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Sample records for bio-fuel center mississippi

  1. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mago, Pedro [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Newell, LeLe [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  2. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  3. Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louay Chamra

    2008-09-26

    Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.

  4. MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Frey

    2009-02-22

    This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

  5. Profitable use of bio fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, Mats [Strateco Develoment AB, Vega (Sweden)], e-mail: mats.e@strateco.se

    2012-11-01

    Traditionally, the transportation industry has been opposed to any new legislation and when rather stringent emission legislation occurred, they objected just as they did when new fuels came on the agenda. On very short notice, Taxi Stockholm lost 20 % of their business when the County decided to award all public transportation contracts to a competitor. It was time to change plans instead of complaining and to take advantage of new opportunities - 'The first mover advantage'. Making the use of bio fuels into a profitable business takes a change of a standard 'business model' to do and there is still much room others to do the same. With a new CEO, an active marketing department and active individuals among the Board of Directors, Taxi Stockholm massaged a strategy where more business and private customers would be attracted by justifying the green leaf on every cab. All initiatives were publically announced and Taxi Stockholm broke new ice by putting a ban on spike tires - a decision which the vice Mayor made part of her ruling for the whole city. The Ban on gasoline and diesel cars were announced and such a statement attracted business from a loyalty point of view and from companies that had a 'Green Transport Policy' to live up to. Taxi Stockholm has seen growth and profitability grow since and credit the green policy on bio fuels such as bio gas and ethanol for most of it. Preem, Stockholm Transit, Volvo and other market driven operators have all seen markets grow from green initiatives.

  6. Mississippi State University Sustainable Energy Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W. Glenn [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-09-26

    The Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC) project at Mississippi State University included all phases of biofuel production from feedstock development, to conversion to liquid transportation fuels, to engine testing of the fuels. The feedstocks work focused on non-food based crops and yielded an increased understanding of many significant Southeastern feedstocks. an emphasis was placed on energy grasses that could supplement the primary feedstock, wood. Two energy grasses, giant miscanthus and switchgrass, were developed that had increased yields per acre. Each of these grasses was patented and licensed to companies for commercialization. The fuels work focused on three different technologies that each led to a gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel product. The three technologies were microbial oil, pyrolysis oil, and syngas-to liquid-hydrocarbons

  7. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  8. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  9. Bio fuels. A comparative analysis; Biokraftstoffe. Eine vergleichende Analyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Norbert; Henke, Jan; Klepper, Gernot

    2009-07-01

    The market for bio fuels is subject to very high dynamics worldwide. Due to the extreme rise of the prices of raw materials as well as due to the retrogressive tax reductions for bio fuels in Germany one hardly invests in bio fuels. Substantial changes are experienced in the markets for fossil raw materials. The prices for agrarian raw material used in this contribution originate from the years 2006 and 2007. The effects of clearly higher oil prices on the bio fuel market are described. The investigation under consideration also deals with criteria of sustainability. The contribution of the individual bio fuels to the reduction of greenhouse gases is analyzed. The costs resulting from this are numerated. This enables a well-established comparison in which less representative bio fuels such as bio methane, BtL fuels and cellulose ethanol also are included.

  10. Public Perception of Bio fuels; Percepcion Publica de los Biocombustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Priolo, V.

    2011-11-10

    The deployment of bio fuels has generated a significant controversy in the energy, agricultural and environmental fields. Governments and promoters around the world have advocated for developing bio fuels based on their potential contribution to emissions reduction and energy security. But opposition to bio fuels has growth in the last years. Environmental NGO's and other stake holders have called for a review of the environmental and social sustainability of energy crops. This controversy has characterized the public debate around bio fuels. In this context, and given the need to improve public involvement in energy technologies, this article reports an investigation of Spanish citizens' perceptions about bio fuels. The study investigated the perceptions of informed citizens and the reasoning basis underlying beliefs and attitudes. The study finds an initial positive association of bio fuels to a clean and natural fuel that is mitigated by participants' concerns on the practical usage of bio fuels and the social and environmental impacts. Study participants' reactions show the need to differentiate among the diverse groups of publics holding differing views and a different reaction to information on the benefits and costs of bio fuels. (Author) 9 refs.

  11. Bio fuels price; El precio de los biocombustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D.

    2008-07-01

    he process of producing ethanol from corn is very expensive. The best bio-fuel is very far from the service stations and the farmers show difficulties to change his work methods. Really have we a suitable technology to produce bio-fuels?.

  12. Bio-fuels for the gas turbine: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, K.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Medi-Caps Institute of Technology and Management, Pigdamber, Rau, Indore (M.P.) (India); Rehman, A.; Sarviya, R.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MANIT, Bhopal (M.P.) (India)

    2010-12-15

    Due to depletion of fossil fuel, bio-fuels have generated a significant interest as an alternative fuel for the future. The use of bio-fuels to fuel gas turbine seems a viable solution for the problems of decreasing fossil-fuel reserves and environmental concerns. Bio-fuels are alternative fuels, made from renewable sources and having environmental benefit. In recent years, the desire for energy independence, foreseen depletion of nonrenewable fuel resources, fluctuating petroleum fuel costs, the necessity of stimulating agriculture based economy, and the reality of climate change have created an interest in the development of bio-fuels. The application of bio-fuels in automobiles and heating applications is increasing day by day. Therefore the use of these fuels in gas turbines would extend this application to aviation field. The impact of costly petroleum-based aviation fuel on the environment is harmful. So the development of alternative fuels in aviation is important and useful. The use of liquid and gaseous fuels from biomass will help to fulfill the Kyoto targets concerning global warming emissions. In addition, to reduce exhaust emission waste gases and syngas, etc., could be used as a potential gas turbine fuel. The term bio-fuel is referred to alternative fuel which is produced from biomass. Such fuels include bio-diesel, bio-ethanol, bio-methanol, pyrolysis oil, biogas, synthetic gas (dimethyl ether), hydrogen, etc. The bio-ethanol and bio-methanol are petrol additive/substitute. Bio-diesel is an environment friendly alternative liquid fuel for the diesel/aviation fuel. The gas turbine develops steady flame during its combustion; this feature gives a flexibility to use alternative fuels. Therefore so the use of different bio-fuels in gas turbine has been investigated by a good number of researchers. The suitability and modifications in the existing systems are also recommended. (author)

  13. Algal biodiesel economy and competition among bio-fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examines the possible results of policy support in developed and developing economies for developing algal biodiesel through to 2040. This investigation adopts the Taiwan General Equilibrium Model-Energy for Bio-fuels (TAIGEM-EB) to predict competition among the development of algal biodiesel, bioethanol and conventional crop-based biodiesel. Analytical results show that algal biodiesel will not be the major energy source in 2040 without strong support in developed economies. In contrast, bioethanol enjoys a development advantage relative to both forms of biodiesel. Finally, algal biodiesel will almost completely replace conventional biodiesel. CO(2) reduction benefits the development of the bio-fuels industry.

  14. Three generation production biotechnology of biomass into bio-fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-08-01

    The great change of climate change, depletion of natural resources, and scarcity of fossil fuel in the whole world nowadays have witnessed a sense of urgency home and abroad among scales of researchers, development practitioners, and industrialists to search for completely brand new sustainable solutions in the area of biomass transforming into bio-fuels attributing to our duty-that is, it is our responsibility to take up this challenge to secure our energy in the near future with the help of sustainable approaches and technological advancements to produce greener fuel from nature organic sources or biomass which comes generally from organic natural matters such as trees, woods, manure, sewage sludge, grass cuttings, and timber waste with a source of huge green energy called bio-fuel. Biomass includes most of the biological materials, livings or dead bodies. This energy source is ripely used industrially, or domestically for rather many years, but the recent trend is on the production of green fuel with different advance processing systems in a greener. More sustainable method. Biomass is becoming a booming industry currently on account of its cheaper cost and abundant resources all around, making it fairly more effective for the sustainable use of the bio-energy. In the past few years, the world has witnessed a remarkable development in the bio-fuel production technology, and three generations of bio-fuel have already existed in our society. The combination of membrane technology with the existing process line can play a vital role for the production of green fuel in a sustainable manner. In this paper, the science and technology for sustainable bio-fuel production will be introduced in detail for a cleaner world.

  15. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  16. PetroChina Inks Bio-Fuel Deal with the State Forestry Administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yunqiang

    2007-01-01

    @@ 11 January 2007, Beijing - PetroChina Company Limited (PetroChina) signed a framework agreement with the State Forestry Administration (SFA) on the development of forest bio-fuel and officially kicked off the construction of the first batch of forest bio-fuel tree breeding bases in Yunnan and Sichuan, marking a substantial step forward in the cooperation of forest bio-fuel development between the two parties.

  17. National Bio-fuel Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jezierski, Kelly [NextEnergy Center, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-12-27

    The National Biofuel Energy Laboratory or NBEL was a consortia consisting of non-profits, universities, industry, and OEM’s. NextEnergy Center (NEC) in Detroit, Michigan was the prime with Wayne State University as the primary subcontractor. Other partners included: Art Van Furniture; Biodiesel Industries Inc. (BDI); Bosch; Clean Emission Fluids (CEF); Delphi; Oakland University; U.S. TARDEC (The Army); and later Cummins Bridgeway. The program was awarded to NextEnergy by U.S. DOE-NREL on July 1, 2005. The period of performance was about five (5) years, ending June 30, 2010. This program was executed in two phases: 1.Phase I focused on bench-scale R&D and performance-property-relationships. 2.Phase II expanded those efforts into further engine testing, emissions testing, and on-road fleet testing of biodiesel using additional types of feedstock (i.e., corn, and choice white grease based). NextEnergy – a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in Detroit was originally awarded a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Dept. of Energy for Phase I of the NBEL program. A few years later, NextEnergy and its partners received an additional $1.9MM in DOE funding to complete Phase II. The NBEL funding was completely exhausted by the program end date of June 30, 2010 and the cost share commitment of 20% minimum has been exceeded nearly two times over. As a result of the work performed by the NBEL consortia, the following successes were realized: 1.Over one hundred publications and presentations have been delivered by the NBEL consortia, including but not limited to: R&D efforts on algae-based biodiesel, novel heterogeneous catalysis, biodiesel properties from a vast array of feedstock blends, cold flow properties, engine testing results (several Society of Automotive Engineers [SAE] papers have been published on this research), emissions testing results, and market quality survey results. 2.One new spinoff company (NextCAT) was formed by two WSU Chemical Engineering professors

  18. Experiments in Social Welfare: An Empirical Evaluation of the "Mississippi Project". Mississippi State University, Social Science Research Center Report 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Kenneth P.; Ross, Peggy J.

    Focusing on a 2-county rural area of Mississippi, 230 female Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients were divided into 4 groups to ascertain the differential effects that additions of higher levels of financial assistance and/or services over a period of a year (1967-68) would have on life styles and potentials for upward…

  19. Full-Scale Incineration System Demonstration at the Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport, Mississippi. Volume 1. Project Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    AD-A252 956 VL FULL-SCALE INCINE AT ION SYST72Z DEMIONSTRAT ION AT THE NAVAL C071, * *STRUCTION BATTALION CENTER, ~*~GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI -VOL!1...however, EPA OSW would not make a delisting determinacion at that time. 3. Incinerator Performance The MWP-2000 incinerator system demonstrated that

  20. Round table on bio-fuels; Table ronde sur les biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-15

    The French ministers of agriculture and of industry have organized a meeting with the main French actors of agriculture, petroleum industry, car making and accessories industry and with professionals of agriculture machines to encourage the development of bio-fuels in France. This meeting took place in Paris in November 21, 2005. Its aim was to favor the partnerships between the different actors and the public authorities in order to reach the ambitious goals of the government of 5.75% of bio-fuels in fossil fuels by 2008, 7% by 2010 and 10% by 2015. The main points discussed by the participants were: the compatibility of automotive fuel standards with the objectives of bio-fuel incorporation, the development of direct incorporation of methanol in gasoline, the ethanol-ETBE partnership, the question of the lower calorific value of ETBE (ethyl tertio butyl ether), the development of new bio-fuels, the development of bio-diesel and the specific case of pure vegetal oils, and the fiscal framework of bio-fuels. This meeting has permitted to reach important improvements with 15 concrete agreements undertaken by the participants. (J.S.)

  1. Bio-fuels: energies between decline and revival; Les biocombustibles: des energies entre declin et renouveau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, A.

    1999-12-01

    The development of bio-fuels is highly dependent of the variations of the prices of major energies, of the agriculture prices and of the situation of the environmental concerns. Thus at the crossroad of various sectors of activity one can question the relevance of the use of bio-fuels, today marginalized. Their development is always taken into consideration during crisis periods (agriculture, energy and pollution). However, once the crisis is gone, it remains the question of the economical viability and sustainability of the infatuation for these non-conventional energies. This paper presents some modalities of valorization of bio-fuels in France and in foreign countries: 1 - the renewable energy sources in France and in the European Union; 2 - the development of bio-fuels at the service of foresters and agriculturists: present day situation and perspectives of wood fuel in France (individual and collective uses), perspectives of biomass energy after the common agricultural policy reform, the objectives of the European Union; 3 - the energy valorization of biomass at the service of environment: forestry exploitation (land planning, pollution abatement), management of public dumps and water processing plants (incineration of household wastes, biogas generation); 4 - the bio-fuels competitiveness. (J.S.)

  2. Recent advances on the production and utilization trends of bio-fuels: A global perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, M.F. [P. K. 216, 61035 Trabzon (Turkey); Balat, Mustafa [Polatoglu ap Kat 6, Besikduzu, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    Bio-fuels are important because they replace petroleum fuels. There are many benefits for the environment, economy and consumers in using bio-fuels. Bio-oil can be used as a substitute for fossil fuels to generate heat, power and/or chemicals. Upgrading of bio-oil to a transportation fuel is technically feasible, but needs further development. Bio-fuels are made from biomass through thermochemical processes such as pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction and supercritical fluid extraction or biochemical. Biochemical conversion of biomass is completed through alcoholic fermentation to produce liquid fuels and anaerobic digestion or fermentation, resulting in biogas. In wood derived pyrolysis oil, specific oxygenated compounds are present in relatively large amounts. Basically, the recovery of pure compounds from the complex bio-oil is technically feasible but probably economically unattractive because of the high costs for recovery of the chemical and its low concentration in the oil. (author)

  3. Assessment of bio-fuel options for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiefeng

    Rising concerns of inadequate petroleum supply, volatile crude oil price, and adverse environmental impacts from using fossil fuels have spurred the United States to promote bio-fuel domestic production and develop advanced energy systems such as fuel cells. The present dissertation analyzed the bio-fuel applications in a solid oxide fuel cell-based auxiliary power unit from environmental, economic, and technological perspectives. Life cycle assessment integrated with thermodynamics was applied to evaluate the environmental impacts (e.g., greenhouse gas emission, fossil energy consumption) of producing bio-fuels from waste biomass. Landfill gas from municipal solid wastes and biodiesel from waste cooking oil are both suggested as the promising bio-fuel options. A nonlinear optimization model was developed with a multi-objective optimization technique to analyze the economic aspect of biodiesel-ethanol-diesel ternary blends used in transportation sectors and capture the dynamic variables affecting bio-fuel productions and applications (e.g., market disturbances, bio-fuel tax credit, policy changes, fuel specification, and technological innovation). A single-tube catalytic reformer with rhodium/ceria-zirconia catalyst was used for autothermal reformation of various heavy hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., diesel, biodiesel, biodiesel-diesel, and biodiesel-ethanol-diesel) to produce a hydrogen-rich stream reformates suitable for use in solid oxide fuel cell systems. A customized mixing chamber was designed and integrated with the reformer to overcome the technical challenges of heavy hydrocarbon reformation. A thermodynamic analysis, based on total Gibbs free energy minimization, was implemented to optimize the operating environment for the reformations of various fuels. This was complimented by experimental investigations of fuel autothermal reformation. 25% biodiesel blended with 10% ethanol and 65% diesel was determined to be viable fuel for use on a truck travelling with

  4. Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Duncan

    Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry or torrefied wood) that can be transported as feedstock for bio-fuel facilities. All feedstock are suited for gasification, which produces syngas that can be used to synthesise petrol or diesel via Fischer-Tropsch reactions, or produce hydrogen via water gas shift reactions. Alternatively, the bio-oil product of fast pyrolysis may be upgraded to produce petrol and diesel, or can undergo steam reformation to produce hydrogen. Implementing a network of mobile facilities reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use a fraction of the biomass energy content to meet thermal or electrical demands. The total energy delivered by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energy content, respectively. However, implementing mobile facilities is economically feasible when large transport distances are required. For an annual harvest of 1.717 million m3 (equivalent to 2000 ODTPD), transport costs are reduced to less than 40% of the total levelised delivered feedstock cost when mobile facilities are implemented; transport costs account for up to 80% of feedstock costs for conventional woodchip delivery. Torrefaction provides the lowest cost pathway of delivering a forest residue resource when using mobile facilities. Cost savings occur against woodchip delivery for annual forest residue harvests above 2.25 million m3 or when transport distances greater than 250 km are required. Important parameters that influence levelised delivered costs of feedstock are transport distances (forest residue spatial density), haul cost factors, thermal and electrical demands of mobile facilities, and initial moisture content of forest residues. Relocating mobile facilities can be optimised for lowest cost

  5. Capacitance Sensors for Nondestructive Moisture Determination in Agricultural and Bio-fuel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisture content of wood chips, pellets, switch grass powders, and similar organic bio-fuel materials is an important property to be known to determine their utility and energy efficiency at various stages of their processing and storage. Several moisture measuring instruments are available in the m...

  6. Reducing Fuel Volatility - An Additional Benefit From Blending Bio-fuels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailis, R.E.; Koeb, B.S.; Sanders, M.W.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Oil price volatility harms economic growth. Diversifying into different fuel types can mitigate this effect by reducing volatility in fuel prices. Producing bio-fuels may thus have additional benefits in terms of avoided damage to macro-economic growth. In this study we investigate trends and patter

  7. Reducing Fuel Volatility. An Additional Benefit From Blending Bio-fuels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailis, R. [Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Koebl, B.S. [Utrecht University, Science Technology and Society, Budapestlaan 6, 3584 CD Utrecht (Netherlands); Sanders, M. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    Oil price volatility harms economic growth. Diversifying into different fuel types can mitigate this effect by reducing volatility in fuel prices. Producing bio-fuels may thus have additional benefits in terms of avoided damage to macro-economic growth. In this study we investigate trends and patterns in the determinants of a volatility gain in order to provide an estimate of the tendency and the size of the volatility gain in the future. The accumulated avoided loss from blending gasoline with 20 percent ethanol-fuel estimated for the US economy amounts to 795 bn. USD between 2010 and 2019 with growing tendency. An amount that should be considered in cost-benefit analysis of bio-fuels.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL SCENARIOS FOR MANDATORY BIO-FUEL BLENDING TARGETS: AN APPLICATION OF INTUITIVE LOGICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Conejero

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Scenarios depicting targets concerning mandatory bio-fuel blending are critical to the strategic planning of food and bio-energy production chains and their design is the purpose of this paper. Each scenario tells a story about how various elements might interact under given conditions. The method herein utilized is primarily based on Schoemaker´s (1995 and Schwartz´s (1991 earlier proposals. A six step framework is followed: i identify the focal issue; ii summarize current mandatory blending targets; iii identify the driving forces as of a macro-environmental analysis; iv validate driving forces with specialists; v rank such key forces by importance before uncertainties, building a correlation matrix; vi design the scenarios. Finally, three alternative scenarios, relative to the adoption on behalf of countries, by the year 2020, of mandatory bio-fuel blending targets, are proposed which might guide these countries’ decision makers when planning production systems.

  9. The petroleum, natural gas and bio fuel transportation; O transporte de petroleo, gas natural e biocombustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Diego Varela; Campos, Carlos Hebert

    2011-01-15

    The paper expose on the activity of petroleum, natural gas and bio fuels transportation, outlining the transportation means used by the petroleum industry. After that, analyses the importance and the economic relevance of the Transpetro. Yet, proceeds an examination of the transportation activity under a constitutional optics, based on the EC 9/95; a legal optic, from the Petroleum Law (Law 9478/97) and some other legal documents related to the theme. Finally, presents the importance that the Law of Natural Gas (Law 11909/09) brought for that activity, by making possible that the natural gas transportation can also be effectuated through the Concession.

  10. Feasibility study on introduction of the bio-fuel power generation in tropical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Study is made on feasibility of introducing the bio-fuel power generation in tropical regions, especially in South East Asia including Okinawa and South America. Biomass promising as bio-fuel is bagasse and palm oil mill dregs; and bagasse is found to be advantageous to the use for large-scaled power generation. Prospective uses of bagasse are a combined use of gasification process and gas turbine power generation, an effective use of gas turbine exhaust heat at sugar cane factories, and a use of the system to be developed which totalizes these two. As to how to carry out the R and D project, since the gasification power generation process itself is a high technology and has partially unknown fields, it is desirable that research and development are conducted in such technologically developed countries as Japan (Okinawa). A developmental plan, therefore, is worked out as such that a pilot plant of approximately 3000kW is to be constructed in Okinawa because the period for bagasse production is at least 3 months there, and a commercial-scale plant is to be constructed and operated in such big bagasse-producing countries as Brazil.

  11. Libraries in Mississippi: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/mississippi.html Libraries in Mississippi To use the sharing features on ... Jackson G. V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center Library Service (142D) 1500 E. Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS ...

  12. A Methodology Proposal to Calculate the Externalisation of Liquid Bio fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Varela, M.

    1999-07-01

    The aim of the survey is to propose a methodology to calculate the externalisation associated with the liquid bio fuels cycle. The report defines the externalisation from a theoretical point of view and classifies them. The reasons to value the externalisation are explained as well as the existing methods. Furthermore, an evaluation of specific environmental and non-environmental externalisation is also presented. The report also reviews the current situation of the transport sector, considering its environmental effects and impacts. The progress made by the ExtemE and ExternE-Transport projects related the externalisation of transport sector is assessed. Finally, the report analyses the existence of different economic instruments to internalize the external effects of the transport sector as well as other aspects of this internalization. (Author) 58 refs.

  13. Return of investment and profitability analysis of bio-fuels production using a modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Deng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the return of investment and profitability of a bio-gasification facility using a modeling method. Based on preliminary market analysis, the results determined that the power facilities driven by biomass gasifiers could be profitable if they consider the most sensitive cost factors such as labor, project investment, and feedstock supply. The result showed that economic feasibility of bio-gasification facility can significantly affect by its production capacity and operating modes (one shift, two shifts, or three shifts. The cost analysis modeling approach developed in this study could be a good approach for economic analysis of bio-syngas and bio-fuel products. In addition, this study demonstrated a unique modeling approach to analyze return of investment and profitability of biofuels production.

