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Sample records for bioadhesive strength water

  1. Effect of pH and ionic strength on the bioadhesive properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosopis gum (PG) extracted from Prosopis africana was investigated for bioadhesive properties as affected by pH and ionic strength. The bioadhesive properties were evaluated using the adhesion of gum dispersion-coated glass beads on the antrum region of the porcine gastrointestinal tract and Lecomte Du Nouy ...

  2. In-vitro evaluation of bioadhesive and release properties of thiamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at determining the effect of gelatin on the bioadhesive strength and release properties of gelatin gum. Bioadhesive strength determination was carried out using tensiometric methods. Thiamine tablets was prepared by wet granulation method and used for the study. Tablets properties evaluated ...

  3. An atomic charge model for graphene oxide for exploring its bioadhesive properties in explicit water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, D; Dragneva, N; Floriano, W B; Mawhinney, R C; Fanchini, G; French, S; Rubel, O

    2014-07-28

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been shown to exhibit properties that are useful in applications such as biomedical imaging, biological sensors, and drug delivery. The binding properties of biomolecules at the surface of GO can provide insight into the potential biocompatibility of GO. Here we assess the intrinsic affinity of amino acids to GO by simulating their adsorption onto a GO surface. The simulation is done using Amber03 force-field molecular dynamics in explicit water. The emphasis is placed on developing an atomic charge model for GO. The adsorption energies are computed using atomic charges obtained from an ab initio electrostatic potential based method. The charges reported here are suitable for simulating peptide adsorption to GO.

  4. Effect of HPMC and mannitol on drug release and bioadhesion behavior of buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride: In-vitro and in-vivo pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal, A; Pandey, M M; Charde, S Y; Raut, P P; Prasanth, K V; Prasad, R G

    2015-07-01

    Delivery of orally compromised therapeutic drug molecules to the systemic circulation via buccal route has gained a significant interest in recent past. Bioadhesive polymers play a major role in designing such buccal dosage forms, as they help in adhesion of designed delivery system to mucosal membrane and also prolong release of drug from delivery system. In the present study, HPMC (release retarding polymer) and mannitol (diluent and pore former) were used to prepare bioadhesive and controlled release buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride (BS) by direct compression method. Compatibility of BS with various excipients used during the study was assessed using DSC and FTIR techniques. Effect of mannitol and HPMC on drug release and bioadhesive strength was studied using a 3(2) factorial design. The drug release rate from delivery system decreased with increasing levels of HPMC in formulations. However, bioadhesive strength of formulations increased with increasing proportion of HPMC in buccal discs. Increased levels of mannitol resulted in faster rate of drug release and rapid in vitro uptake of water due to the formation of channels in the matrix. Pharmacokinetic studies of designed bioadhesive buccal discs in rabbits demonstrated a 10-fold increase in bioavailability in comparison with oral bioavailability of buspirone reported.

  5. Bioadhesive floating microsponges of cinnarizine as novel gastroretentive delivery: Capmul GMO bioadhesive coating versus acconon MC 8-2 EP/NF with intrinsic bioadhesive property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, Smita; Pathak, Kamla

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at the development of low-density gastroretentive bioadhesive microsponges of cinnarizine by two-pronged approach (i) coating with bioadhesive material and (ii) exploration of acconon MC 8-2 EP/NF as bioadhesive raw material for fabrication. Microsponges were prepared by quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method using 3 2 factorial design. Capmul GMO was employed for bioadhesive coating. In parallel, potential of acconon for the fabrication of bioadhesive floating microsponges (A8) was assessed. Formulation with entrapment efficiency = 82.4 ± 3.4%, buoyancy = 82.3 ± 2.5%, and correlation of drug release (CDR 8h ) = 88.7% ± 2.9% was selected as optimized formulation (F8) and subjected to bioadhesive coating (BF8). The %CDR 8h for A8 was similar to BF8 (87.2% ± 3.5%). Dynamic in vitro bioadhesion test revealed comparable bioadhesivity with BF8. The ex vivo permeation across gastric mucin displayed 63.16% for BF8 against 56.74% from A8; affirmed the bioadhesivity of both approaches. The study concluded with the development of novel bioadhesive floating microsponges of cinnarizine employing capmul GMO as bioadhesive coating material and confirmed the viability of acconon MC 8-2EP/NF as bioadhesive raw material for sustained targeted delivery of drug.

  6. Bioadhesive Controlled Release Clotrimazole Vaginal Tablets | Bhat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study indicates the possible use of suitable mixtures of natural and semi-synthetic cellulosic polymers for the preparation of clotrimazole mucoadhesive tablets for application as a vaginal controlled delivery system. Keywords: Clotrimazole, Swelling, Cellulosic polymers, Guar gum, Bioadhesion, Release ...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of anti-bacterial and anti-fungal citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinshan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Jianqing; Xie, Denghui; Gerhard, Ethan; Nisic, Merisa; Shan, Dingying; Qian, Guoying; Zheng, Siyang; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections in the use of surgical devices and medical implants remain a major concern. Traditional bioadhesives fail to incorporate anti-microbial properties, necessitating additional anti-microbial drug injection. Herein, by the introduction of the clinically used and inexpensive anti-fungal agent, 10-undecylenic acid (UA), into our recently developed injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesives (iCMBAs), a new family of anti-bacterial and anti-fungal iCMBAs (AbAf iCs) was developed. AbAf iCs not only showed strong wet tissue adhesion strength, but also exhibited excellent in vitro cyto-compatibility, fast degradation, and strong initial and considerable long-term anti-bacterial and anti-fungal ability. For the first time, the biocompatibility and anti-microbial ability of sodium metaperiodate (PI), an oxidant used as a cross-linking initiator in the AbAf iCs system, was also thoroughly investigated. Our results suggest that the PI-based bioadhesives showed better anti-microbial properties compared to the unstable silver-based bioadhesive materials. In conclusion, AbAf iCs family can serve as excellent anti-bacterial and anti-fungal bioadhesive candidates for tissue/wound closure, wound dressing, and bone regeneration, especially when bacterial or fungal infections are a major concern. PMID:26874283

  8. Effect of Water on Coal Strength | Singh | Momona Ethiopian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water content is one of the most important factors influencing the rock strength. The present study has been conducted to see how coal strength changes under dry and water saturated conditions. The study reveals that the strength of coal decreases with increasing moisture. For rock mechanics and rock engineering ...

  9. Formulation and evaluation of lactoferrin bioadhesive tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Takeda, C; Seto, I; Kawano, G; Machida, Y

    2007-10-01

    For the treatment of chronic inflammation in the oral cavity, we attempted to develop bioadhesive tablets of bovine lactoferrin (B-LF) which has antibacterial properties and immune regulatory functions. B-LF tablets containing pectin, tamarind gum or carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) were prepared by direct compression. Tablets consisting of B-LF, pectin and xylitol passed through 60- or 100-mesh sieves were also prepared. The tablets containing CMC had insufficient bioadhesive force. Although the tablets containing tamarind gum showed the longest residence time in the oral cavity, an unpleasant taste gradually developed. The tablets containing pectin showed the highest value of bioadhesive force and the taste was acceptable. The characteristics of the B-LF tablets were improved by adding an appropriate amount of xylitol and using the ingredients sieved by a 100-mesh sieve. The therapeutic effect was evaluated by using rats with an ulcer on the oral mucosa. In the present study, swelling on the periphery of the ulcer was observed after administration of the B-LF tablets, and then the ulcer has reduced overall.

  10. Design and Characterization of Bioadhesive In-Situ Gelling Ocular Inserts of Gatifloxacin Sesquihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra D.N.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study: Several polymeric systems have been used to fabricate ocular inserts for better ocular bioavailability and retention to drug of which gelling systems have shown advantages of convenient administration and increased contact time. The purpose of the present study was to develop a bioadhesive in-situe gelling ocular insert of Gatifloxacin using polymeric system of sodium alginate as gelling and chitosan as bioadhesive agent.Materials and methods: Polymeric ocular inserts of Gatifloxacin sesquehydrate (GS were composed using sodium alginate and chitosan with glycerin as plasticizer by solvent casting method. The ocular inserts were investigated for physicochemical properties (thickness, weight variation, folding endurance and surface pH, mechanical strength (tensile strength, elongation at break, swelling index, and bioadhesion parameters. In vitro release studies were carried using a fabricated donor-receptor compartment model. Results: Cumulative drug released from the formulation ranged from 95-99% within 8-12h. The formulation D (2% sodium alginate and 1% chitosan sustained the drug release for the longest period of time (12h. Zero-order release of the drug was from optimized formulation D. A high correlation coefficient (r=0.9845 was recorded between in vitro and in vivo drug release.Conclusion: Gatifloxacin sesquehydrate inserts have appreciable film forming properties and were found to posses good antimicrobial efficacy.

  11. Temperature Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Incorporated Hydroxypropylcellulose Polymer Matrix Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repka, Michael A.; Munjal, Manish; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the bioadhesive profiles of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) polymer matrices as a function of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. In addition, the effect of processing temperature on the stability of THC and its extent of degradation to cannabinol (CBN) was investigated. A hot-melt cast molding method was used to prepare HPC polymer matrix systems incorporated with THC at 0, 4, 8, and 16 percent. Bioadhesive measurements including peak adhesive force, area under the curve, and elongation at adhesive failure were recorded utilizing the TA.XT2i Texture Analyzer™. Data obtained from these tests at various contact time intervals suggested that the incorporation of THC led to an increase in the bioadhesive strength of the HPC polymer matrices. To determine the stability of THC and the resulting CBN content in the matrices, three different processing temperatures were utilized (120, 160, and 200°C). Post-production High Performance Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the processed systems contained at least 94% of THC and the relative percent formation of CBN was 0.5% at 120°C and 0.4% at 160°C compared to 1.6% at 200°C. These findings indicate that the cannabinoid may be a plausible candidate for incorporation into systems utilizing hot-melt extrusion techniques for the development of an effective mucoadhesive transmucosal matrix system for delivery of THC. PMID:16455601

  12. Tensile Strength of Water Exposed to Pressure Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that pressurization for an extended period of time increases the tensile strength of water, but little information is available on the effect of pressure pulses of short duration. This is addressed in the present paper where we first measure the tensile strength of water...... at an extended water-solid interface by imposing a tensile stress pulse which easily causes cavitation. Next, a compressive pulse of duration ~1 ms and a peak intensity of a few bar is imposed prior to the tensile stress pulse. A dramatic increase of the tensile strength is observed immediately after...

  13. Effect of Water on Coal Strength

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    1. INTRODUCTION. The knowledge of the mechanisms of the interaction of water with rock and its effects on rock properties is of paramount importance in geotechnical engineering. The presence of water at site of large projects such as dams, canals, caverns, highways and underground reservoirs are always a significant ...

  14. Preparation and Evaluation of Buccal Bioadhesive Films Containing Clotrimazole

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.; Jain, S.; Muthu, M. S.; Tiwari, S.; Tilak, R.

    2008-01-01

    Buccal bioadhesive films, releasing topical drugs in the oral cavity at a slow and predetermined rate, provide distinct advantages over traditional dosage forms. The aim of present study was to prepare and evaluate buccal bioadhesive films of clotrimazole for oral candidiasis. The film was designed to release the drug at a concentration above the minimum inhibitory concentration for a prolonged period of time so as to reduce the frequency of administration of the available conventional dosage...

  15. Preparation and evaluation of buccal bioadhesive films containing clotrimazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Jain, S; Muthu, M S; Tiwari, S; Tilak, R

    2008-01-01

    Buccal bioadhesive films, releasing topical drugs in the oral cavity at a slow and predetermined rate, provide distinct advantages over traditional dosage forms. The aim of present study was to prepare and evaluate buccal bioadhesive films of clotrimazole for oral candidiasis. The film was designed to release the drug at a concentration above the minimum inhibitory concentration for a prolonged period of time so as to reduce the frequency of administration of the available conventional dosage forms. The different proportions of sodium carboxymethylcellulose and carbopol 974P (CP 974P) were used for the preparation of films. Carbopol was used to incorporate the desired bioadhesiveness in the films. The films were prepared by solvent casting method and evaluated for bioadhesion, in vitro drug release and effectiveness against Candida albicans. In vitro drug release from the film was determined using a modified Franz diffusion cell while bioadhesiveness was evaluated with a modified two-arm balance using rabbit intestinal mucosa as a model tissue. Films containing 5% CP 974P of the total polymer were found to be the best with moderate swelling along with favorable bioadhesion force, residence time and in vitro drug release. The microbiological studies revealed that drug released from the film could inhibit the growth of C. albicans for 6 h. The drug release mechanism was found to follow non-Fickian diffusion.

  16. Effect of Fibre Hybridization on Compressive Strength, Split Tensile Strength and Water Permeability of SFRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M P Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of an investigation conducted to study the compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability of fibre concrete mixes containing steel fibres in mono, binary and ternary combinations. Steel fibres of different lengths i.e. 12.5 mm, 25 mm and 50 mm having constant diameter of 0.6 mm were used to obtain mono, binary and ternary combinations. A reference concrete mix with no fibres was also used for comparison purpose. The total fibre volume fraction was kept at 1.0% in all the mixes. Compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability tests were conducted of specimens of size 100 x 100 x 100 mm after 28 days of curing.  It has been observed that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed  in HySFRC for compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability.

  17. Compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption of concrete containing palm oil kernel shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Xiang-ONG, Jun; Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Hamid, Noor Azlina Abdul; Kuzaiman, Salsabila; Ali, Adiwijaya

    2017-11-01

    Effect of inclusion of palm oil kernel shell (PKS) and palm oil fibre (POF) in concrete was investigated on the compressive strength and flexural strength. In addition, investigation of palm oil kernel shell on concrete water absorption was also conducted. Total of 48 concrete cubes and 24 concrete prisms with the size of 100mm × 100mm × 100mm and 100mm × 100mm × 500mm were prepared, respectively. Four (4) series of concrete mix consists of coarse aggregate was replaced by 0%, 25%, 50% and 75% palm kernel shell and each series were divided into two (2) main group. The first group is without POF, while the second group was mixed with the 5cm length of 0.25% of the POF volume fraction. All specimen were tested after 7 and 28 days of water curing for a compression test, and flexural test at 28 days of curing period. Water absorption test was conducted on concrete cube age 28 days. The results showed that the replacement of PKS achieves lower compressive and flexural strength in comparison with conventional concrete. However, the 25% replacement of PKS concrete showed acceptable compressive strength which within the range of requirement for structural concrete. Meanwhile, the POF which should act as matrix reinforcement showed no enhancement in flexural strength due to the balling effect in concrete. As expected, water absorption was increasing with the increasing of PKS in the concrete cause by the porous characteristics of PKS

  18. Characterisation of a new bioadhesive system based on polysaccharides with the potential to be used as bone glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Bettina; Volkmer, Elias; Kokott, Andreas; Augat, Peter; Ohnmacht, Michael; Sedlmayr, Nicole; Schieker, Matthias; Claes, Lutz; Mutschler, Wolf; Ziegler, Günter

    2009-10-01

    Although gluing bone is in theory a very attractive alternative to classical fracture treatment, this method is not yet clinically established due to the lack of an adhesive which would meet all the necessary requirements. We therefore developed a novel two-component bioadhesive system with the potential to be used as a bone adhesive based on biocompatible and degradable biopolymers (chitosan, oxidised dextran or starch). After mixing in water, the two components covalently cross-link by forming a Schiff's base. By the same mechanism, the glue binds to any other exposed amino group such as for example those exposed in fractured bone, even in the presence of water. Modified chitosan was synthesised from commercially available chitosan by deacetylation and was then reduced in molecular weight by heating in acid. The amount of free amino groups was analysed by IR. The molecular weight was determined by viscosimetry. Starch or dextran were oxidised with periodic acid to generate aldehyde groups, which were quantified by titration. l-Dopa was conjugated to oxidised dextran or starch in analogy to the gluing mechanism of mussels. Biomechanical studies revealed that the new glue is superior to fibrin glue, but has less adhesive strength than cyanoacrylates. In vitro cell testing demonstrated excellent biocompatibility, rendering this glue a potential candidate for clinical use.

  19. Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    to the MF results. 18-01-2017 Memorandum Report Bottom scattering Bottom scattering strength Reverberation Underwater acoustics Active sonar August...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/7160--17-9701 Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water January...18, 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. RogeR C. gauss edwaRd L. Kunz Joseph M. FiaLKowsKi RiChaRd Menis Acoustic Signal

  20. The effect of Plantago major seed mucilage combined with carbopol on the release profile and bioadhesive properties of propranolol HCl buccoadhesive tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Buccoadhesive drug delivery systems have distinct advantages in comparison with oral administration. Plant exudates like gum or mucilage are being studied for their use as pharmaceutical adjuvant. The aim of this study is to evaluate the properties of the Plantago major seed mucilage as a mucoadhesive agent and propranolol hydrochloride is chosen as a model drug. Mucoadhesive tablets of propranolol hydrochloride were formulated by combination of two mucoadhesive polymers include Carbopol 934P and Plantago major mucilage, and properties such as in vitro drug release, swelling, erosion, mucoadhesive force were studied. The results show increase in bioadhesive strength and decrease in release rate with increase in percent of Carbopol 934P, as F13 (containing Carbopol 934P alone and F8 (containing mucilage alone show the highest bioadhesive strength and highest release rate respectively and these results were matched to swelling results which decrease in swelling of matrices results in decrease in bioadhesion. Matrices with both Plantago major mucilage and Carbopol have the optimum drug release in bioadhesive formulation of propranolol tablets.

  1. Models for predicting compressive strength and water absorption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work presents a mathematical model for predicting the compressive strength and water absorption of laterite-quarry dust cement block using augmented Scheffe's simplex lattice design. The statistical models developed can predict the mix proportion that will yield the desired property. The models were tested for lack of ...

  2. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Being overhead athletes, water polo players can present with muscular imbalances of the shoulder, between the internal rotators (IR) and external rotators (ER), leading to changes in posture and an increased risk of injury. Objectives: To assess posture and isokinetic shoulder strength of female club-level ...

  3. influence of molding water content on shear strength characteristic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    INFLUENCE OF MOLDING WATER CONTENT ON SHEAR STRENGTH OF COMPACTED CEMENT KILN DUST, K. J. Osinub. K. J. Osinub. K. J. Osinubi, et al. Nigerian Journal of Technology,. Vol. 34, No. 2, April 2015 267 pavements or as waste containment materials. Therefore, recent studies have been geared towards.

  4. Influence of Molding Water Content on Shear Strength Characteristic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory investigation was carried out to determine the shear strength characteristics of compacted cement kiln dust treated lateritic soils for use in liners and covers with up to 12.5% cement kiln dust by dry weight of soil. Specimens were prepared at molding water contents of -2, 0, +2 and +4% of the optimum moisture ...

  5. Molecular biology approaches in bioadhesion research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of molecular biology tools in the field of bioadhesion is still in its infancy. For new research groups who are considering taking a molecular approach, the techniques presented here are essential to unravelling the sequence of a gene, its expression and its biological function. Here we provide an outline for addressing adhesion-related genes in diverse organisms. We show how to gradually narrow down the number of candidate transcripts that are involved in adhesion by (1 generating a transcriptome and a differentially expressed cDNA list enriched for adhesion-related transcripts, (2 setting up a BLAST search facility, (3 perform an in situ hybridization screen, and (4 functional analyses of selected genes by using RNA interference knock-down. Furthermore, latest developments in genome-editing are presented as new tools to study gene function. By using this iterative multi-technologies approach, the identification, isolation, expression and function of adhesion-related genes can be studied in most organisms. These tools will improve our understanding of the diversity of molecules used for adhesion in different organisms and these findings will help to develop innovative bio-inspired adhesives.

  6. Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water

  7. An evaluation of the bioadhesive performance and release of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bioadhesion of the tablets increased with an increase in binder concentration. The tablets showed satisfactory hardness and friability values. However all the tablets failed the disintegration time test. The disintegration times of the tablets formulated with Detarium gum were lower in 0.1N HCI than the tablets prepared ...

  8. Evaluation of the bioadhesive property of Grewia gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bioadhesive property of grewia gum for sustained release of Indomethacin from tablets was evaluated using pig gastric mucus as substrate. The tablets formulated by wet granulation contained 75 mg of the drug and 15 or 20 %w/w of the gum. Similar tablets made differently with carbopol 934, tragacanth and sodium ...

  9. The Bioadhesive and Rheological properties of some fluconazole gels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained indicate that high viscosity grade sodium carboxymethylcellulose (HV NaCMC) at 1.0 - 2% w/w concentration levels gave bioadhesive gels with viscoelastic properties which are affected by type and concentration of dye added to the formulation either as excipient or to assist in the determination of MTR.

  10. Strength, Endurance, Throwing Velocity and in-Water Jump Performance of Elite German Water Polo Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinner Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was threefold: 1 to assess the eggbeater kick and throwing performance using a number of water polo specific tests, 2 to explore the relation between the eggbeater kick and throwing performance, and 3 to investigate the relation between the eggbeater kick in the water and strength tests performed in a controlled laboratory setting in elite water polo players. Fifteen male water polo players of the German National Team completed dynamic and isometric strength tests for muscle groups (adductor, abductor, abdominal, pectoralis frequently used during water polo. After these laboratory strength tests, six water polo specific in-water tests were conducted. The eggbeater kick assessed leg endurance and agility, maximal throwing velocity and jump height. A 400 m test and a sprint test examined aerobic and anaerobic performance. The strongest correlation was found between jump height and arm length (p < 0.001, r = 0.89. The laboratory diagnostics of important muscles showed positive correlations with the results of the in-water tests (p < 0.05, r = 0.52-0.70. Muscular strength of the adductor, abdominal and pectoralis muscles was positively related to in-water endurance agility as assessed by the eggbeater kick (p < 0.05; r = 0.53-0.66. Findings from the current study emphasize the need to assess indices of water polo performance both in and out of the water as well as the relation among these parameters to best assess the complex profile of water polo players.

  11. Characterization of spray dried bioadhesive metformin microparticles for oromucosal administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Camilla; Madsen, Katrine Dragsbæk; Hyrup, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    delivery systems are considered a promising approach as they facilitate a close contact between the drug and the oral mucosa. In this study, bioadhesive chitosan-based microparticles of metformin hydrochloride were prepared by spray drying aqueous dispersions with different chitosan:metformin ratios...... be prepared and analyzed using the ex vivo retention model. We observed an increase in metformin retention on porcine mucosa with increasing chitosan:metformin ratios, while no effect of increasing the chitosan molecular weight was found. Rheological characterization of feeds for spray drying was performed...... and chitosan grades with increasing molecular weights. A recently developed ex vivo flow retention model with porcine buccal mucosa was used to evaluate the bioadhesive properties of spray dried microparticles. An important outcome of this study was that microparticles with the desired metformin content could...

  12. Effect of polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer on bioadhesion and release rate property of eplerenone pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendre, Prakash Namdeo; Chaudhari, Pravin Digambar

    2017-05-01

    The present study involved the design and development of oral bioadhesive pellets of eplerenone. A solid dispersion of eplerenone was developed with a hydrophilic carrier, polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer (Soluplus ® ). Bioadhesive pellets were prepared from this solid dispersion using a combination of HPMC K4M and Carbopol 934P. Both the solid dispersion and the pellets were evaluated for various physicochemical properties such as solubility, entrapment efficiency, drug content, surface morphology, mucoadhesion and swelling behavior. Analysis carried out using FT-IR, DSC and XRD found no interaction between the eplerenone and excipients. The solid dispersion had irregular-shaped smooth-surfaced particles of diameter 265 ± 105.5 μm. In TEM analysis, eplerenone particles of size 79-120 nm were found. The solubility and dissolution of eplerenone in the Soluplus ® -based solid dispersion were 5.26 and 2.50 times greater, respectively. Investigation of the swelling behavior of the pellets showed that the thickness of the gel layer increased continuously over the duration of the study. Moreover, a correlation was observed between the thickness and strength of the gel layer and the percentage release. The mechanism of drug release was found to be non-Fickian (anomalous), with the release kinetics approaching first-order kinetics. The bioavailability of the eplerenone bioadhesive pellet formulation was studied using Wistar rats and was found to be improved. An in vivo mucoadhesion study showed that the pellets are retained for 24 h in rabbits. It was concluded that Soluplus ® had a positive effect on the solubility and dissolution of pellets without affecting the bioadhesion.

  13. γ radiation induced changes in the bioadhesion properties of Ca-alginate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popeski-Dimovski, Riste

    2009-01-01

    The need for controlled release of drugs and their administration in specific zone of the organism asks for developing of carriers of drugs who will do the job. The two greatest needs, controlled release, and attention on the site, organ, of the organism that's treated its bioadhesion is best done with polymer gels. From the many choices of polymer gels, ether synthetic or natural the Na-alginate gels are the best suited because of their easy of access and good controlled release as being nontoxic to the living organisms and showing promising bioadhesion capability. Because of that examining the possibility for modification of the bioadhesion properties with gamma radiation is of interest. In this work Ca-alginate gels are irradiated with different absorbed doses to see if there will be any changes of the bioadhesion properties. For this mechanical compressibility tests and bioadhesion pull test are conducted on the irradiated samples. The results show that under irradiation gels louse their structural integrity becoming softer but the bioadhesive properties increase. But this increase is very small of up to 20% and its of no interest in practical circumstances where the practice is interested in changes of at least 100% and up, so changing the doses and properties of the gels to increase the bioadhesive properties might be of further interest. (Author)

  14. Bioadhesive Nanoaggregates Based on Polyaspartamide-g-C18/DOPA for Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sooyoun; Nguyen, Minh Phuong; Choi, Youngjin; Kim, Jaeyun; Kim, Dukjoon

    2017-08-14

    Biocompatible adhesive nanoaggregates were synthesized based on polyaspartamide copolymers grafted with octadecylamine (C18) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and their adhesive properties were investigated with regard to wound healing. The chemical structure and morphology of the synthesized polyaspartamide-g-C18/DOPA nanoaggregates were analyzed using 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H NMR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The in vitro adhesive energy was up to 31.04 J m -2 for poly(dimethylacrylamide) gel substrates and 0.1209 MPa for mouse skin, and the in vivo wound breaking strength after 48 h was 1.8291 MPa for C57BL/6 mouse. The MTT assay demonstrated that the synthesized polymeric nanoaggregates were nontoxic. The polyaspartamide-g-C18/DOPA nanoaggregates were in vivo tested to mouse model and demonstrated successful skin adhesion, as the mouse skin was perfectly cured in their dermis within 6 d. As this material has biocompatibility and enough adhesive strength for wound closure, it is expected to be applied as a new type of bioadhesive agent in the human body.

  15. Impact of internal water reservoirs on shrinkage of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Drčar, Grega

    2013-01-01

    High strength concrete has lower water-cement ratio compared to regular concrete, which allows higher strength of the concrete. Because of low water-cement ratio, there is a lack of water during the process of hydration.During the transport of water from the capillary pores of concrete, high forces to the structure of the hardening cement paste were created. Because of this forces, the concrete shrinks, which creates cracks and therefore reduces durability of the concrete elements. In this...

  16. Development and characterization of p1025-loaded bioadhesive liquid-crystalline system for the prevention ofStreptococcus mutansbiofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Duque, Cristiane; Aida, Kelly Limi; Dos Santos, Vanessa Rodrigues; Massunari, Loiane; Chorilli, Marlus

    2018-01-01

    Formation of a dental biofilm by Streptococcus mutans can cause dental caries, and remains a costly health problem worldwide. Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of peptidic drugs, such as peptide p1025, analogous to the fragments 1025-1044 of S. mutans cellular adhesin, responsible for the adhesion and formation of dental biofilm. However, peptides have physicochemical characteristics that may affect their biological action, limiting their clinical performance. Therefore, drug-delivery systems, such as a bioadhesive liquid-crystalline system (LCS), may be attractive strategies for peptide delivery. Potentiation of the action of LCS can be achieved with the use of bioadhesive polymers to prolong their residence on the teeth. In line with this, three formulations - polyoxypropylene-(5)-polyoxyethylene-(20)-cetyl alcohol, oleic acid, and Carbopol C974P in different combinations (F1C, F2C, and F3C) were developed to observe the influence of water in the LCS, with the aim of achieving in situ gelling in the oral environment. These formulations were assessed by polarized light microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, rheological analysis, and in vitro bioadhesion analysis. Then, p1025 and a control (chlorhexidine) were incorporated into the aqueous phase of the formulation (F + p1025 and F + chlorhexidine), to determine their antibiofilm effect and toxicity on epithelial cells. Polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering showed that F1C and F2C were LCS, whereas F3C was a microemulsion. F1C and F2C showed pseudoplastic behavior and F3C Newtonian behavior. F1C showed the highest elastic and bioadhesive characteristics compared to other formulations. Antibiofilm effects were observed for F + p1025 when applied in the surface-bound salivary phase. The p1025-loaded nanostructured LCS presented limited cytotoxicity and effectively reduced S. mutans biofilm formation, and could be a promising p1025-delivery strategy to prevent the formation

  17. IPNs from Cyclodextrin:Chitosan Antioxidants: Bonding, Bio-Adhesion, Antioxidant Capacity and Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tamara Perchyonok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available IPNs are unique “alloys” of cross-linked polymers in which at least one network is synthesized and/or cross-linked in the presence of the other. IPNs are also known as entanglements of polymer networks that are ideally held together only by permanent topological interactions. The objectives of this study are to evaluate novel chitosan-based functional drug delivery systems that can be successfully incorporated into “dual action bioactive tooth restorative materials”. These materials should be capable of inducing an improved wound healing prototype. The novel hydrogels will be investigated with respect to the antioxidant capacity of conventional antioxidants, such as resveratrol, b-carotene and propolis, as a designer drug delivery system, with the use of SEM imaging for the characterization of the surfaces, bio-adhesive property, antioxidant capacity, free radical defence, antioxidant, active ingredient stability and reactive features of novel materials. The additional benefit of the site-specific “functional restorative material” for use in dressings to deliver antibiotics to wound sites can provide tissue compatibility and reduced interference with wound healing. The materials were tested using an effective in vitro free radical generation model as functional additive prototypes for further development of “dual function restorative wound healing materials”. We quantified the effects of functional designer biomaterials on the dentin bond strength of a composite and evaluated the bio-adhesive capacity of the materials in the two separate “in vitro” systems. The added benefits of the chitosan/vitamin C/cyclodextrin (CD host:guest complex-treated hydrogels involved a positive influence on the tetracycline release, increased dentin bond strength, as well as a demonstrated in vitro “built-in” free radical defence mechanism and, therefore, acting as a “proof of concept” for functional multi-dimensional restorative wound

  18. Prediction the effects of ZnO2 nanoparticles on splitting tensile strength and water absorption of high strength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, two models based on artificial neural networks (ANN and gene expression programming (GEP for predicting splitting tensile strength and water absorption of concretes containing ZnO2 nanoparticles at different ages of curing have been developed. To build these models, training and testing using experimental results for 144 specimens produced with 16 different mixture proportions were conducted. The used data in the multilayer feed forward neural networks models and input variables of genetic programming models are arranged in a format of eight input parameters that cover the cement content (C, nanoparticle content (N, aggregate type (AG, water content (W, the amount of superplasticizer (S, the type of curing medium (CM, Age of curing (AC and number of testing try (NT. According to these input parameters, in the neural networks and genetic programming models, the splitting tensile strength and water absorption values of concretes containing ZnO2 nanoparticles were predicted. The training and testing results in these two models have shown the strong potential of the models for predicting the splitting tensile strength and water absorption values of concretes containing ZnO2 nanoparticles. Although neural networks have predicted better results, genetic programming is able to predict reasonable values with a simpler method rather than neural networks.

  19. Environmental effect of water absorption and flexural strength of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    stubs with silver paste. To enhance the conductivity of the composite samples, a thin film of platinum is vacuum evaporated onto them before the photographs are taken. Figure-15(a) displays the flexural strength of the untreated fiber composite in normal condition. Most of the fibers are seen to be broken which indicates a ...

  20. models for predicting compressive strength and water absorption

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    construction of buildings and structures. Producers of sandcrete blocks that utilize these materials use arbitrary mixes and the strength of blocks produced using this combination of quarry dust and lateritic sand as replacement for natural sand cannot be guaranteed. The appropriate mix of laterite and quarry dust or the.

  1. Environmental effect of water absorption and flexural strength of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present investigation is aimed at processing a composite using jute fiber and epoxy resin as matrix and red mud as a filler material. The degradation of the composite mechanical properties such as flexural strength has been studied when it is subjected to different environmental conditions. To increase the adhesion ...

  2. marine water effect on compressive strength of concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    was obtained from the laboratory. Concrete cubes cast and cured with seawater were observed to have a higher strength at 28 days i.e. about 115% when ... production [6-11]. However, in some communities where seawater abound, it is virtual impossible to produce concrete without seawater. This necessitates this work. 2.

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of buccal bioadhesive films containing salbutamol sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Soni, Rajeev; Rawat, Manoj Kumar; Jain, Achint; Deshpande, Shripad Bhimarao; Deshpande, Shripad Bheemrao; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Muthu, Madaswamy Sona

    2010-03-01

    The aim of present study was to prepare and evaluate buccal bioadhesive films of salbutamol sulphate (SS) for the treatment of asthma. The films were designed to release the drug for a prolonged period of time so as to reduce the frequency of administration of the available conventional dosage forms of SS. The different proportions of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and Carbopol 940P (CP 940P) were used for the preparation of films. Carbopol was used to incorporate the desired bioadhesiveness in the films. The films were prepared by solvent casting method and evaluated for bioadhesion, in vitro drug release and anti asthmatic effect (bronchoprotection) in histamine induced bronchospasm of guinea pigs. In vitro drug release from the film was determined using a modified Franz diffusion cell while bioadhesiveness was evaluated with a modified two-arm balance using guinea pig buccal mucosa as a model tissue. Films containing SCMC : CP 940P ratio of 76 : 24 was found to be the best with moderate swelling along with favorable bioadhesion force and in vitro drug release. The drug release mechanism was found to follow non-Fickian diffusion as release mechanism. The prolonged in vivo effect (bronchoprotection) obtained from the buccal bioadhesive film of SS administered via buccal route may improve the treatment of asthmatic disorders by reducing the frequency of administration which is associated with the tolerance effect of SS. Additionally for the clinical benefit, it is also expected to reduce the major adverse effects of SS such as tachycardia and arrhythmias via buccal absorption.

  4. Regional Water System Vulnerabilities and Strengths for Unavoidable Climate Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, P. H.; Palaniappan, M.; Christian-Smith, J.; Cooley, H.

    2011-12-01

    A wide range of options are available to help water systems prepare and adapt for unavoidable climate impacts, but these options vary depending on region, climatic conditions, economic status, and technical infrastructure in place. Drawing on case studies from the United States, India, and elsewhere, and from both urban and agricultural water systems, risks to water supply and quality are evaluated and summarized and categories of responses to help improve the effectiveness of adaptation policies are reviewed. Among the issues to be discussed are characteristics unique to developing country cities, such as the predominance of informal actors in the water sector. The formal, or government sector, which often exclusively manages water access and distribution in developed country cities, is only one among many players in the water sector in developing country cities. Informal access to water includes direct access by individuals through private groundwater systems, private water markets using vendors or sales of bottled water, and rainwater harvesting systems on individual homes. In this environment, with already existing pressures on water availability and use, the impacts of climate change on water will be strongly felt. This complicates planning for water supply and demand and risks increasing already prevalent water insecurity, especially for urban poor. In wealthier countries, any planning for water-related climate impacts tends to take the form of "business as usual" responses, such as efforts to expand supply with new infrastructure, manage demand through conservation programs, or simply put off addressing the problem to the next generation of managers and users. These approaches can be effective, but also risk missing unusual, non-linear, or threshold impacts. Examples of more informed and innovative efforts to substantively address climate change risks will be presented.

  5. Effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of portland composite cement (PCC) mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronge, M. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Hamada, H.; Irmawaty, R.

    2017-11-01

    Cement manufacturing of Indonesia has been introduced Portland Composite Cement (PCC) to minimize the rising production cost of cement which contains 80% clinker and 20% mineral admixture. A proper curing is very important when the cement contains mineral admixture materials. This paper reports the results of an experimental study conducted to evaluate the effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of PCC mortar. Mortar specimens with water to cement ratio of (W/C) 0.5 were casted. Compressive strength, flexural strength and concrete resistance were tested at 7, 28 and 91 days cured water. The results indicated that water curing duration is essential to continue the pozzolanic reaction in mortar which contributes to the development of strength of mortar made with PCC.

  6. Effect of water on ductility and fatigue strength of austempered ductile cast iron (ADI)

    OpenAIRE

    Terutoshi, Yakushiji; W. George, Ferguson; Masahiro, Goto

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of decreasing the tensile strength and elongation of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI) in the wet condition, various tension tests and impact test were carried out. And the three point bending fatigue tests were carried out on ADI and annealed 0.55% carbon steel to clarify the influence of water on fatigue strength. The main conclusions areas follows. Embrittlement by water begins when the plastic deformation start in tension test. The fatigue limit of ADI in...

  7. Influence of drying and water supplying after drying on tensile strength of cement mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, H.; Takiguchi, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the change in tensile strength of cement mortar subjected to rapid drying and water supply after drying. Flexural strength was investigated for several cement paste specimens cured in water for a certain period, with some specimens dried for 1 day and cured again in water after drying. As a result, it is known that the flexural strength of the specimen allowed to dry becomes about 1/3 of that of a sound specimen, but it is almost recovered after about 3h water curing after drying. The reason why the strength changes is usually connected with a restrained stress due to drying shrinkage and a stress relaxation due to expansion caused by water absorption. However, when the restrained stress at the surface overtakes the tensile strength, and a considerable number of minute cracks occur, as was observed, the above explanation cannot be accepted, because the tensile stress is almost perfectly relaxed by the occurrence of the cracks. In this paper, the reason for the strength recovery as a result of water absorption is reconsidered by means of stress analysis and microscopic examination of the cracks. (orig.)

  8. Strength and water absorption characteristics of cement-bonded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rate of water absorption (< 25% after 24 hours) and the resultant thickness swelling (<1% after 24 hours) of the boards was relatively slow. It was concluded that the material could be used in bearing wall construction and as partitioning in bungalows and one- storey buildings in Nigeria. Journal of Civil Engineering ...

  9. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M P; Singh, S P; Singh, A P

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together.

  10. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. P.; Singh, S. P.; Singh, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together. PMID:27379298

  11. Changes of strength characteristics of pervious concrete due to variations in water to cement ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, M.; Sicakova, A.

    2017-10-01

    Pervious concrete is considered to be a sustainable pavement material due to high water permeability. The experiment presented in this paper was aimed at study the influence of water to cement ratio on both the compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete. Typically, less water content in concrete mixture leads to less porosity of cement paste and thus it provides desirable mechanical properties. In case of conventional dense concrete, the lower is the water to cement ratio, the higher or better is the strength, density and durability of concrete. This behaviour is not quite clear in case of pervious concrete because of low amount of cement paste present. Results of compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete are discussed in the paper while taking into account values measured after 2 and 28 days of hardening and variations in water to cement ratio. The results showed that changes of water to cement ratio from 0.25 to 0.35 caused only slight differences in strength characteristics, and this applied to both types of tested strength.

  12. The influence of water flow (reversal) on bond strength development in young masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, C.; Larbi, J.

    1999-01-01

    Water loss from the fresh mortar is believed to be related to mortar-brick bond strength development in masonry. Recent research on mortar-brick bond has shown that, particularly, effects of water flow on the composition and the hydration conditions of the mortar-brick interface have to be taken

  13. modified water-cement ratio law for compressive strength of rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    solid agricultural waste (rice husk) and also produce more sustainable cheaper concrete products. To this end, studies on the development of modified water- cement ratio law for concrete incorporating RHA is timely and justifiable. The relationship between the compressive strength and the cement-water ratio is ...

  14. Effect of pH on the rate of curing and bioadhesive properties of dopamine functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencer, Morgan; Liu, Yuan; Winter, Audra; Murley, Meridith; Meng, Hao; Lee, Bruce P

    2014-08-11

    The remarkable underwater adhesion strategy employed by mussels has inspired bioadhesives that have demonstrated promise in connective tissue repair, wound closure, and local delivery of therapeutic cells and drugs. While the pH of oxygenated blood and internal tissues is typically around 7.4, skin and tumor tissues are significantly more acidic. Additionally, blood loss during surgery and ischemia can lead to dysoxia, which lowers pH levels of internal tissues and organs. Using 4-armed PEG end-capped with dopamine (PEG-D) as a model adhesive polymer, the effect of pH on the rate of intermolecular cross-linking and adhesion to biological substrates of catechol-containing adhesives was determined. Adhesive formulated at an acidic pH (pH 5.7-6.7) demonstrated reduced curing rate, mechanical properties, and adhesive performance to pericardium tissues. Although a faster curing rate was observed at pH 8, these adhesives also demonstrated reduced mechanical and bioadhesive properties when compared to adhesives buffered at pH 7.4. Adhesives formulated at pH 7.4 demonstrated a good balance of fast curing rate, elevated mechanical properties and interfacial binding ability. UV-vis spectroscopy evaluation revealed that the stability of the transient oxidation intermediate of dopamine was increased under acidic conditions, which likely reduced the rate of intermolecular cross-linking and bulk cohesive properties for hydrogels formulated at these pH levels. At pH 8, competing cross-linking reaction mechanisms and reduced concentration of dopamine catechol due to auto-oxidation likely reduced the degree of dopamine polymerization and adhesive strength for these hydrogels. pH plays an important role in the adhesive performance of mussel-inspired bioadhesives and the pH of the adhesive formulation needs to be adjusted for the intended application.

  15. Concurrent Strength and Interval Endurance Training in Elite Water Polo Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botonis, Petros G; Toubekis, Argyris G; Platanou, Theodoros I

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of different high-intensity interval training (HIIT) intervals performed concurrently with strength and specific water polo training on performance indices of elite players. During the precompetition season, 2 water polo clubs were assigned to either HIIT of 4 × 4 minutes (n = 7, HIIT4 × 4) or HIIT of 16 × 100-m swimming efforts (n = 7, HIIT16 × 100). Both clubs applied the swimming (6% above the speed corresponding to blood lactate concentration of 4.0 mmol · L) and strength training (85-90% of 1 repetition maximum, 5 repetitions, 4 sets) twice per week concurrently with specific water polo training. Before and after the 8-week intervention period, maximal bench press strength was measured and a speed-lactate test (5 × 200 m) was performed to determine the speed corresponding to lactate concentration of 4.0, 5.0, and 10.0 mmol · L(-1). Maximal strength was improved in both groups (HIIT4 × 4: 14 ± 4% vs. HIIT16 × 100: 19 ± 10%). Improvements in speed corresponding to 4.0, 5.0, and 10.0 mmol · L(-1) were shown only after HIIT4 × 4 (9 ± 5, 8 ± 3, 7 ± 2%, respectively; p training together with specific water polo training performed concurrently improves muscle strength and allows specific adaptations enhancing swimming performance of elite water polo players.

  16. In vivo near infrared (NIRS) sensor attachment using fibrin bioadhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew; Pagano, Roberto; Kwon, Brian; Dumont, Guy; Shadgan, Babak

    2018-02-01

    Background: `Tisseel' (Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL) is a fibrin-based sealant that is commonly used during spine surgery to augment dural repairs. We wish to intra-operatively secure a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) sensor to the dura in order to monitor the tissue hemodynamics of the underlying spinal cord. To determine if `Tisseel' sealant adversely attenuates NIR photon transmission. Methods: We investigated `Tisseel' in both an in vitro and in vivo paradigm. For in vitro testing, we used a 1 mm pathlength cuvette containing either air or `Tisseel' interposed between a NIR light source (760 and 850 nm) and a photodiode detector and compared transmittance. For in vivo testing, a continuous wave (760 and 850 nm) spatiallyresolved NIRS device was placed over the triceps muscle using either conventional skin apposition (overlying adhesive bandage) or bioadhesion with `Tisseel'. Raw optical data and tissue saturation index (TSI%) collected at rest were compared. Results: In-vitro NIR light absorption by `Tisseel' was very high, with transmittance reduced by 95% compared to air. In-vivo muscle TSI% values were 80% with conventional attachment and 20% using fibrin glue. Conclusion: The optical properties of `Tisseel' significantly attenuate NIR light during in-vitro transmittance and critically compromise photon transmission in-vivo.

  17. Effect of water absorption by the aggregate on properties of high-strength lightweight concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punkki, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, high-strength lightweight concrete has become an interesting building material for the offshore oil industry. This doctoral thesis presents an experimental investigation of the effect of water absorption by three different types of lightweight aggregates. One type did not show any water absorption ability at all and so represented no problem to the concrete production. For the two other high-strength aggregates, which were of more conventional types, the water absorption depended not only on the properties of the aggregates, but also on the concrete mixing procedure and the properties of the fresh cement paste. When water absorbing lightweight aggregate was used in a dry condition, the workability of the concrete was significantly reduced by the water absorption of the aggregate. This effect was not present when prewetted aggregate was used. The water absorption by the lightweight aggregate also affected the early compressive strength of concrete. After one day, dry aggregate gave on the average 10 MPa higher compressive strength than did prewetted aggregate. The strength-density ratio was affected by the moisture condition of the aggregate. Dry lightweight aggregate gave 9 MPa higher compressive strength at a density of 2000 kg/m{sup 3} compared to that of prewetted aggregate. The water absorption by the lightweight also affected the microstructure of the hardened concrete. Dry lightweight aggregate gave a slightly better microstructure than normal weight aggregate. The results indicate that the use of prewetted aggregate adversely affected the transition zone between the aggregate and the cement paste. 69 refs., 58 figs., 42 tabs.

  18. Strength and Biot's coefficient for high-porosity oil- or water-saturated chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    . The Biot coefficient states the degree of cementation or how the pore pressure contributes to the strain resulting from an external load for a porous material. It is here calculated from dynamic measurements and correlated with the strength of outcrop chalk characterized by the onset of pore collapse...... during hydrostatic loading. The hypothesis is that the Biot coefficient and the theory of poroelasticity may cover the fluid effect by including the increased fluid bulk modulus from oil to water. A high number of test results for both oil- and water-saturated high-porosity outcrop chalk show correlation...... between the Biot coefficient and the strength....

  19. Nanoparticle transport in water-unsaturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Louis, Cédric; Gehan, Hélène; Brichart, Thomas; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the influence of ionic strength and flow on nanoparticle (NP) retention rate in an unsaturated calcareous medium, originating from a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit of the region of Lyon (France). Laboratory columns 10 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length were used. Silica nanoparticles (Au-SiO 2 -FluoNPs), with hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 50 to 60 nm and labeled with fluorescein derivatives, were used to simulate particle transport, and bromide was used to characterize flow. Three flow rates and five different ionic strengths were tested. The transfer model based on fractionation of water into mobile and immobile fractions was coupled with the attachment/detachment model to fit NPs breakthrough curves. The results show that increasing flow velocity induces a decrease in nanoparticle retention, probably as the result of several physical but also geochemical factors. The results show that NPs retention increases with ionic strength. However, an inversion of retention occurs for ionic strength >5.10 −2  M, which has been scarcely observed in previous studies. The measure of zeta potential and DLVO calculations show that NPs may sorb on both solid-water and air-water interfaces. NPs size distribution shows the potential for nanoparticle agglomeration mostly at low pH, leading to entrapment in the soil pores. These mechanisms are highly sensitive to both hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which explains their high sensitivity to flow rates and ionic strength.

  20. Bioadhesive drug delivery system using glyceryl monooleate for the intravesical administration of paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Ju; Kim, Sae Woong; Chung, Hesson; Park, Yeong Taek; Choi, Young Wook; Cho, Yong-Hyun; Yoon, Moon Soo

    2005-10-01

    Many reports have shown that the efficacy of intravesical therapy for bladder cancer is in part limited by the poor penetration of drugs into the urothelium. The present study evaluated the effect of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) on the absorption of intravesically administered paclitaxel in a rabbit model of bladder cancer. Urine, plasma, and tissue pharmacokinetics were determined in rabbits treated for 120 min with paclitaxel (500 microg/20 ml) by intravesical instillation. Two formulations of GMO/paclitaxel were evaluated using different proportions of water, 15 and 30%, and Taxol was used as a control. Animals were observed for clinical signs of toxicity and necropsy was performed. 120 min after instillation, the bladder was emptied and excised. In the urine, paclitaxel concentration was decreased by 39.6 and 41.2% in the two experimental groups and by 25.2% in the control group. The paclitaxel concentrations in the urothelium were 53 and 56% of the urine concentration in both experimental groups, but 11% in the control group. The concentration then declined exponentially in the underlying capillary-perfused tissues, reaching equilibrium at a depth of 1,400-1,700 microm. The plasma concentrations were extremely low compared with concentrations in urine and bladder tissues and were not associated with clinical toxicity. We conclude that GMO has a significantly increased bioadhesiveness to bladder mucosa. Therefore, intravesical administration of GMO/paclitaxel/water provides a significant advantage for drugs targeting the bladder tissue, and paclitaxel represents a viable option for intravesical bladder cancer therapy. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Water absorption and tensile strength degradation of Petung bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) fiber-reinforced polymeric composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judawisastra, H.; Sitohang, Ramona; Rosadi, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo fibers have attracted great interest and are believed to have the potential as natural fiber for reinforcing polymer composites. This research aims to study water absorption behavior and its effect to tensile strength of the composites made from petung bamboo fiber, which is one of the most

  2. Diametral tensile strength of two dental composites when immersed in ethanol, distilled water and artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Abdur; Amin, Faiza; Abbas, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    To examine the effect of distilled water, artificial saliva and ethanol on the tensile strength of direct tooth-coloured restorative material. The study was conducted at Dr. Ishrat ul Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, from April 2011 to September 2012. The testing was performed at the Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (PCSIR) laboratories. Two composite resins Filtek Z250 and Spectrum TPH were tested. Specimens (13 mm x 3 mm x 2 mm) of each material were prepared in the stainless steel mould according to the manufacturers' instructions and distributed into 3 equal groups: one immersed in distilled water, the other in artificial saliva, and the last one in ethanol for 24 hours. Tensile strength was determined after 24 hours in universal Instron Testing Machine. There were 72 specimens in all; 36 (50%) each for Filtek Z250 and Spectrum TPH. The three sub-groups in each case had 12 (33.3%) specimens. For the Filtek Z250, there was no statistically significant difference between immersion in distilled water and artificial saliva, but the ethanol group presented lower tensile strength (ptensile strength compared to distilled water (ptested composite resins were affected by the immersion media and adversely affected the mechanical properties of composite resins.

