WorldWideScience

Sample records for bio engine emissions

  1. Combustion and emissions of the diesel engine using bio-diesel fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The combustion and heat release of engines using diesel fuel and bio-diesel fuel have been investigated.The results illustrate that the combustion happens in advance and the ignition delay period is shortened.The initial heat release peak declines a little,the corresponding crankshaft angle changes in advance,and the combustion duration is prolonged.The economic performance and emission features of diesel engines using diesel fuel and bio-diesel fuel are compared.The results also show that the specific fuel consumption of bio-diesel increases by about 12% .The emissions,such as CO,HC,and particulate matter decrease remarkably whereas NOx increases a little.

  2. EFFECT OF METALLOID COMPOUND AND BIO-SOLUTION ADDITIVES ON BIODIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST EMISSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoon Fangsuwannarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to perform comparative analysis of the effect of the different fuel additives as polymer based-bio-solution, natural organic based-bio-solution and nano-titanium metalloid (TiO2 compound on the performance parameters and exhuast emissions of a pickup Diesel engine, operating on commercial Diesel fuel (D and B5 palm biodiesel (95% D+5% palm oil. The basic properties of the fuel blended with TiO2 metalloid compound and bio-solution based additives were measured according to ASTM standard. Engine performance of a pickup diesel engine was investigated by testing on a chassis dynamometer with the simulation of road load condition. It was found that TiO2 based-additive is more effective for improving engine power than pure Diesel and B5 fuels by 7.78% and 1.36%, respectively. Meanwhile, with using TiO2 additive, the maximum engine torque on average increased by 1.01% and 1.53% in the wide range between 1,700 and 3,000 rpm as compared with Diesel and B5 fuels, respectively. The TiO2 and natural organic additives is significantly effective on Diesel fuel for reducing brake specific fuel consumption reached by 13.22% and 10.01%, respectively as compared with pure Diesel. Moreover, the exhuast emissions (NOx, CO and CO2 decreased from the engine using the TiO2 additive in Diesel fuel and natural organic additive in Diesel fuel.

  3. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  4. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratoriesThe Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  5. Evaluation of Emissions Bio diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Maroto, J. J.; Dorronsoro Arenal, J. L.; Rojas Garcia, E.; Perez Pastor, R.; Garcia Alonso, S.

    2007-09-27

    The generation of energy from vegetal products is one of the possibilities to our reach in order to reduce the atmospheric pollution. Particularly, the use of bio diesel in internal combustion engines can be one of the best options. The finest particles emitted by the combustion engines are easily breathable and on them different substances can be absorbed presumably toxic, between which it is possible to emphasize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), by its demonstrated carcinogen character. In this work, it is studied on the one hand, the characteristics that can present the aerosol of emission in a diesel engine with a maximum power of 97 kW, working without load to 600 rpm, using as combustible mixtures of bio diesel and diesel in different proportions. On the other hand, the evolution that takes place in the concentration of PAHs in emission particles, according to the percentage of bio diesel used in the combustible mixture. (Author) 9 refs.

  6. Emission Characteristics of CI Engine by using Palm BioDiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.shai sundaram

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental concerns and energy crisis of the world has led to the search of alternate to the fossil fuel. FAME (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester is environment friendly, alternative, and non-toxic, safe; biodegradable has a high flash point and is also termed as Bio-Diesel. The growing economic risk of relying primarily on fossil fuels with limited reserves and Increasing prices has increased the interest on alternative energy sources. Clean and renewable biofuels have been touted as the answer to the issue of diminishing fossil fuels. INDIA the largest producer of palm oil has committed to focus interest on biofuels, namely palm biodiesel. Since palm oil has a high fossil energy balance, it is a key source of raw material for biodiesel production. This paper presents palm biodiesel as an alternative source of green renewable energy through a survey conducted from previously researched findings. In this experimental study testing of emission characteristics and performances test of palm Bio-diesel at various ratios form (B25%, B 50%, B75%, B100% of Bio-diesel. As we compared with fossil fuel (diesel and palm bio-diesel on base of various emission elements (CO, CO2, NOx, O2, and HC.

  7. The Effect of Bio-Fuel Blends and Fuel Injection Pressure on Diesel Engine Emission for Sustainable Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Muralidharan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Diesel engine emits more pollutants to atmosphere causing air pollution. This necessitates the search of a renewable alternate fuel which is environment friendly. The objective of this research was to investigate the environmental aspects of pongamia bio-fuel in a single cylinder diesel engine with the influence of fuel injection pressure. Approach: Bio-fuel was prepared from non-edible Pongamia pinnata oil by transesterification and used as a fuel in C.I engine. The effect of fuel injection pressure on the engine emission characteristics of a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine has been experimentally investigated using pongamia pinnata methyl ester and its blends with diesel fuel from 0-30% with an increment of 5% at full load. The tests were conducted at five different injection pressures (190, 200, 210, 220 and 230 KN m-2 by means of adjusting injector spring tension. Results: Compared to diesel, blend B5 exhibits lower engine emissions of unburnt hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and carbon di oxide at full load. The High injection pressure of 220 KN m-2 shows lesser emissions of unburnt hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide while oxides of nitrogen and carbon dioxide are found to be slightly higher than diesel and blends at full load. Conclusion: From the test results, it was found that a high injection pressure of 220 KN m-2 causes better atomization with improved engine emission characteristics for diesel and blends at full load. Moreover blend B5 showed best results at 220 KN m-2 injection pressure.

  8. Investigation of palm methyl-ester bio-diesel with additive on performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine under 8-mode testing cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Senthilkumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its same diesel-like fuel properties and compatibility with petroleum-based diesel fueled engines. Therefore, in this paper the prospects and opportunities of using various blends of methyl esters of palm oil as fuel in an engine with and without the effect of multi-functional fuel additive (MFA, Multi DM 32 are studied to arrive at an optimum blend of bio-diesel best suited for low emissions and minimal power drop. Experimental tests were conducted on a four stroke, three cylinder and naturally aspirated D.I. Diesel engine with diesel and various blend percentages of 20%, 40%, 45%, and 50% under the 8 mode testing cycle. The effect of fuel additive was tested out on the optimum blend ratio of the bio-diesel so as to achieve further reduced emissions. Comparison of results shows that, 73% reduction in hydrocarbon emission, 46% reduction in carbon monoxide emission, and around 1% reduction in carbon dioxide emission characteristics. So it is observed that the blend ratio of 40% bio-diesel with MFA fuel additive creates reduced emission and minimal power drop due to effective combustion even when the calorific value is comparatively lower due to its higher cetane number.

  9. Hydrocarbon raw emission characterization of a direct-injection spark ignition engine operated with alcohol and furan-based bio fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thewes, Matthias [FEV GmbH, Aachen (Germany); Mauermann, Peter; Pischinger, Stefan [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Combustion Engines; Bluhm, Kerstin; Hollert, Henner [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Environmental Research, Dept. of Ecosystem Analysis

    2013-06-01

    Within the Cluster of Excellence ''Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass'' the impact of various potential bio fuels on engine combustion is studied. Besides alcohols, furan-based bio fuels have come into the focus with novel production routes to transform biomass into 2-Methylfuran or 2,5-Dimethylfuran. In the present study, the influence of these and other bio fuels on the hydrocarbon raw emission spectrum of a direct-injection spark-ignition single cylinder engine is studied experimentally by means of gas chromatographic and mass spectroscopic analysis of exhaust gas samples. The results obtained are compared to operation with conventional EN 228 gasoline fuel. This fuel showed slip of partially carcinogenic aromatic fuel molecule(s) in warm and in cold engine conditions. For the bio fuels, slip was found to be significant for the alcohol fuels. The carcinogenic molecule 1,3-Butadiene was present in the exhaust gas of all fuels. Furan as another possibly carcinogenic molecule was found at significantly higher concentrations in the exhaust gas of the furan-based bio fuels compared to conventional gasoline fuel but not in the exhaust gas of the alcohol fuels. (orig.)

  10. Engineering BioBrick vectors from BioBrick parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Thomas F

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The underlying goal of synthetic biology is to make the process of engineering biological systems easier. Recent work has focused on defining and developing standard biological parts. The technical standard that has gained the most traction in the synthetic biology community is the BioBrick standard for physical composition of genetic parts. Parts that conform to the BioBrick assembly standard are BioBrick standard biological parts. To date, over 2,000 BioBrick parts have been contributed to, and are available from, the Registry of Standard Biological Parts. Results Here we extended the same advantages of BioBrick standard biological parts to the plasmid-based vectors that are used to provide and propagate BioBrick parts. We developed a process for engineering BioBrick vectors from BioBrick parts. We designed a new set of BioBrick parts that encode many useful vector functions. We combined the new parts to make a BioBrick base vector that facilitates BioBrick vector construction. We demonstrated the utility of the process by constructing seven new BioBrick vectors. We also successfully used the resulting vectors to assemble and propagate other BioBrick standard biological parts. Conclusion We extended the principles of part reuse and standardization to BioBrick vectors. As a result, myriad new BioBrick vectors can be readily produced from all existing and newly designed BioBrick parts. We invite the synthetic biology community to (1 use the process to make and share new BioBrick vectors; (2 expand the current collection of BioBrick vector parts; and (3 characterize and improve the available collection of BioBrick vector parts.

  11. Engineering BioBrick vectors from BioBrick parts

    OpenAIRE

    Knight Thomas F; Endy Drew; Shetty Reshma P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The underlying goal of synthetic biology is to make the process of engineering biological systems easier. Recent work has focused on defining and developing standard biological parts. The technical standard that has gained the most traction in the synthetic biology community is the BioBrick standard for physical composition of genetic parts. Parts that conform to the BioBrick assembly standard are BioBrick standard biological parts. To date, over 2,000 BioBrick parts have ...

  12. Production of Bio-Diesel to Neem oil and its performance and emission Analysis in two stroke Diesel Engine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Mahesh BABU

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In India Neem tree is a widely grown up termed as a divine tree due to its wide relevance in many areas of study. This paper deals with Biodiesel production from neem oil, which is monoester produced usingtransesterification process. Biodiesel is a safe alternative fuel to replace traditional petroleum diesel. It has high lubricity, clean burning fuel and can be a fuel component for use in existing unmodified diesel engine. Neem (Azadirachita Indica is an evergreen tree, which is endemic to the Indian Sub-continent and has beenintroduced to many other areas intropics. The fuel properties of biodiesel including flash point-and fire point were examined. The engine properties and pollutant emissions characteristics under different biodiesel percentages were also studied. The results shows that the biodiesel produced using neem oil could reduce Carbon monoxide and smoke emissions significantly while the Nitrogen oxide emission changed slightly. Thus, the ester of this oil can be used as environment friendly alternative fuel for diesel engine.

  13. Toxicological properties of emission particles from heavy duty engines powered by conventional and bio-based diesel fuels and compressed natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major areas for increasing the use of renewable energy is in traffic fuels e.g. bio-based fuels in diesel engines especially in commuter traffic. Exhaust emissions from fossil diesel fuelled engines are known to cause adverse effects on human health, but there is very limited information available on how the new renewable fuels may change the harmfulness of the emissions, especially particles (PM). We evaluated the PM emissions from a heavy-duty EURO IV diesel engine powered by three different fuels; the toxicological properties of the emitted PM were investigated. Conventional diesel fuel (EN590) and two biodiesels were used − rapeseed methyl ester (RME, EN14214) and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) either as such or as 30% blends with EN590. EN590 and 100% HVO were also operated with or without an oxidative catalyst (DOC + POC). A bus powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) was included for comparison with the liquid fuels. However, the results from CNG powered bus cannot be directly compared to the other situations in this study. Results High volume PM samples were collected on PTFE filters from a constant volume dilution tunnel. The PM mass emission with HVO was smaller and with RME larger than that with EN590, but both biofuels produced lower PAH contents in emission PM. The DOC + POC catalyst greatly reduced the PM emission and PAH content in PM with both HVO and EN590. Dose-dependent TNFα and MIP-2 responses to all PM samples were mostly at the low or moderate level after 24-hour exposure in a mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Emission PM from situations with the smallest mass emissions (HVO + cat and CNG) displayed the strongest potency in MIP-2 production. The catalyst slightly decreased the PM-induced TNFα responses and somewhat increased the MIP-2 responses with HVO fuel. Emission PM with EN590 and with 30% HVO blended in EN590 induced the strongest genotoxic responses, which were significantly greater than

  14. Toxicological properties of emission particles from heavy duty engines powered by conventional and bio-based diesel fuels and compressed natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalava, Pasi I; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Murtonen, Timo; Happo, Mikko S; Markkanen, Ari; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Hakulinen, Pasi; Hillamo, Risto; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Salonen, Raimo O; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2012-09-29

    One of the major areas for increasing the use of renewable energy is in traffic fuels e.g. bio-based fuels in diesel engines especially in commuter traffic. Exhaust emissions from fossil diesel fuelled engines are known to cause adverse effects on human health, but there is very limited information available on how the new renewable fuels may change the harmfulness of the emissions, especially particles (PM). We evaluated the PM emissions from a heavy-duty EURO IV diesel engine powered by three different fuels; the toxicological properties of the emitted PM were investigated. Conventional diesel fuel (EN590) and two biodiesels were used - rapeseed methyl ester (RME, EN14214) and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) either as such or as 30% blends with EN590. EN590 and 100% HVO were also operated with or without an oxidative catalyst (DOC + POC). A bus powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) was included for comparison with the liquid fuels. However, the results from CNG powered bus cannot be directly compared to the other situations in this study. High volume PM samples were collected on PTFE filters from a constant volume dilution tunnel. The PM mass emission with HVO was smaller and with RME larger than that with EN590, but both biofuels produced lower PAH contents in emission PM. The DOC + POC catalyst greatly reduced the PM emission and PAH content in PM with both HVO and EN590. Dose-dependent TNFα and MIP-2 responses to all PM samples were mostly at the low or moderate level after 24-hour exposure in a mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Emission PM from situations with the smallest mass emissions (HVO + cat and CNG) displayed the strongest potency in MIP-2 production. The catalyst slightly decreased the PM-induced TNFα responses and somewhat increased the MIP-2 responses with HVO fuel. Emission PM with EN590 and with 30% HVO blended in EN590 induced the strongest genotoxic responses, which were significantly greater than those with EN590

  15. Toxicological properties of emission particles from heavy duty engines powered by conventional and bio-based diesel fuels and compressed natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalava Pasi I

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major areas for increasing the use of renewable energy is in traffic fuels e.g. bio-based fuels in diesel engines especially in commuter traffic. Exhaust emissions from fossil diesel fuelled engines are known to cause adverse effects on human health, but there is very limited information available on how the new renewable fuels may change the harmfulness of the emissions, especially particles (PM. We evaluated the PM emissions from a heavy-duty EURO IV diesel engine powered by three different fuels; the toxicological properties of the emitted PM were investigated. Conventional diesel fuel (EN590 and two biodiesels were used − rapeseed methyl ester (RME, EN14214 and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO either as such or as 30% blends with EN590. EN590 and 100% HVO were also operated with or without an oxidative catalyst (DOC + POC. A bus powered by compressed natural gas (CNG was included for comparison with the liquid fuels. However, the results from CNG powered bus cannot be directly compared to the other situations in this study. Results High volume PM samples were collected on PTFE filters from a constant volume dilution tunnel. The PM mass emission with HVO was smaller and with RME larger than that with EN590, but both biofuels produced lower PAH contents in emission PM. The DOC + POC catalyst greatly reduced the PM emission and PAH content in PM with both HVO and EN590. Dose-dependent TNFα and MIP-2 responses to all PM samples were mostly at the low or moderate level after 24-hour exposure in a mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Emission PM from situations with the smallest mass emissions (HVO + cat and CNG displayed the strongest potency in MIP-2 production. The catalyst slightly decreased the PM-induced TNFα responses and somewhat increased the MIP-2 responses with HVO fuel. Emission PM with EN590 and with 30% HVO blended in EN590 induced the strongest genotoxic responses, which were

  16. Performance and emission parameters of single cylinder diesel engine using castor oil bio-diesel blended fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Ghobadian, B.; Najafi, G.; Jaliliantabar, F.; Mamat, R.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance and emission parameters of a CI single cylinder diesel engine operating on biodiesel-diesel blends (B0, B5, B10, B15 and E20: 20% biodiesel and 80% diesel by volume). A reactor was designed, fabricated and evaluated for biodiesel production. The results showed that increasing the biodiesel content in the blend fuel will increase the performance parameters and decrease the emission parameters. Maximum power was detected for B0 at 2650 rpm and maximum torque was belonged to B20 at 1600 rpm. The experimental results revealed that using biodiesel-diesel blended fuels increased the power and torque output of the engine. For biodiesel blends it was found that the specific fuel consumption (sfc) was decreased. B10 had the minimum amount for sfc. The concentration of CO2 and HC emissions in the exhaust pipe were measured and found to be decreased when biodiesel blends were introduced. This was due to the high oxygen percentage in the biodiesel compared to the net diesel fuel. In contrast, the concentration of CO and NOx was found to be increased when biodiesel is introduced.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Performance and emission characteristics of Various Nano Particles with Bio-Diesel blend on Di Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, N.; Goldwin Xavier, X.; Rajasekar, R.; Ganesh Bairavan, P.; Dhanseelan, S.

    2017-05-01

    Present study provides the effect of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) and Cerium Oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles additives on the Performance and emission uniqueness of Jatropha. Jatropha blended fuel is prepared by the emulsification technique with assist of mechanical agitator. Nano particles (Zinc Oxide (ZnO)) and Cerium Oxide (CeO2)) mixed with Jatropha blended fuel in mass fraction (100 ppm) with assist of an ultrasonicator. Experiments were conducted in single cylinder constant speed direct injection diesel engine for various test fuels. Performance results revealed that Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) of Jatropha blended Cerium Oxide (B20CE) is 3% and 11% higher than Jatropha blended zinc oxide (B20ZO) and Jatropha blended fuel (B20) and 4% lower than diesel fuel (D100) at full load conditions. Emission result shows that HC and CO emissions of Jatropha blended Cerium Oxide (B20CE) are (6%, 22%, 11% and 6%, 15%, 12%) less compared with Jatropha blended Zinc Oxide (B20ZO), diesel (D100) and Jatropha blended fuel (B20) at full load conditions. NOx emissions of Jatropha blended Cerium Oxide is 1 % higher than diesel fuel (D100) and 2% and 5% lower than Jatropha blended Zinc Oxide, and jatropha blended fuel.

  18. Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Herbert F

    2011-01-01

    The future challenges to medical and biological engineering, sometimes referred to as biomedical engineering or simply bioengineering, are many. Some of these are identifiable now and others will emerge from time to time as new technologies are introduced and harnessed. There is a fundamental issue regarding "Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree" that requires a common understanding of what is meant by a B.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering, or Biological Engineering. In this paper we address some of the issues involved in branding the Bio/Biomedical Engineering degree, with the aim of clarifying the Bio/Biomedical Engineering brand.

  19. Bio-engineering in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Bio-engineering in the Baltic Sea – value of water quality improvements & risk perceptions Dr. Marianne Zandersen1 Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University Abstract The Baltic Sea is heavily eutrofied and the trend has gone from bad to worse. The hypoxic zone has increased about 4...... of the water column to the bottom waters/deepwater. The expected effects include a slowing down of the sediment release from the bottom and improvement of the possibilities for aerobic bacterial decomposition and over time for the establishment of fauna. The projects test a bio-engineered approach to speeding...

  20. Performance and emission characteristics of a low heat rejection engine with different air gap thicknesses with Jatropha oil based bio-diesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali Krishna, M V S; Sarita, G; Seshagiri Rao, V V R; Chowdary, R P; Ramana Reddy, Ch V

    2010-04-01

    The research work on alternate fuels has been the topic of wider interest in the context of depletion of fossil fuels and increasing of pollution levels of the engines with conventional fossil fuels. Alcohols and vegetable oils are considered to replace diesel fuels as they are renewable in nature. However, use of alcohols in internal combustion engines is limited in India, as these fuels are diverted to PetroChemical industries and hence much emphasis is given to the non-edible vegetable oils as alternate fuels in internal combustion engines. However, the drawbacks of low volatility and high viscosity associated with non-edible vegetable oils call for hot combustion chamber, provided by low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine. Investigations are carried out on a LHR diesel engine with varied air gap thicknesses and injection pressures with jatropha oil based bio-diesel at normal temperature. Performance is improved with high degree of insulation with LHR engine with vegetable oil in comparison with conventional engine (CE) with pure diesel operation.

  1. Bio-based targeted chemical engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Márquez Luzardoa; Dr. ir. Jan Venselaar

    2012-01-01

    Avans University of Applied Sciences is redrafting its courses and curricula in view of sustainability. For chemical engineering in particular that implies a focus on 'green' and bio-based processes, products and energy. Avans is situated in the Southwest region of the Netherlands and specifically

  2. Radial-Basis-Function-Network-Based Prediction of Performance and Emission Characteristics in a Bio Diesel Engine Run on WCO Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs, which is a relatively new class of neural networks, have been investigated for their applicability for prediction of performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine fuelled with waste cooking oil (WCO. The RBF networks were trained using the experimental data, where in load percentage, compression ratio, blend percentage, injection timing, and injection pressure were taken as the input parameters, and brake thermal efficiency (BTE, brake specific energy consumption (BSEC, exhaust gas temperature (, and engine emissions were used as the output parameters. The number of RBF centers was selected randomly. The network was initially trained using variable width values for the RBF units using a heuristic and then was trained by using fixed width values. Studies showed that RBFNN predicted results matched well with the experimental results over a wide range of operating conditions. Prediction accuracy for all the output parameters was above 90% in case of performance parameters and above 70% in case of emission parameters.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Effect Factors on NOx Emission from Bio-Diesel Fuel Engine%生物柴油发动机NOx排放影响因素的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛功平; 王忠; 安玉光; 倪培永; 魏胜利

    2011-01-01

    The spray and combustion models of bio-diesel fuel have been amended and built on the basis of the differences of physical and chemical characteristics between bio-diesel fuel and diesel fuel. The veracity of the new models has been tested by comparison of experimental results and simulation result. The effects of diesel engine parameters on combustion temperature and NO, emission, such as nozzle orifice, spray cone angle, injection timing, and ECR ratio, have been investigated in detail according to the simulation results using AVL - fire software.%根据生物柴油与柴油物性参数的差别,对柴油缸内喷雾燃烧模型进行修正,建立了生物柴油的缸内喷雾燃烧模型,利用该模型计算得到的缸内压力示功图与试验结果进行对比,验证了模型的准确性;利用AVL - fire软件,计算了发动机参数对生物柴油NOx排放的影响规律,着重考察了喷孔直径、喷雾锥角、喷油提前角、EGR率对燃烧温度和NOx排放的影响.

  4. A LIGHTING GUIDE FOR BIO-ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this report is a guide for Bio Environmental Engineers to evaluate lighting installations. It is limited in scope and does not cover...all aspects of illumination. It is intended to furnish the Bio -Environmental Engineers with a working knowledge of lighting, its design and effects on personnel. (Author)

  5. Bio-engineering in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Bio-engineering in the Baltic Sea – value of water quality improvements & risk perceptions Dr. Marianne Zandersen1 Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University Abstract The Baltic Sea is heavily eutrofied and the trend has gone from bad to worse. The hypoxic zone has increased about 4...... to the Baltic Sea, the prevalence of oxygen depleted areas has not decreased. Two pilot projects in Sweden and Finland investigate the effects of oxygenation pumping in coastal and deepwater areas (PROPPEN and BOX projects, respectively). Oxygenation pumping moves oxygen rich water from the higher levels...... up the recovery of the Baltic Sea such that the sea could be unaffected by eutrofication sooner than without oxygenation pumping . We undertake a representative primary survey of the populations in Sweden, Finland and Lithuania in order to assess the preferences of the population around the Baltic...

  6. Particulate emissions from diesel engines: correlation between engine technology and emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Michael; Wiartalla, Andreas; Holderbaum, Bastian; Kiesow, Sebastian

    2014-03-07

    In the last 30 years, diesel engines have made rapid progress to increased efficiency, environmental protection and comfort for both light- and heavy-duty applications. The technical developments include all issues from fuel to combustion process to exhaust gas aftertreatment. This paper provides a comprehensive summary of the available literature regarding technical developments and their impact on the reduction of pollutant emission. This includes emission legislation, fuel quality, diesel engine- and exhaust gas aftertreatment technologies, as well as particulate composition, with a focus on the mass-related particulate emission of on-road vehicle applications. Diesel engine technologies representative of real-world on-road applications will be highlighted.Internal engine modifications now make it possible to minimize particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions with nearly no reduction in power. Among these modifications are cooled exhaust gas recirculation, optimized injections systems, adapted charging systems and optimized combustion processes with high turbulence. With introduction and optimization of exhaust gas aftertreatment systems, such as the diesel oxidation catalyst and the diesel particulate trap, as well as NOx-reduction systems, pollutant emissions have been significantly decreased. Today, sulfur poisoning of diesel oxidation catalysts is no longer considered a problem due to the low-sulfur fuel used in Europe. In the future, there will be an increased use of bio-fuels, which generally have a positive impact on the particulate emissions and do not increase the particle number emissions.Since the introduction of the EU emissions legislation, all emission limits have been reduced by over 90%. Further steps can be expected in the future. Retrospectively, the particulate emissions of modern diesel engines with respect to quality and quantity cannot be compared with those of older engines. Internal engine modifications lead to a clear reduction of the

  7. Large Engine Emission Reduction - LEER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-10-15

    The target of the project LEER is to find the most cost-effective means of today to reduce exhaust gas emissions, particularly NO{sub x} and particulates, of power-plant and ship propulsion diesel engines. The methods are controlling of the combustion and exhaust gas after-treatment. As research methods, theoretical and literature studies as well as engine tests are used. Using the state of the art technology in the whole engine process from combustion control to after treatment is vital for keeping the product competitive in today's engine market. The project consists of two main tasks, Performance and Emission. The Performance task deals with controlling the combustion for optimising the trade-off between fuel consumption and pollutant formation, NO{sub x} in particular. The Emission task concentrates on improving the after treatment technology in particulate reduction, and understanding the particulate formation by gaining information of particulate nature and composition. (orig.)

  8. Nanoparticle emissions from combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Merkisz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

     This book focuses on particulate matter emissions produced by vehicles with combustion engines. It describes the physicochemical properties of the particulate matter, the mechanisms of its formation and its environmental impacts (including those on human beings). It discusses methods for measuring particulate mass and number, including the state-of-the-art in Portable Emission Measurement System (PEMS) equipment for measuring the exhaust emissions of both light and heavy-duty vehicles and buses under actual operating conditions. The book presents the authors’ latest investigations into the relations between particulate emission (mass and number) and engine operating parameters, as well as their new findings obtained through road tests performed on various types of vehicles, including those using diesel particulate filter regeneration. The book, which addresses the needs of academics and professionals alike, also discusses relevant European regulations on particulate emissions and highlights selected metho...

  9. Performance Evaluation of Diesel Engine with Preheated Bio Diesel with Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Vajja, Sai; Murali, R. B. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper mainly reviews about the usage of preheated bio diesel added with 0.5% Etchant as an alternative fuel and evaluates its performance for various blends with different loads. Bio diesel is added with Etchant for rapid combustion as for the bio diesel, the cetane number is high that results in shorter delay of ignition and the mixture is preheated to raise its temperature to improve the combustion process. Analysis of the parameters required to define the combustion characteristics such as IP, BP, ηbth, ηm, ISFC, BSFC, IMEP, MFC, Exhaust Gas Temperature, Heat Release and heat balance is necessary as these values are significant to assess the performance of engine and its emissions of preheated bio diesel.

  10. Effect of Corn Stalk Bio-Oil on Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Direct Injection Diesel Engine%玉米秸秆生物油对直喷式柴油机燃烧与排放的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩旭东; 黄勇成; 易延洪; 黄松; 闻振江

    2012-01-01

    The experimental bio-oil was produced from corn stalk through fast pyrolysis process. In this paper, four emulsions with 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% by mass fraction of corn stalk bio-oil (CSB) in diesel fuel, represented by CSB5, CSB10, CSB15 and CSB20, respectively, were prepared by the ultrasonic emulsification method. Then, the combustion and emission characteristics of an unmodified direct injection diesel engine operating on the four emulsions were studied and compared with those of No. 0 diesel operation in order to provide the basis and theoretical guidance for the application of bio-oil in diesel engines. The results showed that, with the increase of CSB mass fraction in the emulsions, the ignition delay lengthens, both the heat released during the premixed combustion phase and the premixed combustion duration increase, while the total combustion duration shortens. With the increase of CSB mass fraction in the emulsions, the peak values of both premixed burning rate and pressure rise rate increase first and then decrease, while those of in-cylinder pressure and combustion temperature decrease. In addition, the fuel economy of CSB5 and CSB 10 is comparable to that of No. 0 diesel, while the fuel economy of CSB 15 and CSB20 is slightly poorer than that of No. 0 diesel. In comparison with No. 0 diesel, NOx emissions of all the emulsions are lower, while HC and CO emissions are higher. Furthermore, these trends are more remarkable with the increase of CSB fraction in the emulsions. Smoke emissions of the emulsions decrease first and then increase with the increase of CSB fraction in the emulsions. Meanwhile, smoke emissions of CSB5 and CSB 10 are lower while those of CSB 15 and CSB20 are slightly higher than those of No. 0 diesel.%采用超声波乳化法制备了玉米秸秆热解生物油质量分数分别为5%、10%、15%和20%的生物油/柴油乳化油,分别记为CSB5、CSB10、CSB15和CSB20,然后在一台未作改动的直喷式

  11. Performance and emission characteristics of diesel engine with COME-Triacetin additive blends as fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Venkateswara Rao, B. V. Appa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Triacetin [C9H14O6] additive is used an anti-knocking agent along with the bio-diesel in DI- diesel engine. In the usage of diesel fuel and neat bio-diesel knocking can be detected to some extent. The T- additive usage in the engine suppressed knocking, improved the performance and reduced tail pipe emissions. Comparative study is conducted using petro-diesel, bio-diesel, and with various additive blends of bio-diesel on DI- diesel engine. Coconut oil methyl ester (COME is used with additive Triacetin (T at various percentages by volume for all loads (No load, 25%, 50%, 75% and full load. The performance of engine is compared with neat diesel in respect of engine efficiency, exhaust emissions and combustion knock. Of the five Triacetin- biodiesel blends tried, 10% Triacetin combination with biodiesel proved encouraging in all respects of performance of the engine.