  14. Analysis of the potential production and the development of bioenergy in the province of Mendoza - Bio-fuels and biomass - Using geographic information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Marco, Noelia; Hilbert, Jorge Antonio [Instituto de Ingenieria Rural, INTA Las Cabanas y Los Reseros s/n, CP: 1712 Castelar, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silva Colomer, Jorge [INTA EEA Junin Mendoza, Carril Isidoro Busquets s/n CP: 5572 (Argentina); Anschau, Renee Alicia; Carballo, Stella [Instituto de Clima y Agua, INTA. Las Cabanas y Los Reseros s/n, CP:1712 Castelar, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    In this work, the partial results of the potential production of energy, starting from the biomass and the development of the crops, directed to the production of bio-fuels (Colza and Topinamur) in the North irrigation oasis of Mendoza, Argentina within the National Program of Bio-energy developed by INTA is presented. For the evaluation of the bio-energetic potential, derived from the biomass, the WISDOM methodology developed by FAO and implemented by INTA in Argentina was applied with the collaboration of national and provincial governmental entities that contribute local information The study of the potential production and the development of the bio-energetic crops have been carried out with the advising and participation of the experts of INTA of the studied crops. The province of Mendoza has semi-deserted agro-climatic characteristics. The type of soil and type of weather allows the production of great quality fruits and vegetables in the irrigated areas. The four great currents of water conform three oasis; Northeast, Center and South, which occupy the 3.67% of the surface of Mendoza. Today, Mendoza has 267,889 irrigated hectares, but the surface that was farmed by irrigation was near to the 400,000 ha. The climate contingencies, froze and hailstorm precipitations, plus the price instability cause great losses in the productive sector, taking it to the forlornness of the exploitations. The crop setting of these forlornness lands with crops directed to the production of bio-fuels and the utilization of the biomass coming from the agriculture activities and the agro industry (pruning of fruit trees, refuses of olive and vine, remnants of the peach industry, etc.) could assist the access to the energy in the rural areas, stimulating the economical improvement and the development in these communities. (author)

  15. The Discussion of Bio-Fuel Development%对未来生物燃料发展技术的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵强; 陈晓香; 魏玓巧

    2015-01-01

    分析了生物质燃料替代化石类燃料的发展背景,总结了生物质燃料的发展过程、技术原理和国内外的发展状况,提出了绿色燃料的发展远景.%The development background of bio-fuel is studied instead of fossil fuel. The development route,technological theory and current situation of bio-fuel are summaried. The bright future of bio-fuel is expected for green production.

  16. 76 FR 19996 - Cooperative Agreement With the University of Mississippi's National Center for Natural Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... National Center for Natural Products Research (U01) To Develop and Disseminate Botanical Natural Product... and dissemination of natural products research and science and the programs developed under the... develop and disseminate botanical natural product research with an emphasis on public safety according...

  17. Life cycle assessment integrated with thermodynamic analysis of bio-fuel options for solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiefeng; Babbitt, Callie W; Trabold, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    A methodology that integrates life cycle assessment (LCA) with thermodynamic analysis is developed and applied to evaluate the environmental impacts of producing biofuels from waste biomass, including biodiesel from waste cooking oil, ethanol from corn stover, and compressed natural gas from municipal solid wastes. Solid oxide fuel cell-based auxiliary power units using bio-fuel as the hydrogen precursor enable generation of auxiliary electricity for idling heavy-duty trucks. Thermodynamic analysis is applied to evaluate the fuel conversion efficiency and determine the amount of fuel feedstock needed to generate a unit of electrical power. These inputs feed into an LCA that compares energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of different fuel pathways. Results show that compressed natural gas from municipal solid wastes is an optimal bio-fuel option for SOFC-APU applications in New York State. However, this methodology can be regionalized within the U.S. or internationally to account for different fuel feedstock options.

  18. Performance Improvement of a Portable Electric Generator Using an Optimized Bio-Fuel Ratio in a Single Cylinder Two-Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an electrical generator using bio-fuel and gasoline blends of different composition as fuel in a single cylinder engine is presented. The effect of an optimized blend ratio of bio-fuel with gasoline on engine performance improvement and thereby on the electrical generator output is studied. Bio-fuels such as ethanol, butanol and methanol are blended with gasoline in different proportions and evaluated for performance. The effects of different bio-fuel/gasoline blending ratios are compared experimentally with that of the gasoline alone using the output power developed by the electric generator as the evaluation parameter. With a composition of 10% ethanol–gasoline, the engine performance is increased up to 6% and with a blending ratio of 20% butanol–gasoline the performance is increased up to 8% compared to the use of 100% gasoline. The investigations are performed on a portable generator used in palm tree harvesting applications.

  19. Thermal Cracking of Jatropha Oil with Hydrogen to Produce Bio-Fuel Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study used thermal cracking with hydrogen (HTC to produce bio-fuel oil (BFO from jatropha oil (JO and to improve its quality. We conducted HTC with different hydrogen pressures (PH2; 0–2.07 MPa or 0–300 psig, retention times (tr; 40–780 min, and set temperatures (TC; 623–683 K. By applying HTC, the oil molecules can be hydrogenated and broken down into smaller molecules. The acid value (AV, iodine value, kinematic viscosity (KV, density, and heating value (HV of the BFO produced were measured and compared with the prevailing standards for oil to assess its suitability as a substitute for fossil fuels or biofuels. The results indicate that an increase in PH2 tends to increase the AV and KV while decreasing the HV of the BFO. The BFO yield (YBFO increases with PH2 and tr. The above properties decrease with increasing TC. Upon HTC at 0.69 MPa (100 psig H2 pressure, 60 min time, and 683 K temperature, the YBFO was found to be 86 wt%. The resulting BFO possesses simulated distillation characteristics superior to those of boat oil and heavy oil while being similar to those of diesel oil. The BFO contains 15.48% light naphtha, 35.73% heavy naphtha, 21.79% light gas oil, and 27% heavy gas oil and vacuum residue. These constituents can be further refined to produce gasoline, diesel, lubricants, and other fuel products.

  20. Effect of Media on Algae Growth for Bio-Fuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha KARAMPUDI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bio-fuels are commonly produced from oleaginous crops, such as rapeseed, soybean, sunflower and oil palm. However, microalgae can be an attractive alternative feedstock for future biofuels because some of the species contain very high amounts of oil, which can be used to extract and be processed into transportation fuels. Their growth rate is very high and faster, can be cultivated in non-agricultural land and waste water. In addition, production of microalgae is not seasonal and they can be harvested routinely as needed. Two strains of Scenedesmus dimorphus (fresh water microalgae were tested for their growth in proteose medium and Modified Bold 3N medium with different levels of nitrogen and glycerol and growth rates were measured using cell count, fresh and dry weight. The growth of S. dimorphus was better in proteose medium with half of the nitrogen source recommended by the UTEX than other media tested. ANOVA table showed significant differences between days, between media, and day � media interaction. When compared to dry weight of S. dimorphus in all media, the growth was better in proteose medium with 10 mL/L glycerol.

  1. Effect of Media on Algae Growth for Bio-Fuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha KARAMPUDI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bio-fuels are commonly produced from oleaginous crops, such as rapeseed, soybean, sunflower and oil palm. However, microalgae can be an attractive alternative feedstock for future biofuels because some of the species contain very high amounts of oil, which can be used to extract and be processed into transportation fuels. Their growth rate is very high and faster, can be cultivated in non-agricultural land and waste water. In addition, production of microalgae is not seasonal and they can be harvested routinely as needed. Two strains of Scenedesmus dimorphus (fresh water microalgae were tested for their growth in proteose medium and Modified Bold 3N medium with different levels of nitrogen and glycerol and growth rates were measured using cell count, fresh and dry weight. The growth of S. dimorphus was better in proteose medium with half of the nitrogen source recommended by the UTEX than other media tested. ANOVA table showed significant differences between days, between media, and day media interaction. When compared to dry weight of S. dimorphus in all media, the growth was better in proteose medium with 10 mL/L glycerol.

  2. Characterization and Performance Test of Palm Oil Based Bio-Fuel Produced Via Ni/Zeolite-Catalyzed Cracking Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Kadarwati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic cracking process of palm oil into bio-fuel using Ni/zeolite catalysts (2-10% wt. Ni at various reaction temperatures (400-500oC in a flow-fixed bed reactor system has been carried out. Palm oil was pre-treated to produce methyl ester of palm oil as feedstock in the catalytic cracking reactions. The Ni/zeolite catalysts were prepared by wetness impregnation method using Ni(NO32.6H2O as the precursor. The products were collected and analysed using GC, GC-MS, and calorimeter. The effects of process temperatures and Ni content in Ni/zeolite have been studied. The results showed that Ni-2/zeolite could give a yield of 99.0% at 500oC but only produced gasoline fraction of 18.35%. The physical properties of bio-fuel produced in this condition in terms of density, viscosity, flash point, and specific gravity were less than but similar to commercial fuel. The results of performance test in a 4-strike engine showed that the mixture of commercial gasoline (petrol and bio-fuel with a ratio of 9:1 gave similar performance to fossil-based gasoline with much lower CO and O2 emissions and more efficient combustion

  3. Carbon nanotube-based glucose oxidase nanocomposite anode materials for bio-fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, Jonathan

    The field of nanotechnology has benefited medicine, science, and engineering. The advent of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and protein-inorganic interfacing have received much attention due to their unique nanostructures which can be modified to act as a scaffold to house proteins or create nanowires. The current trend incorporates the robustness and specificity characteristics of proteins to the mechanical strength, enlarged surface area, and conductive capabilities emblematic of their inorganic counterparts. Bio-Fuel Cells (BFCs) and Biosensors remain at the forefront and devices such as implantable glucose monitors are closer to realization than ever before. This research strives to exploit potential energy from the eukaryotic enzyme Glucose Oxidase (GOx) during oxidation of its substrate, glucose. During this process, a two-electron transfer occurs at its two FAD redox centres which can be harnessed via an electrochemical setup involving a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNTs) modified electrode. The objective is to develop a MWCNT-GOx bionanocomposite capable of producing and sustaining a competitive power output. To help with this aim, investigation into a crosslinked enzyme cluster (CEC) immobilization technique is envisioned to amplify power output due to its highly concentrated, reusable, and thermally stable characteristics. Numerous CEC-GOx-MWCNT composites were fabricated with the highest initial output reaching 170 muW/cm 2. It was hypothesized that the carbohydrate moiety increased tunnelling distance and therefore hindered electron transfer. Efforts to produce a recombinant GOx without the encumbrance were unsuccessful. Two sub-clone constructs were explored and although a recombinant protein was identified, it was not confirmed to be GOx. BFC testing on bionanocomposites integrating non-glycosylated GOx could not be performed although there remains a strong contention that the recombinant would demonstrate superior power densities in comparison to its

  4. The Mississippi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭豪

    2005-01-01

    The Mississippi (密西西比河) is one of the world's great continental rivers. Gathering its waters from two - thirds of the United States, the Mississippi flows some 6,400 kilometers from its northern sources(源头) in the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico,which makes it one of the world's longest waterways.

  5. Hydrocarbon raw emission characterization of a direct-injection spark ignition engine operated with alcohol and furan-based bio fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thewes, Matthias [FEV GmbH, Aachen (Germany); Mauermann, Peter; Pischinger, Stefan [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Combustion Engines; Bluhm, Kerstin; Hollert, Henner [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Environmental Research, Dept. of Ecosystem Analysis

    2013-06-01

    Within the Cluster of Excellence ''Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass'' the impact of various potential bio fuels on engine combustion is studied. Besides alcohols, furan-based bio fuels have come into the focus with novel production routes to transform biomass into 2-Methylfuran or 2,5-Dimethylfuran. In the present study, the influence of these and other bio fuels on the hydrocarbon raw emission spectrum of a direct-injection spark-ignition single cylinder engine is studied experimentally by means of gas chromatographic and mass spectroscopic analysis of exhaust gas samples. The results obtained are compared to operation with conventional EN 228 gasoline fuel. This fuel showed slip of partially carcinogenic aromatic fuel molecule(s) in warm and in cold engine conditions. For the bio fuels, slip was found to be significant for the alcohol fuels. The carcinogenic molecule 1,3-Butadiene was present in the exhaust gas of all fuels. Furan as another possibly carcinogenic molecule was found at significantly higher concentrations in the exhaust gas of the furan-based bio fuels compared to conventional gasoline fuel but not in the exhaust gas of the alcohol fuels. (orig.)

  6. Characterization and Performance Test of Palm Oil Based Bio-Fuel Produced Via Ni/Zeolite-Catalyzed Cracking Process

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Kadarwati; Sri Wahyuni

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic cracking process of palm oil into bio-fuel using Ni/zeolite catalysts (2-10% wt. Ni) at various reaction temperatures (400-500oC) in a flow-fixed bed reactor system has been carried out. Palm oil was pre-treated to produce methyl ester of palm oil as feedstock in the catalytic cracking reactions. The Ni/zeolite catalysts were prepared by wetness impregnation method using Ni(NO3)2.6H2O as the precursor. The products were collected and analysed using GC, GC-MS, and calorimeter. The ef...

  7. Syntrophic co-culture of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium for bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jui-Jen; Ho, Cheng-Yu.; Chen, Wei-En; Huang, Chieh-Chen [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chou, Chia-Hung; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi [Department of Science and Technology, National Kaohsiung First University, Kaohsiung (China)

    2008-10-15

    By using brewery yeast waste and microflora from rice straw compost, an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen-producing system has been established. For the purpose of industrialization, the major players of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial strains in the system were isolated and their combination for an effective production of bio-hydrogen and other bio-fuels was examined in this study. The phylogenetic analysis found that four anaerobic isolates (Clostridium beijerinckii L9, Clostridium diolis Z2, Clostridium roseum Z5-1, and C. roseum W8) were highly related with each other and belongs to the cluster I clostridia family, the family that many of solvent-producing strains included. On the other hand, one of the aerobic isolates, the Bacillus thermoamylovorans strain I, shown multiple extracellular enzyme activities including lipase, protease, {alpha}-amylase, pectinase and cellulase, was suggested as a good partner for creating an anaerobic environment and pre-saccharification of substrate for those co-cultured solventogenic clostridial strain. Among these clostridial strains, though C. beijerinckii L9 do not show as many extracellular enzyme activities as Bacillus, but it performs the highest hydrogen-producing ability. The original microflora can be updated to a syntrophic bacterial co-culture system contended only with B. thermoamylovorans I and C. beijerinckii L9. The combination of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium may play the key role for developing the industrialized bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen-producing system from biomass. (author)

  8. Bio-oils and other bio fuels used in heat- and power generation; Flytande biobraenslen foer el- och vaermeproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandgren, Annamaria; Ekdahl, Emma; Sernhed, Kerstin; Lindstroem, Erica

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assemble and disseminate knowledge about bio-oils and other bio fuels which are used for heat- and power generation or liquid bio fuels/oils that may become interesting in the future. One aim of this study was to give an updated picture of the Swedish market for bio-oils and to provide an overview of practical experience on the usage of bio-oils in the Swedish heat and power industry. In order to show a green profile, bio-oils can be used in the heat and power generation. However, not all bio-oils can be viewed as climate friendly. Some production of bio-oils may actually - if a lifecycle perspective is considered - lead to increased emissions of greenhouse gases, and there are also ethical issues that need to be considered. The data collection was carried out in three different fields. The objective of the first part was to create an overview of the Swedish market for liquid bio fuels/oils for heat and power production. The second part of the study aimed to clarify the issues surrounding environmental and ethical issues associated with the use of different bio-oils. A selection of oil crops for a closer study was made based on production volume (soybean, palm oil and rapeseed) and expected future potential (jatropha). This part of the study was based on a literature review. In the third part of the study technical and practical experiences from using bio-oils in heat and power production were studied. The interviews made with purchasing managers in the second part gave valuable information on which utilities would be the most interesting to interview for the study of technical and practical experiences, where interviews were carried out with persons familiar with the daily operation of the plant. The use of liquid bio fuels was about 4.3 % of total fuel use in Swedish district heating production in 2007 (1.2 % pine oil and 3.0 % other bio-oil). In other words, it is mainly bio-oils that have been used and not other types of liquid

  9. Bio-oils and other bio fuels used in heat- and power generation; Flytande biobraenslen foer el- och vaermeproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandgren, Annamaria; Ekdahl, Emma; Sernhed, Kerstin; Lindstroem, Erica

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assemble and disseminate knowledge about bio-oils and other bio fuels which are used for heat- and power generation or liquid bio fuels/oils that may become interesting in the future. One aim of this study was to give an updated picture of the Swedish market for bio-oils and to provide an overview of practical experience on the usage of bio-oils in the Swedish heat and power industry. In order to show a green profile, bio-oils can be used in the heat and power generation. However, not all bio-oils can be viewed as climate friendly. Some production of bio-oils may actually - if a lifecycle perspective is considered - lead to increased emissions of greenhouse gases, and there are also ethical issues that need to be considered. The data collection was carried out in three different fields. The objective of the first part was to create an overview of the Swedish market for liquid bio fuels/oils for heat and power production. The second part of the study aimed to clarify the issues surrounding environmental and ethical issues associated with the use of different bio-oils. A selection of oil crops for a closer study was made based on production volume (soybean, palm oil and rapeseed) and expected future potential (jatropha). This part of the study was based on a literature review. In the third part of the study technical and practical experiences from using bio-oils in heat and power production were studied. The interviews made with purchasing managers in the second part gave valuable information on which utilities would be the most interesting to interview for the study of technical and practical experiences, where interviews were carried out with persons familiar with the daily operation of the plant. The use of liquid bio fuels was about 4.3 % of total fuel use in Swedish district heating production in 2007 (1.2 % pine oil and 3.0 % other bio-oil). In other words, it is mainly bio-oils that have been used and not other types of liquid

  10. CO{sub 2} mitigation costs of liquid bio fuels use for transportation; Estimacion de costes de reduccion del CO{sub 2} por la utlizacion de biocarburantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, M.; Saez, R.

    2007-07-01

    The transportation sector is responsible for 25% of GHG emissions in Spain and will be greater in the next few years. The use of bio fuels in transportation is able to reduce the increase according to the results of Life Cycle Analysis. However the bio fuel production costs are higher than those from fossil fuels. In this study an assessment of the CO{sub 2} mitigation costs when using liquid bio fuels (bioethanol and bio diesel) has been carried out. Existing international and Spanish data of GHG and bio fuel costs have been taken into account for the assessment of CO{sub 2} mitigation costs. The results show that for current technology and with Spanish data, the estimated mitigation cost is 8 euros/t CO2-eq. for bio diesel from used cooking oil, 271 Euros/t CO2-eq. for bio diesel from oil seeds and 213 Euros/t CO2-eq. for bio ethanol from wheat and barley. When the international data are considered, similar results are obtained except for bio ethanol that are higher, due to the fact that in Spain the bio ethanol plants use energy efficient technology. (Author)

  11. Cogeneration and production of 2nd generation bio fuels using biomass gasification; Cogeneracion y produccion de biocombustibles de 2 generacion mediante gasificacion de biomasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruena Leal, A.; Diez Rodriguez, D.; Antolin Giraldo, G.

    2011-07-01

    Thermochemical decomposition process of gasification, in which a carbonaceous fuel, under certain conditions of temperature and oxygen deficiency, results in a series of reactions that will produce a series of gaseous products is now widely used for high performance energetic and versatility of these gaseous products for energy and 2nd generation bio fuels and reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. (Author)

  12. Conventional and microwave pyrolysis of a macroalgae waste from the Agar-Agar industry. Prospects for bio-fuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera-Lorenzo, N; Fuente, E; Bermúdez, J M; Suárez-Ruiz, I; Ruiz, B

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of the pyrolysis of a macroalgae industrial solid waste (algae meal) in an electrical conventional furnace and in a microwave furnace has been carried out. It was found that the chars obtained from both pyrolyses are similar and show good properties for performing as a solid bio-fuel and as a precursor of activated carbon. Bio-oils from conventional pyrolysis have a greater number of phenolic, pyrrole and alkane compounds whereas benzene and pyridine compounds are more predominant in microwave pyrolysis with a major presence of light compounds. The bio-gas fraction from microwave pyrolysis presents a much higher syngas content (H2+CO), and a lower CO2 and CH4 proportion than that obtained by conventional pyrolysis. Yields are similar for both treatments with a slightly higher gas yield in the case of microwave pyrolysis due to the fact that microwave heating favors heterogeneous reactions between the gases and the char.

  13. The Effect of Bio-Fuel Blends and Fuel Injection Pressure on Diesel Engine Emission for Sustainable Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Muralidharan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Diesel engine emits more pollutants to atmosphere causing air pollution. This necessitates the search of a renewable alternate fuel which is environment friendly. The objective of this research was to investigate the environmental aspects of pongamia bio-fuel in a single cylinder diesel engine with the influence of fuel injection pressure. Approach: Bio-fuel was prepared from non-edible Pongamia pinnata oil by transesterification and used as a fuel in C.I engine. The effect of fuel injection pressure on the engine emission characteristics of a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine has been experimentally investigated using pongamia pinnata methyl ester and its blends with diesel fuel from 0-30% with an increment of 5% at full load. The tests were conducted at five different injection pressures (190, 200, 210, 220 and 230 KN m-2 by means of adjusting injector spring tension. Results: Compared to diesel, blend B5 exhibits lower engine emissions of unburnt hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and carbon di oxide at full load. The High injection pressure of 220 KN m-2 shows lesser emissions of unburnt hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide while oxides of nitrogen and carbon dioxide are found to be slightly higher than diesel and blends at full load. Conclusion: From the test results, it was found that a high injection pressure of 220 KN m-2 causes better atomization with improved engine emission characteristics for diesel and blends at full load. Moreover blend B5 showed best results at 220 KN m-2 injection pressure.