  3. The Effect of Green Inhibitor on strength and water permeability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reinforce concrete durability treated with green inhibitor were experimentally studied. The permeability and strength of a concrete plays a critical and significant role in controlling the properties of concrete, and serviceability of reinforced concrete. It is a usual practice to assess the water permeability characteristics when ...

  4. Bioadhesive agents in addition to oral contrast media - evaluation in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; Schneider, G.; Textor, J.; Schild, H.H.; Fimmers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the additional effect of bioadhesives in combination with iotrolan and barium as oral contrast media in an animal model. Method: The bioadhesives Noveon, CMC, Tylose and Carbopol 934 were added to iotrolan and barium. The solutions were administered to rabbits by a feeding tube. The animals were investigated by computed tomography (CT) and radiography after 0,5, 4, 12, 24 and in part after 48 hours. Mucosal coating and contrast filling of the bowel were evaluated. Results: Addition of bioadhesives to oral contrast media effected long-term contrast in the small intestine and colon, but no improvement in continuous filling and coating of the gastrointestinal tract was detected. Mucosal coating was seen only in short regions of the caecum and small intestine. In CT the best results for coating were observed with tylose and CMC, in radiography additionally with carbopol and noveon. All contrast medium solutions were well tolerated. Conclusion: The evaluated contrast medium solutions with bioadhesives have shown long-term contrast but no improvement in coating in comparison to conventional oral contrast media. (orig.) [de

  5. Water Sorption and Flexural Strength of Thermoplastic and Conventional Heat-Polymerized Acrylic Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mohammad Ali; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the water sorption and flexural strength of thermoplastic and conventional acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: Water sorption and flexural strength were compared between a thermoplastic modified polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin (group A) and a heat-polymerized PMMA acrylic resin (group B) as the control group (n=10). A three-point bending test was carried out for flexural strength testing. For water sorption test, 10 disc-shaped samples were prepared. After desiccating, the samples were weighed and immersed in distilled water for seven days. Then, they were weighed again, and desiccated for the second and third times. Differences between the mean values in the two groups were analyzed using Student’s t-test. Results: The mean value of water sorption was 14.74±1.36 μg/mm3 in group A, and 19.11±0.90 μg/mm3 in group B; this difference was statistically significant (Pthermoplastic resins can be a suitable alternative to conventional PMMA acrylic resins as denture base materials. PMID:26877737

  6. Effect of magnetic water on strength and workability of high performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Mazloom

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, concrete is one of the most important and widely used human product. Improving concrete characteristics have always been one of the fundamental subjects for engineers. Improve the physical properties of water, as one of the main elements of concrete, is one way to improve the characteristics of the concrete. When water passes through the magnetic field, its physical quality has changed, it is called Magnetic water. This study examines the effect of the use of magnetized water (MW with a solenoid current-carrying, on the compressive strength and workability of high performance concrete. The variables of this study were the intensity of magnetic field, the silica fume replacement level and water to cement ratio in different mixes. The results show that using MW increases the workability of concrete about 36% in average.MW in combination with superplasticizer is more effective than MW on workability and compressive strength of concrete. MW had more positive effects on the samples without silica fume. Increasing the intensity of magnetic field improved the workability, 28 and 90 days compressive strength concrete.

  7. Influence of ionic strength on the viscosities and water loss of bentonite suspensions containing polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Viana Amorim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was made of the influence of ionic strength (S on the apparent (AV and plastic (PV viscosities and water loss (WL of sodium bentonite suspension with polymers. Na-bentonite was dispersed in water (4.86% w/w of different ionic strengths (S = 0.0, 0.015, 0.030 and 0.045 M followed by the addition of polymer. Three polymer samples were studied, i.e., low viscosity carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC BV, polyanionic cellulose (PAC, and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM. The results indicated that the presence of salts and increased salinity greatly influence the apparent and plastic viscosities and water loss of bentonite suspensions with polymer.

  8. Influence of bioadhesive polymers on the protective effect of fluoride against erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Daniele Mara da Silva; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Scaramucci, Tais; Aoki, Idalina Vieira; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated if the incorporation of the bioadhesive polymers Carbopol 980, Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), and Aristoflex AVC in a fluoridated solution (NaF-900ppm) would increase the solution's protective effect against enamel erosion. Enamel specimens were submitted to a 5-day de-remineralization cycling model, consisting of 2min immersions in 0.3% citric acid (6x/day), 1min treatments with the polymers (associated or not with fluoride), and 60min storage in artificial saliva. Ultrapure water was used as the negative control and a 900ppm fluoride solution as positive control. The initial Knoop microhardness (KHN1) was used to randomize the samples into groups. Another two microhardness assessments were performed after the first (KHN2) and second (KHN3) acid immersions, to determine initial erosion in the first day. The formula: %KHN alt =[(KHN3-KHN2)/KHN2]*100 was used to define the protective effect of the treatments. After the 5-day cycling, surface loss (SL, in μm) was evaluated with profilometry. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p<0.05). For %KHN alt , the polymers alone did not reduce enamel demineralization when compared to the negative control, but Carbopol associated with NaF significantly improved its protective effect. The profilometric analysis showed that Carbopol, associated or not with NaF, exhibited the lowest SL, while CMC and Aristoflex did not exhibit a protective effect, nor were they able to improve the protection of NaF. It is concluded that Carbopol enhanced NaF's protection against initial erosion. Carbopol alone or associated with NaF was able to reduce SL after several erosive challenges. Carbopol by itself was able to reduce the erosive wear magnitude to the same extent as the sodium fluoride, therefore, is a promising agent to prevent or control enamel erosion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. From sticky stuff to sweet receptors--achievements, limits and novel approaches to bioadhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, C M

    1996-01-01

    About 10 years ago, the concept of bioadhesion was introduced into the pharmaceutical literature and has since stimulated much research and development both in academia and in industry. The first generation of bioadhesive drug delivery systems (BBDS) were based on so-called mucoadhesive polymers, i.e. natural or synthetic macromolecules, often already well accepted and used as pharmaceutical excipients for other purposes, which show the remarkable ability to 'stick' to humid or wet mucosal tissue surfaces. While these novel dosage forms were mainly expected to allow for a possible prolongation, better localization or intensified contact to mucosal tissue surfaces, it had to be realized that these goals were often not so easily accomplished, at least not by means of such relatively straightforward technology. However, although not always convincing as a 'pharmaceutical glue', some of the mucoadhesive polymers were found to display other, possibly even more important biological activities, namely to inhibit proteolytic enzymes and/or to modulate the permeability of usually tight epithelial tissue barriers. Such features were found to be particularly useful in the context of peptide and protein drug delivery. But still, the interest in realizing 'true' bioadhesion continues: instead of mucoadhesive polymers, plant or bacterial lectins, i.e. adhesion molecules which specifically bind to sugar moieties of the epithelial cell membrane, are now widely being investigated as drug delivery adjuvants. These second-generation bioadhesives not only provide for cellular binding, but also for subsequent endo- and transcytosis. This makes the novel, specifically bioadhesive molecules particularly interesting for the controlled delivery of DNA/RNA molecules in the context of antisense or gene therapy.

  10. An ongoing investigation on modeling the strength properties of water-entrained cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    -based materials. Beyond the discussion of whether or not the introduction of superabsorbent polymers leads to a strength reduction, this paper uses both experimental and theoretical background to separate the effect of SAP in both pore structure and internal relative humidity and the effect from the active......Water-entrained cement based materials by superabsorbent polymers is a concept that was introduced in the research agenda about a decade ago. However, a recent application in the production of high performance concrete revealed potential weaknesses when the proportioning of this intelligent...... material is not well performed, raising doubts among both academic and industrial society about the usability of superabsorbent polymers in cement-based materials. This work constitutes the baseline tentatively to be used on modeling the compressive strength of SF-modified water-entrained cement...

  11. Treatment of high organic strength waste waters; Tratamiento de aguas residuales de alta carga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti Duran, J.; Leyda Escoruela, L. [COMSA, S.A., Madrid (Spain)

    1995-11-01

    A biological treatment process is likely to be the preferred and main stage for the treatment of high strength waste waters. In some instance the wastes will contain a fraction of toxic or non-biodegradable organic constituents which affects the implementation of the central biological process. Two different technologies using tower-shape reactors are described, together with a Low Pressure Chemical Oxidation process technology used in the pretreatment of poorly biodegradable wastes.

  12. Role of Water Sorption in Tablet Crushing Strength, Disintegration, and Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, M; Teerakapibal, R; Kim, K; Elder, E J

    2017-08-01

    Drugs formulated as tablets are subjected to accelerated stability conditions with the goal of identifying a stable formulation that will exhibit a sufficiently long shelf life. Water sorption at a condition such as 40°C/75% RH can result in significant changes in tablet properties such as a decrease in dissolution rate, the cause of which may be difficult to interpret, given the complex nature of ingredients and their interactions in a tablet. In this research, three drugs, displaying a wide range of physicochemical properties, were formulated with commonly used diluents, disintegrants, and binders, using a design of experiments approach. The tablets were stored at accelerated conditions and assessed for content, dissolution, disintegration, and crushing strength, as well as other properties. The research demonstrated many water-induced effects in tablet properties. Due to the experimental design approach that revealed many interactions, it was possible to interpret all of the changes observed in tablet crushing strength, disintegration, and dissolution for the drugs using a common set of physical principles. Specifically, the relevant factors considered were (1) mechanical properties of materials, (2) water sorption surface effects in surface diffusion and capillary condensation, (3) water sorption bulk effects for amorphous materials such as viscous flow/spreading, and (4) water-induced stress on interparticle bonding arising from volume expansion. These physical principles enable a comprehensive interpretation of the complex changes observed in tablet properties, which should be valuable in the design of tablet formulations that will be stable to accelerated storage conditions.

  13. Prediction of shear strength of unsaturated pyroclastic ashes from water retention curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comegna, Luca; Damiano, Emilia; Gargano, Rudy; Greco, Roberto; Palladino, Mario; Romano, Nunzio

    2017-04-01

    Pyroclastic deposits covering steep slopes, characteristic of large mountainous areas of Campania (southern Italy), are often affected by shallow landslides triggered by rainfall. The equilibrium of such deposits is in fact usually guaranteed by the contribution to soil shear strength offered by soil suction, which decreases when soil approaches saturation. More specifically, soil suction exerts a compressive stress on solid particles, which increases shear strength thanks to friction. In this study, the model of Lu et al. (2010), which assumes that the fraction of soil suction effectively transmitted to solid particles is proportional to the degree of saturation of the soil, and a recently proposed model, based on the assumption that suction is transmitted to soil solid particles only through their wet external surface (Greco and Gargano, 2015), are applied to predict soil suction stress of pyroclastic ashes from their water retention curve. This latter is modeled by means of the equation of van Genuchten (1980), as well as by means of the model of Romano et al. (2011), which assumes a bimodal distribution of pore dimensions. Experimental data of shear strength of pyroclastic ashes from various sites in Campania are compared with the values of shear strength predicted with the various tested models. The investigated soils are loose silty sands, characterized by a porosity larger than 0.7, friction angle ranging between 36° and 38°, and small or even null cohesion. In all cases, the best agreement between modeled and experimental shear strength is obtained by means of the model of Greco and Gargano, applied with the adoption of the bimodal water retention model of Romano et al. The obtained results highlight the importance of accurate modeling soil suction stress to correctly predict landslide triggering conditions in slopes covered with shallow unsaturated granular deposits. References Greco R, Gargano R. A novel equation for determining the suction stress of

  14. Estimating water retention curves and strength properties of unsaturated sandy soils from basic soil gradation parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Hu, Nian; François, Bertrand; Lambert, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    This study proposed two pedotransfer functions (PTFs) to estimate sandy soil water retention curves. It is based on the van Genuchten's water retention model and from a semiphysical and semistatistical approach. Basic gradation parameters of d60 as particle size at 60% passing and the coefficient of uniformity Cu are employed in the PTFs with two idealized conditions, the monosized scenario and the extremely polydisperse condition, satisfied. Water retention tests are carried out on eight granular materials with narrow particle size distributions as supplementary data of the UNSODA database. The air entry value is expressed as inversely proportional to d60 and the parameter n, which is related to slope of water retention curve, is a function of Cu. The proposed PTFs, although have fewer parameters, have better fitness than previous PTFs for sandy soils. Furthermore, by incorporating with the suction stress definition, the proposed pedotransfer functions are imbedded in shear strength equations which provide a way to estimate capillary induced tensile strength or cohesion at a certain suction or degree of saturation from basic soil gradation parameters. The estimation shows quantitative agreement with experimental data in literature, and it also explains that the capillary-induced cohesion is generally higher for materials with finer mean particle size or higher polydispersity.

  15. Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete Using Treated Waste Water for Mixing and Curing of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Kanwal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective utilization of the available resources is imperative approach to achieve the apex of productivity. The modern world is focusing on the conditioning, sustainability and recycling of the assets by imparting innovative techniques and methodologies. Keeping this in view, an experimental study was conducted to evaluate the strength of concrete made with treated waste water for structural use. In this study ninetysix cylinders of four mixes with coarse aggregates in combination with FW (Fresh Water, WW (Wastewater, TWW (Treated Wastewater and TS (Treated Sewagewere prepared. The workability of fresh concrete was checked before pouring of cylinders. The test cylinders were left for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days for curing. After curing, the compressive strength was measured on hardened concrete cylinders accordingly. Test results showed that workability of all the four mixes were between 25-50mm but ultimate compressive strength of concrete with WW was decreased and with TWW, TS at the age of 28 days do not change significantly. This research will open a new wicket in the horizon of recycling of construction materials. The conditioning and cyclic utilization will reduce the cost of the construction and building materials as well as minimize the use of natural resources. This novelty and calculating approach will save our natural assets and resources.

  16. Biocompatible and bioadhesive hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, monofunctional poly(alkylene glycols and itaconic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mićić Maja M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of hydrogels were prepared by the radical copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, itaconic acid and four different poly(alkylene glycol (methacrylate components (Bisomers in a water/ethanol mixture as solvent. The polymers swell in water at 25°C to yield homogeneous transparent hydrogels. All the hydrogels displayed pH sensitive behavior in buffers of the pH range from 2.20 to 7.40, under conditions similar to those of biological fluids. The presence of these two comonomers, which were added to HEMA, increased the swelling degree of the hydrogels and gave gels with better elasticity. The hydrogels were thermally stable in the vicinity of the physiological temperature (37°C. The copolymer containing pure poly(ethylene glycol acrylate units generally had the best properties. The tests performed on the hydrogels confirmed that they were neither hemolytic nor cytotoxic. The copolymer samples showed better cell viability and less hemolytic activity than the PHEMA sample, confirming the assumption that poly(alkylene glycols improve the biocompatibility of hydrogels. Due to their swelling and mechanical characteristics, as well as the very good biocompatibility and bioadhesive properties, poly(Bisomer/HEMA/IA hydrogels are promising for utilization in the field of biomedicals, especially for the controlled release of drugs.

  17. Early age compressive strength, porosity, and sorptivity of concrete using peat water to produce and cure concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivia, Monita; Ismeddiyanto, Wibisono, Gunawan; Sitompul, Iskandar R.

    2017-09-01

    Construction in peatland has faced scarce water sources for mixing and curing concrete. It is known that peat water has high organic content and low pH that can be harmful to concrete in the environment. In some remote areas in Riau Province, contractors used peat water directly without sufficient treatments to comply with SKSNI requirements of concrete mixing water. This paper presents a study of compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and blended OPC-Palm Oil Fuel Ash (OPC-POFA) concrete. The specimens were mixed using natural water and peat water, then some of them were cured in fresh water and peat water. Six mixtures were investigated using a variation of cement, mixing water and curing water. Tap water is used as control mixing and curing water for all specimens. The compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity were calculated at seven and 28 days. Results indicate that the use of peat water will cause low compressive strength, high porosity and sorptivity for both OPC and OPC-POFA concrete. Using peat water and curing the specimens in tap water could improve the early strength, porosity and sorptivity of OPC concrete; however, it has an adverse effect on OPC-POFA specimens. The properties of early age concrete of both types (OPC and OPC-POFA) using peat water were as good as those with tap water. Therefore, it is suggested that peat water should be considered as mixing and curing water for concrete where tap water resources are scarce. Investigation of its long-term properties, as well as extending the observed age of concrete is recommended before any use of peat water.

  18. Mass attenuation coefficients of several bio-adhesive based oil palm particleboards at 16.59-25.26 keV photon energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu Mustapa, U. A.; Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Hamid, P. N. K. Abd; Hashim, R.; Ahmad, M. Z.; Aziz, M. Z. Abd

    2018-01-01

    Particleboards made of oil palm with addition of polylactic acid (PLA), starch, and fish oil were fabricated with target density of 1.0 g/cm3. The mass attenuation coefficients of the particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) configuration in conjunction with niobium, molybdenum, palladium and tin metal plates that provided Kα1 photon energies between 16.59 and 25.26 keV. The results were compared to the calculated value of water using XCOM. The results showed that all particleboards having mass attenuation coefficients near to the value of water with the mass attenuation coefficient different less than 0.25. The method of fabrication did not give significant different to the mass attenuation coefficients of the particleboards. The results had indicated the potential of bio-adhesive based palm oil particleboards to be developed as phantoms for low energy photons.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and correlation between in vitro release and in vivo absorption of bio-adhesive pellets of panax notoginseng saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Chun-Yan

    2017-02-01

    The present study was designed to prepare and compare bio-adhesive pellets of panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) with hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), chitosan, and chitosan : carbomer, explore the influence of different bio-adhesive materials on pharmacokinetics behaviors of PNSbio-adhesive pellets, and evaluate the correlation between in vivo absorption and in vitro release (IVIVC). In order to predict the in vivo concentration-time profile by the in vitro release data of bio-adhesive pellets, the release experiment was performed using the rotating basket method in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. The PNS concentrations in rat plasma were analyzed by HPLC-MS-MS method and the relative bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using Kinetica4.4 pharmacokinetic software. Numerical deconvolution method was used to evaluate IVIVC. Our results indicated that, compared with ordinary pellets, PNS bio-adhesive pellets showed increased oral bioavailability by 1.45 to 3.20 times, increased C max , and extended MRT. What's more, the release behavior of drug in HPMC pellets was shown to follow a Fickian diffusion mechanism, a synergetic function of diffusion and skeleton corrosion. The in vitro release and the in vivo biological activity had a good correlation, demonstrating that the PNS bio-adhesive pellets had a better sustained release. Numerical deconvolution technique showed the advantage in evaluation of IVIVC for self-designed bio-adhesive pellets with HPMC. In conclusion, the in vitro release data of bio-adhesive pellets with HPMC can predict its concentration-time profile in vivo. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Use Level of Chrome Tannage For Rabbit Fur Leather Observed on Tearing Strength, Stitch Tearing Strength, Water Absorption and Organoleptic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustakim Mustakim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out the appropiate of chrome tannage level for rabbit fur leather quality. The result were expected to contribute information for many people who relate with tanning technology, especialy about the use level of chrome tannage for fur leather quality and could as patern to hold further research.The material that used were 12 pieces of three months of rabbit skin. The method is Completely Randomized Design, consist of three treatments of chrome tannage (Chromosal B, they were : B1 (Chromosal B 6%, B2 (Chromosal B 8%, and B3 (Chromosal B 10%. Each of treatment hold on four replications. The variables which measured are tearing strength, stitch teraing strength, water absorption and organoleptic consist of “kekuatan bulu”’ “kerataan bulu” and “kelemasan kulit” in fur leather. Data was analysed by analysis variance followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. The result of this research show that the use level of chromosal B give very significant influence among tearing strength, stitch tearing strength and water absorption. It gave significant influence among the organoleptic test. Based on the result, can be concluded that 10 percent of chrome tannage (chromosal B, produce the best result on tearing strength, stitch tearing strength, water absorption and organoleptic for “kekuatan bulu” and “kerataan bulu”. The incrase of chrome tannage offer will decrease the “kelemasan kulit” in fur leather and the best “kelemasan kulit” produced by the lowest chrome tannage offer, that was 6 percent of Chromosal B. The best quality of rabbit fur leather produced by 10 percent of chrome tannage offer.   Keywords: chrome, tannage, fur leather

  1. Modeling and experiments on the drive characteristics of high-strength water hydraulic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengmeng; Hou, Jiaoyi; Ning, Dayong; Gong, Xiaofeng; Gong, Yongjun

    2017-05-01

    Fluidic artificial muscles are popular in robotics and function as biomimetic actuators. Their pneumatic version has been widely investigated. A novel water hydraulic artificial muscle (WHAM) with high strength is developed in this study. WHAMs can be applied to underwater manipulators widely used in ocean development because of their environment-friendly characteristics, high force-to-weight ratio, and good bio-imitability. Therefore, the strength of WHAMs has been improved to fit the requirements of underwater environments and the work pressure of water hydraulic components. However, understanding the mechanical behaviors of WHAMs is necessary because WHAMs use work media and pressure control that are different from those used by pneumatic artificial muscles. This paper presents the static and dynamic characteristics of the WHAM system, including the water hydraulic pressure control circuit. A test system is designed and built to analyze the drive characteristics of the developed WHAM. The theoretical relationships among the amount of contraction, pressure, and output drawing force of the WHAM are tested and verified. A linearized transfer function is proposed, and the dynamic characteristics of the WHAM are investigated through simulation and inertia load experiments. Simulation results agree with the experimental results and show that the proposed model can be applied to the control of WHAM actuators.

  2. Impact strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins subjected to long-term water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wady, Amanda Fucci; Machado, Ana Lucia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2011-01-01

    Water may influence the mechanical properties of the acrylic resins. Thus, the effect of water storage on the impact strength (IS) of one denture base (Lucitone 550 - L) and four reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II - T; UfiGel Hard - U; Kooliner - K; New Truliner - NT) was evaluated. Bars of L were made (60 x 6 x 2 mm) and relined (2 mm) with T, U, K, NT and L. Intact specimens of each material (60 x 6 x 4 mm) were also fabricated for comparative purposes. Specimens were submitted to Charpy impact tests without water storage (control) and after immersion in water for 7, 90 and 180 days. Data (kJ/m(2)) analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p=0.05) revealed that after 90 days, U exhibited an increase in the IS (0.93) compared to 7 days (0.58). K (1.48) and L/K (7.21) exhibited a decrease at the 7-day period (1.01 and 3.23, respectively). NT (0.60) showed an increase in the IS after 180 days (1.52), whereas L/NT (7.70) showed a decrease (3.17). Water immersion improved the IS of U and NT, and decreased the IS of K, L/K, and L/NT. Water may affect differently the IS of acrylic resins and, consequently, the resistance to fracture of relined denture bases.

  3. Design of novel bioadhesive materials based on mussel-derived glues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce Po-Shu

    2005-11-01

    3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a unique amino acid found in mussel adhesive proteins (MAPS), was incorporated into polyethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels using several methods in an attempt to create a novel adhesive biomaterial that can potentially function as a wound closure material, a tissue engineering scaffold, or a mucoadhesive drug carrier. MAP sequences contain as much as 25 mol% DOPA, which is responsible for both strong water-resistant adhesion and rapid curing of these proteins. In the first strategy, DOPA was chemically attached to PEG and both enzymatic and chemical oxidizing reagents were used to induce oxidative cross-linking of DOPA, which resulted in rapid gel formation. Although DOPA was incorporated into a biocompatible PEG-based gel, the oxidized-forms of DOPA are believed to be less adhesive than the catecholic form. Thus, the second focus of the thesis was to incorporate the reduced form of DOPA into a gel network through photopolymerization. This was accomplished by copolymerizing N-methacrylated DOPA with PEG-diacrylate (PEG-DA). While catechol integration was demonstrated, the presence of DOPA lengthened gelation time and reduced the extent of gelation and the mechanical integrity of photocured hydrogels. In the third part of this thesis, the inhibitive effect of DOPA on photopolymerization was eliminated through the design of methacrylated amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of PEG and poly(lactide) (PLA). The self-assembling ability of these polymers was exploited to separate DOPA residues from methacrylate groups. Rapid gelation was achieved (network by custom-designing a new methacrylated PEG-b-PLA copolymer with a free --NH2 group on the PEG backbone and to incorporate short poly(DOPA) and poly(DOPA-Lys) peptides through N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) polymerization. Contact mechanical tests of DOPA-modified gels submerged in an aqueous medium demonstrated strong adhesive interaction to TiO 2, and it was confirmed that the

  4. Effect of Fiber Volume Fraction and Water Absorption toward Bending Strength of Coconut Filters/ Polyester Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Lokantara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The variation of fibre volume and the duration of water soaking take influence on the mechanical properties of composite. This research aim is to know the influence of fraction volume fibre and soaking duration on the mineral watertoward the tensile strength and flexural of polyester-coconut-tapis composite. This research used coconut-tapis fibre which is cut 1 cm in length with 0%, 5%, 7,5%, and 10% fiber volume fraction, unsaturated-polyester (UPRs matrix resin type Yucalac 157 BQTN-EX, and MEKPO hardener. The flexure specimen are made by press hand lay-up method and cut according ASTM D790-03 for the flexure test. The result of flexure test shows that the duration of soaking and the fiber volume fraction give a significant effect on the flexural strength of composite. The highest strength are reached by composite with 10% fibre volume on 48 hour soaking time equal to 41.994 MPa. The flexure modulus happenend shows increasing until 24 hour soaking time. The highest modulus are reached by composite with 10% fibre volume equal to 7.114 GPa while the lowest are reached by composite with 0% fibre volume equal to 3,023 GPa.

  5. Effects of Nanosilica on Compressive Strength and Durability Properties of Concrete with Different Water to Binder Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of different nanosilica dosages (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5% with respect to cement on compressive strength and durability properties of concrete with water/binder ratios 0.65, 0.55, and 0.5 were investigated. Water sorptivity, apparent chloride diffusion coefficient, electrical resistivity, and carbonation coefficient of concrete were measured. The results showed that compressive strength significantly improved in case of water/binder = 0.65, while for water/binder = 0.5 no change was found. Increasing nanosilica content, the water sorptivity decreased only for water/binder = 0.55. The addition of 0.5% nanosilica decreased the apparent chloride diffusion coefficient for water/binder = 0.65 and 0.55; however, higher nanosilica dosages did not decrease it with respect to reference value. The resistivity was elevated by 0.5% nanosilica for all water/binder ratios and by 1.5% nanosilica only for water/binder = 0.5. The carbonation coefficient was not notably affected by increasing nanosilica dosages and even adverse effect was observed for water/binder = 0.65. Further information of microstructure was also provided through characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. The effectiveness of a certain nanosilica dosage addition into lower strength mixes was more noticeable, while, for the higher strength mix, the effectiveness was less.

  6. Influence of water storage on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Scheidel, Donal D; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine enamel and dentin bond durability after long-term water storage using self-etch adhesives. Two single step self-etch adhesives (SU, Scotchbond Universal and GB, G-ӕnial Bond) and a two-step self-etch adhesive (OX, OptiBond XTR) were used. The shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (FS) of the enamel and dentin were obtained with and without phosphoric acid pre-etching prior to application of the adhesives. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h, 6 months, and one year. A staircase method was used to determine the FS using a frequency of 10 Hz for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. The SBS and FS of enamel bonds were significantly higher with pre-etching, when compared to no pre-etching for the same water storage period. The FS of dentin bonds with pre-etching tended to decrease relative to no pre-etching at the same storage period. For the one year storage period, SU and GB with pre-etching showed significantly lower FS values than the groups without pre-etching. The influence of water storage on FS of the self-etch adhesives was dependent on the adhesive material, storage period and phosphoric acid pre-etching of the bonding site. Phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel improves the effectiveness of self-etch adhesive systems. Inadvertent contact of phosphoric acid on dentin appears to reduce the ability of self-etch adhesives to effectively bond resin composite materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Composites based on cellulose fiber nonwovens and a water-soluble polymer 2. Strength-deformation characteristics of the composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpakovska, D.; Kalnins, M.

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between the strength-deformation properties and certain structural characteristics (volume content of polymer and voids, orientation of fibers) of composites prepared by impregnation of cellulose fiber nonwovens (CFNs) with poly(vinyl alcohol) water solutions is discussed. With growth in the volume fraction of polymer to 0.25-0.30, the tensile elastic modulus and ultimate strength of the composites increase compared with those of CFN. As a consequence of enhanced adhesion among the cellulose fibers, the relative values of tensile strength and elastic modulus in the main orientation direction of the fibers is higher than in the perpendicular one. Therefore, with increasing content of polymer in the composite, its degree of anisotropy diminishes significantly. The punching strength almost linearly correlates with the tensile strength. The breaking strain in tension increases considerably with growing content of polymer, but the tearing strength changes only slightly.

  8. Coupling Effect of Intruding Water and Inherent Gas on Coal Strength Based on the Improved (Mohr-Coulomb Failure Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available When employing hydraulic processes to increase gas drainage efficiency in underground coal mines, coal seams become a three-phase medium, containing water intruding into the coal pores with the inherent occurrence of gas. This can change the stress state of the coal and cause instability. This work studied the mechanical properties of coal containing water and gas and derived an appropriate failure criterion. Based on mixture theory of unsaturated porous media, the effective stress of coal, considering the interaction of water and gas, was analyzed, and the failure criterion established by combining this with the Mohr–Coulomb criterion. By introducing the stress factor of matrix suction and using fitted curves of experimentally determined matrix suction and moisture content, the relationships between coal strength, gas pressure, and moisture content were determined. To verify the established strength theory, a series of triaxial compression strength tests of coal containing water and gas were carried out on samples taken from the Songzao, Pingdingshan, and Tashan mines in China. The experimental results correlated well with the theoretical predictions. The results showed a linear decrease in the peak strength of coal with increasing gas pressure and an exponential reduction in peak strength with increasing moisture content. The strength theory of coal containing water and gas can become an important part of multiphase medium damage theory.

  9. Effect of 180 days of water storage on the transverse strength of acetal resin denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Ayla; Ozkan, Yasemin Kulak; Arda, Tugberk; Akalin, Buket

    2010-01-01

    Acetal resin has been used as an alternative denture base and clasp material since 1986. The manufacturers claim that acetal resin has superior physical properties when compared to conventional denture base acrylic resins. Limited information is available about transverse strengths of acetal resin. The purpose of this investigation was to compare transverse strengths of pink and white acetal resins to transverse strengths of conventional heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resin in increasing durations of water storage. A transverse strength test was performed in accordance with International Standards Organization (ISO) specification No 1567. Twenty 65 x 10 x 2.5 mm(3) specimens of each resin were prepared; five specimens of each resin group were subjected to three-point bending test after 50 hours, 30 days, 60 days, and 180 days of water storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Experimental groups' transverse strengths were compared by three-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests. Transverse strength of PMMA denture base material was found to be in accordance with the requirements of ISO specification No 1567. Transverse strengths of white and pink acetal resin could not be calculated in this study, as white and pink acetal resin specimens did not break at the maximum applied force in the three-point bending test. Flexural strength of acetal resin was found to be within the ISO specification limits. As the water storage time increased, the deflection values of PMMA showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both the white and pink acetal resin showed significant increase in deflection as the water storage time was increased from 50 hours to 180 days (p resin suffered from permanent deformation, but did not break in the three-point bending test. Acetal resin showed significant increase in deflection as the water storage time was increased from 50 hours to 180 days. All materials tested demonstrated deflection values in compliance with ISO

  10. Biotic indices for assessing the status of coastal waters: a review of strengths and weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Alcoverro, Teresa; Romero, Javier

    2010-05-01

    Biotic indices have become key assessment tools in most recent national and trans-national policies aimed at improving the quality of coastal waters and the integrity of their associated ecosystems. In this study we analyzed 90 published biotic indices, classified them into four types, and analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of each type in relation to the requirements of these policies. We identified three main type-specific weaknesses. First, the problems of applicability, due to practical and conceptual difficulties, which affect most indices related to ecosystem function. Second, the failure of many indices based on structural attributes of the community (e.g. taxonomic composition) to link deterioration with causative stressors, or to provide an early-detection capacity. Third, the poor relevance to the ecological integrity of indices based on attributes at the sub-individual level (e.g. multi-biomarkers). Additionally, most indices still fail on two further aspects: the broad-scale applicability and the definition of reference conditions. Nowadays, the most promising approach seems to be the aggregation of indices with complementary strengths, and obtained from different biological communities.

  11. Potential Water Reuse for High Strength Fruit and Vegetable Processor Wastewater with an MBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Adam W; Zytner, Richard G; Chang, Sheng

      High strength food processing wastewater from two processing plants was studied to determine the effectiveness of an aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) to reduce BOD, TSS and nutrients below municipal sewer discharge limits. The MBR comprised a 20 L lab-scale reactor combined with a flat sheet, ultrafiltration membrane module. The parameters studied included the operational flux, solids and hydraulic retention times and recirculation ratio with regards to nitrification/denitrification. The MBR system provided excellent removal efficiency at 97% COD, 99% BOD, 99.9% TSS, 90% TKN, and 60% TP for both processing plants, which eliminated the surcharges, allowing the firms to stay competitive. Effluent reuse tests showed that activated carbon proved effective in removing color from the MBR permeate, while UV treatment was able to achieve a 5 log reduction in bacteriophage. Overall, these treatment successes show the potential for water reuse in the agrifood sector.

  12. Optimum Mix for Pervious Geopolymer Concrete (GEOCRETE Based on Water Permeability and Compressive Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Arafa Salaheddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC consumes considerable natural resources and energy, and it also affects the emission of a significant quantity of CO2 in the atmosphere. This pervious geopolymer concrete study aims to explore an alternative binder without OPC. Pervious geopolymer concretes were prepared from fly ash (FA, sodium silicate (NaSiO3, sodium hydroxide (NaOH solution, and coarse aggregate (CA. The effects of pervious geopolymer concrete parameters that affect water permeability and compressive strength are evaluated. The FA to CA ratios of 1:6, 1:7,1:8, and 1:9 by weight, CA sizes of 5–10, 10–14, and 14–20 mm, constant NaSiO3/NaOH ratio of 2.5, alkaline liquid to fly ash (AL/FA ratios of 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6, and NaOH concentrations of 8, 10, and 12 M were the pervious geopolymer concrete mix proportions. The curing temperature of 80 °C for 24 h was used. The results showed that a pervious geopolymer concrete with CA of 10 mm achieved water permeability of 2.3 cm/s and compressive strength of 20 MPa with AL/FA ratio of 0.5, NaOH concentration of 10 M, and FA:CA of 1:7. GEOCRETE is indicated to have better engineering properties than does pervious concrete that is made of ordinary Portland cement.

  13. Effect of water storage on resin-dentin bond strengths formed by different bonding approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on resin-dentin bond strengths [µTBS] using different adhesive bonding approaches. Materials and Methods: Flat superficial dentin surfaces of 24 extracted human third molars were exposed and polished to create a standardized smear layer. The teeth were randomly distributed into four different groups: Three-step etch-and-rinse (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE - SBMP, two-step etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond 2, 3 M ESPE - SB; two-step self-etch (AdheSE, Ivoclar/Vivadent - AD; and self-etch 1 step (Adper Prompt L-Pop, 3M ESPE - LP. Following the adhesive application (n = 6, resin composite was incrementally applied (Filtek™ Supreme XT - 3 M ESPE in order to obtain bonded sticks, with a cross-sectioned area of 0.81 mm 2 . The bonded sticks were randomly divided and assigned to be tested after one day [OD] (n 30 or six months [6 M] of water storage [6 M] (n = 30. Results: Two-way ANOVA and Tukey′s test showed that none of the adhesives showed degradation after 6 M. SB achieved the highest µTBS both in the [OD] (49.13 MPa and [6M] (40.27 MPa. Despite the highest values in both time evaluations, the µTBS of SB significantly reduced after 6M. LP showed the lowest µTBS in both periods of evaluation (18.35 and 18.34 MPa. Conclusions: Although a significant degradation was only observed for SB, this was the adhesive that showed the highest µTBS after 6 M of water storage.

  14. The impact of water content and ionic diffusion on the uniaxial compressive strength of shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talal AL-Bazali

    2013-12-01

    Finally, the impact of ionic diffusion on the compressive strength of shale was carried out in the absence of both chemical osmosis and capillary forces. Results show that the invasion of sodium and calcium ions into shale reduced its compressive strength considerably while the invasion of potassium ions enhanced its compressive strength.

  15. Colloid transport in unsaturated porous media: the role of water content and ionic strength on particle straining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Walker, Sharon L

    2008-02-19

    Packed column and mathematical modeling studies were conducted to explore the influence of water saturation, pore-water ionic strength, and grain size on the transport of latex microspheres (1.1 microm) in porous media. Experiments were carried out under chemically unfavorable conditions for colloid attachment to both solid-water interfaces (SWI) and air-water interfaces (AWI) using negatively charged and hydrophilic colloids and modifying the solution chemistry with a bicarbonate buffer to pH 10. Interaction energy calculations and complementary batch experiments were conducted and demonstrated that partitioning of colloids to the SWI and AWI was insignificant across the range of the ionic strengths considered. The breakthrough curve and final deposition profile were measured in each experiment indicating colloid retention was highly dependent on the suspension ionic strength, water content, and sand grain size. In contrast to conventional filtration theory, most colloids were found deposited close to the column inlet, and hyper-exponential deposition profiles were observed. A mathematical model, accounting for time- and depth-dependent straining, produced a reasonably good fit for both the breakthrough curves and final deposition profiles. Experimental and modeling results suggest that straining--the retention of colloids in low velocity regions of porous media such as grain junctions--was the primary mechanism of colloid retention under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The extent of stagnant regions of flow within the pore structure is enhanced with decreasing water content, leading to a greater amount of retention. Ionic strength also contributes to straining, because the number of colloids that are held in the secondary energy minimum increases with ionic strength. These weakly associated colloids are prone to be translated to stagnation regions formed at grain-grain junctions, the solid-water-air triple point, and dead-end pores and then becoming

  16. Polymeric films as a promising carrier for bioadhesive drug delivery: Development, characterization and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Bassi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioadhesive films using tamarind seed polysaccharide were prepared for the treatment of candida vaginitis using nystatin as the model drug. Films were prepared by solvent casting method. A 32 factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables (polymer and plasticizer concentration on a range of dependent variables namely mechanical, swelling, interfacial, and bioadhesive properties through response surface methodological approach, using Design Expert® software. Formulation composition that provided the most desired and optimized results was selected using desirability approach. Nystatin was solubilized using Tween 60 and was incorporated into the selected film. Drug solubilization and dispersion were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The optimized film released 73.92 ± 2.54% of nystatin at the end of 8 h in simulated vaginal fluid and the release data showed best fit to Korsmeyer–Peppas model with R2 of 0.9990 and the release mechanism to be super case-II. The optimized film also showed appropriate anti candida activity through appearance of zone of inhibition during antifungal activity testing study.

  17. Pharmacokinetics study of bio-adhesive tablet of Panax notoginseng saponins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Hanzhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Panax notoginseng saponin (PNS is the main active gradient of Chinese traditional medicine Panax notoginseng. Although its prominent therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated by various researchers, the broader application is restricted by the low bioavailability of PNS. This article aims to discuss PNS's plasma pharmacokinetics after oral administration of bio-adhesive tablet of PNS to beagle dogs and improve its bioavailability in comparison with normal tablet. The bio-adhesive tablet was prepared according to our previous patent, using chitosan as main excipient. A simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS combined with solid-phase extraction (SPE method for the analysis of PNS in dog's plasma was developed in our previous study, and was validated to apply in the pharmacokinetics study in this work. Three ingredients: Notoginsenoside R1 (R1, Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1 and Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1 (Figure 1, were chosen as indicators of PNS to analyze it in vivo. Statistically significant increase (P

  18. Preparation and evaluation of bioadhesive benzocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Lee, Jin-Woo; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Chi H

    2003-07-09

    This study was performed to develop new enhanced anesthetic benzocaine gels with a suitable bioadhesive property for local anesthetic effects. As the concentration of benzocaine in the HPMC gels increased up to 15%, the permeation of drug increased, thereafter slightly increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 11.29 kcal/mol. Bioadhesive forces were also measured. The permeation rate of drug through the skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants or fatty acids. Among the enhancers used, diethylene glycol showed the most enhancing effects. Analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. According to the rat tail-flick test, the value of AUEC (0 - 360min) of 15% benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol was 4662 +/- 200 s min, while that of gels without diethylene glycol was 3353 +/- 132 s min, showing about 1.39-fold increase in analgesic activity. Fifteen percentage of benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol showed the most enhanced, prolonged analgesic effects, showing the maximum anesthetic effects at 240 min, while the gels without diethylene glycol showed maximum effect at 180 min.

  19. Use of Novel Surfaces to Reduce Bioadhesion on Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Snails can sense surfaces and change mucus properties: Cross: 73% reduction Engineer Research and...100 120 140 160 180 MES TFE Si Wafer C o n ta c t a n g le ( d e g re e s ) Deinoized water Carboxymethylcellulose Snail Mucus Teflon 0 20 40 60 80...efficacy • Conclusions • Future Directions 2 Engineer Research and Development Center • Problem: invasive species stowaways  Snails , plant

  20. Some difficulties and inconsistencies when using habit strength and reasoned action variables in models of metered household water conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Bradley S; Martin, John F; Pearce, Meryl; Willis, Eileen

    2013-01-30

    Research employing household water consumption data has sought to test models of water demand and conservation using variables from attitude theory. A significant, albeit unrecognised, challenge has been that attitude models describe individual-level motivations while consumption data is recorded at the household level thereby creating inconsistency between units of theory and measurement. This study employs structural equation modelling and moderated regression techniques to addresses the level of analysis problem, and tests hypotheses by isolating effects on water conservation in single-person households. Furthermore, the results question the explanatory utility of habit strength, perceived behavioural control, and intentions for understanding metered water conservation in single-person households. For example, evidence that intentions predict water conservation or that they interact with habit strength in single-person households was contrary to theoretical expectations. On the other hand, habit strength, self-reports of past water conservation, and perceived behavioural control were good predictors of intentions to conserve water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined strength exercises on dry land and in the water to improve swimming parameters of athletes with paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skucas, Kestutis; Pokvytyte, Vaida

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present research was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of combined dry land strength and resistance swimming training for increasing upper body strength, swimming performance and stroking parameters in swimmers with paraplegia and to determine correlation between these parameters. The preliminary, the second (after 4 weeks), the third (after 8 weeks) and the last (after 12 weeks) testing were performed. The measurements consisted of the following assessments: the assessment of isometric strength in dry land (tension force), the assessment of swimming performance and stroke parameters during 50-m backstroke, the assessment of strength during tethered swimming (tension force). Sixteen swimmers with paraplegia after complete spinal cord injury in thoracic and lumbar lesion participated in the investigation. Subjects with paraplegia represent the experimental and control groups. The participants of the experimental group had five training sessions per week, two hours per training session on dry land (two times per week) and in the water (three times per week). The subjects of the control group had five swimming training sessions per week for two hours each. The strength, performance and stroke characteristics of the experimental group reveal differences among pre-test, after month, after two months and post-test values. The strength, performance and stroke characteristics of the control group did not change after a month, after two months and after the experiment. The coefficient of determination of the experimental group revealed a positive correlation (r2=0.67) between 50-m result and the number of strokes, between the force tension in water and in dry land (r2=0.5), between the number of strokes and the force tension in water (r2=0.53). This study indicated that the swimmers with paraplegia involved in 12 weeks combined strength on dry land and resistance training in the water program improved strength, swimming performance and stroke parameters in

  2. The influence of recycled expanded polystyrene (EPS) on concrete properties: Influence on flexural strength, water absorption and shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsalah, Jamaleddin; Al-Sahli, Yosra; Akish, Ahmed; Saad, Omar; Hakemi, Abdurrahman

    2013-12-01

    Expanded polystyrene waste in a granular form was used as a lightweight aggregate in order to produce lightweight concretë Lightweight EPS concrete composites were produced by replacing the coarse aggregate, either partially or fully with equal volume of EPS aggregates. The coarse aggregate replacements levels used were 25, 50, 75, and 100%, which corresponded to (9.20, 18.40, 27.60, and 36.8%) from total volume. The investigation is directed towards the development and performance evaluation of the concrete composites containing EPS aggregates, without addition of either bonding additives, or super-plasticizers on some concrete properties such as flexure strength, water absorption and change in length (or shrinkage). Experimental results showed that a density reduction of 12% caused flexure strength to decrease by 25.3% at a replacement level of 25% EPS. However, the reduction percentage strongly depends upon the replacement level of EPS granules. Moreover, the lower strength concretes showed a higher water absorption values compared to higher strength concrete, i.e., increasing the volume percentage of EPS increases the water absorption as well as the negative strain (shrinkage). The negative strain was higher at concretes of lower density (containing a high amount of EPS aggregate). The water to cement ratio of EPS aggregate concrete is found to be slightly lower than that of conventional concrete.

  3. Calculating the strength of water pipes for their rehabilitation with the application of polymer hoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primin, Oleg

    2017-10-01

    Such factors as: the growing deterioration and unsatisfactory technical condition of the pipes of water supply and wastewater disposal networks in Russian cities and other inhabited localities, as well as limited (under the conditions of Russian housing and utilities sector reforming) funding of pipeline renovation and rehabilitation have considerably aggravated the problem of pipe reliability provision. These factors make pipe renovation and rehabilitation quite a topical issue.A very promising trend in the field of pipeline construction and renovation named “trenchless technologies” has been commonly used in the world in recent years. As a result of this, a wide choice of different construction materials used for pipe rehabilitation appeared in the market. Under the conditions of densely built-up urban areas, these methods are of great current interest for city utilities. Quite different pipe renovation methods are used currently but the most popular method comprises the application of a flexible polymeric hose that makes it possible to form a new composite pipe inside the old one. The wall thickness of such a hose is among the important factors that have an impact on the cost and efficiency of pipe renovation methods based on the application of flexible polymeric hoses. The hose wall thickness is determined on the basis of calculating the “soil – old pipe – hose” system in view of its static stability. The article describes the technology for the trenchless rehabilitation of water pipes and the strength calculation method for a “pipe – polymeric hose” double-layer structure.

  4. Facile synthesis of high strength hot-water wood extract films with oxygen-barrier performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ge-Gu; Fu, Gen-Que; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Gong, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Ya-Shuai; Peng, Feng; Yao, Chun-Li; Sun, Run-Cang

    2017-01-01

    Biobased nanocomposite films for food packaging with high mechanical strength and good oxygen-barrier performance were developed using a hot-water wood extract (HWE). In this work, a facile approach to produce HWE/montmorillonite (MMT) based nanocomposite films with excellent physical properties is described. The focus of this study was to determine the effects of the MMT content on the structure and mechanical properties of nanocomposites and the effects of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on the physical properties of the HWE-MMT films. The experimental results suggested that the intercalation of HWE and CMC in montmorillonite could produce compact, robust films with a nacre-like structure and multifunctional characteristics. This results of this study showed that the mechanical properties of the film designated FCMC0.05 (91.5 MPa) were dramatically enhanced because the proportion of HWE, MMT and CMC was 1:1.5:0.05. In addition, the optimized films exhibited an oxygen permeability below 2.0 cm3 μm/day·m2·kPa, as well as good thermal stability due to the small amount of CMC. These results provide a comprehensive understanding for further development of high-performance nanocomposites which are based on natural polymers (HWE) and assembled layered clays (MMT). These films offer great potential in the field of sustainable packaging.

  5. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prahara E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  6. Isolation of Sulphate Reduction Bacteria (SRB to Improve Compress Strength and Water Penetration of Bio-Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alshalif A. Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to isolate sulphate reduction bacteria (SRB from acid mire water collected at Sg Pelepah Kota Tinggi, Johor Malaysia. The isolation process was conducted in high alkaline and anaerobic conditions to sustain the bacteria in concrete environment. Properties tests such as compressive strength and water penetration were conducted. The result showed that optimal growth condition of sulphate reduction bacteria is pH 9-10. It was also observed that the bacteria is a coccus shape after gram staining process. The bacteria was used after 10 days of culturing prior to growth curve measurement. The liquid culture containing sulphate reduction bacteria were used at 1%, 3% and 5% as replacement ratio of water content. Concrete specimens were cured in the air conditions for 7, 14 and 28 days. Maximum increment on compressive strength was 13.0% and decrement in water penetration was 8.5% occurred with 5% of SRB. The enhancement in compressive strength and water penetration performance was due to calcium precipitation within concrete pores. Image of scanning electronic microscopy (SEM showed bacteria sustained and survived in concrete environment by reducing diameter of pores in concrete specimens.

  7. Analysis of the physical properties of trehalose-water-lithium iodide based on the bond strength coordination number fluctuation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahara; Jean L Ndeugueu; Masaru Aniya

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of trehalose-water-lithium iodide system has been investigated by the mean of the Bond Strength Coordination Number Fluctuation (BSCNF) model. The result indicates that by increasing the trehalose content, maintaining the content of LiI constant, the fragility decreases due to the increase of the connectivity between the structural units. Our analysis suggests also that the fragility of the system is controlled by the amount of water in the composition. By increasing the water content, the total bond strength decreases and its fluctuation increases, resulting in the increase of the fragility. Based on the analysis of the obtained parameters of the BSCNF model, a physical interpretation of the VFT parameters reported in a previous study has been given. (author)

  8. Effect of HPMC and mannitol on drug release and bioadhesion behavior of buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride: In-vitro and in-vivo pharmacokinetic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Jaipal, A.; Pandey, M.M.; Charde, S.Y.; Raut, P.P.; Prasanth, K.V.; Prasad, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of orally compromised therapeutic drug molecules to the systemic circulation via buccal route has gained a significant interest in recent past. Bioadhesive polymers play a major role in designing such buccal dosage forms, as they help in adhesion of designed delivery system to mucosal membrane and also prolong release of drug from delivery system. In the present study, HPMC (release retarding polymer) and mannitol (diluent and pore former) were used to prepare bioadhesive and control...