  12. Performance and emission characteristics of diesel engine with COME-Triacetin additive blends as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswara Rao, P. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, K I T S, Warangal- 506015, A. P. (India); Appa Rao, B.V. [Dept. of Marine Engineering, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam-530003, A. P. (India)

    2012-07-01

    The Triacetin [C9H14O6] additive is used an anti-knocking agent along with the bio-diesel in DI- diesel engine. In the usage of diesel fuel and neat bio-diesel knocking can be detected to some extent. The T- additive usage in the engine suppressed knocking, improved the performance and reduced tail pipe emissions. Comparative study is conducted using petro-diesel, bio-diesel, and with various additive blends of bio-diesel on DI- diesel engine. Coconut oil methyl ester (COME) is used with additive Triacetin (T) at various percentages by volume for all loads (No load, 25%, 50%, 75% and full load). The performance of engine is compared with neat diesel in respect of engine efficiency, exhaust emissions and combustion knock. Of the five Triacetin- biodiesel blends tried, 10% Triacetin combination with biodiesel proved encouraging in all respects of performance of the engine.

  13. Experimental investigation of effects of bio-additives on fuel economy of the gasoline engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The matter extracted from palm oil was considered as gasoline additive. The effect of various percentages (0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%) of the bio-additives on fuel economy of SI engine respectively running on prime gasoline, gasoline with known compo- nents, ethanol gasoline, and methanol gasoline under typical urban operation condition 2000 r/min was investigated. The results showed that the bio-additives can remarkably improve the fuel economy of SI engine while operating on all kinds of fuel. The optimal ratio of bio-additive to gasoline depends on the fuel used and on the different engine operating conditions. Besides, the experiments of constant volume combustion bomb, analysis of in cylinder processes, the synchrotron ra- diation and high-temperature friction were conducted to probe into the mechanism of the bio-additive impact on fuel economy. It indicated that the bio-additives can increase the maximum cylinder combustion pressure, improve exhaust emissions and largely reduce the frication coefficient.

  14. Experimental investigation of effects of bio-additives on fuel economy of the gasoline engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO ChunDe; ZHANG ZhiHui; XU YuanLi; HUANG Yu

    2008-01-01

    The matter extracted from palm oil was considered as gasoline additive. The effect of various percentages (0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%) of the bio-additives on fuel economy of SI engine respectively running on prime gasoline, gasoline with known compo-nents, ethanol gasoline, and methanol gasoline under typical urban operation condition 2000 r/min was investigated. The results showed that the bio-additives can remarkably improve the fuel economy of Sl engine while operating on all kinds of fuel. The optimal ratio of bio-additive to gasoline depends on the fuel used and on the different engine operating conditions. Besides, the experiments of constant volume combustion bomb, analysis of in cylinder processes, the synchrotron re-dietion and high-temperature friction were conducted to probe into the mechanism of the bio-additive impact on fuel economy. It indicated that the bio-additives can increase the maximum cylinder combustion pressure, improve exhaust emissions and largely reduce the frication coefficient.

  15. Chemical Engineering in the "BIO" world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiarappa, Gianluca; Grassi, Mario; Abrami, Michela

    2017-01-01

    Modern Chemical Engineering was born around the end of the 19th century in Great Britain, Germany, and the USA, the most industrialized countries at that time. Milton C. Whitaker, in 1914, affirmed that the difference between Chemistry and Chemical Engineering lies in the capability of chemical...... and momentum balances. Thus, the birth of Biological Engineering may be considered as a Darwinian evolution of Chemical Engineering similar to that experienced by mammals which, returning to water, used legs and arms to swim. From 1960 on, Biological Engineering underwent a considerable evolution as witnessed...

  16. Chemical Engineering in the "BIO" World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarappa, Gianluca; Grassi, Mario; Abrami, Michela; Abbiati, Roberto Andrea; Barba, Anna Angela; Boisen, Anja; Brucato, Valerio; Ghersi, Giulio; Caccavo, Diego; Cascone, Sara; Caserta, Sergio; Elvassore, Nicola; Giomo, Monica; Guido, Stefano; Lamberti, Gaetano; Larobina, Domenico; Manca, Davide; Marizza, Paolo; Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Grassi, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Modern Chemical Engineering was born around the end of the 19th century in Great Britain, Germany, and the USA, the most industrialized countries at that time. Milton C. Whitaker, in 1914, affirmed that the difference between Chemistry and Chemical Engineering lies in the capability of chemical engineers to transfer laboratory findings to the industrial level. Since then, Chemical Engineering underwent huge transformations determining the detachment from the original Chemistry nest. The beginning of the sixties of the 20th century saw the development of a new branch of Chemical Engineering baptized Biomedical Engineering by Peppas and Langer and that now we can name Biological Engineering. Interestingly, although Biological Engineering focused on completely different topics from Chemical Engineering ones, it resorted to the same theoretical tools such as, for instance, mass, energy and momentum balances. Thus, the birth of Biological Engineering may be considered as a Darwinian evolution of Chemical Engineering similar to that experienced by mammals which, returning to water, used legs and arms to swim. From 1960 on, Biological Engineering underwent a considerable evolution as witnessed by the great variety of topics covered such as hemodialysis, release of synthetic drugs, artificial organs and, more recently, delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNA). This review, based on the activities developed in the frame of our PRIN 2010-11 (20109PLMH2) project, tries to recount origins and evolution of Chemical Engineering illustrating several examples of recent and successful applications in the biological field. This, in turn, may stimulate the discussion about the Chemical Engineering students curriculum studiorum update. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Miniature field emission light sources for bio-chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gorecka-Drzazga, Anna; Dziuban, Jan A [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland)], E-mail: bartlomiej.cichy@pwr.wroc.pl

    2009-01-01

    A concept based on preparation of miniature field emission light sources (FELS) for integration with bio-chips is presented. Glass and silicon-glass micro-fluidic systems (biochips) with spectrofluorometric detection are designated for this solution. Planar, miniature silicon-glass field emission light sources were designed and fabricated for this conception. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used as a low-voltage electron emissive layer. Nanocrystalline yttria matrices doped with rare earth (Re) ions (Re: Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) have been synthesized and utilized as phosphor layers. Light emission spectral characteristics of fabricated sources allow to couple them with typical fluorescent markers as e.g. Alexa, Fluorescein or TO-PRO, used on the wide scale in biochemical researches. Fabricated FELSs are characterized by the intensive and homogenous light emission with well defined sharp emission lines. The efficient and stable field emission from carbon nanotubes has also been noticed. Fabricated FELS are technologically compatible with highly developing micromachined fluidic systems and are able to direct on-chip integration with these microsystems.

  18. Marine Engines and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Moroianu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Current international policy initiatives by the International Maritime Organization (IMO to reduce emissions from ship propulsion systems (NOx and SOx, primarily mark the first efforts to define a framework to address this issue. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx emissions from ship engines are significant on a global level. NOx emissions participate in the formation of photochemical smog and acid rain. Marine sourced emissions have significant impact on air quality on land. The challenge is to control NOx emissions without increasing fuel consumption and smoke. Most engine manufacturers can meet the current IMO limits by engine tuning measures

  19. Influence of Gasoline Components on Engine Efficiency and Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Guilherme B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the next few decades, it is expected that fossil fuels and bio-fuels used in internal combustion engines will remain the primary source for vehicular propulsion. This justifies the intense worldwide research and development effort to comply with the challenges of increasing efficiency and reducing internal combustion engine emissions. The modeling of commercial fuels and engine combustion processes presents great challenges. There is also the need to better understand how different fuel components interact and influence engine combustion and performance parameters. In the present work, surrogate fuels were used to implement methodologies to evaluate the influence of fuel components on fuel properties and multiple engine combustion and performance parameters. Special attention is given to engine efficiency and emissions behavior and their correlations to fuel properties and others performance parameters of the engine. The potentials of each component and corresponding chemical group were identified for different engine designs. The results combine information and methodologies that can be used to develop fuels for different applications.

  20. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  1. Bio-Diesel production and Effect of Catalytic Converter on Emission performance with Bio-Diesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Murali Manohar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bio-Diesel the word itself defines almost all the features of the Bio-Diesel literary. In the Era of this Global Warming where the people are making their living more and more comfortable and they are deteriorating the environment also. The uses of the automobiles with the conventional source of fuel leads to the production of the toxic gaseous substances like carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxide of sulphur, hydro-carbons etc. The limitation comes with the rise in the price of the fuel as well as the produce of the green house gases as the exhaust gas. In the present study, a new method has been employed to produce Bio-Diesel in a homely basis. Theproduction of the Bio-Diesel is done by using Bio-Diesel processor. It requires the used vegetable oil, methanol and the lye with the accurate proportionate. Generally, emissions of regulated compounds changed linearly with the blend level. The objective is to detect any posit ive or negative effects depending on blend levels, because conventional diesel fuel and biodiesel can be blended in every ratio. The known positive and negative effects of biodiesel varied accordingly and investigate the effect of Catalytic Converter on emission performance with Bio- Diesel Blends.

  2. Experimental Investigations on the Engine Performance and Characteristics of Compression Ignition (CI Engine Using Dual Bio – Fuel Methyl Ester As Alternate Fuel With Exhaust Gas Recirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inturi Vamsi,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum products and resources are limited and their consumption is increasing very fast with globalization and high technology development since last decade. The emissions from the petroleum products polluting the environment considerably. Bio-fuels can be produced from diverse sources, which are subject to local geography, topology and climatology. Hence, every nation will have its own choice of a source. Duel bio-fuel represents an untapped resource of energy easily available in India. This study investigates the potential substitution of duel bio-fuel methyl ester blends for diesel as fuel for automobiles and other industrial purposes. This study is concerned with the analysis of the performance and emission characteristics of the duel bio-fuel methyl esters and comparing with petroleum diesel. The fuels used were neat methyl ester, diesel and different blends of the methyl ester with diesel. The tests were carried out on a 4.4 KW, single cylinder, direct injection, air-cooled diesel engine. The fuels used were neat duel bio-fuel methyl ester, diesel and different blends of the methyl ester with diesel. The experimental result shows that 20% of blend shows better performance with reduced pollution. This analysis shows that duel bio-fuel methyl ester and its blends are a potential substitute for diesel.

  3. Bio-Engineering High Performance Microbial Strains for MEOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangdong Fang; Qinghong Wang; Patrick Shuler

    2007-12-30

    The main objectives of this three-year research project are: (1) to employ the latest advances in genetics and bioengineering, especially Directed Protein Evolution technology, to improve the effectiveness of the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process. (2) to improve the surfactant activity and the thermal stability of bio-surfactant systems for MEOR; and (3) to develop improved laboratory methods and tools that screen quickly candidate bio-systems for EOR. Biosurfactants have been receiving increasing attention as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) agents because of their unique properties (i.e., mild production conditions, lower toxicity, and higher biodegradability) compared to their synthetic chemical counterparts. Rhamnolipid as a potent natural biosurfactant has a wide range of potential applications, including EOR and bioremediation. During the three-year of the project period, we have successfully cloned the genes involved in the rhamnolipid bio-synthesis. And by using the Transposon containing Rhamnosyltransferase gene rhlAB, we engineered the new mutant strains P. aeruginosa PEER02 and E. coli TnERAB so they can produce rhamnolipid biosurfactans. We were able to produce rhamnolipds in both P. aeroginosa PAO1-RhlA- strain and P. fluorescens ATCC15453 strain, with the increase of 55 to 175 fold in rhamnolipid production comparing with wild type bacteria strain. We have also completed the first round direct evolution studies using Error-prone PCR technique and have constructed the library of RhlAB-containing Transposon to express mutant gene in heterologous hosts. Several methods, such as colorimetric agar plate assay, colorimetric spectrophotometer assay, bioactive assay and oil spreading assay have been established to detect and screen rhamnolipid production. Our engineered P. aeruginosa PEER02 strain can produce rhamnolipids with different carbon sources as substrate. Interfacial tension analysis (IFT) showed that different rhamnolipids from different

  4. Genetic Engineering In BioButanol Production And Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Rao

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The growing need to address current energy and environmental problems has sparked an interest in developing improved biological methods to produce liquid fuels from renewable sources. Higher-chain alcohols possess chemical properties that are more similar to gasoline. Ethanol and butanol are two products which are used as biofuel. Butanol production was more concerned than ethanol because of its high octane number. Unfortunately, these alcohols are not produced efficiently in natural microorganisms, and thus economical production in industrial volumes remains a challenge. The synthetic biology, however, offers additional tools to engineer synthetic pathways in user-friendly hosts to help increase titers and productivity of bio-butanol. Knock out and over-expression of genes is the major approaches towards genetic manipulation and metabolic engineering of microbes. Yet there are TargeTron Technology, Antisense RNA and CRISPR technology has a vital role in genome manipulation of C.acetobutylicum. This review concentrates on the recent developments for efficient production of butanol and butanol tolerance by various genetically engineered microbes.

  5. Correlating Engine NOx Emission with Biodiesel Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaseelan, Thangaraja; Mehta, Pramod Shankar

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel composition comprising of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters has a significant influence on its properties and hence the engine performance and emission characteristics. This paper proposes a comprehensive approach for composition-property-NOx emission analysis for biodiesel fuels and highlights the pathways responsible for such a relationship. Finally, a procedure and a predictor equation are developed for the assessment of biodiesel NOx emission from its composition details.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Bio-Diesel Obtained From Waste Cooking Oil and Its Blends with Diesel on Single Cylinder Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Sharma,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment a comprehensive experimental investigation of bio-diesel oil on single cylinder engine running with biodiesel obtained from Waste cooking oil and its blends with diesel was carried out for its performance and emission analysis. The results which obtained are significantly comparable to pure diesel. It shows that biodiesel obtained from cooking oil can be used as alternative fuel with better performance and lower emissions compared with diesel and play a very vital role for the overall economic development of the country.

  7. Bio-based targeted chemical engineering education : Role and impact of bio-based energy and resourcedevelopment projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardoa, N.M.; Venselaar, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Avans University of Applied Sciences is redrafting its courses and curricula in view of sustainability. For chemical engineering in particular that implies a focus on 'green' and bio-based processes, products and energy. Avans is situated in the Southwest region of the Netherlands and specifically i

  8. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sendilvelan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combustion rate controllable. Meanwhile, the periphery of the fuel-rich zone leads to fierce burning, which results in slightly high NOx emissions. The experiments were conducted in a modified single cylinder water-cooled diesel engine. In this experiment we use diesel, bio-diesel (Jatropha and gasoline as the fuel at different mixing ratios. HCCI has advantages in high thermal efficiency and low emissions and could possibly become a promising combustion method in internal combustion engines.

  9. Cleaning the Diesel Engine Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    necessitates a rethinking of public governance that involve multilevel governance and integrating technology push and pull strategies. The agenda requires a re-conceptualisation of the innovation concept with special emphasis on value chain dynamics. The paper includes an analysis of the Danish innovation......This paper examines how technologies for cleaning of diesel emission from road vehicles can be supported by facilitating a technology push in the Danish automotive emission control industry. The European commission is at present preparing legislation for the euro 5 emission standard (to be enforced...... policy based on Michael Porters cluster theory. The paper however suggest that the narrow focus on productivity and economic growth in Porters theory should be qualified and integrated with a broader scope of societal policy aims including social and environmental issues. This suggestion also...

  10. Particulate matters from diesel engine exhaust emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Velimir S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution caused by diesel engine emissions, especially particulate matters and nitric oxides emissions, is one of the biggest problems of current transportation. In the near future the emission of diesel particulate matters will become one of the most important factors that will affect the trend of engine development. Ambient airborne particles have adverse environmental and health effects and therefore their concentration in the air is regulated. Recent medical studies showed that different particle properties are important (for example: number/concentration, active surface, chemical composition/morphology and may take role in the responsibility for their human health impact. Thus, diesel engines are one of the most important sources of particles in the atmosphere, especially in urban areas. Studying health effects and diesel engine particulate properties, it has been concluded that they are a complex mixture of solids and liquids. Biological activity of particulate matter may be related to particle sizes and their number. The paper presents the activities of UN-ECE working group PMP on defining the best procedure and methodology for the measurement of passenger cars diesel engines particle mass and number concentrations. The results of inter-laboratory emissions testing are presented for different engine technologies with special attention on repeatability and reproducibility of measured data. .

  11. Bio-engineering traits of Pinus radiata D.Don

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Marden, Michael; Marrosu, Roberto; Schwarz, Massimiliano; Phillips, Chris John; Cohen, Denis; Niedda, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Pinus radiata is widely cultivated in New Zealand. Due to steep slopes and intense rainfall, the silviculture of Pinus radiata forests is important to control erosion and slope stability. Bio-engineering traits such as root distribution and root tensile strength are fundamental to understand the effectiveness of Pinus radiata. This information is needed to use the state of the art root reinforcement model (the Root Bundle Model) and the physically-based slope stability model SOSlope. Yet, little is known about root distribution and tensile strength for this specie. We measured soil moisture and carried out 30 field tensile tests on roots of Pinus radiata. We also measured root distribution data from 5 plants, digging arc of circles 0.6 radian around the trees in four opposite directions. We fully excavated the root system of two trees. Using the Root Bundle Model, results of our measurements allow estimation of root reinforcement. With the slope stability model SOSlope, information on the intensity and frequency of harvesting and on the development of weak zones that can be supported by a stand of Pinus radiata in relation to slope stability can be calculated. An added value is that the collected data allow us to make inferences between number and sizes of roots, and growth direction.

  12. Emission consequences of introducing bio ethanol as a fuel for gasoline cars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Morten Mentz; Møller, Flemming; Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the direct vehicle emission impact of the future use of bio ethanol as a fuel for gasoline cars in Denmark arising from the vehicle specific fuel consumption and emission differences between neat gasoline (E0) and E5/E85 gasoline-ethanol fuel blends derived from emission...... tests using primarily the European NEDC and ARTEMIS driving cycles. The E0-E5 test vehicles (nine cars) represent today’s gasoline car traffic well where most of the driving is being made with cars certified as Euro 3+. The FFV test cars (25 cars) are all certified according to the Euro 4 emission......% in 2030. As predicted by the vehicle specific emission differences the calculated emission impacts of using bio ethanol are small for NOx, VOC and CO. Instead, for FS, BS1 and BS2 large emission reductions are due to the gradually cleaner new sold gasoline cars and the decline in total mileage until...

  13. Performance and Emission Characteristics of Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engine Fueled with Biodiesel and High Speed Diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gopinathan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Depleting petroleum reserves on the earth and increasing concerns about the environment leads to the question for fuels which are eco-friendly safer for human beings. The objective of present study was to investigate the effect of coating on cylinder head of a Diesel engine on the performance and emission characteristics of exhaust gases using Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel (HSD as a fuel. In this study the effect of Tin and Hard Chrome coating on the performance and emission characteristics of diesel engine was investigated using Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel as a fuel. For this purpose the cylinder head of the test engine were coated with a Tin and Hard Chrome of 100 µ thick by the Electroplating method. For comparing the performance of the engine with coated components with the base engine, readings were taken before and after coating. To make the diesel engine to work with Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel a modification was done. The engine’s performance was studied for both Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel with and without Tin, Hard Chrome coating. Also the emissions values are recorded to study the engine’s behavior on emissions. Satisfactory performance was obtained with Tin and Hard Chrome coating compared with a standard diesel engine. The brake thermal efficiency was increased up to 2.08% for High Speed Diesel with Tin coating and there was a significant reduction in the specific fuel consumption. The CO emission in the engine exhaust decreases with coating. Using Bio Diesel and High Speed Diesel fuel for a LHR diesel engine causes an improvement in the performance characteristics and significant reduction in exhaust emissions.

  14. Soil bio-engineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    OpenAIRE

    PETRONE, A.; Preti, F.

    2009-01-01

    The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on authochtonal plants suitable for this kind of works and on economic efficiency is essential for the divulgation of such techniques. The present paper is focused on this two issues related to the realization of various typologies of soil bio-engineering works in the humid tropic of Nicaragua.


    ...

  15. Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J. M.

    2000-07-06

    A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

  16. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli: a sustainable industrial platform for bio-based chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianzhong; Zhou, Li; Tian, Kangming; Kumar, Ashwani; Singh, Suren; Prior, Bernard A; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2013-12-01

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, more bulk and/or fine chemicals are produced by bioprocesses, replacing the traditional energy and fossil based intensive route. The Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium, Escherichia coli has been studied extensively on a fundamental and applied level and has become a predominant host microorganism for industrial applications. Furthermore, metabolic engineering of E. coli for the enhanced biochemical production has been significantly promoted by the integrated use of recent developments in systems biology, synthetic biology and evolutionary engineering. In this review, we focus on recent efforts devoted to the use of genetically engineered E. coli as a sustainable platform for the production of industrially important biochemicals such as biofuels, organic acids, amino acids, sugar alcohols and biopolymers. In addition, representative secondary metabolites produced by E. coli will be systematically discussed and the successful strategies for strain improvements will be highlighted. Moreover, this review presents guidelines for future developments in the bio-based chemical production using E. coli as an industrial platform.

  17. Electro-Quasistatic Simulations in Bio-Systems Engineering and Medical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rienen, U.; Flehr, J.; Schreiber, U.; Schulze, S.; Gimsa, U.; Baumann, W.; Weiss, D. G.; Gimsa, J.; Benecke, R.; Pau, H.-W.

    2005-05-01

    Slowly varying electromagnetic fields play a key role in various applications in bio-systems and medical engineering. Examples are the electric activity of neurons on neurochips used as biosensors, the stimulating electric fields of implanted electrodes used for deep brain stimulation in patients with Morbus Parkinson and the stimulation of the auditory nerves in deaf patients, respectively. In order to simulate the neuronal activity on a chip it is necessary to couple Maxwell's and Hodgkin-Huxley's equations. First numerical results for a neuron coupling to a single electrode are presented. They show a promising qualitative agreement with the experimentally recorded signals. Further, simulations are presented on electrodes for deep brain stimulation in animal experiments where the question of electrode ageing and energy deposition in the surrounding tissue are of major interest. As a last example, electric simulations for a simple cochlea model are presented comparing the field in the skull bones for different electrode types and stimulations in different positions.

  18. Emissions and properties of Bio-oil and Natural Gas Co-combustion in a Pilot Stabilised Swirl Burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Dylan

    Fast pyrolysis oil, or bio-oil, has been investigated to replace traditional fossil fuels in industrial burners. However, flame stability is a challenge due to its high water content. In order to address its instability, bio-oil was co-fired with natural gas in a lab scale 10kW swirl burner at energy ratios from 0% bio-oil to 80% bio-oil. To evaluate the combustion, flame shape, exhaust and particulate emissions, temperatures, as well as infrared emission were monitored. As the bio-oil energy fraction increased, NO emissions increased due to the nitrogen content of bio-oil. CO and particulate emissions increased likely due to carbonaceous residue exiting the combustion zone. Unburnt Hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions increased rapidly as combustion became poor at 60-80% bio-oil energy. The temperature and infrared output decreased with more bio-oil energy. The natural gas proved to be effective at anchoring the bio-oil flame to the nozzle, decreasing instances of extinction or blowout.

  19. CO and PAH emissions from engines operating on producer gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    from the start been that a high CO emission is a measure for incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons and thus an indicator for the presents of organic micro emissions such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Measurements from two operating gasification plants show that there is no correlation...... between the high CO emissions and PAH emissions from engines operating on producer gas. The measured PAH emissions were more than 20 times lower than the recommended emission limit for gas engines. Since unburned CO and UHC are similar in origin the reasonable regulated limit for CO emissions from engines...

  20. Electrifying white biotechnology: engineering and economic potential of electricity-driven bio-production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, Falk; Rosa, Luis F M; Kracke, Frauke; Virdis, Bernardino; Krömer, Jens O

    2015-03-01

    The production of fuels and chemicals by electricity-driven bio-production (i.e., using electric energy to drive biosynthesis) holds great promises. However, this electrification of white biotechnology is particularly challenging to achieve because of the different optimal operating conditions of electrochemical and biochemical reactions. In this article, we address the technical parameters and obstacles to be taken into account when engineering microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BES) for bio-production. In addition, BES-based bio-production processes reported in the literature are compared against industrial needs showing that a still large gap has to be closed. Finally, the feasibility of BES bio-production is analysed based on bulk electricity prices. Using the example of lysine production from sucrose, we demonstrate that there is a realistic market potential as cost savings of 8.4 % (in EU) and 18.0 % (in US) could be anticipated, if the necessary yields can be obtained.

  1. Lean-burn engines UHC emission reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karll, B.; Kristensen, P.G.; Nielsen, M.; Iskov, H. [Danish Gas Technology Centre a/s (Denmark); Broe Bendtsen, A.; Glarborg, P.; Dam-Johansen, K. [Technical University of Denmark. CHEC, Department of Chemical Engineering (Denmark)

    1999-04-01

    The effect of adding hydrogen to methane as a fuel for spark ignited engines has been extensively investigated. Both the possibility of adding a limited amount of hydrogen as well as equal amounts of hydrogen and carbon dioxide to natural gas has been investigated. A 10 vol% addition of hydrogen to the natural gas caused a reduction in UHC of approximately 40%, and an increase in efficiency of approximately three percentage points at the test engine. It is unknown if the gain is representative for large engines. Similar results for UHC reduction and efficiency were obtained for combined hydrogen and carbon dioxide addition. The carbon dioxide was added by exhaust gas recirculation. However, the price of hydrogen, makes this idea uneconomical even when carbon dioxide is readily available through recirculation of engine exhaust. Adiabatic prereforming may be used to convert natural gas into methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide in order to generate hydrogen and at the same time increase the methane number. The process has been found to be competitive with adding of hydrogen but it is still not economical. The effect of NO/NO{sub 2} on methane oxidation has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. A detailed kinetic modelling study of the UHC conversion dependency of exhaust gas parameters is reported and the project has contributed to the theoretical understanding of the oxidation chemistry. Both NO and NH{sub 3} addition to the engine inlet was used to increase the NO{sub x} level, and the general trend was a decrease in UHC as the NO{sub x} level increased, both in cylinger, manifold and rector. From the data it is concluded that NO and NH{sub 3} addition have identical effects. The results show a 15-35% decrease in manifold UHC. However, the increased emissions of NO{sub x} and CO associated with this process must be realised. Field tests show a 28% UHC reduction without an increase in CO emission. The UHC oxidation in the exhaust reactor has been tested

  2. Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer: Engineering Flight Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Shoen, Steven S.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) successfully completed its first set of engineering test flights. HyTES was developed in support of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). HyspIRI is one of the Tier II Decadal Survey missions. HyTES currently provides both high spectral resolution (17 nm) and high spatial resolution (2-5m) data in the thermal infrared (7.5-12 micron) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. HyTES data will be used to help determine the optimum band positions for the HyspIRI Thermal Infrared (TIR) sensor and provide antecedent data for HyspIRI related studies.

  3. Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

  4. Lean-burn engines UHC emission reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karll, B.; Kristensen, P.G.; Nielsen, M.; Iskov, H. [Danish Gas Technology Centre a/s (Denmark); Broe Bendtsen, A.; Glarborg, P.; Dam-Johansen, K. [Technical University of Denmark. CHEC, Department of Chemical Engineering (Denmark)

    1999-04-01

    The effect of adding hydrogen to methane as a fuel for spark ignited engines has been extensively investigated. Both the possibility of adding a limited amount of hydrogen as well as equal amounts of hydrogen and carbon dioxide to natural gas has been investigated. A 10 vol% addition of hydrogen to the natural gas caused a reduction in UHC of approximately 40%, and an increase in efficiency of approximately three percentage points at the test engine. It is unknown if the gain is representative for large engines. Similar results for UHC reduction and efficiency were obtained for combined hydrogen and carbon dioxide addition. The carbon dioxide was added by exhaust gas recirculation. However, the price of hydrogen, makes this idea uneconomical even when carbon dioxide is readily available through recirculation of engine exhaust. Adiabatic prereforming may be used to convert natural gas into methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide in order to generate hydrogen and at the same time increase the methane number. The process has been found to be competitive with adding of hydrogen but it is still not economical. The effect of NO/NO{sub 2} on methane oxidation has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. A detailed kinetic modelling study of the UHC conversion dependency of exhaust gas parameters is reported and the project has contributed to the theoretical understanding of the oxidation chemistry. Both NO and NH{sub 3} addition to the engine inlet was used to increase the NO{sub x} level, and the general trend was a decrease in UHC as the NO{sub x} level increased, both in cylinger, manifold and rector. From the data it is concluded that NO and NH{sub 3} addition have identical effects. The results show a 15-35% decrease in manifold UHC. However, the increased emissions of NO{sub x} and CO associated with this process must be realised. Field tests show a 28% UHC reduction without an increase in CO emission. The UHC oxidation in the exhaust reactor has been tested

  5. Fabrication and characterization of bio-engineered cardiac pseudo tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Tao; Boland, Thomas [Department of Bioengineering, 420 Rhodes Hall, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Baicu, Catalin; Aho, Michael; Zile, Michael, E-mail: tboland@clemson.ed [Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    We report on fabricating functional three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using an inkjet based bio-prototyping method. With the use of modified inkjet printers, contractile cardiac hybrids that exhibit the forms of the 3D rectangular sheet and even the 'half heart' (with two connected ventricles) have been fabricated by arranging alternate layers of biocompatible alginate hydrogels and mammalian cardiac cells according to pre-designed 3D patterns. In this study, primary feline adult and H1 cardiomyocytes were used as model cardiac cells. Alginate hydrogels with controlled micro-shell structures were built by spraying cross-linkers in micro-drops onto un-gelled alginic acid. The cells remained viable in constructs as thick as 1 cm due to the programmed porosity. Microscopic and macroscopic contractile functions of these cardiomyocyte constructs were observed in vitro. These results suggest that the inkjet bio-prototyping method could be used for hierarchical design of functional cardiac pseudo tissues, balanced with porosity for mass transport and structural support.

  6. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnavi, S; Saravanan, U; Arthi, N; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Kumary, T V; Rajan, S; Verma, R S

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44(+), αSMA(+), Vimentin(+) and CD105(-) human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children.

  7. Electro-Quasistatic Simulations in Bio-Systems Engineering and Medical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. van Rienen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Slowly varying electromagnetic fields play a key role in various applications in bio-systems and medical engineering. Examples are the electric activity of neurons on neurochips used as biosensors, the stimulating electric fields of implanted electrodes used for deep brain stimulation in patients with Morbus Parkinson and the stimulation of the auditory nerves in deaf patients, respectively. In order to simulate the neuronal activity on a chip it is necessary to couple Maxwell's and Hodgkin-Huxley's equations. First numerical results for a neuron coupling to a single electrode are presented. They show a promising qualitative agreement with the experimentally recorded signals. Further, simulations are presented on electrodes for deep brain stimulation in animal experiments where the question of electrode ageing and energy deposition in the surrounding tissue are of major interest. As a last example, electric simulations for a simple cochlea model are presented comparing the field in the skull bones for different electrode types and stimulations in different positions.

  8. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  9. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  10. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  11. Study on Carbonyl Emissions of Diesel Engine Fueled with Biodiesel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruina Li; Zhong Wang; Guangju Xu

    2017-01-01

      Biodiesel is a kind of high-quality alternative fuel of diesel engine. In this study, biodiesel and biodiesel/diesel blend were used in a single cylinder diesel engine to study the carbonyl emissions...