  14. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. S.; Christidis, N.; Stott, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by controlling black carbon is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC), produces a positive radiative forcing of about +0.25 Wm-2 over the 20th century, compared with +2.52 Wm-2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, -0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 yr of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to the period being examined as fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from fBC unscaled by the detection analysis. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. White paper report from working groups attending the international conference on research and educational opportunities in bio-fuel crop production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, K.T. [University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Dep., Southwest Florida Res. and Educ. Center, Immokalee, FL 34142 (United States); Gilbert, R.A. [University of Florida, Agronomy Dep., Everglades Res. and Educ. Center, Belle Glade, FL 33430 (United States); Helsel, Z.A. [Rutgers University, Plant Biology and Pathology Dep., New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8520 (United States); Buacum, L. [University of Florida, Hendry County Extension, LaBelle, FL 33935 (United States); Leon, R.; Perret, J. [EARTH University, Apto. 4442-1000, San Jose (Costa Rica)

    2010-12-15

    A conference on current research and educational programs in production of crops for bio-fuel was sponsored and organized by the EARTH University and the University of Florida in November, 2008. The meeting addressed current research on crops for bio-fuel production with discussions of research alternatives for future crop production systems, land use issues, ethics of food vs. fuel production, and carbon sequestration in environmentally sensitive tropical and sub-tropical regions of the Americas. The need and potential for development of graduate and undergraduate curricula and inter-institutional cooperation among educational institutions in the region were also discussed. Delegations from Belize, Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Honduras, Panama, The Dominican Republic, and the United States including ministers of Agriculture and Energy attended this meeting. Over a two-day period, four working groups provided a framework to facilitate networking, motivate task oriented creative thinking, and maintain a timely accomplishment of assigned duties in the context of the conference themes. Participants in the conference were assigned to one of four working groups, each following given topics: Agronomy, Environment, Socio-Economics and Education/Extension. It was the consensus of representatives of industry, academic and regulatory community assembled in Costa Rica that significant research, education and socio-economic information is needed to make production of bio-fuel crops sustainable. Agronomic research should include better crop selection based on local conditions, improved production techniques, pest and disease management, and mechanical cultivation and harvesting. Another conclusion was that tailoring of production systems to local soil characteristics and use of bio-fuel by-products to improve nutrient use efficiency and reduction of environmental impact on water quantity and quality is critical to sustainability of bio-fuel crop production. (author)

  16. CEN standard for water-soluble chloride, sodium and potassium in solid bio-fuels; CEN standard for vandoploeseligt chlorid, natrium og kalium i faste biobraendsler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    In 2000 a European work of standardization for 'Solid bio-fuels' under CEN/TC 335 was started. In Denmark this work is followed through the Danish mirror committee S-358. Denmark was asked to prepare a draft for a European standard concerning determination of the water-soluble content of chloride, sodium and potassium in solid bio-fuels. The draft should be based on the Danish 'Recommended analysis methods' no. 10 and 11 concerning respectively the determination of the water-soluble content of chloride and the water soluble content of sodium and potassium in solid bio-fuels. The content of chlorine, sodium and potassium in a fuel is important for the use of the fuel, as high contents can contribute significantly to utilisation problems such as corrosion, fouling and slagging in furnaces. The gaseous emissions from the thermal processes may also be affected. Concerning sodium and potassium it is furthermore the content of the water-soluble and readily volatile salts which is problematic in relation with energy conversion processes. Sodium and potassium bound in non-water soluble compounds as clay minerals (silicates) normally will not volatilises during the process and therefore do not contribute to the formation of deposits. A determination of the water-soluble content of sodium and potassium is therefore not an alternative routine method for sodium and potassium, but a separate method for a determination of the 'aggressive' contents of sodium and potassium. For some solid bio-fuels the water-soluble contents will however be equal to the total contents, this goes for instance for potassium in straw. There is a very large variation in the content of chlorine, sodium and potassium for the different types of solid bio-fuel, from the low contents in clean wood to contents in percentage in straw. Knowledge of the content of chlorine, sodium and potassium in a bio-fuel is thus important in relation to e.g. plant design and fuel purchasing

  17. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jones

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by the aerosol's control is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about + 0.25 Wm−2 over the 20th century, compared with a little under + 2.5 Wm−2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, -0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 years of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to a number of analysis choices, and fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from the unscaled simulation. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by controlling black carbon is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about +0.25 Wm−2 over the 20th century, compared with +2.52 Wm−2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, −0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 yr of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to the period being examined as fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from fBC unscaled by the detection analysis. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Integrated micro-economic modelling and multi-criteria methodology to support public decision-making: the case of liquid bio-fuels in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozakis, S.; Sourie, J.-C. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Economie et Sociologie Rurales, Thiveral-Grignon, 78 (France); Vanderpooten, D. [Universite Paris-Dauphine, LAMSADE, Paris, 75 (France)

    2001-07-01

    Decision making to determine government support policy for agro-energy industry can be assisted by mathematical programming and Multiple Criteria procedures. In this case study, tax credit policy in the French bio-fuel industry producing ethanol and esters is determined. Micro-economic models simulate the agricultural sector and the bio-fuel industry through multi-level mixed integer linear programming. Aggregate supply of energy crops at the national level is estimated using a staircase model of 450 individual farm sub-models specialising in arable cropping. The government acts as a leader, since bio-fuel chains depend on subsidies. The model provides rational responses of the industry, taking into account of the energy crops' supply, to any public policy scheme (unitary tax exemptions for bio-fuels subject to budgetary constraints) as well as the performance of each response regarding total greenhouse gases emissions (GHG), budgetary expenditure and agents' surpluses. Budgetary, environmental and social concerns will affect policy decisions, and a multi-criteria optimisation module projects the decision maker aims at the closest feasible compromise solutions. When public expenditure is the first priority, the best compromise solution corresponds to tax exemptions of about 2 FF l{sup -1} [FF: French Franc (1Euro equivalent to 6.559FF)] for ester and 3FF l{sup -1} for ethanol (current tax exemptions amount at 2.30FF l{sup -1} for ester and 3.30FF l{sup -1} for ethanol). On the other hand, a priority on the reduction of GHG emissions requires an increase of ester volume produced at the expense of ethanol production (2.30 FF l{sup -1} for both ester and ethanol chains proposed by the model). (Author)

  20. Pyrolysis of forest residues: an approach to techno-economics for bio-fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The techno-economics for producing liquid fuels from Maine forest residues were determined from a combination of: (1) laboratory experiments at USDA-ARS’s Eastern Regional Research Center using hog fuel (a secondary woody residue produced from mill byproducts such as sawdust, bark and shavings) as a...

  1. Bio fuels: an alternative for the sustainability of the familiar agriculture; Biocombustiveis: uma alternativa para a sustentabilidade da agricultura familiar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Patricia Honorio [Universidade Salvador, BA (Brazil). Desenvolvimento Regional e Planejamento Ambiental], e-mail: patonorio@hotmail.com; Ventura, Andrea Cardoso [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)], e-mail: andreaventurassa@gmail.com; Teixeira, Carlos Andre [Semear Ambiental, Salvador, BA (Brazil)], e-mail: carlosteixeira@semearambiental.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Nevertheless the criticism of various economy sectors and international organisms to the production of bio fuels, the Brazilian Government are giving incentives for that production since the year of 2004, when they launched an incentive program for the production of oleaginous species which are the raw material for the production of bio diesel, emphasizing the support to familiar agriculture. However, there are serious questionings about the real contribution of these fuels for the sustainability not only of the planet, but also the population, taking into consideration the possible social and environmental impacts of the implementation of their policies. This paper tries to debate all those problems through the analysis of the possible effects of the Brazilian policies of incentive to the bio diesel production for the family farmers from the semi-arid of the state of Bahia, Brazil. The paper intends to evaluate if this type of production is a real alternative for the sustainability of the familiar agriculture, and if there is another model of more adequate management for the production of oleaginous for bio diesel by the familiar agriculture.

  2. The Upper Mississippi River System—Topobathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jayme M.; Hanson, Jenny L.; Sattler, Stephanie R.

    2017-03-23

    The Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS), the navigable part of the Upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers, is a diverse ecosystem that contains river channels, tributaries, shallow-water wetlands, backwater lakes, and flood-plain forests. Approximately 10,000 years of geologic and hydrographic history exist within the UMRS. Because it maintains crucial wildlife and fish habitats, the dynamic ecosystems of the Upper Mississippi River Basin and its tributaries are contingent on the adjacent flood plains and water-level fluctuations of the Mississippi River. Separate data for flood-plain elevation (lidar) and riverbed elevation (bathymetry) were collected on the UMRS by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program. Using the two elevation datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) developed a systemic topobathy dataset.

  3. Research on thermal stability of aviation bio-fuel%航空生物燃料热稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凯; 夏祖西; 孙婷

    2012-01-01

    航空生物燃料作为环境友好的可替代燃料应用于民用航空器上应满足适航标准的要求。航空燃料的热氧化稳定性是航空油料质量控制的重要指标,建立严格的质量控制体系对确保航空飞行安全有着重大意义。文章对航空生物燃料的热氧化机理、氧化稳定性影响因素生物燃料原料来源、储存条件及金属种类、含量及利用抗氧化剂改进其热稳定性的方法进行了综述,并对现有的航空生物燃料热氧化稳定性评价方法馏分加速氧化法、JFTOT方法、TGA方法进行了详细阐述。%Being an environmental friendly alternative fuel the aviation bio-fuel must satisfy the airworthiness standard before being applied to the aircraft. The thermal and oxidation stability of aviation bio-fuel is an important indicator of aviation fuel quality control and it is necessary to build strict quality control system to ensure the safety of aircraft flight. The pa- per reviewed the aviation bio-fuel oxidation mechanism, the factors impacting the thermal stability such as the sources of bio-fuel, the storage conditions and the types and contents of metal contained in the fuel, and the methods used to improve the stability as adding antioxidants. Further discussions were done on the aviation bio-fuel thermal and oxidation stability evaluation methods such as distillate accelerated oxidation method, JFTOT method and TGA method.

  4. 含氧生物燃料的雾化性能测试及分析%Measurement and analysis of atomization characteristics of oxygenated bio-fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张弛; 傅奇慧; 荣龙; 林宇震; 许全宏

    2012-01-01

    A pressure-swirl atomizer was adopted to measure the atomization characteristics of oxygenated bio-fuel and its different blends with conventional kerosene RP-3.The study was conducted to analyze the effect of the chemical composition and physical-chemical properties on the atomization characteristics of the oxygenated bio-fuel.For the blends with 50% or less oxygenated bio-fuel,a Sauter mean diameter(SMD) prediction model was developed.The experimental results show that decrease the oxygenated bio-fuel in the blends,the atomization would be improved.In addition,increase the supply pressure drop,the difference of atomization among the fuel blends would be reduced.When the supply pressure drop is larger than 1.0 MPa,SMD of the fuel blends can achieve less than 40 μm.By analysis,currently the oxygenated bio-fuel can not be directly used for aero-engine,and the fuel-hydroprocessing or aircraft modification is necessary for meeting the demands of the long-term future aviation.%采用离心喷嘴对含氧生物燃料及其与传统航空煤油RP-3不同比例混合燃料的雾化性能进行测试,并分析了该燃料的组分和理化性质对雾化性能的影响.同时,对含氧生物燃料体积分数在50%以下的混合燃料,发展了具有较高精度的雾化颗粒索太尔平均直径(SMD)预估模型.试验结果表明:随着含氧生物燃料比例的减少,混合燃料的雾化性能得到改善,并且随着供油压差的增大,不同比例混合燃料间的雾化性能差距缩小;供油压差高于1.0MPa后混合燃料的SMD均可达到小于40μm的水平.经分析,目前该含氧生物燃料还不能直接应用于航空发动机,需要通过燃料氢化处理或者飞行器硬件改造,才可用于长远期的未来航空.

  5. Implementing the Bio-fuel Plan while considering water resource protection; Mise en oeuvre du plan biocarburant au regard de la protection de la ressource en eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This report recalls the objectives of the 'Bio-fuel Plan', and analyses firstly their implications in terms of cultivated surfaces either by using land fallows, or by substitution to other crops, or by intensification, and secondly, the consequences of these different options for water resources. The authors finally discusses the agronomic issue related to the protection of colza, the content of the environmental charter for the cultivation of winter colza, and some financial and practical conditions for the development of energetic crops

  6. Marker-Trait Association for Biomass Yield of Potential Bio-fuel Feedstock Miscanthus sinensis from Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eNie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a great potential bio-fuel feedstock, the genus Miscanthus has been widely studied around the world, especially Miscanthus × giganteus owing to its high biomass yield in Europe and North America. However, the narrow genetic basis and sterile characteristics of M. × giganteus have become a limitation for utilization and adaptation to extreme climate conditions. In this study, we focused on one of the progenitors of M. × giganteus, Miscanthus sinensis, which was originally distributed in East Asia with abundant genetic resources and comparable biomass yield potential to M. × giganteus in some areas. A collection of 138 individuals was selected for conducting a three-year trial of biomass production and analyzed by using 104 pairs of SRAP, ISAP, and SSR primers for genetic diversity as well as marker-trait association. Significant differences in biomass yield and related traits were observed among individuals. Tiller number, fresh biomass yield per plant and dry biomass yield per plant had a high level of phenotypic variation among individuals and the coefficient of variation were all above 40% in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The majority of the traits had a significant correlation with the biomass yield except for the length and width of flag leaves. Plant height was a highly stable trait correlated with biomass yield. A total of 1059 discernible loci were detected by markers across individuals. The population structure (Q and cluster analyses identified three subpopulations in the collection and family relative kinship (K represented a very complex relationship among M. sinensis populations from Southwest China. Model testing identified that Q+K was the best model for describing the associations between the markers and traits, compared to the simple linear, Q or K model. Using the Q+K model, 12 significant associations (P < 0.001 were identified including four markers with plant height and one with biomass yield. Such associations would serve an

  7. Method for estimations of the local forest bio-fuel resource; Metodik foer skattning av lokala skogsbraensleresurser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaaath, Haerje; Gaellerspaang, Andreas; Hallsby, Goeran; Lundstroem, Anders; Loefgren, Per; Nilsson, Mats; Staahl, Goeran [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics

    2000-05-01

    A new method for detailed estimation of local above-ground woody biomass is presented. The procedure has been developed with the aim to support large and small scale strategic planning, from various aspects of bio energy utilisation in Sweden. Important features of the method are options to deal with areas defined by the user, and to include local harvest restrictions. A planning tool suitable for local forest owners, municipalities, and bio energy enterprises has previously not been available since costume-made local estimates of woody biomass have lacked sufficient precision or been considered to costly. In the suggested method satellite image data and a sample of field plots from the Swedish National Forest Inventory (NFI) are combined using the 'k Nearest Neighbour' method (kNN). The results are transferred to the forestry planning system Hugin which provides estimates of the present and future potentials of forest bio-fuels. In the Hugin system there are great possibilities to take into account various local interests and restrictions that influence the potential of woody biomass utilisation. As an example, the priority and the intensity of forestry treatments such as establishment of new stands, pre-commercial thinning, thinning, and final cut can be considered. Other factors that can be incorporated are harvest restrictions for specific areas like nature preservation areas or riparian zones. In addition minimum requirements for harvest amounts per hectare can be set as general restrictions. In the initial steps geographical objects like roads, railroads, or forests at a specified distance from roads can be excluded from further calculations. As a demonstration example the above-ground woody biomass was calculated for the municipality AeIvsbyn in northern Sweden. The estimates were based on traditionally performed cutting operations and results can be presented separately for different species by tree fractions (bark, needles, branches and tops

  8. Hydrogen: A real alternative to fossil fuels and bio fuels in the Spanish vehicle industry; El Hidrogeno: Una alternativa real a los combustible fosiles y a los biocombustible para automoacion en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Sobrino, F.; Rodriguez-Monroy, C.; Hernandez-Perez, J. L.

    2010-07-01

    For several years, UE has been trying to increase the use of bio fuels to replace petrol or diesel in the transports with the aim of fulfilling a commitment about climate change, supplying environmentally friendly conditions, promoting renewable energy sources. To achieve this, the 2003/30/EC Directive states that in all the European countries, before 31st December 2010, at least 5.75% of all petrol and diesel fuels used for transport are bio fuels. In previous papers, the authors evaluated this possibility. Analyzing hydrogen as replacement of fossil fuels and bio fuels nowadays in spain and a technical,economic and environmental point of view is the aim of this paper. (Author)

  9. Information report presented in application of the article 146 of the rules by the Finance, the General Economy and the plan commission, on the bio-fuels; Rapport d'information depose en application de l'article 146 du reglement par la commission des finances, de l'economie generale et du plan sur les biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-05-01

    This information report deals with the advantages of the bio-fuels as a renewable energy source: the incentive legislation and the implementation in Europe, some encouraging results and the measures offered for a more voluntarist action in favor of the bio-fuels development. (A.L.B.)

  10. 1989 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Open River 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  11. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  12. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  13. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  14. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  15. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  16. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  17. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Brandon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  18. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  19. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  20. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  1. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  2. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Alton

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  3. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Dresden

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  4. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  5. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  6. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  7. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  8. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  9. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  10. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- La Grange

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  11. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  12. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Lockport

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  13. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  14. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  15. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  16. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  17. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  18. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  19. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  20. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  1. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  2. 77 FR 58900 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00060

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00060 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  3. Earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity 1811-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Richard L.; Bograd, Michael B.E.

    2011-01-01

    This map summarizes two centuries of earthquake activity in Mississippi. Work on the Mississippi map was done in collaboration with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Office of Geology. The earthquake data plotted on the map are from several sources: the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, and the Arkansas Geological Survey. In addition to earthquake locations, other materials include seismic hazard and isoseismal maps and related text. Earthquakes are a legitimate concern in Mississippi and parts of adjacent States. Mississippi has undergone a number of felt earthquakes since 1811. At least two of these events caused property damage: a magnitude 4.7 earthquake in 1931, and a magnitude 4.3 earthquake in 1967. The map shows all historical and instrumentally located earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity between 1811 and 2010. The largest historic earthquake in the vicinity of the State was an intensity XI event, on December 16, 1811; the first earthquake in the New Madrid sequence. This violent event and the earthquakes that followed caused considerable damage to the then sparsely settled region.

  4. Stennis Visitors Center and Administrative Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This aerial view shows the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center and main Administrative complex. The Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing and for commercial remote sensing.

  5. Development status and analysis of microalgal bio-fuel patents in China%中国微藻生物质能源专利技术分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 李爱芬; 万凌琳; 张成武

    2012-01-01

    大力发展微藻生物质能源是解决能源危机和环境问题的有效途径.文章从微藻资源、微藻培养系统、培养物采收技术、微藻生物柴油炼制、含油微藻综合利用等方面出发,综述了中国微藻生物质能源专利的发展现状,旨在使科研工作者更加全面地了解这一领域发展趋势,并且促进科研工作者对自主知识产权的保护意识.%Developing microalgal bio-energy was considered vigorously to be one of the most effective approach to solve the problem of energy crisis and environment pollution. The development status of microalgal bio-fuel patents in China was reviewed from the following aspsects: oleaginous microalgae strains, microalgal culture system, harvesting technique, microalgae biodiesel refining、 oilness microalgae, comprehensive utilization of microalgal biomass. The researchers was enabled to gain a unique insight into the trend of chinese microalgal bio-energy development and the awareness of intellectual property protection.

  6. The effects of catalysts on the conversion of organic matter and bio-fuel production in the microwave pyrolysis of sludge at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Huang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Lin; Sun, Shichang; Zhang, Peixin; Zhang, Xianghua; Zhao, Xuxin

    2017-08-01

    Adding catalyst could improve the yields and qualities of bio-gas and bio-oil, and realize the oriented production. Results showed that the catalytic gas-production capacities of CaO were higher than those of Fe2O3, and the bio-gas yield at 800°C reached a maximum of 35.1%. Because the polar cracking active sites of CaO reduced the activation energy of the pyrolysis reaction and resulted in high catalytic cracking efficiencies. In addition, the quality of bio-oil produced by CaO was superior to that by Fe2O3, although the bio-oil yield of CaO was relatively weak. The light bio-fuel oriented catalytic pyrolysis could be realized when adding different catalysts. At 800°C, CaO was 45% higher than Fe2O3 in aspect of H2 production while Fe2O3 was 103% higher than CaO in aspect of CH4 production. Therefore, CaO was more suitable for H2 production and Fe2O3 was more suitable for CH4 production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in the states of Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and...

  8. SCR at bio fuels combustion - phase 2. Measures to extend catalyst life time; SCR vid biobraensleeldning - etapp 2. Aatgaerder foer att foerlaenga katalysatorns livslaengd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer; Bodin, Henrik; Sahlqvist, Aasa [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Khodayari, Raziyeh; Odenbrand, Ingemar [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering II

    2000-07-01

    In this project phase, the deactivation of catalysts during combustion of bio fuels, and different methods of regeneration have been investigated. The overall purpose is to improve the economic and technical possibilities to use SCR at bio fuels combustion. The two different methods for regeneration are washing with water and so called sulphation (treatment with sulphur dioxide). The results from wood fired FB-boilers show that the catalyst lose 25% (average) of the relative activity during a normal heat production season. The tendency is that a boiler with short residence time between final combustion and catalyst and/or high flame temperatures gives a faster deactivation. Such unfavourable conditions arise in FB-boilers with a large part of the combustion in freeboard/cyclone. The alkali content of the fuel (wood fuel) is of minor importance for the deactivation rate compared with the combustion conditions. The flue gas temperature within the interval 250 - 375 deg C is not an important parameter for the deactivation in the time interval 3 000 - 6 000 h. The 'new' honeycomb catalysts that were tested during phase two, BiotypA-C, evidently show different deactivation trends. The highly active BiotypC e.g. increases its activity during the first thousand hours. Calculations indicate that BiotypC at 315 deg C requires the smallest volume of catalyst over ten years of operation in order to maintain given performance. Practical consequences for downstream equipment also need to be carefully checked. Sulphation with SO{sub 2} works in the laboratory as a regeneration method for all of the tested samples. The sulphatised samples deactivation are almost comparable to a fresh sample when exposed to flue gas. About 80 % of the lost activity can be regained only by using sulphation. Plate-type catalysts gets a somewhat lower increase in activity compared to honeycomb-types, probably related to chemical rather than geometric design. High SO{sub 2}-concentration

  9. The Mississippi CCS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-09-30

    The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

  10. An Analysis of Corporal Punishment Practices in the State of Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Damond, Twyla A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this research mainly centers on a quantitative descriptive overview of corporal punishment practices in the state of Mississippi, but this study also includes a legal document analysis component. This study forms the Mississippi portion of a comprehensive analysis of the demographics of corporal punishment in the public schools of the…

  11. Utilization of Swedish fly ash from bio fuel fired power plants as a filler material in concrete; Anvaendning av svenska flygaskor som fillermaterial i betong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundblom, Hillevi [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    The tested Swedish fly ashes (FA) (FA from bio combustion) in this project proved to have good filler qualities such as improving the stability and the rheological behavior of the concrete. One of tested FA could directly replace the compared limestone filler in the concrete recipes in booth laboratory investigation and in full-scale demonstration. The other FA demanded more water. The recipes were modified in the laboratory investigation to get a functional recipe for full-scale demonstration. The process to investigate the Swedish FA has been following (this project is one part of several investigation): Basic characterization; Characterization as a filler material; Full-scale demonstration; Certification, regularly quality assurance; Continuous use of Swedish FA in the Swedish Concrete Industry. Three representatives Swedish FA have been investigated in step 1-3 according to the process above. There were two FA in a full-scale demonstration a FA from bio fuel/paper sludge fired circulated fluidized bed boiler (at a paper mill) and a FA from a peat fired pulverized boiler. The test made was basic chemical and physical characterization, investigation as a filler material and strength development of a crushed aggregate self-compacting concrete in laboratory and in a full-scale demonstration. The conclusion were following: FA from the paper mill CFB boiler changes in strength development depending on the combustion temperature. It seems the reason is in the way CaO is distribute into different chemical compounds. Higher compressive strength with higher free CaO (analyzed in XRD) Higher content of reactive SiO{sub 2} and free lime in the CFB FA comparing with the PF FA. The soundness of the FA have been tested in early research projects. The sieves curves demonstrated that the FA from the CFB boiler coarser than the other FA tested and the limestone filler compared. The coarser grain fraction could explain why the FA demanded more water in the laboratory and full

  12. Design and evaluation of concentric cylinder bio fuel cell with proton exchange membrane-graphite powder–Glucose oxidase anode assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourish Karmakar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The current research is based on Mediated electron transfer in novel electrode assembly. Graphite powder has been used to slow down the movement of glucose oxidase. Glucose oxidase was mixed with graphite powder and stuffed into a compartment with dialysis membrane on one side while Nafion 117 on the other side. The compartment was meshed with stainless steel wire which not only gave support to the graphite powder but also was useful in electron capturing. The dialysis membrane (MW cut-off > 12000 Da let the glucose molecule to pass through but does not let the enzyme to escape to the solution. This enhances the enzyme activity and longer the half life of the Bio fuel cell (BFC. Hydroquinone was used as the mediator. The assembly generated quite a high current of 18mA and had a power density of 33µW/cm2. The higher current value is due to large effective surface area of contact of the electrode. The design was robust and can be made easily.