  9. Design and evaluation of a bioadhesive film for transdermal delivery of propranolol hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Bazigha K Abdul; Aziz, Uday S; Sarheed, Omar; Rasool, Alaa A Abdul

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a suitable trans-dermal delivery system for propranolol hydrochloride (PPL) via employing chitosan as a film former. Drug concentration uniformity, thickness, moisture uptake capacity and skin bioadhesion of the films were characterized. The effects of chitosan and PPL concentration and different penetration enhancers on the release and permeation profiles from the films were investigated. Skin irritation of the candidate film was evaluated. Chitosan film (PPL 2 mg cm(-2), chitosan 2%, m/m, cineol 10%, m/m) was found nonirritant and achieved 88.2% release after 8 hours in phosphate buffer. Significant high (p < 0.001) permeation of PPL through rat skin was obtained using this film compared to the film without enhancer (about 8 times enhancement factor), making it a promising trans-dermal delivery system for PPL.

  10. Formulation and in vitro characterization of ciprofloxacin floating and bioadhesive extended-release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Tavakoli, N; Roozbahani, F

    2006-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is mainly absorbed in the proximal areas of the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of our study was production of floating-bioadhesive tablets to lengthen the stay of drug in its absorption area. Effervescent tablets were made using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), polyacrylic acid (AA), polymetacrylic acid (MAA), citric acid, and sodium bicarbonate. Tablets with 5% effervescent base had longer lag time than 10%. The type of polymer had no significant effect on the floating lag time. All tablets floated atop the medium for 23-24 hr. Increasing CMC caused higher mucoadhesion than AA (p < 0.05). All formulations showed a Higuchi, non-Fickian release mechanism. Tablets with 10% effervescent base, 80% CMC/20% HPMC, or 80% AA /20% MAA seemed desirable.

  11. Effect of long-term water aging on microtensile bond strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of one total-etch and four self-etching adhesives to dentin. The adhesive materials were: one total-etch adhesive (Admira Bond) and four self-etch adhesives (Clearfil S tri Bond, Hybrid Bond, Futurabond NR, Adhe SE). Freshly extracted human third molar teeth were used. For each tooth, dentin was exposed on the occlusal surface by cutting with an Isomet saw and the remaining part was mounted in a plastic ring using dental stone. After adhesive application, a composite resin (Grandio) was placed in 5-6 mm height to form a crown segment. For each tested adhesive, two test procedures (n=6 teeth) were carried out. Procedure A: the teeth were stored in water for 24 hours, and then sectioned longitudinally, buccolingually and mesiodistally to get rectangular beams of 1 +/- 0.1 mm thickness on which a micro-tensile test was carried out. Procedure B: The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 3 years before sectioning and microtensile testing. During microtensile testing the beams were placed in a universal testing machine and load was applied at cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. For the 24-hour water storage groups, there was no significant difference in the bond strength between the different adhesives. After 3 years of water storage, the bond strength of all self-etch adhesives was significantly reduced compared to the control groups (24 hours). In contrast, the bond strength of Admira Bond was not significantly reduced.

  12. Laboratory determination of the infrared band strengths of pyrene frozen in water ice: Implications for the composition of interstellar ices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E. E. [New York Center for Astrobiology and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Gudipati, M. S.; Werner, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Boogert, A. C. A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Mail Code 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lignell, H. [Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2025 (United States); Allamandola, L. J. [Space Science Division, Mail Stop 245-6, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Stapelfeldt, K. R., E-mail: hardee@rpi.edu, E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10%-20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O ices. The D{sub 2}O mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H{sub 2}O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 μm. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet band strengths, and we find that they are generally ∼50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5-8 μm spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 μm CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5%-9% of the cosmic carbon budget and account for 2%-9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5-8 μm region.

  13. Laboratory Determination of the Infrared Band Strengths of Pyrene Frozen in Water Ice: Implications for the Composition of Interstellar Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.E.; Gudipati, M.S.; Boogert, A.C.A.; Lignell, H.; Allamandola, L.J.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Werner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometers) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10 to 20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H2O and deuterium oxide ices. The deuterium oxide mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H2O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 micrometers. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet (UV) band strengths, and we find that they are generally approximately 50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. (2011) based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. (2008) to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5 to 8 micrometer spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 micrometer CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5 to 9% of the cosmic carbon budget, and account for 2 to 9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5 to 8 micrometer region.

  14. Effects of warm air drying on water sorption, solubility, and adhesive strength of simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Alessandra; Wambier, Leticia; Malaquias, Tamirez; Wambier, Denise S; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of the temperature of air used for solvent evaporation on water sorption, solubility, and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives. Four commercial simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB]; Te Econom [TE]; XP Bond [XP] and Ambar [AM]) were selected. Disk-shaped specimens were prepared by dispensing the uncured resin into a mold (5.8 mm x 0.8 mm). Solvent evaporation was performed using a warm (60°C) or cold (20°C) air stream for 40 s. After desiccation, the cured specimens were weighed and then stored in distilled water for evaluation of the water diffusion kinetics over a 28-day period. For the UTS measurement, hourglass-shaped specimens of adhesives were prepared and tested in tension. The data from each test were evaluated with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a confidence level of 95%. Water sorption and solubility varied significantly between materials, but no significant difference was observed between warm and cold conditions (p > 0.05). TE and AM showed the lowest water sorption and solubility (p < 0.05). For SB, TE, and XP, the use of a warm air stream resulted in higher ultimate tensile strength (p < 0.05) in both experimental conditions. The water sorption and solubility of the materials seem to be more influenced by their composition than by the temperature used for solvent evaporation. For some adhesives, the use of a warm air stream can yield higher ultimate tensile strength.

  15. Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report: thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼ φ 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated

  16. OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) design report, Rev. 2 October 31, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.; Pfeiffer, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are planned to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼φ30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, data reduction, and test matrix are the subject of the first portion of this report. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The introduction of a thermal gradient across the crust is thought to be important for these tests because of uncertainty in the magnitude of the thermal stresses and thus their relative

  17. OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) design report, Rev. 2 October 31, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.; Pfeiffer, P. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are planned to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, data reduction, and test matrix are the subject of the first portion of this report. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The introduction of a thermal gradient across the crust is thought to be important for these tests because of uncertainty in the magnitude of the thermal stresses and thus their

  18. An Experimental Study on the Water-Induced Strength Reduction in Zigong Argillaceous Siltstone with Different Degree of Weathering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-chuan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The water-softening property of soft rocks is a key problem in geotechnical engineering. A typical red-bed soft rock (the Zigong argillaceous siltstones with different weathering degree is selected as an example to study the water-softening property and the influence of degree of weathering. A series of mechanical and microstructure tests are carried out to analyze the weathering characteristics and mechanism of the Zigong argillaceous siltstones. The results of mechanical experiments reveal that the water content and the weathering degree of rock specimens both have a weakening effect on the compressive and shear strengths. According to the results of present microstructure tests, the mechanical properties of the Zigong argillaceous siltstones are closely correlated with their physical properties, including internal microstructure and material composition for highly weathered rocks or moderately weathered rocks (in both natural and saturation conditions. Finally, experimental results indicate that the changes of microstructure and internal materials are two main factors that influence rock strength parameters after contacting with water and that these properties reflect the rock weathering degree. In a word, when red-bed soft rocks are encountered in geotechnical engineering, special attention should be paid to presence of water.

  19. Effect of varying water-to-powder ratios and ultrasonic placement on the compressive strength of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Fatima B; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Gunday, Mahir; Dummer, Paul M H

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) when mixed with 2 different water-to-powder (WP) proportions using either hand or ultrasonic placement. Tooth-colored ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and white MTA Angelus (Angelus Soluçoes Odontologicas, Londrina, Brazil) were investigated. One gram of each MTA powder was mixed with either 0.34 or 0.40 g distilled water. The 4 groups were further divided into 2 groups of 5 specimens for each of the following techniques: conventional (ie, hand placement) and placement using indirect ultrasonic activation for 30 seconds. All specimens were subjected to compressive strength testing after 4 days. The results were statistically analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance and Tukey Honestly Significant Difference tests at a significance level of P MTA (84.17 ± 22.68) were significantly greater than those of MTA Angelus (47.71 ± 14.29) (P MTA specimens that were mixed in the 0.34 WP ratio, and then the samples were placed with ultrasonic activation (mean = 91.35 MPa). The lowest values were recorded for MTA Angelus samples that were mixed in the 0.40 WP ratio, and the specimens were placed without ultrasonic activation (mean = 36.36 MPa). Ultrasonic activation had no significant difference in terms of compressive strength. When using ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus, higher WP ratios resulted in lower compressive strength values. Ultrasonication had no significant effect on the compressive strength of the material regardless of the WP ratio that was used. Therefore, adherence to the manufacturer's recommended WP ratio when preparing MTA for use in dental applications is advised. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel for reduction of alveolar osteitis incidence: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Reza Kalantar Motamedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alveolar osteitis (AO creates severe and self-limiting pain, which needs to be treated with several postoperative visits, leading to increases in patient′s morbidity and costs. Hence, the most basic and best treatment could be prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of bioadhesive chlorhexidine (CHX gel in reducing AO occurrence with published studies. Materials and Methods: Medline/PubMed, Scopus, EBSCO, Ovid and Cochrane central registry for control trial were searched up to 28 February 2014 using "alveolar osteitis" and "chlorhexidine" as key words for systematic review and meta-analysis. Inclusion criteria were prospective and randomized controlled trials (RCTs published on this topic. From the chosen studies, the eligible articles were reviewed. Data were analyzed using Review Manager 5.2 software. Results: Out of 43 studies, seven eligible trials with 593 participants were selected. Bioadhesive 0.2% CHX gel prevented approximately 72% of AO (Odd ratio (OR = 0.28, 95% confidence Interval (CI: 0.18-0.44; P < 0.001. Conclusion: Bioadhesive 0.2% CHX gel may be effective as a post-medication to reduce incidence of AO.

  1. Governance Strengths and Weaknesses to implement the Marine Strategy Framework Directive in European Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freire-Gibb, L. Carlos; Koss, Rebecca; Piotr, Margonski

    2014-01-01

    addresses the Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) of the current European marine governance structures and its relationship to implement the MSFD. Results of the SWOT analysis were acquired through a combination of approaches with MSFD experts and stakeholders including: 30 face......-to-face interviews, an online survey with 264 stakeholder respondents and focus groups within each European marine region. The SWOT analysis concurrently identifies common strengths and weakness and key governance issues for implementing the MSFD for European marine regions. This paper forms one assessment within...

  2. Effect of powder-to-water ratio on the push-out bond strength of white mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Uzunoğlu, Emel

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of powder-to-water ratio on the retention characteristics of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; Angelus, Londrina, Pr, Brazil) over time. One hundred and thirty-five root dentin slices from extracted single-rooted human mandibular premolar teeth were instrumented to achieve a diameter of 1.3 mm. Three MTA groups were prepared using 4:1, 3:1, and 2:1 powder-to-water ratios. The samples were stored for 96 h and 7 and 28 days at 37°C. The push-out bond strengths were measured using an Instron testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (anova) with Bonferroni correction. There was a statistically significant difference between the experimental groups at the 96-h and 7-day study periods (P = 0.002). At 96 h, the materials prepared at 2:1 ratio had the lowest bond strength than the samples prepared at the other two ratios (P < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the findings at 96-h and 28-day study periods for 2:1 and 4:1 ratios. The highest bond strength value was found at 28 days of exposure (P < 0.001). The powder-to-water ratio significantly interfered with the bond strength properties of white MTA. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Investigating the characteristic strength of flocs formed from crude and purified Hibiscus extracts in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alfred Ndahi; Bridgeman, John

    2016-10-15

    The growth, breakage and re-growth of flocs formed using crude and purified seed extracts of Okra (OK), Sabdariffa (SB) and Kenaf (KE) as coagulants and coagulant aids was assessed. The results showed floc size increased from 300 μm when aluminium sulphate (AS) was used as a coagulant to between 696 μm and 722 μm with the addition of 50 mg/l of OK, KE and SB crude samples as coagulant aids. Similarly, an increase in floc size was observed when each of the purified proteins was used as coagulant aid at doses of between 0.123 and 0.74 mg/l. The largest floc sizes of 741 μm, 460 μm and 571 μm were obtained with a 0.123 mg/l dose of purified Okra protein (POP), purified Sabdariffa (PSP) and purified Kenaf (PKP) respectively. Further coagulant aid addition from 0.123 to 0.74 mg/l resulted in a decrease in floc size and strength in POP and PSP. However, an increase in floc strength and reduced d50 size was observed in PKP at a dose of 0.74 mg/l. Flocs produced when using purified and crude extract samples as coagulant aids exhibited high recovery factors and strength. However, flocs exhibited greater recovery post-breakage when the extracts were used as a primary coagulant. It was observed that the combination of purified proteins and AS improved floc size, strength and recovery factors. Therefore, the applications of Hibiscus seeds in either crude or purified form increases floc growth, strength, recoverability and can also reduce the cost associated with the import of AS in developing countries. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Water and saliva contamination effect on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ascensión; Mena, Ana; Ortiz, Antonio José; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of water and saliva contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system. Brackets were bonded to 240 bovine lower incisors divided into 12 groups. Four bonding procedures were evaluated, including (1) TSEP/Transbond XT, (2) TMIP/ Transbond XT, (3) TSEP/Transbond PLUS, and (4) TMIP/Transbond PLUS, each under three different bonding conditions: without contamination, with water contamination, and with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant on the teeth was quantified with the use of image analyzing equipment. Without contamination, bond strengths for the four procedures were similar (P > .05). TSEP/Tranbond PLUS and TMIP/Transbond PLUS left significantly less adhesive on the teeth after debonding than TSEP/Transbond XT and TMIP/Transbond XT (P .017), although for TMIP/ Transbond XT, both variables showed significant reductions after contamination (P < .017). TSEP/Transbond PLUS, TMIP/Transbond PLUS, and TSEP/Transbond XT showed greater tolerance to wet conditions than was shown by TMIP/Transbond XT.

  5. The effect of active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery on subsequent knee extension and flexion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Strejcová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recovery is an important aspect of every physical activity. Many athletes train hard without giving their body time to recover which can lead to overreaching, burnout or poor performance. Currently cold-water immersion recovery and active recovery have emerged as some of the most popular interventions enabling faster recovery. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of three kinds of recovery (active recovery, cold water immersion, passive recovery on medium-term knee strength in the extension and flexion. METHODS: Fourteen athletes at the age of 26.6 ± 4.4 years performed, in a random cross-over design, 3 sessions with 3 repeated medium-term isokinetic tests. The effect of active recovery, passive rest and cold water immersion were assessed by 3 × 3 (time × recovery repeated-measure ANOVA, respectively. The dependent variables were – peak torque, total work and average power. RESULTS: We found significantly lower absolute differences between the first and third trial in knee extension for peak torque after the active recovery (↑ 0.9 N × m than after the cold water immersion (↓ 14.6 N × m or the passive recovery (↓ 13.9 N × m. The decrease of the average power was significantly lower differences after the active recovery (↓ 5 W than after the cold water immersion (↓ 23.7 W or passive recovery (↓ 25.9 W. The changes in total work were not significant. We did not found any changes in the isokinetic strength for the knee flexors after different kinds of recovery. Maximal heart rate (HRmax was significantly higher during the active recovery than during the cold water immersion and the passive recovery (173 ± 14, 166 ± 14 and 167 ± 14 rpm. We have found significant differences in the average heart rates (HRavg during active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery (124 ± 8, 97 ± 9 and 107 ± 12 rpm. CONCLUSION: We found the positive effect of the active recovery on the subsequent medium-term performance for

  6. The effect of relative humidity on tensile strength and water vapor permeability in chitosan, fish gelatin and transglutaminase edible films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia ALVARADO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractComposite films of chitosan, fish gelatin and microbial transglutaminase (MTgase were developed. Films were produced by the casting method and dried at room temperature for 30 h, conditioned for 7 days at 30 °C at a relative humidity (RH from 11 to 90%, and characterized. Chitosan:fish gelatin films in different proportions (100:0, 75:25, 50:50 with MTgase, were subjected to tensile properties and water vapor transmission (WVT testing. The results showed that tensile strength decreased with an increase in RH and with an increase in gelatin content. Percent of elongation also increased with increasing RH and gelatin concentration. Water vapor transmission showed an increase proportional to an increase in RH with the presence of gelatin being unfavorable for reducing WVT. Results in this work allowed studying the effect of relative humidity on tensile and water vapor properties of chitosan and fish gelatin films.

  7. Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Llion A; Raastad, Truls; Markworth, James F; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid M; Shield, Anthony; Cameron-Smith, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2015-09-15

    We investigated functional, morphological and molecular adaptations to strength training exercise and cold water immersion (CWI) through two separate studies. In one study, 21 physically active men strength trained for 12 weeks (2 days per week), with either 10 min of CWI or active recovery (ACT) after each training session. Strength and muscle mass increased more in the ACT group than in the CWI group (P work (19%), type II muscle fibre cross-sectional area (17%) and the number of myonuclei per fibre (26%) increased in the ACT group (all P < 0.05), but not the CWI group. In another study, nine active men performed a bout of single-leg strength exercises on separate days, followed by CWI or ACT. Muscle biopsies were collected before and 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise. The number of satellite cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (10-30%) and paired box protein (Pax7) (20-50%) increased 24-48 h after exercise with ACT. The number of NCAM(+) satellite cells increased 48 h after exercise with CWI. NCAM(+) - and Pax7(+) -positive satellite cell numbers were greater after ACT than after CWI (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase(Thr421/Ser424) increased after exercise in both conditions but was greater after ACT (P < 0.05). These data suggest that CWI attenuates the acute changes in satellite cell numbers and activity of kinases that regulate muscle hypertrophy, which may translate to smaller long-term training gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. The use of CWI as a regular post-exercise recovery strategy should be reconsidered. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  8. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from low strength waste water at low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Wang, Y.; Kampman, C.; Zeeman, G.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Direct anaerobic treatment of municipal waste waters allows for energy recovery in the form of biogas. A further decrease in the energy requirement for waste water treatment can be achieved by removing the ammonium in the anaerobic effluent with an autotrophic process, such as anammox. Until now,

  9. Effect of thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage on retentive strengths of luting cements for zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Vicky; Kampf, Gabriel; Stender, Elmar; Willershausen, Brita; Ernst, Claus-Peter

    2015-06-01

    Bond stability between zirconia crowns and luting cement and between cement and dentin is a main concern; however, only limited evidence is available as to its longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the retentive strengths of 7 self-adhesive cements (RelyX Unicem Aplicap, RelyX Unicem Clicker, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, iCEM, Maxcem Elite, Bifix SE, SpeedCem), 2 adhesive cements with self-etch primers (Panavia 21, SEcure), 1 glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem), 1 resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Meron Plus), and 1 zinc phosphate cement for luting zirconia crowns (LAVA) to extracted teeth after thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage. Two-hundred-forty extracted human molars (2 treatments; n=10 per cement) were prepared in a standardized manner. All cements were used according to the manufacturers' recommendations. The intaglios of the crowns were treated with airborne-particle abrasion. After thermocycling (×5000, 5°C/55°C) with or without 1 year of water storage, the cemented ceramic crowns were removed by using a Zwick universal testing device. Statistical analyses were done with the Wilcoxon rank sum and the 2-independent-samples Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Median retentive strengths [MPa] for specimens thermocycled only/thermocycled with 1 year of water storage were as follows: Panavia 21: 1.7/2.5, SEcure: 3.0/3.0, RelyX Unicem Aplicap: 3.1/3.4, RelyX Unicem Clicker: 4.1/4.2, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix: 3.8/3.1, iCEM: 2.3/2.7, Maxcem Elite: 3.0/3.2, Bifix SE: 1.7/1.7, SpeedCem: 1.3/1.6, Meron Plus: 3.1/2.7, Ketac Cem: 1.4/1.4, and zinc phosphate cement: 1.1/1.6. Statistically significant differences were found only among specimens thermocycled only or thermocycled with 1-year water storage (P<.001). Significant differences in retentive strengths were observed among cements after thermocycling only or thermocycling with 1 year of water storage, but not for the effect of the additional 1 year of water storage. Copyright © 2015

  10. Evaluation of Epirubicin in Thermogelling and Bioadhesive Liquid and Solid Suppository Formulations for Rectal Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature sensitive Pluronic (Plu and pH-sensitive polyacrylic acid (PAA were successfully mixed in different ratios to form in situ gelling formulations for colon cancer therapy. The major formulations were prepared as the liquid and solid suppository dosage forms. Epirubicin (Epi was chosen as a model anticancer drug. In vitro characterization and in vivo pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of Epi in six Plu/PAA formulations were evaluated. Our in vitro data indicate that Epi in Plu 14%/PAA 0.75% of both solid and liquid suppositories possess significant cytotoxicity, strong bioadhesive force, long-term appropriate suppository base, sustained release, and high accumulation of Epi in rat rectums. These solid and liquid suppositories were retained in the upper rectum of Sprague-Dawley (SD rats for at least 12 h. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study using SD rats showed that after rectal administration of solid and liquid suppositories, Epi had greater area under the curve and higher relative bioavailability than in a rectal solution. These solid and liquid suppositories exhibited remarkable inhibition on the tumor growth of CT26 bearing Balb/c mice in vivo. Our findings suggest that in situ thermogelling and mucoadhesive suppositories demonstrate a great potential as colon anticancer delivery systems for protracted release of chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. Preparation of Bioadhesive Phosphorescent Particles and Their Use as Markers for Video-oculography of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Tomomi; Takeuchi, Eri; Katoh, Akira; Yamaki, Tsutomu; Uchida, Masaki; Natsume, Hideshi

    2016-03-20

    To develop a bioadhesive phosphorescent particle that can be used as a marker in video-oculography to assess eye movements in the dark without drug treatment. The marker was prepared by spray-coating a Sr4Al14O25: Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphor with a carboxyvinyl polymer. The morphologic, luminescent and adhesive properties were assessed. The dynamic properties of VOR measured by the marker were compared with those obtained by tracking the pupil under miotic treatment. Non-aggregated and non-fused particles having diameters of about 5µm could be prepared by polymeric coating of the phosphor, resulting in particles small enough not to restrict eye movement. Although the phosphorescent of the particles decreased with increasing thickness of the coating layer, the coated particles were detectable in the dark for at least 60 min. The thicker the coating layer was, the higher the adhesiveness of the particles obtained. The particles having the thickest coating layer were retained on the corneal surface during VOR measurement and thus performed well as a marker in video-oculography. The dynamic properties of VOR measured by the marker were essentially identical to those obtained by tracking the pupil under miotic treatment. Our marker will contribute to understanding the mechanisms underlying motor learning.

  12. Modeling the diffusion of Na+ in compacted water-saturated Na-bentonite as a function of pore water ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments of bentonite barrier performance in waste management scenarios require an accurate description of the diffusion of water and solutes through the barrier. A two-compartment macropore/nanopore model (on which smectite interlayer nanopores are treated as a distinct compartment of the overall pore space) was applied to describe the diffusion of 22 Na + in compacted, water-saturated Na-bentonites and then compared with the well-known surface diffusion model. The two-compartment model successfully predicted the observed weak ionic strength dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient (D a ) of Na + , whereas the surface diffusion model did not, thus confirming previous research indicating the strong influence of interlayer nanopores on the properties of smectite clay barriers. Since bentonite mechanical properties and pore water chemistry have been described successfully with two-compartment models, the results in the present study represent an important contribution toward the construction of a comprehensive two-compartment model of compacted bentonite barriers

  13. Implementation of strength pareto evolutionary algorithm II in the multiobjective burnable poison placement optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharari, Rahman [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursalehi, Navid; Abbasi, Mohmmadreza; Aghale, Mahdi [Nuclear Engineering Dept, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II), is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP) optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (K-e-f-f) for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor.

  14. Implementation of strength pareto evolutionary algorithm II in the multiobjective burnable poison placement optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharari, Rahman; Poursalehi, Navid; Abbasi, Mohmmadreza; Aghale, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II), is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP) optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (K-e-f-f) for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

  15. Evaluation of compressive strength and water absorption of soil-cement bricks manufactured with addition of pet (polyethylene terephthalate wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alexandre Paschoalin Filho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the evaluation of compressive strength of soil-cement bricks obtained by the inclusion in their mixture of PET flakes through mineral water bottles grinding. The Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET has been characterized by its difficulty of disaggregation in nature, requiring a long period for this. On the other hand, with the increase in civil construction activities the demand for raw material also increases, causing considerable environmental impacts. In this context, the objective of this research is to propose a simple methodology, preventing its dumping and accumulation in irregular areas, and reducing the demand of raw materials by the civil construction industry. The results showed that compressive strengths obtained were lower than recommended by NBR 8491 (Associação Brasileira de Normas Técnicas [ABNT], 2012b at seven days of curing time. However, they may be used as an alternative solution in masonry works in order to not submit themselves to great loads or structural functions. The studied bricks also presented water absorption near to recommended values by NBR 8491 (ABNT, 2012b. Manufacturing costs were also determined for this brick, comparing it with the costs of other brick types. Each brick withdrew from circulation approximately 300 g of PET waste. Thus, for an area of 1 m2 the studied bricks can promote the withdrawal of approximately 180 beverage bottles of 2 L capacity.

  16. Implementation of Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II in the Multiobjective Burnable Poison Placement Optimization of KWU Pressurized Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Gharari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II, is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (Keff for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor.

  17. Chemical Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of an Ester Prodrug of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Poly (Ethylene Oxide) Matrices: Effect of Formulation Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumma, Sridhar; Majumdar, Soumyajit; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Gul, Waseem; Repka, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to stabilize a novel hemiglutarate ester prodrug of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymeric matrices produced by hot-melt fabrication, for systemic delivery of THC through the oral transmucosal route. For this purpose, the influence of pH modifiers and antioxidants employed as stabilizing agents in these matrices was investigated. Based on the stability studies, two final formulations were made, and the stability of the active was assessed in these systems. In addition, the bioadhesive properties of PEO matrices were studied as a function of bioadhesive polymer type and concentration, contact time, drug loading and wetting time. Of all of the polymers investigated, bioadhesion was highest with Carbopol® 971p. Bioadhesion increased with bioadhesive polymer concentration and wetting time to a certain level beyond which there was no further contribution. Both the contact time and drug loading influenced the bioadhesion. Severe degradation of the prodrug was observed during storage, even at room temperature (75% at the end of 3 months). Incorporation of the stabilizing agents in the PEO matrices reduced the degradation of the prodrug considerably. Citric acid was the most effective of all of the pH modifiers studied. Among the various antioxidants utilized, degradation was observed least in presence of BHT and ascorbic acid. Only 7.6% and 8.2% of prodrug degraded in these matrices, respectively, as compared to the PEO only matrices (59.4%) at the end of 3 months at 25 °C/60% RH. The prodrug was very stable in both of the final formulations at the end of the 3 months at 40 °C/75% RH. PMID:18652884

  18. Modified water-cement ratio law for compressive strength of rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work examines the modification of age long water – cement ratio law of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete to cater for concrete with Rice Husk Ash (RHA). Chemical analysis of RHA produced under controlled temperature of 600°C was carried out. A total of one hundred and fifty (150) RHA concrete cubes at ...

  19. A New Concept of Ultrafiltration Fouling Control : Backwashing with Low Ionic Strength Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) is a proven technology in water treatment nowadays. However, fouling remains a major challenge in the operation of UF, especially in regard to colloidal NOM fouling. In general, a number of colloidal NOM fouling mechanisms may occur, such as adsorption, gel formation. Colloidal

  20. Evaluation of Cedrela gum as a binder and bioadhesive component in ibuprofen tablet formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ayodele Odeniyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The compressional, mechanical and bioadhesive properties of tablet formulations incorporating a new gum obtained from the incised trunk of the Cedrela odorata tree were evaluated and compared with those containing hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC. Compressional properties were evaluated using Hausner's ratio, Carr's Index, the angle of repose, and Heckel, Kawakita and Gurnham plots. Ibuprofen tablets were prepared using the wet granulation method. Bioadhesive studies were carried out using the rotating cylinder method in either phosphate buffer pH 6.8 or 0.1 M hydrochloric acid media. The gum is a low viscosity polymer (48 cPs, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the presence of a hydroxyl group. Py and Pk values, which are measures of plasticity, showed the gum to be significantly (pPropriedades de compressão, mecânicas e de formulações de comprimidos bioadesivos, que incorporam nova goma de mascar obtidas a partir de incisão de tronco da árvore de Cedrela odorata, foram avaliadas e comparadas com aquelas contendo hidroxipropilmetilcelulose (HPMC. Propriedades de compressão foram avaliadas usando a razão de Hausner, índice de Carr, ângulo de repouso e os gráficos de Heckel, Kawakita e Gurnham. Prepararam-se comprimidos de ibuprofeno utilizando o método de granulação a úmido. Realizaram-se estudos de bioadesividade utilizando o método de cilindro rotativo em tampão fosfato pH 6,8, ou meio ácido com 0,1 M de ácido clorídrico. A goma é um polímero de baixa viscosidade (48 cPs e a espectroscopia no infravermelho por Transformada de Fourier (FTIR revelou a presença de um grupo hidroxila. Valores de Py e Pk, que são medidas de plasticidade, mostraram que a goma é significativamente (p <0,05 mais plástica do que HPMC e que a plasticidade aumenta com a concentração de polímero. Todas as formulações de comprimidos mostraram-se não-friáveis (<1,0% e aquelas contendo a goma apresentaram maior resist

  1. The effects of water-based exercise in combination with blood flow restriction on strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joamira P; Neto, Gabriel R; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Bemben, Michael G; Laurentino, Gilberto C; Batista, Gilmário; Silva, Júlio C G; Freitas, Eduardo D S; Sousa, Maria S C

    2015-12-01

    Water-based exercise and low-intensity exercise in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR) are two methods that have independently been shown to improve muscle strength in those of advancing age. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of water-based exercise in combination with BFR on maximum dynamic strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women. Twenty-eight women underwent an 8-week water-based exercise program. The participants were randomly allocated to one of the three groups: (a) water exercise only, (b) water exercise + BFR, or (c) a non-exercise control group. Functional capacity (chair stand test, timed up and go test, gait speed, and dynamic balance) and strength testing were tested before and after the 8-week aquatic exercise program. The main findings were as follows: (1) water-based exercise in combination with BFR significantly increased the lower limb maximum strength which was not observed with water-based exercise alone and (2) water-based exercise, regardless of the application of BFR, increased functional performance measured by the timed up and go test over a control group. Although we used a healthy population in the current study, these findings may have important implications for those who may be contraindicated to using traditional resistance exercise. Future research should explore this promising modality in these clinical populations.

  2. Influence of Palm Oil Fuel Ash and W/B Ratios on Compressive Strength, Water Permeability, and Chloride Resistance of Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Sanawung, Wachilakorn; Cheewaket, Tieng; Tangchirapat, Weerachart; Jaturapitakkul, Chai

    2017-01-01

    This research studies the effects of W/B ratios and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on compressive strength, water permeability, and chloride resistance of concrete. POFA was ground until the particles retained on sieve number 325 were less than 5% by weight. POFA was used to partially replace OPC at rates of 15, 25, and 35% by weight of binder. The water to binder (W/B) ratios of concrete were 0.40 and 0.50. The compressive strength, water permeability, and chloride resistance of concrete were inve...

  3. Properties of bioadhesive ketoprofen liquid suppositories: preparation, determination of gelation temperature, viscosity studies and evaluation of mechanical properties using texture analyzer by 4 × 4 factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgüney, Işık; Kardhiqi, Anita

    2014-12-01

    Development and evaluation of thermosensitive and bioadhesive liquid suppositories containing ketoprofen (KP). This study was conducted to develope thermosensitive and bioadhesive liquid suppositories containing KP using poloxamer and different bioadhesive polymers and to investigate their gelation temperature, viscosity and mechanical properties. Bioadhesive liquid suppositories were prepared by the cold method using poloxamer 407 (P 407), Poloxamer 188 (P 188) and various amounts of different bioadhesive polymers. Their gelation temperatures, viscosity values and mechanical properties were determined using texture analyzer by 4 × 4 factorial design. It was seen that in presence of KP, gelation temperature of formulation P 407/P 188 (4/20%) significantly decreased from 64 to 37.1 °C. It is to be noted that addition of increasing concentrations of bioadhesive polymers lowered gelation temperature and its decrease was highest with addition of Carbopol 934 P (C). Results of texture profile analysis (TPA) showed that formulations containing C have significantly higher hardness and adhesiveness values than other bioadhesive formulations. According to TPA, gel structure of liquid suppository formulation F5, containing P 407/P 188/KP/C (4/20/2.5/0.8%), exhibited the greatest hardness, compressibilty, adhesiveness and besides greatest viscosity. According to mechanical properties and viscosity values, it was concluded that F5 could be a promising formulation.

  4. Determining the precipitable water vapor thresholds under different rainfall strengths in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ta-Kang; Shih, Hsuan-Chang; Wang, Chuan-Sheng; Choy, Suelynn; Chen, Chieh-Hung; Hong, Jing-Shan

    2018-02-01

    Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) plays an important role for weather forecasting. It is helpful in evaluating the changes of the weather system via observing the distribution of water vapor. The ability of calculating PWV from Global Positioning System (GPS) signals is useful to understand the special weather phenomenon. In this study, 95 ground-based GPS and rainfall stations in Taiwan were utilized from 2006 to 2012 to analyze the relationship between PWV and rainfall. The PWV data were classified into four classes (no, light, moderate and heavy rainfall), and the vertical gradients of the PWV were obtained and the variations of the PWV were analyzed. The results indicated that as the GPS elevation increased every 100 m, the PWV values decreased by 9.5 mm, 11.0 mm, 12.2 mm and 12.3 mm during the no, light, moderate and heavy rainfall conditions, respectively. After applying correction using the vertical gradients mentioned above, the average PWV thresholds were 41.8 mm, 52.9 mm, 62.5 mm and 64.4 mm under the no, light, moderate and heavy rainfall conditions, respectively. This study offers another type of empirical threshold to assist the rainfall prediction and can be used to distinguish the rainfall features between different areas in Taiwan.

  5. Water deprivation decreases strength in fast twitch muscle in contrast to slow twitch muscle in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, F; Grosset, J F; Canon, F

    2018-04-06

    The effects of dehydration on muscle performance in human are still contradictory, notably regarding muscle force. The effect of water deprivation (WD) on mechanical properties of skeletal muscle, and more precisely its impact on slow and fast muscles remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time whether WD leads to changes in contractile properties of skeletal muscle and whether these changes were muscle type-specific. Sixteen-week old male rats were assigned to either a control group (C) with water, or a 96 h WD group. At the end of the period, twitch and tetanus properties as well as biochemical and structural analysis were performed on soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Absolute twitch (Pt) and tetanic (P 0 ) tension were respectively 17% and 14% lower in EDL of WD rats as compared with C rats, whereas unexpected increases of 43% and 25% were observed in SOL. Tensions normalized with respect to muscle mass were not affected by WD in EDL whereas they were increased by more than 40% in SOL. A 96 h WD period leads to a decrease in fibre cross-sectional area and absolute myofibrillar content only in EDL. It is hypothesized that differences in the results between slow and fast muscles may come from i) a muscle type-specific effect of WD on protein balance, EDL showing a greater myofibrillar protein breakdown, and ii) a greater sensitivity to osmolality changes induced by WD in EDL than in SOL. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of a chondroitin sulfate bioadhesive to enhance integration of bioglass particles for repairing critical-size bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuqing; Guo, Qiongyu; Shores, Lucas S; Aly, Ahmed; Ramakrishnan, Meera; Kim, Ga Hye; Lu, Qiaozhi; Su, Lixin; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of autogenous or allograft bones by artificial graft materials represents a growing area of interest in current bone repair strategies. Bioactive ceramics in particulate form, such as Bioglass (BG) 45S5, stimulate bone mineralization comparable to autologous bone grafts, but have potential issues of particle migration and inflammation. The aim of this study was to employ a chondroitin sulfate- (CS-) based bioadhesive to improve integration of the bioglass (NovaBone Putty) to prevent particle migration and promote bone regeneration. This BG-CS composite can encapsulate bone marrow (BM) to form a mechanically stable construct, BG-CS-BM. Rheological characterization confirmed the formation of CS-BM hydrogel by reacting the CS-based bioadhesive with the BM. Compared to the bioglass, the BG-CS-BM composite demonstrated a superior capacity to maintain construct integrity under both aqueous and turbulent environments in vitro. After implantation for 4 weeks in a critical-size distal femoral bone defect in a rabbit model, there was significantly greater bone growth in BG-CS-BM as compared to bioglass-only and the empty control. Unlike BG-CS-BM, BG-CS recruited BM in situ from the bone defect. BG-CS demonstrated a similar effect in bone formation but at a comparatively slower rate than BG-CS-BM over 6-weeks' implantation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Composites based on cellulose fiber nonwovens and a water soluble polymer 1. Structure and strength-deformation characteristics of cellulose fiber nonwovens and structural characteristics of the composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpakovska, D.; Kalnins, M.

    2012-03-01

    The results of a study on the strength-deformation characteristics (tensile elastic modulus, ultimate strength, elongation at break, and punching and tearing strengths) of two kinds of cellulose fiber nonwovens (CFNs) with dissimilar void content and different geometrical parameters of cellulose fibers are discussed. The structural characteristics of composites prepared by impregnation with poly(vinyl alcohol) water solutions are analyzed, too. Composites with volume fractions of polymer up to 0.4% and volume fractions of voids up to 0.3% were prepared. Filling of voids by the polymer occurred without significant changes in the structure of CFNs. The fraction of closed voids increased with polymer content.

  8. Improving the de-agglomeration and dissolution of a poorly water soluble drug by decreasing the agglomerate strength of the cohesive powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahham, Ayman; Stewart, Peter J; Das, Shyamal C

    2013-11-30

    Influence of ternary, poorly water-soluble components on the agglomerate strength of cohesive indomethacin mixtures during dissolution was studied to explore the relationship between agglomerate strength and extent of de-agglomeration and dissolution of indomethacin (Ind). Dissolution profiles of Ind from 20% Ind-lactose binary mixtures, and ternary mixtures containing additional dibasic calcium phosphate (1% or 10%; DCP), calcium sulphate (10%) and talc (10%) were determined. Agglomerate strength distributions were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation of particle size, work of cohesion and packing fraction distributions. The agglomerate strength of Ind decreased from 1.19 MPa for the binary Ind mixture to 0.84 MPa for 1DCP:20Ind mixture and to 0.42 MPa for 1DCP:2Ind mixture. Both extent of de-agglomeration, demonstrated by the concentration of the dispersed indomethacin distribution, and extent of dispersion, demonstrated by the particle size of the dispersed indomethacin, were in descending order of 1DCP:2Ind>1DCP:20Ind>binary Ind. The addition of calcium sulphate dihydrate and talc also reduced the agglomerate strength and improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of indomethacin. While not definitively causal, the improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug by poorly water soluble components was related to the agglomerate strength of the cohesive matrix during dissolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of water immersion delivery on the strength of pelvic floor muscle and pelvic floor disorders during postpartum period: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Mei; Tang, Fei; Tang, Wan; Yin, Heng; Sun, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Yin; Zhou, Yong; Luo, Yan; Li, Lu-Man; Tan, Zhi-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Water immersion delivery is a non-pharmacological approach to ease labor pain. This paper aims to investigate the effect of water immersion delivery on increasing strength of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) and relieving pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) during postpartum period. A total of 2749 vaginal-delivery primiparas in postpartum 6-8 weeks were selected as research objects. Based on the modes of delivery, 600 patients were assigned into water immersion delivery group, 2149 were assigned into conventional delivery group. The scales of PFM strength and pelvic organ prolapsed (POP) were determined by specially trained personnel using digital palpation, and the symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) were investigated by questionnaire survey. The weak PFM strength was improved by doing Kegel exercise at home for 6-8 weeks. We found that ①The rate of episiotomy in water immersion delivery group was 77.50% (465/600), which was lower than that in conventional delivery group (84.69%, 1820/2149) (P  .05); ④The rates of vaginal wall prolapsed and uterus prolapsed were 29.83% (179/600) and 2.83% (17/600) in water immersion delivery group and 30.95% (665/2149) and 4.37% (94/2149) in the conventional delivery group, wherein the intergroup difference was not significant (P > .05). ⑤After Kegel exercise, the strength of PFM was promoted (P < .01). Water immersion delivery has been proved to a beneficial alternative method for conventional delivery method. This delivery mode is associated with fewer episiotomy rate, and avoiding episiotomy is beneficial for maintaining PFM strength of women in postpartum 6-8 weeks. The strength of PFM during postpartum period can be improved by doing Kegel exercise at home.

  10. Advanced preformulation investigations for the development of a lead intravaginal bioadhesive polymeric device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndesendo, Valence M K; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Buchmann, Eckhart; Kumar, Pradeep; Khan, Riaz A; Meyer, Leith C R

    2012-03-01

    To screen various polymers through extensive preformulation investigations to ultimately obtain a lead polymer combination for designing a desirable Intravaginal Bioadhesive Polymeric Device (IBPD). Hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers (18) at different combinations were blended and compressed into 62 caplet-shaped devices at 5 tons, one of the hydrophilic polymers being a modified synthetic product of polyamide 6,10 ((m)PA 6,10). Two sets of crosslinked PAA-based caplets comprising either allyl-sucrose (AS-PAA) or allyl-penta-erythritol (APE-PAA) were explored. The devices were subjected to in-process validation tests and thereafter to preformulation investigational screening {equilibrium swelling ratio (ESR) being a screening parameter}, using a One Variable at a Time (OVAT) approach. Molecular mechanics force field simulations in both vacuum and solvated systems were conducted to investigate the influence of addition and subsequent replacement of a polymer(s) on the spatial disposition and energetic profile of the sterically constrained and geometrically optimized multi-polymeric complex, IBPD. The developed devices were sufficiently strong (longitudinal crushing force:286 ± 0.01 N; mean weight:600 ± 0.48 mg; mean friability:0.31 ± 0.04%). Through OVAT approach, 15 lead formulations with minimal swelling tendencies (ESRs ranging from 0.011 to 0.084) were obtained out of 62 formulations. F62 {i.e. (m)PA 6,10, (150 mg), PLGA (400 mg), EC (200 mg), PVA (25 mg) and PAA (25 mg)} displayed minimal swelling tendency and therefore the highest stability. The highly stabilized conformation of the final in silico IBPD polymeric assembly PLGA-(m)PA6,10-PVA-PAA-EC corroborated the experimental results in terms of preformulation investigational screening using the OVAT approach. The results obtained suggest that (m)PA 6,10, PLGA, EC, PVA and PAA at an appropriate weight ratio may be suitable for development of an IBPD.

  11. Comparison of the flexural strength of polymethyl methacrylate resin reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and processed by conventional water bath technique and microwave polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuwar, Surabhi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Agrawal, Benaiffer; Choure, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    This in vitro study was done to compare the flexural strength of polymethyl methacrylate resin reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and processed by conventional water bath technique and using microwave energy. A total of 180 acrylic resin specimens measuring 65 mm × 10 mm × 2.5 mm were fabricated, with conventional water bath groups and microwave group having ninety specimens each. Ninety specimens were divided into thirty specimens as control and subgroups containing 0.025% MWCNTs and 0.050% MWCNTs with thirty specimens each. The specimens were tested for flexural strength by three-point bending test on universal testing machine. The statistical analysis was done using Student's t -test and one-way analysis of variance, and the intercomparison between each group was done using Tukey's post hoc analysis. The mean flexural strength of specimens cured by water bath technique was 95.563 MPa and microwave technique was 118.416 MPa. Control Group B possesses highly significant increase in flexural strength than Control Group A with P < 0.01. Unpaired Student's t -test showed that Subgroup B1 and Subgroup B2 possess highly significant increase in flexural strength than Subgroup A1and Subgroup A2. Heat polymerized denture base resin with and without reinforcement of MWCNTs and polymerized by microwave technique possess higher flexural strength than heat polymerized fiber reinforced denture resin polymerized by water bath technique. MWCNTs could be used as an effective reinforcement material for denture base resin polymerized by either water bath technique or microwave energy.

  12. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  13. Adhesive strength of pilot-scale-produced water-washed cottonseed meal in comparison with a synthetic glue for non-structural interior application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water-washed cottonseed meal (WCSM) has been shown the potential to be used as renewable and environment-friendly adhesives in wood products industry. Recently, WCSM was produced from defatted meal in a pilot scale. In this study, we initially compare the adhesive strength of the pilot-produced WCSM...

  14. Non-equilibrium hydrogen exchange for determination of H-bond strength and water accessibility in solid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohe, Kristof; Movellan, Kumar Tekwani; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate measurement of non-equilibrium backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for solid proteins. The target of this study are the slowly exchanging residues in solid samples, which are associated with stable secondary-structural elements of proteins. These hydrogen exchange processes escape methods measuring equilibrium exchange rates of faster processes. The method was applied to a micro-crystalline preparation of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin. Therefore, from a 100% back-exchanged micro-crystalline protein preparation, the supernatant buffer was exchanged by a partially deuterated buffer to reach a final protonation level of approximately 20% before packing the sample in a 1.3 mm rotor. Tracking of the HN peak intensities for 2 weeks reports on site-specific hydrogen bond strength and also likely reflects water accessibility in a qualitative manner. H/D exchange can be directly determined for hydrogen-bonded amides using 1 H detection under fast magic angle spinning. This approach complements existing methods and provides the means to elucidate interesting site-specific characteristics for protein functionality in the solid state.

  15. Abrupt changes in Antarctic Intermediate Water strength lead Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation changes during the last deglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, R.; Marcantonio, F.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    depth that is greater than that of modern AAIW flow, may actually be recording shoaling of the southern-sourced mid-depth circulation instead of variations of AAIW. At the beginning of the YD, Bølling-Allerød, and H1 in the Florida Straits, changing ɛNd values lead benthic foraminiferal δ18O changes in 26JPC and 31JPC,which have previously been interpreted as reflecting AMOC variability [3]. This suggests that variations in the strength of AAIW lead significant changes in AMOC across abrupt climate events across the deglacial, providing evidence that the trigger for abrupt climate change may reside in the Southern Hemisphere. Additional high-resolution ɛNd results from VM12-107 will be presented in an effort to better constrain the role of intermediate waters during the last deglaction. [1] Came et al. (2008) Paleoceanography 23, PA1217 [2] Pahnke et al. (2008) Nature Geoscience 1, 870-874 [3] Lynch-Stieglitz et al. (2011) Paleoceanography 26, PA1205

  16. The comparison of cold-water immersion and cold air therapy on maximal cycling performance and recovery markers following strength exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane J. Hayter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI and cold air therapy (CAT on maximal cycling performance (i.e. anaerobic power and markers of muscle damage following a strength training session. Twenty endurance-trained but strength-untrained male (n = 10 and female (n = 10 participants were randomised into either: CWI (15 min in 14 °C water to iliac crest or CAT (15 min in 14 °C air immediately following strength training (i.e. 3 sets of leg press, leg extensions and leg curls at 6 repetition maximum, respectively. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and fatigue, isometric knee extensor and flexor torque and cycling anaerobic power were measured prior to, immediately after and at 24 (T24, 48 (T48 and 72 (T72 h post-strength exercises. No significant differences were found between treatments for any of the measured variables (p > 0.05. However, trends suggested recovery was greater in CWI than CAT for cycling anaerobic power at T24 (10% ± 2%, ES = 0.90, T48 (8% ± 2%, ES = 0.64 and T72 (8% ± 7%, ES = 0.76. The findings suggest the combination of hydrostatic pressure and cold temperature may be favourable for recovery from strength training rather than cold temperature alone.

  17. Specificity of machine, barbell, and water-filled log bench press resistance training on measures of strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, George A; McCurdy, Kevin W; Ernest, James M; Doscher, Michael W; Walters, Stacey D

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 10 weeks of resistance training with an isotonic bench press machine and 2 types of free-weight bench press exercises on several measures bench press strength. Specificity was investigated by comparing the ability to transfer strength gained from a type of training that differed from the mode of testing. Forty-nine men participated in the study. The subjects completed a pretest on the machine (MB), barbell (BB), isokinetic (IB), and log (LB) bench press to determine baseline strength and completed 10 weeks of training on the MB, BB, or LB. The 3 groups were tested to see whether differential training effects occurred from pre- to posttest scores on the BB, MB, LB, and peak force on the IB. By multivariate analysis, the trial-by-group interaction was not statistically significant. The multivariate and subsequent univariate analyses of variance tests indicated statistically significant effects from pre- to posttest for peak force on the IB test and the BB, MB, and LB. Correlations among the strength tests were high (0.92 > or = r or = r < pr = 0.83). Mean 3 repetition maximum MB strength was 8% higher than BB strength, which was 3% higher than LB strength, indicating differences in the amount of stabilization required to control the resistance. The findings of this study showed that all 3 training groups significantly improved in strength during short-term training on the MB, BB, and LB. These data lend evidence that improved strength after training on the MB, BB, and LB equally transfers to strength gains on any of the 4 modes of testing. These results should be considered when including similar exercises varying in stability into the training program to improve strength.

  18. The effect of varied mix proportion and water-cement ratio on the compressive strength of medium grade concretepoduced from Bama gravel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Omundi

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Concrete cubes produced from Bama gravel (Category B using varied mix proportions and water-cement ratios were subjected to compressive strength and density tests at the curing ages 7, 14 and 28 days. The results indicated that the strength of 28.00Nmm-2 was recorded from the mix proportion of 1:1/2:4 and water-cement ratio of 0.55, which corresponds to a density of 2495 kgm-3. A careful inspection of the results obtained generally shows that the strenfths are inversely proportional to the fine aggregate content and water-cement ratios. It is recommended that great care should be taken while mixing the aggregate proportions of the Bama gravel in order to obtain high quality medium grade concrete for construction purposes.