  12. Low emission fuel engine and method of operating same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmich, M.J.

    1990-09-11

    This patent describes a low emission duel fuel engine system. It comprises: a dual fuel engine having a combustion chamber; a fuel oil supply connected to the engine; a fuel gas supply connected to the engine; and means connected between the fuel oil supply and the engine for injecting fuel oil into the engine. The means connected between the engine and fuel oil supply limiting the injection of fuel oil to the combustion chamber to pilot ignition quantities only, wherein the limiting means includes means for limiting the injection of fuel oil such that the exhaust emission of NO{sub x} is at an emission rate of less than 1 GM/PH-HR, whereby the exhaust emission performance of the dual fuel engine is enhanced.

  13. Cardiovascular Bio-Engineering: Current State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Yarza, Teresa; Bataille, Isabelle; Letourneur, Didier

    2017-04-01

    Despite the introduction of new drugs and innovative devices contributing in the last years to improve patients' quality of life, morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases remain high. There is an urgent need for addressing the underlying problem of the loss of cardiac or vascular tissues and therefore developing new therapies. Autologous vascular transplants are often limited by poor quality of donor sites and heart organ transplantation by donor shortage. Vascular and cardiac tissue engineering, whose aim is to repair or replace cardiovascular tissues by the use of cells, engineering and materials, as well as biochemical and physicochemical factors, appears in this scenario as a promising tool to repair the damaged hearts and vessels. We will present a general overview on the fundamentals in the area of cardiac and vascular tissue engineering as well as on the latest progresses and challenges.

  14. Emission consequences of introducing bio ethanol as a fuel for gasoline cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Morten; Møller, Flemming; Jensen, Thomas C.

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the direct vehicle emission impact of the future use of bio ethanol as a fuel for gasoline cars in Denmark arising from the vehicle specific fuel consumption and emission differences between neat gasoline (E0) and E5/E85 gasoline-ethanol fuel blends derived from emission tests using primarily the European NEDC and ARTEMIS driving cycles. The E0-E5 test vehicles (nine cars) represent today's gasoline car traffic well where most of the driving is being made with cars certified as Euro 3+. The FFV test cars (25 cars) are all certified according to the Euro 4 emission standard introduced in Europe from the mid-2000s. This matches well with the propagation of the FFV technology in Europe. For vehicles using E5 rather than E0, the average fuel consumption and emission differences are small. For CO, VOC and NOx the derived average differences are 0.5%, -5% and 7%, respectively. For FFVs using E85 rather than E5, the emission differences become even smaller for VOC and NOx, but greater for CO. The derived average emission differences are in this case 18%, -1% and 5% for CO, VOC and NOx, respectively. In both comparative cases there is a large variation in the emission difference values calculated for the individual cars. The large standard deviations introduce some uncertainties in the final averages computed for each emission component. The vehicle based emissions are made up for two fossil fuel baseline scenarios (FS), characterised by high and low traffic growth rates. For each FS, two biofuel scenarios (BS1, BS2) are presented. BS1 reaches the Danish policy targets (10% biofuel share in 2020). BS2 is more ambitious (25% in 2030). By definition the biofuel part of the combusted fuel is CO2 neutral and the maximum CO2 emission difference between FS and BS2 becomes 27% in 2030. As predicted by the vehicle specific emission differences the calculated emission impacts of using bio ethanol are small for NOx, VOC and CO. Instead, for FS, BS1 and BS2

  15. Emissions Characteristics of Small Diesel Engine Fuelled by Waste Cooking Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Amir

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative, decomposable and biological-processed fuel that has similar characteristics with mineral diesel which can be used directly into diesel engines. However, biodiesel has oxygenated, more density and viscosity compared to mineral diesel. Despite years of improvement attempts, the key issue in using waste cooking oil-based fuels is oxidation stability, stoichiometric point, bio-fuel composition, antioxidants on the degradation and much oxygen with comparing to diesel gas oil. Thus, the improvement of emission exhausted from diesel engines fueled by biodiesel derived from waste cooking oil (WCO is urgently required to meet the future stringent emission regulations. The purpose of this research is to investigate the influences of WCO blended fuel and combustion reliability in small engine on the combustion characteristics and exhaust emissions. The engine speed was varied from 1500-2500 rpm and WCO blending ratio from 5-15 vol% (W5-W15. Increased blends of WCO ratio is found to influences to the combustion process, resulting in decreased the HC emissions and also other exhaust emission element. The improvement of combustion process is expected to be strongly influenced by oxygenated fuel in biodiesel content.

  16. Study on the Effect of the Bio-lubricating-oil-additive on the Gaseous Pollutants and Particulate Matter Emissions of Diesel Engine%生物机油添加剂对柴油机气态污染物和颗粒物排放的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽民; 鲍晓峰; 姚鹏; 李凯; 朱仁成

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the bio-lubricating-oil additive was determined by the emission experiment of the diesel engine bench test.The test procedure followed Road vehicles-engine test code-performance (GB/T 18297-2001) and Limits and measurement methods for exhaust pollutants from compression ignition and gas fuelled positive ignition engines of vehicles (Ⅲ,Ⅳ,Ⅴ) (GB 17691-2005).The engine speed of 2 000 r/min was chosen to conduct the load characteristic test, with CO, THC, NOx and particulate matter in the exhaust gas collected and analyzed.The results show that the specific THC and CO brake specific emissions generally change little, and decreased only at low load, with the maximum reduction of about 15%.The specific NOx brake specific emission increased to a certain extent, with a maximum of rate 15%.The specific particulate concentration could be reduced significantly, with maximum rate of 53%.After using the additive, the particle number concentration of 20-100 nm can be reduced at low load, the particle number concentration does not change obviously at medium load, the particle number concentrations below 20 nm and above 50 nm will be reduced at high load, while the particle number concentration of 20-50 nm will be slightly increased.With the increase of the engine load, the particle size distribution map will gradually increase and become narrow and shift to the left, and the use of additives will mitigate the trend.%通过柴油机台架试验对某种生物机油添加剂进行排放性试验,确定其对柴油机尾气中各类污染物排放的影响。试验过程依据GB/T 18297—2001《汽车发动机性能试验方法》和GB 17691—2005《车用压燃式、气体燃料点燃式发动机与汽车排气污染物排放限值及测量方法(中国Ⅲ、Ⅳ、Ⅴ阶段)》,选定转速为2000 r/min进行发动机负荷特性试验,对尾气中的CO、THC ( total hydro carbons)、NOx 及颗粒物进行采集分析。结果表明:使用

  17. Reduction of methane emission from landfills using bio-mitigation systems – from lab tests to full scale implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    , or open or closed bed biofilter systems. The objective of this paper is to describe the relationship between research on process understanding of the oxidation of landfill gas contained methane and the up-scale to full bio-mitigation systems implemented at landfills. The oxidation of methane is controlled...... due to self-heating processes. Bio-mitigation can be used as a stand-alone technology or combined with active or passive gas collection. When implementing bio-mitigation systems focus should be on additional fugitive methane emissions or the presence of uncontrolled point releases. A protocol...... for implementing a bio-mitigation system is presented, and the reported landfill-implemented bio-mitigation systems either established as full-scale or pilot-scale systems are reviewed. It is concluded that bio-mitigation systems have a large potential for providing cost-efficient mitigation options for reducing...

  18. Vorticella: A Protozoan for Bio-Inspired Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Sangjin Ryu; Pepper, Rachel E.; Moeto Nagai; Danielle C. France

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we introduce Vorticella as a model biological micromachine for microscale engineering systems. Vorticella has two motile organelles: the oral cilia of the zooid and the contractile spasmoneme in the stalk. The oral cilia beat periodically, generating a water flow that translates food particles toward the animal at speeds in the order of 0.1–1 mm/s. The ciliary flow of Vorticella has been characterized by experimental measurement and theoretical modeling, and tested for flow co...

  19. CO Emissions from Gas Engines Operating on Biomass Producer Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Jensen, T. K.; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2004-01-01

    High carbon monoxide (CO) emission from gas engines fueled by producer gas is a concerning problem in the struggle to make biomass gasification for heat and power production a success. CO emissions from engines operating on biomass producer gases are high, especially at very lean conditions where...

  20. Effect of Bio Ethanol and Diesel Blend on Small Diesel Engine Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H Hashemi Fard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of Bio-ethanol as an alternative diesel engine fuel is rapidly increasing. Bio-ethanol is mixed with diesel fuel at different ratios and used in CI and SI engines. Since vibrations have direct effects on users and engine components, for this reason analysis of vibration resulting from combustion in CI engines is very important. In this study, evaluation of vibration was performed for both diesel and ethanol blends. Commercial diesel fuel (D100, E2 (2% ethanol and 98% diesel fuel, E5, E10, E15 and E20 were used in a two-wheel MITSUBISHI tractor. The engine was tested in 1200, 1600, 2000 and 2400 rpm for all fuel blends, and also the effect of load was investigated for D100 and E10. Results showed that vibration is significantly affected by fuel blend. It was observed that E10 had the lowest vibration while E20 had the highest value. It was also observed that vibration increased as engine speed increased for all fuel blends. It was found that both axial and lateral vibrations affected significantly by load. The lateral vibrations decreased continuously with load rise , but the axial vibrations increased initially but started to follow a reverse trend.

  1. Vorticella: A Protozoan for Bio-Inspired Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjin Ryu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduce Vorticella as a model biological micromachine for microscale engineering systems. Vorticella has two motile organelles: the oral cilia of the zooid and the contractile spasmoneme in the stalk. The oral cilia beat periodically, generating a water flow that translates food particles toward the animal at speeds in the order of 0.1–1 mm/s. The ciliary flow of Vorticella has been characterized by experimental measurement and theoretical modeling, and tested for flow control and mixing in microfluidic systems. The spasmoneme contracts in a few milliseconds, coiling the stalk and moving the zooid at 15–90 mm/s. Because the spasmoneme generates tension in the order of 10–100 nN, powered by calcium ion binding, it serves as a model system for biomimetic actuators in microscale engineering systems. The spasmonemal contraction of Vorticella has been characterized by experimental measurement of its dynamics and energetics, and both live and extracted Vorticellae have been tested for moving microscale objects. We describe past work to elucidate the contraction mechanism of the spasmoneme, recognizing that past and continuing efforts will increase the possibilities of using the spasmoneme as a microscale actuator as well as leading towards bioinspired actuators mimicking the spasmoneme.

  2. Revised emission factors for gas engines including start/stop emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Boll Illerup, J.; Birr-Petersen, K.

    2008-06-15

    Liberalisation of the electricity market has led to Danish gas engine plants increasingly converting to the spot and regulating power markets. In order to offer regulating power, plants need to be able to start and stop the engines at the plants quickly. The liberalisation causes a considerable change of operation practice of the engines e.g. less full load operation hours /year. The project provides an inventory determining the scale of the emissions during the start and stop sequence as well as proposals for engine modifications aimed at reducing start/stop emissions. This report includes calculation of emission factors as well as an inventory of total emissions and reduction potentials. (au)

  3. Calculation of odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Morten; Kousgaard, Uffe; Oxbøl, Arne

    2006-07-31

    In a new approach the odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport are calculated using actual fuel flow and emission measurements (one main engine and one APU: Auxiliary Power Unit), odour panel results, engine specific data and aircraft operational data for seven busy days. The calculation principle assumes a linear relation between odour and HC emissions. Using a digitalisation of the aircraft movements in the airport area, the results are depicted on grid maps, clearly reflecting aircraft operational statistics as single flights or total activity during a whole day. The results clearly reflect the short-term temporal fluctuations of the emissions of odour (and exhaust gases). Aircraft operating at low engine thrust (taxiing, queuing and landing) have a total odour emission share of almost 98%, whereas the shares for the take off/climb out phases (2%) and APU usage (0.5%) are only marginal. In most hours of the day, the largest odour emissions occur, when the total amount of fuel burned during idle is high. However, significantly higher HC emissions for one specific engine cause considerable amounts of odour emissions during limited time periods. The experimentally derived odour emission factor of 57 OU/mg HC is within the range of 23 and 110 OU/mg HC used in other airport odour studies. The distribution of odour emission results between aircraft operational phases also correspond very well with the results for these other studies. The present study uses measurement data for a representative engine. However, the uncertainties become large when the experimental data is used to estimate the odour emissions for all aircraft engines. More experimental data is needed to increase inventory accuracy, and in terms of completeness it is recommended to make odour emission estimates also for engine start and the fuelling of aircraft at Copenhagen Airport in the future.

  4. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Yang, Xiaofan [ORNL; Debusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging

  5. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  6. Engineering of a polymer layered bio-hybrid heart valve scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnavi, S., E-mail: jani84@gmail.com [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, TN (India); Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Kumary, T.V., E-mail: tvkumary@yahoo.com [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Bhuvaneshwar, G.S., E-mail: gs.bhuvnesh@gmail.com [Trivitron Innovation Centre, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, TN (India); Natarajan, T.S., E-mail: tsniit@gmail.com [Conducting Polymer laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036, TN (India); Verma, R.S., E-mail: vermars@iitm.ac.in [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, TN (India)

    2015-06-01

    Current treatment strategy for end stage valve disease involves either valvular repair or replacement with homograft/mechanical/bioprosthetic valves. In cases of recurrent stenosis/ regurgitation, valve replacement is preferred choice of treatment over valvular repair. Currently available mechanical valves primarily provide durability whereas bioprosthetic valves have superior tissue compatibility but both lack remodelling and regenerative properties making their utility limited in paediatric patients. With advances in tissue engineering, attempts have been made to fabricate valves with regenerative potential using various polymers, decellularized tissues and hybrid scaffolds. To engineer an ideal heart valve, decellularized bovine pericardium extracellular matrix (DBPECM) is an attractive biocompatible scaffold but has weak mechanical properties and rapid degradation. However, DBPECM can be modified with synthetic polymers to enhance its mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a Bio-Hybrid scaffold with non-cross linked DBPECM in its native structure coated with a layer of Polycaprolactone-Chitosan (PCL-CH) nanofibers that displayed superior mechanical properties. Surface and functional studies demonstrated integration of PCL-CH to the DBPECM with enhanced bio and hemocompatibility. This engineered Bio-Hybrid scaffold exhibited most of the physical, biochemical and functional properties of the native valve that makes it an ideal scaffold for fabrication of cardiac valve with regenerative potential. - Highlights: • A Bio-Hybrid scaffold was fabricated with PCL-CH blend and DBPECM. • PCL-CH functionally interacted with decellularized matrix without cross linking. • Modified scaffold exhibited mechanical properties similar to native heart valve. • Supported better fibroblast and endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation. • The developed scaffold can be utilized for tissue engineering of heart valve.

  7. [Effect of Aeration Strategies on Emissions of Nitrogenous Gases and Methane During Sludge Bio-Drying].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Wei, Yuan-song; Zhang, Jun-ya; Zhao, Chen-yang; Cai, Xing; Zhang, Yuan-li; Shao, Chun-yan; Li, Hong-mei

    2016-01-15

    The data on nitrogen gas (NH3, N2O, NO) emissions during sludge bio-drying process in China is scarce, especially NO due to its unstable chemical property. In this study, effect of two aeration modes on emissions of methane and nitrogenous gas was compared during the continuous aerated turning pile sludge bio-drying process at full scale. In these two aeration strategies, the one currently used in the plant was set as the control, and the other was set as the test in which the aeration was used for oxygen supply, pile temperature control, and moisture removal in the start-up, middle and final stages, respectively. The results showed that the aeration strategy used in the test could not only obviously accelerate the rate of sludge drying (the moisture contents of the test and the control were 36.6% and 42% on day 11) , but also had a better drying performance (the final moisture contents of the test and the control were 33.6% and 37.6%, respectively) and decreased the ammonia cumulative emission by 5%, (ammonia cumulative emission of the test and the control were 208 mg x m(-3) and 219.8 mg x m(-3), respectively). Though a lower accumulated emission (eCO2) of greenhouse gas in the test at 3.61 kg x t(-1) was observed than that of the control (3.73 kg x t(-1) dry weight) , the cumulative emission of NO in the test at 1.9 g x m(-2) was 15. 9% higher than that of the control (1.6 g x m(-2)).

  8. Experimental Investigation of Bio-Diesel Obtained From Waste Cooking Oil and Its Blends with Diesel on Single Cylinder Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. B. Sharma; Dr. Amit Pal

    2014-01-01

    In this experiment a comprehensive experimental investigation of bio-diesel oil on single cylinder engine running with biodiesel obtained from Waste cooking oil and its blends with diesel was carried...

  9. Generic methods for aero-engine exhaust emission prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakariyants, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    In the thesis, generic methods have been developed for aero-engine combustor performance, combustion chemistry, as well as airplane aerodynamics, airplane and engine performance. These methods specifically aim to support diverse emission prediction studies coupled with airplane and engine simulation

  10. Engineering of a polymer layered bio-hybrid heart valve scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnavi, S; Kumary, T V; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Natarajan, T S; Verma, R S

    2015-06-01

    Current treatment strategy for end stage valve disease involves either valvular repair or replacement with homograft/mechanical/bioprosthetic valves. In cases of recurrent stenosis/ regurgitation, valve replacement is preferred choice of treatment over valvular repair. Currently available mechanical valves primarily provide durability whereas bioprosthetic valves have superior tissue compatibility but both lack remodelling and regenerative properties making their utility limited in paediatric patients. With advances in tissue engineering, attempts have been made to fabricate valves with regenerative potential using various polymers, decellularized tissues and hybrid scaffolds. To engineer an ideal heart valve, decellularized bovine pericardium extracellular matrix (DBPECM) is an attractive biocompatible scaffold but has weak mechanical properties and rapid degradation. However, DBPECM can be modified with synthetic polymers to enhance its mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a Bio-Hybrid scaffold with non-cross linked DBPECM in its native structure coated with a layer of Polycaprolactone-Chitosan (PCL-CH) nanofibers that displayed superior mechanical properties. Surface and functional studies demonstrated integration of PCL-CH to the DBPECM with enhanced bio and hemocompatibility. This engineered Bio-Hybrid scaffold exhibited most of the physical, biochemical and functional properties of the native valve that makes it an ideal scaffold for fabrication of cardiac valve with regenerative potential.

  11. BioGPS descriptors for rational engineering of enzyme promiscuity and structure based bioinformatic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Ferrario

    Full Text Available A new bioinformatic methodology was developed founded on the Unsupervised Pattern Cognition Analysis of GRID-based BioGPS descriptors (Global Positioning System in Biological Space. The procedure relies entirely on three-dimensional structure analysis of enzymes and does not stem from sequence or structure alignment. The BioGPS descriptors account for chemical, geometrical and physical-chemical features of enzymes and are able to describe comprehensively the active site of enzymes in terms of "pre-organized environment" able to stabilize the transition state of a given reaction. The efficiency of this new bioinformatic strategy was demonstrated by the consistent clustering of four different Ser hydrolases classes, which are characterized by the same active site organization but able to catalyze different reactions. The method was validated by considering, as a case study, the engineering of amidase activity into the scaffold of a lipase. The BioGPS tool predicted correctly the properties of lipase variants, as demonstrated by the projection of mutants inside the BioGPS "roadmap".

  12. Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

  13. Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

    2000-06-19

    Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

  14. Engineering photonic and plasmonic light emission enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Nathaniel

    Semiconductor photonic devices are a rapidly maturing technology which currently occupy multi-billion dollar markets in the areas of LED lighting and optical data communication. LEDs currently demonstrate the highest luminous efficiency of any light source for general lighting. Long-haul optical data communication currently forms the backbone of the global communication network. Proper design of light management is required for photonic devices, which can increase the overall efficiency or add new device functionality. In this thesis, novel methods for the control of light propagation and confinement are developed for the use in integrated photonic devices. The first part of this work focuses on the engineering of field confinement within deep subwavelength plasmonic resonators for the enhancement of light-matter interaction. In this section, plasmonic ring nanocavities are shown to form gap plasmon modes confined to the dielectric region between two metal layers. The scattering properties, near-field enhancement and photonic density of states of nanocavity devices are studied using analytic theory and 3D finite difference time domain simulations. Plasmonic ring nanocavities are fabricated and characterized using photoluminescence intensity and decay rate measurements. A 25 times increase in the radiative decay rate of Er:Si02 is demonstrated in nanocavities where light is confined to volumes as small as 0.01( ln )3. The potential to achieve lasing, due to the enhancement of stimulated emission rate in ring nanocavities, is studied as a route to Si-compatible plasmon-enhanced nanolasers. The second part of this work focuses on the manipulation of light generated in planar semiconductor devices using arrays of dielectric nanopillars. In particular, aperiodic arrays of nanopillars are engineered for omnidirectional light extraction enhancement. Arrays of Er:SiNx, nanopillars are fabricated and a ten times increase in light extraction is experimentally demonstrated

  15. Evaluation of engine performance, emissions, of a twin cylinder diesel engine fuelled with waste plastic oil and diesel blends with a fraction of methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tarun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the methanol and waste plastic oil as an alternative fuel has been carried out. This report deals with the exhaust emission of waste plastic fuel on twin cylinder diesel engine. The objectives of this report are to analyse the fuel consumption and the emission characteristic of a twin cylinder diesel engine that are using waste plastic oil compared to usage of ordinary diesel that are available in the market. This report describes the setups and the procedures for the experiment which is to analyse the emission characteristics and fuel consumption of diesel engine due to usage of the both fuels. Detail studies about the experimental setup and components have been done before the experiment started. Data that are required for the analysis is observed from the experiments. Calculations and analysis have been done after all the required data needed for the thesis is obtained. The experiment used diesel engine with no load which means no load exerted on it. A four stroke Twin cylinder diesel engine was adopted to study the brake thermal efficiency, brake specific energy consumption, mechanical efficiency, brake power, volumetric efficiency, indicated thermal efficiency and emissions at full load with the fuel of fraction methanol in bio-diesel. In this study, the diesel engine was tested using methanol blended with bio-diesel at certain mixing ratios of (WPO: Diesel 20:80, 40:60 and 60:40 methanol to bio-diesel respectively. By the end of the report, the successful of the project have been started which is Kirloskar engine is able to run with waste plastic oil (WPO but the engine needs to run by using diesel fuel first, then followed by waste plastic oil and finished with diesel fuel as the last fuel usage before the engine turned off. The performance of the engine using blended fuel compared to the performance of engine with diesel fuel. Experimental results of blended fuel and diesel fuel are also compared.   Keywords

  16. 40 CFR 1045.105 - What exhaust emission standards must my sterndrive/inboard engines meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emissions for engines powered by the following fuels: (1) Alcohol-fueled engines: THCE emissions. (2... from advertisements or other marketing materials for any engines in the engine family. (B) Your...

  17. Exhaust emissions from small engines in handheld devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijewski Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of investigations on the exhaust emissions carried out under real operating conditions of gasoline engines operating in a power generator and a chainsaw. During the operation of these devices the authors measured the following exhaust emissions: CO, HC, NOx and CO2. For the measurements the authors used a portable exhaust emission analyzer SEMTECH DS by SENSORS. This analyzer measures the concentrations of the exhaust gas components in an on-line mode while the engine is running under real operating conditions (road, field etc.. The exhaust emissions tests of non-road engine applications are performed on engine test beds in the NRSC (ISO 8178 and NRTC tests. The presented method is a new solution in determining of the exhaust emissions from such engines. The obtained results were compared with the applicable emission requirements. Besides, based on the performed investigations, the authors attempted an evaluation of the possibilities of the use of the measurement method for development works related to the reduction of the emission from small gasoline engines.

  18. Piston ring lubrication and hydrocarbon emissions from internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelund, K.

    1997-11-01

    Is it the intention with this project to improve the existing hydrocarbon emission model at the Institute by combining it with a model for predicting the piston ring lubrication. The piston ring lubrication model should be experimentally verified to ensure the validity of the model. The following items were the objectives of the current study: Develop a piston ring lubrication model. This implies the development of a ring-pack gas flow model; Examine the response of the piston ring lubrication model to changing engineer conditions. Especially, it would be interesting to look at the engine warm-up phase since this is the phase where the engine-out emissions are highest and where the commonly used three way catalyst is not capable of converting the engine-out emissions, thereby leading the engine-out emissions directly out in to the environment with the exhaust gases; In order to verify the piston ring lubrication model the lubricant distribution on the cylinder liner should be investigated experimentally. Here again it would be of great interesting to look at the engine warm-up phase; The piston ring lubrication model should be adjusted for application together with the new hydrocarbon emission model for SI-engines at the Institute in order to increase the accuracy of the latter; The piston ring lubrication model could be used for describing the transport of PAH`s in diesel engines. (EG)

  19. Biological issues in materials science and engineering: Interdisciplinarity and the bio-materials paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.

    2006-07-01

    Biological systems and processes have had, and continue to have, important implications and applications in materials extraction, processing, and performance. This paper illustrates some interdisciplinary, biological issues in materials science and engineering. These include metal extraction involving bacterial catalysis, galvanic couples, bacterial-assisted corrosion and degradation of materials, biosorption and bioremediation of toxic and other heavy metals, metal and material implants and prostheses and related dental and medical biomaterials developments and applications, nanomaterials health benefits and toxicity issue, and biomimetics and biologically inspired materials developments. These and other examples provide compelling evidence and arguments for emphasizing biological sicences in materials science and engineering curricula and the implementation of a bio-materials paradigm to facilitate the emergence of innovative interdisciplinarity involving the biological sciences and materials sciences and engineering.

  20. Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

    2010-09-30

    In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

  1. CO and PAH emissions from engines operating on producer gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    . When the environmental effect of the emissions is discussed, unburned hydrocarbons in the form of methane is a strong greenhouse gas (21 times higher than CO2) will CO only indirectly through photochemical reactions is involved in the production of the greenhouse gas ozone. The destruction of CO...... low that no plant could uphold regulations without expensive equipment for after treatment of the emissions. CO emissions from engines operating on biomass producer gases are high, especially at very lean conditions where the emissions exceed the regulated value significantly. The high CO emissions...

  2. Particulate Emissions Hazards Associated with Fueling Heat Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Hendricks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available All hydrocarbon- (HC- fueled heat engine exhaust (tailpipe emissions (<10 to 140 nm contribute as health hazards, including emissions from transportation vehicles (e.g., aircraft and other HC-fueled power systems. CO2 emissions are tracked and, when mapped, show outlines of major transportation routes and cities. Particulate pollution affects living tissue and is found to be detrimental to cardiovascular and respiratory systems where ultrafine particulates directly translocate to promote vascular system diseases potentially detectable as organic vapors. This paper discusses aviation emissions, fueling, and certification issues, including heat engine emissions hazards, detection at low levels and tracking of emissions, and alternate energy sources for general aviation.

  3. Dynamic programming for Integrated Emission Management in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijndel, J. van; Donkers, M.C.F.; Willems, F.P.T.; Heemels, W.P.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated Emission Management (IEM) is a supervisory control strategy that aims at minimizing the operational costs of diesel engines with an aftertreatment system, while satisfying emission constraints imposed by legislation. In previous work on IEM, a suboptimal real-time implementable solution w

  4. Exhaust gas emission from a two-stroke engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippitsch, H.H.; Eichlseder, H.

    1986-01-01

    According to present day ideas, carbon monoxide CO, hydrocarbons HC and nitrogen oxide NO are regarded as harmful substances in the exhaust gas and are therefore limited by law in some countries. After a survey of the regulations in Europe and the USA, the origin of these substances in a two-stroke engine is briefly described. The effect of the type of engine is then shown by results from various engines. It was found that emission can be drastically reduced by new engine designs. The introduction of exhaust gas regulations in Austria has caused the firm of Bombadier-Rotax to intensify their development work in this field. The state of exhaust gas emission of present day mass-produced engines was compared with previous engines at this opportunity.

  5. Study on emissions reduction of DMCC engine with oxidation catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Chunde; LIU Xibo; WANG Hongfu; LIU Xiaoping; CHENG Chuanhui; WANG Yinshan

    2007-01-01

    A new combustion model diesel/methanol compound combustion (DMCC) is presented,in which methanol is injected into manifold and ignited by certain amount of diesel fuel.The results showed that DMCC remarkably decreased the emission of NOx and the smoke,but increased the emission of HC,CO and PM.However,HC,CO and NOx were dramatically decreased with a catalytic converter,and PM was also decreased compared with that of diesel engine.The testing results illustrated that,combined with oxidation catalyst converter,DMCC could improve engine emissions.

  6. Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Don (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period December 2004 through August 2007 for the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3-01136, Task Order 8, Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady of the NASA Glenn Research Center. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence of the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report is for a test program in which NASA funded engine validations of integrated technologies that reduce aircraft engine noise. These technologies address the reduction of engine fan and jet noise, and noise associated with propulsion/airframe integration. The results of these tests will be used by NASA to identify the engineering tradeoffs associated with the technologies that are needed to enable advanced engine systems to meet stringent goals for the reduction of noise. The objectives of this program are to (1) conduct system engineering and integration efforts to define the engine test-bed configuration; (2) develop selected noise reduction technologies to a technical maturity sufficient to enable engine testing and validation of those technologies in the FY06-07 time frame; (3) conduct engine tests designed to gain insight into the sources, mechanisms and characteristics of noise in the engines; and (4) establish baseline engine noise measurements for subsequent use in the evaluation of noise reduction.

  7. Interfacing engineered nanoparticles with biological systems: anticipating adverse nano-bio interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaz, Beatriz; Charron, Gaëlle; Pfeiffer, Christian; Zhao, Yuliang; de la Fuente, Jesus M; Liang, Xing-Jie; Parak, Wolfgang J; Del Pino, Pablo

    2013-05-27

    The innovative use of engineered nanomaterials in medicine, be it in therapy or diagnosis, is growing dramatically. This is motivated by the current extraordinary control over the synthesis of complex nanomaterials with a variety of biological functions (e.g. contrast agents, drug-delivery systems, transducers, amplifiers, etc.). Engineered nanomaterials are found in the bio-context with a variety of applications in fields such as sensing, imaging, therapy or diagnosis. As the degree of control to fabricate customized novel and/or enhanced nanomaterials evolves, often new applications, devices with enhanced performance or unprecedented sensing limits can be achieved. Of course, interfacing any novel material with biological systems has to be critically analyzed as many undesirable adverse effects can be triggered (e.g. toxicity, allergy, genotoxicity, etc.) and/or the performance of the nanomaterial can be compromised due to the unexpected phenomena in physiological environments (e.g. corrosion, aggregation, unspecific absorption of biomolecules, etc.). Despite the need for standard protocols for assessing the toxicity and bio-performance of each new functional nanomaterial, these are still scarce or currently under development. Nonetheless, nanotoxicology and relating adverse effects to the physico-chemical properties of nanomaterials are emerging areas of the utmost importance which have to be continuously revisited as any new material emerges. This review highlights recent progress concerning the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems and following adverse effects.