  13. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  14. 2010/11 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  15. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  16. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Dresden Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  17. 2010/11 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  18. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Brandon Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  19. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  20. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  1. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Marseillies Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Lockport Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  10. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  12. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  13. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  14. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Peoria Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  15. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5a

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  16. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  17. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  18. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  19. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Dresden Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  20. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  1. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--LaGrange Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--St Croix River

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  10. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Starved Rock Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Alton Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  12. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  13. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  14. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Alton Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  15. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 07

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  16. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  17. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  18. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  19. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  20. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--St Croix River

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  1. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Peoria Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  10. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  12. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Dresden Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  13. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5a

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  14. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  15. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  16. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  17. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Marseillies Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  18. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Alton Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  19. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  20. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  1. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Brandon Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--LaGrange Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  10. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Brandon Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  12. 2002 Land Cover/Use Data for Pool 8 - Upper Mississippi River

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created a high-resolution land cover/use data set for Mississippi River...

  13. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 8 Color Infrared

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  14. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  15. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Peoria Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  16. 2010/11 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 08

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  17. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  18. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  19. Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, K.J.; Kaminski, R.M.; Moorhead, D.J.; Hodges, J.D.; Nasser, J.R.; Smith, L.M.; Pederson, R.L.; Kaminski, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Available data are summarized according to the following major topics: (1) characteristics of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV); (2) waterfowl populations associated with the MAV; (3) habitat requirements of migrating and wintering waterfowl in the MAV; (4) current habitat management practices in the MAV, including croplands, moist-soil impoundments, and forested wetlands; (5) status and classification of winter habitat in the MAV; and (6) research and management information needs.

  20. 77 FR 58903 - Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment...: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort... Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  1. 77 FR 58902 - Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road.... Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416....

  2. 78 FR 64397 - Mississippi Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... 503(a) of the Act permits a State to assume primacy for the regulation of surface coal mining and....regulations.gov . A. Mississippi Surface Coal Mining Regulations Sec. 105. Definitions Mississippi proposed to... revisions. C. Mississippi Surface Coal Mining Regulations Sec. 2902. Lands Eligible for Remining Mississippi...

  3. Flexible 75 kWel Stirling CHP-plant for bio-fuels with low emissions and a high fuel utilization. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the project ''Flexible 75 kWel Stirling CHP-plant for bio-fuels with low emissions and a high fuel utilization'' was to combine the Danish experiences with the Stirling engine and updraft gasification with the application of the FLOX gas burner technology for developing and demonstrating a flexible biomass-based small scale CHP plant with 75 kW electrical output, high power efficiency and low emissions. Further, the project has aimed at increasing the technology's reliability and decreasing the need for service. Also, the project has included the development of a control and communication system for unmanned start-up and operation of the plant. During the project the objective was altered and so the development of a new Stirling engine design was done on the 4-cylindred 35 kWe Stirling engine instead of the 8-cylindred 75 kWe Stirling engine. Focus has been on designing a more durable engine designed for easy and fast service. Cold test of the engine has been successful and now full-scale hot tests are to be performed. In the project Stirling DK has also in cooperation with project partner Danish gas Technology Centre developed the Stirling Engine with Diluted Oxidation (SEDIOX) concept which is a combustion technology based on the diluted oxidation principle. A trademark is obtained and also a patent application is filed and pending regarding the SEDIOX combustion chamber concept. All components for the Stirling gasification plant were produced and installed at Svanholm Estate. The plant consisted of one conventional combustion chamber and one SD3E-type Stirling engine. The plant was commissioned in June 2009 and 1,472 hours of operation and 43 MWh of electricity production was achieved before the plant was de-commissioned in February 2010 due to divergences between Svanholm Estate and Stirling DK. During operation the control system including remote access was tested thoroughly and with great success. The new overall

  4. Environment Assessment for the Construction of a Visitor/Education Center at NASA Stennis Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a building for the operation of a Visitor/Education Center at a location next to the Mississippi Welcome Center on Interstate 10 along highway 607 in Hancock County Mississippi.

  5. Exploration and Production of Hydrocarbon Resources in Coastal Alabama and Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    temporary bases ( Weston , o 1978). For instance, Delta operations have been staged from a dock owned by a mud supplier at the Port of Mobile. It is...In Sixth Annual Conference on Wetlands Restoration and Creation, Symposium, Tampa, FL. Tolson, j.S., C.W. Copeland , and B.L. Bearden. 1983...Availability of Additional Grotndwater Supplies in the Pascagoula Area, Mississippi. Mississippi Research and Development Center, Jackson, MS. Weston , R.F

  6. Potentiometric Surface in the Sparta-Memphis Aquifer of the Mississippi Embayment, Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    -Memphis aquifer in the Mississippi embayment was about 540 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Water use from the Sparta-Memphis aquifer was about 170 Mgal/d in Arkansas, about 68 Mgal/d in Louisiana, about 97 Mgal/d in Mississippi, and about 205 Mgal/d in Tennessee. The author acknowledges, with great appreciation, the efforts of the personnel in the U.S. Geological Survey Water Science Centers of Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee, and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Office of Land and Water Resources that participated in the planning, water-level measurement, data evaluation, and review of the potentiometric-surface map. Without the contribution of data and the technical assistance of their staffs, this report would not have been completed.

  7. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  8. The Strategic Thinking and Practice of Brazil's Bio-fuel Developments%巴西生物燃料开发战略构想与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宝宇

    2012-01-01

    巴西开发生物燃料的战略构想是:减少对化石燃料的依赖;增加经济效益和减少温室气体排放;增加就业,提高落后地区人口收入,促进地区平衡发展;实行"乙醇外交",提升巴西的国际地位。巴西的上述构想是依据当前的世界能源形势以及本国的国情而产生的。它的实践已取得国际公认的成果,但亦存在某些问题。%The strategic thinking of Brazil's bio-fuel developments is: reducing the reliance on fossil fuels; increasing economic benefits and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; creating more job opportunities; improving people's income in the backward areas, promoting the balance development of regions; executing the "ethanol diplomacy" to enhance the international status of Brazil. This concept is based on current world energy situation and Brazil's national condi- tions. The practice has been internationally well-recognized, but some problems still remain.

  9. Groundwater availability of the Mississippi embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian R.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Gurdak, Jason J.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater is an important resource for agricultural and municipal uses in the Mississippi embayment. Arkansas ranks first in the Nation for rice and third for cotton production, with both crops dependent on groundwater as a major source of irrigation requirements. Multiple municipalities rely on the groundwater resources to provide water for industrial and public use, which includes the city of Memphis, Tennessee. The demand for the groundwater resource has resulted in groundwater availability issues in the Mississippi embayment including: (1) declining groundwater levels of 50 feet or more in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in parts of eastern Arkansas from agricultural pumping, (2) declining groundwater levels of over 360 feet over the last 90 years in the confined middle Claiborne aquifer in southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana from municipal pumping, and (3) litigation between the State of Mississippi and a Memphis water utility over water rights in the middle Claiborne aquifer. To provide information to stakeholders addressing the groundwater-availability issues, the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program supported a detailed assessment of groundwater availability through the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS). This assessment included (1) an evaluation of how these resources have changed over time through the use of groundwater budgets, (2) development of a numerical modeling tool to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate trends, and (3) application of statistical tools to evaluate the importance of individual observations within a groundwater-monitoring network. An estimated 12 million acre-feet per year (11 billion gallons per day) of groundwater was pumped in 2005 from aquifers in the Mississippi embayment. Irrigation constitutes the largest groundwater use, accounting for approximately 10 million acre-feet per year (9 billion gallons per day) in 2000 from the Mississippi

  10. Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee; 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Outcrop and subcrop extent of the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

  11. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Mississippi River suspended sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raff, J.; Hites, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The Mississippi River Basin drains water from 41% of the conterminous U.S. and is a valuable resource that supplies food, transportation, and irrigation to more than 95 million people of the region. Discharge and runoff from industry, agriculture, and population centers have increased the loads of anthropogenic organic compounds in the river. There has been growing concern over the rising levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in air, sediment, biota, and humans, but there have been no studies to measure the concentrations of these chemicals in North America's largest river system. The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence of PBDEs (15 congeners including BDE-209) and to identify possible sources within the Mississippi River Basin. We found PBDEs to be widespread throughout the region, rivaling PCBs in their extent and magnitude of contamination. We have also calculated the total amount of PBDEs released to the Gulf of Mexico in 2002.

  12. Advances of in edible vegetable oil as rick hydrocarbon bio-fuel%非食用植物油作为生物富烃燃料原料的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洋; 张爱华; 肖志红; 汪红梅; 李昌珠

    2014-01-01

    随着世界化石能源渐趋枯竭、环境问题日益突出、能源需求的不断扩大,促使人们积极寻找新的替代能源燃料。在这些新型能源中,具有高生物降解性的、无毒的生物富烃燃料作为替代燃料更具吸引力。选用非食用植物油作为主要的原料制备生物富烃燃料可以缓解食用油的压力和减少原料的成本。本文阐述非食用植物油作为未来生物富烃燃料的主要原料的必要性和潜力,介绍目前国内外非食用植物油研究现状及几种常用的非食用植物油作为生产生物富烃燃料的发展状况。%People search for new alternative energy with energy crisis due to depletion of resources,increased environ-mental problems,and growing energy demand. Because of biodegradability and nontoxicity biodiesel has become more at-tractive as alternative fuel. It can be reducing cvst feedstaks and dependeng on edible oil to make bio-fuel for inedible vegetable oil.Therefore,the aim of this paper is to review the necessity and potentiality of the in edible oils and to iden-tify the emerging technologies to produce biodiesel. The current domestic and foreign research of development and several in edible vegetable oil as biodiesel production was introduced.

  13. Variance in Dominant Grain Size Across the Mississippi River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. L.; Chamberlain, E. L.; Esposito, C. R.; Wagner, R. W.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2016-02-01

    Proposals to restore coastal Louisiana often center on Mississippi River diversion projects wherein water and sediment are routed into wetlands and shallow waters in an effort to build land. Successful design and implementation of diversions will include consideration of behavior and characteristics of sediment, both in the river and in the receiving basin. The Mississippi River sediment load is primarily mud (roughly 75%), with the remainder being very-fine to medium sand or organic detritus. The dominance of muds leads many to suggest that diversions should focus on capturing the mud fraction despite the smaller size and longer settling times required for these particles compared to sand; others believe that sand should be the focus. We present a systemic analysis of the texture of land-building sediment in the Mississippi Delta using borehole data from various depositional environments representing a range of spatial scales, system ages, and fluvial and basin characteristics. We include subdelta-scale data from the incipient Wax Lake Delta and from the distal plain of the abandoned Lafourche subdelta, as well as crevasse-scale data from modern Cubit's Gap and the Attakapas splay, an inland Lafourche crevasse. Comparison of these sites demonstrates a large variance in the volumetric mud to sand ratios across the system. We consider the differences to be emblematic of the various forcings on each lobe as it formed and suggest that the most efficient building block for a diversion is a function of the receiving basin and is not uniform across the entire delta.

  14. 甜高粱生产生物燃料关键因素分析%Analysis on key factors of sweet sorghum as raw material for bio-fuel production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜瑞恒; 李素英; 吕芃; 刘国庆; 籍贵苏; 侯升林; 马雪; 王建平; 杨娜

    2012-01-01

    针对以甜高粱为原料生产生物燃料中存在的原料不足、产品成本高等问题,根据近10年甜高粱育种与栽培研究成果以及与企业的合作经验,对影响上述问题的主要因素如品种、种植区域、技术、政策等进行分析。结果表明:甜高粱虽有较好的品种,但不能满足所有地区以甜高粱秆为原料生产燃料产业持续发展的需要,这是造成原料基地不足的首要原因。我国的边际土地面积巨大、类型众多,不都完全适合种植甜高粱来生产燃料乙醇,选择种植区域不当是甜高粱种植不足的第2个原因。在甜高粱高产种植、加工技术方面,重视了高产栽培、发酵技术等核心技术的研究,忽略了配套技术研究,这是造成生产成本高的主要原因。国家虽然制定了相关产业政策,但不足以引导生物质能产业健康持续发展。在今后发展以甜高粱为原料生产生物燃料过程中,首先需注意甜高粱品种的多元化,要特别注意选育早熟、高产、高含糖量品种、杂交种;其次根据区域气候特点,选择适宜地区不仅适合种植甜高粱,更要适合甜高粱的储藏和加工;同时研究甜高粱机械化收储运、甜高粱秆连续发酵、糟渣利用等配套技术研究,构建完整的产业链;制定中小规模生物质能产业持续发展的政策法规和生物能源研发的国家持续投入机制,保障生物质能产业稳步发展。%In addition to the problems of the shortage of raw material and high costs in bio-fuel production using sweet sorghum.The reasons which bringing on the above-mentioned problems are analyzed based on the achievement in sweet sorghum breeding,cultivation and industrial cooperation during the last decade.The key factors include the cultivar of sweet sorghum,planting areas,technology and the government policy.Although some sweet sorghum cultivars are better,these cultivars could not provide a sustainable supply to

  15. Reconnaissance level study Mississippi storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Lansen, A.J.; De Ridder, H.A.J.; Edge, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance level study of a storm surge barrier in the Mississippi River. Historical hurricanes have shown storm surge of several meters along the Mississippi River levees up to and upstream of New Orleans. Future changes due to sea level rise and subsidence will further

  16. Reconnaissance level study Mississippi storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Lansen, A.J.; De Ridder, H.A.J.; Edge, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance level study of a storm surge barrier in the Mississippi River. Historical hurricanes have shown storm surge of several meters along the Mississippi River levees up to and upstream of New Orleans. Future changes due to sea level rise and subsidence will further inc

  17. The Mississippi River in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳

    2014-01-01

    In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Mississippi River is not just to provide a general background, but to consti-tute the center image of the novel. It gives“form”to the whole novel, all the adventures in the book begins with the river and ends with the river. This paper talks about the important river. It is a symbol of freedom and maternity, and it has deep meaning of life and regeneration, purification and sublimation. The symbols and senses of this river deepen the theme of the novel, and prop up its broad and profound metaphorical world.

  18. “Camellia house, Jackson, Mississippi, post-1936”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A. McHaney

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available “Camellia house, Jackson, Mississippi, post-1936,” Eudora Welty as Photographer, p. 51, with the gracious permission of the Eudora Welty Foundation“Camellia house” illustrates Welty’s aesthetic awareness of the capabilities of the camera to transform light. The black and white lines of the shadows, ceiling boards, and sky pull our eyes to the white square at the photograph’s center. Yet we are simultaneously aware of the upright poles wrapped in barbershop shadow stripes and of the gently cur...

  19. Viability assessment of regional biomass pre-processing center based bioethanol value chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Joseph E.

    Petroleum accounts for 94% of all liquid fuels and 36% of the total of all energy consumed in the United States. Petroleum dependence is problematic because global petroleum reserves are estimated to last only for 40 to 60 years at current consumption rates; global supplies are often located in politically unstable or unfriendly regions; and fossil fuels have negative environmental footprints. Domestic policies have aimed at promoting alternative, renewable liquid fuels, specifically bio-fuels derived from organic matter. Cellulosic bio-ethanol is one promising alternative fuel that has featured prominently in federal bio-fuel mandates under the Energy Independence and Security Act, 2007. However, the cellulosic bio-ethanol industry faces several technical, physical and industrial organization challenges. This dissertation examines the concept of a network of regional biomass pre-treatment centers (RBPC) that form an extended biomass supply chain feeding into a simplified biorefinery as a way to overcome these challenges. The analyses conducted address the structural and transactional issues facing bio-ethanol value chain establishment; the technical and financial feasibility of a stand alone pre-treatment center (RBPC); the impact of distributed pre-treatment on biomass transport costs; a comparative systems cost evaluation of the performance of the RBPC chain versus a fully integrated biorefinery (gIBRh), followed by application of the analytical framework to three case study regions.

  20. Bioassessment of Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at five stations on Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi were evaluated using Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBP)...

  1. Middle Mississippi River Sturgeon Preliminary Contaminants Investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We examined the health of forty-one wild caught sturgeon from a reach of the Mississippi River with an organochlorine consumption advisory and a reference site. The...

  2. U. Mississippi program ups physics interests

    CERN Multimedia

    Carrington, E

    2002-01-01

    The University of Mississippi is one of the 44 national sites taking part in QuarkNet, a national program that provides high school teachers with the opportunity to work with university researchers on physics research (1/2 page).

  3. Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR Forest Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR Forest Management Plan is a general plan which outlines the Refuge management objectives, forest description, forest management...

  4. North Mississippi Refuges Complex: 2001 annual narrative

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for North Mississippi Refgues (including Dahomey NWR, Tallahatchie NWR, and Coldwater River NWR) outlines activities and accomplishments...

  5. Continuing Education in Nursing Comes to Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Avis B.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the growth and development of the Continuing Education in Nursing Department, a part of the School of Nursing at the University of Southern Mississippi. Curriculum development inservice programs, workshops, conferences. (RB)

  6. Odonates of North Mississippi Refuges Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Contains a list of dragonflies and damsel flies captures on the refuge complex in about 2003 or 2004 by graduate student Jason Bried, Mississippi State Univeristy,...

  7. Bioassessment of Black Creek, Holmes County, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at four stations on Black Creek and one station on Harland Creek (reference site), Holmes County, Mississippi were...

  8. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium energy field. Final year report. R and D on the bio-fuel production by high functional bio-reactor; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium energy bun'ya. Kokino bio reactor ni yoru bio nenryo seisan ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu (saishu nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A system was developed for producing automobile fuel from the recycled paper and waste cooking oil using high functional intelligent yeast. Element technology is the functional yeast creation technology and the online intelligent control technology of the process into which the fixed bio-reactor was inserted. Studies were made on the following: 1) creation of high activity lipase production/ethanol production yeasts; 2) bio-fuel production by intelligent bio-reactor; 3) process optimization control technology by fuzzy control; 4) stabilization of bio-fuel production yeast; 5) comprehensive investigational study. In FY 2000, the results were obtained as written below: development of the stable lipase coming from rhizopus japonicus, fixed bacterium using rhizopus oryzae fungus body which can be used more than ten times, direct ethanol fermentation from starch by developing the multi-copy glucoamylase manifestation yeast, operation of a 20L capacity bench plant, etc. (NEDO)

  9. ATM Coastal Topography-Mississippi, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Mississippi coastline, from Lakeshore to Petit Bois Island, acquired September 9-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS

  10. 76 FR 336 - Notice of NEPA Public Scoping Meeting Information for the Great Lakes and Mississippi River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... conducting a feasibility study of the options and technologies that could be applied to prevent aquatic.... Thursday, February 10, 2011: Vicksburg Convention Center, 1600 Mulberry Street, Vicksburg, MS. Please see... Lakes and Mississippi River Interbasin Study (``GLMRIS'') AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S. Army...

  11. Evaluation of the Color Me Healthy Program in Influencing Nutrition and Physical Activity in Mississippi Preschool Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huye, Holly F.; Bankston, Sarah; Speed, Donna; Molaison, Elaine F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the level of implementation and perceived value in creating knowledge and behavior change from the Color Me Healthy (CMH) training program in child care centers, family day carehomes, or Head Start facilities throughout Mississippi. Methods: A two-phase survey was used to initially…

  12. Modeling the Response of Primary Production and Sedimentation to Variable Nitrate Loading in the Mississippi River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-06

    USA d Department of Marine Science, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529, USA ARTICLE INFO ABSTRACT Article history ...The non-diatom KNH, + +H phytoplanktonic group covers all non-siliceous forms including cyanobacteria , flagellates, and dinoflagellates, although in the

  13. 75 FR 5071 - Mississippi L&D 21, LLC, Mississippi River No. 21 Hydropower Company Lock + TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Mississippi L&D 21, LLC, Mississippi River No. 21 Hydropower Company Lock... No. 21 Hydropower Company (Hydropower Company) filed an application for a preliminary permit for the proposed Mississippi River No. 21 Hydropower Project No. 13637. On January 8, 2010, Lock + TM Hydro Friends...

  14. Responses of Bats to Forest Fragmentation in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, Arkansas, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Risch, Thomas S.; Karen F. Gaines; Connior, Matthew B.; Rex E. Medlin

    2010-01-01

    Intense conversion of bottomland hardwood forests to rice and soybeans in the Mississippi River Valley of Arkansas has restricted the remaining forest to isolated fragments. Habitat fragmentation has proven to be detrimental to population sustainability of several species, and is the subject of intense study with often species and latitude specific responses. We compared both coarse land area classes and landscape fragmentation metrics from six 30 km × 30 km subsets centered on publicly owned...

  15. Stennis Space Center observes 2009 Energy Awareness Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees Maria Etheridge (l to r), Linda Sauland Maurice Prevost visit a Coast Electric Power Association display featuring energy-efficient light bulbs during 2009 Energy Awareness Day activities on Oct. 20. The exhibit was one of several energy-efficiency and energy-awareness displays on-site for employees to visit. Vendors included Mississippi Power Company, Coast Electric Power Association, Mississippi Development Authority - Energy Division,Jacobs FOSC Environmental, Southern Energy Technologies, and Siemens Building Technologies.

  16. 用废弃生物质快速生产生物燃油新工艺及转锥式裂解装置设计%Study on Fast Producting Bio-fuel-oil New Technology and Designon ZKR500 Rotating Cone Reactor for Flash Pyrolysis/Liquefaction of Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王述洋; 谭文英; 陈爱军

    2000-01-01

    研究探讨了一种能够将废弃生物质快速液化转换成生物质液化燃油的新技术方法,并研究设计出适用于该工艺的关键设备"ZKR-500型转锥式废弃生物质快速裂解液化反应器"·%A new process for fast producing bio-fuel-oil by solid biomass and design of the key equipment of the process ZKR500 Rotating Cone Reactor for Flash Pyrolysis Liquefaction of Biomass were studied in the paper.

  17. Emergency Operations Center ribbon cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Center Director Gene Goldman and special guests celebrate the opening of the site's new Emergency Operations Center on June 2. Participants included (l t r): Steven Cooper, deputy director of the National Weather Service Southern Region; Tom Luedtke, NASA associate administrator for institutions and management; Charles Scales, NASA associate deputy administrator; Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour; Gene Goldman, director of Stennis Space Center; Jack Forsythe, NASA assistant administrator for the Office of Security and Program Protection; Dr. Richard Williams, NASA chief health and medical officer; and Weldon Starks, president of Starks Contracting Company Inc. of Biloxi.

  18. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Helena quadrangle of Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The Helena quadrangle covers a region largely within the Mississippi River flood plain in the extreme northern Gulf Coastal Province. Tertiary sediments in this area are relatively thick, and overlie a Paleozoic basin gradually shoaling to the northeast. The Oachita Tectonic Zone strikes southeasterly through the center of the quadrangle. The exposed sequence is almost entirely Quaternary sediments of the flood plain area. Older Cenozoic deposits crop out in upland areas on the west side of the river valley. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Sixty uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and all appeared to occur as the result of cultural and/or weather effects. Magnetic data appear to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  19. 78 FR 25336 - Mississippi Disaster # MS-00066

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00066 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Application Deadline Date: 01/21/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  20. Hurricane Katrina impacts on Mississippi forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonja N. Oswalt; Christopher Oswalt; Jeffery Turner

    2008-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina triggered public interest and concern for forests in Mississippi that required rapid responses from the scientific community. A uniform systematic sample of 3,590 ground plots were established and measured in 687 days immediately after the impact of Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast. The hurricane damaged an estimated 521 million trees with more...