  19. Bioadhesion of mussels and geckos: Molecular mechanics, surface chemistry, and nanoadhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeshin

    The adhesive strategies of living creatures are diverse, ranging from temporary to permanent adhesions with various functions such as locomotion, self-defense, communication, colony formation, and so on. The classic example of temporary adhesion is the gecko, which is known for its ability to walk along vertical and even inverted surfaces; this remarkable adhesion arises from the interfacial weak interactions of van der Waals and capillary forces. In contrast, a celerbrated example of permanent adhesion is found in marine mussels which secrete protein adhesives that function in aqueous environments without mechanical failure against turbulent conditions on the seashore. In addition, mussel adhesives stick to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces. However, most commonly used man-made adhesives lack such unique adhesion properties compared to their natural counterparts. For example, many commercial adhesives quickly lose their adhesive strength when exposed to solvents, particularly water. The first part of this thesis focused on adhesion mechanics of mussels at a single-molecule level, in which the adhesive molecule showed surprisingly strong yet reversible adhesion on inorganic surfaces but exhibited irreversible covalent bond formation on organic surfaces. Strong and reversible adhesion on mucin surfaces was found, indicating potential application for drug delivery via mucus layers. Next, inspired by the mussel's versatile adhesion on a wide variety of material surfaces, a material-independent surface modification chemistry called 'polydopamine coating' is described. This concept was subsequently adapted to develop a surface-independent polymeric primer for layer-by-layer assembly of multifunctional coatings. Finally, a new bio-hybrid adhesive 'geckel' was developed by the functional combination of adhesion strategies of geckos and mussels. The new bio-inspired adhesive and material-independent surface chemistry can revolutionize the research areas such as

  20. OECM MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 final data report, Rev. 0 February 12, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼φ30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully

  1. OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 final data report, Rev. 1 February 10, 2003.; Report, Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure; and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼φ30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF MOLDING WATER CONTENT AND LIME CONTENT ON THE STRENGTH OF STABILIZED SOIL WITH LIME AND RICE HUSK ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Setyo Muntohar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength gain of stabilized soils is not only influenced by the type and proportion of the stabilizers and its curing time, but also by the water content needed to maintain the reaction. The reaction of lime – RHA with soil is pozzolanic. Hence, the process will be subjected greatly by the amount of water to react with admixtures and the proportion of the stabilizer. This paper presents the result of a laboratory study on the unconfined compressive strength (UCS of soils stabilized with lime and RHA, compacted at the OMC, and at the dry and wet side of OMC. The amount of lime required for stabilization (LRS is determined by Eades and Grim's Method. The results showed that the water content determines the UCS characteristics of unstabilized and stabilized soils. The UCS of stabilized soils decreased with increasing molding water content, but it is still higher than of the un-stabilized soils. In general, higher lime content results to a higher UCS. The maximum strength of the stabilized soil is attained at lime/RHA ratio of 1/2. The UCS of the stabilized soil increased significantly about 7 – 9 times to the un-stabilized UCS.

  3. Development of an ex vivo retention model simulating bioadhesion in the oral cavity using human saliva and physiologically relevant irrigation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Katrine D; Sander, Camilla; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Pedersen, Anne Marie L; Jacobsen, Jette

    2013-05-20

    In recent years, there has been a particular interest in bioadhesive formulations for oromucosal drug delivery as this may promote prolonged local therapy and enhanced systemic effect. Saliva plays a vital role in oromucosal drug absorption by dissolving the drug and presenting it to the mucosal surface. However, the rheological, chemical, and interfacial properties of this complex biological fluid may strongly affect the adhesion of bioadhesive formulations. There is a need for well characterized in vitro models to assess the bioadhesive properties of oral dosage forms for administration in the oral cavity. Thus we aimed at developing an advanced ex vivo buccal retention model, with focus on choosing a physiologically relevant irrigation media closely resembling human saliva. Spray dried chitosan microparticles containing metformin hydrochloride as an example of a small hydrophilic drug, were employed as bioadhesive formulations. Chewing-stimulated human whole saliva was collected and characterized for use in retention studies in comparison with four artificial irrigation media; phosphate buffer, Saliva Orthana(®), porcine gastric mucin base media (PGM3), and xanthan gum based media (XG2). Retention of metformin, applied as spray dried microparticles on porcine buccal mucosa, greatly depended on the characteristics of the irrigation media. When rheology of the irrigation media was examined, changes in retention profiles could be interpreted, as irrigation media containing mucin and xanthan gum possessed a higher viscosity than phosphate buffer, which led to longer retention of the drug due to better hydration of the mucosa and the spray dried microparticles. Metformin retention profiles were comparable when human saliva, Saliva Orthana(®), or PGM3 were used as irrigation media. Moreover, PGM3 displayed physico-chemical properties closest to those of human saliva with regard to pH, protein content and surface tension. Saliva Orthana(®) and PGM3 are therefore

  4. Scraping and Stapling of End-Grafted DNA Chains by a Bioadhesive Spreading Vesicle to Reveal Chain Internal Friction and Topological Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Gimoon; Hisette, Marie Laure; Sun, Yuting Liang; Gisler, Thomas; Johner, Albert; Thalmann, Fabrice; Schröder, André Pierre; Marques, Carlos Manuel; Lee, Nam-Kyung

    2010-08-01

    Stained end-grafted DNA molecules about 20μm long are scraped away and stretched out by the spreading front of a bioadhesive vesicle. Tethered biotin ligands bind the vesicle bilayer to a streptavidin substrate, stapling the DNAs into frozen confinement paths. Image analysis of the stapled DNA gives access, within optical resolution, to the local stretching values of individual DNA molecules swept by the spreading front, and provides evidence of self-entanglements.

  5. Double-blind, randomized pilot study of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel in the prevention and treatment of mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Sanchez, Rosa-Maria; Pachón-Ibáñez, Jerónimo; Marín-Conde, Fátima; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis; Torres-Lagares, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    to evaluate, in an initial way, the effectiveness of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% versus placebo as a preventive and therapeutic intervention of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. In this pilot study, 7 patients (range of age: 18- 65), having histological documented diagnosis of squamous carcinoma on the head and neck region in stage III and IV, and receiving combined radiation treatment and chemotherapy (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 22, and 43 of irradiation) were studied. Simultaneously, a topical application was performed with bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% in the study group, and the placebo gel for the control group in 5 applications per day, from the time of initiation of cancer treatment to 2 weeks after completion of chemo-radiotherapy treatment (11 weeks of follow-up). The gradation of mucositis, pain, analgesic consumption, infectious complications, and treatment tolerance was measured. After 7 patients completed the protocol, any differences were observed between groups in an interval analysis. Mucositis, pain, and tolerance was similar in both groups. Our results must be interpreted with caution due to the reduced sample size, but the use of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% didn't contribute clinical improvement to the oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  6. Effect of experimental acid/base conditioner on microtensile bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to dentin after long-term water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeno, Kohyoh; Taira, Yohsuke; Ito, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    An experimental conditioner (Exp), which was an aqueous solution of 10% ascorbic acid and 5% ferric chloride, was prepared in this study. This study evaluated the effect of Exp on the microtensile bond strength between a self-curing resin and dentin after long-term water immersion. Flat human dentin surfaces were sequentially pretreated with 40% phosphoric acid, 10% sodium hypochlorite, and Exp. Surface pretreatment with an aqueous solution of 10% citric and 3% ferric chloride (10-3) was used as a control. Composite resin rods were bonded to pretreated dentin surfaces using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Microtensile bond strengths were evaluated after water immersion at 24 h, 12 months, 24 months, and 36 months. At each immersion period, the bond strength of Exp was significantly higher than that of 10-3. After 36 months, Exp showed no significant decrease in microtensile bond strength, but 10-3 showed significant reductions. Pretreatment with experimental acid/base conditioner markedly improved the bonding durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human dentin when compared against the conventional 10-3 treatment.

  7. Effect of intra-alveolar placement of 0.2% chlorhexidine bioadhesive gel on the incidence of alveolar osteitis following the extraction of mandibular third molars. A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Linares, Jordi; Hueto-Madrid, Juan-Antonio; González-Lagunas, Javier; Raspall-Martin, Guillermo; Mareque-Bueno, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar osteitis (AO) is a common complication after third molar surgery. One of the most studied agents in its prevention is chlorhexidine (CHX), which has proved to be effective. Objectives: The aim of this randomized double-blind clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy of 0.2% bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel placed intra-alveolar in the prevention of AO after the extraction of mandibular third molars and to analyze the impact of risk factors such as smoking and oral contraceptives in the development of AO. Study Design: The study was a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial performed in the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of Hospital Vall d’Hebron and was approved by the Ethics Committee. A total of 160 patients randomly received 0.2% bioadhesive gel (80 patients) or bioadhesive placebo (80 patients). Results: 0.2% bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel applied in the alveolus after third molar extraction reduced the incidence of dry socket by 22% compared to placebo with differences that were not statistically significant. Smoking and the use of oral contraceptives were not related to higher incidence of dry socket. Female patients and the difficulty of the surgery were associated with a higher incidence of AO with statistically significant differences. 0.2% bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel did not produce any of the side effects related to chlorhexidine rinses. Conclusions: A 22% reduction of the incidence of alveolar osteitis with the application of 0.2% bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel compared to placebo with differences that were not statistically significant was found in this clinical trial. The lack of adverse reactions and complications related to chlorhexidine gel supports its clinical use specially in simple extractions and adds some advantages compared to the rinses in terms of duration of the treatment and reduction of staining and taste disturbance. Key words:Alveolar osteitis, dry socket, chlorhexidine bioadhesive gel, mandibular third molar surgery. PMID

  8. OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report: thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.J.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼φ30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the

  9. OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-3 test data report: thermal Hydraulic results, Rev. 0 February 19, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼φ30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the third water ingression test, designated SSWICS-3. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR

  10. Multifunctional Mesoporous Carbon Capsules and their Robust Coatings for Encapsulation of Actives: Antimicrobial and Anti-bioadhesion Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Gargi; Mittal, Nitesh; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2017-06-14

    We present the synthesis and applications of multifunctional hollow porous carbon spheres with well-ordered pore architecture and ability to encapsulate functional nanoparticles. In the present work, the applications of hollow mesoporous carbon capsules (HMCCs) are illustrated in two different contexts. In the first approach, the hollow capsule core is used to encapsulate silver nanoparticles to impart antimicrobial characteristics. It is shown that silver-loaded HMCCs (concentration ∼100 μg/mL) inhibit the growth and multiplication of bacterial colonies of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) up to 96% and 83%, respectively. In the second part, the fabrication of hierarchical micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic coatings of HMCCs (without encapsulation with silver nanoparticles) is evaluated for anti-bioadhesion properties. Studies of protein adsorption and microorganism and platelet adhesion have shown a significant reduction (up to 100%) for the HMCC-based superhydrophobic surfaces compared with the control surfaces. Therefore, this unique architecture of HMCCs and their coatings with the ability to encapsulate functional materials make them a promising candidate for a variety of applications.

  11. Effect of surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of herbicides diuron and amitrole from water by an activated carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha-Cámara, M A; López-Ramón, M V; Alvarez-Merino, M A; Moreno-Castilla, C

    2007-01-30

    A study was conducted on the effects of carbon surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of diuron and amitrole from aqueous solutions by adsorption on an as-received and oxidized activated carbon fiber. Results obtained were explained by the surface characteristics of the adsorbents and the characteristics of the herbicide molecules. Under the experimental conditions used, diuron uptake was much higher than that of amitrole, despite its larger molecular dimensions, due to the lesser water solubility, greater hydrophobicity, and larger dipolar moment of diuron compared with amitrole. Uptake variations associated with differences in carbon surface oxidation, solution pH, and ionic strength were explained by corresponding changes in electrostatic, hydrophobic, and van der Waals interactions.

  12. Effect of Water Storage on the Micro-shear Bond Strength of Two Self-etch Adhesives to Enamel and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jaberi Ansari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the influence of storage time on micro-shear bond strength of two self-etching materials to enamel and dentin.Materials and Methods: Human third molar teeth were sectioned to 1.5 mm thick beams and randomly divided into 2 groups. In group I, SE Bond and in group II, Tri-S Bond was used to bond a composite rod (AP-X to each treated surface. Specimens were prepared according to manufacturer instructions. Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to water storage time; 1 day, 6 and 12 months. Microshear bond strengths were determined under a crosshead speed of 1mm/min using a universal testing machine and expressed in MPa. Data was statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnett post hoc test.Results: Micro-shear bond strength of two adhesives to enamel and dentin showed a slight but not significant decrease over time (P>0.5. After one day, the mean bond strength of enamel in groups I and II were 39.47 and 34.65 MPa and in dentin were 45.20 and 36.0 MPa respectively. There was no statistically significant differencebetween two materials (P=0.190, P=0.082. After six months the bond strength in group I and II was 35.93 and 35.18 MPa for enamel, and 38.27and 35.19 MPa for dentin respectively, these differences was not statistically significant (P=0.520, P=0.179.After one year, the bond strength of enamel in groups I and II, were 34.47and 29.91MPa, and in dentin were 33.86 and 32.53 MPa respectively which was not statistically significant (P=0.609, P=0.991.Conclusion: The micro-shear bond strength of both adhesives to enamel and dentin decreased slightly over time; however these decreases were not statistically significant.

  13. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P, E-mail: b-lee@nerites.com [Nerites Corporation, 505 S. Rosa Road, Suite 123, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

  14. Conscious and anaesthetised Göttingen mini-pigs as an in-vivo model for buccal absorption - pH-dependent absorption of metoprolol from bioadhesive tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Jacobsen, Jette; Andersen, Morten B

    2014-01-01

    by testing pH-dependent absorption of metoprolol from a solid dosage form. Buccal tablets buffered to pH 6.2 and pH 8.9, oral liquid and intravenous injection were tested in four conscious and anaesthetised Göttingen mini-pigs in a non-randomised cross-over study. Blood samples were collected and processed....... In conclusion, this study showed a pH-dependent absolute bioavailability of metoprolol when administrated as bioadhesive buccal tablets to anaesthetised mini-pigs. The anaesthesia was found to delay the time to reach maximal plasma concentration of metoprolol as compared to the conscious pig model when...

  15. The effects of silica fume and hydrated lime on the strength development and durability characteristics of concrete under hot water curing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is considered to be highly important for preserving continued industrial growth and human development. Concrete, being the world’s largest manufacturing material comprises cement as an essential binding component for strength development. However, excessive production of cement due to high degree of construction practices around the world frames cement as a leading pollutant of releasing significant amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere. To overcome this environmental degradation, silica fume and hydrated lime are used as partial replacements to cement. This paper begins with the examination of the partial replacement levels of hydrated lime and silica fume in concrete and their influence on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. The effect of hot water curing on concrete incorporated with both silica fume and hydrated lime is also investigated in this paper. The results reported in this paper show that the use of silica fume as a partial replacement material improved both the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete due to the formation of calcium silica hydrate crystals through the pozzolanic reaction. Although the hydrated lime did not significantly contribute in the development of strength, its presence enhanced the durability of concrete especially at long-term. The results also showed that hot water curing enhanced the strength development of concrete incorporated with silica fume due to the accelerated rate of both the hydration and pozzolanic reaction that takes place between silica fume and calcium hydroxide of the cement matrix particularly at early times. The results reported in this paper have significant contribution in the development of sustainable concrete. The paper does not only address the use of alternative binders as a partial replacement material in concrete but also suggest proper curing conditions for the proposed replacement materials. These practices

  16. Proton inventory of the water-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-acetyl-1,2,4-triazole. Examination of ionic strength effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.F.; Huskey, W.P.; Hogg, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Proton inventories of the water-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-acetyl-1,2-4-triazole have been completed under a variety of conditions. The solvent deuterium isotope effect, k/sub H 2 O/k/sub D 2 O/, determined at pH 4.7 or the equivalent point on the pD rate profile at 25 0 C by using acetic acid-acetate buffers at 1 M ionic strength was 3.18. The solvent deuterium isotope effects determined at ionic strenghs of 1 and 0.5 M by using 10 -3 M HCl (DCl) to control the pH(D) were 3.13 and 3.07, respectively. In all cases the proton inventories exhibit significant downward curvature and are, within experimental error, consistent with a cyclic transition state structure involving four water molecules. The equation k/sub n/ = k 0 (1 - n + 0.75n) describes the proton inventories where the value of the isotope fractionation factor for the four in-flight protons is 0.75. These inventories are compared to an earlier study done with no ionic strength control, and several alternative transition states are considered in detail

  17. Integrated Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC) with an anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) for low strength wastewater treatment, energy harvesting and water reclamation

    KAUST Repository

    Jimenez Sandoval, Rodrigo J.

    2013-11-01

    Shortage of potable water is a problem that affects many nations in the world and it will aggravate in a near future if pertinent actions are not carried out. Decrease in consumption, improvements in water distribution systems to avoid losses and more efficient water treatment processes are some actions that can be implemented to attack this problem. Membrane technology and biological processes are used in wastewater treatment to achieve high water quality standards. Some other technologies, besides water treatment, attempt to obtain energy from organic wastes present in water. In this study, a proof-of-concept was accomplished demonstrating that a Microbial Electrolysis Cell can be fully integrated with a Membrane Bioreactor to achieve wastewater treatment and harvest energy. Conductive hollow fiber membranes made of nickel functioned as both filter material for treated water reclamation and as a cathode to catalyze hydrogen production reaction. The produced hydrogen was subsequently converted into methane by hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Organic removal was 98.9% irrespective of operation mode. Maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate was 0.2 m3/m3d, while maximum current density achieved was 6.1 A/m2 (based on cathode surface area). Biofouling, an unavoidable phenomenon in traditional MBRs, can be minimized in this system through self-cleaning approach of hybrid membranes by hydrogen production. The increased rate of hydrogen evolution at high applied voltage (0.9 V) reduces the membrane fouling. Improvements can be done in the system to make it as a promising net energy positive technology for the low strength wastewater treatment.

  18. First-Principles Investigation on Ionization Strength, Volume Expansion, and Water Rotational Rigidity of Small Water Cluster Systems Formed around Sodium(I), Calcium(II), and Iron(II) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncoro, Handoko Setyo; Sakaue, Mamoru; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno

    2011-02-01

    Some ionic effects on small water cluster systems formed around sodium(I), calcium(II), and iron(II) cations have been investigated using the density functional theory. By assuming that the numbers of water molecules in the first and the second water layers are 6 and 12, respectively, it is shown that (i) the Ca(II) aqueous cluster shrinks and its volume becomes similar to that of a pure (H2O)18 cluster whereas the Fe(II) and Na(I) aqueous clusters expand; (ii) owing to the water dipole--dipole interactions induced by the ion in the second water layer binding, the ionization strength of the Ca(II) aqueous cluster is close to that of Fe(II) but sufficiently higher than that of Na(I); (iii) the isotropicity of s-type Ca(II) and Na(I) cation orbitals as the cause of the reduction in water rotational rigidity in the ion--water bonding has been clarified by analyzing the charge transfer and non interacting kinetic energy. By considering the three ionic effects, we predict that the Ca(II) ion is one of the more competitive water cationic impurities in the PEMFC membrane.

  19. Decreased toxicity of aluminium when the ionic strength increases in water; Blir aluminium mindre toksisk naar ionestyrken i vannet oeker?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alstad, E.W. [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper evaluates the acute mortality of fish caused by the toxicity of aluminium in water. The evaluation is based on the polymerization hypothesis. According to the author, the level of toxicity decreases when the concentration and charge of ions increase. The paper presents the preliminary results from the executed experiment. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Effects of sterilization with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma, ethylene oxide, and steam on bioadhesive properties of nylon and polyethylene lines used for stabilization of canine stifle joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatineau, Matthieu; El-Warrak, Alexander O; Bolliger, Christian; Mourez, Michael; Berthiaume, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    To compare effects of sterilization with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (HPGP), ethylene oxide, and steam on bioadhesive properties of nylon and polyethylene lines used for stabilization of canine stifle joints. Samples of a 36.3-kg test nylon leader line, 57.8-kg test nylon fishing line, and 2-mm ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were used. In this in vitro study, samples of nylon leader line, fishing line, and UHMWPE sterilized by use of HPGP, ethylene oxide, and steam or unsterilized samples were used. Bacterial adherence on unsterilized and sterilized samples was tested with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. Five samples were examined for each line type and sterilization condition, and final colony counts were obtained. Bacterial adherence was significantly affected by method of sterilization for all 3 line types. For most of the samples, bacterial adherence was similar or lower when HPGP sterilization was used, compared with results for sterilization via ethylene oxide and steam, respectively. Bacterial adherence was significantly higher for UHMWPE, compared with adherence for the nylon line, regardless of the sterilization method used. Bacterial adherence was higher for nylon fishing line than for nylon leader line for S epidermidis after ethylene oxide sterilization and for E coli after HPGP and ethylene oxide sterilization. Effects of HPGP sterilization on bioadhesive properties of nylon and polyethylene lines compared favorably with those for ethylene oxide and steam sterilization. Also, nylon line may be a more suitable material than UHMWPE for suture prostheses on the basis of bacterial adherence properties.

  1. Hydraulic continuity and biological effects of low strength very low frequency electromagnetic waves: Case of microbial biofilm growth in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Merlin; Noamen, Omri; Evelyne, Gonze; Eric, Valette; Gilles, Cauffet; Marc, Henry

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to elucidate the interactions between water, subjected to electromagnetic waves of very low frequency (VLF) (kHz) with low strength electromagnetic fields (3.5 mT inside the coils), and the development of microbial biofilms in this exposed water. Experimental results demonstrate that in water exposed to VLF electromagnetic waves, the biomass of biofilm is limited if hydraulic continuity is achieved between the electromagnetic generator and the biofilm media. The measured amount of the biofilm's biomass is approximately a factor two lower for exposed biofilm than the non-exposed biofilm. Measurements of electromagnetic fields in the air and simulations exhibit very low intensities of fields (electromagnetic generator. Exposure to electric and magnetic fields of the quoted intensities cannot explain thermal and ionizing effects on the biofilm. A variable electrical potential with a magnitude close to 20 mV was detected in the tank in hydraulic continuity with the electromagnetic generator. The application of quantum field theory may help to explain the observed effects in this case. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Down-regulation of POLYGALACTURONASE1 alters firmness, tensile strength and water loss in apple (Malus x domestica) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Ross G; Sutherland, Paul W; Johnston, Sarah L; Gunaseelan, Kularajathevan; Hallett, Ian C; Mitra, Deepali; Brummell, David A; Schröder, Roswitha; Johnston, Jason W; Schaffer, Robert J

    2012-08-02

    While there is now a significant body of research correlating apple (Malus x domestica) fruit softening with the cell wall hydrolase ENDO-POLYGALACTURONASE1 (PG1), there is currently little knowledge of its physiological effects in planta. This study examined the effect of down regulation of PG1 expression in 'Royal Gala' apples, a cultivar that typically has high levels of PG1, and softens during fruit ripening. PG1-suppressed 'Royal Gala' apples harvested from multiple seasons were firmer than controls after ripening, and intercellular adhesion was higher. Cell wall analyses indicated changes in yield and composition of pectin, and a higher molecular weight distribution of CDTA-soluble pectin. Structural analyses revealed more ruptured cells and free juice in pulled apart sections, suggesting improved integrity of intercellular connections and consequent cell rupture due to failure of the primary cell walls under stress. PG1-suppressed lines also had reduced expansion of cells in the hypodermis of ripe apples, resulting in more densely packed cells in this layer. This change in morphology appears to be linked with reduced transpirational water loss in the fruit. These findings confirm PG1's role in apple fruit softening and suggests that this is achieved in part by reducing cellular adhesion. This is consistent with previous studies carried out in strawberry but not with those performed in tomato. In apple PG1 also appears to influence other fruit texture characters such as juiciness and water loss.

  3. Compressive strength and initial water absorption rate for cement brick containing high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a substitutional material for sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Noorwirdawati; Din, Norhasmiza; Sheikh Khalid, Faisal; Shahidan, Shahiron; Radziah Abdullah, Siti; Samad, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah

    2017-11-01

    The rapid growth of today’s construction sector requires high amount of building materials. Bricks, known to have solid properties and easy to handle, which leads to the variety of materials added or replaced in its mixture. In this study, high density polyethylene (HDPE) was selected as the substitute materials in the making of bricks. The reason behind the use of HDPE is because of its recyclable properties and the recycling process that do not emit hazardous gases to the atmosphere. Other than that, the use of HDPE will help reducing the source of pollution by avoiding the millions of accumulated plastic waste in the disposal sites. Furthermore, the material has high endurance level and is weatherproof. This study was carried out on experimenting the substitute materials in the mixture of cement bricks, a component of building materials which is normally manufactured using the mixture of cement, sand and water, following a certain ratios, and left dried to produce blocks of bricks. A series of three different percentages of HDPE were used, which were 2.5%, 3.0% and 3.5%. Tests were done on the bricks, to study its compressive strength and the initial water absorption rate. Both tests were conducted on the seventh and 28th day. Based on the results acquired, for compressive strength tests on the 28th day, the use of 2.5% of HDPE shown values of 12.6 N/mm2 while the use of 3.0% of HDPE shown values of 12.5 N/mm2. Onto the next percentage, 3.5% of HDPE shown values of 12.5 N/mm2.

  4. Effect of water storage on the flexural strength of heat-cured denture base resin reinforced with stick (s glass fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Galav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flexural strength (FS of denture base resins (DBRs had been improved by reinforcing it with different glass fibers. However, a limited data are available on the effect of glass fiber reinforcement with conventional heat-cured resin after prolonged water storage. Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the reinforcing effect of novel S-glass and nylon fibers on the FS of acrylic DBRs. It also aimed to evaluate the effect of glass fiber reinforcement on the FS of acrylic DBRs after a prolonged storage in water. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty identical specimens were fabricated in specially designed molds according to the manufacturer's instructions. The three experimental groups were prepared consisting of conventional (unreinforced acrylic resin, novel S-glass fiber-reinforced and nylon fiber-reinforced acrylic resin. The specimens were fabricated in a standardized fashion for each experimental group. Each group was further subdivided into two groups on the basis of storage conditions (dry and wet. FS was tested using a three-point universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Glass fiber-reinforced group was further tested after prolonged storage in distilled water. Entered data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and least significant difference post hoc test. Results: In this study, statistically significant differences were noted in the FS of all the groups. S-glass fiber-reinforced group had highest FS compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001. Nylon fiber-reinforced group had lowest FS. All the groups stored in distilled water revealed a decrease in strength compared to those stored in dry atmosphere. Among wet specimens, those stored for 3 weeks had a significantly higher FS than those stored at one and 2 weeks (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this investigation, the FS of heat-cured acrylic DBR was improved after reinforcement with glass fibers. It can be

  5. Integrating microbial fuel cells with anaerobic acidification and forward osmosis membrane for enhancing bio-electricity and water recovery from low-strength wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinmeng; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Yuqin; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2017-03-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and forward osmosis (FO) are two emerging technologies with great potential for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. In this study, anaerobic acidification and FO membrane were simultaneously integrated into an air-cathode MFC (AAFO-MFC) for enhancing bio-electricity and water recovery from low-strength wastewater. During a long-term operation of approximately 40 days, the AAFO-MFC system achieved a continuous and relatively stable power generation, and the maximum power density reached 4.38 W/m 3 . The higher bio-electricity production in the AAFO-MFC system was mainly due to the accumulation of ethanol resulted from anaerobic acidification process and the rejection of FO membrane. In addition, a proper salinity environment in the system controlled by the addition of MF membrane enhanced the electricity production. Furthermore, the AAFO-MFC system produced a high quality effluent, with the removal rates of organic matters and total phosphorus of more than 97%. However, the nitrogen removal was limited for the lower rejection of FO membrane. The combined biofouling and inorganic fouling were responsible for the lower water flux of FO membrane, and the Desulfuromonas sp. utilized the ethanol for bio-electricity production was observed in the anode. These results substantially improve the prospects for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery, and further studies are needed to optimize the system integration and operating parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of 18-week in-season heavy-resistance and power training on throwing velocity, strength, jumping, and maximal sprint swim performance of elite male water polo players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Veliz, Rafael; Requena, Bernardo; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Newton, Robert U; Sáez de Villarreal, Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    We examined the effects of 18 weeks of strength and high-intensity training on key sport performance measures of elite male water polo (WP) players. Twenty-seven players were randomly assigned to 2 groups, control (in-water training only) and strength group, (strength training sessions [twice per week] + in-water training). In-water training was conducted 5 d·wk. Twenty-meter maximal sprint swim, maximal dynamic strength 1-repetition maximum (1RM) for upper bench press (BP) and lower full squat (FS) body, countermovement jump (CMJ), and throwing velocity were measured before and after the training. The training program included upper and lower body strength and high-intensity exercises (BP, FS, military press, pull-ups, CMJ loaded, and abs). Baseline-training results showed no significant differences between the groups in any of the variables tested. No improvement was found in the control group; however, meaningful improvement was found in all variables in the experimental group: CMJ (2.38 cm, 6.9%, effect size [ES] = 0.48), BP (9.06 kg, 10.53%, ES = 0.66), FS (11.06 kg, 14.21%, ES = 0.67), throwing velocity (1.76 km·h(-1), 2.76%, ES = 0.25), and 20-m maximal sprint swim (-0.26 seconds, 2.25%, ES = 0.29). Specific strength and high-intensity training in male WP players for 18 weeks produced a positive effect on performance qualities highly specific to WP. Therefore, we propose modifications to the current training methodology for WP players to include strength and high-intensity training for athlete preparation in this sport.

  7. Development of an ex vivo retention model simulating bioadhesion in the oral cavity using human saliva and physiologically relevant irrigation media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Katrine D.; Sander, Camilla; Baldursdottir, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a particular interest in bioadhesive formulations for oromucosal drug delivery as this may promote prolonged local therapy and enhanced systemic effect. Saliva plays a vital role in oromucosal drug absorption by dissolving the drug and presenting it to the mucosal...... in the oral cavity. Thus we aimed at developing an advanced ex vivo buccal retention model, with focus on choosing a physiologically relevant irrigation media closely resembling human saliva. Spray dried chitosan microparticles containing metformin hydrochloride as an example of a small hydrophilic drug, were...... gum possessed a higher viscosity than phosphate buffer, which led to longer retention of the drug due to better hydration of the mucosa and the spray dried microparticles. Metformin retention profiles were comparable when human saliva, Saliva Orthana(®), or PGM3 were used as irrigation media. Moreover...

  8. A Conservative Bioadhesive Approach to the Reattachment of Complicated Crown Fractures in Permanent First Molars: A Case Report with a 2-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Mirikar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a clinical report demonstrating combined restorative bioadhesive treatment and prosthetic rehabilitation of uncommon type of dental injury in an eighteen-year-old female involving crown fracture of all the permanent first molars and left upper premolars due to a bicycle riding accident. To restore the coronal fracture with invasion of biologic width, flap surgery with osteotomy and osteoplasty localized on the fractured teeth was performed, and the tooth remnant was reattached to the crown with a self-etch adhesive system. Frank pulp exposure was treated by self-etch dentin adhesive after surface disinfection prior to sealing of the wound site. At 2-year recall, the teeth continue to be aesthetically and functionally stable with a favourable pulpal and periapical environment.

  9. Dynamic bio-adhesion of polymer nanoparticles on MDCK epithelial cells and its impact on bio-membranes, endocytosis and paracytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Yuan, Lan; Dai, Wenbing; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Fang, Weigang; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-03-21

    Nowadays, concern about the use of nanotechnology for biomedical application is unprecedentedly increasing. In fact, nanosystems applied for various potential clinical uses always have to cross the primary biological barrier consisting of epithelial cells. However, little is really known currently in terms of the influence of the dynamic bio-adhesion of nanosystems on bio-membranes as well as on endocytosis and transcytosis. This was investigated here using polymer nanoparticles (PNs) and MDCK epithelial cells as the models. Firstly, the adhesion of PNs on cell membranes was found to be time-dependent with a shift of both location and dispersion pattern, from the lateral adhesion of mainly mono-dispersed PNs initially to the apical coverage of the PN aggregate later. Then, it was interesting to observe in this study that the dynamic bio-adhesion of PNs only affected their endocytosis but not their transcytosis. It was important to find that the endocytosis of PNs was not a constant process. A GM1 dependent CDE (caveolae dependent endocytosis) pathway was dominant in the preliminary stage, followed by the co-existence of a CME (clathrin-mediated endocytosis) pathway for the PN aggregate at a later stage, in accordance with the adhesion features of PNs, suggesting the modification of PN adhesion patterns on the endocytosis pathways. Next, the PN adhesion was noticed to affect the structure of cell junctions, via altering the extra- and intra-cellular calcium levels, leading to the enhanced paracellular transport of small molecules, but not favorably enough for the obviously increased passing of PNs themselves. Finally, FRAP and other techniques all demonstrated the obvious impact of PN adhesion on the membrane confirmation, independent of the adhesion location and time, which might lower the threshold for the internalization of PNs, even their aggregates. Generally, these findings confirm that the transport pathway mechanism of PNs through epithelial cells is rather

  10. Conscious and anaesthetised Göttingen mini-pigs as an in-vivo model for buccal absorption - pH-dependent absorption of metoprolol from bioadhesive tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Jacobsen, Jette; Andersen, Morten B; Jespersen, Mads L; Karlsson, Jens-Jacob; Garmer, Mats; Jørgensen, Erling B; Holm, René

    2014-05-01

    The potential of buccal mucosa as a site for systemic absorption has attracted increased attention in recent years creating a need for new predictive in-vivo models. The aim of this study was to evaluate anaesthetised and conscious Göttingen mini-pigs as a model for buccal drug absorption by testing pH-dependent absorption of metoprolol from a solid dosage form. Buccal tablets buffered to pH 6.2 and pH 8.9, oral liquid and intravenous injection were tested in four conscious and anaesthetised Göttingen mini-pigs in a non-randomised cross-over study. Blood samples were collected and processed before analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection. An ex-vivo flow retention model was applied to study release and retention of the bioadhesive buccal tablets. The Tmax obtained from the two buccal conscious groups (55 ± 5 and 35 ± 5 min) were significantly different to the buccal anaesthetised groups (120 ± 0 and 165 ± 15 min) for buccal tablet pH 6.2 and pH 8.9, respectively. Also, the absolute bioavailability from the anaesthetised buccal tablet pH 8.9 (20.7 ± 4.0%) had a significant increase compared to all other buccal tablet groups. In conclusion, this study showed a pH-dependent absolute bioavailability of metoprolol when administrated as bioadhesive buccal tablets to anaesthetised mini-pigs. The anaesthesia was found to delay the time to reach maximal plasma concentration of metoprolol as compared to the conscious pig model when administrated as buccal tablets.

  11. Preformulation and characterization of a lidocaine hydrochloride and dexamethasone sodium phosphate thermo-reversible and bioadhesive long-acting gel for intraperitoneal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelaez-Camargo, Diana; Suñé-Negre, Josep Maria; Roig-Carreras, Manel; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Miñarro-Carmona, Montserrat; Ticó-Grau, Josep Ramon

    2016-02-10

    The search for new formulations of anaesthetic agents that allow a localized administration and provide a prolonged effect is of great interest in the multimodal management of postoperative pain. The pre-formulation and characterization of a lidocaine and dexamethasone thermosensitive and bioadhesive long-acting gel for intraperitoneal administration was done as a tool in the management of pain in abdominal surgeries. The pre-formulation process was conducted by a systematic variation of the concentration of the different polymers, until setting it, in a suitable concentration that allowed an adequate gelation temperature. The poloxamer 407 (P407) was used as the main polymer; hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) as the bioadhesive agent and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to adjust the gelation temperature and physicochemical properties. The formulations were characterized by gelation temperature, pH, viscosity at 25°C and 37°C, gelation time, density and osmolality. Gelation temperature was decreased when increasing the concentration of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and poloxamer 407, this effect was also observed when adding lidocaine hydrochloride and dexamethasone sodium phosphate to the formulations. The gelation temperature did not have statistically significant relation with the PVP concentration (P-value of 0.6797), even though, there is a tendency in the gelation temperature by varying it. Between the developed formulations, the 12.5/3.3/0.4% (P407/HPMC/PVP) formulation presents an appropriate gelation temperature, a suitable viscosity for administration by syringe, an adequate and stable pH and osmolality to prevent tissue damage and a correct gelation time that allowed the formation of a prolonged release implant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic bio-adhesion of polymer nanoparticles on MDCK epithelial cells and its impact on bio-membranes, endocytosis and paracytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Yuan, Lan; Dai, Wenbing; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Fang, Weigang; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, concern about the use of nanotechnology for biomedical application is unprecedentedly increasing. In fact, nanosystems applied for various potential clinical uses always have to cross the primary biological barrier consisting of epithelial cells. However, little is really known currently in terms of the influence of the dynamic bio-adhesion of nanosystems on bio-membranes as well as on endocytosis and transcytosis. This was investigated here using polymer nanoparticles (PNs) and MDCK epithelial cells as the models. Firstly, the adhesion of PNs on cell membranes was found to be time-dependent with a shift of both location and dispersion pattern, from the lateral adhesion of mainly mono-dispersed PNs initially to the apical coverage of the PN aggregate later. Then, it was interesting to observe in this study that the dynamic bio-adhesion of PNs only affected their endocytosis but not their transcytosis. It was important to find that the endocytosis of PNs was not a constant process. A GM1 dependent CDE (caveolae dependent endocytosis) pathway was dominant in the preliminary stage, followed by the co-existence of a CME (clathrin-mediated endocytosis) pathway for the PN aggregate at a later stage, in accordance with the adhesion features of PNs, suggesting the modification of PN adhesion patterns on the endocytosis pathways. Next, the PN adhesion was noticed to affect the structure of cell junctions, via altering the extra- and intra-cellular calcium levels, leading to the enhanced paracellular transport of small molecules, but not favorably enough for the obviously increased passing of PNs themselves. Finally, FRAP and other techniques all demonstrated the obvious impact of PN adhesion on the membrane confirmation, independent of the adhesion location and time, which might lower the threshold for the internalization of PNs, even their aggregates. Generally, these findings confirm that the transport pathway mechanism of PNs through epithelial cells is rather

  13. The effect of ceramic primer on shear bond strength of resin composite cement to zirconia: a function of water storage and thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Liebermann, Anja; Roos, Malgorzata; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Ing, Dipl

    2013-11-01

    The authors investigated the use of ceramic primers combined with self-adhesive resin composite cements on the shear bond strength (SBS) to zirconia and compared them with one conventional resin composite cement. The authors divided zirconia substrates (N = 550) into three groups: RelyX Unicem Aplicap self-adhesive universal resin composite cement (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.) (group A) (n = 220); G-CEM Capsule self-adhesive resin composite cement (GC Europe, Leuven, Belgium) (group B) (n = 220); and Panavia 21 with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator and Clearfil SE Bond primer (n = 110) (Kuraray Dental, Tokyo) used as a standard comparison (SC). The authors examined the self-adhesive resin composite cements without (0) and with (1) the use of a ceramic primer. They measured SBS initially (37°C for three hours), after water storage (37°C for one, four, nine, 16 or 25 days) and after thermal cycling (5°C and 55°C for 1,500, 6,000, 13,500, 24,000 or 37,500 cycles). The authors analyzed data by using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and a χ(2) test. Application of a ceramic primer did not result in a negative impact on SBS. Specimens in the A1 group (that is, RelyX Unicem Aplicap with ceramic primer) exhibited significantly higher SBS before and after water storage and thermal cycling compared with specimens that were not treated with a primer. The self-adhesive resin composite cements combined with ceramic primer exhibited similar or higher SBS values compared with those in the SC group at each aging duration (that is, water storage and thermal cycling). With respect to G-CEM Capsule, the authors observed a significantly positive effect of the primer after nine and 16 days' water storage and after one and four days' thermal cycling. They observed predominantly adhesive failures. Ceramic primer in combination with self-adhesive resin composite cement demonstrated a positive effect on SBS to zirconia and should be used for

  14. Silver(I Extraction with Benzo-18-Crown-6 Ether from Water into 1,2-Dichloroethane: Analyses on Ionic Strength of the Phases and their Equilibrium Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Kudo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Extraction constants (Kex & Kex± for the extraction of silver picrate (AgPic by benzo-18-crown-6 ether (B18C6 into 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE were determined at 298 K and various ionic strength (I-values of a water phase with or without excess HNO3. Here the symbols, Kex and Kex±, were defined as [AgLPic]DCE/P and [AgL+]DCE[Pic−]DCE/P with P = [Ag+][L]DCE[Pic−] and L = B18C6, respectively; [ ]DCE refers to the concentration of the corresponding species in the DCE phase at equilibrium. Simultaneously, KD,Pic (= [Pic−]DCE/[Pic−] and K1,DCE (= Kex/Kex± values for given I and IDCE values were determined, where the symbol IDCE shows I of the DCE phase. Also, equilibrium potential differences (Δφeq based on the Pic− transfer at the water/DCE interface were obtained from the analysis of the KD,Pic [= KD,PicS exp{−(F/RT Δφeq}] values; the symbol KD,PicS shows KD,Pic at Δφeq = 0 V. On the basis of these results, I dependences of logKex and logKex± and IDCE ones of logK1,DCE and logKex± were examined. Extraction experiments of AgClO4 and AgNO3 by B18C6 into DCE were done for comparison. The logKex±-versus-Δφeq plot for the above Ag(I extraction systems with Pic−, ClO4−, and NO3− gave a good positive correlation.

  15. Impact of ionic strength of growth on the physiochemical properties, structure, and adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes polyelectrolyte brushes to a silicon nitride surface in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordesli, Fatma Pinar; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2012-12-15

    The adhesion energies between pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes EGDe to a model surface of silicon nitride were quantified using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in water for cells grown in pure media (as the control) and in media of four different ionic strengths of added NaCl (IS of 0.05 M, 0.1 M, 0.3 M and 0.5 M NaCl). The physiochemical properties of L. monocytogenes EGDe surface brushes were shown to have a strong influence on the adhesion of the microbe to the silicon nitride surface. The transitions in the adhesion energies, physiochemical properties, and the structure of bacterial surface polyelectrolyte brushes were observed for the cells grown in the media of 0.1M added NaCl. Our results suggested that the highest long-range electrostatic repulsion which was partially balanced by the Liftshitz-van der Waals attraction for the cells grown at 0.1M was responsible for the highest energy barrier to adhesion for these cells as predicted by the soft-particle analysis of DLVO theory and the lower adhesion measured by AFM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An investigation into mechanical strength of exoskeleton of hydrothermal vent shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas, E-mail: tomar@purdue.edu

    2015-04-01

    This investigation reports a comparison of the exoskeleton mechanical strength of deep sea shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata and shallow water shrimp species Pandalus platyceros at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 80 °C using nanoindentation experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that both shrimp exoskeletons have the Bouligand structure. Differences in the structural arrangement and chemical composition of both shrimps are highlighted by SEM and EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) analyses. The variation in the elastic moduli with temperature is found to be correlated with the measured compositional differences. The reduced modulus of R. exoculata is 8.26 ± 0.89 GPa at 25 °C that reduces to 7.61 ± 0.65 GPa at 80 °C. The corresponding decrease in the reduced modulus of P. platyceros is from 27.38 ± 2.3 GPa at 25 °C to 24.58 ± 1.71 GPa at 80 °C. The decrease in reduced moduli as a function of temperature is found to be dependent on the extent of calcium based minerals in exoskeleton of both types of shrimp exoskeletons. - Highlights: • Shrimp species Pandalus platyceros and Rimicaris exoculata exoskeletons are analyzed. • Temperature dependent properties of shrimp exoskeleton are compared. • Mechanical properties are correlated with structure and composition of exoskeleton. • Mechanical properties reduce with increase in temperature. • Presence of biominerals gives better thermal stability to structure.

  17. The influence of AT1002 on the nasal absorption of molecular weight markers and therapeutic agents when co-administered with bioadhesive polymers and an AT1002 antagonist, AT1001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Keon-Hyoung; Eddington, Natalie D

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effects of the tight junction permeation enhancer, AT1002, on the nasal absorption of molecular weight markers and low bioavailable therapeutic agents co-administered with bioadhesive polymers or zonulin antagonist. The bioadhesive polymers, carrageenan and Na-CMC, were prepared with AT1002 to examine the permeation-enhancing effect of AT1002 on the nasal absorption of inulin, calcitonin and saquinavir after nasal administration to Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood samples were collected over a 6-hour period from a jugular cannula. In addition, we determined whether AT1002 exerts a permeation-enhancing effect via activation of PAR-2 specific binding to a putative receptor of zonulin. To examine this zonulin antagonist, AT1001, was administered 30 min prior to dosing with an AT1002/inulin solution and blood samples were collected over a 6-hour period. The bioadhesive polymers did not directly increase the absorption of inulin, calcitonin and saquinavir, but promoted the permeation-enhancing effect of AT1002 when delivered nasally, thereby significantly increasing the absorption of each drug. Pre-treatment with AT1001 antagonized the zonulin receptor and significantly minimized the permeation-enhancing effect of AT1002. These findings will assist in understanding the permeation-enhancing capability of and the receptor binding of AT1002. Further, combining AT1002 with carrageenan supports the development of the mucosal delivery of therapeutic agents that have low bioavailability even with bioadhesive agents. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Histological evaluation of the rat dental pulp after indirect capping with sildenafil or L-NAME incorporated into a bioadhesive thermoresponsive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Rodrigues Cupertino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the histological dental pulp state in vivo after indirect pulp capping using sildenafil or LG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NAME, incorporated into a new bioadhesive thermoresponsive system (BTS. Male Wistar rats were subjected to an upper and lower first molar class I cavity preparation followed by indirect pulp capping with sildenafil or L-NAME. Calcium hydroxide (CaOH2 was used as a control. The teeth and surrounding bone were properly dissected and processed for Nissl’s staining. Pulp state was evaluated considering the morphological aspects of the inflammatory response, type of inflammatory infiltrate, organization of the odontoblast layer, blood vessel condition, and presence of abscesses or necrosis. The results were expressed as average of observations. The most intense inflammatory response was observed 3 days after the cavity preparation. No identified changes were detected in the dental pulp response of the molars treated with L-NAME compared with those treated with CaOH2. A dual effect was observed in the teeth treated with sildenafil. While low sildenafil concentration (0.015% w w-1 promoted effects comparable to CaOH2, at a higher concentration (0.15% w w-1, sildenafil caused a severe inflammatory response and pulp necrosis. This pioneering suggest that NO pathway activity may be a determinant in the process of dental pulp healing.

  19. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  20. Exercise in waist-high warm water decreases pain and improves health-related quality of life and strength in the lower extremities in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusi, N; Tomas-Carus, P; Häkkinen, A; Häkkinen, K; Ortega-Alonso, A

    2006-02-15

    To evaluate the short- and long-term efficacy of exercise therapy in a warm, waist-high pool in women with fibromyalgia. Thirty-four women (mean +/- SD tender points 17 +/- 1) were randomly assigned to either an exercise group (n = 17) to perform 3 weekly sessions of training including aerobic, proprioceptive, and strengthening exercises during 12 weeks, or to a control group (n = 17). Maximal unilateral isokinetic strength was measured in the knee extensors and flexors in concentric and eccentric actions at 60 degrees /second and 210 degrees /second, and in the shoulder abductors and adductors in concentric contractions. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed using the EQ-5D questionnaire; pain was assessed on a visual analog scale. All were measured at baseline, posttreatment, and after 6 months. The strength of the knee extensors in concentric actions increased by 20% in both limbs after the training period, and these improvements were maintained after the de-training period in the exercise group. The strength of other muscle actions measured did not change. HRQOL improved by 93% (P = 0.007) and pain was reduced by 29% (P = 0.012) in the exercise group during the training, but pain returned close to the pretraining level during the subsequent de-training. However, there were no changes in the control group during the entire period. The therapy relieved pain and improved HRQOL and muscle strength in the lower limbs at low velocity in patients with initial low muscle strength and high number of tender points. Most of these improvements were maintained long term.

  1. The Strength Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    In the Ph.D-project ͚Strengths-based Learning - Children͛s character strengths as a means to their learning potential͛ 750 Danish children have assessed ͚The Strength Compass͛ in order to identify their strengths and to create awareness of strengths. This was followed by a strengths-based interve......In the Ph.D-project ͚Strengths-based Learning - Children͛s character strengths as a means to their learning potential͛ 750 Danish children have assessed ͚The Strength Compass͛ in order to identify their strengths and to create awareness of strengths. This was followed by a strengths...