  8. Engine design optimization for running on ethanol with low emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjirja, S. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Thermo- and Fluid Dynamics

    1996-05-01

    The aim of this project was to optimize the Volvo AH10A245 engine design parameters for ethanol fuel with Beraid (Trade mark of the ignition improver manufactured by the Akzo Nobel Surface Chemistry AB). The method used was engine testing with variation of design, performance, and other functional parameters, which affect the engine thermodynamics, and exhaust gas composition. The first design parameter, which was tested and optimized was the compression ratio, which was optimized at the ratio of 23:1. In order to prevail the fuel spray impingement, which might affect the unburned or partially burned emissions (CO), the combustion chamber was redesigned to a straight-side wall bowl in piston. Furthermore, the injector position was optimized by means of lifting or descending it few millimeters. The best emission levels was achieved with the injector lift of 1.00 mm. The inlet air temperature was optimized for lower emissions by removing the intercooler thermostat. Injector nozzles with different cross section areas of holes were tested, and the 6 holes injector nozzles with smaller cross sectional area, compared with base nozzles, were selected. The engine performance was maintained for lower engine rated speed 2000 (instead of 2200 rpm for conventional engine) and lower intermediate speed 1250 (instead of 1320 rpm for conventional engine). Such engine performance optimization was followed by the improved specific fuel consumption, and lower emissions compared with conventional speeds. The backpressure governor, desperately needed during the first phase of engine design optimization was, finally avoided. It can only be used as in the conventional diesel engine. 7 refs, 26 figs, 18 tabs, 7 appendices

  9. Experimental investigation of performance and emissions of a VCR diesel engine fuelled with n-butanol diesel blends under varying engine parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Ashish; Sharma, Dilip; Soni, Shyam Lal; Mathur, Alok

    2017-07-13

    The continuous rise in the cost of fossil fuels as well as in environmental pollution has attracted research in the area of clean alternative fuels for improving the performance and emissions of internal combustion (IC) engines. In the present work, n-butanol is treated as a bio-fuel and investigations have been made to evaluate the feasibility of replacing diesel with a suitable n-butanol-diesel blend. In the current research, an experimental investigation was carried out on a variable compression ratio CI engine with n-butanol-diesel blends (10-25% by volume) to determine the optimum blending ratio and optimum operating parameters of the engine for reduced emissions. The best results of performance and emissions were observed for 20% n-butanol-diesel blend (B20) at a higher compression ratio as compared to diesel while keeping the other parameters unchanged. The observed deterioration in engine performance was within tolerable limits. The reductions in smoke, nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and carbon monoxide (CO) were observed up to 56.52, 17.19, and 30.43%, respectively, for B20 in comparison to diesel at rated power. However, carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrocarbons (HC) were found to be higher by 17.58 and 15.78%, respectively, for B20. It is concluded that n-butanol-diesel blend would be a potential fuel to control emissions from diesel engines. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  10. Utilization of LPG and gasoline engine exhaust emissions by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Duygu, Ergin; Ilbaş, Mustafa; Dönmez, Gönül

    2013-02-15

    The effect of engine exhaust emissions on air pollution is one of the greatest problems that the world is facing today. The study focused on the effects of realistic levels of engine exhaust emissions of liquid petroleum gas (LPG) and gasoline (GSN) on Phormidium sp. and Chlorella sp. Multi parameters including pH, different medial compositions, fuel types, flow rates and biomass concentrations were described in detail. Effects of some growth factors such as triacontanol (TRIA) and salicylic acid (SA) have also been tested. The maximum biomass concentration of Phormidium sp. reached after 15 days at 0.36 and 0.15 g/L initial biomass concentrations were found as 1.160 g/L for LPG emission treated cultures and 1.331 g/L for GSN emission treated cultures, respectively. The corresponding figures were 1.478 g/L for LPG emission treated cultures and 1.636 g/L for GSN emission treated cultures at 0.65 and 0.36 g/L initial Chlorella sp. biomass concentrations. This study highlights the significance of using Phormidium sp. and Chlorella sp. for utilization of LPG and GSN engine exhaust emissions by the help of growth factors. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Diesel engine emission deterioration - a preliminary study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, Cecilia J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to find a parameter in diesel and oil analysis of underground mining vehicles that can be correlated with personal diesel particulate matter (DPM) exposure and used as part of an engine maintenance programme. A number...

  12. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul J; Elahipanah, Sina; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-24

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  13. Comparing ultraweak bio-chemiluminescence emission in wounded green and etiolated soybean cotyledons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, WenLi; Zhou, Quan; Li, Ling; Xing, Da; Van Wijk, Roeland; Tang, YongHong

    2006-02-01

    Ultraweak bio-chemiluminescence (UBC) from germinating soybean (Glycine max L. Merr) cotyledon under mechanical wounding was observed by a high sensitivity imaging system based on an intensified charge couple device (ICCD) detector or a high sensitive single photon counter (SPC) device. The UBC imaging showed that the intensity of UBC at the injury location on a wounded green cotyledon was greater than on a wounded etiolated cotyledon. Based on results with a SPC UBC intensity of wounded green cotyledon was high at first and then gradually decreased. The emission spectrum of wounded green cotyledon had a greater proportion of red light. The increase in UBC of wounded etiolated soybean cotyledon was less than that of green ones. The emission spectrum of wounded etiolated cotyledon had a greater amount of orange light. The data suggest that most of the UBC in green cotyledon was due to damaged chloroplasts and mitochondria. Our data suggest that oxidation of damage's tissue lead to the production of ROS. Electronic excitation energy was transfered from the excited molecules by ROS to Chl-a in the thylakoid membranes, so the intensity of UBC in the wounded soybean green cotyledon was obviously higher than in the wounded etiolated soybean cotyledon.

  14. Tiny pollutant emissions of a dimethyl ether fuelled engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG Jing; ZHANG Yu-sheng; ZHOU Xiao-song; WU Hong-wei

    2008-01-01

    Emissions of dimethyl ether (DME) fuelled engines were investigated by orthogonal experiments on a ZS195 diesel engine. The study mainly focused on the tiny pollutant emissions of formaldehyde (CH2O), methyl formate (CH3OCHO) and formic acid (HCOOH). The presence of CH2O, CH3OCHO and HCOOH are proved in the exhaust by gas chromatograph and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The analysis of variance results indicate that the fuel delivery advance angle is the most important factor for CH2O emission. The fuel delivery advance angle and the interaction of injection pressure and nozzle diameter are considerable factors for unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emission. The mechanism forming tiny pollutants, primarily through CH2O formation, is suggested to be similar to the mechanism forming UHC by DME partial oxidation existing in crevices and boundary zones, and is verified via DME combustion simulation of a multizone chemical kinetic model.

  15. Characterization of lubrication oil emissions from aircraft engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenhong; Liscinsky, David S; Winstead, Edward L; True, Bruce S; Timko, Michael T; Bhargava, Anuj; Herndon, Scott C; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Anderson, Bruce E

    2010-12-15

    In this first ever study, particulate matter (PM) emitted from the lubrication system overboard breather vent for two different models of aircraft engines has been systematically characterized. Lubrication oil was confirmed as the predominant component of the emitted particulate matter based upon the characteristic mass spectrum of the pure oil. Total particulate mass and size distributions of the emitted oil are also investigated by several high-sensitivity aerosol characterization instruments. The emission index (EI) of lubrication oil at engine idle is in the range of 2-12 mg kg(-1) and increases with engine power. The chemical composition of the oil droplets is essentially independent of engine thrust, suggesting that engine oil does not undergo thermally driven chemical transformations during the ∼4 h test window. Volumetric mean diameter is around 250-350 nm for all engine power conditions with a slight power dependence.

  16. BioCarian: search engine for exploratory searches in heterogeneous biological databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Nazar; Tennakoon, Chandana

    2017-10-02

    There are a large number of biological databases publicly available for scientists in the web. Also, there are many private databases generated in the course of research projects. These databases are in a wide variety of formats. Web standards have evolved in the recent times and semantic web technologies are now available to interconnect diverse and heterogeneous sources of data. Therefore, integration and querying of biological databases can be facilitated by techniques used in semantic web. Heterogeneous databases can be converted into Resource Description Format (RDF) and queried using SPARQL language. Searching for exact queries in these databases is trivial. However, exploratory searches need customized solutions, especially when multiple databases are involved. This process is cumbersome and time consuming for those without a sufficient background in computer science. In this context, a search engine facilitating exploratory searches of databases would be of great help to the scientific community. We present BioCarian, an efficient and user-friendly search engine for performing exploratory searches on biological databases. The search engine is an interface for SPARQL queries over RDF databases. We note that many of the databases can be converted to tabular form. We first convert the tabular databases to RDF. The search engine provides a graphical interface based on facets to explore the converted databases. The facet interface is more advanced than conventional facets. It allows complex queries to be constructed, and have additional features like ranking of facet values based on several criteria, visually indicating the relevance of a facet value and presenting the most important facet values when a large number of choices are available. For the advanced users, SPARQL queries can be run directly on the databases. Using this feature, users will be able to incorporate federated searches of SPARQL endpoints. We used the search engine to do an exploratory search

  17. Potential Climate and Ozone Impacts From Hybrid Rocket Engine Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hybrid rocket engines that use N2O as an oxidizer and a solid hydrocarbon (such as rubber) as a fuel are relatively new. Little is known about the composition of such hybrid engine emissions. General principles and visual inspection of hybrid plumes suggest significant soot and possibly NO emissions. Understanding hybrid rocket emissions is important because of the possibility that a fleet of hybrid powered suborbital rockets will be flying on the order of 1000 flights per year by 2020. The annual stratospheric emission for these rockets would be about 10 kilotons, equal to present day solid rocket motor (SRM) emissions. We present a preliminary analysis of the magnitude of (1) the radiative forcing from soot emissions and (2) the ozone depletion from soot and NO emissions associated with such a fleet of suborbital hybrid rockets. Because the details of the composition of hybrid emissions are unknown, it is not clear if the ozone depletion caused by these hybrid rockets would be more or less than the ozone depletion from SRMs. We also consider the climate implications associated with the N2O production and use requirements for hybrid rockets. Finally, we identify the most important data collection and modeling needs that are required to reliably assess the complete range of environmental impacts of a fleet of hybrid rockets.

  18. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    Air traffic is growing continuously [1]. The increasing number of airplanes leads to an increase of aviation emissions giving rise to environmental concerns globally by high altitude emissions and, locally on air quality at the ground level [2]. The overall impact of aviation emissions on the environment is likely to increase when the growing air transportation trend [2] is considered. The Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiment (APRIDE)-5 campaign took place at Zurich Airport in 2013. In this campaign, aircraft exhaust is sampled during engine acceptance tests after engine overhaul at the facilities of SR Technics. Direct sampling from the engine core is made possible due to the unique fixed installation of a retractable sampling probe and the use of a standardized sampling system designed for the new particulate matter regulation in development for aircraft engines. Many of the gas-phase aircraft emissions, e.g. CO2, NOX, CO, SO2, hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected by the instruments in use. This study, part of the APRIDE-5 campaign, focuses on the primary VOC emissions in order to produce emission factors of VOC species for varying engine operating conditions which are the surrogates for the flight cycles. Previously, aircraft plumes were sampled in order to quantify VOCs by a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) [3]. This earlier study provided a preliminary knowledge on the emission of species such as methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene and toluene by varying engine thrust levels. The new setup was (i) designed to sample from the diluted engine exhaust and the new tool and (ii) used a high resolution time of flight PTR-MS with higher accuracy for many new species, therefore providing a more detailed and accurate inventory. We will present the emission factors for species that were quantified previously, as well as for many additional VOCs detected during the campaign

  19. POLLUTANT EMISSION NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF A MARINE ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOREL DUMITRU VELCEA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The energies produced by the diesel engines of strong power are largely used in marine propulsion because of their favorable reliability and their significant output. However, the increasingly constraining legislations, aimed at limiting the pollutant emissions from the exhaust gas produced by these engines, tend to call into question their supremacy. The analysis of the pollutant emissions and their reduction in the exhaust gas of the slow turbocharged marine diesel engine using ANSYS 15 constitutes the principal objective of this study. To address problems of global air pollution due to the pollutant emission from fuel oil engin e combustion, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms by which pollutants are produced in combustion processes. In the present work, an experimental and numerical study is carried out on a unit of real use aboard a car ferry ship. A numerical model based on a detailed chemical kinetics scheme is used to calculate the emissions of NOx, SOx and Sooth in an internal combustion engine model for the same characteristics of the real unit.

  20. Soil bio-engineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petrone

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on authochtonal plants suitable for this kind of works and on economic efficiency is essential for the divulgation of such techniques. The present paper is focused on this two issues related to the realization of various typologies of soil bio-engineering works in the humid tropic of Nicaragua.



    In the area of Río Blanco, located in the Department of Matagalpa, soil bio-engineering installations were built in several sites. The particular structures built were: drainages with live fascine mattress, a live palisade, a vegetated live crib wall for riverbank protection, a vegetative covering made of a metallic net and biotextile coupled with a live palisade made of bamboo. In order to evaluate the suitability of the various plants used in the works, monitorings were performed, one in the live palisade alongside an unpaved road and the other on the live crib wall along a riverbank, collecting survival rate and morphological parameters data. Concerning the economic efficiency we proceed to a financial analysis of the works and once the unit price was obtained, we converted the amount in EPP Dollars (Equal Purchasing Power in order to compare the Nicaraguan context with the Italian one.



    Among the used species we found that Madero negro (Gliricidia sepium and Roble macuelizo (Tabebuia rosea are adequate for soil-bioengineering measure on slopes while Helequeme (Erythrina fusca reported a successful behaviour only in the crib wall for riverbank protection.



    In the comparison of the costs in Nicaragua and in Italy, the unit price reduction for the Central American country ranges between 1.5 times (for the vegetative covering and almost 4 times (for the fascine mattress if it's used the EPP dollar exchange

  1. Soil bio-engineering for risk mitigation and environmental restoration in a humid tropical area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, A.; Preti, F.

    2009-07-01

    The use of soil bio-engineering techniques in developing countries is a relevant issue for disaster mitigation, environmental restoration and poverty reduction. Research on authochtonal plants suitable for this kind of works and on economic efficiency is essential for the divulgation of such techniques. The present paper is focused on this two issues related to the realization of various typologies of soil bio-engineering works in the humid tropic of Nicaragua. In the area of Río Blanco, located in the Department of Matagalpa, soil bio-engineering installations were built in several sites. The particular structures built were: drainages with live fascine mattress, a live palisade, a vegetated live crib wall for riverbank protection, a vegetative covering made of a metallic net and biotextile coupled with a live palisade made of bamboo. In order to evaluate the suitability of the various plants used in the works, monitorings were performed, one in the live palisade alongside an unpaved road and the other on the live crib wall along a riverbank, collecting survival rate and morphological parameters data. Concerning the economic efficiency we proceed to a financial analysis of the works and once the unit price was obtained, we converted the amount in EPP Dollars (Equal Purchasing Power) in order to compare the Nicaraguan context with the Italian one. Among the used species we found that Madero negro (Gliricidia sepium) and Roble macuelizo (Tabebuia rosea) are adequate for soil-bioengineering measure on slopes while Helequeme (Erythrina fusca) reported a successful behaviour only in the crib wall for riverbank protection. In the comparison of the costs in Nicaragua and in Italy, the unit price reduction for the Central American country ranges between 1.5 times (for the vegetative covering) and almost 4 times (for the fascine mattress) if it's used the EPP dollar exchange rate. Conclusions are reached with regard to hydrological-risk mitigating actions performed on a

  2. Ultra-bright emission from hexagonal boron nitride defects as a new platform for bio-imaging and bio-labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Christopher; Tran, Trong Toan; Shimoni, Olga; Totonjian, Daniel; Lobo, Charlene J.; Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowan; Englund, Dirk R.; Ford, Michael J.; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2016-12-01

    Bio-imaging requires robust ultra-bright probes without causing any toxicity to the cellular environment, maintain their stability and are chemically inert. In this work we present hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) nanoflakes which exhibit narrowband ultra-bright single photon emitters1. The emitters are optically stable at room temperature and under ambient environment. hBN has also been noted to be noncytotoxic and seen significant advances in functionalization with biomolecules2,3. We further demonstrate two methods of engineering this new range of extremely robust multicolour emitters across the visible and near infrared spectral ranges for large scale sensing and biolabeling applications.

  3. Diesel engine performance and exhaust emission analysis using diesel-organic germanium fuel blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafiq Zulkifli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative fuels such as biodiesel, bio-alcohol and other biomass sources have been extensively research to find its potential as an alternative sources to fossil fuels. This experiment compared the performance of diesel (D, biodiesel (BD and diesel-organic germanium blend (BG5 at five different speeds ranging from 1200-2400 rpm. BG5 shows significant combustion performance compared to BD. No significant changes of power observed between BG5 and BD at a low speed (1200 rpm. On the contrary, at higher speeds (1800 rpm and 2400 rpm, BG5 blend fuel shows increased engine power of 12.2 % and 9.2 %, respectively. Similarly, torque shows similar findings as engine power, whereby the improvement could be seen at higher speeds (1800 rpm and 2400 rpm when torque increased by 7.3 % and 2.3 %, respectively. In addition, the emission results indicated that for all speeds, CO2, and NO had reduced at an average of 2.1 % and 177 %, respectively. Meanwhile, CO emission had slightly increased compared to BD at low speeds by 0.04 %. However, the amount of CO released had decreased at an average of 0.03 % as the engine speed increased. Finally, measurement of O2 shows an increment at 16.4 % at all speed range.

  4. Low emissions compression ignited engine technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gerald N.; Kilkenny, Jonathan P.; Fluga, Eric C.; Duffy, Kevin P.

    2007-04-03

    A method and apparatus for operating a compression ignition engine having a cylinder wall, a piston, and a head defining a combustion chamber. The method and apparatus includes delivering fuel substantially uniformly into the combustion chamber, the fuel being dispersed throughout the combustion chamber and spaced from the cylinder wall, delivering an oxidant into the combustion chamber sufficient to support combustion at a first predetermined combustion duration, and delivering a diluent into the combustion chamber sufficient to change the first predetermined combustion duration to a second predetermined combustion duration different from the first predetermined combustion duration.

  5. Bio-inspired engineering of cell- and virus-like nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Alessandro; Molinaro, Roberto; Sushnitha, Manuela; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Martinez, Jonathan O; Arrighetti, Noemi; Corbo, Claudia; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-12-01

    The engineering of future generations of nanodelivery systems aims at the creation of multifunctional vectors endowed with improved circulation, enhanced targeting and responsiveness to the biological environment. Moving past purely bio-inert systems, researchers have begun to create nanoparticles capable of proactively interacting with the biology of the body. Nature offers a wide-range of sources of inspiration for the synthesis of more effective drug delivery platforms. Because the nano-bio-interface is the key driver of nanoparticle behavior and function, the modification of nanoparticles' surfaces allows the transfer of biological properties to synthetic carriers by imparting them with a biological identity. Modulation of these surface characteristics governs nanoparticle interactions with the biological barriers they encounter. Building off these observations, we provide here an overview of virus- and cell-derived biomimetic delivery systems that combine the intrinsic hallmarks of biological membranes with the delivery capabilities of synthetic carriers. We describe the features and properties of biomimetic delivery systems, recapitulating the distinctive traits and functions of viruses, exosomes, platelets, red and white blood cells. By mimicking these biological entities, we will learn how to more efficiently interact with the human body and refine our ability to negotiate with the biological barriers that impair the therapeutic efficacy of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Emissions from main propulsion engine on container ship at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Harshit; Welch, William A.; Henningsen, Svend; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.

    2010-12-01

    Emission measurements were made for major gases and PM2.5 mass for a post PanaMax Class container vessel operating on heavy fuel oil at sea. Additional measurements were made for PM composition, elemental and organic carbon, select hydrocarbons, including PAHs, carbonyls, and n-alkanes. The testing followed the International Standard Organization protocols for emission measurements and operating test cycle. Results showed the weighted emission factor for NOx and PM2.5 were 19.77 ± 0.28 and 2.40 ± 0.05 g/kWh, respectively. The study provided a rare opportunity to repeat measurements made three years earlier on the same vessel. Emission factors of CO2 and NOx closely matched the earlier values, suggesting a low deterioration factor. Results showed the black carbon emission factor was 0.007 ± 0.001 g/kWh, an important metric for determining the radiative forcing contribution of marine engines.

  7. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.

  8. Polydioxanone-based bio-materials for tissue engineering and drug/gene delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonoo, Nowsheen; Jeetah, Roubeena; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2015-11-01

    Since the commercialization of polydioxanone (PDX) as a biodegradable monofilament suture by Ethicon in 1981, the polymer has received only limited interest until recently. The limitations of polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) coupled with the growing need for materials with enhanced features and the advent of new fabrication techniques such as electrospinning have revived interest for PDX in medical devices, tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Electrospun PDX mats show comparable mechanical properties as the major structural components of native vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) i.e. collagen and elastin. In addition, PDX's unique shape memory property provides rebound and kink resistance when fabricated into vascular conduits. The synthesis of methyl dioxanone (MeDX) monomer and copolymers of dioxanone (DX) and MeDX have opened up new perspectives for poly(ester-ether)s, enabling the design of the next generation of tissue engineering scaffolds for application in regenerating such tissues as arteries, peripheral nerve and bone. Tailoring of polymer properties and their formulation as nanoparticles, nanomicelles or nanofibers have brought along important developments in the area of controlled drug or gene delivery. This paper reviews the synthesis of PDX and its copolymers and provides for the first time an exhaustive account of its applications in the (bio)medical field with focus on tissue engineering and drug/gene delivery.

  9. An innovative bio-engineering retaining structure for supporting unstable soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Bella

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new prefabricated bio-engineering structure for the support of unstable soil. This prefabricated structure is made of a steel frame which is completely filled with soil and a face made of tree trunks among which scions or autochthonous bushes are planted. Due to the difficulties in interpreting the complex interaction between soil and structure during the installation and lifetime, an in situ test was carried out in order to evaluate the state of stress in the steel frame and to understand the global behavior of the structure under service loads. On the basis of the obtained results, a procedure for checking the structure safety was proposed and discussed. An easy design method was developed during the research. Moreover, the use of this type of prefabricated structure shows several advantages, such as good performances in terms of stabilizing effects, and easy assembly and transport.

  10. Econophysics and bio-chemical engineering thermodynamics: The exergetic analysis of a municipality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-11-01

    Exergy is a fundamental quantity because it allows us to obtain information on the useful work obtainable in a process. The analyses of irreversibility are important not only in the design and development of the industrial devices, but also in fundamental thermodynamics and in the socio-economic analysis of municipality. Consequently, the link between entropy and exergy is discussed in order to link econophysics to the bio-chemical engineering thermodynamics. Last, this link holds to the fundamental role of fluxes and to the exergy exchanged in the interaction between the system and its environment. The result consists in a thermodynamic approach to the analysis of the unavailability of the economic, productive or social systems. The unavailability is what the system cannot use in relation to its internal processes. This quantity result is interesting also as a support to public manager for economic decisions. Here, the Alessandria Municipality is analyzed in order to highlight the application of the theoretical results.

  11. The effects of aircraft engine pollutant emission measurement variability on engine certification policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassell, A.B.; Dryburgh, D.C.

    1978-10-01

    Divergence between aircraft engine emission regulations proposed by EPA and ICAO is discussed. Every engine, upon entering service, requires a certificate as to its compliance with emission standards. It is shown that despite the large variability in the measurements, it is possible to devise a certification procedure requiring the testing of one engine only. Statistical modeling of such a test at the 5% significance level is described. Values of the parameter standard deviation/mean recommended as certification standards for various pollutants are given. Features of a rational certification scheme to be formulated are outlined.

  12. The methods of formaldehyde emission testing of engine: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Geng, Peng; Cao, Erming; Wei, Lijiang

    2015-12-01

    A number of measurements have been provided to detect formaldehyde in the atmosphere, but there are no clear unified standards in engine exhaust. Nowadays, formaldehyde, an unregulated emission from methanol engine, has been attracting increasing attention by researchers. This paper presents the detection techniques for formaldehyde emitted from the engines applied in recent market, introducing the approaches in terms of unregulated emission tests of formaldehyde, which involved gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, chromatography-mass spectrometry, chromatography-spectrum, Fourier infrared spectroscopy and spectrophotometry. The author also introduces the comparison regarding to the advantages of the existing detection techniques based on the principle, to compare with engine exhaust sampling method, the treatment in advance of detection, obtaining approaches accessing to the qualitative and quantitative analysis of chromatograms or spectra. The accuratest result obtained was chromatography though it cannot be used continuously. It also can be utilized to develop high requirements of emissions and other regulations. Fourier infrared spectroscopy has the advantage of continuous detection for a variety of unregulated emissions and can be applied to the bench in variable condition. However, its accuracy is not as good as chromatography. As the conclusion, a detection technique is chosen based on different requirements.

  13. Mobile robots for localizing gas emission sources on landfill sites: is bio-inspiration the way to go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Bennetts, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Neumann, Patrick P; Trincavelli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators, or algorithms that control the behavior of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odor plume. In particular the task of tracking an odor plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behavior of moths, dung beetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro-drone) in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behavior of animals, can be usefully "translated" into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically inspired algorithms.

  14. Mobile Robots for Localizing Gas Emission Sources on Landfill Sites: Is Bio-Inspiration the Way to Go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor eHernandez Bennetts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators or algorithms that control the behaviour of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odour plume. In particular the task of tracking an odour plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behaviour of moths, dungbeetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro drone in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is at the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behaviour of animals, can be usefully translated into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically-inspired algorithms.

  15. Influence of Jet Fuel Composition on Aircraft Engine Emissions: A Synthesis of Aerosol Emissions Data from the NASA APEX, AAFEX, and ACCESS Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C.; Herndon, S. C.; Knighton, W. B.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Yu, Z.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    We statistically analyze the impact of jet fuel properties on aerosols emitted by the NASA McDonnell Douglas DC-8 CFM56-2-C1 engines burning fifteen different aviation fuels. Data were collected for this single engine type during four different, comprehensive ground tests conducted over the past decade, which allow us to clearly link changes in aerosol emissions to fuel compositional changes. It is found that the volatile aerosol fraction dominates the number and volume emissions indices (EIs) over all engine powers, which are driven by changes in fuel aromatic and sulfur content. Meanwhile, the naphthalenic content of the fuel determines the magnitude of the non-volatile number and volume EI as well as the black carbon mass EI. Linear regression coefficients are reported for each aerosol EI in terms of these properties, engine fuel flow rate, and ambient temperature, and show that reducing both fuel sulfur content and napththalenes to near-zero levels would result in roughly a ten-fold decrease in aerosol number emitted per kg of fuel burn. This work informs future efforts to model aircraft emissions changes as the aviation fleet gradually begins to transition toward low-aromatic, low-sulfur alternative jet fuels from bio-based or Fischer-Tropsch production pathways.

  16. Effects of diesel and bio-diesel oils temperature on spray and performance of a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkachai Sutheerasak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research paper is the spray and engine performance investigation from preheated diesel and biodiesel oils at fuel temperature from 60 to 90 o C by comparing with non-preheated oil. In the experiment, there are fuel injection modeling and diesel engine testing, which is direct injection, 4 stroke and 4 cylinders. Results of fuel spray show that preheated diesel oil increase 4.7degree of spray angle and decrease 4.30 % of fuel injection pressure, as preheated bio-diesel oil increase 7.6degree of spray angle and decrease 13.90 % of fuel injection pressure to compare with non-preheated oil. As engine preformance testing results, preheated diesel oil increase 26.20% of thermal efficiency and decrease 4.30 % of BSFC, as preheated bio-diesel oil increase 30% of thermal efficiency and decrease 29.90 % of BSFC to compare with non-preheated oil.

  17. Engineering of bio-hybrid materials by electrospinning polymer-microbe fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam H.; Malal, Ram; Cohn, Daniel; Chidambaram, Dev

    2009-01-01

    Although microbes have been used in industrial and niche applications for several decades, successful immobilization of microbes while maintaining their usefulness for any desired application has been elusive. Such a functionally bioactive system has distinct advantages over conventional batch and continuous-flow microbial reactor systems that are used in various biotechnological processes. This article describes the use of polyethylene oxide99-polypropylene oxide67-polyethylene oxide99 triblock polymer fibers, created via electrospinning, to encapsulate microbes of 3 industrially relevant genera, namely, Pseudomonas, Zymomonas, and Escherichia. The presence of bacteria inside the fibers was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. Although the electrospinning process typically uses harsh organic solvents and extreme conditions that generally are harmful to bacteria, we describe techniques that overcome these limitations. The encapsulated microbes were viable for several months, and their metabolic activity was not affected by immobilization; thus they could be used in various applications. Furthermore, we have engineered a microbe-encapsulated cross-linked fibrous polymeric material that is insoluble. Also, the microbe-encapsulated active matrix permits efficient exchange of nutrients and metabolic products between the microorganism and the environment. The present results demonstrate the potential of the electrospinning technique for the encapsulation and immobilization of bacteria in the form of a synthetic biofilm, while retaining their metabolic activity. This study has wide-ranging implications in the engineering and use of novel bio-hybrid materials or biological thin-film catalysts. PMID:19667172

  18. Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakab, Karoly; Marga, Francoise; Forgacs, Gabor [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Norotte, Cyrille [Department of Biology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Murphy, Keith [Organovo, Inc., 5871 Oberlin Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana, E-mail: forgacsg@missouri.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and, most lately, bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor, it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore, scaffolds, populated with differentiated cells or stem cells, of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, no matter how sophisticated scaffolds are, they can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach might be to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bio-ink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion. (topical review)

  19. Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Karoly; Norotte, Cyrille; Marga, Francoise; Murphy, Keith; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2010-06-01

    Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and, most lately, bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor, it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore, scaffolds, populated with differentiated cells or stem cells, of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, no matter how sophisticated scaffolds are, they can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach might be to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bio-ink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion.

  20. Performance and emissions characteristics of a partially insulated gasoline engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew Hwa Chan [School of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents the work continued from the previous study on a low heat rejection (LHR) engine. Instead of using a single-property yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating to achieve the thermal barrier for the piston crown, a varying-properties functionally graded material (FGM) was used in this study. Extensive experiments were conducted on a 3-cylinder SI Daihatsu engine with all piston crowns coated with a layer of ceramic, which consists of zirconia and yttria with varying compositions along its thickness. Measurements of engine performance, in particular its fuel consumption and emissions characteristics, were made before and after the application of FGM coatings onto the piston crowns. To gain more insight of improved engine performance, in-cylinder pressure measurements were conducted which provide direct comparison of pressure-volume diagrams between baseline and that coated with FGM. (authors)

  1. Diesel Engine Emission Reduction Using Catalytic Nanoparticles: An Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajin C. Sajeevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide being a rare earth metal with dual valance state existence has exceptional catalytic activity due to its oxygen buffering capability, especially in the nanosized form. Hence when used as an additive in the diesel fuel it leads to simultaneous reduction and oxidation of nitrogen dioxide and hydrocarbon emissions, respectively, from diesel engine. The present work investigates the effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on performance and emissions of diesel engine. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical method and techniques such as TEM, EDS, and XRD have been used for the characterization. Cerium oxide was mixed in diesel by means of standard ultrasonic shaker to obtain stable suspension, in a two-step process. The influence of nanoparticles on various physicochemical properties of diesel fuel has also been investigated through extensive experimentation by means of ASTM standard testing methods. Load test was done in the diesel engine to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on the efficiency and the emissions from the engine. Comparisons of fuel properties with and without additives are also presented.