  1. Katrina Effect on Mathematics Achievement in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, John; Lewis, Mark; Gross, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina caused severe physical damage to the Gulf Coast states of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Homes and businesses were destroyed. Natural habitats were annihilated, and many Americans were displaced for days, weeks, and even years. This study investigated the within-subject effects and contrasts of poverty, rurality, and…

  2. Mississippi Business and Technology Framework, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of the 2004 Mississippi Business and Technology Framework is to promote business and economic literacy, both successful domestic and international functioning, diverse practice of interpersonal, teamwork, and leadership skills, technology as a tool for managing information, and lifelong learning skills that foster flexible…

  3. Forest statistics for North Mississippi counties - 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne L. Faulkner; Patrick E. Miller; Andrew J. Hartsell; Jack D. London

    1993-01-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a 1994 forest inventory of north Mississippi counties (fig. 1). Field work was conducted from December 1992 to May 1993. Core tables 1 through 25 were compatible among Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) units in the Eastern United States, Supplemental tables 26 through 44 provide information beyond that provided...

  4. Forest statistics for Southwest Mississippi counties - 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne L. Faulkner; Andrew J. Hartsell; Jack D. London

    1995-01-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a 1994 forest inventory of southwest Mississippi counties (fig. I). These data are considered preliminary. Field work was conducted from February to august 1994. Core tables 1 through 25 are compatible among forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) units in the Eastern United States. Supplemental tables 26 through 44...

  5. AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell,D.A; Broadhead, L.W.; Harrell, W.J.

    2006-03-31

    The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercialization of these agricultural byproducts and waste products as feedstocks in the production of energy. The final products from this project were two business plans; one for a Thermal plant, and one for a Biodiesel/Ethanol plant. Agricultural waste fired steam and electrical generating plants and biodiesel plants were deemed the best prospects for developing commercially viable industries. Additionally, oil extraction methods were studied, both traditional and two novel techniques, and incorporated into the development plans. Mississippi produced crop and animal waste biomasses were analyzed for use as raw materials for both industries. The relevant factors, availability, costs, transportation, storage, location, and energetic value criteria were considered. Since feedstock accounts for more than 70 percent of the total cost of producing biodiesel, any local advantages are considered extremely important in developing this particular industry. The same factors must be evaluated in assessing the prospects of commercial operation of a steam and electrical generation plant. Additionally, the access to the markets for electricity is more limited, regulated and tightly controlled than the liquid fuel markets. Domestically produced biofuels, both biodiesel and ethanol, are gaining more attention and popularity with the consuming public as prices rise and supplies of foreign crude become less secure. Biodiesel requires no major modifications to existing diesel engines or supply chain and offers significant environmental benefits. Currently the biodiesel industry requires Federal and State incentives to allow the industry to develop and become self-sustaining. Mississippi has available the necessary feedstocks and is

  6. The Mississippi River: A place for fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harold; Ickes, Brian; Chen, Yushun; Chapman, Duane C.; Jackson, John; Chen, Daqing; Li, Zhongjie; Kilgore, Jack; Phelps, Quinton; Eggleton, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Mississippi River flows 3,734 km from its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota to its outlet at the Gulf of Mexico. Along its course, it collects water from portions of two Canadian provinces and 41 % of the conterminous United States. Although greatly altered for navigation and flood control throughout much of its length, the Mississippi River remains an important fishery resource that provides habitat for 188 species of fishes and recreational and commercial fishing opportunities. The objectives of this chapter are to describe the contemporary fisheries habitat throughout the Mississippi River, identify how management to achieve human benefits influences the fishes and their habitats, and summarize efforts to conserve and enhance fish habitat. The 826-km headwater reach is entirely in Minnesota and remains largely unaltered. The reaches that extend 1,059 km from St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota to above the confluence with the Missouri River near St. Louis, Missouri have been altered by impoundment that has affected floodplain function, increased sedimentation of backwaters, and homogenized the formerly diverse aquatic habitats. After the confluence with the Missouri River, the Mississippi River flows freely for 1,849 km to the Gulf of Mexico. The alterations of the free-flowing reaches of greatest significance to the fisheries resource are reducing the duration and height of the flood pulse as a consequence of shortening the river channel, disconnection of the river from its historic and present floodplain, and loss of secondary channel-island complexes. Engineering features to improve commercial navigation have also added habitat and, when wisely manipulated, can be used to rehabilitate habitat. Some aspects of water quality have improved, but legacy chemicals and nutrient-laden inflows and sediments remain problems. Although true restoration in the sense of restoring all environmental conditions to an unaltered state is unlikely, the future value of the

  7. Archive of sediment data from vibracores collected in 2010 offshore of the Mississippi barrier islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Kyle W.; Flocks, James G.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center collected sediment cores from coastal waters offshore of the Mississippi barrier islands. With funding support from the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility project, 65 subaqueous sediment cores were collected over an area of 480 square kilometers (km2), from Ship Island to Petit Bois Island Pass, Mississippi, within the boundary of Gulf Islands National Seashore. This represents only a fraction of the total area encompassed by the NGOM project, which extends from Sabine Lake, Louisiana, to Perdido Bay, Alabama. The primary objectives of the NGOM project are to understand the evolution of coastal ecosystems on the northern gulf coast, the impact of human activities on these ecosystems, and the vulnerability of ecosystems and human communities to more frequent and intense hurricanes in the future.

  8. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  9. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  10. Variability in the bulk composition and abundance of dissolved organic matter in the lower Mississippi and Pearl rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shuiwang; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Shiller, Alan M.; Dria, Karl; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Carman, Kevin R.

    2007-06-01

    In this study, we examined the temporal and spatial variability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) abundance and composition in the lower Mississippi and Pearl rivers and effects of human and natural influences. In particular, we looked at bulk C/N ratio, stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry of high molecular weight (HMW; 0.2 μm to 1 kDa) DOM. Monthly water samples were collected at one station in each river from August 2001 to 2003. Surveys of spatial variability of total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were also conducted in June 2003, from 390 km downstream in the Mississippi River and from Jackson to Stennis Space Center in the Pearl River. Higher DOC (336-1170 μM), C/N ratio,% aromaticity, and more depleted δ15N (0.76-2.1‰) were observed in the Pearl than in the lower Mississippi River (223-380 μM, 4.7-11.5‰, respectively). DOC, C/N ratio, δ13C, δ15N, and % aromaticity of Pearl River HMW DOM were correlated with water discharge, which indicated a coupling between local soil inputs and regional precipitation events. Conversely, seasonal variability in the lower Mississippi River was more controlled by spatial variability of a larger integrative signal from the watershed as well as in situ DOM processing. Spatially, very little change occurred in total DOC in the downstream survey of the lower Mississippi River, compared to a decrease of 24% in the Pearl River. Differences in DOM between these two rivers were reflective of the Mississippi River having more extensive river processing of terrestrial DOM, more phytoplankton inputs, and greater anthropogenic perturbation than the Pearl River.

  11. Northern Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge Complex Bird List

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bird checklist for North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuges Complex including Cold River, Dahomey, and Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuges.

  12. Histomoniasis in wild turkeys in Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, G A

    1980-07-01

    Blackhead (histomoniasis, enterohepatitis) was diagnosed as the cause of death for three wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) found in widely separated areas in Mississippi. The turkeys came from areas with high turkey population densities and supplemental feeding programs. Finding three sick and/or dead wild turkeys in a year's period suggests that the disease is more prevalent than generally believed. Recommendations for management programs are presented.

  13. Glyphosate-Resistant Goosegrass from Mississippi

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay K. Nandula; Wright, Alice A.; Molin, William T.

    2013-01-01

    A suspected glyphosate-resistant goosegrass [Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.] population, found in Washington County, Mississippi, was studied to determine the level of resistance and whether the resistance was due to a point mutation, as was previously identified in a Malaysian population. Whole plant dose response assays indicated a two- to four-fold increase in resistance to glyphosate. Leaf disc bioassays based on a glyphosate-dependent increase in shikimate levels indicated a five- to eight...

  14. Electronic Cigarette Use among Mississippi Adults, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent L. Mendy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine in the form of aerosol. We identify differences and associations in e-cigarette use by sociodemographic characteristics and describe the reported reasons for initiating use among Mississippi adults. We used the 2015 Mississippi Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which collected information on e-cigarette use from 6,035 respondents. The prevalence of current e-cigarette use and having ever tried an e-cigarette was determined overall and by sociodemographic characteristics. Weighted prevalences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and prevalences for subgroups were compared using the X2 tests and associations were assessed using logistic regression. In 2015, 4.7% of Mississippi adults currently used e-cigarettes, while 20.5% had ever tried an e-cigarette. The prevalence of current e-cigarette use was significantly higher for young adults, whites, men, individuals unable to work, those with income $35,000–$49,999, and current smokers compared to their counterparts. Similar results were observed for having ever tried an e-cigarette. E-cigarette use was associated with age, race, income, and smoking status. Most (71.2% of current e-cigarette users and over half (52.1% of those who have ever tried e-cigarettes reported that a main reason for trying or using e-cigarettes was “to cut down or quit smoking.”

  15. The Effect Of Diversity Mandates: The Case Of Mississippi Institutions Of Higher Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hochradel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After more than 40 years since the University of Mississippi integrated its student body and the passage of civil rights and affirmative action legislation throughout the United States, universities are confronting the issue of developing not only a diverse student body, but also a diverse faculty, staff, and administration.  In the intervening years, much research has been conducted in the area of diversity within universities.  Past research focused on the attitudes towards diversity, necessity and benefits of diversity, and student initiatives to address these issues.  However, the vast majority of diversity research centers on human resources issues.  In 2006, Commissioner Tom Meredith of the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL charged the Mississippi higher education institutions with increasing the diversity of faculty, staff, and students.  The purpose of this study is to investigate the diversity among these institutions and to determine the effect of the mandate by the IHL on the diversity of employees and students at these universities.  Data analysis includes a report of the current diversity status and analysis of change based on the mandate.  This study concludes with a discussion of the results, implications of these results, and directions for future research.

  16. Techniques for rearing and releasing nonmigratory cranes: Lessons from the Mississippi Sandhill Crane program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D.H.; Olsen, G.H.; Gee, G.F.; Nicolich, Jane M.; O'Malley, K.E.; Nagendran, Meenakshi; Hereford, Scott G.; Range, P.; Harper, W.T.; Ingram, R.P.; Smith, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Captive-reared Mississippi sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pulla) reared at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent) have been released at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge (MSCNWR) since 1981. Of 131 birds released through December 1990, 103 were reared by foster parents. The remaining 28 were experimentally hand-reared in 1989 and 1990. After refining release procedures, parent-reared birds have integrated into the wild flock, many have survived, and some have bred. Releases of hand-reared cranes elsewhere in the 1970's were largely unsuccessful, at least in part due to the lack of a lengthy acclimation period. A new hand-rearing protocol holds promise in producing release-worthy birds. The technique employs some features first used in the 1960's (e.g., a costume for the human caretaker and model crane heads used to train chicks to feed). In the mid-1980's, the following features were added: (1) the costumed caretaker was given a visor and feathers, (2) a taxidermic crane head or a hand puppet was held or suspended from the ceiling for use in stimulating chicks to feed, (3) a taxidermic mount of a brooding crane supplied warmth, (4) a full-sized live crane was maintained in an adjacent pen and in visual contact with neonatal young to provide an imprinting model, and (5) a small group of adult (or subadult) cranes was penned adjacent to the outdoor chick pens to provide socialization models. Recent releases of Mississippi sandhill cranes hand-reared according to this protocol and released in Mississippi have had high first-year survival rates. The now-operational technique holds promise for producing large numbers of release-worthy birds.

  17. Mississippi River Sediment Availability Study: Summary of Available Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Wallerstein . 2000. Sediment transport in the Lower Mississippi River. Final Report, Contract Number N68171-00-M-5982. London, England: U.S. Army Research...Development and Standardization Group-U.K. Thorne, C. R., O. P. Harmar, and N. Wallerstein . 2001. Morphodynamics of the Lower Mississippi River

  18. A comprehensive sediment budget for the Mississippi Barrier Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walstra, D.J.R.; De Vroeg, J.H.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; Swinkels, C.; Luijendijk, A.P.; De Boer, W.P.; Hoekstra, R.; Hoonhout, B.; Henrotte, J.; Smolders, T.; Dekker, F.; Godsey, E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to conceive any realistic plan for post-Katrina island restoration, it is necessary to understand the physical processes that move sand along the littoral drift zone off the coast of Mississippi. This littoral zone influences the character of the Mississippi barrier islands as they exist in

  19. A comprehensive sediment budget for the Mississippi Barrier Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walstra, D.J.R.; De Vroeg, J.H.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; Swinkels, C.; Luijendijk, A.P.; De Boer, W.P.; Hoekstra, R.; Hoonhout, B.; Henrotte, J.; Smolders, T.; Dekker, F.; Godsey, E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to conceive any realistic plan for post-Katrina island restoration, it is necessary to understand the physical processes that move sand along the littoral drift zone off the coast of Mississippi. This littoral zone influences the character of the Mississippi barrier islands as they exist in

  20. Perplexing Federal Cases from Mississippi: Lessons for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Lindon J.

    2010-01-01

    Federal court cases are examined in an effort to view recent First Amendment rights infringements which have occurred in Mississippi. Case law reinforces students' rights to wear same-sex outfits to school functions as well as to bring same-sex dates. Connection to a recent civil rights investigation by the NAACP into a north Mississippi middle…

  1. 78 FR 36683 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi AGENCY: Federal Communications... Broadcasting, allots FM Channel 228A ] as a first local service at Summit, Mississippi. To accommodate that... U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting....

  2. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  3. Long-term measurements of agronomic crop irrigation in the Mississippi Delta portion of the Lower Mississippi River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    With over 4 million ha irrigated cropland, the Lower Mississippi River Valley (LMRV) is a highly productive agricultural region where irrigation practices are similar and the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer (MRVA) is a primary source of on-demand irrigation. Owing to agricultural exports, ...

  4. The Legacy of the 1948 Underseepage and Crevasse Maps, Lower Mississippi River Levees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    ER D C/ G SL S R- 17 -2 The Legacy of the 1948 Underseepage and Crevasse Maps, Lower Mississippi River Levees G eo te ch ni ca l a nd...release; distribution is unlimited. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation’s toughest engineering and...environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our nation’s public good. Find out more at www.erdc.usace.army.mil. To

  5. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome Site, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  6. Radium isotopes in the lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, T. F.; Curwick, P. B.

    1991-02-01

    Radium isotopes have been measured in Mississippi River water at several locations between St. Francisville and Venice, Louisiana. Measured activities averaged 11.1 dpm/100 L (disintegrations per minute per 100 L) for dissolved 226Ra with a 228Ra/226Ra activity ratio of 1.04 and a 224Ra/228Ra activity ratio of 1.06 for the section of river above a phosphogypsum waste-discharge input. Down river from this site, the dissolved 226Ra activity averaged 22.4 dpm/100 L with a 228Ra/226Ra activity ratio of 0.55 and a 224Ra/228Ra activity ratio of 0.87. Chemical and isotopic reequilibration of the radium in the waste with that in the river water and suspended sediments occurs very rapidly. Fluxes of 226Ra are calculated to be 2.44×1014 dpm/yr (disintegrations per minute per year) for the main stem of the Mississippi during phosphogypsum disposal compared to 0.98×1014 dpm/yr when no phosphogypsum disposal is occurring. 28Ra flux is calculated to be 1.06×1014 dpm/yr during disposal and 1.01×1014 dpm/yr in the absence of disposal. The radium flux is estimated to be 45% in the dissolved state and 55% in the adsorbed state.

  7. Parathion poisoning of Mississippi kites in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian

    1994-01-01

    Parathion(phosphorothioic acid O, O-diethyl O-[4-nitrophenyl] ester) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide, used on a variety of crops and occasionally for mosquito control, and is highly toxic to birds (Smith 1987). Intentional poisoning with parathion is reported to have killed more than 8000 red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in two separate instances (Stone et al. 1984). Use of parathion on wheat fields has resulted in the mortality of about 1600 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and other waterfowl in one instance (White et al. 1982) and about 200 Canada geese in another (Flickinger et al. 1991). More than 200 laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) died near cotton fields treated with parathion (White et al. 1979). Secondary poisoning of raptors resulting from the consumption of prey exposed to parathion, has been reported experimentally and in the field. Stone et al. (1984) found two dead red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), a Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) and an American kestrel (Falco sparverius) that had fed on blackbirds killed by parathion. One of four American kestrels died after being fed cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) that had been exposed to 10ppm parathion for 96 hr (Fleming et al. 1982). The Mississippi kite (Ictinia mississippensis) is highly insectivorous (Brown and Amadon 1968) and is thus subject to secondary poisoning resulting from consumption of insects exposed to pesticides. I report here an instance of secondary parathion poisoning in wild Mississippi kites.

  8. Gallbladder surgery for Medicare patients in Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, A B; Sanchez, N; Miller, D

    1994-10-01

    Mississippi Foundation for Medical Care (MFMC) conducted a review of gallbladder surgery performed on Mississippi Medicare Patients using hospital claims files and limited record review for verification of claims file data. Significant error rates in the surgeon identification number were found in the claims files. It should also be noted that the current ICD-9-CM coding system does not allow for identification of laparoscopic cholecystectomies converted to open procedures. Past studies have attempted to use claims data alone for these types of analyses. These findings demonstrate the importance of using caution by those attempting to use claims data (without verification) to define patterns of hospital utilization, clinical outcomes and/or physician profiling. Claims data must be tested for validity for reliable pattern analysis. In addition, considerable variation was found among providers in elements such as conversion rates, complication and readmission rates. A few surgeons showed patterns for critical variables that were quite different from the universe. There was however, no statistically significant differences associated between volume of cases performed and outcomes. Time frame comparisons over several years show significant (> 80%) increase in gallbladder surgery since the introduction of the laparoscopic procedure.

  9. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  10. Mississippi graduate DOE EPSCor trainee project. First annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    The promotion of an aggressive energy research initiative was identified as a goal of the Mississippi Research Consortium (MRC) from its inception in 1986. The Department of Energy EPSCOR Program has provided opportunities to address the needs and enhance the interactive programs of energy-related research in the State of Mississippi. The Mississippi DOE EPSCOR Graduate Traineeships Project is a program of education and research which will (1) increase the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field, and (2) interface with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities.

  11. Mississippi graduate DOE EPSCor trainee project. [First Annual Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    The promotion of an aggressive energy research initiative was identified as a goal of the Mississippi Research Consortium (MRC) from its inception in 1986. The Department of Energy EPSCOR Program has provided opportunities to address the needs and enhance the interactive programs of energy-related research in the State of Mississippi. The Mississippi DOE EPSCOR Graduate Traineeships Project is a program of education and research which will (1) increase the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field, and (2) interface with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities.

  12. Inland Waters - Mississippi River Centerline - Headwaters to Gulf Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — Mississippi River centerline data derived from USACE navigation sailing line (recommended track) data and on-screen digitized in areas of no data. Data set extends...

  13. Level III Ecoregions of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for the Mississippi Alluvial Plain were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in...

  14. North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuges Complex: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on North Mississippi NWRs Complex for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Complex...

  15. Level IV Ecoregions of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for the Mississippi Alluvial Plain were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in...

  16. Upper Mississippi River : Furbearer Manangement Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River NWR Furbearer Management Plan directs the management and regulation of trapping. The furbearer management program directly supports the...

  17. Breeding bird study in the Mississippi River Floodplain

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A breeding bird study was initiated in 1992 to census birds on the Gardner Division of Mark Twain NWR. The division is located in the Mississippi River floodplain...

  18. Forest Management Plan : Upper Mississippi River Wildlife & Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi National Wildlife and Fish Refuge Forest Management Plan is a general plan which outlines the refuge management objectives, forest...

  19. 2005 Hancock and Jackson Counties, Mississippi LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the topographic mapping of Hancock and Jackson Counties, Mississippi during 2005. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS...

  20. The Trail Inventory of Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this...

  1. Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge Bird List

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This checklist includes species of birds and is based on observations by refuge personnel, ornithologists,and members of the Mississippi Coast Audubon Society....

  2. Sign Plan : Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of...

  3. Freshwater mussels of North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A literature search of the distribution of freshwater mussels anticipated to be found on refuges assoicated with the North Mississippi Refuges Cjomplex and museum...

  4. Ideas in Practice: The Mississippi River: Humanities and Civil Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonalt, Larry; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course offered for the freshman civil engineering major at the University of Missouri-Rolla. The rationale of developing the course which focuses on the symbolic, social, and technological aspects of the Mississippi River is included. (HM)

  5. The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study, Grain Size Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study was funded by NOAA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Program. Dr. L.J. Doyle produced grain size analyses in the...

  6. Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  7. The proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize Mississippi State University (MSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL). DOE grant funds are available to the University for the limited purpose of performing preliminary studies, including analysis necessary to conduct this environmental assessment. The proposed facility would be located in the Mississippi Research and Technology Park, adjacent to the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station campus in Starkville, Mississippi. Total project cost is estimated at $7,953,600. This proposed laboratory would be designed to conduct research into combustion devices related to waste management and environmental restoration that is of importance to industry and government. The proposed facility`s role would be to develop diagnostic instrumentation capabilities in the area of combustion and related processes.

  8. MARKETING PRACTICES AND MARKET CHANNEL UTILIZATION BY MISSISSIPPI SOYBEAN PRODUCERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Darren; JONES, Tom

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines current marketing practices by Mississippi soybean producers as well as willingness to participate in a marketing cooperative and willingness to plant Identity Preserved soybeans. In general, most Mississippi soybean producers utilize cash sales at harvest or forward contracting as primary marketing tools. Use of futures and options is found to increase with farm size. Willingness to participate in a marketing cooperative (pool) is found to be effected by use of cash sales...

  9. 78 FR 20889 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 158-Vicksburg/Jackson, Mississippi; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... Proposed Production Activity; Bauhaus USA, Inc.; (Upholstered Furniture); Saltillo, Mississippi The Greater... activity on behalf of Bauhaus USA, Inc. (Bauhaus), located in Saltillo, Mississippi. The notification...

  10. Determination of the Economic Viability & Technical Feasibility of Commercial Jatropha Curcas Production for Generation of Jatropha oil as Bio-Fuel Feedstock from Wasteland: Final Technical Report on Life Cycle Impact Assessment of Jatropha Cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arup [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States); Chikara, Jitendra [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States); Wheeler, Candace [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Ever since it was demonstrated that Jatropha seed oil could be converted into a world class biodiesel and could run in unmodified stationary and mobile diesel engines with simultaneous reduction in emissions, it caught the attention of the world. The capability to grow this crop on wastelands added to its attractiveness. However, the single biggest challenge came in the form of the availability of adequate feed stock in the form of the Jatropha fruit. Adequacy of feed stock can only be possible if large plantations are cultivated and produce enough fruit. The people, world over, jumped into Jatropha cultivation without heeding to the need to first ensure quality germplasm and understand the agronomic requirements of the plants. As a result many plantations failed to give the required yield. CSIR-CSMCRI had been researching Jatropha and had an end-to-end approach, i.e., it developed the best technology to prepare biodiesel and also worked towards the practical problems that it envisaged to be important for raising Jatropha productivity. It focused only on cultivation on wastelands as this was the only practical strategy, given the limited arable land India has and the risk of food security for the burgeoning population. While working in this direction, the Institute zeroed-in on a few germplasm, which gave consistently higher seed yield over several years. These germplasm were clonally propagated in large numbers to be raised in experimental plantations at different geographical locations in India. Many agronomic practices were developed as a part of these different projects. It was at this juncture that General Motors and the U.S. Department of Energy joined hands with CSIR-CSMCRI to further the work on Jatropha. A center of expertise for Jatropha was established and work was initiated to further refine the understanding regarding the best practices. Efforts were to be made to generate primary data, hitherto unavailable for wastelands, on which life cycle

  11. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  12. Turnover Rates of Fall Migrating Pectoral Sandpipers Through the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MA V) is the historic alluvial floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River. Most of the MAV is located in Arkansas, Louisiana, and...