  2. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  3. The influence of long term water immersion on shear bond strength of amalgam repaired by resin composite and mediated by adhesives or resin modified glass ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, R; Nissan, J; Shafir, H; Shapira, G; Alter, E; Brosh, T

    2012-07-01

    To assess the shear bond strength between amalgam and resin composite mediated by either multipurpose adhesive systems or RMGI when subjected to long term immersion in saline. Part I: Cylindrical specimens (6 mm × 6 mm) composed of equal parts of sandblasted set amalgam (Oralloy) and composite (Z-100), with a thin layer of either Scotchbond Multipurpose, All Bond 2, Amalgam Bond Plus, High Q Bond Plus or Vitrebond in between were fabricated (n = 100 × 5). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups, immersed in saline at 37 °C for either 48 h, 3 or 6 months, followed by thermocycling (5000; 5/55 °C) and shear bond strength testing (SBS). Part II: Identical specimens were fabricated with intermediary of either Ketac Cem, Fuji Lining LC, Rely X Luting, Fuji Plus or Meron Plus (n = 100 × 5). Immersion periods, followed by thermocycling and SBS testing as in Part I. Two representative specimens from each subgroup were sectioned and inspected under SEM. The two classes of intermediary agents yielded SBS which differed mainly in the 6 months incubation period. While multipurpose adhesives provided SBS values of ~9-10 MPa RMGI provided higher SBS of ~16 MPa. All Bond 2 and Amalgam Bond Plus exhibited deterioration of SBS during the 6 month period as well as Rely X Luting. Gap sizes between 0.5 and 3 μm exist between all intermediaries and the amalgam; on the other hand all intermediaries exhibit gap-free interfaces between the adhesives/RMGI and the composite. Vitrebond in particular and RMGIs in general can serve as an excellent coupler of resin composite to amalgam, providing a durable bond. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in the hydrogen-bonding strength of internal water molecules and cysteine residues in the conductive state of channelrhodopsin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Muders, Vera; Schlesinger, Ramona; Heberle, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, particularly in the less understood class of membrane proteins. As the first of its kind, channelrhodopsin is a light-gated cation channel and paved the way for the new and vibrant field of optogenetics, where nerve cells are activated by light. Still, the molecular mechanism of channelrhodopsin is not understood. Here, we applied time-resolved FT-IR difference spectroscopy to channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae. It is shown that the (conductive) P2380 intermediate decays with τ ≈ 40 ms and 200 ms after pulsed excitation. The vibrational changes between the closed and the conductive states were analyzed in the X-H stretching region (X = O, S, N), comprising vibrational changes of water molecules, sulfhydryl groups of cysteine side chains and changes of the amide A of the protein backbone. The O-H stretching vibrations of "dangling" water molecules were detected in two different states of the protein using H218O exchange. Uncoupling experiments with a 1:1 mixture of H2O:D2O provided the natural uncoupled frequencies of the four O-H (and O-D) stretches of these water molecules, each with a very weakly hydrogen-bonded O-H group (3639 and 3628 cm-1) and with the other O-H group medium (3440 cm-1) to moderately strongly (3300 cm-1) hydrogen-bonded. Changes in amide A and thiol vibrations report on global and local changes, respectively, associated with the formation of the conductive state. Future studies will aim at assigning the respective cysteine group(s) and at localizing the "dangling" water molecules within the protein, providing a better understanding of their functional relevance in CaChR1.

  5. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air ... can hurt your health. Learn more about the health effects of polluted water. You can also learn more ... Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Here are ...

  6. Characterisation of the fatigue properties of cast irons used in the water industry and the effect on pipe strength and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohebbi, H; Jesson, D A; Mulheron, M J; Smith, P A

    2009-01-01

    As part of an on going programme to characterise the residual properties and understand the failure mechanisms of in-service grey cast iron water pipes, the fatigue crack propagation behaviour of grey cast iron samples has been studied. Specimens were sourced from three ex-service pipes. For each pipe the microstructure and composition were characterised and the fracture toughness was determined. The fatigue behaviour was investigated in terms of the crack growth rate (da/dN) as a function of the applied stress intensity factor range. Clear differences in the fatigue behaviour of the samples from different pipes were observed. The result from these investigations, which indicate that microstructural differences play a role in mechanical behaviour, will support the development of asset management tools for use in the water industry.

  7. Prediction of concrete strength in massive structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Makino, H.; Nakane, S.; Kawaguchi, T.; Ohike, T.

    1989-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures of a nuclear power plant are mostly of mass concrete with cross-sectional dimensions larger than 1.0 m. The temperature of concrete inside after placement rises due to heat of hydration of cement. It is well known that concrete strengths of mass concrete structure subjected to such temperature hysteresis are generally not equal to strengths of cylinders subjected to standard curing. In order to construct a mass concrete structure of high reliability in which the specified concrete strength is satisfied by the specified age, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of the strength gain property of concrete in the structure and its relationships with the water-cement ratio of the mix, strength of standard-cured cylinders and the internal temperature hysteresis. This report describes the result of studies on methods of controlling concrete strength in actual construction projects

  8. Strength Training for Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  9. The strength compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    interviews with the parents. For younger children there has been no possibility to test for strengths. In a Danish PhD project a tool to map children’s strengths was needed for children aged 6-16 and with permission from the VIA-institute ‘The Strength Compass’ was made in cooperation with The Danish...

  10. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  11. Strengths-based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    Strength-based learning - Children͛s Character Strengths as Means to their Learning Potential͛ is a Ph.D.-project aiming to create a strength-based mindset in school settings and at the same time introducing strength-based interventions as specific tools to improve both learning and well......-being. The Ph.D.-project in Strength-based learning took place in a Danish school with 750 pupils age 6-16 and a similar school was functioning as a control group. The presentation will focus on both the aware-explore-apply processes and the practical implications for the schools involved, and on measurable...

  12. Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chovanec, A.; Grath, J.; Kralik, M.; Vogel, W.

    2002-01-01

    An up-date overview of the situation of the Austrian waters is given by analyzing the status of the water quality (groundwater, surface waters) and water protection measures. Maps containing information of nitrate and atrazine in groundwaters (analyses at monitoring stations), nitrate contents and biological water quality of running waters are included. Finally, pollutants (nitrate, orthophosphate, ammonium, nitrite, atrazine etc.) trends in annual mean values and median values for the whole country for the years 1992-1999 are presented in tables. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  13. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available to explore desalination for future capacity. Water is essential to life: the human body is about 75 percent water, with up to 85 percent of brain cells liquid. Around 71 percent of the planet is covered in water, but 97,5 percent of it is salt water... risen to 90 percent, leaving only 10 percent for animals and plants. Yet 40 percent of the water used globally is for sanitation and other uses in buildings. The operation of buildings places a strain on raw water reserves, while wastewater and sewage...

  14. Effects of Temperature, Oxygen Level, Ionic Strength, and pH on the Reaction of Benzene with Hydroxyl Radicals at the Air-Water Interface in Comparison to the Bulk Aqueous Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Aubrey A; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2015-08-06

    Atmospheric aerosols (e.g., fog droplets) are complex, multiphase mediums. Depending on location, time of day, and/or air mass source, there can be considerable variability within these droplets, relating to temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Due to the droplets' inherently small size, the reactions that occur within these droplets are determined by bulk aqueous phase and air-water interfacial conditions. In this study, the reaction of benzene and hydroxyl radicals is examined kinetically in a thin-film flow-tube reactor. By varying the aqueous volume (e.g., film thickness) along the length of the reactor, both bulk and interfacial reaction rates are measured from a single system. Temperature, pH, and ionic strength are varied to model conditions typical of fog events. Oxygen-poor conditions are measured to study oxygen's overall effect on the reaction pathway. Initial rate activation energies and the bulk aqueous phase and interfacial contributions to the overall rate constant are also obtained.

  15. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marion County, Indiana Salt Lake County, Utah Seattle-King County, Washington Tools and Training CLPPP CAP Healthy ... wish to use tap water for drinking or cooking, especially when the water has been off and ...

  16. predicting the compressive strength of obudu earth blocks stabilized

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... strength development of the CKD stabilized blocks. 4. Modeling Compressive Strengths. Scheffe's [21] predictive mixture models were formulated for the 28 Day compressive strength at various water con- tents. The correlation between the experimental and the. Nigerian Journal of Technology. Vol. 31, No.

  17. Interfacial Interactions in Microbial Bioadhesion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, David

    1996-01-01

    ... (exopolymers,, surface charges) on adhesion to substrata. Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with know surface characteristics were used in adhesion tests under laminar flow in aqueous environments...

  18. Water

    OpenAIRE

    Hertie School of Governance

    2010-01-01

    All human life depends on water and air. The sustainable management of both is a major challenge for today's public policy makers. This issue of Schlossplatz³ taps the streams and flows of the current debate on the right water governance.

  19. Photon strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, I.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for extracting photon strength functions are briefly discussed. We follow the Brink-Axel approach to relate the strength functions to the giant resonances observed in photonuclear work and summarize the available data on the E1, E2 and M1 resonances. Some experimental and theoretical problems are outlined. (author)

  20. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  1. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  2. Interviewing to Understand Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Michael R.

    2018-01-01

    Interviewing clients about their strengths is an important part of developing a complete understanding of their lives and has several advantages over simply focusing on problems and pathology. Prerequisites for skillfully interviewing for strengths include the communication skills that emerge from a stance of not knowing, developing a vocabulary…

  3. Sharply Reduced Biofilm Formation from Cobetia marina and in Black Sea Water on Modified Siloxane Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danail Akuzov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Siloxane fouling release coatings are currently the only viable non-toxic commercial alternative to toxic biocide antifouling paints. However, they only partially inhibit biofouling since biofilms remain a major issue. With the aim to improve the bacterial resistance of siloxane coatings modified with non-ionic surfactant (NIS, antioxidant (AO or both NIS/AO, the ability of PEG-silane co-cross-linker was investigated to reduce Cobetia marina adhesion and multispecies biofilm formation from natural seawater. Surface physical-chemical and physical-mechanical parameters relevant to bio-adhesion were estimated before the testing of the biofilm formation. Slightly reduced biofilm from C. marina and sharply reduced multispecies biofilm, formed in natural sea water, were found on the PEG-silane co-cross-linked coatings without modifying additives. However, both C. marina growth and biofilm formation from natural sea water were sharply reduced on the PEG-silane co-cross-linked coatings containing NIS or AO, even more, no C. marina adhesion was seen on the coating containing NIS and AO simultaneously. Possible explanations of the observed effects are presented in this article. It was concluded that the PEG-silane co-cross-linker, toghether with NIS and AO, can be used as an efficient tool to additionally reduce the bioadhesion of Gram-negative marine bacteria and multispecies biofilm formation on siloxane antifouling coatings.

  4. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  5. Development of K-Basin High-Strength Homogeneous Sludge Simulants and Correlations Between Unconfined Compressive Strength and Shear Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Baer, Ellen BK; Chun, Jaehun; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sande, Susan; Buchmiller, William C.

    2011-02-20

    K-Basin sludge will be stored in the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) at an interim storage location on Central Plateau before being treated and packaged for disposal. During the storage period, sludge in the STSCs may consolidate/agglomerate, potentially resulting in high-shear-strength material. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) plans to use water jets to retrieve K-Basin sludge after the interim storage. STP has identified shear strength to be a key parameter that should be bounded to verify the operability and performance of sludge retrieval systems. Determining the range of sludge shear strength is important to gain high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from the STSCs. The shear strength measurements will provide a basis for bounding sludge properties for mobilization and erosion. Thus, it is also important to develop potential simulants to investigate these phenomena. Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) show that high-uranium-content K-Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has 'paste' and 'chunks' with shear strengths of approximately 3-5 kPa and 380-770 kPa, respectively. High-uranium-content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185 C, 10 hours) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. These high values were estimated by measured unconfined compressive strength (UCS) obtained with a pocket penetrometer. Due to its ease of use, it is anticipated that a pocket penetrometer will be used to acquire additional shear strength data from archived K-Basin sludge samples stored at the PNNL Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) hot cells. It is uncertain whether the pocket penetrometer provides accurate shear strength measurements of the material. To assess the bounding material strength and

  6. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...... correlation to the curing time. The experiments show no correlation between the anisotropy and the curing time and a small strength difference between the two drilling directions. The literature shows variations on which drilling direction that is strongest. Based on a Monto Carlo simulation of the expected...

  7. What Are Strength Training Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strength training is any practice or exercise specifically designed to increase muscle tone, strength, and fitness. Concerned that strength training will make you bulky and too muscle-y? You are not alone.

  8. The assessment of bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M. Z. A. Mohd; Muhamad, K.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete (HPFRC). Firstly, this paper presents the various steps taken to prepare the HPFRC with self-compacting property. The minimum targeted slump flow is 600 mm and minimum targeted compressive strength is 80 MPa. The key mix variables considered are such as type of superplasticizer, water cement ratio and silica fume content. Then, the bond strength between the heat damaged concrete with HPFRC was examined. The experimental parameters are heating temperature, surface treatment technique and curing method and the results show that, all experimental parameters are significantly affected the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and HPFRC.

  9. nanocomposite hydrogels with high gel strength

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    used in many fields such as hygienic products,1 agriculture,2,3 waste water treatment,4,5 drug-delivery systems6– ... commercially synthesized hectorite product was used to prepare NC gels by inverse microemulsion poly- ... 2.4 Gel strength evaluation of the nanocomposite hydrogels. The apparent viscosity was a relative ...

  10. Strength of Fibrous Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Zheng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    "Strength of Fibrous Composites" addresses evaluation of the strength of a fibrous composite by using its constituent material properties and its fiber architecture parameters. Having gone through the book, a reader is able to predict the progressive failure behavior and ultimate strength of a fibrous laminate subjected to an arbitrary load condition in terms of the constituent fiber and matrix properties, as well as fiber geometric parameters. The book is useful to researchers and engineers working on design and analysis for composite materials. Dr. Zheng-Ming Huang is a professor at the School of Aerospace Engineering & Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, China. Mr. Ye-Xin Zhou is a PhD candidate at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the University of Hong Kong, China.

  11. Material Strength in Vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollaine, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    Preliminary results of measurements of vanadium strength at 600 kb and 1 Mb, at strain rates between 10^7/s and 10^8/s, are inconsistent with the Steinberg-Guinan [1] model, which is independent of strain rate, but can be made consistent with other models, such as PTW [2]. We compare several different strength models to the data. [1] DJ.Steinberg, S.G.Cochran, and M.W.Guinan, J. Appl. Phys. 51, 1498 (1980). [2] D.L. Preston, D.L.Tonks, and D.C. Wallace, J. Appl. Phys. 93, 211 (2003).

  12. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chowdhury

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Wood Ash (WA prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45 and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20% including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM, strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper.

  13. Gender Differences in Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyward, Vivian H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This investigation examined gender differences of 103 physically active men and women in upper and lower body strength as a function of lean body weight and the distribution of muscle and subcutaneous fat in the upper and lower limbs. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  14. Probe tests microweld strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Probe is developed to test strength of soldered, brazed or microwelded joints. It consists of a spring which may be adjusted to the desired test pressure by means of a threaded probe head, and an indicator lamp. Device may be used for electronic equipment testing.

  15. Strength and thermal stability of fiber reinforced plastic composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flexural tests and dimensional stability (water absorption and thickness swelling) of the rattan composites were determined. The results obtained revealed that the rattan composites possessed adequate strength and had low water absorption and thickness swelling rates. The water absorption of the composites was ...

  16. Low velocity impact behaviour of ultra high strength concrete panels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    parametric studies by varying the volume fraction of steel fibres. Keywords. Ultra high strength concrete; panel; drop weight test; impact analysis;. ABAQUS. 1. Introduction. Ultra high strength concrete is a special type of concrete which is characterized by a low water- binder ratio, high quality pozzolanic material, and without ...

  17. Compressive strength of marine material mixed concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan; Parung, H.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Djamaluddin, R.

    2017-11-01

    Many cement factories have been incorporated fly ash with clinker cement to produce blended cement. PCC is a type of blended cement incorporated fly ash that produced in Indonesia cement factories. To promote the sustainable development in the remote islands this present paper attempted to study the suitability of sea water, marine sand that available abundantly surround the remote island with Portland Composite Cement (PCC) and crushed river stone to produce concrete. Slump test was conducted to evaluate the workability of fresh concrete and also compressive strength with stress-strain relationship was carried out to evaluate the hardened concrete that cured with two curing condition (e.g. sea water curing, and tap water-wet burlap curing). Test result indicated that fresh concrete had proper workability and all hardened specimens appeared a good compaction result. Compressive strength of specimens cured which sea water was higher than the specimens which cured by tap water-wet burlap where stress-strain behavior of specimens made with sea water, marine sand, and PCC had similar behavior with specimens which made with PCC and tap water.

  18. Relationship between pore structure and compressive strength of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Pore structure; compressive strength; concrete; statistical model; mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) ... Author Affiliations. J BU1 Z TIAN. College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098, People's Republic of China ...

  19. Redox Buffer Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The proper functioning of enzymes in bodily fluids requires that the pH be maintained within rather narrow limits. The first line of defense against large pH fluctuations in such fluids is the passive control provided by the presence of pH buffers. The ability of pH buffers to stabilize the pH is indicated by the buffer value b introduced in 1922 by van Slyke. It is equally important for many enzymes that the redox potential is kept within a narrow range. In that case, stability of the potential is most readily achieved with a redox buffer. In this communication we define the redox buffer strength by analogy with acid-base buffer strength.

  20. Strengths only or strengths and relative weaknesses? A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Teri; Diessner, Rhett; Reade, Lindsay

    2009-10-01

    Does working on developing character strengths and relative character weaknesses cause lower life satisfaction than working on developing character strengths only? The present study provides a preliminary answer. After 76 college students completed the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths (C. Peterson & M. E. P. Seligman, 2004), the authors randomly assigned them to work on 2 character strengths or on 1 character strength and 1 relative weakness. Combined, these groups showed significant gains on the Satisfaction With Life Scale (E. Diener, R. A. Emmons, R. J. Larsen, & S. Griffin, 1985), compared with a 32-student no-treatment group. However, there was no significant difference in gain scores between the 2-strengths group and the 1-character-strength-and-1-relative-character-weakness group. The authors discuss how focusing on relative character weaknesses (along with strengths) does not diminish-and may assist in increasing-life satisfaction.

  1. Osmocapsules for direct measurement of osmotic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Lee, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Seok

    2014-03-26

    Monodisperse microcapsules with ultra-thin membranes are microfluidically designed to be highly sensitive to osmotic pressure, thereby providing a tool for the direct measurement of the osmotic strength. To make such osmocapsules, water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion drops with ultra-thin shells are prepared as templates through emulsification of core-sheath biphasic flow in a capillary microfluidic device. When photocurable monomers are used as the oil phase, the osmocapsules are prepared by in-situ photopolymerization of the monomers, resulting in semipermeable membranes with a relatively large ratio of membrane thickness to capsule radius, approximately 0.02. These osmocapsules are buckled by the outward flux of water when they are subjected to a positive osmotic pressure difference above 125 kPa. By contrast, evaporation-induced consolidation of middle-phase containing polymers enables the production of osmocapsules with a small ratio of membrane thickness to capsule radius of approximately 0.002. Such an ultra-thin membrane with semi-permeability makes the osmocapsules highly sensitive to osmotic pressure; a positive pressure as small as 12.5 kPa induces buckling of the capsules. By employing a set of distinct osmocapsules confining aqueous solutions with different osmotic strengths, the osmotic strength of unknown solutions can be estimated through observation of the capsules that are selectively buckled. This approach provides the efficient measurement of the osmotic strength using only a very small volume of liquid, thereby providing a useful alternative to other measurement methods which use complex setups. In addition, in-vivo measurement of the osmotic strength can be potentially accomplished by implanting these biocompatible osmocapsules into tissue, which is difficult to achieve using conventional methods. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  3. Compressive Strength of Compacted Clay-Sand Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faseel Suleman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sand to improve the strength of natural clays provides a viable alternative for civil infrastructure construction involving earthwork. The main objective of this note was to investigate the compressive strength of compacted clay-sand mixes. A natural clay of high plasticity was mixed with 20% and 40% sand (SP and their compaction and strength properties were determined. Results indicated that the investigated materials exhibited a brittle behaviour on the dry side of optimum and a ductile behaviour on the wet side of optimum. For each material, the compressive strength increased with an increase in density following a power law function. Conversely, the compressive strength increased with decreasing water content of the material following a similar function. Finally, the compressive strength decreased with an increase in sand content because of increased material heterogeneity and loss of sand grains from the sides during shearing.

  4. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  5. Strength Development for Young Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Participation in strength training is important for older children or young adolescences who wish to improve fitness or participate in sports. When designing strength training programs for our youth this age group is immature anatomically, physiologically, and psychologically. For the younger or inexperienced group the strength training activities…

  6. The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone have been measured as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. Both the fracture strength and the frictional strength obey the law of effective stress, that is, the strength is determined not by the confining pressure alone but by the difference between the confining pressure and the pore pressure. The fracture strength of the rock varies by as much as 20 per cent depending on the cement between the grains, but the frictional strength is independent of lithology. Over the range 0 2 kb, ??=0??5 + 0??6??n. This relationship also holds for other rocks such as gabbro, dunite, serpentinite, granite and limestone. ?? 1975.

  7. Strength in numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkis, S

    1999-03-01

    A case study showing the attitudes and actions reinforcing discrimination against women's rights in Lebanon is presented. The study illustrates the way in which the public¿s views and the interests of families and local dignitaries can manipulate opinions. Organizations aimed at protecting women's rights have found strength in working together. The Lebanese League, an organization comprised of 17 women's and human rights associations, has established a center and a telephone hotline to encourage abused women to disclose and discuss their situation. The center provides support in the form of legal, psychological and medical assistance. Another organization working with the Lebanese League towards the same vision is the Lebanese Physically Handicapped Union. Efforts to lobby around a Lebanese legislation discriminating against women so far had no success, but all organizations involved are aware of the need to work through a range of interventions, and to take a long-term view, before they can count on any success.

  8. Unfired clay bricks – moisture properties and compressive strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E.J. de Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus, methods and test results from an experimental investigation of (1) the properties for moisture performance of the materials, including water vapour sorption and water vapour transmission, (2) humidity buffering of the indoor climate by an absorbent material, and (3) the compressive...... strength are presented....

  9. Compressive Strength of Hollow Sandcrete Blocks Made with Rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 120 blocks were produced and cured by water sprinkling at 1, 3, 7, 21 and 28 days. Properties such as compressive strength, density and water absorption were determined. The results showed that blocks made at 30% RHA to cement replacement meet the replacements specified by BS 2028 (1968) and Federal ...

  10. Institutional Strength in Depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weightman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Much work has been undertaken in order to identify, learn and implement the lessons from the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. These have mainly targeted on engineering or operational lessons. Less attention has been paid to the institutional lessons, although there have been some measures to improve individual peer reviews, particularly by the World Association of Nuclear Operators, and the authoritative IAEA report published in 2015 brought forward several important lessons for regulators and advocated a system approach. The report noted that one of the contributing factors the accident was the tendency of stakeholders not to challenge. Additionally, it reported deficiencies in the regulatory authority and system. Earlier, the root cause of the accident was identified by a Japanese independent parliamentary report as being cultural and institutional. The sum total of the institutions, the safety system, was ineffective. While it is important to address the many technical and operational lessons these may not necessary address this more fundamental lesson, and may not serve to provide robust defences against human or institutional failings over a wide variety of possible events and combinations. The overall lesson is that we can have rigorous and comprehensive safety standards and other tools in place to deliver high levels of safety, but ultimately what is important is the ability of the nuclear safety system to ensure that the relevant institutions diligently and effectively apply those standards and tools — to be robust and resilient. This has led to the consideration of applying the principles of the strength in depth philosophy to a nuclear safety system as a way of providing a framework for developing, assessing, reviewing and improving the system. At an IAEA conference in October 2013, a model was presented for a robust national nuclear safety system based on strength in depth philosophy. The model highlighted three main layers: industry, the

  11. Commitee III.1 Ultimate Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the subject of ductile collapse of ships and offshore structures and their components due to buckling and excessive yielding under overload conditions. Consideration is given to load-deflection predictions for components with fabrication imperfections and in-service damage a...... and to the ultimate strength and post-ultimate behaviour of structural systems in order to identify the reserve strength. The effect of uncertainties in the modelling on the strength predictions is highlighted in two design examples....

  12. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion...... test in persons with stroke, generally showing marked reductions in muscle strength of paretic and, to a lesser degree, nonparetic muscles when compared with healthy controls, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity....

  13. Hormonal changes in strength training

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael, Gáll

    2017-01-01

    Title: Hormonal changes in strength training Objectives: Perform a systematic review of literature dealing with hormonal changes in strength training. Based on the informations from aforementioned literature, describe wheather acute hormonal response after a bout of strength training significantly influence the proces of hypertrophy or not. Hormone testosterone and changes of its concentrations is for this thesis the most important. Methods: Method of traditional review was used in this thesi...

  14. A Canonical Password Strength Measure

    OpenAIRE

    Panferov, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    We notice that the "password security" discourse is missing the most fundamental notion of the "password strength" -- it was never properly defined. We propose a canonical definition of the "password strength", based on the assessment of the efficiency of a set of possible guessing attack. Unlike naive password strength assessments our metric takes into account the attacker's strategy, and we demonstrate the necessity of that feature. This paper does NOT advise you to include "at least three ...

  15. Strength layout of pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moczall, K.; Schmid, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    Different properties are required from pipes of nuclear power plants according to their respective importance for the safety as well as the availability of a plant. For reasons of expediency and profitability, it has therefore been necessary to attach 5 requiremental stages to the above-mentioned as well as to all other components. Of the five stages, the first three represent those which are of major, medium or minor importance for safety of nuclear plants. The 4th stage gives in general the importance of the availability of a plant, whereas the 5th stage is provided for the rest of the pipes. The requirements of conventional, technical regulations are generally fulfilled in the 4th stage, whereas, phased accordingly, exceeding requirements are set up and specified in the first three stages. These requirements refer to the securing of the workability of plant components, to (redundant, resp. diverse) layout, and to the quality of components (qualifying of producers and production processes, preliminary checking of production papers, supervision of production, material and construction testing, documentation) as well as to strength verification (pressure test, stress-strain measurements, stress and fatigue analysis). (orig.) [de

  16. Signalling control strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, Hans V

    2008-06-07

    Metabolic control analysis (MCA) has become what it is, largely because the special organization of living cells led to rather specific questions. These questions focused on the role of enzymes, genes, and, in subsequent generalizations, on well-defined process activities. With an emphasis on the work by Heinrich and co-workers, the theory behind MCA is summarized in a way that leads naturally to its extensions to hierarchical systems, such as gene expression and signal transduction, and to control beyond the steady state. The analysis of the control properties of signal transduction cascades is reviewed with an emphasis on the relative importance of the protein kinases and the protein phosphatases. The two types of enzyme are both important for the amplitude of signal transduction, whereas phosphatases may be more important for the later phases of signal transduction and for its duration. Novel MCA of concentrations and fluxes that vary with time is explicated. It is concluded that the clarity and operationality of concepts such as control strength (now control coefficient) plus the clear theoretical frameworks provided by Heinrich and colleagues, should enable us greatly to reduce the Babylonian confusion that could otherwise occur in the data deluges of Systems Biology.

  17. Improving Interlaminar Shear Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Justin

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of complex propulsion elements.1 Use of fiber-reinforced, polymeric composite tanks are known to reduce weight while increasing performance of propulsion vehicles. Maximizing the performance of these materials is needed to reduce the hardware weight to result in increased performance in support of NASA's missions. NASA has partnered with the Mississippi State University (MSU) to utilize a unique scalable approach of locally improving the critical properties needed for composite structures. MSU is responsible for the primary development of the concept with material and engineering support provided by NASA. The all-composite tank shown in figure 1 is fabricated using a prepreg system of IM7 carbon fiber/CYCOM 5320-1 epoxy resin. This is a resin system developed for out-of-autoclave applications. This new technology is needed to support the fabrication of large, all composite structures and is currently being evaluated on a joint project with Boeing for the Space Launch System (SLS) program. In initial efforts to form an all composite pressure vessel using this prepreg system, a 60% decrease in properties was observed in scarf joint regions. Inspection of these areas identified interlaminar failure in the adjacent laminated structure as the main failure mechanism. This project seeks to improve the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) within the prepreg layup by locally modifying the interply region shown in figure 2.2

  18. High Strength Steel Welding Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edwards, Glen

    1998-01-01

    .... These electrodes were insensitive to moderate variations in chemical composition or cooling rate, had acceptable strength and impact toughness, and exhibited more uniform mechanical properties...

  19. Grain boundary strength as point defect sink strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volobuev, A.V.; Gann, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    Sink strength of spherical grain boundary as an absolutely absorbing surface and as finite thickness wall consisting of the edge dislocations are considered. The values of the grain boundary sink strength are shown to be critically dependent on the point defect recombination degree

  20. Physiological Effects of Strength Training and Various Strength Training Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    Current knowledge in the area of muscle physiology is a basis for a discussion on strength training programs. It is now recognized that the expression of strength is related to, but not dependent upon, the size of the muscle and is probably more related to the ability to recruit more muscle fibers in the contraction, or to better synchronize their…

  1. Cancer Prevention: Distinguishing Strength of Evidence from Strength of Opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett S. Kramer, MD, MPH, Associate Director for Disease Prevention and Director of the Office of Medical Applications of Research in the Office of Disease Prevention, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, presented "Cancer Prevention: Distinguishing Strength of Evidence from Strength of Opinion".

  2. Reliability of Hull Girder Ultimate Strength of Steel Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-wei, Gao; Gui-jie, Shi

    2018-03-01

    Hull girder ultimate strength is an evaluation index reflecting the true safety margin or structural redundancy about container ships. Especially, after the hull girder fracture accident of the MOL COMFORT, the 8,000TEU class large container ship, on June 17 2013, larger container ship safety has been paid on much more attention. In this paper, different methods of calculating hull girder ultimate strength are firstly discussed and compared with. The bending ultimate strength can be analyzed by nonlinear finite element method (NFEM) and increment-iterative method, and also the shear ultimate strength can be analyzed by NFEM and simple equations. Then, the probability distribution of hull girder wave loads and still water loads of container ship are summarized. At last, the reliability of hull girder ultimate strength under bending moment and shear forces for three container ships is analyzed by using a first order method. The conclusions can be applied to give guidance for ship design and safety evaluation.

  3. Effect of Curing Temperature Histories on the Compressive Strength Development of High-Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-Hyeok Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relative strength-maturity relationship of high-strength concrete (HSC specifically developed for nuclear facility structures while considering the economic efficiency and durability of the concrete. Two types of mixture proportions with water-to-binder ratios of 0.4 and 0.28 were tested under different temperature histories including (1 isothermal curing conditions of 5°C, 20°C, and 40°C and (2 terraced temperature histories of 20°C for an initial age of individual 1, 3, or 7 days and a constant temperature of 5°C for the subsequent ages. On the basis of the test results, the traditional maturity function of an equivalent age was modified to consider the offset maturity and the insignificance of subsequent curing temperature after an age of 3 days on later strength of concrete. To determine the key parameters in the maturity function, the setting behavior, apparent activation energy, and rate constant of the prepared mixtures were also measured. This study reveals that the compressive strength development of HSC cured at the reference temperature for an early age of 3 days is insignificantly affected by the subsequent curing temperature histories. The proposed maturity approach with the modified equivalent age accurately predicts the strength development of HSC.

  4. Microcracking and durability of high strength concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yssorche, M.P.

    1995-07-01

    Durability of 28 days compressive strength concrete of 20 to 120 MPa has been studied. The ability of concrete to transport aggressive agents has been determined for four properties: the air permeability, the chloride diffusivity, the water absorption and the carbonation. A chloride migration test for high and very high strength concrete (HSC and VHSC) has been built. The relationship between transport properties and the compressive strength after one and 28 days of humid curing has always the same shape: transport decreases when strength increases. However, transport properties often vary in the ordinary concrete field. Beyond, the domain is much more limited. The relationship between transport properties and strength valid for ordinary concrete can not be simply extrapolated for HSC and VHSC. To determine the part of microcracking of HSC and VHSC, concrete behaviour stored in two mediums has been studied: the ones shaming the storing condition of concrete in auto-desiccation, the others reproducing the storing conditions of concrete in desiccation. Auto-desiccation (measuring relative humidity at balance) and desiccation (measuring mass losses) have been showed. Microcracks and shrinkage strains have been measured. It has been showed that auto-desiccation microcracks proving in HSC or VHSC don't question the durability. Microcracks, as for permeability, do not develop between 28 days and one year. On the contrary, desiccation microcracks observed in HSC and VHSC, increase with transport properties between 28 days and 1.5 year. Thus, a bulk concrete is always more durable than a cover concrete. At last, the good influence of increase of curing of 1 to 28 days on the transport of all concretes has been emphasized. (author)

  5. STRENGTH SHRINKAGE AND CREEP OF CONCRETE IN TENSION AND COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Kristiawan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Strength, shrinkage and creep of concrete in tension and compression have been determined and the relationship between those properties was studied. Direct tensile tests were applied to measure those properties in tension. The relationship of creep in tension and compression was determined based on the measurement of creep at similar stress and similar stress/strength ratio. It is found that concrete deforms more in tension than in compression. Except for concrete with a higher water/cement ratio, the use of pulverised fuel ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag, superplasticizer and shrinkage reducing admixture has no effect on strength. However, they affect creep and shrinkage of concrete.

  6. Loading Conditions and Longitudinal Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Methods for the calculation of the lightweight of the ship.Loading conditions satisfying draught, trim and intact stability requirements and analysis of the corresponding stillwater longitudinal strength.......Methods for the calculation of the lightweight of the ship.Loading conditions satisfying draught, trim and intact stability requirements and analysis of the corresponding stillwater longitudinal strength....

  7. Strength Training and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... training certification and experience with kids and strength training. When teaching a new exercise, the trainer should have kids perform the exercise under his or her supervision in a hazard-free, well-lit, and ... and after strength training. Kids should begin with one set of 8– ...

  8. Oscillator strengths for neutral technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garstang, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oscillator strengths have been calculated for most of the spectral lines of TcI which are of interest in the study of stars of spectral type S. Oscillator strengths have been computed for the corresponding transitions in MnI as a partial check of the technetium calculations

  9. Strength development of pervious concrete containing engineered biomass aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, A. A. M.; Shahidan, S.; Koh, H. B.; Kandash, A.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Pervious concrete with high porosity has good permeability and low mechanical strengths are commonly used in controlling storm water management. It is different from normal concrete. It is only containing single size of coarse aggregate and has lower density compared with normal concrete. This study was focused on the effect of Engineered Biomass Aggregate (EBA) on the compressive strength, void ratio and water permeability of pervious concrete. EBA was prepared by coating the biomass aggregate with epoxy resin. EBA was used to replace natural coarse aggregate ranging from 0% to 25%. 150 mm cube specimens were prepared and used to study the compressive strength, void ratio and water permeability. Compressive strength was tested at 7, 14 and 28 days. Meanwhile, void ratio and permeability tests were carried out on 28 days. The experimental results showed that pervious concrete containing EBA gained lower compressive strength. The compressive strength was reduced gradually by increasing the percentage of EBA. Overall, Pervious concrete containing EBA achieved higher void ratio and permeability.

  10. STRENGTH OF NANOMODIFIED HIGH-STRENGTH LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOZEMTСEV Alexandr Sergeevich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research aimed at development of nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete for construction. The developed concretes are of low average density and high ultimate compressive strength. It is shown that to produce this type of concrete one need to use hollow glass and aluminosilicate microspheres. To increase the durability of adhesion between cement stone and fine filler the authors offer to use complex nanodimensinal modifier based on iron hydroxide sol and silica sol as a surface nanomodifier for hollow microspheres. It is hypothesized that the proposed modifier has complex effect on the activity of the cement hydration and, at the same time increases bond strength between filler and cement-mineral matrix. The compositions for energy-efficient nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete which density is 1300…1500 kg/m³ and compressive strength is 40…65 MPa have been developed. The approaches to the design of high-strength lightweight concrete with density of less than 2000 kg/m³ are formulated. It is noted that the proposed concretes possess dense homogeneous structure and moderate mobility. Thus, they allow processing by vibration during production. The economic and practical implications for realization of high-strength lightweight concrete in industrial production have been justified.

  11. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  12. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  13. On strength of porous material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1999-01-01

    of irregularities only scattered MOE-MOR relations (clouds) can be established from which no really results can be read.For homogeneously produced porous materials, however, like modern ceramics and high performance concretes MOE-MOR relations can be presented which are reliable. The present paper contributes...... from knowing about pore geometry, solid phase stiffness, and zero-porosity strength. Pore geometry is the very important common denominator which controls both both stiffness and strength.The accurate results obtained are finally used to suggest generalizations with respect to strength in general...

  14. Prediction of Torsional Strength for Very High Early Strength Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphot PRACHASAREE

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Very early high strength geopolymers are gaining acceptance as alternative repair materials for highways and other infrastructure. In this study, a very rapid geopolymer binder based on Metakaolin (MK and Parawood ash (PWA, developed by the authors, was experimentally tested and a prediction model for its torsional strength is proposed. The geopolymer samples were subjected to uniaxial compression, flexural beam, and torsion tests. The modulus of rupture and torsional strength in terms of compression strength were found to be well approximated by 0.7(f’c1/2 and 1/7(x2y (f’c1/2, respectively. Also an interaction relation to describe combined bending and torsion was developed in this study. In addition, the effects of aspect ratio (y/x were studied on both torsional strength and combined bending and torsion. It was found that an aspect ratio of y/x = 3 significantly reduced the torsional resistance, to about 50 % of the torsional strength of a square section.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.4.17280

  15. Characteristics of structural loess strength and preliminary framework for joint strength formula

    OpenAIRE

    Rong-jian Li; Jun-ding Liu; Rui Yan; Wen Zheng; Sheng-jun Shao

    2014-01-01

    The strength of structural loess consists of the shear strength and tensile strength. In this study, the stress path, the failure envelope of principal stress (Kf line), and the strength failure envelope of structurally intact loess and remolded loess were analyzed through three kinds of tests: the tensile strength test, the uniaxial compressive strength test, and the conventional triaxial shear strength test. Then, in order to describe the tensile strength and shear strength of structural lo...

  16. [Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

    1995-09-22

    Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

  17. Rock strength under explosive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimer, N.; Proffer, W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation emphasizes the importance of a detailed description of the nonlinear deviatoric (strength) response of the surrounding rock in the numerical simulation of underground nuclear explosion phenomenology to the late times needed for test ban monitoring applications. We will show how numerical simulations which match ground motion measurements in volcanic tuffs and in granite use the strength values obtained from laboratory measurements on small core samples of these rocks but also require much lower strength values after the ground motion has interacted with the rock. The underlying physical mechanisms for the implied strength reduction are not yet well understood, and in fact may depend on the particular rock type. However, constitutive models for shock damage and/or effective stress have been used successfully at S-Cubed in both the Geophysics Program (primarily for DARPA) and the Containment Support Program (for DNA) to simulate late time ground motions measured at NTS in many different rock types

  18. Strength Training: For Overall Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of falls. This can help you maintain independence as you age. Manage chronic conditions. Strength training ... 2016. Resistance training for health and fitness. American College of Sports Medicine. https://www.acsm.org/public- ...

  19. World strength map: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.; Mooney, Walter

    2010-05-01

    Rheology and strength of the Earth's lithosphere have been debated since the beginning of the last century, when the concept of a strong lithosphere overlying viscous asthenosphere was introduced. The issue of strength of the lithospheric plates and their spatial and temporal variations is important for many geodynamic applications. For rocks with given mineralogical composition and microstructure, temperature is one of the most important parameters controlling rheology. We present the first world strength map obtained from global thermal and crustal models. Temperature estimates for the deeper horizons of the lithosphere, where the heat transport is mostly conductive, requires a precise knowledge of many crustal parameters (mainly thermal conductivity and heat production), which are extremely uncertain. Therefore, we use a combination of indirect approaches, such as seismic tomography and geothermal analysis. Furthermore, we implement a global crustal model on the base of previous compilations. Lithology of the upper and lower crust was classified based on tectonic maps of the World in agreement with the previous study of Tesauro et al. (2009). The results show a good correspondence between strength values and geological features. We observe some general tendency for old cratons and areas affected by the Tertiary volcanism, characterized by high and low strength values, respectively. At the same time, relevant differences in the strength distribution between similar structures are found.

  20. Fatigue Strength of Titanium Risers - Defect Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babalola, Olusegun Tunde

    2001-07-01

    This study is centred on assessment of the fatigue strength of titanium fusion welds for deep-water riser's applications. Deep-water risers are subjected to significant fatigue loading. Relevant fatigue data for titanium fusion welds are very scarce. Hence there is a need for fatigue data and life prediction models for such weldments. The study has covered three topics: Fatigue testing, Fractography and defect assessment, and Fracture Mechanics modelling of fatigue crack growth. Two series of welded grade of titanium consisting of 14 specimens in each series were fatigue tested under constant amplitude loading. Prior to fatigue testing, strain gauge measurements of some specimens was conducted to enable the definition of stress range in the fatigue assessment procedure. The results were compared with finite solid element analysis and related to fatigue stresses in a riser pipe wall. Distribution and geometry of internal and surface defects both in the as-welded and in the post-weld machined conditions were assessed using fractography. This served as a tool to determine the fatigue initiation point in the welds. Fracture mechanics was applied to model fatigue strength of titanium welds with initiation from weld defects. Two different stress intensity factor formulations for embedded eccentrically placed cracks were used for analysis of elliptical cracks with the major axis parallel and close to one of the free surfaces. The methods were combined to give a satisfactory model for crack growth analysis. The model analyses crack growth of elliptical and semi-elliptical cracks in two directions, with updating of the crack geometry. Fatigue strength assessment was conducted using two crack growth models, the Paris-Erdogan relation with no threshold and the Donahue et al. relation with an implied threshold. The model was validated against experimental data, with a discussion on the choice of crack growth model. (author)

  1. Push-out strength of modified Portland cements and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Francesco; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Huffman, Bradford; Sword, Jeremy; Agee, Kelli; Siboni, Francesco; Tay, Franklin; Prati, Carlo; Pashley, David

    2010-02-01

    Modified calcium-silicate cements derived from white Portland cement (PC) were formulated to test their push-out strength from radicular dentin after immersion for 1 month. Slabs obtained from 42 single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared with 0.6 mm diameter holes, then enlarged with rotary instruments. After immersion in EDTA and NaOC1, the holes were filled with modified PCs or ProRoot MTA, Vitrebond and Clearfil SE. Different concentrations of phyllosilicate (montmorillonite-MMT) were added to experimental cements. ProRoot MTA was also included as reference material. Vitrebond and Clearfil SE were included as controls. Each group was tested after 1 month of immersion in water or PBS. A thin-slice push-out test on a universal testing machine served to test the push-out strength of materials. Results were statistically analyzed using the least squares means (LSM) method. The modified PCs had push-out strengths of 3-9.5 MPa after 1 month of immersion in water, while ProRoot MTA had 4.8 MPa. The push-out strength of PC fell after incubation in PBS for 1 month, while the push-out strength of ProRoot MTA increased. There were no significant changes in Clearfil SE Bond or Vitrebond after water or PBS storage.

  2. Shear Strength of Stabilized Kaolin Soil Using Liquid Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Fazlina, M. I. S.; Nizam, Z. M.; Fairus, Y. M.; Hakimi, M. N. A.; Riduan, Y.; Faizal, P.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the suitability of polymer in soil stabilization by examining its strength to withstand compressive strength. Throughout this research study, manufactured polymer was used as a chemical liquid soil stabilizer. The liquid polymer was diluted using a proposed dilution factor of 1 : 3 (1 part polymer: 3 parts distilled water) to preserve the workability of the polymer in kaolin mixture. A mold with a diameter of 50 mm and a height of 100 mm was prepared. Kaolin soil was mixed with different percentages of polymer from 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30% and 35% of the mass of the kaolin clay sample. Kaolin mixtures were tested after a curing period of 3 days, 7 days, 14 days and 28 days respectively. The physical properties were determined by conducting a moisture content test and Atterberg limit test which comprise of liquid limit, plastic limit and shrinkage limit. Meanwhile, the mechanical properties of the soil shear strength were identified through an unconfined compressive strength (UCS) test. Stabilized kaolin soil showed the highest compressive strength value when it was mixed with 35% of polymer compared to other percentages that marked an increment in strength which are 45.72% (3 days), 67.57% (7 days), 81.73% (14 days) and 77.84% (28 days). Hence, the most effective percentage of liquid polymer which should be used to increase the strength of kaolin soil is 35%.

  3. An appropriate relationship between flexural strength and compressive strength of palm kernel shell conc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Tunde Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the determination of an appropriate compressive–flexural strength model of palm kernel shell concrete (PKSC. The direct and indirect Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV measurements, with respective to mechanical properties of compression (cube and flexural (slab elements, of concrete at various mixes and water/cement (w/c ratios were made. A total of 225 cubes and 15 slabs of the PKSC were casted for nominal mixes of 1:1:1, 1:1:2 and 1:11/2:3, and varying (w/c ratios of 0.3–0.7 at interval of 0.1. The test elements were cured for 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 91 days in water at laboratory temperature. The elements were then subjected to nondestructive testing using the Pundit apparatus for determination of direct ultrasonic wave velocity and the elastic modulus at the various ages. The cubes were subsequently subjected to destructive compressive test. The 28-day compressive strength–UPV and strength–age statistical relationships at w/c ratio of 0.5 determined from the velocity–strength data set in linear, power, logarithm, exponential and polynomial trend forms. The polynomial trend line in the form y = aln(x at R2 value of 0.989, found appropriate, among others, was proposed for the formulation of the compressive strength–flexural strength model of PKSC at w/c ratio of 0.5.

  4. The Compressive Strength of High-Performance Concrete and Ultrahigh-Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Kadri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The compressive strength of silica fume concretes was investigated at low water-cementitious materials ratios with a naphthalene sulphonate superplasticizer. The results show that partial cement replacement up to 20% produce, higher compressive strengths than control concretes, nevertheless the strength gain is less than 15%. In this paper we propose a model to evaluate the compressive strength of silica fume concrete at any time. The model is related to the water-cementitious materials and silica-cement ratios. Taking into account the author's and other researchers’ experimental data, the accuracy of the proposed model is better than 5%.

  5. Efeito da utilização de bandas elásticas durante aulas de hidroginástica na força muscular de mulheres Effect of the use of elastic bands during water gymnastics classes in muscular strength of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo Pinto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar as modificações na força/resistência muscular após quatro semanas de hidroginástica com e sem a utilização de bandas elásticas. Participaram do estudo 26 mulheres com idade entre 50 e 60 anos, praticantes de hidroginástica havia pelo menos seis meses. Pré e pós-treinamento, os sujeitos foram submetidos aos testes de flexão de cotovelo, impulsão vertical sem auxílio dos braços e levantar da cadeira em 30 segundos. Os sujeitos foram divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos: treinamento elástico (GTE e treinamento convencional (GTC. O GTE realizou a aula de hidroginástica com incremento de banda elástica como sobrecarga adicional. O GTC realizou aula de hidroginástica sem sobrecarga adicional. Para o tratamento estatístico foi utilizada análise de variância (ANOVA por dois fatores, seguida do teste post hoc de Tukey com P The purpose of this study was to compare the muscle strength/resistance changes after four weeks of water gymnastics with and without the use of elastic bands. 26 women aged 50-60 years, who have attended water gymnastics classes for at least six month participated in the study. The subjects were pre and post-training assessed through elbow flexion, vertical jump without arm movements and 30-second stand and seat chair tests. The sample was randomly divided into two groups: Elastic band group (EBG and Regular training group (RTG. EBG was engaged in water gymnastics classes program with the elastic band as additional load, while GTC engaged in only regular water gymnastics classes with no additional apparatus. The statistic analysis chosen was the two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test with p 0.01. Tukey post hoc test evidenced significant increase pre-post training period at EBG program for all studied variables. These results suggest that elastic bands are an interesting strategy for water gymnastics classes to increase muscle strength of upper and lower limbs in women.

  6. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  7. Water bath accelerated curing of concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    Water bath methods for accelerating the strength development of portland cement concrete were investigated in a two phase study as follows. Phase I - Participation in a cooperative accelerated strength testing program sponsored by the American Societ...

  8. Strength of biodegradable polypropylene tapes filled with a modified starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinidiktova, N. S.; Ermolovich, O. A.; Goldade, V. A.; Pinchuk, L. S.

    2006-05-01

    The possibility of creating composite materials with high deformation and strength characteristics based on polypropylene (PP) and a natural polysaccharide in the form of a modified starch (MS) has been studied. The modified starch is shown to interact chemically with functional groups of PP, thereby positively affecting the physicomechanical properties, structure, and water absorption properties of films and oriented flat fibers based on starch-filled PP. The strength characteristics of both oriented and unoriented composites are 1.5-2.0 times as high as those of the initial PP. The water absorption ability of the materials varies symbatically with content of MS, which points to the dominant contribution of interactions at the PP-MS interface. The introduction of MS into synthetic polymers offers a possibility of producing new ecologically safe materials with high strength characteristics.

  9. The effects of alloying elements on strength, hardenability, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They were then air cooled before being cold rolled to ~0.9mm and annealed. Dual phase heat treatment was carried out at 755oC followed by quenching in water. Tensile and hardenability tests were carried out. Results showed that alloying elements in steel increased strength in the dual phase steels by amounts ranging ...

  10. Influence of curing regimes on compressive strength of ultra high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper is aimed to identify an efficient curing regime for ultra high performance concrete (UHPC), to achieve a target compressive strength more than 150 MPa, using indigenous materials. The thermal regime plays a vital role due to the limited fineness of ingredients and low water/binder ratio. By activation of the ...

  11. Effect Of Bulk Density Variation On The Compression Strength Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports a study conducted to assess the influence of variation of bulk density on compression strength of clay-bonded sand. Five sand mixes containing silica sand, sodium silicate gel (1 wt. % to 5 wt. %), potters' clay (2 wt. %), and about 5 wt. % water were produced. Each mix was divided into three portions to ...

  12. effect of crude oil contamination on the compressive strength

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    exploitation, refining and product marketing which is concentrated in Niger ... and simulated water/crude oil mix. The samples were .... (Control Mix). A good concrete is expected to have its compressive strength increased with age. Similar to those suggested by British Cement Association, BCA [21]. This was actualized by ...

  13. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Compressive Strength Of Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents the results of investigation of the effects of elevated temperatures on the compressive strength of Grade 40 concrete. A total of thirty cube specimens were cast, cured in water at ambient temperature in the laboratory and subjected to various temperature regimes before testing. A concrete mix of 1:1:3 ...

  14. optimisation of compressive strength of periwinkle shell aggregate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... found to be 19.50N/mm2corresponding to a mix ratio of 1:3:6 (cement, sand and periwinkle shell) at a water-cement ratio of 0.65. With the formulated ... their own accommodation. As a result, alternative materials to ..... Compressive Strength of Rice Husk Ash Pozzolan. Concrete” Journal of Scientific and ...

  15. Formulation and Evaluation of Bioadhesive Cyproheptadine Tablets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    carried out by shear stress measurement. [12,13]. Two smooth, polished glass slides were selected, one of which was fixed with an adhesive onto a fixed surface. The second. (upper) slide was tied with a thread, which was then passed over a pulley and tied to a pan. The weight of the pan and frictional force of the upper ...