  2. Divided Combustion Chamber Gasoline Engines - A Review for Emissions and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascunana, Jose L.

    1974-01-01

    Describes characteristic designs of the engine. Data for fuel economy and emission are presented. Data show that automobiles equipped with one of the engines described have passed the 1975 Federal Emissions Standards. (SLH)

  3. Divided Combustion Chamber Gasoline Engines - A Review for Emissions and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascunana, Jose L.

    1974-01-01

    Describes characteristic designs of the engine. Data for fuel economy and emission are presented. Data show that automobiles equipped with one of the engines described have passed the 1975 Federal Emissions Standards. (SLH)

  4. Investigations of Rocket Engine Combustion Emissions During ACCENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. N.; Friedl, R. R.

    2001-12-01

    The composition of rocket combustion emissions and the atmospheric processes that determine their stratospheric impacts are poorly understood. While present day rocket emissions do not significantly affect stratospheric chemistry, the potential for vigorous growth of the space transportation industry in coming decades suggests that rocket emissions and their stratospheric impacts should be better understood. A variety of in-situ measurements and modeling results were obtained during the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) effort that will be used to evaluate the role of rocket exhaust in perturbing ozone chemistry in plume wakes and in the global stratosphere. We present a review of the ACCENT rocket emissions science objectives, summarize data obtained during the WB-57F plume wake sorties, and briefly discuss how the data will help resolve several outstanding questions regarding the impact of rocket emissions on the stratosphere. These include measurement of the emission indices for several important rocket engine combustion products and validation of plume wake chemistry models.

  5. Flame blowout and pollutant emissions in vitiated combustion of conventional and bio-derived fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder

    The widening gap between the demand and supply of fossil fuels has catalyzed the exploration of alternative sources of energy. Interest in the power, water extraction and refrigeration (PoWER) cycle, proposed by the University of Florida, as well as the desirability of using biofuels in distributed generation systems, has motivated the exploration of biofuel vitiated combustion. The PoWER cycle is a novel engine cycle concept that utilizes vitiation of the air stream with externally-cooled recirculated exhaust gases at an intermediate pressure in a semi-closed cycle (SCC) loop, lowering the overall temperature of combustion. It has several advantages including fuel flexibility, reduced air flow, lower flame temperature, compactness, high efficiency at full and part load, and low emissions. Since the core engine air stream is vitiated with the externally cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) stream, there is an inherent reduction in the combustion stability for a PoWER engine. The effect of EGR flow and temperature on combustion blowout stability and emissions during vitiated biofuel combustion has been characterized. The vitiated combustion performance of biofuels methyl butanoate, dimethyl ether, and ethanol have been compared with n-heptane, and varying compositions of syngas with methane fuel. In addition, at high levels of EGR a sharp reduction in the flame luminosity has been observed in our experimental tests, indicating the onset of flameless combustion. This drop in luminosity may be a result of inhibition of processes leading to the formation of radiative soot particles. One of the objectives of this study is finding the effect of EGR on soot formation, with the ultimate objective of being able to predict the boundaries of flameless combustion. Detailed chemical kinetic simulations were performed using a constant-pressure continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) network model developed using the Cantera combustion code, implemented in C++. Results have

  6. Infrared Emissivity Measurements of Building and Civil Engineering Materials: A New Device for Measuring Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchau, Jean-Pierre; Marchetti, Mario; Ibos, Laurent; Dumoulin, Jean; Feuillet, Vincent; Candau, Yves

    2014-10-01

    The knowledge of the infrared emissivity of materials used in buildings and civil engineering structures is useful for two specific approaches. First, quantitative diagnosis of buildings or civil engineering infrastructures by infrared thermography requires emissivity values in the spectral bandwidth of the camera used for measurements, in order to obtain accurate surface temperatures; for instance, emissivity in the band III domain is required when using cameras with uncooled detectors (such as micro-bolometer arrays). Second, setting up accurate thermal balances by numerical modeling requires the total emissivity value for a large wavelength domain; this is, for instance, the case for computing the road surface temperature to predict ice occurrence. Furthermore, periodical surveys of emissivity variations due to aging or soiling of surfaces could be useful in many situations such as thermal mapping of roads or building insulation diagnosis. The use of portable emissivity measurement devices is required for that purpose. A device using an indirect measurement method was previously developed in our lab; the method uses measurement of the reflectivity from a modulated IR source and requires calibration with a highly reflective surface. However, that device uses a low-frequency, thermal modulation well adapted to laboratory measurements but unfit for fast and in situ measurements. Therefore, a new, portable system which retains the principle of an indirect measurement but uses a faster-frequency, mechanical modulation more appropriate to outdoor measurements was developed. Both devices allow measurements in the broad m to m) and narrow m to m) bands. Experiments were performed on a large number of materials commonly used in buildings and civil engineering structures. The final objective of this work is to build a database of emissivity of these materials. A comparison of laboratory and on-site measurements of emissivity values obtained in both spectral bands will be

  7. Regulated and unregulated emissions from modern 2010 emissions-compliant heavy-duty on-highway diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalek, Imad A; Blanks, Matthew G; Merritt, Patrick M; Zielinska, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established strict regulations for highway diesel engine exhaust emissions of particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to aid in meeting the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The emission standards were phased in with stringent standards for 2007 model year (MY) heavy-duty engines (HDEs), and even more stringent NOX standards for 2010 and later model years. The Health Effects Institute, in cooperation with the Coordinating Research Council, funded by government and the private sector, designed and conducted a research program, the Advanced Collaborative Emission Study (ACES), with multiple objectives, including detailed characterization of the emissions from both 2007- and 2010-compliant engines. The results from emission testing of 2007-compliant engines have already been reported in a previous publication. This paper reports the emissions testing results for three heavy-duty 2010-compliant engines intended for on-highway use. These engines were equipped with an exhaust diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), high-efficiency catalyzed diesel particle filter (DPF), urea-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst (SCR), and ammonia slip catalyst (AMOX), and were fueled with ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel (~6.5 ppm sulfur). Average regulated and unregulated emissions of more than 780 chemical species were characterized in engine exhaust under transient engine operation using the Federal Test Procedure cycle and a 16-hr duty cycle representing a wide dynamic range of real-world engine operation. The 2010 engines' regulated emissions of PM, NOX, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide were all well below the EPA 2010 emission standards. Moreover, the unregulated emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitroPAHs, hopanes and steranes, alcohols and organic acids, alkanes, carbonyls, dioxins and furans, inorganic ions, metals and elements, elemental carbon, and particle number were substantially (90

  8. IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehman, Andre L.

    2000-08-20

    As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by

  9. The Efficiency of the Smoke Meter at Characterizing Engine Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladino, Jonathan D.

    1997-01-01

    The effectiveness of a smoke meter's ability to characterize the particulate emissions of a jet fuel combustor was evaluated using the University of Missouri-Rolla Mobile Aerosol Sampling System (UMR-MASS). A burner simulating an advanced jet engine combustor design was used to generate typical combustion particulates, which were then analyzed by the smoke meter. The same particulates were then size discriminated to ascertain the effective impact of aerosol diameter on smoke number readings.

  10. Nano-Bio Engineered Carbon Dot-Peptide Functionalized Water Dispersible Hyperbranched Polyurethane for Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Maji, Somnath; Mishra, Debasish; Devi, K Sanjana P; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-03-01

    The present study delves into a combined bio-nano-macromolecular approach for bone tissue engineering. This approach relies on the properties of an ideal scaffold material imbued with all the chemical premises required for fostering cellular growth and differentiation. A tannic acid based water dispersible hyperbranched polyurethane is fabricated with bio-nanohybrids of carbon dot and four different peptides (viz. SVVYGLR, PRGDSGYRGDS, IPP, and CGGKVGKACCVPTKLSPISVLYK) to impart target specific in vivo bone healing ability. This polymeric bio-nanocomposite is blended with 10 wt% of gelatin and examined as a non-invasive delivery vehicle. In vitro assessment of the developed polymeric system reveals good osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Aided by this panel of peptides, the polymeric bio-nanocomposite exhibits in vivo ectopic bone formation ability. The study on in vivo mineralization and vascularization reveals the occurrence of calcification and blood vessel formation. Thus, the study demonstrates carbon dot/peptide functionalized hyperbranched polyurethane gel for bone tissue engineering application.

  11. Potential of aeration flow rate and bio-char addition to reduce greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions during manure composting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdhury, Md Albarune; de Neergaard, Andreas; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2014-01-01

    Aeration is an important factor influencing CO2, CH4, N2O and NH3 emissions from the composting process. Both CH4 and N2O are potent greenhouse gases (GHG) of high importance. Here, we examined the effects of high and low aeration rates together with addition of barley straw with and without bio......-char on GHG and NH3 emissions from composting cattle slurry and hen manure in small-scale laboratory composters. Depending on treatment, cumulative C losses via CO2 and CH4 emissions accounted for 11.4-22.5% and 0.004-0.2% of initial total carbon, while N losses as N2O and NH3 emissions comprised 0.......05-0.1% and 0.8-26.5% of initial total nitrogen, respectively. Decreasing the flow rate reduced cumulative NH3 losses non-significantly (by 88%) but significantly increased CH4 losses (by 51%) from composting of cattle slurry with barley straw. Among the hen manure treatments evaluated, bio-char addition...

  12. Virtual Instrument for Emissions Measurement of Internal Combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gases emissions measurement systems in internal combustion engines are strict and expensive nowadays. For this reason, a virtual instrument was developed to measure the combustion emissions from an internal combustion diesel engine, running with diesel-biodiesel mixtures. This software is called virtual instrument for emissions measurement (VIEM, and it was developed in the platform of LabVIEW 2010® virtual programming. VIEM works with sensors connected to a signal conditioning system, and a data acquisition system is used as interface for a computer in order to measure and monitor in real time the emissions of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2 gases. This paper shows the results of the VIEM programming, the integrated circuits diagrams used for the signal conditioning of sensors, and the sensors characterization of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2. VIEM is a low-cost instrument and is simple and easy to use. Besides, it is scalable, making it flexible and defined by the user.

  13. Virtual Instrument for Emissions Measurement of Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Armando; Montero, Gisela; Coronado, Marcos; García, Conrado; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The gases emissions measurement systems in internal combustion engines are strict and expensive nowadays. For this reason, a virtual instrument was developed to measure the combustion emissions from an internal combustion diesel engine, running with diesel-biodiesel mixtures. This software is called virtual instrument for emissions measurement (VIEM), and it was developed in the platform of LabVIEW 2010® virtual programming. VIEM works with sensors connected to a signal conditioning system, and a data acquisition system is used as interface for a computer in order to measure and monitor in real time the emissions of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2 gases. This paper shows the results of the VIEM programming, the integrated circuits diagrams used for the signal conditioning of sensors, and the sensors characterization of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2. VIEM is a low-cost instrument and is simple and easy to use. Besides, it is scalable, making it flexible and defined by the user. PMID:27034893

  14. Emission of ions and charged soot particles by aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorokin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a model which examines the formation and evolution of chemiions in an aircraft engine is proposed. This model which includes chemiionisation, electron thermo-emission, electron attachment to soot particles and to neutral molecules, electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, ion-soot interaction, allows the determination of the ion concentration at the exit of the combustor and at the nozzle exit of the engine. It also allows the determination of the charge of the soot particles. For the engine considered, the upper limit for the ion emission index EIi is of the order of (2-5 x1016 ions/kg-fuel if ion-soot interactions are ignored and the introduction of ion-soot interactions lead about to a 50% reduction. The results also show that most of the soot particles are either positively or negatively charged, the remaining neutral particles representing approximately 20% of the total particles. A comparison of the model results with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines during the SULFUR experiments (Schumann, 2002 shows an excellent agreement.

  15. Emission of ions and charged soot particles by aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorokin

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a model which examines the formation and evolution of chemiions in an aircraft engine is proposed. This model which includes chemiionisation, electron thermo-emission, electron attachment to soot particles and to neutral molecules, electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, ion-soot interaction, allows the determination of the ion concentration at the exit of the combustor and at the nozzle exit of the engine. It also allows the determination of the charge of the soot particles. A comparison of the model results with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines during the SULFUR experiments (Schumann, 2002 shows an excellent agreement.

  16. Modern industrial engines. Emission calibration and engine management; Moderne Industriemotoren. Emissionsabstimmung und Motormanagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Thorsten [IAV GmbH, Gifhorn (Germany). Bereich Elektronisches Motormanagement fuer Dieselmotoren; Weiskirch, Christian [IAV GmbH, Gifhorn (Germany). Fachbereich Nutzfahrzeuge; Lieske, Stefan [Volkswagen AG, Salzgitter (Germany). Geschaeftsfeld Motor; Manz, Holger [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany). Vertrieb Antriebssysteme, Bereiche Industriemotoren, Marinemotoren und Blockheizkraftwerke

    2010-09-15

    October 2009 saw the introduction of emission standard 99/96/EC Euro V in Europe for commercial vehicles larger 3.5 t. This concern also machines they are used in the municipal segment, for example road sweepers and snow plows. Quick in responding to the change, the Volkswagen Aktiengesellschaft chose for her Euro V engine an aggregate that was already being used successfully in high-volume passenger-car production: the TDI 2.0 - 475 NE industrial engine with common-rail injection based on the 2.0 l CR 4V diesel engine from the Golf and Passat. (orig.)

  17. Nitrous oxide emissions after sewage sludge and inorganic N-fertilization of a willow bio-energy plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemedtsson, Leif; Hedenrud, Anna; Rychlik, Sophie; Weslien, Per; Kasimir Klemedtsson, Åsa; Achberger, Christine; Lindroth, Anders

    2014-05-01

    The use of sewage sludge as fertilizer after harvest or inorganic N-fertilization of bio-energy plantations can give rise to high emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Plantations of e.g. willow (Salix) are today grown and used for bioenergy purposes. They could serve as carbon and nitrogen sinks, lowering greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate a change in climate. However, since N2O is such a powerful greenhouse gas it can have a large impact on the total emission of greenhouse gases from a bio-energy plantation. The magnitude of N2O emissions after fertilization is therefore important to investigate. This study concerns N2O emissions from a conventionally grown bio-energy plantation of Salix. The aim of the study was to investigate the use of sewage sludge after harvest as well as inorganic N-fertilization in a growing plantation, and its effect on emissions of N2O from the soil ecosystem. The field site is a Salix plantation in south-western Sweden, a representative site in management practices and abiotic conditions. The site was divided into two areas, a larger field and smaller plots. The field was applied with sewage sludge after harvest 2013. Emissions of N2O were measured using the micrometeorological Eddy covariance technique, with a Quantum Cascade laser (Aerodyne). The fluxes of CO2 and H2O were measured using a LI-7200(Li-cor) instrument. The flux was calculated using the EddyPro software. On the plots, N2O emissions from inorganic N-fertilization (2013) were monitored using automatic chambers (height 1.05 m, volume 0.2625 m3) and a trace gas analyzer (TGA100, Campbell Scientific, USA) during approximately one (1) year. The N2O emissions from the plots (inorganic fertilizer) and field (sewage sludge) were compared with non-fertilized plots (controls) using the automatic chambers for both comparisons. The N2O emissions from the control plot for the inorganic fertilizer had an emission over the growing season that was 0.33 kg N2O

  18. The Effect of Bio-Fuel Blends and Engine Load on Diesel Engine Smoke Density for Sustainable Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. R. K. Mandloi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The diesel engine is a major contributor to air pollution especially within cities and along urban traffic routes. Therefore it has become very essential to develop the technology of IC engines, which will reduce the consumption of petroleum fuels and exhaust gas emissions. In fact, agricultural and transport sectors are almost diesel dependent. The various alternative fuel options researched for diesel are mainly biogas, producer gas, ethanol, methanol and vegetable oils. Out of all these, vegetable oils offer an advantage because of its comparable fuel properties with diesel and can be substituted between 20%-100%depending upon its processing. But as India stillimports huge quantity of edible oils, therefore, the use of non-edible oils of minor oilseeds like Karanji oil has been tested as a diesel fuel extender. The problems have been mitigated by developing vegetable oil derivatives that approximate the properties and performance and make them compatible with the hydrocarbon-based diesel fuels through the pyrolysis, micro emulsification, dilution and transesterification. The various fuel blends of karanji oil were tested on different engine loads to evaluate it smoke density.

  19. Emissions From Various Biodiesel Sources Compared to a Range of Diesel Fuels in DPF Equipped Diesel Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.; Tester, J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of various sources of petroleum-based and bio-based diesel fuels on regulated emissions and fuel economy in diesel particulate filter (DPF) equipped diesel engines. Two model year 2008 diesel engines were tested with nine fuels including a certification ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), local ULSD, high aromatic ULSD, low aromatic ULSD, and twenty percent blends of biodiesel derived from algae, camelina, soy, tallow, and yellow grease. Regulated emissions were measured over the heavy duty diesel transient test cycle. Measurements were also made of DPF-out particle size distribution and total particle count from a 13-mode steady state test using a fast mobility particle sizer. Test engines were a 2008 Cummins ISB and a 2008 International Maxx Force 10, both equipped with actively regenerated DPFs. Fuel consumption was roughly 2% greater over the transient test cycle for the B20 blends versus certification ULSD in both engines, consistent with the slightly lower energy content of biodiesel. Unlike studies conducted on older model engines, these engines equipped with diesel oxidation catalysts and DPFs showed small or no measurable fuel effect on the tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). No differences in particle size distribution or total particle count were seen in a comparison of certification ULSD and B20 soy, with the exception of engine idling conditions where B20 produced a small reduction in the number of nucleation mode particles. In the Cummins engine, B20 prepared from algae, camelina, soy, and tallow resulted in an approximately 2.5% increase in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compared to the base fuel. The International engine demonstrated a higher degree of variability for NO{sub x} emissions, and fuel effects could not be resolved (p > 0.05). The group of petroleum diesel test fuels produced a range of NO{sub x} emissions very similar to that

  20. Scaffold Free Bio-orthogonal Assembly of 3-Dimensional Cardiac Tissue via Cell Surface Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; O’Brien, Paul J.; Elahipanah, Sina; Yousaf , Muhammad N.

    2016-01-01

    There has been tremendous interest in constructing in vitro cardiac tissue for a range of fundamental studies of cardiac development and disease and as a commercial system to evaluate therapeutic drug discovery prioritization and toxicity. Although there has been progress towards studying 2-dimensional cardiac function in vitro, there remain challenging obstacles to generate rapid and efficient scaffold-free 3-dimensional multiple cell type co-culture cardiac tissue models. Herein, we develop a programmed rapid self-assembly strategy to induce specific and stable cell-cell contacts among multiple cell types found in heart tissue to generate 3D tissues through cell-surface engineering based on liposome delivery and fusion to display bio-orthogonal functional groups from cell membranes. We generate, for the first time, a scaffold free and stable self assembled 3 cell line co-culture 3D cardiac tissue model by assembling cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblast cells via a rapid inter-cell click ligation process. We compare and analyze the function of the 3D cardiac tissue chips with 2D co-culture monolayers by assessing cardiac specific markers, electromechanical cell coupling, beating rates and evaluating drug toxicity. PMID:28008983

  1. Scaffold Free Bio-orthogonal Assembly of 3-Dimensional Cardiac Tissue via Cell Surface Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; O’Brien, Paul J.; Elahipanah, Sina; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2016-12-01

    There has been tremendous interest in constructing in vitro cardiac tissue for a range of fundamental studies of cardiac development and disease and as a commercial system to evaluate therapeutic drug discovery prioritization and toxicity. Although there has been progress towards studying 2-dimensional cardiac function in vitro, there remain challenging obstacles to generate rapid and efficient scaffold-free 3-dimensional multiple cell type co-culture cardiac tissue models. Herein, we develop a programmed rapid self-assembly strategy to induce specific and stable cell-cell contacts among multiple cell types found in heart tissue to generate 3D tissues through cell-surface engineering based on liposome delivery and fusion to display bio-orthogonal functional groups from cell membranes. We generate, for the first time, a scaffold free and stable self assembled 3 cell line co-culture 3D cardiac tissue model by assembling cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblast cells via a rapid inter-cell click ligation process. We compare and analyze the function of the 3D cardiac tissue chips with 2D co-culture monolayers by assessing cardiac specific markers, electromechanical cell coupling, beating rates and evaluating drug toxicity.

  2. Intelligent Surfaces in Biotechnology Scientific and Engineering Concepts, Enabling Technologies, and Translation to Bio-Oriented Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grandin, H Michelle; Whitesides, George M

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of smart and responsive surfaces in biotechnology and their applications A wave of recent advances in cell biology, biophysics, chemistry, and materials science has enabled the development of a new generation of smart biomaterials. Intelligent Surfaces in Biotechnology: Scientific and Engineering Concepts, Enabling Technologies, and Translation to Bio-Oriented Applications provides readers with a comprehensive overview of surface modifications and their applications, including coverage of the physico-chemical properties, characterization methods, smart coating techno

  3. Restoration of badlands through applying bio-engineering techniques in active gully systems: Evidence from the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, P.; Vanacker, V.; Alvarado, D.; Govers, G.

    2012-04-01

    A better insight in the processes controlling sediment generation, transport and deposition in badlands is necessary to enhance restoration of degraded soils through eco-engineering techniques. In this study, we evaluate the effect of different bio-engineering measures on soil and slope stability. Five micro-catchments (of 0.2 to 5 ha) were selected within a 3 km2 area in the lower part of the Loreto catchment (Southern Ecuadorian Andes). The micro-catchments differ only by land cover and degree of implementation of soil and water conservation measures. Bio-engineering techniques were used to construct dikes made of fascines of wooden sticks and earth-filled tires in active gully beds, where they are most efficient to reduce water and sediment transport. The experimental design consists of three micro-catchments within highly degraded lands: (DI) micro-catchment with bio-engineering measures concentrated in the active gully beds, (DF) with reforestation of Eucalyptus trees, and (DT) reference situation without any conservation measures. Two micro-catchments were monitored in agricultural lands with (AI) and without (AT) bio-engineering measures in the active gully beds. All catchments were equipped with San Dimas flumes to measure water flow, and sediment traps to monitor sediment export. In the (active) gully beds, various parameters related to gully stability (soil water content, bed elevation, vegetation cover, sedimentation/erosion) were monitored at weekly intervals. First results show that bio-engineering techniques are efficient to stabilize active gully beds through a reduction of the rapid concentration of excess rainfall and the sediment production and transfer. Fascines made of wooden sticks are far more efficient than earth-filled tires. Sediment deposition behind dikes is strongly dependent on precedent rainfall events, and the slope and vegetation cover of the gully floor. The sediment deposited facilitates colonization of the gully floor by native

  4. A study on emission characteristics of an EFI engine with ethanol blended gasoline fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bang-Quan; Wang, Jian-Xin; Hao, Ji-Ming; Yan, Xiao-Guang; Xiao, Jian-Hua

    The effect of ethanol blended gasoline fuels on emissions and catalyst conversion efficiencies was investigated in a spark ignition engine with an electronic fuel injection (EFI) system. The addition of ethanol to gasoline fuel enhances the octane number of the blended fuels and changes distillation temperature. Ethanol can decrease engine-out regulated emissions. The fuel containing 30% ethanol by volume can drastically reduce engine-out total hydrocarbon emissions (THC) at operating conditions and engine-out THC, CO and NO x emissions at idle speed, but unburned ethanol and acetaldehyde emissions increase. Pt/Rh based three-way catalysts are effective in reducing acetaldehyde emissions, but the conversion of unburned ethanol is low. Tailpipe emissions of THC, CO and NO x have close relation to engine-out emissions, catalyst conversion efficiency, engine's speed and load, air/fuel equivalence ratio. Moreover, the blended fuels can decrease brake specific energy consumption.

  5. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: an innovative approach for the characterization of the gaseous emissions from residual MSW bio-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, M; Rada, E C; Antolini, D

    2011-01-01

    In the sector of residual municipal solid waste management an increasing attention is put towards the role of biological treatments like bio-drying and bio-stabilization in order to decrease the need of landfilling volumes. The literature shows a lack of information concerning the emission factor of pollutants released from these processes. The available data are generally spot characterizations of concentration and air flow-rate that are used together in order to assess the emission factors. This approach caused significant differences among the available data as the release of pollutants is not steady. This paper belongs to a group of six papers concerning a research on material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems, developed by a network of five universities. The contribution of the University of Trento, focuses on the bio-drying process with the following targets: (a) developing an innovative low cost method of sampling/measurement able to take into account the dynamics of release of pollutants; (b) checking the efficiency of a bio-filter; (c) verifying the variability of generation of some pollutants; (d) generating emission factors. The research was developed using a bio-drying pilot plant. As a treatment of the process air, the bio-reactor was coupled with a bio-filter. The emissions were characterized using an original approach based on the adoption of two measurement chambers suitable for hosting passive samplers. The passive samplers allowed the characterization of VOCs, N(2)O, NH(3) and H(2)S. A bio-chemical model, useful for energy and mass balances, supported the interpretation of the presented bio-drying run.

  6. Engineering single-molecule, nanoscale, and microscale bio-functional materials via click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Michael Angelo-Anthony

    To expand the design envelope and supplement the materials library available to biomaterials scientists, the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuCAAC) was explored as a route to design, synthesize and characterize bio-functional small-molecules, nanoparticles, and microfibers. In each engineered system, the use of click chemistry provided facile, bio-orthogonal control for materials synthesis; moreover, the results provided a methodology and more complete, fundamental understanding of the use of click chemistry as a tool for the synergy of biotechnology, polymer and materials science. Fluorophores with well-defined photophysical characteristics (ranging from UV to NIR fluorescence) were used as building blocks for small-molecule, fluorescent biosensors. Fluorophores were paired to exhibit fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) and used to probe the metabolic activity of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO). The FRET pair exhibited a significant variation in PL response with exposure to the lysate of Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, an organism which can degrade variants of both the donor and acceptor fluorophores. Nanoparticle systems were modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry affinity tags for CARDO and were subsequently utilized for affinity based bioseparation of CARDO from crude cell lysate. The enzymes were baited with an azide-modified carbazolyl-moiety attached to a poly(propargyl acrylate) nanoparticle. Magnetic nanocluster systems were also modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry fluorescent imaging tags. The iron-oxide nanoclusters were coated with poly(acrylic acid-co-propargyl acrylate) to provide a clickable surface. Ultimately, alternate Cu-free click chemistries were utilized to produce biohybrid microfibers. The biohybrid microfibers were synthesized under benign photopolymerization conditions inside a microchannel, allowing the encapsulation of viable bacteria. By adjusting pre-polymer solutions and laminar flow rates within the

  7. Effects of diesel and bio-diesel oils temperature on spray and performance of a diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Ekkachai Sutheerasak

    2014-01-01

    Research paper is the spray and engine performance investigation from preheated diesel and biodiesel oils at fuel temperature from 60 to 90 o C by comparing with non-preheated oil. In the experiment, there are fuel injection modeling and diesel engine testing, which is direct injection, 4 stroke and 4 cylinders. Results of fuel spray show that preheated diesel oil increase 4.7degree of spray angle and decrease 4.30 % of fuel injection pressure, as preheated bio-diesel oil increase 7.6degree o...

  8. Bio-derived Fuel Blend Dilution of Marine Engine Oil and Imapct on Friction and Wear Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta; Fenske, George R.; Corlett, John; Murphy, Chris; Przesmitzki, Steve

    2016-04-01

    To reduce the amount of petroleum-derived fuel used in vehicles and vessels powered by internal combustion engines, the addition of bio-derived fuel extenders is a common practice. Ethanol is perhaps the most common bio-derived fuel used for blending, and butanol is being evaluated as a promising alternative. The present study determined the fuel dilution rate of three lubricating oils (E0, E10, and i-B16) in a marine engine operating in on-water conditions with a start-and-stop cycle protocol. The level of fuel dilution increased with the number of cycles for all three fuels. The most dilution was observed with i-B16 fuel, and the least with E10 fuel. In all cases, fuel dilution substantially reduced the oil viscosity. The impacts of fuel dilution and the consequent viscosity reduction on the lubricating capability of the engine oil in terms of friction, wear, and scuffing prevention were evaluated by four different tests protocols. Although the fuel dilution of the engine oil had minimal effect on friction, because the test conditions were under the boundary lubrication regime, significant effects were observed on wear in many cases. Fuel dilution also was observed to reduce the load-carrying capacity of the engine oils in terms of scuffing load reduction.

  9. NOx Emissions from a Rotating Detonation-wave Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. Progress towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model including NOx chemistry is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. Results to date show that NOx emissions are not a problem for the RDE due to the short residence times and the nature of the flow field. Furthermore, simulations show that the amount of NOx can be further reduced by tailoring the fluid dynamics within the RDE.

  10. Recovery of Metals and Stabilization of Arsenic from (Bio-)Leaching Operations by Engineered Biological Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Contreras, P.A.; weghuis, M.O.; Weijma, J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the application of biotechnological stabilization of arsenic from (bio-) leaching operations. One of the latest applications of the Thioteq technology is arsenic immobilization. The Thioteq-scorodite biorecovery reactor is an aerobic system to immobilise arsenic in bio-scorodit

  11. Engineering a predatory bacterium as a proficient killer agent for intracellular bio-products recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Virginia; Herencias, Cristina; Jurkevitch, Edouard;

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the potential of the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, an obligate predator of other Gram-negative bacteria, as an external cell-lytic agent for recovering valuable intracellular bio-products produced by prey cultures. The bio-product targets to be recovered...

  12. Recent developments on genetic engineering of microalgae for biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Tan, Shi-I; Kao, Pei-Hsun; Chang, Yu-Kaung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2017-08-08

    Microalgae serve as a promising source for the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals. Microalgae can help mitigate greenhouse effect. They are superior to terrestrial plants as feedstock in many aspects and their biomass is naturally rich in lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, pigments and other valuable compounds. However, there are still some obstacles in developing microalgae-based biofuels and chemicals in industry Due to the relatively slow growth rate and high cultivation cost of microalgae, Therefore, screening of to screen efficient and robust microalgal strains as well as genetic modifications of the available strains for further improvement are of urgent demand in the development of microalgae-based biorefinery. In genetic engineering of microalgae, transformation and selection methods are the key steps to accomplish the target gene modification. For a powerful genetic screening, the resistance gene used should be efficient. However, determination of the preferable type and dosage of antibiotics used for transformant selection is usually time-consuming and microalgal-strain-dependent. Therefore, more powerful and efficient techniques should be developed to meet this need. In this review, the conventional and emerging genome-editing tools (e.g., CRISPR-Cas9, TALEN and ZFN) used in editing the genomes of nuclear, mitochondria and chloroplast of microalgae are thoroughly surveyed. In the current scenario, insufficient genomic data will challenge the applications of such genome editing tools in microalgae. Although all the techniques mentioned above demonstrate their abilities to perform gene editing and desired phenotype screening, there still need to overcome higher production cost and lower biomass productivity, to achieve efficient production of the desired products in microalgal biorefineries. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Engineering Molecular Recognition with Bio-mimetic Polymers on Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson T; Beyene, Abraham; Chio, Linda; Demirer, Gözde; Yang, Darwin; Landry, Markita P

    2017-01-10

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are a class of optically active nanomaterial that fluoresce in the near infrared, coinciding with the optical window where biological samples are most transparent. Here, we outline techniques to adsorb amphiphilic polymers and polynucleic acids onto the surface of SWNTs to engineer their corona phases and create novel molecular sensors for small molecules and proteins. These functionalized SWNT sensors are both biocompatible and stable. Polymers are adsorbed onto the nanotube surface either by direct sonication of SWNTs and polymer or by suspending SWNTs using a surfactant followed by dialysis with polymer. The fluorescence emission, stability, and response of these sensors to target analytes are confirmed using absorbance and near-infrared fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrate surface immobilization of the sensors onto glass slides to enable single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to characterize polymer adsorption and analyte binding kinetics.