  13. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  14. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Mississippi. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Mississippi.

  15. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  16. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  17. 77 FR 59166 - South Mississippi Electric Cooperative: Plant Ratcliffe, Kemper County Integrated Gasification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service South Mississippi Electric Cooperative: Plant Ratcliffe, Kemper County... Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Facility located in Kemper County, Mississippi (the Project)....

  18. 78 FR 49255 - Foreign-Trade Zone 158-Vicksburg/Jackson, Mississippi; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Furniture); Belden, Saltillo, and Verona, Mississippi On February 28, 2013, the Greater Mississippi Foreign... Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Lane Furniture Industries, Inc., in Belden, Saltillo, and...

  19. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  20. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  1. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  2. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  3. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  4. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  5. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  6. Mississippi – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Mississippi has no current or pending state or local statutes recognizing sexual orientation or gender identity as protected classes of citizens. More generally, Mississippi is not welcoming socially or in its laws to LGBT people. Mississippi custody courts consider homosexuality negatively in determining custody disputes. In 2001, Mississippi banned adoption by same-sex couples. In 2004, eighty-six percent (86%) of Mississippians voted in favor of an amendment to the state constitution banni...

  7. Mississippi – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Mississippi has no current or pending state or local statutes recognizing sexual orientation or gender identity as protected classes of citizens. More generally, Mississippi is not welcoming socially or in its laws to LGBT people. Mississippi custody courts consider homosexuality negatively in determining custody disputes. In 2001, Mississippi banned adoption by same-sex couples. In 2004, eighty-six percent (86%) of Mississippians voted in favor of an amendment to the state constitution banni...

  8. Final Report on the Mississippi Project CLEAR Voice Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Barnett; Fuller, Ed

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the state of Mississippi conducted a web-based survey of all school-based licensed educators in which they were asked to share their perceptions of the state of teacher working conditions in Mississippi. This report of the Mississippi Teacher Working Conditions Survey, Project CLEAR Voice (Cultivate Learning Environments to Accelerate…

  9. 75 FR 81125 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Crescent Railroad Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 481.4, at Rock Island... Railroad Drawbridge, across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 481.4, at Rock Island, Illinois to open...

  10. 33 CFR 223.1 - Mississippi River Water Control Management Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., responsibilities and authority of the Mississippi River Water Control Management Board. (b) Applicability. This...) Composition. The Mississippi River Water Control Management Board is a continuing board consisting of the... improving inter-divisional coordination of water control management activities within the Mississippi...

  11. Use of NASA Satellite Data in Aiding Mississippi Barrier Island Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Spruce, Joseph; Kalcic, Maria; Fletcher, Rose

    2009-01-01

    This presentation discusses a NASA Stennis Space Center project in which NASA-supported satellite and aerial data is being used to aid state and federal agencies in restoring the Mississippi barrier islands. Led by the Applied Science and Technology Project Office (ASTPO), this project will produce geospatial information products from multiple NASA-supported data sources, including Landsat, ASTER, and MODIS satellite data as well as ATLAS multispectral, CAMS multispectral, AVIRIS hyperspectral, EAARL, and other aerial data. Project objectives include the development and testing of a regional sediment transport model and the monitoring of barrier island restoration efforts through remote sensing. Barrier islands provide invaluable benefits to the State of Mississippi, including buffering the mainland from storm surge impacts, providing habitats for valuable wildlife and fisheries habitat, offering accessible recreational opportunities, and preserving natural environments for educating the public about coastal ecosystems and cultural resources. Unfortunately, these highly valued natural areas are prone to damage from hurricanes. For example, Hurricane Camille in 1969 split Ship Island into East and West Ship Island. Hurricane Georges in 1998 caused additional land loss for the two Ship Islands. More recently, Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike impacted the Mississippi barrier islands. In particular, Hurricane Katrina caused major damage to island vegetation and landforms, killing island forest overstories, overwashing entire islands, and causing widespread erosion. In response, multiple state and federal agencies are working to restore damaged components of these barrier islands. Much of this work is being implemented through federally funded Coastal Impact Assessment and Mississippi Coastal Improvement programs. One restoration component involves the reestablishment of the island footprints to that in 1969. Our project will employ NASA remote sensing

  12. Use of NASA Satellite Data in Aiding Mississippi Barrier Island Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Spruce, Joseph; Kalcic, Maria; Fletcher, Rose

    2009-01-01

    This presentation discusses a NASA Stennis Space Center project in which NASA-supported satellite and aerial data is being used to aid state and federal agencies in restoring the Mississippi barrier islands. Led by the Applied Science and Technology Project Office (ASTPO), this project will produce geospatial information products from multiple NASA-supported data sources, including Landsat, ASTER, and MODIS satellite data as well as ATLAS multispectral, CAMS multispectral, AVIRIS hyperspectral, EAARL, and other aerial data. Project objectives include the development and testing of a regional sediment transport model and the monitoring of barrier island restoration efforts through remote sensing. Barrier islands provide invaluable benefits to the State of Mississippi, including buffering the mainland from storm surge impacts, providing habitats for valuable wildlife and fisheries habitat, offering accessible recreational opportunities, and preserving natural environments for educating the public about coastal ecosystems and cultural resources. Unfortunately, these highly valued natural areas are prone to damage from hurricanes. For example, Hurricane Camille in 1969 split Ship Island into East and West Ship Island. Hurricane Georges in 1998 caused additional land loss for the two Ship Islands. More recently, Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike impacted the Mississippi barrier islands. In particular, Hurricane Katrina caused major damage to island vegetation and landforms, killing island forest overstories, overwashing entire islands, and causing widespread erosion. In response, multiple state and federal agencies are working to restore damaged components of these barrier islands. Much of this work is being implemented through federally funded Coastal Impact Assessment and Mississippi Coastal Improvement programs. One restoration component involves the reestablishment of the island footprints to that in 1969. Our project will employ NASA remote sensing

  13. Tulane/Xavier University hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, January 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-02

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Summaries which describe objectives, goals, and accomplishments are included on ten collaborative cluster projects, two education projects, and six initiation projects. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Hypoxia Adjacent to the Mississippi River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabalais, N. N.; Turner, R. E.

    2005-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico receives the freshwater and constituent flux from the Mississippi River, which integrates 40% of the lower 48 United States. In the last half of the 20th century, the flux of nitrogen tripled, phosphorus concentration appears to have increased, and silicate concentration decreased. These changes result from landscape alterations over two centuries with an intensification of human activities that increased the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus particularly in the 1960s to 1980s. Evidence for eutrophication in the coastal ecosystem includes an increase in algal biomass, carbon accumulation from nutrient-enhanced production, worsening oxygen deficiency in the lower water column, and shifts in food web structure. The extent of the oxygen deficiency reaches 20,000 km2 of the inner continental shelf over long periods in summer with the potential for affecting commercially important fisheries in the Gulf. There is daily, weekly and seasonal variability in currents and stratification on the shelf and, therefore, no simple description of the couplings between nutrient delivery, carbon production in surface waters and delivery to and cycling in bottom waters. There are, however, multiple lines of evidence to implicate changes in riverine nutrient loads with overall primary and secondary production, carbon accumulation at the seabed, and low oxygen conditions on the shelf. The change in nutrient loads and responses of the northern Gulf coastal ecosystem, including widespread, severe seasonal hypoxia, parallel similar conditions in the coastal ocean on a global scale.

  15. Glyphosate-Resistant Goosegrass from Mississippi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Nandula

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A suspected glyphosate-resistant goosegrass [Eleusine indica (L. Gaertn.] population, found in Washington County, Mississippi, was studied to determine the level of resistance and whether the resistance was due to a point mutation, as was previously identified in a Malaysian population. Whole plant dose response assays indicated a two- to four-fold increase in resistance to glyphosate. Leaf disc bioassays based on a glyphosate-dependent increase in shikimate levels indicated a five- to eight-fold increase in resistance. Sequence comparisons of messenger RNA for epsps, the gene encoding the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, from resistant and sensitive goosegrass, revealed a cytosine to thymine nucleotide change at position 319 in the resistant accessions. This single nucleotide polymorphism causes a proline to serine amino acid substitution at position 106 in 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase. A real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using DNA probes specific for the nucleotide change at position 319 was developed to detect this polymorphism. Goosegrass from 42 locations were screened, and the results indicated that glyphosate-resistant goosegrass remained localized to where it was discovered. Pendimethalin, s-metolachlor, clethodim, paraquat and fluazifop controlled resistant goosegrass 93% to 100%, indicating that several control options for glyphosate-resistant goosegrass are available.

  16. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes the 2011 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site1). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

  17. Future reservoir management under climate change for the Mississippi River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asnaashari, Ahmad; Gharabaghi, Bahram; McBean, Edward A. [University of Guelph, Guelph, (Canada); Kunjikutty, Sobhalatha; Lehman, Paul [Mississipi Valley Conservation, Lanark, (Canada); Wade, Winston [British Columbia Office, Vancouver, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper is part of an ongoing research project designed to evaluate the effect of climate change on reservoir operation policies in the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority. The study used the results from a first paper, including projected daily temperature and precipitation, for future streamflow calculation. This paper presented the development, calibration and validation of a rainfall-runoff NAM model for the Mississippi River watershed. The calibrated Mike11/NAM model was fed with predicted climatic data to generate long term future streamflow in the basin. Forecast flows were run in a Mike 11/HD model to estimate the corresponding lake levels. The storages and flows at Shabomeka Lake, Mazinaw Lake and Marble Lake were simulated. The results showed that climate change is likely to have implications for reservoir operations in the Mississippi River watershed, which will include changed water level regimes due to modifications in the projected future streamflow hydrograph to meet desired lake levels.

  18. Adsorptive removal of cesium using bio fuel extraction microalgal waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi, E-mail: inoue@elechem.chem.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, Honjo 1, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Gurung, Manju [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, Honjo 1, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL, Canada A1B 3X5 (Canada); Adhikari, Birendra Babu; Alam, Shafiq [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL, Canada A1B 3X5 (Canada); Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, Honjo 1, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Kurata, Minoru [Research Laboratories, DENSO CORPORATION, Minamiyama 500-1, Komenoki, Nisshin, Aichi 470-0111 (Japan); Atsumi, Kinya [New Business Promotion Dept., DENSO CORPORATION, Showa-cho 1-1, Kariya, Aichi 448-8661 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A novel biosorbent was prepared from the microalgal waste after biofuel extraction. • Higher selectivity and adsorption efficiency of the adsorbent for Cs{sup +} over Na{sup +} ions from aqueous solutions. • Potential candidate and eco-friendly alternative to the commercial resins such as zeolite. - Abstract: An adsorption gel was prepared from microalgal waste after extracting biodiesel oil by a simple chemical treatment of crosslinking using concentrated sulfuric acid. The adsorbent exhibited notably high selectivity and adsorption capacity towards Cs{sup +} over Na{sup +} from aqueous solutions, within the pH range of slightly acidic to neutral. The adsorption followed Langmuir isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacity of the gel for Cs{sup +} calculated from Langmuir model was found to be 1.36 mol kg{sup −1}. Trace concentration of Cs{sup +} ions present in aqueous streams was successfully separated from Na{sup +} ions using a column packed with the adsorbent at pH 6.5. The adsorption capacity of the gel towards Cs{sup +} in column operation was 0.13 mol kg{sup −1}. Although the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions were easily eluted using 1 M hydrochloric acid solution, simple incineration is proposed as an alternative for the treatment of adsorbent loaded with radioactive Cs{sup +} ions due to the combustible characteristics of this adsorbent.

  19. Bifunctional Nanostructured Base Catalysts: Opportunities for BioFuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, William

    2010-12-30

    ABSTRACT This research studied and develop novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We will focus on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts formed by two techniques: from (mixed) metal-oxide bases and by nitrogen substitution for oxygen in zeolites. These catalysts will be compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, catalytic fast pyrolysis, and transesterification reactions. These reactions are important in processes that are currently being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and will be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we have studied the aldol-condensation of acetone with furfural over oxides and zeolites, the conversion of sugars by rapid pyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our previous research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen-substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  20. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James O' Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

  1. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James O' Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

  2. Water resources investigations in Mississippi, 1984-85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamonds, A.G.; Moss, Carol

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the Water Resources Division in Mississippi. It summarizes progress made in water-resources investigations and related activities in the current fiscal year ending September 30, 1984, and outlines the work to be accomplished during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1985. Its specific purpose is to inform cooperating State, local, and other Federal agencies about all activities of this Division in water investigations in Mississippi and to give those cooperators a better understanding of how their participation fits into the total USGS program of water resources investigations. (USGS)

  3. 1989 and 2010/11 Aquatic Areas Data: Mississippi River Navigation Pools 4, 8, 13, 26, Open River Section 2, and the Illinois River’s La Grange Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhser, Janis; DeJager, Nathan R.; Rogala, James T.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS). Aerial images of Pools 1-13 Upper Mississippi River System and Pools, Alton-Marseilles, Illinois River were collected in color infrared (CIR) in August of 2010 at 8”/pixel and 16”/pixel respectively using a mapping-grade Applanix DSS 439 digital aerial camera. In August 2011, CIR aerial images of Pools 14-Open River South, Upper Mississippi River and Pools Dresden-Lockport, Illinois River were collected at 16”/pixel with the same camera. The CIR aerial images were interpreted and automated using a 31-class LTRMP vegetation classification. These data have been used to create a variety of products, one of which is a data set used to classify aquatic areas. The 2010/11 aquatic areas data sets were created by first generalizing the available land cover/use data into a land/water data set, then reinterpreting the areas classified as water to determine the type of aquatic area. Area coverage for this data set is the Upper Mississippi River between Minneapolis, MN and Cairo, IL, and the Illinois River from its confluence with the Mississippi to Joliet, IL.

  4. Strategies for achieving healthy energy balance among African Americans in the Mississippi Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Groesbeck P; Scarinci, Isabel C

    2007-10-01

    Low-income African Americans who live in rural areas of the Deep South are particularly vulnerable to diseases associated with unhealthy energy imbalance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has suggested various physical activity strategies to achieve healthy energy balance. Our objective was to conduct formal, open-ended discussions with low-income African Americans in the Mississippi Delta to determine 1) their dietary habits and physical activity levels, 2) their attitudes toward CDC's suggested physical activity strategies, and 3) their suggestions on how to achieve CDC's strategies within their own environment. A qualitative method (focus groups) was used to conduct the study during 2005. Prestudy meetings were held with African American lay health workers to formulate a focus group topic guide, establish inclusion criteria for focus group participants, select meeting sites and times, and determine group segmentation guidelines. Focus groups were divided into two phases. All discussions and focus group meetings were held in community centers within African American neighborhoods in the Mississippi Delta and were led by trained African American moderators. Phase I focus groups identified the following themes: overeating, low self-esteem, low income, lack of physical exercise, unhealthy methods of food preparation, a poor working definition of healthy energy balance, and superficial knowledge of strategies for achieving healthy energy balance. Phase 2 focus groups identified a preference for social support-based strategies for increasing physical activity levels. Energy balance strategies targeting low-income, rural African Americans in the Deep South may be more effective if they emphasize social interaction at the community and family levels and incorporate the concept of community volunteerism.

  5. Strategies for Achieving Healthy Energy Balance Among African Americans in the Mississippi Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groesbeck P. Parham, MD

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionLow-income African Americans who live in rural areas of the Deep South are particularly vulnerable to diseases associated with unhealthy energy imbalance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has suggested various physical activity strategies to achieve healthy energy balance. Our objective was to conduct formal, open-ended discussions with low-income African Americans in the Mississippi Delta to determine 1 their dietary habits and physical activity levels, 2 their attitudes toward CDC’s suggested physical activity strategies, and 3 their suggestions on how to achieve CDC’s strategies within their own environment. MethodsA qualitative method (focus groups was used to conduct the study during 2005. Prestudy meetings were held with African American lay health workers to formulate a focus group topic guide, establish inclusion criteria for focus group participants, select meeting sites and times, and determine group segmentation guidelines. Focus groups were divided into two phases.ResultsAll discussions and focus group meetings were held in community centers within African American neighborhoods in the Mississippi Delta and were led by trained African American moderators. Phase I focus groups identified the following themes: overeating, low self-esteem, low income, lack of physical exercise, unhealthy methods of food preparation, a poor working definition of healthy energy balance, and superficial knowledge of strategies for achieving healthy energy balance. Phase 2 focus groups identified a preference for social support-based strategies for increasing physical activity levels. ConclusionEnergy balance strategies targeting low-income, rural African Americans in the Deep South may be more effective if they emphasize social interaction at the community and family levels and incorporate the concept of community volunteerism.

  6. Mississippi Medical Reserve Corps: Moving Mississippi From Emergency Planning to Response Ready.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lisa C; Fifolt, Matthew; Mercer, Caroline; Pevear, Jesse; Wilson, Jonathan

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that might impact a Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteer's decision to respond to an emergency event. The 2 primary goals of this survey were to (1) establish realistic planning assumptions regarding the use of volunteers in health care emergency responses, and (2) determine whether barriers to volunteer participation could be addressed by MRC units to improve volunteer response rates. An anonymous online survey instrument was made available via Qualtrics through a customized URL. For the purpose of distribution, the Mississippi State Department of Health sent an electronic message that included the survey link to all MRC volunteers who were registered with the Mississippi Responder Management System (MRMS) as of September 2014. Approximately 15% of those surveyed indicated they would be available and able to deploy within 24 hours. The most common factors reported in terms of respondent decisions to deploy included risk to personal health (61.2%), length of deployment (58.8%), and the security of the deployment area (55.3%). In addition, 67% of respondents indicated that extended periods of deployment would have a negative financial impact on their lives. Respondents who have had training or previous deployment experience reported having greater knowledge of potential response roles, increased comfort in their ability to respond with the MRC, and increased confidence in responding to differing public health emergencies. Barriers to MRC volunteers being able to deploy should be addressed by each MRC unit. Issues such as risk to personal safety while on deployment, site security, and length of deployment should be considered by planners and those solutions communicated to MRC members during trainings. Emergency plans utilizing MRC volunteers will require significant evaluation to assess the risk of relying on an expected resource that could be severely limited during an actual emergency.

  7. State of Mississippi Campuses Step Up to the Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Making the right decisions at the right time is critical. Following through on those decisions is challenging and can take courage. One example of a group of institutions and facility management professionals stepping up to the task and having the courage to challenge the status quo is the State of Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning…

  8. Evidence of late glacial runoff in the lower Mississippi Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Roger T.

    Thousands of cubic kilometers of massive coarse-grained glacial outwash underlie the alluvial plain of the Lower Mississippi Valley between Cairo, Illinois, and the Gulf of Mexico. However, valley trains deposited by braided streams characterize less than one-third of the valley area, and those attributable to runoff from the Laurentide Ice Sheet cover less than 15,000 km2, mostly in the St. Francis Basin segment of the valley. There they form a series of subdued terraces that reflect episodes of meltwater release and possibly catastrophic flood events. Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores establish that the initial runoff entered the basin about 16.3 ka BP and continued without a significant lull for about 5000 years. The distribution of archeological sites tends to support an effective brief cessation of runoff to the valley about 11.0 ka BP when meltwater is thought to have been diverted from the Mississippi River Valley to the St. Lawrence Valley. Both radiocarbon dates and archeological evidence document a final pulse of outwash to the (Lower) Mississippi Valley about 10.0 ka BP when the Mississippi River occupied Thebes Gap near Cairo and created the Charleston Fan. All outwash deposition ended, and the river adopted a meandering regime not later than 9.8 ka BP.

  9. Geomorphic Mapping Pool 7 - Upper Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-05

    in the conversion of raw organic material to humus , the mixing of organic and inorganic material, the creation of channels, and the vertical...Mississippi River, Quaternary Research 20: 165-176. GALLAGHER, JAMES P., ROLAND RODELL, and KATHERINE STEVENSON , 1982, The 1980-1982 LaCrosse Area

  10. Mississippi's DUI Offender Intervention: 40 Years of Programming and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela A.; Gardner, Sheena; Xu, Xiaohe; Chi, Guangqing; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Mississippi Alcohol Safety Education Program (MASEP) is a court-mandated driving under the influence (DUI) intervention for persons convicted of DUI. This study describes the evolution of the curriculum, evaluates the effectiveness of MASEP in reducing recidivism, and examines whether recent program revisions have led to improvements in…

  11. Water quality monitoring and data collection in the Mississippi sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runner, Michael S.; Creswell, R.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey and the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources are collecting data on the quality of the water in the Mississippi Sound of the Gulf of Mexico, and streamflow data for its tributaries. The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting continuous water-level data, continuous and discrete water-temperature data, continuous and discrete specific-conductance data, as well as chloride and salinity samples at two locations in the Mississippi Sound and three Corps of Engineers tidal gages. Continuous-discharge data are also being collected at two additional stations on tributaries. The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources collects water samples at 169 locations in the Gulf of Mexico. Between 1800 and 2000 samples are collected annually which are analyzed for turbidity and fecal coliform bacteria. The continuous data are made available real-time through the internet and are being used in conjunction with streamflow data, weather data, and sampling data for the monitoring and management of the oyster reefs, the shrimp fishery and other marine species and their habitats.

  12. Obesity and Health Risk of Children in the Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Abigail; Waddell, Dwight; Ford, M. Allison; Bentley, John P.; Woodyard, Catherine D.; Hallam, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mississippi (MS) Delta adults and youth report obesity rates far exceeding those of the state and nation. State law requires in-school physical activity and nutrition practices to address childhood obesity but does not require evaluation of outcomes, specifically the impact on weight-related outcomes. This paper offers 3 things: (1)…

  13. 2009-2010 USACE Vicksburg District Lidar: Mississippi River Delta

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR collected at 1.0 points per square meter (1.0m GSD) for the entire portion of the Mississippi River Delta in the Vicksburg District. This area was flown during...

  14. Forest Management Expenses of Mississippi's Nonindustrial Private Forest Landowners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn G. Arano; Tamara L. Cushing; Ian A. Munn

    2002-01-01

    Detailed information about the forest management expenditures incurred by nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) landowners over time provides a wealth of information about costs associated with forestland ownership, management practices implemented hv NIPF landowners, and changes in management intensity over time. A survey of Mississippi's nonindustrial private...

  15. SIMULATING LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER OUTFLOW AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane Katrina was the direct cause of the flooding of New Orleans in September 2005. Between its passage and the pumping of flood waters back into Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River, the flood waters acquired considerable amounts of contaminants, notably silver, but...

