutrient bioavailability research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casgrain, Amélie; Collings, Rachel; Harvey, Linda J; Boza, Julio J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2010-05-01

    A micronutrient bioavailability workshop, which involved international experts and members of the scientific community and the food industry, with interactive breakout sessions based on synectics principles, was organized by the International Life Sciences Institute Europe Addition of Nutrients to Food Task Force and the European Commission Network of Excellence European Micronutrient Recommendations Aligned. After presentations by experts, a series of "challenge statements" was discussed. The aim was to address topical issues, in particular those that linked bioavailability with the derivation of micronutrient requirements and dietary recommendations, to identify gaps in knowledge and to consider research priorities. Several generic research priorities were identified, including improving the quality of dietary surveys/food composition tables, the need for more metabolic studies that use stable isotopes and high-quality longer-term interventions, and the development of multifactorial mathematical models. Among the common recurrent factors identified as important were polymorphisms/genotype, consideration of the whole diet, chemical form of the micronutrient, and the determination of physiologic requirements. The involvement of all participants in the structured discussions ensured a broad overview of current knowledge, state-of-the-art research, and consideration of priorities for future research. PMID:20200267

  2. Effect of Arsenic and Chromium on the Serum Amino-Transferases Activity in Indian Major Carp, Labeo rohita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and hexavalent chromium toxicity results from their ability to interact with sulfahydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, and to substitute phosphorus in a variety of biochemical reactions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT; E.C: 2.6.1.2 and Aspartate amino transferase (AST; EC 2.6.1.1 play a crucial role in transamination reactions and can be used as potential biomarkers to indicate hepatotoxicity and cellular damage. While histopathological studies in liver tissue require more time and expertise, simple and reliable biochemical analysis of ALT and AST can be used for a rapid assessment of tissue and cellular damage within 96 h. The main objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of arsenic and hexavalent chromium on the activity of ALT and AST in the Indian major carp, Labeo rohita for 24 h and 96 h. Significant increase in the activity of ALT (P < 0.01 from controls in arsenic exposed fish indicates serious hepatic damage and distress condition to the fish. However, no such significant changes were observed in chromium-exposed fish suggesting that arsenic is more toxic to the fish. These findings indicate that ALT and AST are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in Labeo rohita.

  3. Role of L-Histidine in Preventing the Toxicological effects Induced by Chromium or Nickel Metals in Male Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many heavy metals including chromium and nickel are widely distributed evolving occupational and environmental exposure risks which may result in adverse health effects. Some antioxidantal amino acids such as L-histidine can ameliorate the toxic effects of these metals. In this study, forty male albino rats were divided into 5 groups, the first group served as control. On the base of body weight, the second group of rats was supplemented with 10 mg/kg hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), dissolved in water for two months. The third group of rats was supplemented with 20 mg/kg nickel as NiCl2 dissolved in water for two months. The fourth group of rats was supplemented with 10 mg/kg chromium hexavalent Cr(VI) in water and fed on 2.5% L-histidine in diet for two months. The fifth group of rats was supplemented with 20 mg/kg nickel as NiCl2 in water and fed on 2.5% L-histidine in diet for two months. The protective effect of L-histidine was monitored by studying the haematological indices and some biochemical aspects in serum such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc(Zn), kidney function (urea, creatinine and creatinine clearance), albumin, total protein and globulin and also thyroid function; triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were evaluated. Spleen tissues were dissected for histopathological examination. The results showed that significant decrease in RBCs, blood hemoglobin, Ht%, MCV, MCH and MCHC were observed, while platelets count was increased significantly after supplementation the rats with chromium and nickel in toxic dose. White blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes were decreased significantly in chromium group and increased significantly in nickel group. Neutrophils were increased non-significantly and basophils were decreased only in nickel group. Monocytes and eosinophils were increased in chromium and nickel groups, and the pronounced increase was observed in nickel group. L

  4. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  5. Bioavailability Studies of Metals in Surface Water of River Challawa, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Uzairu, A.; O. J. Okunola; Wakawa, R. J.; Adewusi, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Due to industrialization of Kano City, more industries located within Challawa industrial estate have discharged waste informed of effluents into River Challawa, which is the main source of irrigation water for agricultural land. Hence, this study is aim at assessing the bioavailable fractions of the metals zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) in surface water of river Challawa, Kano, Nigeria, across seasons. It was found that the concentrations of most metals inc...