  14. Performance Improvement of a Portable Electric Generator Using an Optimized Bio-Fuel Ratio in a Single Cylinder Two-Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an electrical generator using bio-fuel and gasoline blends of different composition as fuel in a single cylinder engine is presented. The effect of an optimized blend ratio of bio-fuel with gasoline on engine performance improvement and thereby on the electrical generator output is studied. Bio-fuels such as ethanol, butanol and methanol are blended with gasoline in different proportions and evaluated for performance. The effects of different bio-fuel/gasoline blending ratios are compared experimentally with that of the gasoline alone using the output power developed by the electric generator as the evaluation parameter. With a composition of 10% ethanol–gasoline, the engine performance is increased up to 6% and with a blending ratio of 20% butanol–gasoline the performance is increased up to 8% compared to the use of 100% gasoline. The investigations are performed on a portable generator used in palm tree harvesting applications.

  15. Flexible 75 kWel Stirling CHP-plant for bio-fuels with low emissions and a high fuel utilization. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the project ''Flexible 75 kWel Stirling CHP-plant for bio-fuels with low emissions and a high fuel utilization'' was to combine the Danish experiences with the Stirling engine and updraft gasification with the application of the FLOX gas burner technology for developing and demonstrating a flexible biomass-based small scale CHP plant with 75 kW electrical output, high power efficiency and low emissions. Further, the project has aimed at increasing the technology's reliability and decreasing the need for service. Also, the project has included the development of a control and communication system for unmanned start-up and operation of the plant. During the project the objective was altered and so the development of a new Stirling engine design was done on the 4-cylindred 35 kWe Stirling engine instead of the 8-cylindred 75 kWe Stirling engine. Focus has been on designing a more durable engine designed for easy and fast service. Cold test of the engine has been successful and now full-scale hot tests are to be performed. In the project Stirling DK has also in cooperation with project partner Danish gas Technology Centre developed the Stirling Engine with Diluted Oxidation (SEDIOX) concept which is a combustion technology based on the diluted oxidation principle. A trademark is obtained and also a patent application is filed and pending regarding the SEDIOX combustion chamber concept. All components for the Stirling gasification plant were produced and installed at Svanholm Estate. The plant consisted of one conventional combustion chamber and one SD3E-type Stirling engine. The plant was commissioned in June 2009 and 1,472 hours of operation and 43 MWh of electricity production was achieved before the plant was de-commissioned in February 2010 due to divergences between Svanholm Estate and Stirling DK. During operation the control system including remote access was tested thoroughly and with great success. The new overall

  16. Human factors engineering for the TERF (Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility) project. [Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedley, W.H.; Adams, F.S. (EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (USA)); Wells, J.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-12-14

    The Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) is being built by EG G Mound Applied Technologies to provide improved control of the tritium emissions from gas streams being processed. Mound handles tritium in connection with production, development, research, disassembly, recovery, and surveillance operations. During these operations, a small fraction of the tritium being processed escapes from its original containment. The objective of this report is to describe the human factors engineering as performed in connection with the design, construction, and testing of the TERF as required in DOE Order 6430.1A, section 1300-12. Human factors engineering has been involved at each step of the process and was considered during the preliminary research on tritium capture before selecting the specific process to be used. Human factors engineering was also considered in determining the requirements for the TERF and when the specific design work was initiated on the facility and the process equipment. Finally, human factors engineering was used to plan the specific acceptance tests that will be made during TERF installation and after its completion. These tests will verify the acceptability of the final system and its components. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Novel bio-synthetic hybrid materials and coculture systems for musculoskeletal tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeseung Janice

    Tissue Engineering is a truly exciting field of this age, trying to regenerate and repair impaired tissues. Unlike the old artificial implants, tissue engineering aims at making a long-term functional biological replacement. One strategy for such tissue engineering requires the following three components: cells, scaffolds, and soluble factors. Cells are cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold with medium containing various soluble factors. Once a tissue is developed in vitro, then it is implanted in vivo. The overall goal of this thesis was to develop novel bio-synthetic hybrid scaffolds and coculture system for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. The most abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components are collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG), which are the natural scaffold for chondrocytes. As two different peptides, collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) and hyaluronic acid binding peptide (HABPep) were previously shown to bind to collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) of GAG, respectively, it was hypothesized that immobilizing CMP and HABP on 3D scaffold would results in an interaction between ECM components and synthetic scaffolds via peptide-ECM bindings. CMP or HABPep-conjugated photopolymerizable poly(ethylene oxide) diacrylate (PEODA) hydrogels were synthesized and shown to retain encapsulated collagen or HA, respectively. This result supported that conjugated CMP and HABPep can interact with collagen and HA, respectively, and can serve as biological linkers in 3D synthetic hydrogels. When chondrocytes or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were seeded, cells in CMP-conjugated scaffolds produced significantly more amount of type II collagen and GAG, compared to those in control scaffolds. Moreover, MSCs cultured in CMP-conjugated scaffolds exhibited lower level of hypertrophic markers, cbfa-1 and type X collagen. These results demonstrated that enhanced interaction between collagen and scaffold via CMP improves chondrogenesis of chondrocytes and MSCs and

  18. A Study on Performance, Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Compression Ignition Engine Using Fish Oil Biodiesel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesha, D. K.; Thimmannachar, Rajiv K.; Simhasan, R.; Nagappa, Manjunath; Gowda, P. M.

    2012-07-01

    Bio-fuel is a clean burning fuel made from natural renewable energy resource; it operates in C. I. engine similar to the petroleum diesel. The rising cost of diesel and the danger caused to the environment has led to an intensive and desperate search for alternative fuels. Among them, animal fats like the fish oil have proven to be a promising substitute to diesel. In this experimental study, A computerized 4-stroke, single cylinder, constant speed, direct injection diesel engine was operated on fish oil-biodiesel of different blends. Three different blends of 10, 20, and 30 % by volume were used for this study. Various engine performance, combustion and emission parameters such as Brake Thermal Efficiency, Brake Specific Fuel Consumption, Heat Release Rate, Peak Pressure, Exhaust Gas Temperature, etc. were recorded from the acquired data. The data was recorded with the help of an engine analysis software. The recorded parameters were studied for varying loads and their corresponding graphs have been plotted for comparison purposes. Petroleum Diesel has been used as the reference. From the properties and engine test results it has been established that fish oil biodiesel is a better replacement for diesel without any engine modification.

  19. From zero to hero - production of bio-based nylon from renewable resources using engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Stefanie; Neubauer, Steffi; Becker, Judith; Yamamoto, Motonori; Völkert, Martin; Abendroth, Gregory von; Zelder, Oskar; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Polyamides are important industrial polymers. Currently, they are produced exclusively from petrochemical monomers. Herein, we report the production of a novel bio-nylon, PA5.10 through an integration of biological and chemical approaches. First, systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum was used to create an effective microbial cell factory for the production of diaminopentane as the polymer building block. In this way, a hyper-producer, with a high diaminopentane yield of 41% in shake flask culture, was generated. Subsequent fed-batch production of C. glutamicum DAP-16 allowed a molar yield of 50%, a productivity of 2.2gL(-1)h(-1), and a final titer of 88gL(-1). The streamlined producer accumulated diaminopentane without generating any by-products. Solvent extraction from alkalized broth and two-step distillation provided highly pure diaminopentane (99.8%), which was then directly accessible for poly-condensation. Chemical polymerization with sebacic acid, a ten-carbon dicarboxylic acid derived from castor plant oil, yielded the bio-nylon, PA5.10. In pure form and reinforced with glass fibers, the novel 100% bio-polyamide achieved an excellent melting temperature and the mechanical strength of the well-established petrochemical polymers, PA6 and PA6.6. It even outperformed the oil-based products in terms of having a 6% lower density. It thus holds high promise for applications in energy-friendly transportation. The demonstration of a novel route for generation of bio-based nylon from renewable sources opens the way to production of sustainable bio-polymers with enhanced material properties and represents a milestone in industrial production. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, Roland [U.S. Department of Energy' s Vehicle Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Maronde, Carl [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Gehrke, Chris [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States); Fiveland, Scott [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    2010-10-30

    This is the final report of the High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy. Work under this co-funded program began in August 2005 and finished in July 2010. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a low emission, high thermal efficiency engine system that met 2010 EPA heavy-duty on-highway truck emissions requirements (0.2g/bhp-hr NOx, 0.14g/bhp-hr HC and 0.01g/bhp-hr PM) with a thermal efficiency of 46%. To achieve this goal, development of diesel homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was the chosen approach. This report summarizes the development of diesel HCCI combustion and associated enabling technologies that occurred during the HECC program between August 2005 and July 2010. This program showed that although diesel HCCI with conventional US diesel fuel was not a feasible means to achieve the program objectives, the HCCI load range could be increased with a higher volatility, lower cetane number fuel, such as gasoline, if the combustion rate could be moderated to avoid excessive cylinder pressure rise rates. Given the potential efficiency and emissions benefits, continued research of combustion with low cetane number fuels and the effects of fuel distillation are recommended. The operation of diesel HCCI was only feasible at part-load due to a limited fuel injection window. A 4% fuel consumption benefit versus conventional, low-temperature combustion was realized over the achievable operating range. Several enabling technologies were developed under this program that also benefited non-HCCI combustion. The development of a 300MPa fuel injector enabled the development of extended lifted flame combustion. A design methodology for minimizing the heat transfer to jacket water, known as precision cooling, will benefit conventional combustion engines, as well as HCCI engines. An advanced combustion control system based on cylinder pressure measurements was developed. A Well

  1. Engine performance and emission of compression ignition engine fuelled with emulsified biodiesel-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawa, W. N.; Mamat, R.; Najafi, G.; Majeed Ali, O.; Aziz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The depletion of fossil fuel and environmental pollution has become world crucial issues in current era. Biodiesel-water emulsion is one of many possible approaches to reduce emissions. In this study, emulsified biodiesel with 4%, 6% and 8% of water contents were prepared to be used as fuel in a direct injection compression ignition engine. The performance indicator such as brake power, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and emissions such as NOx and particulate matter (PM) were investigated. The engine was set at constant speed of 2500 rpm and load from 20% to 60%. All the results were compared to B5 (blend of 95% petroleum diesel and 5% palm oil biodiesel) biodiesel. At low load, the BSFC decrease by 12.75% at 4% water ratio and decreased by 1.5% at 6% water ratio. However, the BSFC increases by 17.19% with increasing water ratio to 8% compared to B5. Furthermore, there was no significant decrease in brake power and BTE at 60% load. For 20% and 40% load there was some variance regarding to brake power and BTE. Significant reduction in NOx and PM emissions by 73.87% and 20.00% respectively were achieved with increasing water ratio to 8%. Overall, it is observed that the emulsified of biodiesel-water is an appropriate alternative fuel method to reduce emissions.

  2. Creating mechanisms of toxic substances emission of combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowski Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the mechanisms of creation of toxic exhaust gases, which mainly derived from inexact fuel metering and improper air-fuel mixture preparation. The paper describes the process of creating toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines during engine operation, and impact on the emission of these components determining the composition of the fuel mixture determined equivalence factor Φ. The principal mechanisms of formation of toxic exhaust gases, in particular nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and also essential according to create each of toxic exhaust gases are the subject of the paper. Moreover, empirical relationships, by means of which it is possible to determine the time of creation of the individual components of toxic exhaust gases, are presented. For example, one of the mechanisms for prompt formation of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons graphic illustration of formation as a function of crank angle is described. At the conclusion, the summary and significance of information on creation mechanisms of toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines are presented.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Performance and Emissions of a Stratified Charge CNG Direct Injection Engine with Turbocharger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiruddin Hilmi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results from 1.6 litre, 4 cylinders stratified charge compressed natural gas (CNG direct injection engine with boosting device. A turbocharger with compressor trim of 40 was used to increase engine output. The engine was tested at wide open throttle (WOT and speed ranging from 1000 to 5000 rpm. Engine performance and emissions data were recorded under steady state condition. Results show turbocharged CNG engine produced an average of 26% increment in brake power and 24% additional maximum brake torque as compared with natural aspirated (NA CNG engine. Turbocharged CNG engine improved brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC and yielded higher fuel conversion efficiency (FCE. Relatively turbocharged CNG engine showed lower emission of hydrocarbon (HC and carbon monoxide (CO throughout tested engine speed. Conversely, the carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrogen oxide (NOx emission produced were slightly higher compared with NA CNG engine.

  4. Toxicological characterization of diesel engine emissions using biodiesel and a closed soot filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooter, Ingeborg M.; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Jedynska, Aleksandra D.; Tromp, Peter C.; Houtzager, Marc M. G.; Verbeek, Ruud P.; Kadijk, Gerrit; Mulderij, Mariska; Krul, Cyrille A. M.

    2011-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the toxicity (oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity) in extracts of combustion aerosols. A typical Euro III heavy truck engine was tested over the European Transient Cycle with three different fuels: conventional diesel EN590, biodiesel EN14214 as B100 and blends with conventional diesel (B5, B10, and B20) and pure plant oil DIN51605 (PPO). In addition application of a (wall flow) diesel particulate filter (DPF) with conventional diesel EN590 was tested. The use of B100 or PPO as a fuel or the DPF reduced particulate matter (PM) mass and numbers over 80%. Similarly, significant reduction in the emission of chemical constituents (EC 90%, (oxy)-PAH 70%) were achieved. No significant changes in nitro-PAH were observed. The use of B100 or PPO led to a NOx increase of about 30%, and no increase for DPF application. The effects of B100, PPO and the DPF on the biological test results vary strongly from positive to negative depending on the biological end point. The oxidative potential, measured via the DTT assay, of the B100 and PPO or DPF emissions is reduced by 95%. The cytotoxicity is increased for B100 by 200%. The measured mutagenicity, using the Ames assay test with TA98 and YG1024 strains of Salmonella typhimurium indicate a dose response for the nitroarene sensitive YG1024 strain for B100 and PPO (fold induction: 1.6). In summary B100 and PPO have good potential for the use as a second generation biofuel resulting in lower PM mass, similar to application of a DPF, but caution should be made due to potential increased toxicity. Besides regulation via mass, the biological reactivity of exhaust emissions of new (bio)fuels and application of new technologies, needs attention. The different responses of different biological tests as well as differences in results between test laboratories underline the need for harmonization of test methods and international cooperation.

  5. The effects of emission control strategies on light-absorbing carbon emissions from a modern heavy-duty diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael A; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Z Gerald; Schauer, James J

    2015-06-01

    Control of atmospheric black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) has been proposed as an important pathway to climate change mitigation, but sources of BC and BrC are still not well understood. In order to better identify the role of modern heavy-duty diesel engines on the production of BC and BrC, emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine operating with different emission control strategies were examined using a source dilution sampling system. The effect of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) on light-absorbing carbon (LAC) was evaluated at three steady-state engine operation modes: idle, 50% speed and load, and 100% speed and load. LAC was measured with four different engine configurations: engine out, DOC out, DPF out, and engine out with an altered combustion calibration. BC and BrC emission rates were measured with the Aethalometer (AE-31). EC and BC emission rates normalized to the mass of CO₂emitted increased with increasing engine speed and load. Emission rates normalized to brake-specific work did not exhibit similar trends with speed and load, but rather the highest emission rate was measured at idle. EC and OC emissions were reduced by 99% when the DOC and DPF architecture was applied. The application of a DPF was equally effective at removing 99% of the BC fraction of PM, proving to be an important control strategy for both LAC and PM. BC emissions were unexpectedly increased across the DOC, seemingly due to a change aerosol optical properties. Removal of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) flow due to simulated EGR cooler failure caused a large increase in OC and BrC emission rates at idle, but had limited influence during high load operation. LAC emissions proved to be sensitive to the same control strategies effective at controlling the total mass of diesel PM. In the context of black carbon emissions, very small emission rates of brown carbon were measured over a range of control technologies and engine operating

  6. International Standards to Reduce Emissions from Marine Diesel Engines and Their Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview of EPA coordination with International Maritime Organization including a list of all international regulations and materials related to emissions from marine compression-ignition (diesel) engines.

  7. EFFECTS OF ETHANOL BLENDED DIESEL FUEL ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM A DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özer CAN

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engine emissions can be improved by adding organic oxygenated compounds to the No. 2 diesel fuel. In this study, effects of 10 % and 15 % (in volume ethanol addition to Diesel No. 2 on exhaust emissions from an indirect injection turbocharged diesel engine running at different engine speeds and loads were investigated. Experimental results showed that the ethanol addition reduced CO, soot and SO2 emissions, although it caused some increase in NOx emission and some power reductions due to lower heating value of ethanol. Improvements on emissions were more significant at full load rather than at partial loads.

  8. 78 FR 63015 - Exhaust Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for Aircraft Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... aircraft engines which, in the EPA Administrator's judgment, causes or contributes to air pollution that... aircraft engine emission standards for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ), compliance flexibilities, and...

  9. A powerful molecular engineering tool provided efficient Chlamydomonas mutants as bio-sensing elements for herbicides detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, Maya D; Giardi, Maria Teresa; Rambaldi, Irene; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Husu, Ivan; Johanningmeier, Udo; Rea, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    This study was prompted by increasing concerns about ecological damage and human health threats derived by persistent contamination of water and soil with herbicides, and emerging of bio-sensing technology as powerful, fast and efficient tool for the identification of such hazards. This work is aimed at overcoming principal limitations negatively affecting the whole-cell-based biosensors performance due to inadequate stability and sensitivity of the bio-recognition element. The novel bio-sensing elements for the detection of herbicides were generated exploiting the power of molecular engineering in order to improve the performance of photosynthetic complexes. The new phenotypes were produced by an in vitro directed evolution strategy targeted at the photosystem II (PSII) D1 protein of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using exposures to radical-generating ionizing radiation as selection pressure. These tools proved successful to identify D1 mutations conferring enhanced stability, tolerance to free-radical-associated stress and competence for herbicide perception. Long-term stability tests of PSII performance revealed the mutants capability to deal with oxidative stress-related conditions. Furthermore, dose-response experiments indicated the strains having increased sensitivity or resistance to triazine and urea type herbicides with I(50) values ranging from 6 × 10(-8) M to 2 × 10(-6) M. Besides stressing the relevance of several amino acids for PSII photochemistry and herbicide sensing, the possibility to improve the specificity of whole-cell-based biosensors, via coupling herbicide-sensitive with herbicide-resistant strains, was verified.

  10. Impact of alternative fuels on emissions characteristics of a gas turbine engine - part 1: gaseous and particulate matter emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Prem; Rye, Lucas; Williams, Paul I; Christie, Simon; Uryga-Bugajska, Ilona; Wilson, Christopher W; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D; Blakey, Simon; Coe, Hugh; Raper, David; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Growing concern over emissions from increased airport operations has resulted in a need to assess the impact of aviation related activities on local air quality in and around airports, and to develop strategies to mitigate these effects. One such strategy being investigated is the use of alternative fuels in aircraft engines and auxiliary power units (APUs) as a means to diversify fuel supplies and reduce emissions. This paper summarizes the results of a study to characterize the emissions of an APU, a small gas turbine engine, burning conventional Jet A-1, a fully synthetic jet fuel, and other alternative fuels with varying compositions. Gas phase emissions were measured at the engine exit plane while PM emissions were recorded at the exit plane as well as 10 m downstream of the engine. Five percent reduction in NO(x) emissions and 5-10% reduction in CO emissions were observed for the alternative fuels. Significant reductions in PM emissions at the engine exit plane were achieved with the alternative fuels. However, as the exhaust plume expanded and cooled, organic species were found to condense on the PM. This increase in organic PM elevated the PM mass but had little impact on PM number.

  11. Engineering the bio-nano interface using a multi-functional polymer coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao

    for the surface engineering of QDs. Third, modulation of the nanoparticle's interaction with biological systems requires access to an effective conjugation of these materials with bioactive targets in a controlled manner. To fulfill this goal, we have developed several zwitterion-based multifunctional ligands presenting tunable functional groups, including carboxyl, amine, azide and biotin. This has allowed conjugation of the QDs to biomolecules via bio-orthogonal coupling chemistries, including (1) amine-isothiocyanate reaction; (2) biotin-streptavidin self-assembly; (3) copper-free click chemistry. The resulted QD-bioconjugates have been tested in sensor design and for cell imaging. We also find that the efficiency of polyhistidine-mediated metal coordination is not only determined by the ligand lateral extension but also greatly influenced by the nature of metal coordination on the QDs. In Chapter 3, we have applied the various multi-coordinating and multi-reactive polymers, in particular, those presenting lipoic acid and PEG for the functionalization of gold nanoparticles and nanorods. Gold nanocrystals coated with this polymer exhibit excellent long-term colloidal stability over a broad range of conditions, and furthermore prevent the formation of protein corona. This was verified using dynamic light scattering measurements combined with agarose gel electrophoresis. The diffusion properties of polymer-coated nanocrystals were further characterized using dynamic light scattering; this has yielded valuable information on the nature of the interparticle interactions in biological media. In Chapter 4, an additional set of modular ligands were synthesized and applied for the surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles. These ligands feature several dopamines for tight binding on iron oxide nanoparticle surface, a short PEG for water solubility and reactive groups (amine, carboxyl, azide and thiol) for bioconjugation. Nanoparticles functionalized with these

  12. Comparing life cycle energy and GHG emissions of bio-based PET, recycled PET, PLA and man-made cellulosics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the environmental profiles of petrochemical PET, (partially) bio-based PET, recycled PET, and recycled (partially) bio-based PET, and compare them with other bio-based materials, namely PLA (polylactic acid, a bio-based polyester) and man-made cellulose fibers

  13. Comparing life cycle energy and GHG emissions of bio-based PET, recycled PET, PLA and man-made cellulosics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the environmental profiles of petrochemical PET, (partially) bio-based PET, recycled PET, and recycled (partially) bio-based PET, and compare them with other bio-based materials, namely PLA (polylactic acid, a bio-based polyester) and man-made cellulose

  14. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E & P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Sarah R. Nuss-Warren

    2006-09-30

    Continuing work in controlled testing uses a one cylinder Ajax DP-115 (a 13.25 in bore x 16 in stroke, 360 rpm engine) to assess a sequential analysis and evaluation of a series of engine upgrades. As with most of the engines used in the natural gas industry, the Ajax engine is a mature engine with widespread usage throughout the gas gathering industry. The end point is an assessment of these technologies that assigns a cost per unit reduction in NO{sub X} emissions. Technologies including one pre-combustion chamber, in-cylinder sensors, the means to adjust the air-to-fuel ratio, and modification of the air filter housing have been evaluated in previous reports. Current work tests non-production, prototype, mid-pressure fuel valves and begins analysis of these tests. This analysis reveals questions which must be answered before coming to any firm conclusions about the use of the180 psig fuel valve. The research team plans to continue with the remaining pre-combustion chamber tests in the coming quarter. By using the Ajax DP-115 these tests are completed in a low-cost and efficient manner. The various technologies can be quickly exchanged with different hardware, and it is inexpensive to run the engine. Progress in moving toward field testing is discussed, and a change in strategy is suggested. Although field engines are available to test, it is suggested that the final field testing be put on hold due to information from outside publications during this last quarter. Instead, KSU would focus on related field-testing and characterization in an outside project that will close an apparent technology gap. The results of this characterization will give a more solid footing to the field testing that will complete this project.

  15. HC-PM COUPLING MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSION OF DIESEL ENGINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Piqiang; Lu Jiaxiang; Deng Kangyao

    2005-01-01

    A rapid, phenomenological model that predicts particulate matter (PM) emission of diesel engines is developed and formulated. The model is a chemical equilibrium composition model, and is based on the formation mechanisms of PM and unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions of diesel engines. It can evaluate the emission concentration of PM via the emission concentration of HC. To validate the model, experiments are carried out in two research diesel engines. Comparisons of the model results with the experimental data show good agreement. The model can be used to evaluate the concentration of PM emission of diesel engines under lack of PM measuring instruments. In addition, the model is useful for computer simulations of diesel engines, as well as electronic control unit (ECU) designs for electronically controlled diesel engines.

  16. Emission characteristics of a turbocharged diesel engine fueled with gas-to-liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tao; ZHANG Wugao; FANG Junhua; HUANG Zhen

    2007-01-01

    Emission characteristics of a turbocharged,intercooled,heavy-duty diesel engine operating on neat gas-toliquids (GTL) and blends of GTL with conventional diesel were investigated and a comparison was made with those of diesel fuel.The results show that nitrogen oxides (NOx),smoke,and particulate matter (PM) emissions can be decreased when operating on GTL and diesel-GTL blends.Engine emissions decrease with an increase of GTL fraction in the blends.Compared with diesel fuel,an engine operatingon GTL can reduce NOx,PM,carbon monoxide (CO),and hydrocarbon (HC) by 23.7%,27.6%,16.6% and 12.9% in ECE R49 13-mode procedure,respectively.Engine speed and load have great influences on emissions when operating on diesel-GTL blends and diesel fuel in the turbocharged diesel engine.The study indicates that GTL is a promisingalternative fuel for diesel engines to reduce emissions.

  17. Evaluation of PM emissions from two in-service gas turbine general aviation aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenhong; Liscinsky, David S.; Fortner, Edward C.; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Croteau, Philip; Herndon, Scott C.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.

    2017-07-01

    We determined particulate matter (PM) emissions in the exhaust plumes from two gas turbine aircraft engines: a CF34-3A1 turbofan engine and a TPE331-6-252B turboprop engine in a dedicated study on in-service general aviation aircraft. The engine power states were from 16% to 100% engine thrust. Both nucleation and soot mode particles were observed from the emission exhausts of the CF34-3A1 engine but only soot particle mode was detected from the TPE331-6-252B engine. For the CF34-3A1 engine, the contribution of soot mode to total PM emissions was dominant at high power, while at decreased engine power states nucleation mode organic PM became important. PM emissions indices of the TPE331-6-252B engine were found to be generally larger than those of the CF34-3A1 engine. For both engines, medium power conditions (40-60% of thrust) yielded the lowest PM emissions. For the TPE331-6-252B engine, volatile PM components including organic and sulfate were more than 50% in mass at low power, while non-volatile black carbon became dominant at high power conditions such as takeoff.

  18. Wastes to Reduce Emissions from Automotive Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Jiménez Aguilar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was actually the investigation of the effect of various treatments on the ability of urine in absorbing greenhouse gases. Urine alone or mixed with olive-oil-mill waste waters (O, poultry litter (P, or sewage sludge (S was used on the absorption of CO2 and NOx from diesel exhaust. The absorption coefficient (0.98–0.29 g CO2/grNH4 was similar to other solvents such as ammonia and amines. The ranges of CO2 absorption(1.7–5.6 g/l and NO reduction (0.9–3.7 g/l in six hours indicate that on average 20 litres of urine could be needed to capture CO2 and NOx vehicle emissions from each covered kilometre. The best results of CO2 absorption and NOx reduction were for urine mixed with O, P and urine alone. These wastes could be used to capture CO2 and NOx from automotive diesel engines to reduce gas emissions. The proposed strategy requires further research to increase CO2 absorption and reduce the risks associated with waste-water reuse.

  19. Damage Characterization of Bio and Green Polyethylene–Birch Composites under Creep and Cyclic Testing with Multivariable Acoustic Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alencar Bravo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the knowledge gained in recent years regarding the use of acoustic emissions (AEs in ecologically friendly, natural fiber-reinforced composites (including certain composites with bio-sourced matrices, there is still a knowledge gap in the understanding of the difference in damage behavior between green and biocomposites. Thus, this article investigates the behavior of two comparable green and biocomposites with tests that better reflect real-life applications, i.e., load-unloading and creep testing, to determine the evolution of the damage process. Comparing the mechanical results with the AE, it can be concluded that the addition of a coupling agent (CA markedly reduced the ratio of AE damage to mechanical damage. CA had an extremely beneficial effect on green composites because the Kaiser effect was dominant during cyclic testing. During the creep tests, the use of a CA also avoided the transition to new damaging phases in both composites. The long-term applications of PE green material must be chosen carefully because bio and green composites with similar properties exhibited different damage processes in tests such as cycling and creep that could not be previously understood using only monotonic testing.

  20. Evaluation of Biodiesel Production, Engine Performance, and Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürü, Metin; Keskïn, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, to decrease environmental pollution and dependence on fossil-based fuels, research on alternative renewable energy sources has been increasing. One such renewable energy source is biodiesel, which is used as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel is renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly. Biodiesel is domestically produced from vegetable oil (edible or nonedible), animal fat, and used cooking oils. In the biodiesel production process, oil or fat undergoes transesterification reaction through use of simple alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, etc. Use of methanol is most feasible because of its low cost, and physical and chemical advantages. Acid catalysis, alkali catalysis, and enzyme catalysis are usually used to improve the reaction rate and yield. Glycerol is a byproduct of the reaction and can be used as an industrial raw material. In this study, biodiesel production methods (direct use, pyrolysis, microemulsion, transesterification, supercritical processes, ultrasound- assisted, and microwave-assisted) and types of catalyst (homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzyme) have been evaluated and compared. In addition, the effects of biodiesel and its blends on diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions are described and reviewed.

  1. Study on Carbonyl Emissions of Diesel Engine Fueled with Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruina Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a kind of high-quality alternative fuel of diesel engine. In this study, biodiesel and biodiesel/diesel blend were used in a single cylinder diesel engine to study the carbonyl emissions. The result shows that carbonyl pollutants of biodiesel and biodiesel/diesel blend are mainly aldehyde and ketone compounds with 1–3 carbon atoms, and formaldehyde concentration is higher than 80% of the total carbonyl pollutants for biodiesel. The formaldehyde concentration peak is reduced with the increase of intake temperature (T, intake pressure (P, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR ratio and increased with the increase of compression ratio (ε. When excess air coefficient (λ is lower than 1.7, the formaldehyde concentration is increased with the increase of excess air ratio. When λ is higher than 1.7, the formaldehyde concentration is reduced with the increase of excess air ratio. The dilution of air can reduce formaldehyde concentration in the premixed flame of diesel effectively; however, it has less effect on biodiesel. Among the fuel pretreatment measures of adding hydrogen, CO, and methane, the addition of hydrogen shows the best effect on reducing formaldehyde of biodiesel.