  16. Formulation and Evaluation of Bioadhesive Cyproheptadine Tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 4 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Assembly of Colloidal Materials Using Bioadhesive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Tohver, Valeria; Crocker, John C.; Weitz, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We have pursued the use of biological crosslinking molecules of several types to make colloidal materials at relatively low volume fraction of colloidal particles. The objective is to make binary alloys of colloidal particles, made of two different colloidal particles coated with complementary biological lock-and-key binding molecules, which assemble due to the biological specificity. The long-term goal is to use low affinity lock-and-key biological interactions, so that the can anneal to form crystalline states. We have used a variety of different surface chemistries in order to make colloidal materials. Our first system involved using selectin-carbohydrate (sialyl-Lewis) interactions; this chemistry is derived from immune system. This chemical interaction is of relatively low affinity, with timescales for dissociation of several seconds. Furthermore, the adhesion mediated by these molecules can be reversed by the chelation of calcium atoms; thus assembled structures can be disassembled reversibly. Our second system employed avidin-biotin chemistry. This well-studied system is of high affinity, and is generally irreversible on a laboratory time-scale. Thus, we would expect selectin-carbohydrate interactions at high molecular density and avidin-biotin interactions to give kinetically-trapped structures; however, at low densities, we would expect significant differences in the structure and dynamics of the two materials, owing to their very different release rates. We have also begun to use a third chemistry - DNA hybridization. By attaching single stranded DNA oligonucleotide chains to beads, we can drive the assembly of colloidal materials by hybridization of complementary DNA chains. It is well known that DNA adenosine-thymine (A-T) and guanine-cytosine (G-C) bases hybridize pairwise with a Gibbs free energy change of 1.7 kcal/mol per base; thus, the energy of the assembly can be modulated by altering the number of complementary bases in the DNA chains. Using these different crosslinking molecules, we have assembled colloidal materials from different-sized colloidal particles, A and B. In the first sets of experiment, we used high densities of adhesion molecules, and 0.96 micron (A) and 5.5 micron (B) diameter particles. The high density of adhesion molecules means that the structures are kinetically trapped in nonequilibrium configurations. The structure of the suspension can be varied by changing the number ratio of the two types of colloidal particles, NA and NB, where A is the smaller particle. With carbohydrate-selectin or avidin-biotin interactions, large NA/NB leads to the formation of colloidal micelles, with the large center B particle surrounded by many smaller A particles. As the ratio NA/NB decreases, the structures become more extended, approaching the formation of macro-Rouse polymers - extended linear chains where A beads are connected with intervening small B linkers.

  18. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in contrast possessed no adhesion to the pure component C11EG6OH SAM at both temperatures examined, 25 and 40°C. The protein adhesion data to the mixed SAM also supports the hypothesis that the mixed SAM displays a non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it displays a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. Advancing contact angles obtained through tensiometry were used to find the surface free energy of the mixed SAM before and after the thermal response using the van Oss-Good-Chaudhury method. The surface tension values obtained, 42 and 38 mN/m for 22 and 40°C, respectively, are not dissimilar enough with regard to error to make conclusions. In a similar manner, the surface free energy of another mixed SAM composed of alkyl and trimethylamine thiolates was also calculated. PNIPAAm brushes grown on a silicon substrate by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were imaged by AFM and characterized by XPS. The height of the resulting brushes could be controlled from ˜5 to 55 nm by reaction time. A thermal response was observed for polymer brushes with a length greater than 20 nm. For polymer brush lengths greater than 20 nm, the static contact angle at 22°C was 35° and varied from 60 to 80° at 40°C. The thermal response was also observed using the captive bubble method. Force-distance curves of the PNIPAAm brushes were taken with an unmodified silicon nitride AFM cantilever at incremental temperature steps. At room temperature the force-distance data was fit to the Alexander-de Gennes model resulting in a hydrated polymer length of 235 nm. The Young's modulus was calculated using the Hertz model and changed from ˜80 MPa at 26°C to ˜350 MPa at 40°C. The solvent condition of the Alexander-de Gennes model was set to the case of good solvent and showed close match to the force-distance data at 26°C. The match was not as close when the solvent condition was set to theta solvent condition and compared to the force-distance data at 40°C. Finally, the effective diffusion coefficients of a dye were obtained for the uptake, encapsulation, and release from a lipid bilayer coated mesoporous particle using a mathematical solution to the experimental system. The resulting effective diffusion coefficients are: 1*10-12 m2/s, 0.4*10-12 m2/s, and 0.7*10-12 m2/s for uptake, encapsulation, and release, respectively. The particles are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption measurements. In contrast to our hypothesis, the lipid bilayer did not completely inhibit diffusion of the rhodamine dye from the particles when encapsulated.

  19. Formulation of Bioadhesive Carbomer Gel Incorporating Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate carbomer gel to localize and target drug action in periodontal pockets. Methods: Diclofenac sodium (DS, anti-inflammatory) and metronidazole hydrochloride (MH, antibacterial) were loaded in gelatin microspheres using glutaraldehyde cross-linking. The microspheres were evaluated for drug loading, ...

  20. Formulation of Bioadhesive Carbomer Gel Incorporating Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Vels College of Pharmacy, Pallavaram, Chennai, India, 2Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash. University, Sunway Campus .... Q is the quantity of drug encapsulated in the microspheres (g),. tQ is the actual quantity ... an egg membrane with the help of adhesive tape while the other end was kept ...

  1. Bioadhesive polymeric platforms for transmucosal drug delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the various routes of drug delivery, the oral route is often preferred by the patient. However, peroral administration of drugs has disadvantages such as hepatic first-pass metabolism and enzymatic degradation within the gastrointestinal tract which constitutes a hindrance to oral administration of certain classes of drugs, ...

  2. Muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, S; Vissing, J

    2014-01-01

    is related to disease duration or gender. The aim of this study was to quantify the strength of patients with MG and investigate whether it is related to disease duration. METHODS: Eight muscle groups were tested by manual muscle testing and with a hand-held dynamometer in 38 patients with generalized MG...... and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The disease duration was recorded and compared with strength measures. RESULTS: On average, muscle strength was decreased by 28% compared with controls (Pstrength measures in individual patients did not differ, suggesting that the muscle...... force reported was not subject to fatigue, but reflected fixed weakness. The male patients showed a greater reduction in muscle force in all eight muscle groups than women with MG (60% vs 77% of normal, Pstrength in shoulder abductors was most affected (51% vs 62...

  3. EFFECT OF SALT WATER IN THE PRODUCTION OF CONCRETE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    fresh water, salt water, compressive strength, flexural strength, setting time. 1. Introduction ... hardening process, it generates shrinkage and heat dissipation .... strength ranges from 6.55-11.13N/mm2 and. 6.26-10.76N/mm2 for fresh and salt water re-. Table 1: Result of sieve analysis of fine aggregate. Standard sieve size.

  4. Withdrawal Strength and Bending Yield Strength of Stainless Steel Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas R. Rammer; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that stainless steel nails have superior corrosion performance compared to carbon steel or galvanized nails in treated wood; however, their mechanical fastening behavior is unknown. In this paper, the performance of stainless steel nails is examined with respect to two important properties used in wood connection design: withdrawal strength...

  5. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Jobstvogt, N.; Böhnke-Henrichs, A.

    2016-01-01

    . Such an assessment could form the basis for improving ES thinking, further embedding it into environmental decisions and management.The Young Ecosystem Services Specialists (YESS) completed a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) analysis of ES through YESS member surveys. Strengths include the approach...... environmental awareness. Threats include resistance to change, and difficulty with interdisciplinary collaboration. Consideration of SWOT themes suggested five strategic areas for developing and implementing ES.The ES concept could improve decision-making related to natural resource use, and interpretation...

  6. Polynomial expansions and transition strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is statistical spectroscopy applied to determining strengths and strength sums of excitation processes in nuclei. The focus will be on a ds-shell isoscalar E2 study with detailed shell-model results providing the standard for comparison; similar results are available for isovector E2 and M1 and E4 transitions as well as for single-particle transfer and ν +- decay. The present study is intended to serve as a tutorial for applications where shell-model calculations are not feasible. The problem is posed and a schematic theory for strengths and sums is presented. The theory is extended to include the effect of correlations between H, the system Hamiltonian, and theta, the excitation operator. Associated with correlation measures is a geometry that can be used to anticipate the goodness of a symmetry. This is illustrated for pseudo SU(3) in the fp-shell. Some conclusions about fluctuations and collectivity that one can deduce from the statistical results for strengths are presented

  7. Fast electromagnetic field strength probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Serra, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    Diode detectors and thermocouple detectors are conventionally used to measure electromagnetic field strength. Both detectors have some disadvantages for applications where a fast response and a high dynamic range is required. The diode detector is limited in dynamic range. The dynamic range is

  8. Comparing strengths of beliefs explicitly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, S.; de Jongh, D.

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a similar use in provability logic, formulas p > B q and p ≥ B q are introduced in the existing logical framework for discussing beliefs to express that the strength of belief in p is greater than (or equal to) that in q. Besides its usefulness in studying the properties of the concept

  9. Repair strength of dental amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chiayi; Speigel, Jason; Mjör, Ivar A

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that newly triturated amalgam condensed vertically on old amalgam was essential for establishing a bond between the new and old amalgams. Twelve rectangular bars were prepared with Dispersalloy and Tytin to establish their baseline flexure strength values. An additional 12 specimens were made and separated into 24 equal halves. All fracture surfaces were abraded with a flat end fissure bur. Twelve surfaces were paired with the original amalgam, and the remaining 12 surfaces were repaired with a different amalgam. At first, freshly triturated amalgam was condensed vertically on the floor of the specimen mold (Group A). The majority of specimens repaired with Group A failed to establish bond at the repair interface. All repair surfaces were abraded again and prepared by a second method. A metal spacer was used to create a four-wall cavity to facilitate vertical condensation directly on the repair surface (Group B). The specimens were stored in ambient air for seven days prior to flexure testing. The strength of specimens repaired with Group B ranged from 26% to 54% of the baseline specimens. ANOVA showed that amalgams repaired with a different amalgam yielded higher strength values than those repaired with the original amalgam, and the baseline specimens exhibited significantly higher strength values than all the repaired specimens.

  10. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  11. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bull, J.W.; Jobstvogt, N.; Böhnke-Henrichs, A.; Mascarenhas, A.; Sitas, N.; Baulcomb, C.; Lambini, C.K.; Rawlins, M.; Baral, H.; Zähringer, J.; Carter-Silk, E.; Balzan, M.V.; Kenter, J.O.; Häyhä, T.; Petz, K.; Koss, R.

    2016-01-01

    The ecosystem services concept (ES) is becoming a cornerstone of contemporary sustainability thought. Challenges with this concept and its applications are well documented, but have not yet been systematically assessed alongside strengths and external factors that influence uptake. Such an

  12. Mixture proportioning of fly ash-concretes based on mortar strength and flow data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusrat, A.; Tahir, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    A method of mixture proportioning of fly ash concretes is presented. The method is based on the strength and flow data of a minimum of nine fly ash-cement mortars. The essence of the method is that three fly ash-binder ratios are to be combined with three water-binder ratios in the range of interest. The strength and water demand data are analyzed for constructing mixture proportion charts. The strength vs. water-binder ratio charts are prepared by down-scaling the 50-mm mortar strength to the 150-mm standard concrete cylinders. The method is illustrated with the help of examples. The trial mixtures proportioned using the proposed methods have reasonably achieved the 28 day target strengths. (author)

  13. To What Degree Thermal Cycles Affect Chalk Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livada, Tijana; Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar Inger

    and water saturated chalk. Sixty disks of dry Kansas chalk exposed to different number of temperature cycles were tested for tensile strength using a Brazilian test. Changes in elastic properties as function of number of temperature cycles of the same chalk, but now saturated in water, were studied using...... triaxial cell experiments. For dry rock, no significant effects of temperature cycling was found on average tensile strength, however the range of the tensile failure stress is doubled for the samples exposed to 50 temperature cycles, as opposed to those to none. For water saturated cores, the temperature...... cycling had a significant effect and a significant accumulative irreversible deformation was seen for the core exposed to cyclical temperature variations, so that the elastic bulk modulus consequently increased more than for a core that had been tested at constant temperature. The inconsistency...

  14. Influência da imersão em água na resistência mecânica de misturas solo-grits compactadas e curadas com vistas a aplicações em estradas florestais Influence of water submersion on the mechanical strength of compacted and cured soil-grits mixtures for forest roads applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Sérgio Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da imersão em água dos corpos-de-prova sobre a resistência mecânica de misturas solo-grits. Trabalhou-se com dois solos da cidade de Viçosa, localizada na Zona da Mata Norte de Minas Gerais, Brasil, respectivamente de texturas predominantemente argilosa e arenosa e com o resíduo sólido industrial grits, um subproduto da indústria de celulose. Determinaram-se os parâmetros de resistência mecânica California Bearing Ratio (CBR e Resistência à Compressão Não-Confinada (RCNC de corpos-de-prova compactados nas energias de compactação referentes aos ensaios Proctor intermediário e Proctor modificado, com teores de grits na faixa de 4 a 28% e períodos de cura de 0, 7 e 28 dias. Com relação ao parâmetro CBR, os ensaios foram realizados segundo a metodologia tradicional (imersão em água dos corpos-de-prova por 96 horas e sem a imersão em água, visando determinar possíveis perdas na capacidade-suporte das misturas. No que tange ao parâmetro compressão não-confinada, os ensaios foram realizados em obediência à norma brasileira para misturas solo-cimento (imersão em água durante quatro horas antes da ruptura dos corpos-de-prova e sem a fase de imersão em água. Os resultados indicaram que a imersão em água dos corpos-de-prova influenciou significativamente a resistência mecânica das misturas solo-grits, que foram dependentes do tipo de ensaio empregado, tipo de solo, teor de grits, energia de compactação e período de cura.This paper address the influence of water submersion on mechanical strength parameters of soil-grits specimens. Two residual soils, predominantly clayey and sandy soils from the city of Viçosa, located in the State of Minas Gerais, "Zona da Mata Norte", Brazil, and waste from cellulose industry were used in the study. The laboratory testing program consisted of CBR (California Bearing Ratio and UCS (Unconfined Compression Strength of specimens prepared with waste contents

  15. Compression specific toughness of normal strength steel fiber reinforced concrete (NSSFRC) and high strength steel fiber reinforced concrete (HSSFRC)

    OpenAIRE

    Marara,Khaled; Erenb,Özgür; Yitmena,İbrahim

    2011-01-01

    Compression toughness tests were carried out on concrete cylinders reinforced with three different aspect ratios of hooked-end steel fibers 60, 75, and 83 and six different percentages of steel fibers 0.5, 1.0, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, and 2.0% by volume of concrete. The w/c ratio used for the normal strength steel fiber reinforced concrete mixes (NSSFRC) was 0.55, and the water-cementitious ratio (w/c+s) for the high strength fiber reinforced concrete mixes (HSSFRC) was 0.31. For each mix, three tes...

  16. Effect of light-activation methods and water storage on the flexural strength of two composite resins and a compomer Efeito da fotoativação e da armazenagem em água na resistência à flexão de duas resinas compostas e um compômero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Eloy Rodrigues Filho

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the flexural strength of three composite resins recommended for direct esthetic restorations: a polyacid modified composite (Dyract AP, a unimodal composite resin (Filtek Z250 and a hybrid composite resin (Point 4. The variation factors, apart from the type of composite resin, were the light activation method and the water storage period. The composite resins were light-cured in continuous mode (40 s, 500 mW/cm² or in ramp mode (0-800 mW/cm² for 10 s followed by 30 s at 800 mW/cm² and stored for 24 hours or 30 days in distilled water at 37°C. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test for multiple comparisons (alpha = 0.05. The composite resin Z250 presented the highest mean flexural strength (166.74 MPa and Dyract AP presented the lowest one (129.76 MPa. The storage for 30 days decreased the flexural strength in ramp mode (24 h: 156.64 MPa; 30 days: 135.58 MPa. The light activation method alone did not lead to different flexural strength values.O presente estudo analisou a resistência à flexão de três compósitos recomendados para restaurações estéticas diretas: um compósito poliácido-modificado (Dyract AP, uma resina composta unimodal (Filtek Z250 e uma resina composta híbrida (Point 4. Os fatores de variação, além do tipo de compósito, foram o método de fotoativação e o período de armazenagem em água. Os materiais foram fotoativados continuamente por 40 s (500 mW/cm² ou com intensidade de luz crescente (0-800 mW/cm² por 10 s seguidos de 30 s a 800 mW/cm². Os períodos de armazenagem foram de 24 horas ou 30 dias em água destilada a 37°C. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância e ao teste de Tukey para comparações múltiplas (alfa = 0,05. A resina composta Z250 apresentou a maior média de resistência à flexão (166,74 MPa e a Dyract AP, a menor (129,76 MPa. A armazenagem por 30 dias diminuiu a resistência à flexão para o método de fotoativação crescente (24 h

  17. Material Strength Models for Vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollaine, Stephen

    2005-07-01

    We have preliminary results of measurements of vanadium strength at 600 kb and 1 Mb, at strain rates between 10^7 and 10^8/s. The results are inconsistent with the Steinberg-Guinan [1] model, which is independent of strain rate, but can be made consistent with other models, such as PTW [2]. We show a variety of different strength models and compare them to the data. [1] DJ.Steinberg, S.G.Cochran, and M.W.Buinan, J. Appl. Phys. 51, 1498 (1980). [2] D.L. Preston, D.L.Tonks, and D.C.wallace, J. Appl. Phys. 93, 211 (2003). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  18. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    In the northern part of Vendsyssel, Denmark, the deposits made in the late glacial time are formed by the sea. The deposits are named after two mussels: Yoldia clay and Saxicava sand. However, in the southern part of Vendsyssel and in the area of Aalborg the clay and sand deposits from the late...... glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  19. Line strengths in WN stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leep, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The author has analyzed high-dispersion spectra of over 100 WN stars in the Galaxy and the Large Magellenic Cloud (LMC). Most of the spectra were obtained through 4-m telescopes (Conti, Leep, and Perry 1981). The measured strengths of the WN classification lines N III lambdalambda4634-41, N IV lambda4057, N V lambda4604 (Smith 1968) for stars on WN subtypes 2.5-8 are shown. The assignments of WN subtypes are based on visual estimates of ratios of line strengths according to the scheme of Smith (1968), except that stars appearing to be earlier than WN3 are classified as WN2 or WN2.5 as explained by van der Hucht et al. (1981) and by Conti, Leep and Perry (1981). (Auth.)

  20. Studies on diametral compressive strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awaji, Hideo; Sato, Sennosuke.

    1978-01-01

    A new approach to the diametral compressive tests using circular anvils is proposed on the basis of the analytical study given in the preceding paper. In this approach, the collapse at the contact edges can be avoided. The experimental results obtained by this method for several kinds of graphite and Italian Ondagata light marble are compared with those of the uniaxial tensile strength, and the discrepancy is discussed for a wide range of brittle materials. (auth.)

  1. Electronic Correlation Strength of Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, A.; C. Albers, R.; E. Christensen, N.

    2013-01-01

    A new electronic quantity, the correlation strength, is defined as a necessary step for understanding the properties and trends in strongly correlated electronic materials. As a test case, this is applied to the different phases of elemental Pu. Within the GW approximation we have surprisingly...... found a "universal" scaling relationship, where the f-electron bandwidth reduction due to correlation effects is shown to depend only upon the local density approximation (LDA) bandwidth and is otherwise independent of crystal structure and lattice constant....

  2. Strength and Microstructure of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Forex - one particular alumina ceramic, I our own detailed crack ample, the relatively large values of r, and c* for the VI observations, and those of...particularly toughness indices, 1i71", indicating that there is sonic the c° , T parameters. However, the indentation mcth- kind of trade -o1Tbetwecn...macroscopic and microsnpic odology takes us closer to the strengths of specimens toughness levels, and that this trade -off is cont’olled by with natural

  3. Long range supergravity coupling strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    A limit of 2x10 -13 has recently been deduced for the fractional difference between the gravitational masses of the K 0 and anti K 0 mesons. This limit is applied here to put stringent limits on the strengths of the long range vector-scalar gravitational couplings envisaged in supergravity theories. A weaker limit is inferred from the general relativistic fit to the precession of the orbit of the pulsar PSR1913+16. (orig.)

  4. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De

    2002-01-01

    Bond strength and hermeticity of plasma activated bonded (PAB) Si-Si interfaces are reported. Bonding of 100 mm Si(1 0 0) wafers was performed. An average bond strength of 9.0+/-3.9 MPa was achieved without performing any annealing steps. Cavities bonded in vacuum were found to be hermetic based...... on detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de......-ionised water (DIW), 24 h in 2.5% HF, 24 h in acetone and 60 s in a resist developer. By analysing the thin silicon oxide present on the surfaces to be bonded with optical methods, the influence of pre-cleaning and activation process parameters was investigated....

  5. STUDY OF EXPERIMENTAL SAMPLES WITH DIFFERENT CONFIGURATIONS AT THE JOINTS COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Magomedova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article marked the behavior of concrete under the action of water, the effect of moisture and water saturation on the performance and durability of concrete waterproofing; offered special configuration interface, allowing to increase the strength characteristics of the concrete structure, the results of experimental studies; conclusions about the relationship configuration of joints and their strength.

  6. The relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength of pavement geopolymer grouting material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Han, X. X.; Ge, J.; Wang, C. H.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength of pavement geopolymer grouting material, 20 groups of geopolymer grouting materials were prepared, the compressive strength and flexural strength were determined by mechanical properties test. On the basis of excluding the abnormal values through boxplot, the results show that, the compressive strength test results were normal, but there were two mild outliers in 7days flexural strength test. The compressive strength and flexural strength were linearly fitted by SPSS, six regression models were obtained by linear fitting of compressive strength and flexural strength. The linear relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength can be better expressed by the cubic curve model, and the correlation coefficient was 0.842.

  7. Forearm Torque and Lifting Strength: Normative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Peter; Fredrikson, Per; Nilsson, Anders; Andersson, Jonny K; Kärrholm, Johan

    2018-02-10

    To establish reference values for new methods designed to quantitatively measure forearm torque and lifting strength and to compare these values with grip strength. A total of 499 volunteers, 262 males and 237 females, aged 15 to 85 (mean, 44) years, were tested for lifting strength and forearm torque with the Kern and Baseline dynamometers. These individuals were also tested for grip strength with a Jamar dynamometer. Standardized procedures were used and information about sex, height, weight, hand dominance, and whether their work involved high or low manual strain was collected. Men had approximately 70% higher forearm torque and lifting strength compared with females. Male subjects aged 26 to 35 years and female subjects aged 36 to 45 years showed highest strength values. In patients with dominant right side, 61% to 78% had a higher or equal strength on this side in the different tests performed. In patients with dominant left side, the corresponding proportions varied between 41% and 65%. There was a high correlation between grip strength and forearm torque and lifting strength. Sex, body height, body weight, and age showed a significant correlation to the strength measurements. In a multiple regression model sex, age (entered as linear and squared) could explain 51% to 63% of the total variances of forearm torque strength and 30% to 36% of lifting strength. Reference values for lifting strength and forearm torque to be used in clinical practice were acquired. Grip strength has a high correlation to forearm torque and lifting strength. Sex, age, and height can be used to predict forearm torque and lifting strength. Prediction equations using these variables were generated. Normative data of forearm torque and lifting strength might improve the quality of assessment of wrist and forearm disorders as well as their treatments. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of additional nanosilica of compressive strength on mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retno Setiati, N.

    2017-07-01

    The use of nanosilica as one of the innovations in concrete technology has developed very rapidly. Some research mentioned that nanosilica obtained from the synthesis process silica sand is a type of material that is as pozolan when added to the concrete mix, so as to accelerate the hydration process in concrete. With the addition of nanosilica into the concrete mix, the compressive strength of the concrete can be increased and it has a high durability. This study aims to determine the effect from the addition of nanosilica on mechanical properties of concrete. Laboratory testing is conducted by making the mortar test specimen size of 50 mm x 50 mm x 50 mm. The material used is composed of silica sand, nanosilica, gravel, superplasticizer, cement, and water. Nanosilica percentage amount is added as much as 5, 10, and 15% by weight of cement. Testing of mechanical properties such as compressive strength mortar done at age 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Based on the analysis and discussion obtained that at 28 days, mortar with the addition of 5% and 15% nanosilica has the compressive strength of 23 MPa. Addition nanosilika into the mortar to improve the mechanical properties by increasing the compressive strength of mortar. The compressive strength of mortar with the addition of 10% nanosilica is 19 MPa. The increase in compressive strength of mortar with the addition of 5% and 15% nano silica is 21% larger than the mortar with the addition of 10% nanosilica and without nanosilica. Nanosilica addition of more than 10% can cause agglomeration when mixed into the mortar so that the impact on the compressive strength of mortar.

  9. А new factor effecting gel strength of pectin polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Kholov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectin polysaccharides obtained from various raw materials have a different component composition and form gels with water, sugar and acid or calcium. In this study, an experimental approach the gelation properties of different pectin samples, varied from different sources, using new methods of hydrolysis and purification. Samples were obtained by hydrolysis of accelerated extraction of pectin and purified by diaultrfiltration, have a high gel strength. The highest gel strength have been found in series of high methoxyl (HM- pectin samples of apple, peach, orange and low methoxyl (LM- pectin samples of commercial citrus pectin and apple pectin obtained by new method. It is shown that in addition to the basic parameters (the content of galacturonic acid, degree of esterification, molecular weight and hidrodinamic radius macromolecule to affect gel strength pectins aggregation of macromolecules, which is determined by the z-average molecular weight. There were observed a clear pattern of the influence of the molecular weight on hydrodynamic parameters for both HM- and LM- pectin samples on the gel strength. It were shown that a high values of molecular weight, intrinsic viscosity, and radius of gyration of pectin samples can significantly increase gel strength, while the value of Mz oppositely influenced the gel strength. As a result, a systematic analysis of this parameter and its relationship to the average molecular weight found that indeed the ratio Mz/Mw for pectin’s is an crucial to assess the quality of pectin at the study of gel strength for pectin polysaccharides.

  10. Relationship between the Compressive and Tensile Strength of Recycled Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Dalati, R.; Haddad, S.; Matar, P.; Chehade, F.H

    2011-01-01

    Concrete recycling consists of crushing the concrete provided by demolishing the old constructions, and of using the resulted small pieces as aggregates in the new concrete compositions. The resulted aggregates are called recycled aggregates and the new mix of concrete containing a percentage of recycled aggregates is called recycled concrete. Our previous researches have indicated the optimal percentages of recycled aggregates to be used for different cases of recycled concrete related to the original aggregates nature. All results have shown that the concrete compressive strength is significantly reduced when using recycled aggregates. In order to obtain realistic values of compressive strength, some tests have been carried out by adding water-reducer plasticizer and a specified additional quantity of cement. The results have shown that for a limited range of plasticizer percentage, and a fixed value of additional cement, the compressive strength has reached reasonable value. This paper treats of the effect of using recycled aggregates on the tensile strength of concrete, where concrete results from the special composition defined by our previous work. The aim is to determine the relationship between the compressive and tensile strength of recycled concrete. (author)

  11. Properties of normal- and high-strength concrete containing metakaolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaguru, P. [Rutgers State Univ. of New Jersey, NJ (United States)

    2001-07-01

    A study was conducted which confirmed the findings of an earlier study that showed that the addition of metakaolin in concrete can improve the compressive strength of concrete and reduce its permeability. Metakaolin is made by calcining purified kaolinite at a specific temperature range. It combines with calcium hydroxide to form calcium silicate and calcium aluminate hydrates. The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of 5 and 9 per cent of metakaolin on plastic and hardened concrete properties. The independent variables were the size of the compressive strength, the type of cement, type of curing and the age at the time of testing. The specimens were cured at 100 per cent relative humidity at 22 degrees C or in warm water maintained at 50 degrees C. The response variables were slump, unit weight, air content, and concrete temperature for fresh concrete. Other variables were compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture and rapid chloride permeability for hardened concrete. It was shown that air content and curing temperature was not affected by metakaolin, and the effect on unit weight was negligible. Metakaolin was found to improve early compressive strength and also improved the strength at later ages. It also enhances the modulus of elasticity and has little effect on modulus rupture. Control concretes had a low chloride ion permeability. Metakaolin reduced the permeability even further. 8 refs., 11 tabs., 7 figs.

  12. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  13. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  14. Fast All-Season Soil STrength (FASST)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankenstein, Susan; Koenig, George G

    2004-01-01

    ... (Fast All-season Soil STrength) was developed. It calculates the ground's moisture content, ice content, temperature, and freeze/thaw profiles, as well as soil strength and surface ice and snow accumulation/depletion...

  15. Effect of Soorh Metakaolin on Concrete Compressive Strength and Durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Saand

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete durability is a key aspect for forecasting the expected life time of concrete structures. In this paper, the effect of compressive strength and durability of concrete containing metakaolin developed from a local natural material (Soorh of Thatta Distict of Sindh, Pakistan is investigated. Soorh is calcined by an electric furnace at 8000C for 2 hours to produce metakaolin. One mix of ordinary concrete and five mixes of metakaolin concrete were prepared, where cement is replaced by developed metakaolin from 5% to 25% by weight, with 5% increment step. The concrete durability was tested for water penetration, carbonation depth and corrosion resistance. The obtained outcomes demonstrated that, 15% replacement level of local developed metakaolin presents considerable improvements in concrete properties. Moreover, a considerable linear relationship was established between compressive strength and concrete durability indicators like water penetration, carbonation depth and corrosion resistance.

  16. Relationship between the edgewise compression strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study were used to determine the linear regression constants in the Maltenfort model by correlating the measured board edgewise compression strength (ECT) with the predicted strength, using the paper components' compression strengths, measured with the short-span compression test (SCT) and the ...

  17. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength

  18. Unexpectedly low tensile strength in concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, A.J.M.; Han, N.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    During an extensive investigation of some 25 concrete bridges and other structures suffering from alkali-silica reaction it has been found that the uniaxial tensile strength of the concrete was extremely low in relation to both the compressive strength and the splitting tensile strength. It is known

  19. Strengths and Satisfaction across the Adult Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Vaillant, George E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2003-01-01

    Positive psychology has recently developed a classification of human strengths (Peterson & Seligman, in press). We aimed to evaluate these strengths by investigating the strengths and life satisfaction in three adult samples recruited from the community (young adult, middle-aged, and older adult), as well as in the surviving men of the Grant study…

  20. Comparative Study of the Compressive Strength of Cement Laterite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The samples were cured by water sprinkling, before testing them for compressive strength at 7, 14, 21 and 28 curing days. Result of the tests showed that the specific gravity of RHA and WA are 2.20 and 2.13 respectively. The Absorption capacity of all the samples is in the range of 4.5 – 9.1%which is within the allowable ...

  1. Microleakage and Shear Bond Strength of a New Giomer Sealant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Capt Samuel N. Durham 2. Academic Title: Resident, Advanced Education in General Dentistry Residency (AEGD-2) 3. School/Department/Center: Air Force...34Microleakage and Shear Bond Strength of a New Giomer Sealant" 7. Intended publication/meeting: Operative Dentistry 8. "Required by" date: 30 June 2015...enamel junction to remove the root using a water- cooled slow-speed diamond saw (Isomet, Buehler). Retention cuts were placed in the lingual surface of

  2. Estimation of Compressive Strength of High Strength Concrete Using Non-Destructive Technique and Concrete Core Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkwan Ju

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the compressive strength of high strength concrete (HSC is an essential investigation for the maintenance of nuclear power plant (NPP structures. This study intends to evaluate the compressive strength of HSC using two approaches: non-destructive tests and concrete core strength. For non-destructive tests, samples of HSC were mixed to a specified design strength of 40, 60 and 100 MPa. Based on a dual regression relation between ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV and rebound hammer (RH measurements, an estimation expression is developed. In comparison to previously published estimation equations, the equation proposed in this study shows the highest accuracy and the lowest root mean square error (RMSE. For the estimation of compressive strength using concrete core specimens, three different concrete core diameters were examined: 30, 50, and 100 mm. Based on 61 measured compressive strengths of core specimens, a simple strength correction factor is investigated. The compressive strength of a concrete core specimen decreases as the core diameter reduces. Such a relation is associated with the internal damage of concrete cores and the degree of coarse aggregate within the core diameter from the extracting process of the cores. The strength estimation expressions was formulated using the non-destructive technique and the core strength estimation can be updated with further test results and utilized for the maintenance of NPP.

  3. Strength evaluation of socket joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the development of a set of equations that can be used to provide a relatively simple solution for identifying the strength of socket joints and for most cases avoid the need of more lengthy analyses. The analytical approach was verified by comparison of the contact load distributions to results obtained from a finite element analysis. The contacting surfaces for the specific joint in this analysis are in the shape of frustrums of a cone and are representative of the tapered surfaces in the socket-type joints used to join segments of model support systems for wind tunnels. The results are in the form of equations that can be used to determine the contact loads and stresses in the joint from the given geometry and externally applied loads. Equations were determined to define the bending moments and stresses along the length of the joints based on strength and materials principles. The results have also been programmed for a personal computer and a copy of the program is included.

  4. Determination of giant resonance strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serr, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Using theoretical strength functions to describe the different giant resonances expected at excitation energies of the order of (60-85)/Asup(1/3) MeV, we calculate the double differential cross sections d 2 sigma/dΩ dE associated with the reactions 208 Pb(α, α') and 90 Zr(α, α') (Esub(α) = 152 MeV). The angular distributions for the giant quadrupole and giant monopole resonances obtained from fits to these spectra, making simple, commonly used assumptions for the peak shapes and background, are compared to the original angular distributions. The differences between them are an indication of some of the uncertainties affecting the giant resonance strengths extracted from hadron inelastic scattering data. Fits to limited angular regions lead to errors of up to 50% in the value of the energy-weighted sum rule, depending on the angles examined. While it seems possible to extract the correct EWSR for the GMR by carrying out the analyses at 0 0 , no single privileged angle seems to exist in the case of the GQR. (orig.)

  5. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Sports Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 3 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. STRENGTH STUDIES ON FLY ASH BASED MAGNETIC WATER CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbani Raghu; Ch. Kireety

    2017-01-01

    The usage of concrete is growing with the exploding scope of construction industry. This called for the extensive production and usage of cement. Among all the ingredients of concrete, cement has deleterious effects on environment. As the usage of concrete is inevitable, pre-emptive measures should be taken to reduce the usage of cement in concrete while maintaining the same engineering properties. To address this cause, research has been carried out on various constituents and parameters of ...

  7. Environmental effect of water absorption and flexural strength of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Rowell, 1997). Another problem associated with ... Table 1. Components of red mud. Constituents. % (wt). Constituents. % (wt). Al2O3. 15.0. Fe2O3. 54.8. TiO2. 3.7. SiO2. 8.44. Na2O. 4.8. CaO. 2.5. P2O5. 0.67. V2O5. 0.38. Ga2O3. 0.096. Mn. 1.1.

  8. Effect of Acidic Water on Strength, Durability and Corrosion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Civil Engineering Research and Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    Posture assessment. The participants were asked to wear appropriate clothing so that the natural curves of the body could be seen. The subjects were asked to stand in their normal, comfortable anatomical position with the postural grid behind them and not to correct any postural abnormalities. A plumb line was used as a.

  10. Effect of Water on Coal Strength | Singh | Momona Ethiopian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Momona Ethiopian Journal of Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  11. Effects of material properties of HFDFRCC Using recycled fine aggregate on shear strength of RC beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratori, Yuhei; Watanabe, Ken

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we performed loading tests on RC beam specimens made of high-fluidity ductile-fiber-reinforced cementitious composites incorporating recycled fine aggregate with different water-binder ratios. We also performed nonlinear finite element analyses to investigate the effects of water-binder ratios and shear reinforcement bars on RC beam shear strength. Additionally, for some factors, we investigated the influence of the presence or absence of shear reinforcement bars on the shear strength of R-HFDFRCC RC beams. We found that fluctuations in the maximum load of the RC beam specimens attributable to differences in the water-binder ratio can generally be predicted if we understand the differences in the material properties (mainly compressive strength, tensile strength and ultimate tensile strain) of the tough, highly fluid cement compound materials incorporating recycled fine aggregate.

  12. Mechanical strength of stems in aquatic macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bociąg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In populations of submerged macrophytes, individuals are selected in terms of resistance to the effect of hydrodynamic forces. The aim of this study was to check whether individuals growing in river water are more tensile and bending resistant than plants occurring in places not exposed to flow stress. We determined the ultimate tensile strength of stems in four macrophyte species, Potamogeton natans, P. pectinatus, Batrachium fluitans and Chara fragilis, which occur in two environmental variants: in running (current velocity of 0.1-0.6 m/s-1 and stagnant water. In addition, flexure of P. natans stems from both environmental variants was examined. What is more, the type and arrangement of strengthening structures in stems of the plants under study were determined. Potamogeton natans stems are the most resistant to stretching (15.6±4.7 N, while stems of P. pectinatus (3.3±1.0 N and Batrachium fluitans (2.6±0.8 N are less resistant. Chara fragilis (0.6±0.3 N has the least resistant stems. Batrachium, Chara and P. pectinatus are more resistant to stretching if they occur in a river current, whereas P. natans, in stagnant lake water. Ultimate bending moment of P. natans stems from lakes is also much greater than of stems from a river (9.75•10-3 – 4.25•10-3 Nm as compared to 2.12•10-3 – 1.00•10-3 Nm. The resistance of stems to breaking is directly proportional to the stem and thallus cross sectional areas. On the one hand, in all the studied Cormophyta species, the more resistant stems (in P. natans from stagnant water, in the others from running water are thicker and characterised by a higher contribution of air spaces in the overall stem cross-section. On the other hand, the stems retain their species specific structure and have a similar proportion of strengthening elements.

  13. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM BOND STRENGTHS OF A GOLD STANDARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa TUNCER

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the micro tensile bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system following 1 year storage in water. Materials and Methods: 10 sound human molar teeth were used for micro tensile bond strength test. Twostep self-etch dentin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond® was applied to the flat dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Composite blocks (Z- 250; 3M ESPE of 5 mm in height have been prepared by using layering technique. Teeth were stored in water for 24 hours at 37°C and longitudinally sectioned to obtain dentin sticks of 1 mm2.Randomly selected samples from half of the teeth were immediately subjected to micro tensile test and. Remaining specimens were tested after 1 year storage in water. Bond strengths were calculated in megapascal (MPa. Results: Means and standard deviations of the Clearfil SE Bond® micro tensile bond strength values were, respectively, 37.31 ± 13.77 MPa and 24.78 ± 2.99 MPa after 24 h and 1 year of storage in water. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.031. Conclusion: Long-term storage in water decreased the micro tensile bond strength values of the twostep self-etch adhesive which has been accepted as the gold standard in bond strength tests.

  14. Movement velocity vs. strength training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário C. Marques

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensity during strength training has been commonly identified with relative load (percentage of one-repetition maximum, 1RM or with performing a given maximal number of repetitions in each set (XRM: 5RM, 10RM, 15 RM, etc.. Yet, none of these methods can be appropriate for precisely monitoring the real training effort in each training session. The first approach requires coaches to individually assess the 1RM value for each athlete. We may agree that expressing intensity as a percentage of the maximum repetition has the advantage that it can be used to program strength training for multiple athletes simultaneously, the loads being later transformed in absolute values (kg for each individual. Further, another advantage is that this expression of the intensity can clearly reflect the dynamics of the evolution of the training load if we understand the percentage of 1RM as an effort, and not as a simple arithmetic calculus. Nevertheless, direct assessment of 1RM has some possible disadvantages worth noting. It may be associated with risk of injury when performed incorrectly or by novice athlete’s and it is time-consuming and impractical for large groups. Moreover, the actual RM can change quite rapidly after only a few training sessions and often the obtained value is not the subject’s true maximum. The classic way to prescribe loading intensity is to determine, through trial and error, the maximum number of repetitions that one can be performed with a given submaximal weight. For example, 5RM refers to a weight that can only be lifted five times. Some studies identified the relationship between selected percentages of 1RM and the number of repetitions to failure, establishing a repetition maximum continuum. It is believed that certain performance characteristics are best trained using specific RM load ranges. This method eliminates the need for a direct 1RM test, but it is not without drawbacks either. Using exhaustive efforts is common

  15. Reference Values of Grip Strength, Prevalence of Low Grip Strength, and Factors Affecting Grip Strength Values in Chinese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ruby; Ong, Sherlin; Cheung, Osbert; Leung, Jason; Woo, Jean

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to update the reference values of grip strength, to estimate the prevalence of low grip strength, and to examine the impact of different aspects of measurement protocol on grip strength values in Chinese adults. A cross-sectional survey of Chinese men (n = 714) and women (n = 4014) aged 18-102 years was undertaken in different community settings in Hong Kong. Grip strength was measured with a digital dynamometer (TKK 5401 Grip-D; Takei, Niigata, Japan). Low grip strength was defined as grip strength 2 standard deviations or more below the mean for young adults. The effects of measurement protocol on grip strength values were examined in a subsample of 45 men and women with repeated measures of grip strength taken with a hydraulic dynamometer (Baseline; Fabrication Enterprises Inc, Irvington, NY), using pair t-tests, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland and Altman plots. Grip strength was greater among men than among women (P values than the Baseline hydraulic dynamometer (P values were also observed when the measurement was performed with the elbow extended in a standing position, compared with that with the elbow flexed at 90° in a sitting position, using the same dynamometer (P values of grip strength and estimated the prevalence of low grip strength among Chinese adults spanning a wide age range. These findings might be useful for risk estimation and evaluation of interventions. However, grip strength measurements should be interpreted with caution, as grip strength values can be affected by type of dynamometer used, assessment posture, and elbow position. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Importance of Muscular Strength: Training Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Nimphius, Sophia; Bellon, Christopher R; Stone, Michael H

    2018-04-01

    This review covers underlying physiological characteristics and training considerations that may affect muscular strength including improving maximal force expression and time-limited force expression. Strength is underpinned by a combination of morphological and neural factors including muscle cross-sectional area and architecture, musculotendinous stiffness, motor unit recruitment, rate coding, motor unit synchronization, and neuromuscular inhibition. Although single- and multi-targeted block periodization models may produce the greatest strength-power benefits, concepts within each model must be considered within the limitations of the sport, athletes, and schedules. Bilateral training, eccentric training and accentuated eccentric loading, and variable resistance training may produce the greatest comprehensive strength adaptations. Bodyweight exercise, isolation exercises, plyometric exercise, unilateral exercise, and kettlebell training may be limited in their potential to improve maximal strength but are still relevant to strength development by challenging time-limited force expression and differentially challenging motor demands. Training to failure may not be necessary to improve maximum muscular strength and is likely not necessary for maximum gains in strength. Indeed, programming that combines heavy and light loads may improve strength and underpin other strength-power characteristics. Multiple sets appear to produce superior training benefits compared to single sets; however, an athlete's training status and the dose-response relationship must be considered. While 2- to 5-min interset rest intervals may produce the greatest strength-power benefits, rest interval length may vary based an athlete's training age, fiber type, and genetics. Weaker athletes should focus on developing strength before emphasizing power-type training. Stronger athletes may begin to emphasize power-type training while maintaining/improving their strength. Future research should

  17. Cobalt: for strength and color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  18. Swimbladder on Fish Target Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunardi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses of target strength (TS for the Selar boops (Oxeye scad and Megalaspis cordyla (Torpedo scad, the most commercially fish in Malaysia. TS can be determined from in situ measurements and acoustic calculation of fish model. TS value, depth, and position (x-y-z of targeted fish can be viewed from echogram using FQ-80 Analyzer by in situ measurement. X-ray imaged can be deployed to develop the acoustic fish model. The percentage of length and upper surface area for swimbladder to body fish of Selar boops more than Megalaspis cordyla can be measured after X-ray process. The percentage of width and volume of swimbladders to its each body are no significantly difference for both fish. These data of swimbladder physic support the result of in situ measurement which TS of Megalaspis cordyla stronger Selar boops.

  19. Flexural strength of acrylic resins polymerized by different cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Barros Barbosa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of studies addressing the effect of microwave polymerization on the properties of acrylic resin, this method has received limited clinical acceptance. This study evaluated the influence of microwave polymerization on the flexural strength of a denture base resin. A conventional heat-polymerized (Clássico, a microwave-polymerized (Onda-Cryl and a autopolymerizing acrylic (Jet resins were used. Five groups were established, according to polymerization cycles: A, B and C (Onda-Cryl, short cycle - 500W/3 min, long - 90W/13 min + 500W/90 sec, and manufacturing microwave cycle - 320W/3 min + 0W/3 min + 720W/3 min; T (Clássico, water bath cycle - 74ºC/9h and Q (Jet, press chamber cycle - 50ºC/15 min at 2 bar. Ten specimens (65 x 10 x 3.3mm were prepared for each cycle. The flexural strength of the five groups was measured using a three-point bending test at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min. Flexural strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey's test was performed to identify the groups that were significantly different at 5% level. The microwave-polymerized groups showed the highest means (p<0.05 for flexural strength (MPa (A = 106.97 ± 5.31; B = 107.57 ± 3.99; C = 109.63 ± 5.19, and there were no significant differences among them. The heat-polymerized group (T showed the lowest flexural strength means (84.40 ± 1.68, and differ significantly from all groups. The specimens of a microwavable denture base resin could be polymerized by different microwave cycles without risk of decreasing the flexural strength.

  20. Benefits of Sealed-Curing on Compressive Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujeong; van Riessen, Arie; Chon, Chul-Min

    2016-01-01

    There is no standardized procedure for producing geopolymers; therefore, many researchers develop their own procedures for mixing and curing to achieve good workability and strength development. The curing scheme adopted is important in achieving maximum performance of resultant geopolymers. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sealed and unsealed curing on mechanical strength of geopolymers. Fly ash-based geopolymers cured in sealed and unsealed moulds clearly revealed that retention of water during curing resulted in superior strength development. The average compressive strength of sealed-cured geopolymers measured after 1 day of curing was a modest 50 MPa, while after 7 day curing the average compressive strength increased to 120~135 MPa. In the unsealed specimens the average compressive strength of geopolymers was lower; ranging from 60 to 90 MPa with a slight increase as the curing period increased. Microcracking caused by dehydration is postulated to cause the strength decrease in the unsealed cured samples. These results show that water is a crucial component for the evolution of high strength three-dimensional cross-linked networks in geopolymers. PMID:28773720

  1. Development of predictive equations for lifting strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine relationship between lifting strengths of male and female subjects and body posture, type of lift (stoop or squat) and velocity of lift. Thirty normal young adults (18 males and 12 females) volunteered for the study. All subjects were required to perform a total of 56 tasks. Of these, 28 were stoop lifts and 28 were squat lifts. In each of the categories of stoop and squat lifts, the strengths were tested in standard posture, isokinetic (linear velocity of 500 mm/s), and isometric modes at half, three-quarters and full horizontal individual reach distances in sagittal, 30 degrees lateral and 60 degrees lateral planes. The strengths were measured using a static dynamic strength tester with a load cell and an IBM microcomputer with an A/D card. The peak and average strength values were extracted and statistically compared across conditions and gender (ANOVA). Finally a multiple regression analysis was carried out to predict strength as a function of reach, posture and velocity of lift. The ANOVA revealed a highly significant effect of gender, reach, plane and velocity (p < 0.01). All regression equations (108) were significant (p < 0.01), and more than 70% of variance in lifting strength was accounted for by the anthropometric variables and sagittal plane strength values. Such an established relationship allows one to predict the human lifting strength capabilities for industrial application based on simple anthropometric and strength characteristics.

  2. Strength and Stiffness of Stabilized Alluvial Silt under Frost Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Yellow River alluvial silt was stabilized into pavement base materials for cold regions. The stabilizing additives were cement, fly ash, and lime, which were included in a range of combinations and dosages when mixed with the silt. Freeze-thaw cyclic impacts were conducted on the treated samples to assess materials performance of withstanding the frost actions. The tests were conducted on samples cured for 7 days to up to 180 days. Test results show that the cement-fly ash-treated samples outperform the other two stabilization categories with respect to material strength and stiffness developed under both normal and frost conditions. Under the normal conditions, the material unconfined compressive (UC strength rises to 3.0 MPa on day 28 depending on the cement and fly ash dosage used. If subjected to frost actions, the fly ash inclusions warrant a residual UC strength value of 1.3 MPa and above. The antifrost performance of the cement-fly ash-treated samples is related to thermal buffer capacity of the fly ash particles. Water adsorption and material soundness results agree with the strength and stiffness development. An optimal dosage was 3–6% for the cement and 0.3 for cement to fly ash mass ratio.

  3. Factors affecting strength and durability of densified biomass products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliyan, Nalladurai; Vance Morey, R. [Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, 1390 Eckles Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Effectiveness of a densification process to create strong and durable bonding in densified products such as pellets, briquettes, and cubes can be determined by testing the strength (i.e., compressive resistance, impact resistance, and water resistance), and durability (i.e., abrasion resistance) of the densified products. These tests can indicate the maximum force/stress that the densified products can withstand, and the amount of fines produced during handling, transportation, and storage. In this article, the procedures used for measuring the strength and durability of the densified products are discussed. The effects of constituents of the feed such as starch, protein, fiber, fat, lignin and extractives; feed moisture content; feed particle size and its distribution; feed conditioning temperature/preheating of feed; added binders; and densification equipment variables (forming pressure, and pellet mill and roll press variables) on the strength and durability of the densified products are reviewed. This article will help select process parameters to produce strong and durable densified products from new biomass feedstocks or animal feed formulations. Guidelines for developing standards on criteria for the acceptance levels of strength and durability of the densified products are presented. (author)

  4. Size effect in resin/glass composite flexure strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, G R; McCool, J I; Boberick, K G; Zhang, H Q

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that composite restorative materials possess an elastic-brittle nature and therefore will exhibit a size effect for flexure strength data. The experimental material consisted of 20 wt% 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA, 10 wt% colloidal silica, and 70 wt% Sr glass and was cured by light irradiation. Two sizes of flexure specimens were fabricated: 3.2x1.6x35 mm, and 6.25x3.1x35 mm. Half of the specimens made were soaked to equilibrium weight gain in 50:50 ethanol:water. The fracture strengths were measured in four-point bending tests. The beams under load were modelled by the finite element package ABAQUS. A statistical fracture mechanics methodology embodied in a public domain computer program called CARES/LIFE, developed by NASA, utilized the ABAQUS input and the fracture strengths of the smaller specimens to predict the fracture strengths of the larger specimens. In making the computation it used an approach that combines a Weibull distribution of flaw size with Batdorf's fracture mechanical model for failure at a material flaw. Both the soaked and unsoaked specimens exhibited Weibull behaviour, with shape parameters ranging from 4.04 to 8.15. Soaking had a clearly detrimental effect on the strengths of specimens of both sizes, and produced a comparable percentage reduction in the estimated scale parameter of the fracture strength distribution. Both the soaked and unsoaked specimens also exhibited a clear and comparable size effect, i.e. the larger specimens had a fracture strength that was lower than that of the smaller specimens by roughly the same percentage. Moreover, the magnitude of the size effect was well predicted by the CARES/LIFE methodology for both the soaked and the dry specimens. The elastic-brittle character of both soaked and unsoaked composite specimens was validated by load-deflection data, the magnitude of the Weibull shape parameters of the observed fracture strength data (<10), and the observed effect

  5. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    Weld strength testing of single spots in DP600 steel is presented for the three typical testing procedures, i.e. tensile-shear, cross-tension and peel testing. Spot welds are performed at two sets of welding parameters and strength testing under these conditions is presented by load......-elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...... the size and shape of the weld nugget, these properties include the new strength of the material in the weld and the heat affected zone based on the predicted hardness resulting from microstructural phase changes simulated during cooling of the weld before strength testing. Comparisons between overall...