  6. The influence of Chromium supplied by tanning and wet finishing processes on the formation of cr(vi) in leather

    OpenAIRE

    W. F. Fuck; M Gutterres; N. R. Marcílio; S. Bordingnon

    2011-01-01

    Chromium used in leather manufacturing can be oxidized from the trivalent to the hexavalent state, causing environmental concerns. In this study, the influence of Cr(III) from tanning, deacidification pH, fatliquors, chrome retanning and vegetable retanning on the formation of Cr(VI) in leather was analyzed by comparing natural and aged samples. In wet-blue leather, even after aging and in fatliquored leathers that did not suffer the aging process, the presence of Cr(VI) was always below the ...

  7. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K.; Saito, Hiroshi; Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y.; Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze; Li, Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Evers, B. Mark; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alon...

  8. Estimation of bioavailability of metals from drilling mud barite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Jerry M

    2008-04-01

    Drilling mud and associated drill cuttings are the largest volume wastes associated with drilling of oil and gas wells and often are discharged to the ocean from offshore drilling platforms. Barite (BaSO4) often is added as a weighting agent to drilling muds to counteract pressure in the geologic formations being drilled, preventing a blowout. Some commercial drilling mud barites contain elevated (compared to marine sediments) concentrations of several metals. The metals, if bioavailable, may harm the local marine ecosystem. The bioavailable fraction of metals is the fraction that dissolves from the nearly insoluble, solid barite into seawater or sediment porewater. Barite-seawater and barite-porewater distribution coefficients (Kd) were calculated for determining the predicted environmental concentration (PEC; the bioavailable fraction) of metals from drilling mud barite in the water column and sediments, respectively. Values for Kdbarite-seawater and Kdbarite-porewater were calculated for barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in different grades of barite. Log Kdbarite-seawater values were higher (solubility was lower) for metals in the produced water plume than log Kdbarite-porewater values for metals in sediments. The most soluble metals were cadmium and zinc and the least soluble were mercury and copper. Log Kd values can be used with data on concentrations of metals in barite and of barite in the drilling mud-cuttings plume and in bottom sediments to calculate PECseawater and PECsediment. PMID:17994916

  9. Studies of chromium gettering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions

  10. Well Completion Report for the Fiscal Year 1999 Drilling Within the Chromium Plume West of the 100-D/DR Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the fiscal year (FY) 1999 field activities associated with installing 12 groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the 100-D Area chromium plume west of the 100-D/DR Reactors (100-HR-3 Operable Unit [OU]). The wells were installed to further investigate the extent of the hexavalent chromium hot spot west of the 100-D/DR Reactors and to support future remedial action decisions associated with the 100-HR-3 OU. These wells were designed for multi-purpose use (i.e., monitoring, extraction, and injection). In addition, one of the wells was installed to support the initial deployment of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology to remediate the chromium plume

  11. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the speciation of traces of chromium using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Ignacio; Briceño, Marisol; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    A microextraction procedure for the speciation of very low concentrations (0.005-0.2 µg L(-1)) of chromium is discussed. To the aqueous sample (10 mL), diluted hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and a small amount of tributylphosphate (80 µL) are incorporated, and the mixture is submitted to ultrasounds for 10 min. The organic phase recovered after centrifuging is injected into the electrothermal atomizer, and the signal due to hexavalent chromium obtained. The repetition of the procedure using another aliquot in which all the chromium present is oxidized to Cr (VI) allows the Cr(III) content to be obtained by difference. The enrichment factor is 240 and the detection limit 0.002 µg L(-1) chromium. The relative standard deviation for ten consecutive microextractions of a 0.1 µg L(-1) chromium solution is close to 8%. The procedure is applied to waters and to the leachates obtained from low cost toys made of plastic materials. PMID:24054574

  12. Zinc bioavailability in the chick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for assessing zinc bioavailability were evaluated in the chick. A low-zinc chick diet was developed using rehydrated, spray-dried egg white autoclaved at 121 C for 30 min as the primary protein source. The relative bioavailability of zinc from soy flour and beef was determined by whole-body retention of extrinsic 65Zn, and in slope ratio assays for growth rate and tissue zinc. Compared to zinc carbonate added to an egg white-based diet, all methods gave similar estimates of approximately 100% zinc bioavailability for beef but estimates for soy flour varied widely. The slope ratio assay for growth rate gave the best estimate of zinc bioavailability for soy flour. True absorption, as measured by percent isotope retention from extrinsically labeled soy flour, was 47%

  13. Catalytic Spectrophotometric Determination of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    STOYANOVA, Angelina Miltcheva

    2005-01-01

    The catalytic effect of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on the oxidation of sulfanilic acid by hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of the reaction product at 360 nm. Under the optimum conditions 2 calibration graphs (for chromium(III) up to 100 ng mL-1, and for chromium(VI) up to 200 ng mL-1) were obtained, using the ``fixed time'' method with detection limits of 4.9 ng mL-1 and 3.8 ng mL-1, respectively...