  2. Reduction of harmful nitrogen oxide emission from low heat rejection diesel engine using carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasi Gopinathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, lanthanum aluminate is used as thermal barrier coating material for the first time in the internal combustion engine to convert the standard engine into low heat rejection engine. Initially, the biodiesel is prepared from sunflower oil by using trans-esterification process. The piton crown, cylinder head and valves of the engine is coated with lanthanum aluminate for a thickness of around 200 microns. However, the analysis of performance and emission characteristics of a standard diesel is carried out with diesel/biodiesel to compare with the low heat rejection engine. The lanthanum aluminate coated engine fueled with sunflower methyl ester shows better performance and emission. But the emission of NOx founds to be higher in the coated engine. Further, a small quantity of carbon nanotubes is added onto the biodiesel to carry out the experiments. Based on the results, the carbon nanotubes are added with the biodiesel to reduce the emission of NOx.

  3. Dioxin emissions from small-scale combustion of bio-fuel and household waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedman, Bjoern

    2005-09-01

    This thesis deals with emissions of persistent organic pollutants, primarily dioxins, from the combustion of solid biofuels and dry combustible household waste in relatively small facilities, 5-600 kW, without advanced air pollution controls. Co-combustion of waste and biofuel in effective small boilers was tested as an alternative to prevailing large-scale management and combustion strategies for handling municipal solid waste. This approach includes no advanced air pollution control systems, but offers two advantages: limiting transport and providing scope to use local biofuel resources. Source-sorted, dry, combustible household waste was collected from households in a sparsely populated area and co-combusted as briquettes together with reed canary-grass in 150-600 kW biofuel boilers. Most trials showed difficulties to meet regulative limits for the emissions of dioxins valid for incineration of MSW and the regulated limits for emissions of hydrochloric acid were exceeded manifold. It was concluded that additional flue-gas cleaning will be needed to ensure that emissions are sufficiently low. Dioxins were also found in the waste, especially in the textile fraction. The mass of dioxins in the flue-gas emissions was generally lower than the mass in the fuel input. Intermittent combustion of wood pellets in a residential boiler resulted in an unexpectedly high dioxin emissions factor of 28 ng (WHO-TEQ)/kg fuel. Combustion of wood in a modern environmentally certified boiler yielded considerably lower dioxin emissions than combustion in an old boiler, and combustion with a full air supply, i.e. with use of heat storage tank, resulted in up to 90% reductions in dioxin emission factors compared to combustion with reduced air supply. Combustion of plastic waste in a residential wood boiler resulted in high emissions of dioxins. Tests of uncontrolled combustion of garden and household waste in barrels or open fires, 'backyard burnings', resulted in emissions

  4. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Sarah R. Nuss-Warren

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this project is to identify, develop, test, and commercialize emissions control and monitoring technologies that can be implemented by exploration and production (E&P) operators to significantly lower the cost of environmental compliance and expedite project permitting. The project team takes considerable advantage of the emissions control research and development efforts and practices that have been underway in the gas pipeline industry for the last 12 years. These efforts and practices are expected to closely interface with the E&P industry to develop cost-effective options that apply to widely-used field and gathering engines, and which can be readily commercialized. The project is separated into two phases. Phase 1 work establishes an E&P industry liaison group, develops a frequency distribution of installed E&P field engines, and identifies and assesses commercially available and emerging engine emissions control and monitoring technologies. Current and expected E&P engine emissions and monitoring requirements are reviewed, and priority technologies are identified for further development. The identified promising technologies are tested on a laboratory engine to confirm their generic viability. In addition, a full-scale field test of prototype emissions controls will be conducted on at least ten representative field engine models with challenging emissions profiles. Emissions monitoring systems that are integrated with existing controls packages will be developed. Technology transfer/commercialization is expected to be implemented through compressor fleet leasing operators, engine component suppliers, the industry liaison group, and the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council. This topical report discusses work completed during Phase 1 of the project Cost Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines. In this report information, data, and results are compiled and summarized from quarterly

  5. Biotechnology as the engine for the Knowledge-Based Bio-Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Alfredo; Bochereau, Laurent; Matthiessen, Line

    2010-01-01

    The European Commission has defined the Knowledge-Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) as the process of transforming life science knowledge into new, sustainable, eco-efficient and competitive products. The term "Bio-Economy" encompasses all industries and economic sectors that produce, manage and otherwise exploit biological resources and related services. Over the last decades biotechnologies have led to innovations in many agricultural, industrial, medical sectors and societal activities. Biotechnology will continue to be a major contributor to the Bio-Economy, playing an essential role in support of economic growth, employment, energy supply and a new generation of bio-products, and to maintain the standard of living. The paper reviews some of the main biotechnology-related research activities at European level. Beyond the 7th Framework Program for Research and Technological Development (FP7), several initiatives have been launched to better integrate FP7 with European national research activities, promote public-private partnerships and create better market and regulatory environments for stimulating innovation.

  6. Ex vivo non-invasive assessment of cell viability and proliferation in bio-engineered whole organ constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xi; Tapias, Luis F; Jank, Bernhard J; Mathisen, Douglas J; Lanuti, Michael; Ott, Harald C

    2015-06-01

    Decellularized organ scaffolds allow whole organ regeneration and study of cell behavior in three-dimensional culture conditions. Cell viability within the bio-engineered organ constructs is an essential parameter reflecting the performance of participating cells during long-term ex vivo culture, and is a prerequisite for further functional performance. Resazurin-based redox metabolic assays have been used to monitor cell viability in both two- and three-dimensional cell cultures. Here we developed a method for monitoring cell viability and proliferation in bio-engineered organ constructs using a resazurin perfusion assay. This method allows non-invasive, repetitive and rapid estimation of viable cell numbers during long-term ex vivo culture. As a proof-of-principle, we assessed the performance of two different endothelial sources and the impact of different perfusion programs on endothelial viability after re-endothelialization of decellularized lung scaffolds. The resazurin-based perfusion assay revealed changes in endothelial viability and proliferation during long-term ex vivo culture, which was consistent with histological assessment at different time points. Finally, we showed that this method could be used for assessment of proliferation and cytotoxicity after pharmacological treatment on a three-dimensional non-small cell lung cancer culture model.

  7. Evaluation of Performance and Emission characteristics of Turbocharged Diesel Engine with Mullite as Thermal Barrier Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Shrirao

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tests were performed on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, diesel engine whose piston crown, cylinder head and valves were coated with a 0.5 mm thickness of 3Al2O3 .2SiO2 (mullite (Al2O3= 60%, SiO2= 40% over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAlY bond coat. Tests were carried out on standard engine (uncoated and low heatrejection (LHR engine with and without turbocharger. This paper is intended to emphasis on energy balance and emission characteristic for standard engine (uncoated and low heat rejection (LHR engine with and without turbocharger. Tests were carried out at different engine load and engine speed conditions for standard and low heatrejection engine with and without turbocharger. The results showed that there was 2.18% decreasing on specific fuel consumption value of low heat rejection (LHR engine with turbocharger compared to standard engine at full load. There was as much as 12% increasing on exhaust gas temperature of LHR engine with turbocharger compared tostandard engine at full load. There was as much as 20.64% increasing on NOx emission of exhaust gas, 22.05% decreasing on CO emission of exhaust gas and 28.20% decreasing on HC emission of exhaust gas of LHR engine with turbocharger compared to standard engine at full load.

  8. Characterization of emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fine particulate matter emissions from aircraft operations at large airports located in areas of the U. S. designated as non-attainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-2.5 are of major environmental concern. PM emissions data for commercial aircraft engin...

  9. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions analysis of catalysts for hydrotreating of fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Spies, Kurt A.; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.; Zhu, Yuanyuan

    2016-03-01

    Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass requires multi-stage catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon drop-in fuels. The current proposed process design involves fixed beds of ruthenium-based catalyst and conventional petroleum hydrotreating catalyst. Similar to petroleum processing, the catalyst is spent as a result of coking and other deactivation mechanisms, and must be changed out periodically. Biofuel life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) assessments typically ignore the impact of catalyst consumed during fuel conversion as a result of limited lifetime, representing a data gap in the analyses. To help fill this data gap, life cycle GHGs were estimated for two representative examples of fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydrotreating catalyst, NiMo/Al2O3 and Ru/C, and integrated into the conversion-stage GHG analysis. Life cycle GHGs for the NiMo/Al2O3 and Ru/C catalysts are estimated at 5.5 and 81 kg CO2-e/kg catalyst, respectively. Contribution of catalyst consumption to total conversion-stage GHGs is 0.5% for NiMo/Al2O3 and 5% for Ru/C. This analysis does not consider secondary sourcing of metals for catalyst manufacture and therefore these are likely to be conservative estimates compared to applications where a spent catalyst recycler can be used.

  10. CO and PAH Emissions from Engines Operating on Biomass Producer Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Jensen, Torben Kvist; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    High carbon monoxide (CO) emission from gas engines fueled by producer gas is a concerning problem in the struggle to make biomass gasification for heat and power production a success. The standing regulations concerning CO emissions from producer gas engine based power plants in most EU countries...

  11. IDEALIZED ENGINE EMISSIONS RESULTING FROM THE COMBUSTION OF GASOLINE SUPPLEMENTED WITH LPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk SAYIN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In the internal combustion engines, the studies to reduce brake specific fuel consumption and exhaust emissions to the lowest level are the start of the investigations on the dual fuel engines. In this study, the changes in the exhaust emissions of the dual fuel (gasoline + LPG at different ratios have been calculated using a computer program and the results are discussed.

  12. Soil C storage and greenhouse gas emission perennial grasses managed for bio energy feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perennial grasses like switchgrass or big bluestem when managed as bioenergy feedstock require nitrogenous inputs. Nitrogen fertilizer frequently cause nitrous oxide emission. Therefore, managing grasses as feedstock may reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential expected from perennial. ...

  13. Wastewater engineering applications of BioIronTech process based on the biogeochemical cycle of iron bioreduction and (biooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Ivanov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioreduction of Fe(III and biooxidation of Fe(II can be used in wastewater engineering as an innovative biotechnology BioIronTech, which is protected for commercial applications by US patent 7393452 and Singapore patent 106658 “Compositions and methods for the treatment of wastewater and other waste”. The BioIronTech process comprises the following steps: 1 anoxic bacterial reduction of Fe(III, for example in iron ore powder; 2 surface renovation of iron ore particles due to the formation of dissolved Fe2+ ions; 3 precipitation of insoluble ferrous salts of inorganic anions (phosphate or organic anions (phenols and organic acids; 4 (biooxidation of ferrous compunds with the formation of negatively, positively, or neutrally charged ferric hydroxides, which are good adsorbents of many pollutants; 5 disposal or thermal regeration of ferric (hydroxide. Different organic substances can be used as electron donors in bioreduction of Fe(III. Ferrous ions and fresh ferrous or ferric hydroxides that are produced after iron bioreduction and (biooxidation adsorb and precipitate diferent negatively charged molecules, for example chlorinated compounds of sucralose production wastewater or other halogenated organics, as well as phenols, organic acids, phosphate, and sulphide. Reject water (return liquor from the stage of sewage sludge dewatering on municipal wastewater treatment plants represents from 10 to 50% of phosphorus load when being recycled to the aeration tank. BioIronTech process can remove/recover more than 90% of phosphorous from this reject water thus replacing the conventional process of phosphate precipitation by ferric/ferrous salts, which are 20–100 times more expensive than iron ore, which is used in BioIronTech process. BioIronTech process can remarkably improve the aerobic and anaerobic treatments of municipal and industrial wastewaters, especially anaerobic digestion of lipid- and sulphate-containing food-processing wastewater. It

  14. Emission and Combustion Characteristics of Si Engine Working Under Gasoline Blended with Ethanol Oxygenated Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanapal Balaji

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of using unleaded gasoline and additives blends on Spark Ignition engine (SI engine combustion and exhaust emission. Approach: A four stroke, single cylinder SI engine was used for conducting this study. Exhaust emissions were analysed for Carbon Monoxide (CO, Hydrocarbon (HC and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx and carbon dioxide (CO2 using unleaded gasoline and additives blends with different percentages of fuel at varying engine torque condition and constant engine speed. Results: The result showed that the blending of unleaded gasoline increases the octane number and power output this may leads to increase the brake thermal efficiency. The CO, HC and NOx emissions concentrations in the engine exhaust decreases while the CO2 concentration increases. Conclusion: Using ethanol as a fuel additive to unleaded gasoline causes an improvement in combustion characteristics and significant reduction in exhaust emissions.

  15. Jet aircraft engine exhaust emissions database development: Year 1990 and 2015 scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Z. Harry; Metwally, Munir; Vanalstyne, Richard; Ward, Clay A.

    1994-01-01

    Studies relating to environmental emissions associated with the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) military jet and charter jet aircraft were conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Transport Aircraft. The report includes engine emission results for baseline 1990 charter and military scenario and the projected jet engine emissions results for a 2015 scenario for a Mach 1.6 HSCT charter and military fleet. Discussions of the methodology used in formulating these databases are provided.

  16. Construction of combustion models for rapeseed methyl ester bio-diesel fuel for internal combustion engine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovitchev, Valeri I; Yang, Junfeng

    2009-01-01

    Bio-diesel fuels are non-petroleum-based diesel fuels consisting of long chain alkyl esters produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils, that are intended for use (neat or blended with conventional fuels) in unmodified diesel engines. There have been few reports of studies proposing theoretical models for bio-diesel combustion simulations. In this study, we developed combustion models based on ones developed previously. We compiled the liquid fuel properties, and the existing detailed mechanism of methyl butanoate ester (MB, C(5)H(10)O(2)) oxidation was supplemented by sub-mechanisms for two proposed fuel constituent components, C(7)H(16) and C(7)H(8)O (and then, by mp2d, C(4)H(6)O(2) and propyne, C(3)H(4)) to represent the combustion model for rapeseed methyl ester described by the chemical formula, C(19)H(34)O(2) (or C(19)H(36)O(2)). The main fuel vapor thermal properties were taken as those of methyl palmitate C(19)H(36)O(2) in the NASA polynomial form of the Burcat database. The special global reaction was introduced to "crack" the main fuel into its constituent components. This general reaction included 309 species and 1472 reactions, including soot and NO(x) formation processes. The detailed combustion mechanism was validated using shock-tube ignition-delay data under diesel engine conditions. For constant volume and diesel engine (Volvo D12C) combustion modeling, this mechanism could be reduced to 88 species participating in 363 reactions.

  17. Photo-oxidation of tyrosine in a bio-engineered bacterioferritin 'reaction centre'-a protein model for artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingorani, Kastoori; Pace, Ron; Whitney, Spencer; Murray, James W; Smith, Paul; Cheah, Mun Hon; Wydrzynski, Tom; Hillier, Warwick

    2014-10-01

    The photosynthetic reaction centre (RC) is central to the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy and is a model for bio-mimetic engineering approaches to this end. We describe bio-engineering of a Photosystem II (PSII) RC inspired peptide model, building on our earlier studies. A non-photosynthetic haem containing bacterioferritin (BFR) from Escherichia coli that expresses as a homodimer was used as a protein scaffold, incorporating redox-active cofactors mimicking those of PSII. Desirable properties include: a di-nuclear metal binding site which provides ligands for bivalent metals, a hydrophobic pocket at the dimer interface which can bind a photosensitive porphyrin and presence of tyrosine residues proximal to the bound cofactors, which can be utilised as efficient electron-tunnelling intermediates. Light-induced electron transfer from proximal tyrosine residues to the photo-oxidised ZnCe6(•+), in the modified BFR reconstituted with both ZnCe6 and Mn(II), is presented. Three site-specific tyrosine variants (Y25F, Y58F and Y45F) were made to localise the redox-active tyrosine in the engineered system. The results indicate that: presence of bound Mn(II) is necessary to observe tyrosine oxidation in all BFR variants; Y45 the most important tyrosine as an immediate electron donor to the oxidised ZnCe6(•+) and that Y25 and Y58 are both redox-active in this system, but appear to function interchangebaly. High-resolution (2.1Å) crystal structures of the tyrosine variants show that there are no mutation-induced effects on the overall 3-D structure of the protein. Small effects are observed in the Y45F variant. Here, the BFR-RC represents a protein model for artificial photosynthesis. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance and Emission Studies of a SI Engine using Distilled Plastic Pyrolysis Oil-Petrol Blends

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Kareddula Vijaya; Puli Ravi Kumar; Swarna Kumari A.; Shailesh P.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, an experimental investigation is carried out to evaluate the use of plastic oil derived from waste plastic which used in a Spark Ignition engine. Experiments are conducted, the measured performance and emissions of plastic oil blends at different proportions are compared with the baseline operation of the SI engine running with gasoline fuel. Engine performance and exhaust gas emissions such as carbon monoxide, total unburned hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and oxides of nit...

  19. MONITORING AND MODELLING OF AIR POLLUTION PRODUCED BY AIRCRAFT ENGINE EMISSION INSIDE THE ATHENS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksander I. Zaporozhets

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  Experimental measuring of air pollution inside the airport, produced by aircraft engine emission during accelaration and take-off on the runway. Measurement data were used for verification of modelling results according to complex model «PolEmiCa». It consists of the following basic components: engine emission inventory calculation; transport of the contaminants by engine jets, dispersion of the contaminants in atmosphere due to wind and atmospheric turbulence.

  20. Green engineering: Green composite material, biodiesel from waste coffee grounds, and polyurethane bio-foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang-Fu

    In this thesis we developed several ways of producing green materials and energy resources. First, we developed a method to fabricate natural fibers composites, with the purpose to develop green textile/woven composites that could potentially serve as an alternative to materials derived from non-renewable sources. Flax and hemp fabrics were chosen because of their lightweight and exceptional mechanical properties. To make these textile/woven composites withstand moist environments, a commercially available marine resin was utilized as a matrix. The tensile, three-point bending, and edgewise compression strengths of these green textile/woven composites were measured using ASTM protocols. Secondly, we developed a chemical procedure to obtain oil from waste coffee grounds; we did leaching and liquid extractions to get liquid oil from the solid coffee. This coffee oil was used to produce bio-diesel that could be used as a substitute for petroleum-based diesel. Finally, polyurethane Bio-foam formation utilized glycerol that is the by-product from the biodiesel synthesis. A chemical synthesis procedure from the literature was used as the reference system: a triol and isocynate are mixed to produce polyurethane foam. Moreover, we use a similar triol, a by-product from bio-diesel synthesis, to reproduce polyurethane foam.

  1. Effect of fuel injection pressure on a heavy-duty diesel engine nonvolatile particle emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lähde, Tero; Rönkkö, Topi; Happonen, Matti; Söderström, Christer; Virtanen, Annele; Solla, Anu; Kytö, Matti; Rothe, Dieter; Keskinen, Jorma

    2011-03-15

    The effects of the fuel injection pressure on a heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust particle emissions were studied. Nonvolatile particle size distributions and gaseous emissions were measured at steady-state engine conditions while the fuel injection pressure was changed. An increase in the injection pressure resulted in an increase in the nonvolatile nucleation mode (core) emission at medium and at high loads. At low loads, the core was not detected. Simultaneously, a decrease in soot mode number concentration and size and an increase in the soot mode distribution width were detected at all loads. Interestingly, the emission of the core was independent of the soot mode concentration at load conditions below 50%. Depending on engine load conditions, growth of the geometric mean diameter of the core mode was also detected with increasing injection pressure. The core mode emission and also the size of the mode increased with increasing NOx emission while the soot mode size and emission decreased simultaneously.

  2. Emission Characteristics of a CI Engine Running with a Range of Biodiesel Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belachew Tesfa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, alternative fuels are being investigated in detail for application in compression ignition (CI engines resulting in exciting potential opportunities to increase energy security and reduce gas emissions. Biodiesel is one of the alternative fuels which is renewable and environmentally friendly and can be used in diesel engines with little or no modifications. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of biodiesel types and biodiesel fraction on the emission characteristics of a CI engine. The experimental work was carried out on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection (DI and turbocharged diesel engine by using biodiesel made from waste oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil and comparing them to normal diesel. The fuels used in the analyses are B10, B20, B50, B100 and neat diesel. The engine was operated over a range of engine speeds. Based on the measured parameters, detailed analyses were carried out on major regulated emissions such as NOx, CO, CO2, and THC. It has been seen that the biodiesel types (sources do not result in any significant differences in emissions. The results also clearly indicate that the engine running with biodiesel and blends have higher NOx emission by up to 20%. However, the emissions of the CI engine running on neat biodiesel (B100 were reduced by up to 15%, 40% and 30% for CO, CO2 and THC emissions respectively, as compared to diesel fuel at various operating conditions.

  3. Stoichiometric and lean burn heavy-duty gas engines: a dilemma between emissions and fuel consumption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M. van der; Rijke, J. de; Seppen, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper compares stoichiometric with lean burn technology for heavy-duty gas engines (natural gas and LPG) and demonstrates that there is a future for both engine concepts on the multilateral global market. Emission limits in Europe as expected in the near future will facilitate both engine conce

  4. Ultra-Low Carbon Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants through Bio-Oil Co-Firing and Biochar Sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Qi; Mba Wright, Mark; Brown, Robert C

    2015-12-15

    This study investigates a novel strategy of reducing carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants through co-firing bio-oil and sequestering biochar in agricultural lands. The heavy end fraction of bio-oil recovered from corn stover fast pyrolysis is blended and co-fired with bituminous coal to form a bio-oil co-firing fuel (BCF). Life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per kWh electricity produced vary from 1.02 to 0.26 kg CO2-eq among different cases, with BCF heavy end fractions ranging from 10% to 60%, which corresponds to a GHG emissions reduction of 2.9% to 74.9% compared with that from traditional bituminous coal power plants. We found a heavy end fraction between 34.8% and 37.3% is required to meet the Clean Power Plan's emission regulation for new coal-fired power plants. The minimum electricity selling prices are predicted to increase from 8.8 to 14.9 cents/kWh, with heavy end fractions ranging from 30% to 60%. A minimum carbon price of $67.4 ± 13 per metric ton of CO2-eq was estimated to make BCF power commercially viable for the base case. These results suggest that BCF co-firing is an attractive pathway for clean power generation in existing power plants with a potential for significant reductions in carbon emissions.

  5. A powerful molecular engineering tool provided efficient Chlamydomonas mutants as bio-sensing elements for herbicides detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya D Lambreva

    Full Text Available This study was prompted by increasing concerns about ecological damage and human health threats derived by persistent contamination of water and soil with herbicides, and emerging of bio-sensing technology as powerful, fast and efficient tool for the identification of such hazards. This work is aimed at overcoming principal limitations negatively affecting the whole-cell-based biosensors performance due to inadequate stability and sensitivity of the bio-recognition element. The novel bio-sensing elements for the detection of herbicides were generated exploiting the power of molecular engineering in order to improve the performance of photosynthetic complexes. The new phenotypes were produced by an in vitro directed evolution strategy targeted at the photosystem II (PSII D1 protein of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using exposures to radical-generating ionizing radiation as selection pressure. These tools proved successful to identify D1 mutations conferring enhanced stability, tolerance to free-radical-associated stress and competence for herbicide perception. Long-term stability tests of PSII performance revealed the mutants capability to deal with oxidative stress-related conditions. Furthermore, dose-response experiments indicated the strains having increased sensitivity or resistance to triazine and urea type herbicides with I(50 values ranging from 6 × 10(-8 M to 2 × 10(-6 M. Besides stressing the relevance of several amino acids for PSII photochemistry and herbicide sensing, the possibility to improve the specificity of whole-cell-based biosensors, via coupling herbicide-sensitive with herbicide-resistant strains, was verified.

  6. 40 CFR 1045.103 - What exhaust emission standards must my outboard and personal watercraft engines meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... following fuels: (1) Alcohol-fueled engines: THCE emissions. (2) Natural gas-fueled engines: NMHC emissions... less than either of the following: (A) Your projected operating life from advertisements or...

  7. Bio filtration of smell emission generated by biological sludge dewatering; Biofiltrazione di emissioni maleodoranti generate dalla disidratazione di fanghi biologici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collivignarelli, C. [Brescia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile. Facolta' di Ingegneria; Riganti, V. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Generale; Berri, A. [Fondazione S. Maugeri, Pavia (Italy); Colombi, A. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Clinica del Lavoro L. Devoto; Conti, F. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Idraulica e Ambientale; Decarro, C. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Farmacologia; Del Frate, G. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ecologia del Territorio e degli Ambienti Terrestri. Ist. di Micologia Medica; Gerla, R. [Ecodeco SpA, Loc. Cassinazza, Giussago, PV (Italy)

    1999-06-01

    This work presents the results of a pilot scale experience about smelling air treatment by means of bio filtration. The odor emission is generated in a dewatering process of the sludge derived from an industrial wastewater biological treatment. The study was carried out by chemical, chemical-physical, microbiological and organoleptic (olfactometric) analysis. Hydrogen sulfide is the main pollutant removed by this treatment; for this parameter a mass balance was developed to validate the collected data. The result was also compared with the ones of a similar treatment experience carried out on a flue gas derived from a different source (pretreatment of liquid waste). This procedure confirmed the good treatmen capacity of the bio filtration process. [Italian] Quasta relazione illustra i risultati di una esperienza su scala pilota di trattamento mediante biofiltrazione di aria maleodorante. L'emissione odorosa e' generata dal trattamento di disidratazione dei fanghi prodotti da un processo di depurazione biologica dei reflui industriali. Lo studio e' stato condotto mediante l'esecuzione di analisi chimiche e chimico-fisiche, microbiologiche e organolettiche (olfattometriche). Il principale inquinante abbattuto dal trattamento e' il solfuro di idrogeno; su questo parametro e' stato impostato un bilancio di massa per la validazione degli ottimi risultati rilevati. I dati raccolti sono anche confrontati con gli esiti di un'analoga esperienza di trattamento effettuata su un refluo di origine diversa (esalazioni da pretrattamento di rifiuti liquidi) confermando la sostanziale capacita' di trattamento del sistema di biofiltrazione.

  8. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    During the fourth reporting period, the project team investigated the Non-Selective Catalytic Reduction technologies that are in use on rich-burn four-stroke cycle engines. Several engines were instrumented and data collected to obtain a rich set of engine emissions and performance data. During the data collection, the performance of the catalyst under a variety of operating conditions was measured. This information will be necessary to specify a set of sensors that can then be used to reliably implement NSCRs as plausible technologies to reduce NOx emissions for four-stroke cycle engines used in the E&P industry. A complete summary all the technologies investigated to data is included in the report. For each technology, the summary includes a description of the process, the emission reduction that is to be expected, information on the cost of the technology, development status, practical considerations, compatibility with other air pollutant control technologies, and any references used to obtain the information.

  9. Influences of Catalytic Combustion on the Ignition Timing and Emissions of HCCI Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Wen; XIE Mao-zhao

    2008-01-01

    The combustion processes of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines whose piston surfaces have been coated with catalyst (rhodium or platinum) were numerically investigated. A single-zone model and a multi-zone model were developed. The effects of catalytic combustion on the ignition timing of the HCCI engine were analyzed through the single-zone model. The results showed that the ignition timing of the HCCI engine was advanced by the catalysis. The effects of catalytic combustion on HC, CO and NOx emissions of the HCCI engine were analyzed through the multi-zone model. The results showed that the emissions of HC and CO (using platinum (Pt) as catalyst) were decreased, while the emissions of NOx were elevated by catalytic combustion. Compared with catalyst Pt, the HC emissions were lower with catalyst rhodium(Rh) on the piston surface, but the emissions of NOx and CO were higher.

  10. Emissions of PCDD/Fs, PCBs, and PAHs from a modern diesel engine equipped with catalyzed emission control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroo, Christopher A; Schenk, Charles R; Sanchez, L James; McDonald, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Exhaust emissions of 17 2,3,7,8-substituted chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan (CDD/F) congeners, tetra-octa CDD/F homologues, 12 2005 WHO chlorinated biphenyls (CB) congeners, mono-nona CB homologues, and 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a model year 2008 Cummins ISB engine were investigated. Testing included configurations composed of different combinations of aftertreatment including a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), copper zeolite urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR), iron zeolite SCR, and ammonia slip catalyst. Results were compared to a baseline engine out configuration. Testing included the use of fuel that contained the maximum expected chlorine (Cl) concentration of U.S. highway diesel fuel and a Cl level 1.5 orders of magnitude above. Results indicate there is no risk for an increase in polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan and polychlorinated biphenyl emissions from modern diesel engines with catalyzed aftertreatment when compared to engine out emissions for configurations tested in this program. These results, along with PAH results, compare well with similar results from modern diesel engines in the literature. The results further indicate that polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan emissions from modern diesel engines both with and without aftertreatment are below historical values reported in the literature as well as the current inventory value.

  11. Combustion and emission analysis of heavy-duty vehicle diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhixin; Wang, Xue; Wang, Xiancheng; Zhou, Jingkai

    2017-03-01

    Aiming at the research on combustion and emission characteristics of heavy-duty vehicle diesel engine, a bench test was carried out for PM and NOx emission for a certain type diesel engine under different speed and loads. Results shows that for this type of heavy-duty vehicle diesel engine, ignition delay is longer and the proportion of diffusion combustion increases under high speed of external characteristics conditions. Under the speed of 1400 r/min, ignition delay decreases with load increases, combustion duration shortened at first, then increases, the proportion of diffusion combustion increases. The ignition delay is longer and cylinder temperature is higher under lower speed external characteristics of diesel engine, the emissions of soot and NOx are heavier; with large load of external characteristics of diesel engine, the emissions of soot and NOx are heavy as well.

  12. [FTIR detection of unregulated emissions from a diesel engine with biodiesel fuel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pi-qiang; Hu, Zhi-yuan; Lou, Di-ming

    2012-02-01

    Biodiesel, as one of the most promising alternative fuels, has received more attention because of limited fossil fuels. A comparison of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel is discussed as regards engine unregulated exhaust emissions. A diesel fuel, a pure biodiesel fuel, and fuel with 20% V/V biodiesel blend ratio were tested without engine modification The present study examines six typical unregulated emissions by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method: formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (C2 H4 O), acetone (C3 H6 O), toluene (C7 H8), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). The results show addition of biodiesel fuel increases the formaldehyde emission, and B20 fuel has little change, but the formaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel shows a clear trend of addition. Compared with the pure diesel fuel, the acetaldehyde of B20 fuel has a distinct decrease, and the acetaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel is lower than that of the pure diesel fuel at low and middle engine loads, but higher at high engine load. The acetone emission is very low, and increases for B20 and pure biodiesel fuels as compared to diesel fuel. Compared with the diesel fuel, the toluene and sulfur dioxide values of the engine show a distinct decrease with biodiesel blend ratio increasing. It is clear that the biodiesel could reduce aromatic compounds and emissions of diesel engines. The carbon dioxide emission of pure biodiesel has a little lower value than diesel, showing that the biodiesel benefits control of greenhouse gas.