  6. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  7. Evaluation of the Compressive Strength of Cement-Spent Resins Matrix Mixed with Bio char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalina Laili; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Zalina Laili; Mohd Abdul Wahab; Nur Azna Mahmud; Nurfazlina Zainal Abidin

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of compressive strength of cement-spent resins matrix mixed with bio char was investigated. In this study, bio char with different percentage (5 %, 8 %, 11 % 14 % and 18 %) was used as alternative admixture material for cement solidification of spent resins. Some properties of the physical and chemical of spent resins and bio char were also investigated. The performance of cemented spent resins with the addition of bio char was evaluated based on their compressive strength and the water resistance test. The compressive strength was evaluated at three different curing periods of 7, 14 and 28 days, while 4 weeks of immersion in distilled water was chosen for water resistance test. The result indicated that the compressive strength at 7, 14 and 28 days of curing periods were above the minimum criterion for example > 3.45 MPa of acceptable level for cemented waste form. Statistical analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between the compressive strength of the specimen and the percentage of bio char content. Result from the water resistance test showed that only one specimen that contained of 5 % of bio char failed the water resistance test due to the high of spent resins/ bio char ratio. The compressive strength of cement solidified spent resins was found increased after the water resistance test indicating further hydration occurred after immersed in water. The results of this study also suggest that the specimen with 8 %, 11 %, 14 % and 18 % of bio char content were resistance in water and suitable for the leaching study of radionuclides from cement-bio char-spent resins matrix. (author)

  8. Permeability, porosity and compressive strength of self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valcuende, M.O.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Most deterioration affecting the durability of self-compacting concrete structures is mediated by water penetration in the concrete, a condition related to its porous structure. The present study analyzes these two factors. To this end, two types of concrete were prepared, a self-compacting and a traditional vibrated concrete, with different W/C ratios and different types of cement. The results of low-pressure water testing to evaluate permeability and analyses to determine compressive strength and pore size distribution showed that self-compacting concrete has lower capillary porosity than traditional concrete, which would explain its greater resistance to water penetration. Such concrete likewise reached higher strength values, except where large proportions of lime powder with low sand equivalents were used in its manufacture, when lower strength was recorded. Lastly, the depth of water penetration and compressive strength were found to be linearly correlated. That correlation was seen to depend, in turn, on the type of concrete, since for any given strength level, self-compacting concrete was less permeable than the traditional material.

    En este trabajo experimental se estudia la penetración de agua en hormigones autocompactables, analizando al mismo tiempo su estructura porosa, pues gran parte de los procesos de deterioro que afectan a la durabilidad de las estructuras están condicionados por estos dos aspectos. Para ello se han fabricado dos tipos de hormigones, uno autocompactable y otro tradicional vibrado, con diferentes relaciones A/C y distintos tipos de cemento. Tras determinar la permeabilidad al agua bajo presión, la resistencia a compresión y las distribuciones de tamaño de poro, los resultados obtenidos ponen de manifiesto que los hormigones autocompactables presentan menor porosidad capilar que los tradicionales, lo que les confiere mejores prestaciones frente a la penetración de agua. Asimismo, dichos hormigones

  9. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gangloff, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    ... (Irwin and Wells, 1997; Paris, 1998). Second, materials scientists developed metals with outstanding balances of high tensile strength and high fracture toughness (Garrison, 1990; Wells, 1993; Boyer, 1993...

  10. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    -elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...... the size and shape of the weld nugget, these properties include the new strength of the material in the weld and the heat affected zone based on the predicted hardness resulting from microstructural phase changes simulated during cooling of the weld before strength testing. Comparisons between overall...

  11. Procedural Options for Measuring Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindova S.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to provide alternative means of measurement and evaluation of muscle strength in rehabilitation practice and diagnostics. In the last few years many electronic devices for evaluation of muscle strength have developed. Contemporary studies have shown that in addition to the standard manual muscle testing muscle strength can be assessed more objectively and analytically using electronic dynamometers and equipment. The strain gauges are used as a tool of precision in the industry that allows measurement of mechanical loads by dynamometers. By using these tools is possible to obtain continuous digital measurement and recording of muscle strength.

  12. Strength optimized designs of thermoelastic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pauli; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2010-01-01

    For thermoelastic structures the same optimal design does not simultaneously lead to minimum compliance and maximum strength. Compliance may be a questionable objective and focus for the present paper is on the important aspect of strength, quantified as minimization of the maximum von Mises stress...... to mathematical programming, which with a large number of both design variables and strength constraints, is found non-practical, we choose simple recursive iterations to obtain uniform energy density and find by examples that the obtained designs are close to fulfilling also strength maximization. In compliance...

  13. Strength properties of separators in alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, T. [Viskase Corp., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Battery separator non-wovens that were coated with regenerated cellulose via the viscose process were subjected to storage in 40% potassium hydroxide (KOH) over a two month period. Samples were periodically checked for wet MD tensile strength. The test showed that among the non-wovens, the polyamide retained about 93% of its initial tensile strength whereas polyvinyl alcohol and cellulosic non-wovens retained only 55% and 35%, respectively. Adding a viscose coating to the non-wovens improved tensile strength retention by 20--25% for the polyvinyl alcohol and cellulosic materials. The viscose-coated polyamide retained more than 98% of its initial tensile strength.

  14. Variations in Compressive Strength of Geopolymer due to the CaO Added Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuqing; Koumoto, Tatsuya; Kondo, Fumiyoshi

    Recently, geopolymer has been a noteworthy material which can be used as a replacement for portland cement. The mechanical characteristics and consistency of the geopolymer are strongly affected by its chemical components of fly ash. The variations in compressive strength of geopolymer due to the CaO added fly ash were investigated in this paper. The compressive strengths of geopolymer were increased with an increase in the curing period, and the characteristics changed from the one of plastic soil material to brittle material such as concrete, regardless of CaO content. Also, the results of compressive strength and modulus of deformation showed their maximum value in the case of 8-10% CaO content. From this result, the maximum characteristics of the strengths were assumed to be exerted in case which the water draining process of geopolymer was balanced with the water absorbing process of additional CaO.

  15. Strength Correlation and Prediction of Engineered Cementitious Composites with Microwave Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok L. Chung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of microwave and mechanical measurements of engineered cementitious composites (ECCs using a nondestructive microwave near-field detecting technique. The objective of this research is to investigate the correlations between effective conductance and compressive strength of ECCs at various curing ages under the influence of different initial water contents. Parallel measurements and regression analysis on compressive strength and microwave conductance were undertaken. It is shown that the strength evolution of ECCs can be accurately modeled and predicted by using microwave conductance at the early ages using bi-exponential functions. Compressive strength grows as a function of decreasing effective conductance, whereas the regression coefficients of the correlation models have a linear variation with water-to-binder ratios. These findings have highlighted the effectiveness of the microwave technique in detecting the variation of liquid phase morphology and pore structure.

  16. Improvement of cement concrete strength properties by carbon fiber additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevsky, Andrey; Kudyakov, Konstantin; Danke, Ilia; Kudyakov, Aleksandr; Kudyakov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of fiber-reinforced concrete with carbon fibers. The effectiveness of carbon fibers uniform distribution in the concrete was obtained as a result of its preliminary mechanical mixing in water solution with chemical additives. Additives are to be used in the concrete technology as modifiers at initial stage of concrete mix preparing. The technology of preparing of fiber-reinforced concrete mix with carbon fibers is developed. The superplasticizer is based on ether carboxylates as a separator for carbon fibers. The technology allows increasing of concrete compressive strength up to 43.4% and tensile strength up to 17.5% as well as improving stability of mechanical properties.

  17. Effect of simplified ethanol-wet bonding on microtensile bond strengths of dentin adhesive agents with different solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Kerim Ayar

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Simplified ethanol-wet bonding exhibited similar 24-hour bond strength mean values for both ethanol/water-based and acetone-based etch-and-rinse adhesives. Therefore, solvent content may not interfere with bond strength to ethanol-saturated dentin.

  18. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  19. Static Material Strength Determined Using a DAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynn, H; Evans, W; Klepeis, J P; Lipp, M; Liermann, P; Yang, W

    2009-06-04

    By measuring sample thickness and pressure gradient using x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction, respectively, the accurate static yield strengths of Ta and Fe were determined at high pressure. This improved method has several advantages over other similar methods to quantitatively determine static material strength.

  20. Deformed metals - structure, recrystallisation and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how new discoveries and advanced experimental techniques in the last 25 years have led to paradigm shifts in the analysis of deformation and annealing structures of metals and in the way the strength of deformed samples is related to structural parameters. This is described in three...... sections: structural evolution by grain subdivision, recovery and recrystallisation and strength-structure relationships....

  1. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  2. Relationship of maximum strength to weightlifting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Michael H; Sands, William A; Pierce, Kyle C; Carlock, Jon; Cardinale, Marco; Newton, Robert U

    2005-06-01

    The primary objective was to assess the relationship of maximum strength to weightlifting ability using established scaling methods. The secondary objective was to compare men and women weightlifters on strength and weightlifting ability. Two correlational observations were carried out using Pearson's r. In the first observation (N = 65) the relationship of dynamic maximum strength (one-repetition maximum (1RM) squat) was compared with weightlifting ability; in the second observation (N = 16), isometric maximum strength (midthigh pull) was studied. Scaling methods for equating maximum strength and weightlifting results were used (load x (Ht), load x kg, load x lbm(-1), allometric, and Sinclair formula) to assess the association between measures of maximum strength and weightlifting performance. Using scaled values; correlations between maximum strength and weightlifting results were generally strong in both observations (e.g., using allometric scaling for the 1RM squat vs the 1RM snatch: r = 0.84, N = 65). Men were stronger than women (e.g., 1RM squat, N = 65: men = 188.1 +/- 48.6 kg; women = 126.7 +/- 28.3 kg); differences generally held when scaling was applied (e.g., 1RM squat scaled with the Sinclair formula: men = 224.7 +/- 36.5 kg; women = 144.2 +/- 25.4 kg). When collectively considering scaling methods, maximum strength is strongly related to weightlifting performance independent of body mass and height differences. Furthermore, men are stronger than women even when body mass and height are obviated by scaling methods.

  3. Impact of Hydrodynamics on Oral Biofilm Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paramonova, E.; Kalmykowa, O. J.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Sharma, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical removal of oral biofilms is ubiquitously accepted as the best way to prevent caries and periodontal diseases. Removal effectiveness strongly depends on biofilm strength. To investigate the influence of hydrodynamics on oral biofilm strength, we grew single- and multi-species biofilms of

  4. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2015-11-01

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  5. DETERMINATION OF FIELD STRENGTH OF CONCRETE FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A maturity function valid for the Ethiopian cement and its equivalent is derived from test results of strength development of concrete in relation to temperature and time. Making use of the maturity function so obtained, the time. ·for the development of strength of concrete under prevailing field temperature is converted to an.

  6. Maximal Strength Testing in Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Milliken, Laurie A.; Westcott, Wayne L.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the safety and efficacy of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing in healthy children age 6-12 years. Data were collected on 96 children who performed a 1RM test on one upper body and one lower body exercise using child-sized weight machines. Findings indicated that children could safely perform 1RM strength tests provided…

  7. Ionic strength sensing in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Boqun; Poolman, Bert; Boersma, Arnold J

    Knowledge of the ionic strength in cells is required to understand the in vivo biochemistry of the charged biomacromolecules. Here, we present the first sensors to determine the ionic strength in living cells, by designing protein probes based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). These

  8. Revealing the Maximum Strength in Nanotwinned Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, L.; Chen, X.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    boundary–related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced...

  9. Restorative Justice as Strength-Based Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This article compares strength-based and restorative justice philosophies for young people and their families. Restorative justice provides ways to respond to crime and harm that establish accountability while seeking to reconcile members of a community. Restorative approaches are an important subset of strength-based interventions.

  10. The strength of glass, hidden damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    The strength of float glass is a necessary engineering parameter. Determining this strength is a complex problem. Earlier results have shown that statistically bending test results are not a homogeneous group. To explain this, a theoiy of "hidden damage" is proposed. The essence of this theory is

  11. Enhancing paper strength by optimizing defect configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Considine; W. Skye; W. Chen; D. Matthys; David W. Vahey; K. Turner; R. Rowlands

    2009-01-01

    Poor formation in paper, as denoted by large local variation of mass, tends to reduce maximum tensile strength but has not been well characterized. The effect of grammage variation on tensile strength was studied by introducing carefully placed holes in tensile specimens made of three different paper materials. Previous researchers demonstrated that the point-stress...

  12. Elastic buckling strength of corroded steel plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ious geometric and corrosion characteristics are investigated and it is found that the aspect ratio of the plate, the average thickness diminution, the standard deviation of thickness diminution and the amount of corrosion loss have influence on the reduction of buckling strength of the corroded plates. Buckling strength of one- ...

  13. Species independent strength grading of structural timber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravenshorst, G.J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Timber as a construction material has been used for millennia, but the research field covering the prediction of the strength of structural timber is still in development. Currently, the common conception is that the determination of strength properties has to be determined for every wood species

  14. Strength testing of the relation between plate dentures and materials for making soft liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Dušan Lj.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In clinical practice, the loss of adhesion between the denture base resin and reliner might cause the loss of material softness, water sorption, bacterial colonization and functional failure of the prosthesis. Aim. This study evaluated the effect of immersion on tensile bond strengths of four soft relining materials to a denture base acrylic resin. Material and methods. Four soft lining materials were bonded to heatpolymerized acrylic resin according to the manufacturers' directions. Forty specimens for bond strength test (10 for each liner type were fabricated. Half of them (control group; n=5 were tested immediately after the fabrication. The other twenty specimens were stored in water at 37°C (test groups; n=5 for one week and then tested. Results. Bond strength of samples right after the fabrication is significantly higher in cases of the samples with silicone elastomer base reliner compared to the samples with soft acrylic base. Bond strength of soft reliners to a denture base resin increases after storing the samples in a water bath for one week at 37°C. Conslusion. Higher increment of tensile bond strength appeared for silicone elastomers in comparison with soft acrylic resins. There were no changes of failure mode except for GC Reline Soft application with the lowest tensile bond strength increment.

  15. Nuclear threshold effects and neutron strength function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel; Comisel, Horia

    2003-01-01

    One proves that a Nuclear Threshold Effect is dependent, via Neutron Strength Function, on Spectroscopy of Ancestral Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the Nuclear Threshold Effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function. Evidence for relation of Nuclear Threshold Effects to Neutron Strength Functions is obtained from Isotopic Threshold Effect and Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly. The empirical and computational analysis of the Isotopic Threshold Effect and of the Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly demonstrate their close relationship to Neutron Strength Functions. It was established that the Nuclear Threshold Effects depend, in addition to genuine Nuclear Reaction Mechanisms, on Spectroscopy of (Ancestral) Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function, in their dependence on mass number. This result constitutes also a proof that the origins of these threshold effects are Neutron Single Particle States at zero energy. (author)

  16. Testosterone Replacement, Muscle Strength, and Physical Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Seon Nam

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscle strength and physical function decrease in older men, as do testosterone levels. Nonetheless, the effects of testosterone replacement therapy on muscle strength and physical function remain inconclusive and equivocal. We conducted a rapid systematic review, the results of which showed that testosterone replacement does not affect muscle strength (measured by hand grip strength and leg muscle strength, although it may increase physical function (measured by the 6-minute walk test, Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly score, and other physical performance tests. However, most of the studies were conducted in the United States or Europe and did not include participants from Asian or other ethnic backgrounds; therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of testosterone replacement in a broader population.

  17. Imaging Shear Strength Along Subduction Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M.; Rempel, Alan W.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-11-01

    Subduction faults accumulate stress during long periods of time and release this stress suddenly, during earthquakes, when it reaches a threshold. This threshold, the shear strength, controls the occurrence and magnitude of earthquakes. We consider a 3-D model to derive an analytical expression for how the shear strength depends on the fault geometry, the convergence obliquity, frictional properties, and the stress field orientation. We then use estimates of these different parameters in Japan to infer the distribution of shear strength along a subduction fault. We show that the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake ruptured a fault portion characterized by unusually small variations in static shear strength. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that large earthquakes preferentially rupture regions with relatively homogeneous shear strength. With increasing constraints on the different parameters at play, our approach could, in the future, help identify favorable locations for large earthquakes.

  18. Imaging shear strength along subduction faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M.; Rempel, Alan W.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Subduction faults accumulate stress during long periods of time and release this stress suddenly, during earthquakes, when it reaches a threshold. This threshold, the shear strength, controls the occurrence and magnitude of earthquakes. We consider a 3-D model to derive an analytical expression for how the shear strength depends on the fault geometry, the convergence obliquity, frictional properties, and the stress field orientation. We then use estimates of these different parameters in Japan to infer the distribution of shear strength along a subduction fault. We show that the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake ruptured a fault portion characterized by unusually small variations in static shear strength. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that large earthquakes preferentially rupture regions with relatively homogeneous shear strength. With increasing constraints on the different parameters at play, our approach could, in the future, help identify favorable locations for large earthquakes.

  19. Influences of cement source and sample of cement source on compressive strength variability of gravel aggregate concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The strength of concrete is influenced by each constituent material used in the concrete : mixture and the proportions of each ingredient. Water-cementitious ratio, cementitious materials, air : content, chemical admixtures, and type of coarse aggreg...

  20. Compressive strength and hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of geopolymerization involves the reaction of solid aluminosilicate materials with highly alkaline silicate solution yielding an aluminosilicate inorganic polymer named geopolymer, which may be successfully applied in civil engineering as a replacement for cement. In this paper we have investigated the influence of synthesis parameters: solid to liquid ratio, NaOH concentration and the ratio of Na2SiO3/NaOH, on the mechanical properties and hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers in distilled water, sea water and simulated acid rain. The highest value of compressive strength was obtained using 10 mol dm-3 NaOH and at the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 1.5. Moreover, the results have shown that mechanical properties of fly ash based geopolymers are in correlation with their hydrolytic stability. Factors that increase the compressive strength also increase the hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers. The best hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers was shown in sea water while the lowest stability was recorded in simulated acid rain. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172054 i Nanotechnology and Functional Materials Center, funded by the European FP7 project No. 245916

  1. Is grip strength a predictor for total muscle strength in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anne E.; Takken, Tim; Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine whether grip strength is related to total muscle strength in children, adolescents, and young adults. The second purpose was to provide reference charts for grip strength, which could be used in the clinical and research setting. This cross-sectional

  2. Character Strengths and Intellectual and Developmental Disability: A Strengths-Based Approach from Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Ryan M.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    There has been limited focus in the disability field on assessing and intervening to promote strengths of character. However, character strengths have received significant attention in the broader field of positive psychology. This paper provides an overview of the growing science of character strengths and explores why and how character strengths…

  3. Detection of rock strength at Branisko massif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarová Edita

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available When monitoring and optimizing the driving proces of the exploratory gallery by a computer system, conditions for verification of the interaction between desintegrating head of driving machine and rock massif were created. One of the output values of this mathematical model is the model strength at a simple pressure ótlH, which is defined as a pressure at the discus and the massif contact during the desintigration (a near limit of massif strength. By geological and geological engineering exploration, the section of length 2340 m was divided into fourty-two geological sections and five quasi-homogeneous massif enviroments. In the article, results of scleroscopic strength óCI , the strength in a simple pressure determined from the point load test and the strength at simple pressure ótlH are confronted . The main advance of the electronic geomechanical monitoring is the density of gained information. The two-seconds sample period of input and output data during the driving process makes it possible to describe driving circumstances in an almost continual way for each millimeter of the built tunnel. Then the information about changes of disintegrated rock properties, have the same density (frequency. By comparing a quantity of data gained by examining the index of point strength, scleroscopic strength and the model strength in a simple pressure from the monitoring process of driving process it is obvious that during the driving of exploratory gallery of motorway tunnel Branisko, a proportion of data number from the three “type examinations” of strength was reached and it was approximately 1:7:5000. Approximately in the same proportion, there were determined values for the 42 geologic sections (I. – XLII., which were defined in detail by the geologic, engineering geologic, hydrogeologic and geotechnic research.. The presented quantity values of presented rock mass strength for each geologic section are presented by their arithmetic average

  4. Ideal strength of bcc molybdenum and niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weidong; Roundy, D.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Morris, J. W.

    2002-09-01

    The behavior of bcc Mo and Nb under large strain was investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density-functional method. We calculated the ideal shear strength for the {211} and {011} slip systems and the ideal tensile strength in the direction, which are believed to provide the minimum shear and tensile strengths. As either material is sheared in either of the two systems, it evolves toward a stress-free tetragonal structure that defines a saddle point in the strain-energy surface. The inflection point on the path to this tetragonal ``saddle-point'' structure sets the ideal shear strength. When either material is strained in tension along , it initially follows the tetragonal, ``Bain,'' path toward a stress-free fcc structure. However, before the strained crystal reaches fcc, its symmetry changes from tetragonal to orthorhombic; on continued strain it evolves toward the same tetragonal saddle point that is reached in shear. In Mo, the symmetry break occurs after the point of maximum tensile stress has been passed, so the ideal strength is associated with the fcc extremum as in W. However, a Nb crystal strained in becomes orthorhombic at tensile stress below the ideal strength. The ideal tensile strength of Nb is associated with the tetragonal saddle point and is caused by failure in shear rather than tension. In dimensionless form, the ideal shear and tensile strengths of Mo (τ*=τm/G111=0.12, σ*=σm/E100=0.078) are essentially identical to those previously calculated for W. Nb is anomalous. Its dimensionless shear strength is unusually high, τ*=0.15, even though the saddle-point structure that causes it is similar to that in Mo and W, while its dimensionless tensile strength, σ*=0.079, is almost the same as that of Mo and W, even though the saddle-point structure is quite different.

  5. The character strengths of class clowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, Willibald; Platt, Tracey; Hofmann, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Class clowns traditionally were studied as a type concept and identified via sociometric procedures. In the present study a variable-centered approach was favored and class clown behaviors were studied in the context of character strengths, orientations to happiness and satisfaction with life. A sample of 672 Swiss children and adolescents filled in an 18 item self-report instrument depicting class clown behaviors. A hierarchical model of class clown behaviors was developed distinguishing a general factor and the four positively correlated dimensions of "identified as a class clown," "comic talent," "disruptive rule-breaker," and "subversive joker." Analysis of the general factor showed that class clowns were primarily male, and tended to be seen as class clowns by the teacher. Analyses of the 24 character strengths of the VIA-Youth (Park and Peterson, 2006) showed that class clowns were high in humor and leadership, and low in strengths like prudence, self-regulation, modesty, honesty, fairness, perseverance, and love of learning. An inspection of signature strengths revealed that 75% of class clowns had humor as a signature strength. Furthermore, class clown behaviors were generally shown by students indulging in a life of pleasure, but low life of engagement. The four dimensions yielded different character strengths profiles. While all dimensions of class clowns behaviors were low in temperance strengths, the factors "identified as the class clown" and "comic talent" were correlated with leadership strengths and the two negative factors ("disruptive rule-breaker," "subversive joker") were low in other directed strengths. The disruptive rule breaking class clown was additionally low in intellectual strengths. While humor predicted life satisfaction, class clowning tended to go along with diminished satisfaction with life. It is concluded that different types of class clowns need to be kept apart and need different attention by teachers.

  6. Water, Water Everywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2009-01-01

    Everybody knows that children love water and how great water play is for children. The author discusses ways to add water to one's playscape that fully comply with health and safety regulations and are still fun for children. He stresses the importance of creating water play that provides children with the opportunity to interact with water.

  7. Improving the normative documents, related to strength and service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evropin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    Paper deals with perfecting and bringing up to date of the regulations ensuring operation safety of equipment, pipelines and structures of an NPP as to the criteria of strength and mechanical integrity. The KTL-40 water coolant reactor of a floating NPP serves as an example to ensure comprehensive consideration of the problem based on the leak-before-break method. One underlines the need for drafting of the regulations taking account of the exact type of a power facility in addition to the available federal regulations wording the nuclear and radiation safety general requirements for nuclear power installations [ru

  8. Method for providing a low density high strength polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L.; Goods, Steven H.; Skala, Dawn M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Keifer, Patrick N.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed is a method for making a polyurethane closed-cell foam material exhibiting a bulk density below 4 lbs/ft.sup.3 and high strength. The present embodiment uses the reaction product of a modified MDI and a sucrose/glycerine based polyether polyol resin wherein a small measured quantity of the polyol resin is "pre-reacted" with a larger quantity of the isocyanate in a defined ratio such that when the necessary remaining quantity of the polyol resin is added to the "pre-reacted" resin together with a tertiary amine catalyst and water as a blowing agent, the polymerization proceeds slowly enough to provide a stable foam body.

  9. Strength evaluation code STEP for brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Futakawa, Masatoshi.

    1997-12-01

    In a structural design using brittle materials such as graphite and/or ceramics it is necessary to evaluate the strength of component under complex stress condition. The strength of ceramic materials is said to be influenced by the stress distribution. However, in the structural design criteria simplified stress limits had been adopted without taking account of the strength change with the stress distribution. It is, therefore, important to evaluate the strength of component on the basis of the fracture model for brittle material. Consequently, the strength evaluation program, STEP, on a brittle fracture of ceramic materials based on the competing risk theory had been developed. Two different brittle fracture modes, a surface layer fracture mode dominated by surface flaws and an internal fracture mode by internal flaws, are treated in the STEP code in order to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture. The STEP code uses stress calculation results including complex shape of structures analyzed by the generalized FEM stress analysis code, ABAQUS, so as to be possible to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture for the structures having complicate shapes. This code is, therefore, useful to evaluate the structural integrity of arbitrary shapes of components such as core graphite components in the HTTR, heat exchanger components made of ceramics materials etc. This paper describes the basic equations applying to the STEP code, code system with a combination of the STEP and the ABAQUS codes and the result of the verification analysis. (author)

  10. Geometry and gravity influences on strength capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliner, Jeffrey; Wilmington, Robert P.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1994-01-01

    Strength, defined as the capability of an individual to produce an external force, is one of the most important determining characteristics of human performance. Knowledge of strength capabilities of a group of individuals can be applied to designing equipment and workplaces, planning procedures and tasks, and training individuals. In the manned space program, with the high risk and cost associated with spaceflight, information pertaining to human performance is important to ensuring mission success and safety. Knowledge of individual's strength capabilities in weightlessness is of interest within many areas of NASA, including workplace design, tool development, and mission planning. The weightless environment of space places the human body in a completely different context. Astronauts perform a variety of manual tasks while in orbit. Their ability to perform these tasks is partly determined by their strength capability as demanded by that particular task. Thus, an important step in task planning, development, and evaluation is to determine the ability of the humans performing it. This can be accomplished by utilizing quantitative techniques to develop a database of human strength capabilities in weightlessness. Furthermore, if strength characteristics are known, equipment and tools can be built to optimize the operators' performance. This study examined strength in performing a simple task, specifically, using a tool to apply a torque to a fixture.

  11. Are only Emotional Strengths Emotional? Character Strengths and Disposition to Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güsewell, Angelika; Ruch, Willibald

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the relations between character strengths and dispositional positive emotions (i.e. joy, contentment, pride, love, compassion, amusement, and awe). A sample of 574 German-speaking adults filled in the Dispositional Positive Emotion Scales (DPES; Shiota, Keltner, & John, 2006), and the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths (VIA-IS; Peterson, Park, & Seligman, 2005). The factorial structure of the DPES was examined on item level. Joy and contentment could not be clearly separated; the items of the other five emotions loaded on separate factors. A confirmatory factor analysis assuming two latent factors (self-oriented and object/situation specific) was computed on scale level. Results confirmed the existence of these factors, but also indicated that the seven emotions did not split up into two clearly separable families. Correlations between dispositional positive emotions and character strengths were positive and generally low to moderate; a few theoretically meaningful strengths-emotions pairs yielded coefficients>.40. Finally, the link between five character strengths factors (i.e. emotional strengths, interpersonal strengths, strengths of restraint, intellectual strengths, and theological strengths) and the emotional dispositions was examined. Each of the factors displayed a distinctive "emotional pattern"; emotional strengths evidenced the most numerous and strongest links to emotional dispositions. © 2012 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being © 2012 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  12. Sources of strength-training information and strength-training behavior among Japanese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Ai; Lee, Euna; Oka, Koichiro; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2016-03-01

    The promotion of strength training is now recognized as an important component of public health initiatives for older adults. To develop successful communication strategies to increase strength-training behavior among older adults, the identification of effective communication channels to reach older adults is necessary. This study aimed to identify the information sources about strength training that were associated with strength-training behaviors among Japanese older adults. The participants were 1144 adults (60-74 years old) randomly sampled from the registry of residential addresses. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted. The independent variables were sources of strength-training information (healthcare providers, friends, families, radio, television, newspapers, newsletters, posters, books, magazines, booklets, the Internet, lectures, other sources), and the dependent variable was regular strength-training behavior. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential relationships. After adjusting for demographic factors and all other information sources, strength-training information from healthcare providers, friends, books and the Internet were positively related to regular strength-training behavior. The findings of the present study contribute to a better understanding of strength-training behavior and the means of successful communication directed at increasing strength training among older adults. The results suggest that healthcare providers, friends, books and the Internet are effective methods of communication for increasing strength-training behaviors among older adults. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Strength properties of concrete at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freskakis, G.N.; Burrow, R.C.; Debbas, E.B.

    1979-01-01

    A study is presented concerning the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and stress-strain relationships of concrete at elevated temperatures. A review of published results provides information for the development of upper and lower bound relationships for compressive strength and the modulus of elasticity and establishes exposure conditions for a lower bound thermal response. The relationships developed from the literature review are confirmed by the results of a verification test program. The strength and elasticity relationships provide a basis for the development of design stress-strain curves for concrete exposed to elevated temperatures

  14. Unexpectedly low tensile strength in concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Siemes, A.J.M.; Han, N.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    During an extensive investigation of some 25 concrete bridges and other structures suffering from alkali-silica reaction it has been found that the uniaxial tensile strength of the concrete was extremely low in relation to both the compressive strength and the splitting tensile strength. It is known that concrete with damage due to ASR has reduced mechanical properties. The literature indicates that with an expansion of 1 0/00 a reduction of 30 % may occur. The reduction found in some of the ...

  15. Singlemode Optical Fibers With Enhanced Strength And Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkin, James P.; Drenzek, Gary A.; Skutnik, Bolesh J.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the reliability of optical fibers has become of great concern due to military, medicaland other specialty high performance applications. With the nearing promise of the local loop and its inherent requirements for a robust fiber, even the telcom market has come to value research on stronger, more fatigue resistant fibers. With the extension of Hard Clad Silica (HCS) technology to all silica optical fibers, a new singlemode fiber (smf) structure has been developed with enhanced reliability. A thin, hard, adherent, polymeric coating is placed between the silica cladding and the typical acrylate buffer coating. This paper presents results on the mechanical properties of this new singlemode fiber and compares it with the commercially available smf type. Dynamic strength, Weibull mean strength and slope, and static fatigue resistance, especially after zero-stress aging, are superior for the new fiber over the conventional smf fiber. Compared to commercial smf, the new fiber can withstand high stresses in moist environments for 40-60 times longer. More significantly after zero-stress aging in boiling water, the commercial smf break in 2.0 GPa (290 ksi), while the new fibers would still have expected lifetimes at 2.0 GPa stress of >9 years. These results make these fibers very useful for high reliability, high strength, long-haul fiber applications.

  16. Bond strength of compomers to dentin using acidic primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, W H; You, C; Powers, J M

    1999-10-01

    To determine the in vitro bond strengths of seven compomer/bonding agent restorative systems to human dentin. Seven compomer/bonding agents were bonded to human dentin, stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, and debonded in tension. Bonding conditions were with and without phosphoric acid etching, with and without the use of combined primer/bonding agents, and under moist and wet bond interfaces. Without phosphoric acid etching, F2000/F2000 Compomer Primer/Adhesive and F2000/Single Bond Dental Adhesive System were less sensitive to dentin wetness. With moist dentin, bond strengths of Dyract/Prime & Bond 2.1, Dyract AP/Prime & Bond 2.1, Hytac/OSB light-curing, one-component bonding agent, F2000/Single Bond, and Freedom/STAE single component light-cured dentin/enamel adhesive system, were improved with phosphoric acid etching. Also, with moist dentin, the bond strength of F2000/F2000 Compomer Primer/Adhesive in the 3M Clicker dispensing system was higher without phosphoric acid etching, whereas bonds of Compoglass/Syntac Single-component were not affected by phosphoric acid etching. Bonding did not occur without primer/bonding agent, regardless of surface condition or use of phosphoric acid etching.

  17. Conciliating surface superhydrophobicities and mechanical strength of porous silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuguo; Zhao, Kun; Cheng, Jinchun; Zhang, Junyan

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic surfaces on Mechanical stable macroporous silicon films were prepared by electrochemical etching with subsequent octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) modification. The surface morphologies were controlled by current densities and the mechanical properties were adjusted by their corresponding porosities. Contrast with the smooth macroporous silicon films with lower porosities (34.1%) and microporous silicon with higher porosities (97%), the macroporous film with a rough three-dimension (3D) surface and a moderate pore to cross-section area ratio (37.8%, PSi2‧) exhibited both good mechanical strength (Yong' modulus, shear modulus and collapse strength are 64.2, 24.1 and 0.32 GPa, respectively) and surface superhydrophobicity (water contact angle is 158.4 ± 2° and sliding angle is 2.7 ± 1°). This result revealed that the surface hydrophobicities (or the surface roughness) and mechanical strength of porous films could be conciliated by pore to cross-section area ratios control and 3D structures construction. Thus, the superhydrophobic surfaces on mechanical stable porous films could be obtained by 3D structures fabrication on porous film with proper pore to cross-section area ratios.

  18. Effect of composite warming on shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Sigrist, Thomas W; Johnson, Gary M

    2018-01-01

    Several manufacturers produce devices designed to warm composite resins used in restorative dentistry. Previous investigators have examined the effects of heating composite restorative resins prior to placement and polymerization. Heating has been reported to reduce viscosity, improve ease of placement, enhance monomer conversion, and reduce microleakage. The aim of the present study was to compare shear bond strengths of room temperature (22°C) and prewarmed (54°C) restorative composite resin. Extracted bovine mandibular incisors were sectioned sagittally and embedded in acrylic cylinders. Enamel was selectively etched with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed, and dried. Self-etching primer was applied to both enamel and dentin. Self-etching adhesive was then applied and photopolymerized. Composite resin capsules were then divided into prewarmed and room temperature groups. Fourteen composite specimens prewarmed in an incubator were applied to the prepared enamel and dentin and photopolymerized. Fourteen room temperature composite specimens were likewise placed. After storage in water for 24 hours, all composite specimens were subjected to shear stress testing. The resulting data were analyzed with a t test (P = 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strengths of the prewarmed and room temperature composite resin specimens. Warming does not appear to affect bond strength of composite resin bonded to both dentin and enamel.

  19. Effect of fly ash on the strength of porous concrete using recycled coarse aggregate to replace low-quality natural coarse aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifi, Eva; Cahya, Evi Nur; Christin Remayanti, N.

    2017-09-01

    The performance of porous concrete made of recycled coarse aggregate was investigated. Fly ash was used as cement partial replacement. In this study, the strength of recycled aggregate was coMPared to low quality natural coarse aggregate which has high water absorption. Compression strength and tensile splitting strength test were conducted to evaluate the performance of porous concrete using fly ash as cement replacement. Results have shown that the utilization of recycled coarse aggregate up to 75% to replace low quality natural coarse aggregate with high water absorption increases compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of porous concrete. Using fly ash up to 25% as cement replacement improves compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of porous concrete.

  20. A roadmap for tailoring the strength and ductility of ferritic/martensitic T91 steel via thermo-mechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, M.; Sun, C.; Fan, Z.; Chen, Y.; Zhu, R.; Yu, K.Y.; Hartwig, K.T.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels with high strength and excellent ductility are important candidate materials for the life extension of the current nuclear reactors and the design of next generation nuclear reactors. Recent studies show that equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) was able to improve mechanical strength of ferritic T91 steels moderately. Here, we examine several strategies to further enhance the mechanical strength of T91 while maintaining its ductility. Certain thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) processes enabled by combinations of ECAE, water quench, and tempering may lead to “ductile martensite” with exceptionally high strength in T91 steel. The evolution of microstructures and mechanical properties of T91 steel were investigated in detail, and transition carbides were identified in water quenched T91 steel. This study provides guidelines for tailoring the microstructure and mechanical properties of T91 steel via ECAE enabled TMT for an improved combination of strength and ductility.

  1. Effect of silane contamination on dentin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Hammond, Barry D; Alex, Gary; Suh, Byoung In

    2017-03-01

    Intraoral repair of porcelain or other silica-based ceramics typically requires the use of silane in the repair protocol. Some porcelain intraoral repairs also involve bonding to exposed or involved tooth tissues including dentin. A study is needed to evaluate whether the cross-contamination of dentin with silane affects bond strength to this tissue. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of silane cross-contamination on dentin bond strength. Flat surfaces of human dentin specimens were created, followed by wet polishing with 320-grit silicon carbide paper. The dentin specimens were divided into 4 groups: group SE (All-Bond Universal Adhesive used in self-etching mode); group SiSE (silane applied to dentin followed by All-Bond Universal Adhesive used in self-etching mode); group ER (All-Bond Universal Adhesive used in total-etch (etch-and-rinse) mode); and group ERSi (Etch and rinse and silane applied to dentin followed by All-Bond Universal Adhesive). The dentin specimens were treated with a universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal) and bonded with a composite resin, using an Ultradent jig mold. Shear bond strength (n=10) was measured after 24 hours of water storage at 37°C. After the shear bond strength test, the dentin sides of fractured specimens in each group were examined with a stereomicroscope at ×15 magnification to determine failure modes. Data were statistically analyzed by 2-way and a 1-way ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). Scanning electron microscopy examination was used to evaluate the dentin surface morphology before and after bonding. The shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin was not affected adversely when the dentin was contaminated with silane prior to using All-Bond Universal in the self-etch or total- etch (phosphoric acid) mode. SE, 30.3 ±3.8 MPa; SiSE, 32.9 ±3.9 MPa; ER, 34.9 ±3.1 MPa; ERSi: 35.2 ±4.9 MPa (P>.05) CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of this

  2. Monopole Strength Function of Deformed Superfluid Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoitsov, M. V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kortelainen, E. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Nakatsukasa, T. [RIKEN, Japan; Losa, C. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste, Italy; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strength for strongly deformed configurations in ^{240}Pu by considering huge quasi-particle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-bound and weakly bound nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  3. Neural adaptations to electrical stimulation strength training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, Tibor; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides evidence for the hypothesis that electrostimulation strength training (EST) increases the force of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) through neural adaptations in healthy skeletal muscle. Although electrical stimulation and voluntary effort activate muscle differently, there

  4. Pilates: Build Strength in Your Core Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Pilates may sound intimidating, but it's an accessible way to build strength in your core muscles for better posture, balance and flexibility. By Mayo Clinic Staff Pilates isn't just for fitness fanatics. It's actually ...

  5. optimizing compressive strength characteristics of hollow building

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    mm2. ... is suggested therefore, that the optimum replacement of sand with granite quarry dust as fine aggregates should be. 15% of the ... Keywords: Keywords: hollow building Blocks, granite dust, sand, partial replacement, compressive strength.

  6. Personality Typology in Relation to Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Antonio; Milaneschi, Yuri; Metter, E. Jeffrey; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity plays a central role in the age-related decline in muscle strength, an important component in the process leading to disability. Personality, a significant determinant of health behaviors including physical activity, could therefore impact muscle strength throughout adulthood and affect the rate of muscle strength decline with aging. Personality typologies combining “high neuroticism” (N≥55), “low extraversion” (Epersonality types. Facet analyses suggest an important role for the N components of depression and hostility. Physical activity level appears to partly explain some of these associations. Conclusion Findings provide support for the notion that the typological approach to personality may be useful in identifying specific personality types at risk of low muscle strength and offer the possibility for more targeted prevention and intervention programs. PMID:21614452

  7. Strength Tests on Hulls and Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaes, K

    1942-01-01

    The present report deals with strength tests on hulls and floats intended in part for the collection of construction data for the design of these components and in part for the stress analysis of the finished hulls and floats.

  8. Shear strength of clay and silt embankments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Highway embankment is one of the most common large-scale geotechnical facilities constructed in Ohio. In the past, the design of these embankments was largely based on soil shear strength properties that had been estimated from previously published e...

  9. Science Academies Refresher Course on Crustal Strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Science Academies Refresher Course on Crustal Strength Rheology and Seismicity (CSRS-2017). Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 3 March 2017 pp 328-328 ...

  10. Nutritional Supplements for Strength Power Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilborn, Colin

    Over the last decade research involving nutritional supplementation and sport performance has increased substantially. Strength and power athletes have specific needs to optimize their performance. Nutritional supplementation cannot be viewed as a replacement for a balanced diet but as an important addition to it. However, diet and supplementation are not mutually exclusive, nor does one depend on the other. Strength and power athletes have four general areas of supplementation needs. First, strength athletes need supplements that have a direct effect on performance. The second group of supplements includes those that promote recovery. The third group comprises the supplements that enhance immune function. The last group of supplements includes those that provide energy or have a direct effect on the workout. This chapter reviews the key supplements needed to optimize the performance and training of the strength athlete.

  11. Impact strength of a modified continuous glass fiber--poly(methyl methacrylate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, P K; Narva, K

    1997-01-01

    The effect of fiber reinforcement of autopolymerizing poly(methyl methacrylate) was investigated. The impact strength of continuous E-glass fiber-poly(methyl methacrylate) composite was determined. Rectangular test specimens (n = 10 per group) were modified by incorporating an additional fiber reinforcement of untreated E-glass fibers, silanized E-glass fibers, or aramid fibers in the test specimens. Controls were either unreinforced or reinforced from the middle of the test specimen only. The impact strength of the specimens was measured by using a charpy-type pendulum impact tester after the specimens had been stored in water at 37 degrees C for 4 weeks. After the impact strength test, the length of the delamination of poly(methyl methacrylate) from the fibers was measured and plotted to the impact strength of the test specimens by using a linear regression model. The impact strength of unreinforced autopolymerizing poly(methyl methacrylate) was 7.8 kl/m2, while incorporation of glass fiber reinforcement with a fiber concentration of 12.4 wt% increased the impact strength to 74.7 kl/m2 (P = .000). The additional fiber reinforcement of the test specimen did not affect the impact strength (P = .363). Delamination negatively correlated with the impact strength of the test specimens (r = -.72, P = .000). The results of this study suggest that glass fiber reinforcement enhanced the impact strength of autopolymerizing poly(methyl methacrylate), while the use of additional fiber reinforcement made of aramid or glass fibers in the test specimens did not have an effect on the impact strength.

  12. Assessment of Shear Strength in Silty Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaniak Katarzyna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparison of shear strength values in silty soils from the area of Poznań, determined based on selected Nkt values recommended in literature, with values of shear strength established on the basis of Nkt values recommended by the author. Analysed silty soils are characterized by the carbonate cementation zone, which made it possible to compare selected empirical coefficients both in normally consolidated and overconsolidated soils

  13. Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-01

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  14. Inlays made from a hybrid material: adaptation and bond strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, M A; Campos, F; Ramos, N C; Rippe, M P; Valandro, L F; Melo, R M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal fit, marginal adaptation, and bond strengths of inlays made of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and polymer-infiltrated ceramic. Twenty molars were randomly selected and prepared to receive inlays that were milled from both materials. Before cementation, internal fit was achieved using the replica technique by molding the internal surface with addition silicone and measuring the cement thicknesses of the pulpal and axial walls. Marginal adaptation was measured on the occlusal and proximal margins of the replica. The inlays were then cemented using resin cement (Panavia F2.0) and subjected to two million thermomechanical cycles in water (200 N load and 3.8-Hz frequency). The restored teeth were then cut into beams, using a lathe, for microtensile testing. The contact angles, marginal integrity, and surface patterns after etching were also observed. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (p<0.05), the Tukey test for internal fit and marginal adaptation, and the Student t-test for bond strength. The failure types (adhesive or cohesive) were classified on each fractured beam. The results showed that the misfit of the pulpal walls (p=0.0002) and the marginal adaptation (p=0.0001) of the feldspathic ceramic were significantly higher when compared to those of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic, while the bond strength values of the former were higher when compared to those of the latter. The contact angle of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic was also higher. In the present study, the hybrid ceramic presented improved internal and marginal adaptation, but the bond strengths were higher for the feldspathic ceramic.

  15. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young's modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs

  16. Comparison of the Effect of two Denture Cleansers on Tensile bond Strength of a Denture Liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, M; Bahrani, F; Adelpour, E

    2013-09-01

    One of the most clinical challenging issues in prosthodontics is debonding of soft liners from the denture base. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare tensile bond strength between soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin when immersed in two different types of denture cleanser and distilled water, at different period of times. In this experimental in vivo study, 238 heat-cured acrylic blocks were made. A soft liner was embedded between the acrylic blocks. Samples were divided into four groups: 17 samples were in the control group and were not soaked in any solution .The remaining samples were divided into 3 groups (Distilled water, Calgon and Fittydent). Each group was then subdivided into two subcategories, regarding the immersion time variable; 15 and 45 minutes. All samples were placed in tension force and tensile bond strength was recorded with the testing machine. One- way ANOVA and Tucky HSD post-hoc test were adopted to analyze the yielded data (α> 0.05). Specimens which were immersed in two denture cleansers (Fittydent and Calgon) and in distilled water showed significant difference (p= 0.001) in bonding strength when compared to the control group. The subjects immersed in denture cleanser solutions and distilled water did not reveal any significant difference (p= 0.90). For all groups; most of the bonding failures (72%) were cohesive type. The effect of the denture cleansers and distilled water on the bond strength was not statistically different; however, the difference was significant between the immersed groups with the non-immersed group. Moreover, type of the denture cleanser did not show any effect on the tensile strength. The tensile strength increases with time of immersion.

  17. Hip Strength in Patients with Quadriceps Strength Deficits after ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David R; Trigsted, Stephanie M; Post, Eric G; Walden, Courtney E

    2016-10-01

    Quadriceps strength deficits persist for years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and patients with these deficits often shift torque demands away from the knee extensors to the hip during functional tasks. However, it is not clear how quadriceps strength deficits may affect hip strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate differences in lower extremity strength in individuals with ACL reconstruction with differing levels of quadriceps strength asymmetry. Isometric strength was recorded bilaterally in 135 participants (73 control and 62 with unilateral ACL reconstruction, time from surgery = 30.9 ± 17.6 months) from the knee extensors and flexors, hip extensors and abductors, and hip internal and external rotator muscle groups. Symmetry indices (limb symmetry index (LSI)) were created based on quadriceps strength, and subjects with ACL reconstruction were subdivided (high quadriceps (LSI ≥ 90%), n = 37; low quadriceps (LSI limb (reconstructed/nondominant vs healthy/dominant) repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare strength (%BW) for each of the six joint motions of interest (knee extensors/flexors, hip abductors/extensors/external, and internal rotators) while controlling for time from surgery. An interaction was observed for quadriceps strength (P limb in the low quadriceps group was weaker than all other limbs. A main effect for group was observed with the low quadriceps group having greater hip extension (P = 0.007) strength in both limbs compared with the other groups. Knee flexion strength was weaker in the reconstructed limb of the high quadriceps group (P = 0.047) compared with all other groups and limbs. Individuals with ACL reconstruction and involved limb quadriceps weakness have greater hip extension strength in both limbs compared with patients with bilateral strength symmetry and controls.

  18. Effect of Silica Fume on two-stage Concrete Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgader, H. S.; El-Baden, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two-stage concrete (TSC) is an innovative concrete that does not require vibration for placing and compaction. TSC is a simple concept; it is made using the same basic constituents as traditional concrete: cement, coarse aggregate, sand and water as well as mineral and chemical admixtures. As its name suggests, it is produced through a two-stage process. Firstly washed coarse aggregate is placed into the formwork in-situ. Later a specifically designed self compacting grout is introduced into the form from the lowest point under gravity pressure to fill the voids, cementing the aggregate into a monolith. The hardened concrete is dense, homogeneous and has in general improved engineering properties and durability. This paper presents the results from a research work attempt to study the effect of silica fume (SF) and superplasticizers admixtures (SP) on compressive and tensile strength of TSC using various combinations of water to cement ratio (w/c) and cement to sand ratio (c/s). Thirty six concrete mixes with different grout constituents were tested. From each mix twenty four standard cylinder samples of size (150mm×300mm) of concrete containing crushed aggregate were produced. The tested samples were made from combinations of w/c equal to: 0.45, 0.55 and 0.85, and three c/s of values: 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Silica fume was added at a dosage of 6% of weight of cement, while superplasticizer was added at a dosage of 2% of cement weight. Results indicated that both tensile and compressive strength of TSC can be statistically derived as a function of w/c and c/s with good correlation coefficients. The basic principle of traditional concrete, which says that an increase in water/cement ratio will lead to a reduction in compressive strength, was shown to hold true for TSC specimens tested. Using a combination of both silica fume and superplasticisers caused a significant increase in strength relative to control mixes.