  16. Geologic Controls of Sand Boil Formation at Buck Chute, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Geology ........................................................................................................................... 4 2.3 Description of...18 3.1 Geology of the Lower Mississippi River Valley...Hypothesis Sand boil formation at the Buck Chute site is the result of geology consisting of point bar and abandoned channel deposits with a thin

  17. Emerging leadership from communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Delta NIRI (Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative) team has conducted several research studies in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region employing the community-based participatory research (CBPR) model. Our collaborative work in the LMD focuses on interventions conducted in each of our c...

  18. 76 FR 41555 - Tupelo, Mississippi Railroad Relocation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... Transportation, Environmental Division (87-01), P.O. Box 1850, Jackson, MS 39215-9947. Comments may also be... Thurman, Environmental Division Manager, Mississippi Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 1850, Jackson... copies of the Draft EIS and appendices at the following locations: Tupelo City Hall, 71 East Troy...

  19. 78 FR 54955 - Mississippi Central Railroad Co.-Lease and Change in Operators Exemption-Line of Mississippi...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ...), owned by the Mississippi-Alabama Railroad Authority (MARA). MSCI also proposes to acquire approximately... MARA, the owner of the Line, to permit MSCI to acquire RRC's leasehold interest in the Line, and for..., pursuant to its agreements with RRC and MARA, MSCI will lease, operate, maintain, and perform all...

  20. Biloxi, Mississippi Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  1. Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) Program: Environmental Contaminants and their Effects on Fish in the Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    We collected, examined, and analyzed 1378 fish of 22 species from 47 sites in the Mississippi River basin (MRB) during 1995 and from a reference site in 1996. The sampling sites in the MRB represented National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program (NCBP) stations situated at key points on major rivers and National Water- Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) stations located on lower-order rivers and streams in the Eastern Iowa Basins (EIB) and Mississippi Embayment (MSE) Study Units. The reference site was the water supply system of the USGS-Leetown Science Center in rural Jefferson County, WV. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio; carp) and black basses (Micropterus spp.; bass), the targeted species, together represented 82% of the fish collected. Each fish was examined in the field for externally and internally visible gross lesions, selected organs were weighed to compute various ponderal and organo-somatic indices, and selected tissues and fluids were obtained and preserved for analysis of biomarkers. Fish health indicators included splenic macrophage aggregates, lysozyme activity, and hispathological analysis of liver, kidney, and other tissues. Reproductive biomarkers included analysis of plasma concentrations of vitellogenin (vtg) and the sex steroid hormones 17-estradiol (E2) and 11-ketotestosterone (11- kt); and the histological determination of percent oocyte atresia (in female fish) and gonadal stage. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity was also measured. Composite samples of whole fish from each station were grouped by species and gender and analyzed for persistent organochlorine and elemental contaminants and for dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ) using the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. Organochlorine and inorganic contaminant concentrations in fish were generally low relative to historical levels at most sites, but remained present at concentrations representing threats to piscivorous wildlife in some locations. Toxaphene and DDT (mostly as p

  2. Concentrations and transport of suspended sediment, nutrients, and pesticides in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during the 2011 Mississippi River flood, April through July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Heather L.; Coupe, Richard H.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    High streamflow associated with the April–July 2011 Mississippi River flood forced the simultaneous opening of the three major flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin for the first time in history in order to manage the amount of water moving through the system. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected samples for analysis of field properties, suspended-sediment concentration, particle-size, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and up to 136 pesticides at 11 water-quality stations and 2 flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin from just above the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers downstream from April through July 2011. Monthly fluxes of suspended sediment, suspended sand, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor were estimated at 9 stations and 2 flood-control structures during the flood period. Although concentrations during the 2011 flood were within the range of what has been observed historically, concentrations decreased during peak streamflow on the lower Mississippi River. Prior to the 2011 flood, high concentrations of suspended sediment and nitrate were observed in March 2011 at stations downstream of the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, which probably resulted in a loss of available material for movement during the flood. In addition, the major contributor of streamflow to the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during April and May was the Ohio River, whose water contained lower concentrations of suspended sediment, pesticides, and nutrients than water from the upper Mississippi River. Estimated fluxes for the 4-month flood period were still quite high and contributed approximately 50 percent of the estimated annual suspended sediment, nitrate, and total phosphorus fluxes in 2011; the largest fluxes were estimated at

  3. The shallow stratigraphy and sand resources offshore from Cat Island, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Buster, Noreen A.

    2014-01-01

    In collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center collected over 487 line kilometers (> 300 miles) of high-resolution geophysical data around Cat Island, Mississippi, to improve understanding of the island's geologic evolution and identify potential sand resources for coastal restoration. In addition, 40 vibracores were collected on and around the island, generating more than 350 samples for grain-size analysis. The results indicate that the geologic evolution of Cat Island has been influenced by deltaic, lagoonal/estuarine, tidal, and oceanographic processes, resulting in a stratigraphic record that is quite complex. The region north of the island is dominated by lagoonal/estuarine deposition, whereas the region south of the island is dominated by deltaic and tidal deposition. In general, the veneer of modern sediment surrounding the island is composed of newly deposited sediment and highly reworked relict sediments. The region east of the island shows the interplay of antecedent barrier-island change with delta development despite a significant ravinement of sediments. The data show from little to no modern sediment east of the island, exposing relict sediments at the seafloor. Finally, the data reveal four subaqueous sand units around the island. Two of the units are northwest of the modern island and one is southwest. Given the dominant, westward, longshore transport along the Mississippi and Alabama barrier islands, the geographic location of these three units suggests that they do not contribute to the modern sediment budget of Cat Island. The last unit is directly east of the island and represents the antecedent island platform that has supplied sand over geologic time for creation of the spits that form the eastern shoreline. Because of its location east of the island, the antecedent island unit may still supply sediment to the island today.

  4. Middle Claiborne Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Outcrop and subcrop extent of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee.

  5. 76 FR 12981 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... Warrant Officer David Chapman, Assistant to the DFO of Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory... (RNA); Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, Harvey Canal, Algiers Canal,...

  6. 78 FR 49254 - Foreign-Trade Zone 158-Vicksburg/Jackson, Mississippi; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Production Activity; Extension of Production Authority; Bauhaus USA, Inc. (Upholstered Furniture); Saltillo... Bauhaus USA, Inc., in Saltillo, Mississippi. The notification was processed in accordance with the...

  7. Middle Claiborne Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee. The...

  8. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: • Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? • How much could these areas produce sustainably? • How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? âÂÃÃÂ

  9. Evaluating post-Katrina recovery in Mississippi using repeat photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher; Mitchell, Jerry T; Cutter, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Hurricane Katrina of August 2005 had extensive consequences for the state of Mississippi in the United States. Widespread infrastructure and property damage, massive social dislocation, and ecological loss remain among the many challenges faced by communities as they work towards 'normalcy'. This study employs repeat photography to understand differential recovery from Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi. Revealing change with conventional landscape photography, a process known as repeat photography, is common in the natural sciences. Simply stated, repeat photography is the practice of re-photographing the same scene as it appears in an earlier photograph. Photographs were taken at 131 sites every six months over a three-year period. Each photograph was assigned a recovery score and a spatially interpolated recovery surface was generated for each time period. The mapped and graphed results show disparities in the progression of recovery: some communities quickly entered the rebuilding process whereas others have lagged far behind.

  10. The Environmental Assessment and Management (TEAM) Guide: Mississippi Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Yes 1 Oreoneetes validus A Crayfish Yes 3 Proeambarus ablusus A Crayfish Yes 2 Proeambarus barbiger Jackson Prairie Crayfish Yes Yes 1...recreational area) Pearl River, from the Barnett Reservoir to the City of Jackson Water Intake Tennessee River, from the Mississippi-Alabama state line...Magees Creek Turkey Fork Reservoir Davis Lake Strong River Beaverdam Creek Lake Lamar Bruce Clear Springs Lake Red Creek Lake Lowndes Percy Quinn

  11. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Bushby; Kimberly Woodruff; Jake Shivley

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary u...

  12. Littoral Sediment Budget for the Mississippi Sound Barrier Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    island system originally extended west to the Mississippi mainland shoreline near the Pearl River, marking the seaward limit of subaerial deposition... Pearl Rivers discharge fresh water into the sound at average rates of about 417 and 362 m3/s, respectively (Kjerfve, 1986). However, during floods...1966, the controlling depth was 39.0 feet. 704,210 ARCE, 1967; p. 490 March 26 to April 26, 1968 Contractor’s pipeline dredge Fritz Jahncke

  13. Mississippi River Hydrodynamic and Delta Management Study (MRHDM) - Geomorphic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Biedenharn Group conducted this study from April 2012 to February 2014. The principal investigators for this study were Charlie Little of the ERDC...zero. Parker and Troutman (1989) proposed that the parameter θ2 may have a physically significant interpretation in terms of sediment supply, as...Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lower Mississippi Valley Division. Parker , R., and B. Troutman. 1989. Frequency distribution for

  14. Surface biomass flux across the coastal Mississippi shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Robert; Vandermeulen, Ryan; Donaghay, Percy; Yang, Haoping

    2016-05-01

    The exchange of water masses across the Mississippi shelf was used to determine the chlorophyll flux for an eight month period in 2013 through the major Mississippi River discharge period in Spring and Fall. Circulation models (NCOM and HYCOM) and SNPP satellite chlorophyll products were used to monitor the changes in the shelf transport and surface biological impact. The physical and biological response of cross shelf exchange was observed in rapidly changing dynamic movements of river plumes across the shelf as identified by the models and satellite products. Six sections on the shelf identified exchange corridors of transport and biomass chlorophyll flux of surface waters between the coast and offshore waters. During the eight month period, the nearshore waters show high carbon chlorophyll flux, averaging -60 x103 kg chl extending to offshore waters. However, at the outer shelf break, a significant carbon flux was observed moving shoreward onto the shelf from offshore waters, averaging +100 x103 kg chl, which is attributed to the dynamic Mississippi River plume. Results indicate a significant amount of offshore surface waters containing biological carbon can exchange across the shelf, clearly demonstrated through the combination of biological satellite products and physical models.

  15. Childhood nutrition in the Mississippi Delta: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Virginia B; Byrd, Sylvia H; Fountain, Brent J; Rader, Nicole E; Frugé, Andrew D

    2016-12-01

    Childhood obesity in the USA has more than tripled in the last three decades, and the prevalence is higher in the Mississippi Delta. Insight into the social, cultural and environmental factors that influence inequity can inform efforts to mediate health disparities. Focus groups (n = 12) among parents/guardians of elementary school children (n = 44) and teachers (n = 59) in the Mississippi Delta were used to investigate barriers and facilitators of healthy eating. Transcriptions were analyzed for themes. A strong preference for junk food among children and the pervasiveness of junk foods in schools and communities were cited as barriers to healthy eating. Potential facilitators of healthy eating included desire to avoid chronic disease, effort to limit junk food consumption and school support. Despite support for efforts to improve nutrition in the Delta, participants voiced a sense of inevitability related to children's consumption of unhealthy foods. This study suggests that parents and teachers express concern related to eating habits of children, yet they experience barriers to healthy eating which contribute to a sense of disempowerment. Improving health in the Mississippi Delta requires comprehensive strategies that offer its citizens a sense of agency. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Mississippi and Louisiana Estuarine Areas. Freshwater Diversion to Lake Pontchartrain Basin and Mississippi Sound. Feasibility Study. Volume 1. Main Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    manateegrass in Lower Laguna Madre , Texas J. Wildl. Manag. 32:501-506 McMillan, Calvin. 1974. Salt tolerance of mangroves and submerged aquatic plants. p. 379...of the diverted freshwater on fish and wildlife populations. 3. The Mississippi River Commission concurs with the District Engineer’s plan with two...a base of natural resources that include commercially important minerals and a variety of fish and wildlife resources. Significant mineral deposits

  17. 78 FR 17643 - Greater Mississippi River Basin Water Management Board; Engineer Regulation No. 15-2-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Department of the Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Greater Mississippi River Basin Water Management Board... Corps Greater Mississippi River Basin Water Management Board. It is applicable to all Corps offices involved with water management within the Greater Mississippi River Basin. The Board consists of the...

  18. Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Larry, E.

    2007-04-30

    The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with

  19. Predictability of surface currents and fronts off the Mississippi Delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, N.D.; Rouse, L.J.; Wiseman, W.J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The dynamic coastal region of the lower Mississippi River was examined under varying conditions of wind, river discharge and circulation patterns of the Gulf of Mexico. Nearly 7,000 deep-sea merchant vessels enter the port complex each year and the area boasts the highest concentration of offshore drilling rigs, rendering the Mississippi delta and adjacent coastal areas vulnerable to risk from oil spills. Satellite imagery has been useful in tracking movements of the Mississippi river plume as recognizable turbidity and temperature fronts are formed where river waters encounter ambient shelf waters. Oil spill modelers often base their predictions of oil movement on the surface wind field and surface currents, but past studies have indicated that this can be overly simplistic in regions affected by river flow because river fronts have significant control over the movement of oil in opposition to prevailing winds. Frontal zones, such as those found where river waters meet oceanic waters, are characterized by strong convergence of surface flow. These frontal zones can provide large and efficient traps or natural booms for spilled oil. In an effort to facilitate cleanup operations, this study made use of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) AVHRR satellite imagery of temperature and reflectance to study front locations and their variability in space and time. The main objectives were to quantify surface temperature structure and locations of fronts throughout the year using satellite image data, to map the structure of the Mississippi sediment plume and to assess the forcing factors responsible for its variability over space and time. The final objective was to use in-situ measurements of surface currents together with satellite image data to better understand surface flow in this region of strong and variable currents. It was concluded that the main factors controlling circulation in the Mississippi River outflow region are river discharge and

  20. SPARROW models used to understand nutrient sources in the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Saad, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) has been linked to hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. To describe where and from what sources those loads originate, SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were constructed for the MARB using geospatial datasets for 2002, including inputs from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and calibration sites throughout the MARB. Previous studies found that highest N and P yields were from the north-central part of the MARB (Corn Belt). Based on the MARB SPARROW models, highest N yields were still from the Corn Belt but centered over Iowa and Indiana, and highest P yields were widely distributed throughout the center of the MARB. Similar to that found in other studies, agricultural inputs were found to be the largest N and P sources throughout most of the MARB: farm fertilizers were the largest N source, whereas farm fertilizers, manure, and urban inputs were dominant P sources. The MARB models enable individual N and P sources to be defined at scales ranging from SPARROW catchments (∼50 km2) to the entire area of the MARB. Inputs of P from WWTPs and urban areas were more important than found in most other studies. Information from this study will help to reduce nutrient loading from the MARB by providing managers with a description of where each of the sources of N and P are most important, thus providing a basis for prioritizing management actions and ultimately reducing the extent of Gulf hypoxia.

  1. Excel Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Citigroup,one of the World top 500 companies,has now settled in Excel Center,Financial Street. The opening ceremony of Excel Center and the entry ceremony of Citigroup in the center were held on March 31.Government leaders of Xicheng District,the Excel CEO and the heads of Asia-Pacific Region leaders of Citibank all participated in the ceremony.

  2. Food Shopping Perceptions, Behaviors And Ability To Purchase Healthy Food Items In The Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: To examine the agreement between perceptions, behaviors and ability to purchase healthy foods in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD). Methods: FOODS 2000, a nutritional survey conducted in 18 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, provided information about dietary intake. A food ...

  3. Development of the Mississippi communities for healthy living nutrition education toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of our study was to develop a nutrition education toolkit for communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) with content that is current, evidence-based, culturally relevant, and user friendly. The Mississippi Communities for Fealthy Living (MCHL), an evidenced-based nutrition educa...

  4. 77 FR 28488 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Hannibal, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Hannibal, MO... Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Hannibal Railroad Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 309.9, at Hannibal, Missouri. The deviation is...

  5. 78 FR 64887 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Hannibal, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Hannibal, MO... Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Hannibal Railroad Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 309.9, at Hannibal, Missouri. The deviation is...

  6. 75 FR 76632 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Hannibal, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Hannibal, MO... of the Hannibal Railroad Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 309.9, at Hannibal.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Norfolk Southern Railroad requested a temporary deviation for the...

  7. High Prevalence of Food Insecurity and Hunger in Households in the Rural Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuff, Janice E.; Horton, Jacqueline A.; Bogle, Margaret L.; Connell, Carol; Ryan, Donna; Zaghloul, Sahar; Thornton, Alma; Simpson, Pippa; Gossett, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Residents of the Lower Mississippi Delta of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi are at risk for food insecurity since a high proportion of the population live in households with incomes below the poverty level and have reduced access to food and decreased availability of a variety of foods. However, the magnitude of the problem is unknown because…

  8. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    This report summarizes the 2012 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. A revised plan is in preparation. The Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site is intended for release in 2013. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi The State of Mississippi owns the surface real estate subject to certain restrictions related to subsurface penetration. The State is the surface operator; the Mississippi Forestry Commission is its agent. The federal government owns the subsurface real estate (including minerals and some surface features), shares right-of-entry easements with the State, and retains rights related to subsurface monitoring. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, is responsible for the long-term surveillance of the subsurface real estate

  9. 78 FR 15292 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge, across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois....

  10. 75 FR 22228 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, Mile 482.9, Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad Cities Marathon to cross the...

  11. 78 FR 16411 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island,...

  12. 76 FR 9224 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad Cities Heart Walk to cross...

  13. 75 FR 68974 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the bridge owner time to...

  14. 76 FR 9223 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad City Marathon to cross...

  15. 77 FR 20716 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad Cities Live Uncommon Walk...

  16. 78 FR 79312 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island,...

  17. 78 FR 21537 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island,...

  18. 78 FR 18933 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island,...

  19. 78 FR 69995 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island,...

  20. 75 FR 17561 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operations of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, Mile 482.9, Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad Cities Heart Walkers to cross...

  1. 40 CFR 81.122 - Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.122 Section 81.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.122 Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  2. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.62 Section 81.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  3. Graduate trainee fellowships for energy research in Mississippi. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR Project has been a program of education and research which has (1) increased the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field and (2) interfaced with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities. Key project activities that have been accomplished are shown below: (1) Statewide conference on energy related research held; (2) HBCU pipeline issue addressed; (3) Research preceptors/problems selected; (4) Trainees screened and accepted; (5) Research initiated; and (6) Practicums organized. Mississippi`s three comprehensive universities -- The University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, and the University of Southern Mississippi -- and the urban institution, Jackson State University have provided a foundation for the expansion of energy-related education and research in the state. The activities of the Mississippi DOE EPSCoR program have been executed under a management strategy developed to establish statewide coordination of research and education programs, i.e., the Mississippi Research Consortium. The Consortium has served as the steering committee for the DOE EPSCoR Program Consortium.

  4. Wetland Management Reduces Sediment and Nutrient Loading to the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restored riparian wetlands in the Upper Mississippi River basin have the potential to remove sediment and nutrients from tributaries before they flow into the Mississippi River. For 3 yr we calculated retention efficiencies of a marsh complex, which consisted of a restored marsh...

  5. Perceptions of Factors Influencing Healthful Food Consumption Behavior in the Lower Mississippi Delta: Focus Group Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Bernestine B.; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda S.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Yadrick, Kathleen; Ndirangu, Murugi; Goolsby, Susan; Watkins, Debra; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hyman, Edith; Stigger, Flavelia; Bogle, Margaret L.; Kramer, Tim R.; Strickland, Earline; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify perceptions of Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) residents regarding factors that influence a change in healthful food consumption behavior to assist in planning sustainable nutrition interventions in the LMD. Design: Nine focus groups were conducted with LMD residents in 9 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. One…

  6. The Production, Communication, and Contestation of Physical Education Policy: The Cases of Mississippi and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Ben; Wright, Paul M.; Amis, John; Ferry, Hugh; Vardaman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the production, communication, interpretation and contestation of new physical education (PE) and physical activity (PA) policy initiatives introduced in Mississippi and Tennessee for the academic year 2006-2007. These states provide a relevant context to study such issues, since Mississippi has the highest…

  7. Community and academia partnerships: a description of the lower mississippi delta nutrition intervention research initiative project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi is among the poorest and most disadvantaged areas of the United States. The diets of the people in the LMD are high in fat, and consumption of fruits and vegetables is low. Chronic conditions such as hypertension, cardi...

  8. Perceptions of Factors Influencing Healthful Food Consumption Behavior in the Lower Mississippi Delta: Focus Group Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Bernestine B.; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda S.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Yadrick, Kathleen; Ndirangu, Murugi; Goolsby, Susan; Watkins, Debra; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hyman, Edith; Stigger, Flavelia; Bogle, Margaret L.; Kramer, Tim R.; Strickland, Earline; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify perceptions of Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) residents regarding factors that influence a change in healthful food consumption behavior to assist in planning sustainable nutrition interventions in the LMD. Design: Nine focus groups were conducted with LMD residents in 9 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. One…

  9. Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Mississippi

    OpenAIRE

    Mallory, Christy; Sears, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 34,800 LGBT workers in Mississippi are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or local laws. Discrimination against LGBT employees has been documented in surveys, media reports, and court cases. Many corporate employers and public opinion in Mississippi support protections for LGBT people in the workplace. 

  10. 77 FR 2289 - FFP Project 33, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 33, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice... filed by FFP Project 33, LLC for Project No. 12924- 002, and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC...

  11. 77 FR 2289 - FFP Project 41, LLC, Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 41, LLC, Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., in Tunica County, Mississippi, and Lee County, Arkansas. The applications were filed by FFP...

  12. 77 FR 2287 - FFP Project 32, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 32, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., in Tensas Parish, Louisiana, and Jefferson County Mississippi. The applications were filed by...

  13. 77 FR 2288 - FFP Project 7, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 7, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice... by FFP Project 7, LLC for Project No. 12851-002, and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC...

  14. 77 FR 25715 - Mississippi 8 Hydro, LLC; FFP Project 98, LLC, ; Notice Announcing Filing Priority for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Mississippi 8 Hydro, LLC; FFP Project 98, LLC, ; Notice Announcing Filing... priority is as follows: 1. Mississippi 8 Hydro, LLC--Project No. 13010-002. 2. FFP Project 98,...

  15. 77 FR 2289 - FFP Project 39, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 39, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., in Bolivar County, Mississippi, and Desha County, Arkansas. The applications were filed by...

  16. 77 FR 2287 - FFP Project 40, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 40, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice... applications were filed by FFP Project 40, LLC for Project No. 12929-002, and Northland Power Mississippi...

  17. An Assessment of Campus Police Departments across Mississippi's Public Community and Junior Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Brad D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide an assessment of campus police departments throughout the 15 public community and junior colleges in Mississippi. This research could provide Mississippi community and junior college administrators the opportunity to observe and appraise the overall safety of their respective campuses in comparison to safety…

  18. An Investigation of the Perception of Professional Development among Mississippi's Secondary Welding Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Douglas Forrest

    2012-01-01

    This research study originated as a result of a paucity of information available regarding how secondary welding teachers in Mississippi perceive the value of professional development they have received within the previous two years. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of Mississippi's secondary welding teachers regarding how…

  19. 77 FR 55219 - Mississippi; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Mississippi; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Mississippi (FEMA-4081-DR), dated August 29,...

  20. 78 FR 14320 - Mississippi; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Mississippi; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Mississippi (FEMA-4101-DR), dated February...