  14. Removal of toxic chromium from aqueous solution, wastewater and saline water by marine red alga Pterocladia capillacea and its activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El Nemr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterocladia capillacea, a red marine macroalgae, was tested for its ability to remove toxic hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. A new activated carbon obtained from P. capillacea via acid dehydration was also investigated as an adsorbent for toxic chromium. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of important parameters such as pH, chromium concentration and adsorbent weight. Batch equilibrium tests at different pH conditions showed that at pH 1.0, a maximum chromium uptake was observed for both inactivated dried red alga P. capillacea and its activated carbon. The maximum sorption capacities for dried red alga and its activated carbon were about 12 and 66 mgg−1, respectively, as calculated by Langmuir model. The ability of inactivated red alga P. capillacea and developed activated carbon to remove chromium from synthetic sea water, natural sea water and wastewater was investigated as well. Different isotherm models were used to analyze the experimental data and the models parameters were evaluated. This study showed that the activated carbon developed from red alga P. capillacea is a promising activated carbon for removal of toxic chromium.

  15. CHROMIUM, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DIABESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suboptimal intakes of the essential nutrient, chromium, are characterized by elevated blood glucose, insulin resistance, obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL. These are also signs and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Improvements due to increased intake of chromium are related to the degr...

  16. The soda-ash roasting of chromite ore processing residue for the reclamation of chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, M. P.; Tathavadkar, V. D.; Calvert, C. C.; Jha, A.

    2001-12-01

    Sodium chromate is produced via the soda-ash roasting of chromite ore with sodium carbonate. After the reaction, nearly 15 pct of the chromium oxide remains unreacted and ends up in the waste stream, for landfills. In recent years, the concern over environmental pollution from hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) from the waste residue has become a major problem for the chromium chemical industry. The main purpose of this investigation is to recover chromium oxide present in the waste residue as sodium chromate. Cr2O3 in the residue is distributed between the two spinel solid solutions, Mg(Al,Cr)2O4 and γ-Fe2O3. The residue from the sodium chromate production process was analyzed both physically and chemically. The compositions of the mineral phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The influence of alkali addition on the overall reaction rate is examined. The kinetics of the chromium extraction reaction resulting from the residue of the soda-ash roasting process under an oxidizing atmosphere is also investigated. It is shown that the experimental results for the roasting reaction can be best described by the Ginstling and Brounshtein (GB) equation for diffusion-controlled kinetics. The apparent activation energy for the roasting reaction was calculated to be between 85 and 90 kJ·mol-1 in the temperature range 1223 to 1473 K. The kinetics of leaching of Cr3+ ions using the aqueous phase from the process residue is also studied by treating the waste into acid solutions with different concentrations.

  17. THE CONSEQUENCES ON BLOOD GSH DYNAMICS ON WISTAR FEMALE RATS AT AD LIBITUM CHROMIUM (VI ADMINISTRATION DURING THE GESTATION AFTER THE WEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORINA GRĂVILĂ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (VI is a widely used industrial chemical, extensively used in paints, metal finishes, steel including stainless steel manufacturing, alloy cast irons, chrome, and wood treatment. In nature chromium occurs in divalent, trivalent and hexavalent forms. Hexavalent chromium predominates over the trivalent form in natural waters. We have studied the influence of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7 on blood GSH values in rats. This study was carried out on 28 Wistar adult female rats, divided in 3 experimental groups (E and one control group (C. The rats were feed with 25ppm (LOAEL, 50ppm and 75ppm potassium dichromate, ad libitum, in drinking water, during the gestation. The control batch received tap water. Reduced glutathione (GSH was measured quantitatively after the wean using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer, through Beutler et al. method, at 412nm. This study reports that potassium dichromate exposure induced the depletion of blood GSH because Cr(VI can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS. It can induce oxidative stress and toxicity.

  18. Bioavailability & Bioequivalence Studies ? Pharmaceutical Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Muntha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetics has now emerged as an important part of drug development especially in the development of new drugs. The combined studies of Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics present a thorough understanding on how the drug affects the body and how the body affects the drug.Bioavailability is the study of the rate and extent to which the active ingredient is absorbed from a dosage form and it is available at the required action site. Bioequivalence is that there should not be any significant difference in bioavailability between two products.Bioavailability (BA and bioequivalence (BE studies play a key role during the phase of drug development for both innovator drugs and generic drugs and thus have gained great attention over the past few decades. BE is used to introduce generic drugs of innovator drugs at a lower cost. So a thorough understanding of these BA/BE studies is required

  19. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  20. Dietary factors that affect carotenoid bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van het K.

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects of increased vegetable consumption. To better understand the potential benefits of carotenoids, we investigated the bioavailability of carotenoids from vegetables and dietary factors which might influence carotenoid bioavailability.In a