  19. Upper extremity injuries associated with strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, H A

    2001-07-01

    Most injuries sustained during strength training are mild strains that resolve with appropriate rest. More severe injuries include traumatic shoulder dislocations, tendon ruptures of the pectoralis major, biceps, and triceps; stress fractures of the distal clavicle, humerus, radius, and ulna; traumatic fractures of the distal radius and ulna in adolescent weightlifters; and compressive and stretch neuropathies. These more severe injuries are usually the result of improperly performing a strength training exercise. Educating athletes regarding proper strength-training techniques serves to reverse established injury patterns and to prevent these injuries in the first place. Recognizing the association of anabolic steroid use to several of the injury patterns further reinforces the need for medical specialists to counsel athletes against their use. With the increasing use of supplements such as creatine, the incidence and nature of strength-training injuries may change further. Greater emphasis on the competitive performance of younger athletes undoubtedly will generate enthusiasm for strength training at earlier ages in both sexes. The importance of proper supervision of these young athletes by knowledgeable persons will increase. As the popularity of strength training grows, there will be ample opportunity to continue to catalog the injury patterns associated with this activity.

  20. The influence of biocalcification on soil-cement interlocking block compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoosathaporn, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Soil-cement interlocking block is used as the building block for many civil structures in Thailand. The addition of many alternative materials into interlocking block in order to improve compressive strength has been reported. However, there is currently no report on the influence of application of biocalcification or microbiologically induced calcite precipitation (MICP on interlocking block compressive strength. Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biocalcification on compressive strength of soil-cement interlocking block. Method. Soil bacterium, Bacillus pasteurii KCTC 3558, and Effective Microorganisms (EM were added into interlocking block before molding as the replacement of mixing water. The change of compressive strength in interlocking block at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days of incubation was determined. Results. At 28 days, the compressive strength of interlocking block supplemented with B. pasteurii KCTC 3558 and 5% EM were 7.38% and 9.79% significantly higher than control. Calcium carbonate crystals were also observed under scanning electron microscope which suggested that an increased compressive strength of interlocking block was caused by biocalcification. Conclusions. Our results showed that microbiologically induced calcite precipitation could help increasing the compressive strength of soil-cement interlocking block.

  1. Influence of application methods of one-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Kyu Choi,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various application methods of one-step self-etch adhesives to microtensile resin-dentin bond strength. Materials and Methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were used. The teeth were assigned randomly to twelve groups (n = 15, according to the three different adhesive systems (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Adper Prompt L-Pop, G-Bond and application methods. The adhesive systems were applied on the dentin as follows: 1 The single coating, 2 The double coating, 3 Manual agitation, 4 Ultrasonic agitation. Following the adhesive application, light-cure composite resin was constructed. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours, and prepared 15 specimens per groups. Then microtensile bond strength was measured and the failure mode was examined. Results Manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating and double coating did. Double coating of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating did and there was no significant difference between the manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation group. There was significant difference in microtensile bonding strength among all adhesives and Clearfil Tri-S Bond showed the highest bond strength. Conclusions In one-step self-etching adhesives, there was significant difference according to application methods and type of adhesives. No matter of the material, the manual or ultrasonic agitation of the adhesive showed significantly higher microtensile bond strength.

  2. Byssus attachment strength of two mytilids in mono-specific and mixed-species mussel beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babarro, Jose M F; Comeau, Luc A

    2014-09-01

    The mussel Xenostrobus securis is endemic to the brackish waters of New Zealand and Australia, but has successfully invaded the inner Galician Rías of NW Spain, where it coexists with the indigenous mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this laboratory study, the plasticity of the byssus attachment strength of two mytilids was compared by manipulating substratum, salinity, and bed assembly. M. galloprovincialis showed stronger byssus detachment strength than X. securis, despite lower byssus coverage. Both species responded similarly to the substratum, with substantially lower byssus strength on methacrylate, which offered the lowest surface free energy. Byssus detachment values for M. galloprovincialis were lower at lower salinity. In mixed beds, a number of mussels moved upwards, eventually colonising the upper layers of the assemblage. This behaviour increased byssus strength but only for X. securis. X. securis is adapted to a wide spectrum of abiotic conditions, a trait that may promote its dissemination within estuarine environments.

  3. Process study of polycyanate resin for wet-filament wound high-strength composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    Polycyanate (or cyanate ester) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14 polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. T1000G/RS-14 composite cylinders were wet-wound and cured using different process schedules and then evaluated for hoop tensile strength and modulus, transverse flexural strength and short beam shear strength. The results of material characterization tests performed on the T1000G carbon fiber and RS-14 resin constituents used in this study are also presented.

  4. Flexural Strength of Acrylic Resin Denture Bases Processed by Two Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Gharechahi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare flexural strength of specimens processed by conventional and injection-molding techniques. Materials and methods. Conventional pressure-packed PMMA was used for conventional pressure-packed and injection-molded PMMA was used for injection-molding techniques. After processing, 15 specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature until measured. Three-point flexural strength test was carried out. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. Flexural strength of injection-polymerized acrylic resin specimens was higher than that of theconventional method (P=0.006. This difference was statistically significant (P=0.006. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, flexural strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by the mold-ing technique.

  5. Influence of atmospheric conditions on the strength of unstabilized earthen constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial compression tests and indirect tensile tests are performed on compacted clayey silt samples upon varying suctions in order to assess the influence of changes in the relative humidity conditions on the strength of unstabilized rammed earthen building materials. The results show that suction plays an important role on the strength of the material. Also the ability of the Belgian clayey silt to develop sufficient mechanical strength to be used as an unstabilized earthen construction material is demonstrated whatever the relative humidity conditions, excepted the fully water saturated state. The experimental data are interpreted in the context of unsaturated soil mechanics using the generalized effective stress concept. This constitutive framework allows defining a unified failure criterion predicting the strength of the earthen building material as a function of the environmental hygroscopic conditions.

  6. The Spalling of Geopolymer High Strength Concrete Wall Panels and Cylinders Under Hydrocarbon Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ali Ahmad Zurisman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete structures were designed to withstand various types of environment conditions from mild to very severe conditions. Fire represents one of the most severe environmental conditions to which concrete structures may be subjected especially in close conduct structure like tunnel. This paper focuses on the spalling of geopolymer high strength concrete exposed to hydrocarbon fire for minimum 2 hours. From the fire test, geopolymer concrete can be classified as a good fire resistance construction materials based on spalling performance of high strength concrete when exposed to hydrocarbon fire. A maximum of 1% (excluding water moisture loss of spalling recorded for high strength geopolymer concrete wall panel. No explosive spallings were observed for high strength geopolymer concrete.

  7. Ionic Strength Differentially Affects the Bioavailability of Neutral and Negatively Charged Inorganic Hg Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzler, Benjamin; Hinz, Aaron; Ruuskanen, Matti; Poulain, Alexandre J

    2017-09-05

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability to bacteria in marine systems is the first step toward its bioamplification in food webs. These systems exhibit high salinity and ionic strength that will both alter Hg speciation and properties of the bacteria cell walls. The role of Hg speciation on Hg bioavailability in marine systems has not been teased apart from that of ionic strength on cell wall properties, however. We developed and optimized a whole-cell Hg bioreporter capable of functioning under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and exhibiting no physiological limitations of signal production to changes in ionic strength. We show that ionic strength controls the bioavailability of Hg species, regardless of their charge, possibly by altering properties of the bacterial cell wall. The unexpected anaerobic bioavailability of negatively charged halocomplexes may help explain Hg methylation in marine systems such as the oxygen-deficient zone in the oceanic water column, sea ice or polar snow.

  8. Influence of seawater mixing and curing on strength characteristics and porosity of ground granulated blast-furnace slag concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwijaya; Hamada, H.; Sagawa, Y.; Yamamoto, D.

    2017-11-01

    Generally, in the concrete industry, several billion tons of fresh water are annually used for mixing water, curing water and cleaning water. Nevertheless, the utilization of seawater in the concrete industry is prohibited, because it increases the risk of corrosion of steel bars in concrete. This study presents strength characteristics and porosity of seawater mixed concrete and tap water mixed concrete incorporating Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS) with water-binder ratio (W/B) of 40%, 50% and 60%. The influence of seawater mixing, GGBS and curing conditions such as tap water curing (TC), seawater curing (SC) and air curing (AC) on the strength and porosity of concrete were evaluated. Based on investigation result, it was shown that there is no significant influence of seawater mixing in improving strength of GGBS concrete up to 365 days in TC and SC. Effectiveness of seawater-mixing on strength enhancement of GGBS concrete is larger in air curing than in water curing. Porosity of seawater-mixed concrete is decreased compared to tap water-mixed concrete in all curing conditions.

  9. The Effects of Isokinetic Strength Training on Strength at Different Angular Velocities: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Kocahan

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: It was shown that angular velocity is important in isokinetic training, and that training at high angular velocities provides strength increases at lower angular velocities, but would not increase strength at angular velocities above the training level. For this reason, it is thought that in the preparation of an isokinetic strength training protocol, angular velocities need to be taken into account. For any athlete, the force at the angular velocity required in her/his sports branch needs to be considered.

  10. Increased cross-education of muscle strength and reduced corticospinal inhibition following eccentric strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidgell, D J; Frazer, A K; Daly, R M; Rantalainen, T; Ruotsalainen, I; Ahtiainen, J; Avela, J; Howatson, G

    2015-08-06

    Strength training of one limb results in a substantial increase in the strength of the untrained limb, however, it remains unknown what the corticospinal responses are following either eccentric or concentric strength training and how this relates to the cross-education of strength. The aim of this study was to determine if eccentric or concentric unilateral strength training differentially modulates corticospinal excitability, inhibition and the cross-transfer of strength. Changes in contralateral (left limb) concentric strength, eccentric strength, motor-evoked potentials, short-interval intracortical inhibition and silent period durations were analyzed in groups of young adults who exercised the right wrist flexors with either eccentric (N=9) or concentric (N=9) contractions for 12 sessions over 4weeks. Control subjects (N=9) did not train. Following training, both groups exhibited a significant strength gain in the trained limb (concentric group increased concentric strength by 64% and eccentric group increased eccentric strength by 62%) and the extent of the cross-transfer of strength was 28% and 47% for the concentric and eccentric group, respectively, which was different between groups (P=0.031). Transcranial magnetic stimulation revealed that eccentric training reduced intracortical inhibition (37%), silent period duration (15-27%) and increased corticospinal excitability (51%) compared to concentric training for the untrained limb (P=0.033). There was no change in the control group. The results show that eccentric training uniquely modulates corticospinal excitability and inhibition of the untrained limb to a greater extent than concentric training. These findings suggest that unilateral eccentric contractions provide a greater stimulus in cross-education paradigms and should be an integral part of the rehabilitative process following unilateral injury to maximize the response. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  12. Evaluation of in-place concrete strength by core testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The overall objective of the work contained in this report is to develop an ALDOT procedure to evaluate core strength results obtained under various conditions. Since there are many factors that influence the apparent strength of cores, strength corr...

  13. Short Communications Strength Properties and Groups of Major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Communications Strength Properties and Groups of Major Commercial Timbers Grown in Kenya. ... The strength groups developed revealed that most species in Kenya are suitable for heavy engineering works and building construction. ... strength properties, commercial timber, physical and mechanical properties

  14. A relation between dynamic strength and manual materials-handling strategy affected by knowledge of strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Daniel; Li, Kang; Zhang, Xudong

    2007-06-01

    We studied the relation between dynamic (isokinetic) strength and the batch-assorting strategy to initiate a manual materials-handling task and the effect of knowledge of strength on that relation. The debated, complex relationship between muscular strength and the risk of injury can be better understood from a behavioral perspective by examining performance strategies in physical acts such as lifting. Thirty-two participants (16 men and 16 women) were first tested for their isokinetic strengths of trunk extension, knee extension, shoulder extension, and shoulder abduction. The participants were then divided into two groups, one provided with knowledge feedback of their strength testing results and the other not provided with such feedback. Participants subsequently performed the same load-handling task in which they carried batches of various weight plates while allowed to assort batches of more than one plate into any combination. Dynamic strength, as represented by a total isokinetic strength score, and knowledge feedback both had significant effects on measures quantifying the batch-assorting strategy. Individuals with greater strength tended to adopt a strategy corresponding to a heavier load per carry and fewer carries per batch. Receiving knowledge feedback evoked a tendency toward handling a heavier load, and this tendency was more salient in the weaker individuals. Potential applications include the use of strength testing in worker selection and training as well as in job design to promote better strategies of balancing productivity and injury prevention.

  15. Strength of precast concrete shear joints reinforced with high-strength wire ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the in-plane shear strength of connections between precast concrete wall elements reinforced with looped high-strength wire ropes. The looped wire ropes are pre-installed in so-called ‘wire boxes’ which function as shear keys. Although only a small amount of research...... on the shear strength of such connections can be found in the literature, this type of connection is increasingly being used because wire ropes are much more construction-friendly than traditional U-bars. A rigid plastic upper bound model for the shear strength of wall connections reinforced with looped wire...

  16. Advances in paediatric strength assessment: changing our perspective on strength development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croix, Mark De Ste

    2007-09-01

    Our knowledge of the age and sex associated changes in strength during childhood and adolescence is relatively limited compared to other physiological parameters. However, those studies available on the age and sex associated change in strength are relatively consistent, especially for the lower limbs. Caution must be taken when transferring this knowledge to other muscle joints as the development in strength appears to be both muscle action and joint specific. Strength appears to increase in both boys and girls until about the age of 14 y where it begins to plateau in girls and a spurt is evident in boys. By 18 y there are few overlaps in strength between boys and girls. The exact age in which sex differences become apparent appears to be both muscle group and muscle action specific and there is a suggestion that sex differences in upper body strength occur earlier than lower body strength. What is less clear is the complex factors that contribute to the production of strength during childhood and adolescence. There are few well controlled longitudinal studies that have concurrently examined the influence of known variables using appropriate statistical techniques. Most studies have shown that maturation does not exert an independent effect when other factors, such as stature and body mass are accounted for. Also, the assumption that muscle cross-sectional area is the most important parameter in strength production does not hold when examined with other known variables. Consistently, stature appears to play a key role in strength development and this may be attributed to the strength spurt that has been linked to peak height velocity, and the muscle moment arm. Advances in technology have provided us with more accurate techniques to examine these explanatory variables but the complex interaction of neural, mechanical and muscular remains to be clearly identified from well controlled longitudinal studies. Key pointsThe age associated development in strength is

  17. Effects of heating durations on normal concrete residual properties: compressive strength and mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed; Shahidan, Shahiron; Khaida Baharuddin, Nur; Beddu, Salmia; Hisyam Abu Bakar, Badorul

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of high temperature with five different heating durations on residual properties of 30 MPa normal concrete. Concrete cubes were being heated up to 600°C for 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes. The temperature will keep constant for 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes. The standard temperature-time curve ISO 834 is referred to. After heating the specimen were left to cool in the furnace and removed. After cooling down to ambient temperature, the residual mass and residual compressive strength were observed. The obtained result shows that, the compressive strength of concrete decrease as the heating duration increases. This heating duration influence, might affects the loss of free water present and decomposition of hydration products in concrete. As the heating duration increases, the amount of water evaporated also increases led to loss in concrete mass. Conclusively, the percentage of mass and compressive strength loss increased as the heating duration increased.

  18. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (presin increments.

  19. Strength and power predictors of sports speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, John B; Hansen, Keir T

    2005-05-01

    For many sporting activities, initial speed rather than maximal speed would be considered of greater importance to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between strength and power and measures of first-step quickness (5-m time), acceleration (10-m time), and maximal speed (30-m time). The maximal strength (3 repetition maximum [3RM]), power (30-kg jump squat, countermovement, and drop jumps), isokinetic strength measures (hamstring and quadriceps peak torques and ratios at 60 degrees .s(-1) and 300 degrees .s(-1)) and 5-m, 10-m, and 30-m sprint times of 26 part-time and full-time professional rugby league players (age 23.2 +/- 3.3 years) were measured. To examine the importance of the strength and power measures on sprint performance, a correlational approach and a comparison between means of the fastest and slowest players was used. The correlations between the 3RM, drop jump, isokinetic strength measures, and the 3 measures of sport speed were nonsignificant. Correlations between the jump squat (height and relative power output) and countermovement jump height and the 3 speed measures were significant (r = -0.43 to -0.66, p sport speed in elite players.

  20. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  1. Ureteral stents: coil strength and durometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendlin, Kari; Dockendorf, Kelly; Horn, Christina; Pshon, Nicole; Lund, Brynn; Monga, Manoj

    2006-07-01

    To evaluate the coil strength before and after urine exposure and the stiffness of commercially available double-J ureteral stents because both properties may affect stent performance and patient comfort. Twelve commercially available 6F ureteral stents were tested for coil strength before and after 30 days of urine exposure. The proximal end of each stent was inserted through a 2-mm hole in bologna, allowed to recoil, and then pulled using a handheld force gauge. Ten different commercially available ureteral stent models were tested for tensile strength using an MTS MicroBionix Testing System and Testworks II software and a 5 N load cell. The Cook Black Silicone and Cook C-Flex stents had the strongest coil strengths before urine exposure at 0.480 +/- 0.0 lb (P Circon Double J stent and Bard InLay. Ureteral stents can be differentiated according to their coil strength and stiffness. The impact of these properties on stent performance and patient comfort deserve additional evaluation. The significant variability found in stent stiffness among stents from different lot numbers suggests poor quality assurance in biomaterials or stent processing and increases the complexity of cross-stent comparisons.

  2. Two methods to improve the accuracy of target-strength estimates for horizontal beaming

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rakowitz, G.; Herold, W.; Fesl, Ch.; Keckeis, H.; Kubečka, Jan; Balk, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 3 (2008), s. 324-331 ISSN 0165-7836 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : shallow water acoustics * horizontal beaming * target strength variability * flash-effect * side-aspect * Cyprinids Subject RIV: GL - Fishing Impact factor: 1.434, year: 2008

  3. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2007-01-01

    of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  4. Effect of a re‑wetting agent on bond strength of an adhesive to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... Each group teeth were randomly divided into groups; I–II: 37% phosphoric acid etching with/without re‑wetting agent, III–IV: ... re‑wetting agent did not provide an advance on bond strength of the adhesive in both primary and permanent teeth ..... laser irradiation the water present in the tissue vaporizes,.

  5. Rheology of water and ammonia-water ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, D. L.; Kohlstedt, D. L.; Durham, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    Creep experiments on fine-grained water and ammonia-water ices have been performed at one atmosphere and high confining pressure in order to develop constitutive relationships necessary to model tectonic processes and interpret surface features of icy moons of the outer solar system. The present series of experiments explores the effects of temperature, strain rate, grain size, and melt fraction on creep strength. In general, creep strength decreases with increasing temperature, decreasing strain rate, and increasing melt fraction. A transition from dislocation creep to diffusion creep occurs at finer grain sizes, higher temperatures, and lower strain rates.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of a high-strength biocompatible glass-ionomer cement for improved dental restoratives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, D; Zhao, J; Park, J; Chu, T M; Yang, Y; Zhang, J T

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a high-strength light-cured glass-ionomer cement (LCGIC). The polymer in the cement was composed of the 6-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), which was synthesized using atom-transfer radical polymerization. The polymer was used to formulate with water and Fuji II LC filler to form LCGIC. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. Commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as control. The results show that the 6-arm PAA polymer exhibited a lower viscosity in water as compared to its linear counterpart that was synthesized via conventional free-radical polymerization. This new LCGIC system was 48% in CS, 77% in diametral tensile strength, 95% in flexural strength and 59% in fracture toughness higher but 93.6% in shrinkage lower than Fuji II LC. An increasing polymer content significantly increased CS, whereas an increasing glass filler content increased neither yield strength nor ultimate CS except for modulus. During aging, the experimental cement showed a significant and continuous increase in yield strength, modulus and ultimate CS, but Fuji II LC only showed a significant increase in strength within 24 h. The experimental cement was very biocompatible in vivo to bone and showed little in vitro cytotoxicity. It appears that this novel LCGIC cement will be a better dental restorative because it demonstrated significantly improved mechanical strengths and better in vitro and in vivo biocompatibilities as compared to the current commercial LCGIC system

  7. Preparation and evaluation of a high-strength biocompatible glass-ionomer cement for improved dental restoratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, D; Zhao, J; Park, J; Chu, T M [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yang, Y; Zhang, J T [Department of Phamacology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: dxie@iupui.edu

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a high-strength light-cured glass-ionomer cement (LCGIC). The polymer in the cement was composed of the 6-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), which was synthesized using atom-transfer radical polymerization. The polymer was used to formulate with water and Fuji II LC filler to form LCGIC. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. Commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as control. The results show that the 6-arm PAA polymer exhibited a lower viscosity in water as compared to its linear counterpart that was synthesized via conventional free-radical polymerization. This new LCGIC system was 48% in CS, 77% in diametral tensile strength, 95% in flexural strength and 59% in fracture toughness higher but 93.6% in shrinkage lower than Fuji II LC. An increasing polymer content significantly increased CS, whereas an increasing glass filler content increased neither yield strength nor ultimate CS except for modulus. During aging, the experimental cement showed a significant and continuous increase in yield strength, modulus and ultimate CS, but Fuji II LC only showed a significant increase in strength within 24 h. The experimental cement was very biocompatible in vivo to bone and showed little in vitro cytotoxicity. It appears that this novel LCGIC cement will be a better dental restorative because it demonstrated significantly improved mechanical strengths and better in vitro and in vivo biocompatibilities as compared to the current commercial LCGIC system.

  8. Microtensile bond strength of lithium disilicate ceramics to resin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Sleem, Donia

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of the internal structure of lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDC) on the microtensile bond strength to a resin adhesive using two surface treatments. Milling blocks of three types of LDC were sectioned (4 mm thick) using a precision cutting machine: IPS Empress 2 (conventional LDC), IPSe.max CAD (a refined crystal high strength LDC), and Celtra (zirconia reinforced LDC). Cut specimens received crystallization heat treatment as suggested by the manufacturers. Two surface treatments were performed on each group: hydrofluoric acid etching (HF) and airborne particle abrasion using 50-μm glass beads, while the as-cut surface served as control. Treated surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The disks were coated with a silane primer and bonded to pre-aged resin composite disks (Tetric EvoCeram) using a resin adhesive (Variolink II) and then stored in water for 3 months. Bonded specimens were sectioned into micro-bars (1x1x6 mm) and microtensile bond strength test (MTBS) was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=0.05). Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in microtensile bond strength values between different LDCs (F=67, pceramic (30.4±4.6 MPa) was significantly higher than both IPS Empress 2 (21.5±5.9 MPa) and IPSe.max ceramics (25.8±4.8 MPa), which had almost comparable MTBS values. SEM images demonstrated homogenous glassy matrix and reinforcing zirconia fillers characteristic of Celtra ceramic. Heat treatment resulted in growth and maturation of lithium disilicate crystals. Particle abrasion resulted in abrasion of the glass matrix and exposure of lithium disilicate crystals, while HF etching produced a microrough surface, which resulted in higher MTBS values and reduction in the percentage of adhesive failure for all groups. Within the limitations of this study, bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramics depends on proper surface treatment and on

  9. Short-term Periodization Models: Effects on Strength and Speed-strength Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hagen; Wirth, Klaus; Keiner, Michael; Mickel, Christoph; Sander, Andre; Szilvas, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Dividing training objectives into consecutive phases to gain morphological adaptations (hypertrophy phase) and neural adaptations (strength and power phases) is called strength-power periodization (SPP). These phases differ in program variables (volume, intensity, and exercise choice or type) and use stepwise intensity progression and concomitant decreasing volume, converging to peak intensity (peaking phase). Undulating periodization strategies rotate these program variables in a bi-weekly, weekly, or daily fashion. The following review addresses the effects of different short-term periodization models on strength and speed-strength both with subjects of different performance levels and with competitive athletes from different sports who use a particular periodization model during off-season, pre-season, and in-season conditioning. In most periodization studies, it is obvious that the strength endurance sessions are characterized by repetition zones (12-15 repetitions) that induce muscle hypertrophy in persons with a low performance level. Strictly speaking, when examining subjects with a low training level, many periodization studies include mainly hypertrophy sessions interspersed with heavy strength/power sessions. Studies have demonstrated equal or statistically significant higher gains in maximal strength for daily undulating periodization compared with SPP in subjects with a low to moderate performance level. The relatively short intervention period and the lack of concomitant sports conditioning call into question the practical value of these findings for competitive athletes. Possibly owing to differences in mesocycle length, conditioning programs, and program variables, competitive athletes either maintained or improved strength and/or speed-strength performance by integrating daily undulating periodization and SPP during off-season, pre-season and in-season conditioning. In high-performance sports, high-repetition strength training (>15) should be

  10. Ultimate Longitudinal Strength of Composite Ship Hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangming; Huang, Lingkai; Zhu, Libao; Tang, Yuhang; Wang, Anwen

    2017-01-01

    A simple analytical model to estimate the longitudinal strength of ship hulls in composite materials under buckling, material failure and ultimate collapse is presented in this paper. Ship hulls are regarded as assemblies of stiffened panels which idealized as group of plate-stiffener combinations. Ultimate strain of the plate-stiffener combination is predicted under buckling or material failure with composite beam-column theory. The effects of initial imperfection of ship hull and eccentricity of load are included. Corresponding longitudinal strengths of ship hull are derived in a straightforward method. A longitudinally framed ship hull made of symmetrically stacked unidirectional plies under sagging is analyzed. The results indicate that present analytical results have a good agreement with FEM method. The initial deflection of ship hull and eccentricity of load can dramatically reduce the bending capacity of ship hull. The proposed formulations provide a simple but useful tool for the longitudinal strength estimation in practical design.

  11. Effectiveness of strength training in post stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Baig, U.A.

    2013-01-01

    The study was done to evaluate the effectiveness of strength training in post stroke. This was an experimental randomized study, conducted at various Physical Therapy OPD setting areas. Sample n = 30; 3 females and 12 males as experimental group and 3 females and 12 males as control group were selected through probability sampling. Mean age of 57 with middle recovery stage of post stroke were included. Different selected strength training exercises were applied on experimental group to assess spasticity, cadence and manual muscle testing. Result was taken by using Mann - Whiteny U test for outcome measures as in cadence, spasticity and manual muscle testing. The result of two outcome measure shows significant result which means the strength training is more effective than the conventional treatment for post stroke of middle recovery stage. (author)

  12. Residual-strength determination in polymetric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic theory of crack growth is used to predict the residual strength of polymetric materials acted upon by a previous history. Specifically, the kinetic theory is used to characterize the state of growing damage that occurs under a constant-stress (load) state. The load is removed before failure under creep-rupture conditions, and the residual instantaneous strength is determined from the theory by taking account of the damage accumulation under the preceding constant-load history. The rate of change of residual strength is found to be strongest when the duration of the preceding load history is near the ultimate lifetime under that condition. Physical explanations for this effect are given, as are numerical examples. Also, the theoretical prediction is compared with experimental data

  13. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  14. Annotation of selection strengths in viral genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCauley, Stephen; de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    - and intergenomic regions. The presence of multiple coding regions complicates the concept of Ka/Ks ratio, and thus begs for an alternative approach when investigating selection strengths. Building on the paper by McCauley & Hein (2006), we develop a method for annotating a viral genome coding in overlapping...... may thus achieve an annotation both of coding regions as well as selection strengths, allowing us to investigate different selection patterns and hypotheses. Results: We illustrate our method by applying it to a multiple alignment of four HIV2 sequences, as well as four Hepatitis B sequences. We...... obtain an annotation of the coding regions, as well as a posterior probability for each site of the strength of selection acting on it. From this we may deduce the average posterior selection acting on the different genes. Whilst we are encouraged to see in HIV2, that the known to be conserved genes gag...

  15. Toughness and strength of nanocrystalline graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Pristine monocrystalline graphene is claimed to be the strongest material known with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. However, graphene made with scalable fabrication techniques is polycrystalline and contains inherent nanoscale line and point defects—grain boundaries and grain-boundary triple junctions—that lead to significant statistical fluctuations in toughness and strength. These fluctuations become particularly pronounced for nanocrystalline graphene where the density of defects is high. Here we use large-scale simulation and continuum modelling to show that the statistical variation in toughness and strength can be understood with ‘weakest-link' statistics. We develop the first statistical theory of toughness in polycrystalline graphene, and elucidate the nanoscale origins of the grain-size dependence of its strength and toughness. Our results should lead to more reliable graphene device design, and provide a framework to interpret experimental results in a broad class of two-dimensional materials. PMID:26817712

  16. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  17. Dataset of the relationship between unconfined compressive strength and tensile strength of rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yutaka; Yui, Mikazu

    2002-02-01

    This report summary the dataset of the relationship between unconfined compressive strength and tensile strength of the rock mass described in supporting report 2; repository design and engineering technology of second progress report (H12 report) on research and development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. (author)

  18. Fatigue strength of repaired cracks in welded connections made of very high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyel, A.

    2017-01-01

    For cyclically loaded structures, fatigue design becomes one of the important design criteria. The state of art shows that with modification of the conventional structural design methodology, the use of very high strength steels may have a positive effect on fatigue strength of welded connections.

  19. Predicting hand function in older adults: evaluations of grip strength, arm curl strength, and manual dexterity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiung-Ju; Marie, Deana; Fredrick, Aaron; Bertram, Jessica; Utley, Kristen; Fess, Elaine Ewing

    2017-08-01

    Hand function is critical for independence in activities of daily living for older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine how grip strength, arm curl strength, and manual dexterous coordination contributed to time-based versus self-report assessment of hand function in community-dwelling older adults. Adults aged ≥60 years without low vision or neurological disorders were recruited. Purdue Pegboard Test, Jamar hand dynamometer, 30-second arm curl test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, and the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument were administered to assess manual dexterous coordination, grip strength, arm curl strength, time-based hand function, and self-report of hand function, respectively. Eighty-four adults (mean age = 72 years) completed the study. Hierarchical multiple regressions show that older adults with better arm curl strength (β = -.25, p arm curl strength (β = .23, p Arm curl strength independently contributed to hand function in both time-based and self-report assessments, indicating that strength of extrinsic muscles of the hand are essential for hand function.

  20. Does Grip Strength Reflect Isokinetic Muscle Strength in Lower Limbs in Patients with CIDP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knak, Kirsten L; Andersen, Linda K; Christiansen, Ingelise; Markvardsen, Lars K

    2018-03-30

    Introduction Grip strength is a common measure of general muscle strength in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, it is important to investigate the correlation and responsiveness of grip strength compared to isokinetic muscle strength (IKS) and function of the lower limbs. Methods Seventy patients with CIDP were evaluated with grip strength, IKS and functional measures of the lower limbs. Reevaluation was done after 2 and 10/12 weeks. Correlation and response analyses were performed. Results Grip strength correlated with IKS ankle (maximum Spearman's rank correlation (R S ) = 0.58) and with walking performance (maximum R S = -0.38). IKS ankle was more responsive to detect change (Standardized Response Mean (SRM) = 0.57) than grip strength (SRM = 0.27). Discussion Grip strength does not seem to be an appropriate surrogate measure of IKS and function of the lower limbs in patients with CIDP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The effect of Nordic hamstring strength training on muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymore, Kayla D; Domire, Zachary J; DeVita, Paul; Rider, Patrick M; Kulas, Anthony S

    2017-05-01

    Hamstring strain injury is a frequent and serious injury in competitive and recreational sports. While Nordic hamstring (NH) eccentric strength training is an effective hamstring injury-prevention method, the protective mechanism of this exercise is not understood. Strength training increases muscle strength, but also alters muscle architecture and stiffness; all three factors may be associated with reducing muscle injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of NH eccentric strength training on hamstring muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength. Twenty healthy participants were randomly assigned to an eccentric training group or control group. Control participants performed static stretching, while experimental participants performed static stretching and NH training for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention measurements included: hamstring muscle architecture and stiffness using ultrasound imaging and elastography, and maximal hamstring strength measured on a dynamometer. The experimental group, but not the control group, increased volume (131.5 vs. 145.2 cm 3 , p strength. The NH intervention was an effective training method for muscle hypertrophy, but, contrary to common literature findings for other modes of eccentric training, did not increase fascicle length. The data suggest that the mechanism behind NH eccentric strength training mitigating hamstring injury risk could be increasing volume rather than increasing muscle length. Future research is, therefore, warranted to determine if muscle hypertrophy induced by NH training lowers future hamstring strain injury risk.

  2. [Loading and strength of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses 2. Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Meijers, C.C.A.J.; Vergoossen, E.L.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate strength of a dental prosthesis is defined as the strongest loading force applied to the prosthesis until afracture failure occurs. Important key terms are strength, hardness, toughness and fatigue. Relatively prevalent complications of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses are

  3. Vocational Psychology: Using One of Counseling Psychology's Strengths to Foster Human Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitschek, Christine; Woodson, Shelley Janiczek

    2006-01-01

    At several points in the history of their field, counseling psychologists have emphasized that fostering human strengths is part of their mission. Vocational psychology is an area of counseling psychology that has focused consistently on human strengths. In keeping with the Major Contribution's theme, this article examines the following: (a)…

  4. Size Effects on the Strength of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    The grain size effect and the specimen size effect on the strength of metals are briefly reviewed with respect to their history and current status of research. It is revealed that the fundamental strengthening mechanisms responsible for these two types of size effect are to increase the resistance...... to dislocation motion and to dislocation generation, respectively. It is shown that both strengthening mechanisms take place in some nanostructured metals, which leads to a suggestion to use these two mechanisms for optimizing the strength and ductility of nanostructured metals. This suggestion is verified...

  5. Large quantum dots with small oscillator strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Schlereth, T.W.; Höfling, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the oscillator strength and quantum efficiency of excitons confined in large InGaAs quantum dots by recording the spontaneous emission decay rate while systematically varying the distance between the quantum dots and a semiconductor-air interface. The size of the quantum dots...... is measured by in-plane transmission electron microscopy and we find average in-plane diameters of 40 nm. We have calculated the oscillator strength of excitons of that size assuming a quantum-dot confinement given by a parabolic in-plane potential and a hard-wall vertical potential and predict a very large...... intermixing inside the quantum dots....

  6. Numerical Model of High Strength Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R. Z.; Wang, C. Y.; Lin, Y. L.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a three-dimensional constitutive model based on the concept of equivalent uniaxial strain. closed Menetrey-Willam (CMW) failure surfaces which combined with Menetrey-Willam meridian and the cap model are introduced in this paper. Saenz stress-strain model is applied and adjusted by the ultimate strength parameters from CMW failure surface to reflect the latest stress or strain condition. The high strength concrete (HSC) under tri-axial non-proportional loading is considered and the model in this paper performed a good prediction.

  7. Correlation between compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of high strength concrete incorporating chopped basalt fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Nasir; Fadhilnuruddin, Muhd; Elshekh, Ali Elheber Ahmed; Fathi, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), is considered as the most important test for non-destructive techniques that are used to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of high strength concrete (HSC). The relationship between the compressive strength of HSC containing chopped basalt fibre stands (CBSF) and UPV was investigated. The concrete specimens were prepared using a different ratio of CBSF as internal strengthening materials. The compressive strength measurements were conducted at the sample ages of 3, 7, 28, 56 and 90 days; whilst, the ultrasonic pulse velocity was measured at 28 days. The result of HSC's compressive strength with the chopped basalt fibre did not show any improvement; instead, it was decreased. The UPV of the chopped basalt fibre reinforced concrete has been found to be less than that of the control mix for each addition ratio of the basalt fibre. A relationship plot is gained between the cube compressive strength for HSC and UPV with various amounts of chopped basalt fibres.

  8. Evaluation and comparison of transverse and impact strength of different high strength denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhinav; Tewari, R K

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate and compare the impact strength and transverse strength of the high-impact denture base materials. A conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin was used as a control. The entire experiment was divided into four main groups with twenty specimens each according to denture base material selected Trevalon, Trevalon Hi, DPI Tuff and Metrocryl Hi. These groups were further subgrouped into the two parameters selected, impact strength and flexural strength with ten specimens each. These specimens were then subjected to transverse bend tests with the help of Lloyds instrument using a three point bend principle. Impact tests were undertaken using an Izod-Charpy digital impact tester. This study was analyzed with one-way analysis of variance using Fisher f-test and Bonferroni t-test. There was a significant improvement in the impact strength of high-impact denture base resins as compared to control (Trevalon). However, in terms of transverse bend tests, only DPI Tuff showed higher transverse strength in comparison to control. Trevalon Hi and Metrocryl Hi showed a decrease in transverse strength. Within the limits of this in vitro study, (1) There is a definite increase in impact strength due to the incorporation of butadiene styrene rubber in this high strength denture base materials as compared to Trevalon used as a control. (2) Further investigations are required to prevent the unduly decrease of transverse strength. (3) It was the limitation of the study that the exact composition of the high-impact resins was not disclosed by the manufacturer that would have helped in better understanding of their behavior.

  9. Evaluation and comparison of transverse and impact strength of different high strength denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate and compare the impact strength and transverse strength of the high-impact denture base materials. A conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin was used as a control. Materials and Methods: The entire experiment was divided into four main groups with twenty specimens each according to denture base material selected Trevalon, Trevalon Hi, DPI Tuff and Metrocryl Hi. These groups were further subgrouped into the two parameters selected, impact strength and flexural strength with ten specimens each. These specimens were then subjected to transverse bend tests with the help of Lloyds instrument using a three point bend principle. Impact tests were undertaken using an Izod-Charpy digital impact tester. Results: This study was analyzed with one-way analysis of variance using Fisher f-test and Bonferroni t-test. There was a significant improvement in the impact strength of high-impact denture base resins as compared to control (Trevalon. However, in terms of transverse bend tests, only DPI Tuff showed higher transverse strength in comparison to control. Trevalon Hi and Metrocryl Hi showed a decrease in transverse strength. Conclusions: Within the limits of this in vitro study, (1 There is a definite increase in impact strength due to the incorporation of butadiene styrene rubber in this high strength denture base materials as compared to Trevalon used as a control. (2 Further investigations are required to prevent the unduly decrease of transverse strength. (3 It was the limitation of the study that the exact composition of the high-impact resins was not disclosed by the manufacturer that would have helped in better understanding of their behavior.

  10. Experimental study on the strength characteristics of stiff clay during earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanatani, Mamoru; Okamoto, Toshiro; Kokusho, Takaji; Matsui, Ietaka

    1989-01-01

    Natural deposits do not always consist only of homogeneous sandy or gravelly materials, but often contain stiff silt or clay layers. The report presents major results of experimental studies on the dynamic strength characteristics of clay. Major results are as follows. The dynamic strength of clay increases with the over-consolidation ratio. The dynamic strength of clay also increases with loading frequency. A structure, with its dead weight, imposes an initial shear stress to the soil elements near the structure at normal times. The dynamic strength of clay increases with the initial shear stress. In largely over-consolidated clay, residual pore water pressure is hardly caused by earthquake loading. As the over-consolidation ratio decreases, pore water pressure increases hyperbolically relative to the maximum strain induced by earthquake loading. Where the maximum strain induced by earthquake loading is less than about 10 %, the static shear strength of clay is increased by the earthquake. Its increase is larger in normally consolidated clay than in over-consolidated clay. (N.K.)

  11. Influence of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zeng, Jishan; Wang, Shaoan; Yang, Zheng; Huang, Qian; Chen, Pixiu; Zhou, Shujuan; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments after different storage time and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces. 128 disc-shaped porcelain specimens were randomly assigned to the following surface treatments: 9.6% HFA, 9.6% HFA combined with silane, 50 μ aluminum trioxide sandblasting followed by silane and application of silane after 37% phosphoric acid. Metal or ceramic brackets were bonded onto each treated porcelain facet with light cured resin. The samples were stored in 37 °C water 1 day or 7 days, thermocycled 500 times from 5 to 55 °C. The shear bond strengths were measured (1 mm/min), and statistically analyzed. The bond failure sites were classified according to ARI system. The surface of the glazed, sandblasted, hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid etched porcelain were examined with SEM. All groups achieved reasonable bond strengths to withstand the application of orthodontic forces. Water storage for 7 days caused lower shear bond strength than that of 1 day. But there is no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean shear bond strength provided by ceramic bracket with mechanical retention had no statistical difference with that of metal bracket. Therefore, the optimal treatment for orthodontic brackets bonding to feldspathic porcelain was to apply phosphoric acid combined with silane.

  12. Influence of chlorhexidine application on longitudinal adhesive bond strength in deciduous teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castelo Branco Leitune

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of applying 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds after phosphoric acid conditioning of dentin on the immediate and long-term bond strengths in deciduous teeth. The occlusal enamel was removed from 40 human sound deciduous molars, which were exfoliated by natural means, and the dentin was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds and washed with running water. The specimens were divided into two groups of 20 teeth. The test group received an application of 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds prior to a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system, whereas the control group received only the adhesive system. Three cylindrical restorations were made with a composite resin for each tooth. Ten teeth in each group were submitted to a microshear bond strength test after 24 hours, while the remaining teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 6 months before testing the microshear bond strength. The test group had a higher bond strength than did the control group after 6 months of storage. No statistical differences were found when groups with the same dentin treatment were compared at different times. Short applications of chlorhexidine at low concentrations prevent hybrid layer degradation and positively affect bond strength over time.

  13. Effect of different chemical disinfectants on the flexural strength of heat-polymerized acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savabi, O; Attar, K; Nejatidanesh, F; Goroohi, H; Badrian, H

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of chemical disinfectants on flexural strength of denture base acrylic resins. A total of 176 rectangular specimens (65x10x3 mm) were made from four heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Triplex,QC-20, Meliodent and Acropars) (n=44). The specimens were thermal cycled for 5000 cycles 5-55 degrees C and randomly divided into four groups (n=11). The specimens were immersed in 1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, 10% Micro 10 or water for 30 minutes. The flexural strength was evaluated using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were subjected to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (alpha=0.05). The highest flexural strengths of denture base resins were achieved after immersion in water (Triplex=128.9+/-12.8, QC-20=125+/-11.8, Meliodent=96.2+/-11.4 and Acropars=78.1+/-12.3 MPa). Triplex and QC-20 showed the highest flexural strengths in all of the solutions (Pacrylic resins was significantly affected by immersion in disinfection solutions but the reduction in flexural strengths of Triplex, QC-20 and Meliodent after disinfection by %1 sodium hypochlorite, %2 glutaraldhyde and Micro 10 were clinically insignificant.

  14. Compressive strength and ductility of short concrete columns reinforced by bamboo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satjapan Leelatanon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the structural and environmentally sustainable aspects of bamboo as a reinforcing material insteadof steel reinforcement in concrete columns. Seven small-scale short columns (125 mm x 125 mm x 600 mm with different typeof reinforcements were tested under concentric loading to investigate strength capacity and ductility. The results showedthat the strength capacity of short columns reinforced by bamboo without surface treatment could resist the axial load asstructurally required by ACI318-05, but ductility was rather low especially the column that was reinforced by 1.6 percent ofreinforcing bamboo which showed brittle behavior similar to that of plain concrete column. This was thought to be an effectof water absorption and a loss of bonding strength between concrete and bamboo. On the other hand, columns reinforcedby bamboo treated with water-repellent substance, Sikadur-31CFN, showed higher strength and ductility than columnsreinforced by untreated bamboo. The result also showed that 1.6 % of steel reinforcement, in relation to the column crosssection,could be replaced by 3.2% of treated reinforcing bamboo, for similar behavior, strength and ductility.

  15. Effect of thermocycling on the tensile and shear bond strengths of three soft liners to a denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Henriques, Flavio Queiroz

    2007-02-01

    In clinical practice, loss of adhesion between the silicone-based denture liner and the denture base resin is always an undesirable event that might cause loss of material softness, water sorption, bacterial colonization and functional failure of the prosthesis. This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on tensile and shear bond strengths of three soft liner materials to a denture base acrylic resin. Three resilient liners (Mucopren-Soft, Mollosil-Plus and Dentusil) and a heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) were processed according to manufacturers' directions. Sixty specimens (14 x 14 mm cross-sectional area) per bond strength test (20 for each liner) were fabricated and either stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours (control groups; n=10) or thermocycled 3,000 times in water between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C (test groups; n=10). The specimens were tested in tensile and shear strength in a universal testing machine until fracture. Bond strength means were compared between water-stored and thermocycled groups for each material, as well as among materials for each treatment (water storage or thermocycling). Failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed) after debonding was assessed. Data were analyzed statistically by paired Student's t-test and ANOVA at 5% significance level. The water-stored groups had statistically significant higher bond strengths than the thermocycled groups (p<0.05). Without thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (2.83 +/- 0.48 MPa) had higher bond strength than Mollosil-Plus (1.04 +/- 0.26 MPa) and Dentusil (1.14 +/- 0.51 MPa). After thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (1.63 +/- 0.48 MPa) had the highest bond strength (p<0.05). The bond strength of the three soft denture liners tested in this study changed with their chemical composition and all of them exhibited higher bond strengths than those usually reported as clinically acceptable. All soft lining materials tested in this study showed a significant decrease in the bond strength to an

  16. Effect of thermocycling on the tensile and shear bond strengths of three soft liners to a denture base resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Nelson Elias

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: In clinical practice, loss of adhesion between the silicone-based denture liner and the denture base resin is always an undesirable event that might cause loss of material softness, water sorption, bacterial colonization and functional failure of the prosthesis. PURPOSE: This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on tensile and shear bond strengths of three soft liner materials to a denture base acrylic resin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three resilient liners (Mucopren-Soft, Mollosil-Plus and Dentusil and a heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20 were processed according to manufacturers' directions. Sixty specimens (14 x 14 mm cross-sectional area per bond strength test (20 for each liner were fabricated and either stored in water at 37ºC for 24 hours (control groups; n=10 or thermocycled 3,000 times in water between 5ºC and 55ºC (test groups; n=10. The specimens were tested in tensile and shear strength in a universal testing machine until fracture. Bond strength means were compared between water-stored and thermocycled groups for each material, as well as among materials for each treatment (water storage or thermocycling. Failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed after debonding was assessed. Data were analyzed statistically by paired Student's t-test and ANOVA at 5% significance level. RESULTS: The water-stored groups had statistically significant higher bond strengths than the thermocycled groups (p<0.05. Without thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (2.83 ± 0.48 MPa had higher bond strength than Mollosil-Plus (1.04 ± 0.26 MPa and Dentusil (1.14 ± 0.51 MPa. After thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (1.63 ± 0.48 MPa had the highest bond strength (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The bond strength of the three soft denture liners tested in this study changed with their chemical composition and all of them exhibited higher bond strengths than those usually reported as clinically acceptable. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: All soft lining materials

  17. Impact strength of small icy bodies that experienced multiple collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Minami; Hayama, Ryo; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2014-05-01

    Frequent collisions are common for small bodies in the Solar System, and the cumulative damage to these bodies is thought to significantly affect their evolution. It is important to study the effects of multiple impacts such as the number of impacts on the impact strength and the ejection velocity of impact fragments. Here we conducted multiple-impact experiments using a polycrystalline water ice target, varying the number of impacts from 1 to 10 times. An ice cylindrical projectile was impacted at 84-502 m s-1 by using a single-stage gas gun in a cold room between -10 and -15 °C. The impact strength of the ice target that experienced a single impact and multiple impacts is expressed by the total energy density applied to the same target, ΣQ, and this value was observed to be 77.6 J kg-1. The number of fine impact fragments at a fragment mass normalized by an initial target mass, m/Mt0 ∼ 10-6, nm, had a good correlation with the single energy density at each shot, Qj, and the relationship was shown to be nm=10·Qj1.31±0.12. We also estimated the cumulative damage of icy bodies as a total energy density accumulated by past impacts, according to the crater scaling laws proposed by Housen et al. (Housen, K.R., Schmidt, R.M., Holsapple, K.A. [1983]. J. Geophys. Res. 88, 2485-2499) of ice and the crater size distributions observed on Phoebe, a saturnian icy satellite. We found that the cumulative damage of Phoebe depended significantly on the impact speed of the impactor that formed the craters on Phoebe; and the cumulative damage was about one-third of the impact strength ΣQ* at 500 m s-1 whereas it was almost zero at 3.2 km s-1.

  18. Magnetic Field Strength Evaluation Yu. S. Yefimov

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic Field Strength Evaluation. 75 fluctuations have natural explanation in the frame of shock-in-jet model (Marscher. & Gear 1985; Hughes et al. 1989; Qian et al. 1991). However, the flare activity (especially periodical) presents some difficulties in this model. To eliminate these problems, Camenzind & Krockenberger ...

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous analysis showed that cavity size and number on one hand and combinations thickness affect the compressive strength of hollow sandcrete blocks. Series arrangement of the cavities is common but parallel arrangement has been recommended. This research performed a comparative analysis of the compressive ...

  20. Methods of Strength Development in Middle Schoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. О. Нарижний

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Strength being the foundation of motor abilities development, the question arises as to rationalizing the process of its development. The purpose of the research is to improve the conventional methods of strength development in middle schoolers. To achieve the objectives set, the study used the following methods: theoretical analysis and collation of methodological literature, testing, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics. Research results. The analysis of the testing results showed a statistically significant increase in the indicators by two of five tests in girls and three of five tests in boys, with the combined method used. The other results show a tendency to improve too, but the deviations in the testing results are statistically weak. The re-use of the method reveals a statistically reliable indicator in one of five exercises, whereas no such indicator manifests in girls. Conclusions. Using the combined method makes it possible to simultaneously influence several types of strength, which rationalizes the development of strength abilities. The tests “bending and unbending of arms in suspension lying”, “remaining in suspension lying on bent arms” proved most informative.