  1. Deep-sea coral record of human impact on watershed quality in the Mississippi River Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prouty, N.G.; Roark, E.B.; Koenig, A.E.; Demopoulos, A.W.J.; Batista, F.C.; Kocar, B.D.; Selby, D.; McCarthy, M.D.; Mienis, F.

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest drivers of historical nutrient and sediment transport into the Gulf of Mexico is the unprecedented scale and intensity of land use change in the Mississippi River Basin. These landscape changes are linked to enhanced fluxes of carbon and nitrogen pollution from the Mississippi Ri

  2. What Works? Process Evaluation of a School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Distribution Program in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Susan C.; Schneider, Doris; Coyle, Karin K.; May, Gary; Robin, Leah; Seymour, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    Background: During the 2004-2005 school year, the Mississippi Department of Education, Office of Child Nutrition, initiated a pilot program to distribute free fruit and vegetable snacks to students during the school day. This article describes the first-year implementation of the Mississippi Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Program. Methods: The process…

  3. 76 FR 41195 - National Forests In Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Forest Service National Forests In Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee... National Forests Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Starkville, MS. The committee is meeting as... Forest Resources, Tulley Auditorium, Thompson Hall, 775 Stone Blvd., Mississippi State, MS, 39762-9690...

  4. 76 FR 41196 - National Forests in Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Forest Service National Forests in Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee... National Forests Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Starkville, MS. The committee is meeting as... Forest Resources, Tulley Auditorium, Thompson Hall, 775 Stone Blvd., Mississippi State, MS 39762-9690...

  5. First Encounters: Native Americans and Europeans in the Mississippi Valley. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, George, III; Restrepo, Luis Fernando; Jones, Linda

    This CD-ROM provides interactive, multimedia software that enables students to investigate many aspects of Native American and European encounters in the Mississippi Valley through study of original historical sources, including texts, maps, artworks, and archaeological finds. The Lower Mississippi Valley was chosen as the study area because of…

  6. 77 FR 3607 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad Cities Heart Walk to cross...

  7. 77 FR 5398 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island... operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad City Marathon to cross...

  8. Organizational culture of Mississippi hospitals as perceived by laboratory professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    From 2006 through 2008, patient safety events cost the Medicare program $8.9 billion and were associated with 99,180 hospital deaths. Of the $2.5 trillion spent on healthcare in 2009, 2.3% or $57.5 million was spent on laboratory costs. Reduction of laboratory-associated errors to 3.4 errors per 1 million tests could save money and lives. The organizational culture of a facility has an impact on quality improvement implementation. Clinical laboratories in Mississippi were surveyed to determine the predominant culture type as perceived by the medical laboratory professionals. Of the 1200 surveys mailed to 90 facilities, 272 were returned complete. It was determined that although the individual participant return rate was 28.6%, 49 of the 90 hospitals or 54.4% of the Mississippi facilities were represented through one or more individual participant responses. The culture scores revealed the following distribution for the individual respondents: group/clan culture scores were predominant for 106 (39.0%), hierarchical culture scores for 94 (34.6%), rational/market culture scores for 36 (13.2%), and developmental/adhocratic culture scores for 24 (8.8%) of the individual respondents. The remaining 12 (4.4%) individuals reported blended or codominant culture scores with 50% claiming a group/clan and hierarchical split. The consolidation of the data to represent the 49 healthcare institutions revealed a different distribution, with 24 (49%) as hierarchical culture, 22 (44.9%) as group/clan culture, and 3 (6.1%) as rational/market culture. Mississippi hospital data parallels previous findings with either hierarchical or group being the predominant organizational culture.

  9. Absence of avian pox in wild turkeys in central Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvillion, C E; Stacey, L M; Hurst, G A

    1991-07-01

    Eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) (n = 1,023), obtained during winter, spring, and summer from 1983 to 1988 on Tallahala Wildlife Management Area (TWMA) (Jasper County, Mississippi, USA) were examined for avian pox lesions. Domestic turkey poults (n = 152) maintained on the area for 1 to 2 wk periods from 1987 to 1989 also were examined. Neither wild nor domestic birds showed gross evidence of pox virus infection. This study indicated that avian pox was not endemic in wild turkeys at TWMA.

  10. Isoetes mississippiensis: A new quillwort from Mississippi, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Schafran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Isoetes mississippiensis S.W. Leonard, W.C. Taylor, L.J. Musselman and R.D. Bray (Isoetaceae, Lycopodiophyta is a new species known from two sites along tributaries of the Pearl River in southern Mississippi. This species is distinguished from other species in the southeastern United States by a combination of character states including a basic diploid (2n=22 chromosome count, laevigate megaspores, and a narrow velum covering less than one-third of the adaxial sporangium wall.

  11. Isoetes mississippiensis: A new quillwort from Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafran, Peter W.; Leonard, Steven W.; Bray, Rebecca D.; Taylor, W. Carl; Musselman, Lytton J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isoetes mississippiensis S.W. Leonard, W.C. Taylor, L.J. Musselman and R.D. Bray (Isoetaceae, Lycopodiophyta) is a new species known from two sites along tributaries of the Pearl River in southern Mississippi. This species is distinguished from other species in the southeastern United States by a combination of character states including a basic diploid (2n=22) chromosome count, laevigate megaspores, and a narrow velum covering less than one-third of the adaxial sporangium wall. PMID:28127238

  12. The Contested Terrain of Historical Memory in Contemporary Mississippi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Elizabeth WOODRUFF

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Depuis quelque temps, des habitants du Mississippi, noirs et blancs, tentent d’affronter leur passé, et ce de diverses manières : en formant des coalitions interraciales dans des communautés qui ont été le cadre de crimes abominables ; en organisant des débats publics autour de symboles liés à l’esclavage, la guerre de Sécession et le mouvement des droits civiques ; en tentant de faire rouvrir des affaires de meurtres commis pendant le mouvement des droits civiques ; en oeuvrant pour modifier les programmes d’histoire dans les écoles publiques. Les conflits autour de l’histoire et de la mémoire du Mississippi reflètent des interprétations divergentes du passé, qui dépendent en grande partie de l’appartenance raciale. Dans le Mississippi, nombre des blancs qui souhaitent que soit reconnue l’histoire du mouvement des droits civiques ont encore du mal à établir le lien entre cette période et certaines interprétations de l’esclavage et de la guerre de Sécession. Il leur faut encore comprendre que la prise de conscience de l’histoire de la ségrégation et de la résistance blanche au mouvement des droits civiques appelle une lecture de l’esclavage et de la guerre de Sécession radicalement différente de celle qui prévaut encore.Recently, black and white Mississippians have sought to confront and redress their history by forming interracial coalitions in communities where horrendous crimes occurred; by holding public debates over historical symbols surrounding the Confederacy, slavery, and civil rights; by attempting to reopen old civil rights murder cases; and by working to change the history curriculum in the public schools. The contemporary struggles over memory and history in Mississippi reflect conflicting black and white interpretations of the past. Many white Mississippians interested in acknowledging the history of the civil rights movement have yet to link that history with interpretations of slavery

  13. Test Facilities Capability Handbook: Volume 1 - Stennis Space Center (SSC); Volume 2 - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensarling, Paula L.

    2007-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the Department of Defense, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain its completeness and accuracy.

  14. Distribution center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Distribution center is a logistics link fulfill physical distribution as its main functionGenerally speaking, it's a large and hiahly automated center destined to receive goods from various plants and suppliers,take orders,fill them efficiently,and deliver goods to customers as quickly as possible.

  15. Evaluating the influence of source basins on downstream water quality in the Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G.M.; Broshears, R.E.; Hooper, R.P.; Goolsby, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Chemical variability in the Mississippi River during water years 1989 to 1998 was evaluated using stream discharge and water-quality data in conjunction with the DAFLOW/BLTM hydraulic model. Model simulations were used to identify subbasin contributions of water and chemical constituents to the Mississippi River upstream from its confluence with the Ohio and the Mississippi River and at the Atchafalaya Diversion in Louisiana. Concentrations of dissolved solids, sodium, and sulfate at the Thebes site showed a general decreasing trend, and concentrations of silica and nitrate showed a general increasing trend as the percentage of discharge from the Mississippi River upstream from Grafton increased. Concentrations of most chemical constituents in the Mississippi River at the Atchafalaya Diversion exhibited a decreasing trend as the percentage of water from the Ohio River increased. Regression models were used to evaluate the importance of the source of water to the water chemistry in the Mississippi River at Thebes and the Atchafalaya Diversion. The addition of terms in regression equations to account for the percent of water from subbasins improved coefficients of determination for predicting chemical concentrations by as much as nine percent at the Thebes site and by as much as 48 percent at the Atchafalaya Diversion site. The addition of source-water terms to regression equations increased the estimated annual loads of nitrate and silica delivered from the Mississippi River Basin to the Gulf of Mexico by as much as 14 and 13 percent, respectively.

  16. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in 2010 from Cat Island, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, Noreen A.; Pfeiffer, William R.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Wiese, Dana S.; Reynolds, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC), in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), conducted geophysical and sedimentological surveys around Cat Island, the westernmost island in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier island chain (fig. 1). The objectives of the study were to understand the geologic evolution of Cat Island relative to other barrier islands in the northern Gulf of Mexico and to identify relationships between the geologic history, present day morphology, and sediment distribution. This report contains data from the bathymetry and side-scan sonar portion of the study collected during two geophysical cruises. Interferometric swath bathymetry and side-scan sonar data were collected aboard the RV G.K. Gilbert September 7-15, 2010. Single-beam bathymetry was collected in shallow water around the island (< 2 meter (m)) from the RV Streeterville from September 28 to October 2, 2010, to cover the data gap between the landward limit of the previous cruise and the shoreline. This report serves as an archive of processed interferometric swath and single-beam bathymetry and side scan sonar data. GIS data products include a 50-m cell size interpolated gridded bathymetry surface, trackline maps, and an acoustic side-scan sonar image. Additional files include error analysis maps, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FDGC) metadata.

  17. Efficient retention of mud drives land building on the Mississippi Delta plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Christopher R.; Shen, Zhixiong; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.; Marshak, Jonathan; White, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Many of the world's deltas - home to major population centers - are rapidly degrading due to reduced sediment supply, making these systems less resilient to increasing rates of relative sea-level rise. The Mississippi Delta faces some of the highest rates of wetland loss in the world. As a result, multibillion dollar plans for coastal restoration by means of river diversions are currently nearing implementation. River diversions aim to bring sediment back to the presently sediment-starved delta plain. Within this context, sediment retention efficiency (SRE) is a critical parameter because it dictates the effectiveness of river diversions. Several recent studies have focused on land building along the open coast, showing SREs ranging from 5 to 30 %. Here we measure the SRE of a large relict crevasse splay in an inland, vegetated setting that serves as an appropriate model for river diversions. By comparing the mass fraction of sand in the splay deposit to the estimated sand fraction that entered it during its life cycle, we find that this mud-dominated sediment body has an SRE of ≥ 75 %, i.e., dramatically higher than its counterparts on the open coast. Our results show that transport pathways for mud are critical for delta evolution and that SRE is highly variable across a delta. We conclude that sediment diversions located in settings that are currently still vegetated are likely to be the most effective in mitigating land loss and providing long-term sustainability.

  18. Large infrequently operated river diversions for Mississippi delta restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John W.; Lane, Robert R.; D'Elia, Christopher F.; Wiegman, Adrian R. H.; Rutherford, Jeffrey S.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Brantley, Christopher G.; Kemp, G. Paul

    2016-12-01

    Currently the Mississippi delta stands as a highly degraded and threatened coastal ecosystem having lost about 25% of coastal wetlands during the 20th century. To address this problem, a 50 billion, 50-year restoration program is underway. A central component of this program is reintroduction of river water back into the deltaic plain to mimic natural functioning of the delta. However, opposition to diversions has developed based on a number of perceived threats. These include over-freshening of coastal estuaries, displacement of fisheries, perceived water quality problems, and assertions that nutrients in river water leads to wetland deterioration. In addition, growing climate impacts and increasing scarcity and cost of energy will make coastal restoration more challenging and limit restoration options. We address these issues in the context of an analysis of natural and artificial diversions, crevasse splays, and small sub-delta lobes. We suggest that episodic large diversions and crevasses (>5000 m3 s-1) can build land quickly while having transient impacts on the estuarine system. Small diversions (water level stress. We use land building rates for different sized diversions and impacts of large periodic inputs of river water to coastal systems in the Mississippi delta to conclude that high discharge diversions operated episodically will lead to rapid coastal restoration and alleviate concerns about diversions. Single diversion events have deposited sediments up to 40 cm in depth over areas up to 130-180 km2. This approach should have broad applicability to deltas globally.

  19. Future Earth Coasts: The Mississippi and Yangtze Rivers as Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, C.; Xu, K.; Chen, Z.; Day, J.; Le Tissier, M.

    2016-02-01

    Deltas and estuaries are productive and fertile links between the land and the sea. Deltas occupy only about 5% of the Earth's surface but sustain over a half billion people all around the world. Many river deltas are endangered because of extensive dam and levee construction, declining sediment supply, groundwater withdrawal, relative sea level rise and severe coastal erosion, leading to a variety of threats to natural, economic and social systems. About 630 million people now live at an elevation of 10 m or less above mean sea level, and maintaining sustainable land with a rising sea will be a challenging problem for many major deltaic coasts and cities in the next century. Stemming from 20 years of LOICZ (Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone), Future Earth Coasts is a new global initiative that seeks to enable the scientific and social scientific communities to build knowledge through collaborative processes to better understand and address the profound and urgent changes occurring in vulnerable coastal zones. The topics of this comparative study are the Mississippi and Yangtze (Changjiang) Rivers, the largest in the United States and China, respectively. We use these two rivers as examples to evaluate current conditions and catalyze future discussion. The Mississippi and Yangtze both have had long-term observations of physical and biological processes that affect human activities, making it possible to quantify both natural and anthropogenic impacts. We also consider the limits to concept of sustainability for the Earth's biosphere and human civilization, and emphasize biophysical constraints and demographic challenges.

  20. Assessment of floodplain vulnerability during extreme Mississippi River flood 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwell, Allison E.; Zhu, Zhenduo; Dutta, Debsunder; Greenberg, Jonathan A.; Kumar, Praveen; Garcia, Marcelo H.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Parker, Gary; Berretta, David P.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Regional change in the variability and magnitude of flooding could be a major consequence of future global climate change. Extreme floods have the capacity to rapidly transform landscapes and expose landscape vulnerabilities through highly variable spatial patterns of inundation, erosion, and deposition. We use the historic activation of the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway during the Mississippi and Ohio River Flooding of 2011 as a scientifically unique stress experiment to analyze indicators of floodplain vulnerability. We use pre- and postflood airborne Light Detection and Ranging data sets to locate erosional and depositional hotspots over the 540 km2 agricultural Floodway. While riparian vegetation between the river and the main levee breach likely prevented widespread deposition, localized scour and deposition occurred near the levee breaches. Eroded gullies nearly 1 km in length were observed at a low ridge of a relict meander scar of the Mississippi River. Our flow modeling and spatial mapping analysis attributes this vulnerability to a combination of erodible soils, flow acceleration associated with legacy fluvial landforms, and a lack of woody vegetation to anchor soil and enhance flow resistance. Results from this study could guide future mitigation and adaptation measures in cases of extreme flooding.

  1. Assessment of floodplain vulnerability during extreme Mississippi River flood 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwell, Allison E; Zhu, Zhenduo; Dutta, Debsunder; Greenberg, Jonathan A; Kumar, Praveen; Garcia, Marcelo H; Rhoads, Bruce L; Holmes, Robert R; Parker, Gary; Berretta, David P; Jacobson, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Regional change in the variability and magnitude of flooding could be a major consequence of future global climate change. Extreme floods have the capacity to rapidly transform landscapes and expose landscape vulnerabilities through highly variable spatial patterns of inundation, erosion, and deposition. We use the historic activation of the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway during the Mississippi and Ohio River Flooding of 2011 as a scientifically unique stress experiment to analyze indicators of floodplain vulnerability. We use pre- and postflood airborne Light Detection and Ranging data sets to locate erosional and depositional hotspots over the 540 km(2) agricultural Floodway. While riparian vegetation between the river and the main levee breach likely prevented widespread deposition, localized scour and deposition occurred near the levee breaches. Eroded gullies nearly 1 km in length were observed at a low ridge of a relict meander scar of the Mississippi River. Our flow modeling and spatial mapping analysis attributes this vulnerability to a combination of erodible soils, flow acceleration associated with legacy fluvial landforms, and a lack of woody vegetation to anchor soil and enhance flow resistance. Results from this study could guide future mitigation and adaptation measures in cases of extreme flooding.

  2. Water-quality data for selected streams in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain ecoregion, northwestern Mississippi, September – October 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Matthew B.; Stocks, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    From September through October 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, collected and analyzed water-quality samples from streams in the Yazoo River basin within the Mississippi Alluvial Plain ecoregion in northwestern Mississippi. Water-quality samples were collected at 56 sites in the study area and analyzed for various physical and chemical characteristics including, but not limited to, suspended sediment, nutrients, and chlorophyll a. Additionally, water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen data were measured at 28 of the sites using multiparameter water-quality meters at 30-minute intervals for a minimum of 48 hours. Data collected for this project will be used in the development of water-quality criteria for nutrients. The nutrient data will enhance existing datasets and support evaluation of cause and effect relations for nutrient criteria development. In addition, these indicators will assist in the development and evaluation of restoration and remediation plans for water bodies not meeting their designated uses, as stated in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Water Act Section 303(d).

  3. Concentrations and transport of suspended sediment, nutrients, and pesticides in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during the 2011 Mississippi River flood, April through July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Heather L.; Coupe, Richard H.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    High streamflow associated with the April–July 2011 Mississippi River flood forced the simultaneous opening of the three major flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin for the first time in history in order to manage the amount of water moving through the system. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected samples for analysis of field properties, suspended-sediment concentration, particle-size, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and up to 136 pesticides at 11 water-quality stations and 2 flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin from just above the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers downstream from April through July 2011. Monthly fluxes of suspended sediment, suspended sand, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor were estimated at 9 stations and 2 flood-control structures during the flood period. Although concentrations during the 2011 flood were within the range of what has been observed historically, concentrations decreased during peak streamflow on the lower Mississippi River. Prior to the 2011 flood, high concentrations of suspended sediment and nitrate were observed in March 2011 at stations downstream of the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, which probably resulted in a loss of available material for movement during the flood. In addition, the major contributor of streamflow to the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during April and May was the Ohio River, whose water contained lower concentrations of suspended sediment, pesticides, and nutrients than water from the upper Mississippi River. Estimated fluxes for the 4-month flood period were still quite high and contributed approximately 50 percent of the estimated annual suspended sediment, nitrate, and total phosphorus fluxes in 2011; the largest fluxes were estimated at

  4. Vicksburg-Jackson Confining Unit: Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Vicksburg-Jackson Confining Unit in Arkansas, Alabama, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, and Tennessee. The hydrogeologic unit...

  5. Middle Wilcox Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Middle Wolcox Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee. The hydrogeologic...

  6. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Savanna District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2007...

  7. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Savanna District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2006...

  8. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Prairie du Chien District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Prairie du Chien District. Refuge background, physical...

  9. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: La Crosse District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - La Crosse District. Refuge background, physical...

  10. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  11. 75 FR 77817 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Mississippi...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... habitat for the Mississippi gopher frog (Rana sevosa) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended... from Rana capito sevosa to Rana sevosa. (11) Whether our approach to designating critical habitat...

  12. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Savanna District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Savanna District. Refuge background, physical...

  13. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  14. Laboratory identification of crayfishes and fishes from the Tallahatchie and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuges, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Results from a 2012 inventory of crayfishes and fishes sampled in Tallahatchie and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuges in western Mississippi are contained in this...

  15. The Trail Inventory of Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this...

  16. Organochlorine chemical hazards for sturgeon larvae in the Middle Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We conducted an ecological risk assessment to characterize organochlorine chemical hazards for sturgeon larvae in the Middle Mississippi River National Wildlife...

  17. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines...

  18. Grassland Management Plan : Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Grassland Management Plan for Upper Mississippi River NWFR provides a description of the Refuge, the purpose for establishing the Refuge, the Refuge’s mission...

  19. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  20. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  1. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Winona District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2006...

  2. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Winona District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1999...

  3. The Trail Inventory of Upper Mississippi River NW&FR- Savanna District [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge- Savanna...

  4. EAARL Coastal Topography--Mississippi and Alabama Barrier Islands, Post-Hurricane Gustav, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Mississippi and Alabama barrier islands, post-Hurricane Gustav (September 2008 hurricane), was produced from...

  5. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA)- Middle Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Middle Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information,...

  6. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Open River North Middle

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  7. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  8. A harvest management strategy for Canada geese in the western Mississippi Flyway

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management of Canada goose (Branta canadensis) harvest in the Mississippi Flyway became increasingly complex during the 1980s. A strategy for managing harvest was...

  9. 75 FR 76279 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Burlington, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Burlington, IA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY:...

  10. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  11. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Savanna District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2003...

  12. Fishery Management Plan: Lake Onalaska Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fishery management planning on the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge provides the framework for cooperative management with state agencies...

  13. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1947. The report begins by...

  14. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  15. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 13 South

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  16. Bathymetric data for the Upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers -- Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Water depth is an important feature of aquatic systems. On the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS), water depth data are important for describing the physical...

  17. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Winona District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2005...

  18. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Winona District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1997...

  19. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Winona District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2004...

  20. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Savanna District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2002...

  1. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the Winona District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1998...

  2. An Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration Options for Upper Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration and Management Options covers the hydrogeomorphic analysis (HGM) for Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge. This...

  3. Upper Mississippi River Floodplain water quality for Keithsburg Division, Illinois, Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service surveyed environmental quality at a backwater system of the Upper Mississippi River between 1994 and 1996. The...

  4. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1949. The report begins by...

  5. Fur Management Plan : Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan discusses approaches to managing furbearer populations; specifically, management strategies, trapping programs and methods. The Upper Mississippi NWFR...

  6. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Lansing District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Lansing District. Refuge background, physical...

  7. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Cassville District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Cassville District. Refuge background, physical...

  8. Landform-Sediment Assemblages Units of the Upper Mississippi River Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Wisconsinan and Holocene Landform-Sediment Assemblages of the Upper Mississippi River Valley. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of natural and cultural resources...

  9. Fire Management Plan: Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge consists of approximately 194,000 acres of wooded islands, waters and marshes extending southward along...

  10. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (dates_meta.txt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  11. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  12. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  13. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates) is a dataset consisting of 271 polygon shapefiles...

  14. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  15. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates) is a dataset consisting of 254 polygon shapefiles...

  16. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Mississippi: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (seagrass) and inshore/offshore artificial reefs in Mississippi. Vector...

  18. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  19. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Open River North South

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  20. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  1. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  2. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 13 North

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  3. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  4. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  5. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  6. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  7. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  8. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  9. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  10. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 4 South

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  11. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 4 North

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  12. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  13. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  14. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  15. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  16. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  17. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  18. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Open River North North

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  19. 2011 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Open River South South

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...

  20. 2010 UMRS Color Infrared Aerial Photo Mosaic - Mississippi River, Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River Restoration-Environmental Management Program (UMRR-EMP) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Region 3 to collect...