  13. Experimental study on the effect of gaseous and particulate emission from an ethanol fumigated diesel engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a four-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine with 10% and 20% of the engine load taken up by fumigation ethanol injected into the air intake of each cylinder, to investigate the gaseous, particulate mass (PM) emissions, and number concentration and size distribution of the engine under five engine loads at the maximum torque engine speed of 1800 r/min. The experimental results show that at low engine loads, the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) decreases with increase in fumigation ethanol; but at high engine loads, the BTE is not significantly changed by fumigation ethanol. Fumigation ethanol can effectively decrease in brake specific nitrogen oxides (BSNOx), particulate mass and number emissions but significantly increase in brake specific hydrocarbon (BSHC), brake specific carbon monoxide (BSCO) and proportion of BSNO/BSNO2. Also, the geometrical mean diameter of the particles (GMD) increases with increase in engine load but the diameter is not changed by fumigation ethanol in all cases.

  14. Improvement of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions in ceramics low heat rejection engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hideo; Higashino, Akira; Sasaki, Hiroshi [Isuzu Ceramics Research Inst. Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to improve fuel consumption and eliminate the cooling system on a diesel engine having low fuel consumption, a low heat rejection (LHR) engine constructed with the thermos structure was studied. Since air temperature at the end of the compression stroke in a LHR engine are much higher than that of a water-cooled engine, the combustion of LHR engine deteriorated and the fuel consumption and exhaust emissions degraded. The combustion phenomenon in the LHR engine were observed. The reason of deterioration in combustion was insufficient air and fuel mixing. In order to improve the mixing, a new pre-combustion chamber was located in the center of the cylinder. Drilled connecting holes radiating to cylinder wall were developed. The desired characteristics at the LHR engine including fuel consumption and exhaust emissions was achieved in the LHR engine with the new precombustion chamber.

  15. A bio-engineered soft-bottom environment: The impact of Lanice conchilega on the benthic species-specific densities and community structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabaut, M.; Guilini, K.; Van Hoey, V.H.; Vincx, M.; Degraer, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of the tube-building, habitat structuring polychaete Lanice conchilega on the macrobenthic community and sediment characteristics of its habitat. To investigate which factors make species occur in a well-known bio-engineered habitat, macrofaunal and sedimentological d

  16. A Bio-Acoustic Levitational (BAL) Assembly Method for Engineering of Multilayered, 3D Brain-Like Constructs, Using Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neuro-Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, Charlène; Chen, Pu; Güven, Sinan; Demirtaş, Tuğrul Tolga; Nieland, Thomas J F; Padilla, Frédéric; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-06

    A bio-acoustic levitational assembly method for engineering of multilayered, 3D brainlike constructs is presented. Acoustic radiation forces are used to levitate neuroprogenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells in 3D multilayered fibrin tissue constructs. The neuro-progenitor cells are subsequently differentiated in neural cells, resulting in a 3D neuronal construct with inter and intralayer neurite elongations.

  17. Assessing/Optimising Bio-fuel Combustion Technologies for Reducing Civil Aircraft Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Mazlan, Nurul Musfirah

    2012-01-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used in aviation because of their advantageous volume as weight characteristics. The objective of this project proposed was to look at advanced propulsion systems and the close coupling of the airframe with advanced prime mover cycles. The investigation encompassed a comparative assessment of traditional and novel prime mover options including the design, off-design, degraded performance of the engine and the environmental and economic analysis of the system. The ...

  18. Concept for lowest emissions of a hydrogen internal combustion engine; Niedrigstemissionskonzept fuer einen wasserstoffbetriebenen Verbrennungsmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Marcel Christian Thomas

    2012-03-15

    This paper describes a concept with lowest emissions for a hydrogen internal combustion engine for passenger cars. With optimisation of the combustion concept the level of nitrogen oxide is below 90%, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide below 99% of the SULEV target (CARB). This concept enables a potential in power density that is comparable to current supercharged combustion engines at lowest emission level without catalytic aftertreatment. Additionally with a catalytic aftertreatment system, the emission level of a current hydrogen combustion engine (mono-fuel) is lowered to a level, that this car can be labeled as air cleaning vehicle for hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

  19. A review of catalytic upgrading of bio-oil to engine fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2011-01-01

    crude oil. Two general routes for bio-oil upgrading have been considered: hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and zeolite cracking. HDO is a high pressure operation where hydrogen is used to exclude oxygen from the bio-oil, giving a high grade oil product equivalent to crude oil. Catalysts for the reaction...... are traditional hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalysts, such as Co–MoS2/Al2O3, or metal catalysts, as for example Pd/C. However, catalyst lifetimes of much more than 200h have not been achieved with any current catalyst due to carbon deposition. Zeolite cracking is an alternative path, where zeolites, e.g. HZSM-5......-oil results in a low H/C ratio of the oil product as no additional hydrogen is supplied. Overall, oil from zeolite cracking is of a low grade, with heating values approximately 25% lower than that of crude oil. Of the two mentioned routes, HDO appears to have the best potential, as zeolite cracking cannot...

  20. Effects of Engine Cooling Water Temperature on Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Ci Engine Operated with Biofuel Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Hossain

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of the coolant is known to have significant influence on engine performance and emissions. Whereas existing literature describes the effects of coolant temperature in engines using fossil derived fuels, very few studies have investigated these effects when biofuel is used. In this study, Jatropha oil was blended separately with ethanol and butanol. It was found that the 80% jatropha oil + 20% butanol blend was the most suitable alternative, as its properties were closest to that of fossil diesel. The coolant temperature was varied between 50°C and 95°C. The combustion process enhanced for both diesel and biofuel blend, when the coolant temperature was increased. The carbon dioxide emissions for both diesel and biofuel blend were observed to increase with temperature. The carbon monoxide, oxygen and lambda values were observed to decrease with temperature. When the engine was operated using diesel, nitrogen oxides emissions correlated in an opposite manner to smoke opacity; however, nitrogen oxides emissions and smoke opacity correlated in an identical manner for biofuel blend. Brake specific fuel consumption was observed to decrease as the temperature was increased and was higher on average when the biofuel was used. The study concludes that both biofuel blend and fossil diesel produced identical correlations between coolant temperature and engine performance. The trends of nitrogen oxides and smoke emissions with cooling temperatures were not identical to fossil diesel when biofuel blend was used in the engine.

  1. Performance and emission analysis of cottonseed oil methyl ester in a diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hueseyin [Department of Automotive, Faculty of Technical Education, Batman University, Batman 72060 (Turkey); Bayindir, Hasan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, 21280 (Turkey)

    2010-03-15

    In this study, performance and emissions of cottonseed oil methyl ester in a diesel engine was experimentally investigated. For the study, cottonseed oil methyl ester (CSOME) was added to diesel fuel, numbered D2, by volume of 5%(B5), 20%(B20), 50%(B50) and 75%(B75) as well as pure CSOME (B100). Fuels were tested in a single cylinder, direct injection, air cooled diesel engine. The effects of CSOME-diesel blends on engine performance and exhaust emissions were examined at various engine speeds and full loaded engine. The effect of B5, B20, B50, B75, B100 and D2 on the engine power, engine torque, bsfc's and exhaust gasses temperature were clarified by the performance tests. The influences of blends on CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and smoke opacity were investigated by emission tests. The experimental results showed that the use of the lower blends (B5) slightly increases the engine torque at medium and higher speeds in compression ignition engines. However, there were no significant differences in performance values of B5, B20 and diesel fuel. Also with the increase of the biodiesel in blends, the exhaust emissions were reduced. The experimental results showed that the lower contents of CSOME in the blends can partially be substituted for the diesel fuel without any modifications in diesel engines. (author)

  2. STED microscopy--super-resolution bio-imaging utilizing a stimulated emission depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, Kohei; Hibi, Terumasa; Kozawa, Yuichi; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-08-01

    One of the most popular super-resolution microscopies that breaks the diffraction barrier is stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. As the optical set-up of STED microscopy is based on a laser scanning microscopy (LSM) system, it potentially has several merits of LSM like confocal or two-photon excitation LSM. In this article, we first describe the principles of STED microscopy and then describe the features of our newly developed two-photon excitation STED microscopy. On the basis of our recent results and those of other researchers, we conclude by discussing future research and new technologies in this field.

  3. CONVERSION OF DIESEL ENGINE INTO SPARK IGNITION ENGINE TO WORK WITH CNG AND LPG FUELS FOR MEETING NEW EMISSION NORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Kaleemuddin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating fuel prices and associated pollution problems of largely exploited petroleum liquid fuel has stimulated the research on abundantly available gaseous fuels to keep the mobility industry intact. In the present work an air cooled diesel engine was modified suitably into a spark ignition engine incorporating electronic ignition and variable speed dependant spark timing to accommodate both LPG and CNG as fuels. Engine was optimized for stoichiometric operation on engine dynamometer. Materials of a few intricate engine components were replaced to suit LPG and CNG application. Ignition timing was mapped to work with gaseous fuels for different speeds. Compensation was done for recovering volumetric efficiency when operated with CNG by introducing more volume of air through resonator. Ignition timing was observed to be the pertinent parameter in achieving good performance with gaseous fuels under consideration. Performance and emission tests were carried out on engine dynamometer and chassis dynamometer. Under wide open throttle and at rated speed condition, it was observed that the peak pressure with LPG was lying between diesel fuel and CNG fuel operation due to slow burning nature of gaseous fuels. As compression ratio was maintained same for LPG and CNG fuel operation, low CO emissions were observed with LPG where as HC + NOx emissions were lower with CNG fuel operation. Chassis dynamometer based emission tests yielded lower CO2 levels with CNG operation.

  4. 40 CFR 1045.25 - How do the requirements related to evaporative emissions apply to engines and their fuel systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of conformity issued under 40 CFR part 1060. (c) Fuel lines intended to be used with new engines and... evaporative emissions apply to engines and their fuel systems? 1045.25 Section 1045.25 Protection of... related to evaporative emissions apply to engines and their fuel systems? (a) Engine manufacturers...

  5. Conversion of the exhaust emission results obtained from combustion engines of heavy-duty vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkisz, J.; Pielecha, J.

    2016-09-01

    The use of internal combustion engines as the drive for heavy-duty vehicles forces these engines to be tested on an engine dynamometer. Thus, these engines operate under forced conditions, which are significantly different from their actual application. To assess the ecology of such vehicles (or more accurately the engine alone) the emission of pollution per unit of work done by the engine must be determined. However, obtaining the results of unit emissions (expressed in grams of the compound per a unit of performed work) does not give the grounds for determining the mass of pollutants on a given stretch of the road travelled by the vehicle. Therefore, there is a need to change the emission value expressed in units referenced to the engine work into a value of road emissions. The paper presents a methodology of determining pollutant emissions of heavy-duty road vehicles on the basis of the unit emissions, as well as additional parameters determined on the basis of the algorithm presented in the article. A solution was obtained that can be used not only for heavy-duty vehicles, but was also extended to allow use for buses.

  6. DoE Method for Operating Parameter Optimization of a Dual-Fuel BioEthanol/Diesel Light Duty Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Di Blasio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, alcoholic fuels have been considered as an alternative transportation biofuel even in compression ignition engines either as blended in diesel or as premixed fuel in the case of dual-fuel configuration. Within this framework, the authors investigated the possibility to improve the combustion efficiency when ethanol is used in a dual-fuel light duty diesel engine. In particular, the study was focused on reducing the HC and CO emissions at low load conditions, acting on the most influential engine calibration parameters. Since this kind of investigation would require a significant number of runs, the statistical design of experiment methodology was adopted to reduce significantly its number. As required by the DoE approach, a set of factors (injection parameters, etc. were selected. For each of them, two levels “high” and “low” were defined in a range of reasonable values. Combining the levels of all the factors, it was possible to evaluate the effects and the weight of each factor and of their combination on the outputs. The results identified the rail pressure, the pilot, and post-injection as the most influential emission parameters. Significant reductions of unburnt were found acting on those parameters without substantial penalties on the global engine performances.

  7. Investigation of diesel engine for low exhaust emissions with different combustion chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodke Pundlik R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upcoming stringent Euro-6 emission regulations for passenger vehicle better fuel economy, low cost are the key challenges for engine development. In this paper, 2.2L, multi cylinder diesel engine have been tested for four different piston bowls designed for compression ratio of CR 15.5 to improve in cylinder performance and reduce emissions. These combustion chambers were verified in CFD at two full load points. 14 mode points have been derived using vehicle model run in AVL CRUISE software as per NEDC cycle based on time weightage factor. Base engine with compression ratio CR16.5 for full load performance and 14-mode points on Engine test bench was taken as reference for comparison. The bowl with flat face on bottom corner has shown reduction 25% and 12 % NOx emissions at 1500 and 3750 rpm full load points at same level of Soot emissions. Three piston bowls were tested for full load performance and 14 mode points on engine test bench and combustion chamber ‘C’ has shown improvement in thermal efficiency by 0.8%. Combinations of cooled EGR and combustion chamber ‘C’ with geometrical changes in engine have reduced exhaust NOx, soot and CO emissions by 22%, 9 % and 64 % as compared to base engine at 14 mode points on engine test bench.

  8. Study of combustion and emission characteristics of turbocharged diesel engine fuelled with dimethylether

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua WU; Zhen HUANG; Xinqi QIAO; Jun LU; Junjun ZHANG; Liang ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study of a turbocharged diesel engine operating on dimethyl ether (DME) was conducted. The combustion and emission characteristics of the DME engine were investigated. The results show that the maximum torque and power of DME are greater than those of diesel, particularly at low speeds; the brake specific fuel consum-ption of DME is lower than that of diesel at low and middle engine speeds, and the injection delay of DME is longer than that of diesel. However, the maximum cylinder pressure, maximum pressure rise rate and combustion noises of the DME engine are lower than those of diesel. The combustion velocity of DME is faster than that of diesel, resulting in a shorter combustion duration of DME. Compared with the diesel engine, NOx emission of the DME engine is reduced by 41.6% on ESC data. In addition, the DME engine is smoke free at any operating condition.

  9. Preparation, characterisation, engine performance and emission characteristics of coconut oil based hybrid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pranil J.; Singh, Anirudh [Division of Physics, School of Engineering and Physics, Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment, University of the South Pacific, 325 Fletcher Road, Suva (Fiji); Khurma, Jagjit [Division of Chemistry, School of Biological, Chemical and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment, University of the South Pacific, Suva (Fiji)

    2010-09-15

    In this study, hybrid fuels consisting of coconut oil, aqueous ethanol and a surfactant (butan-1-ol) were prepared and tested as a fuel in a direct injection diesel engine. After determining fuel properties such as the density, viscosity and gross calorific values of these fuels, they were used to run a diesel engine. The engine performance and exhaust emissions were investigated and compared with that of diesel. The experimental results show that the efficiency of the hybrid fuels is comparable to that of diesel. As the viscosity of the hybrid fuels decreased and approached that of diesel, the efficiency increased progressively towards that of diesel. The exhaust emissions were lower than those for diesel, except carbon monoxide emissions, which increased. Hence, it is concluded that these hybrid fuels can be used successfully as an alternative fuel in diesel engines without any modifications. Their completely renewable nature ensures that they are environmentally friendly with regard to their emissions characteristics. (author)

  10. Effects of Aftermarket Control Technologies on Gas and Particle Phase Oxidative Potential from Diesel Engine Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter (PM) originating from diesel combustion is a public health concern due to its association with adverse effects on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. This study investigated emissions from three stationary diesel engines (gensets) with var...

  11. Methods of Reducing Emissions from Two-stroke low-speed Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Mitu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide focus on fuels is generally increasing because of the focus on exhaust gas emissions. General awareness of environmental issues is increasing rapidly. Diesel engine makers were first involved in questions regarding exhaust gas emissions in the field of stationary applications. A study of the exhaust gas emissions from a diesel engine represents a challenge to both the engine designer and to makers of exhaust gas treatment equipment. It is also a valuable tool for reaching a deeper understanding of the engine combustion process. These emissions control technologies, like Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR, will help to reduce pollutants that impact our health and the health of our communities as well as reduce smog creation and other factors that contribute to climate change and global warming.

  12. BioTCM-SE: a semantic search engine for the information retrieval of modern biology and traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Chen, Huajun; Bi, Xuan; Gu, Peiqin; Chen, Jiaoyan; Wu, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the functional mechanisms of the complex biological system as a whole is drawing more and more attention in global health care management. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), essentially different from Western Medicine (WM), is gaining increasing attention due to its emphasis on individual wellness and natural herbal medicine, which satisfies the goal of integrative medicine. However, with the explosive growth of biomedical data on the Web, biomedical researchers are now confronted with the problem of large-scale data analysis and data query. Besides that, biomedical data also has a wide coverage which usually comes from multiple heterogeneous data sources and has different taxonomies, making it hard to integrate and query the big biomedical data. Embedded with domain knowledge from different disciplines all regarding human biological systems, the heterogeneous data repositories are implicitly connected by human expert knowledge. Traditional search engines cannot provide accurate and comprehensive search results for the semantically associated knowledge since they only support keywords-based searches. In this paper, we present BioTCM-SE, a semantic search engine for the information retrieval of modern biology and TCM, which provides biologists with a comprehensive and accurate associated knowledge query platform to greatly facilitate the implicit knowledge discovery between WM and TCM.

  13. BioTCM-SE: A Semantic Search Engine for the Information Retrieval of Modern Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the functional mechanisms of the complex biological system as a whole is drawing more and more attention in global health care management. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, essentially different from Western Medicine (WM, is gaining increasing attention due to its emphasis on individual wellness and natural herbal medicine, which satisfies the goal of integrative medicine. However, with the explosive growth of biomedical data on the Web, biomedical researchers are now confronted with the problem of large-scale data analysis and data query. Besides that, biomedical data also has a wide coverage which usually comes from multiple heterogeneous data sources and has different taxonomies, making it hard to integrate and query the big biomedical data. Embedded with domain knowledge from different disciplines all regarding human biological systems, the heterogeneous data repositories are implicitly connected by human expert knowledge. Traditional search engines cannot provide accurate and comprehensive search results for the semantically associated knowledge since they only support keywords-based searches. In this paper, we present BioTCM-SE, a semantic search engine for the information retrieval of modern biology and TCM, which provides biologists with a comprehensive and accurate associated knowledge query platform to greatly facilitate the implicit knowledge discovery between WM and TCM.

  14. Turbulence, combustion, efficiency and emission measurements on a supercharged natural gas SI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einewall, P.; Olsson, Magnus

    1996-08-01

    LDV was used to measure turbulence in six different combustion chambers for a natural gas operated TD102 Volvo truck engine. The efficiency and emissions were measured during supercharged lean operation. The combustion chambers were altered by using pistons with different crown geometries. Some of the load cases require supercharged operation of the engine. The cooling of the cylinder-head was therefore improved. Turbulence, combustion rate, emissions and efficiency was measured for four different piston design. 8 refs, figs

  15. On-board diagnosis of emission control system malfunctions in electronically controlled spark ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzoni, P.M. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Rizzoni, G. [Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corp., Apollo, PA (United States). Energy Conversion Div.; Minelli, G. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Facolta di Ingegneria

    1993-09-01

    This paper discusses simulation and experimental results of a study aimed at diagnosing faults associated with an automotive engine exhaust emissions control system. Parity space methods are applied to a model of the engine intake, fueling, combustion and exhaust dynamics to diagnose faults in sensors and actuators used by the exhaust emissions control system. The results indicate that a mix of linear dynamic and nonlinear static models permit the design of an effective diagnostic strategy.

  16. HYDROGEN ADDITION ON COMBUSTION AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH SPEED SPARK IGNITION ENGINE- AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIVAPRASAD K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims at characterizing the combustion and emission parameters of a single cylinder high speed SI engine operating with different concentrations of hydrogen with gasoline fuel. The conventional carburetted SI engine was modified into an electronically controllable engine, wherein ECU was used to control the injection timings and durations of gasoline. The engine was maintained at a constant speed of 3000 rpm and wide open throttle position. The experimental results demonstrated that heat release rate and cylinder pressure were increased with the addition of hydrogen until 20%. The CO and HC emissions were reduced considerably whereas NOx emission was increased with the addition of hydrogen in comparison with pure gasoline engine operation.

  17. Effect of Ferrofluid on the Performance and Emission Patterns of a Four-Stroke Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Shafii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests were carried out to investigate the effects of adding water-based ferrofluid to diesel fuel in a diesel engine. These effects included the combustion performance and exhaust emission characteristics of the diesel engine. To this end, emulsified diesel fuels of 0, 0.4, and 0.8 ferrofluid/diesel ratios by volume were used in a four-stroke diesel engine, operating at 2200 rpm. The results indicate that adding ferrofluid to diesel fuel has a perceptible effect on engine performance, increasing the brake thermal efficiency relatively up to 12% and decreasing the brake-specific fuel consumption relatively up to 11% as compared to diesel fuel. Furthermore, from the analysis of gaseous species of engine exhaust, it was found that NOx emissions were lower than that of diesel fuel while the CO emissions increased. In addition, it was found that nanoparticles can be collected at the exhaust flow using a magnetic bar.

  18. Spray and combustion visualization of bio-diesel in a direct injection diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the self-developed dynamic visualization photographic setup, this article investigated some major factors affecting the spray and combustion process of diesel engine fueled by biodiesel. The experimental results show: With the increase of biodiesel percentage, fuel injection advances slightly, the ignition delay becomes shorter and the duration of combustion lengthens. Engine speed has little effect on the spray. However, the combustion rate is increased and the burning time becomes shorter with the increase of engine speed, although the duration of combustion in terms of crank angle increases. With the increase of needle opening pressure, both the spray cone angle and the spray penetration of biodiesel increases, the atomization of spray improves, the ignition delay and the duration of combustion becomes shorter, the peak pressure increases.

  19. Experimental investigation of evaporation rate and emission studies of diesel engine fuelled with blends of used vegetable oil biodiesel and producer gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjappan Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study to measure the evaporation rates, engine performance and emission characteristics of used vegetable oil methyl ester and its blends with producer gas on naturally aspirated vertical single cylinder water cooled four stroke single cylinder diesel engine is presented. The thermo-physical properties of all the bio fuel blends have been measured and presented. Evaporation rates of used vegetable oil methyl ester and its blends have been measured under slow convective environment of air flowing with a constant temperature and the values are compared with fossil diesel. Evaporation constants have been determined by using the droplet regression rate data. The fossil diesel, biodiesel blends and producer gas have been utilized in the test engine with different load conditions to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of diesel engine and the results are compared with each other. From these observations, it could be noted that, smoke and hydrocarbon drastically reduced with biodiesel in the standard diesel engine without any modifications.

  20. About methods to reduce emissions of turbo charged engine gasoline direct injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neacsu, D.; Ivan, F.; Niculae, M.

    2017-08-01

    The paper aims to analyse and explain new methods applied on gasoline direct injection to reduce gas emissions and greenhouse effect. There are analysed the composition of emission inside the engine and which are the most harmful emission for the environment. Will be analysed the methods and systems which have a contribution to decrease emissions produced by the mixture of air and fuel. The paper contains details about after treatment systems which are designed to decrease gas emissions without any other negative consequence on the environment.

  1. Large engine cylinder honing as a contribution to emissions reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Josef [Nagel Maschinen- und Werkzeugfabrik GmbH, Nuertingen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    As well as new combustion processes and aftertreatment, increasingly rigorous environmental protection regulations are also promoting advances in engine manufacturing techniques. These measures include optimised surfaces made possible using the most modern honing technologies, such as those already in widespread use in the manufacture of automotive engines. The transfer of these honing technologies to large high and medium speed engines is best achieved using new machining concepts. (orig.)

  2. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Beshouri; Kirby S. Chapman; Jim McCarthy; Sarah R. Nuss-Warren; Mike Whelan

    2006-03-01

    This quarterly report re-evaluates current market objectives in the exploration and production industry, discusses continuing progress in testing that evaluates emission control technologies applied to a two-stroke cycle natural gas-fueled engine, and presents a scheme for enacting remote monitoring and control of engines during upcoming field tests. The examination of current market objectives takes into account technological developments and changing expectations for environmental permitting which may have occurred over the last year. This demonstrates that the continuing work in controlled testing and toward field testing is on track Market pressures currently affecting the gas exploration and production industry are shown to include a push for increased production, as well as an increasing cost for environmental compliance. This cost includes the direct cost of adding control technologies to field engines as well as the indirect cost of difficulty obtaining permits. Environmental regulations continue to require lower emissions targets, and some groups of engines which had not previously been regulated will be required to obtain permits in the future. While the focus remains on NOx and CO, some permits require reporting of additional emissions chemicals. Continuing work in controlled testing uses a one cylinder Ajax DP-115 (a 13.25 in bore x 16 in stroke, 360 rpm engine) to assess a sequential analysis and evaluation of a series of engine upgrades. As with most of the engines used in the natural gas industry, the Ajax engine is a mature engine with widespread usage throughout the gas gathering industry. The end point is an assessment of these technologies that assigns a cost per unit reduction in NOx emissions. Technologies including one pre-combustion chamber, in-cylinder sensors, the means to adjust the air-to-fuel ratio, and modification of the air filter housing have been evaluated in previous reports. Current work focuses on final preparations for testing

  3. Regulated and unregulated emissions from a diesel engine fueled with biodiesel and biodiesel blended with methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C. S.; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Zhen

    Experiments were carried out on a diesel engine operating on Euro V diesel fuel, pure biodiesel and biodiesel blended with methanol. The blended fuels contain 5%, 10% and 15% by volume of methanol. Experiments were conducted under five engine loads at a steady speed of 1800 rev min -1 to assess the performance and the emissions of the engine associated with the application of the different fuels. The results indicate an increase of brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency when the diesel engine was operated with biodiesel and the blended fuels, compared with the diesel fuel. The blended fuels could lead to higher CO and HC emissions than biodiesel, higher CO emission but lower HC emission than the diesel fuel. There are simultaneous reductions of NO x and PM to a level below those of the diesel fuel. Regarding the unregulated emissions, compared with the diesel fuel, the blended fuels generate higher formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and unburned methanol emissions, lower 1,3-butadiene and benzene emissions, while the toluene and xylene emissions not significantly different.

  4. Engine Performance (Section C: Emission Control Systems). Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Module 3. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Larry

    This engine performance (emission control systems) module is one of a series of competency-based modules in the Missouri Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Topics of this module's five units are: positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) and evaporative emission control systems; exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); air injection and catalytic converters;…

  5. Avco Lycoming/NASA contract status. [on reduction of emissions from aircraft piston engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The standards promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbon (HC), and oxides-of-nitrogen (NOx) emissions were the basis in a study of ways to reduce emissions from aircraft piston engines. A variable valve timing system, ultrasonic fuel atomization, and ignition system changes were postulated.

  6. Integrated emission management strategy for cost-optimal engine-aftertreatment operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloudt, R.P.M.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2011-01-01

    A new cost-based control strategy is presented that optimizes engine-aftertreatment performance under all operating conditions. This Integrated Emission Management strategy minimizes fuel consumption within the set emission limits by on-line adjustment of air management based on the actual state of

  7. Analysis of experimental hydrogen engine data and hydrogen vehicle performance and emissions simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This paper reports the engine and vehicle simulation and analysis done at Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) as a part of a joint optimized hydrogen engine development effort. Project participants are: Sandia National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Miami. Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios. NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignite engines can provide Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in either a series hybrid or a conventional automobile.

  8. Novel Oxygen Storage Components Promoted Palladium Catalysts for Emission Control in Natural Gas Powered Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin ZHAO; Mao Chu GONG; Xue Song FENG; Yong Yue LUO; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2005-01-01

    A three-way catalyst comprised novel oxygen storage components for emission control in natural gas powered engines was prepared. The addition of novel oxygen storage components to the Pd/γ-A12O3 catalysts resulted in improved activities of the fresh and aged catalyst by lowering the light-off temperature for methane in natural gas engines exhaust.

  9. Novel Sampling Techniques for Measurement of Turbine Engine Total Particulate Matter Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first progress report of a study to evaluate two different condensation devices for the measurement of the total (volatile + non-volatile) particulate matter (PM) emissions from aircraft turbine engines by direct sampling at the engine exit. The characteristics of th...

  10. Emission Constrained Multiple-Pulse Fuel Injection Optimisation and Control for Fuel-Efficient Diesel Engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, X.; Jager, B. de; Willems, F.P.T.

    2015-01-01

    With the application of multiple-pulse fuel injection profiles, the performance of diesel engines is enhanced in terms of low fuel consumption and low engine-out emission levels. However, the calibration effort increases due to a larger number of injection timing parameters. The difficulty of contro

  11. Emission Constrained Multiple-Pulse Fuel Injection Optimisation and Control for Fuel-Efficient Diesel Engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, X.; Jager, B. de; Willems, F.P.T.

    2015-01-01

    With the application of multiple-pulse fuel injection profiles, the performance of diesel engines is enhanced in terms of low fuel consumption and low engine-out emission levels. However, the calibration effort increases due to a larger number of injection timing parameters. The difficulty of contro

  12. Evaluation of Methods for the Determination of Black Carbon Emissions from an Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines consist of nanometer size black carbon (BC) particles plus gas-phase sulfur and organic compounds which undergo gas-to-particle conversion downstream of the engine as the plume cools and dilutes. In this study, four BC measurement ...

  13. Engineering of a bio-functionalized hybrid off-the-shelf heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Svenja; Seifert, Jan; Votteler, Miriam; Shen, Nian; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2014-02-01

    Currently available heart valve replacements are limited in long-term performance or fail due to leaflet thickening, lack of growth or remodeling potential. In order to address these issues, it is necessary to mimic multiple factors of the native valvular extracellular matrix (ECM) such as architecture, mechanical behavior and biochemical signals. Here, we successfully generated an electrospun PEGdma-PLA scaffold adapted to the structure and mechanical properties of native valve leaflets. Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) and valvular endothelial cells (VECs) were seeded on the scaffold and when cultured under physiological conditions in a bioreactor, the construct performed like a native leaflet. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to obtain detailed mechanical information from the leaflets, which enabled the first layer-specific measurement of the Young's modulus. Interestingly, spongiosa stiffness was much lower compared to the fibrosa and ventricularis. Moreover, investigations into human fetal heart valve development identified collagen type I and versican as important structural proteins. As a proof of principle, these proteins were introduced to the scaffold, demonstrating the ability to bio-functionalize the hybrid valve based on natures' blueprint.

  14. Process engineering for stable nitrogen removal using the SymBio process; Stickstoffentfernung aus Abwaessern mit dem SymBio-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, R.; Viertl, C. [SHW Hoelter Wassertechnik GmbH, Essen (Germany); Augustinova, E. [Technicka Univ., Kosice (Slovakia)

    1997-09-01

    Biological nitrogen removal during the activated sludge process via the stages of nitrification and denitrification is sufficiently known from the extensive operating experience gained in existing sewage treatment plants. The new measuring device (BioBalance) makes it possible to control the SymBio process in on-line operation. The process has the advantage that nitrate or nitrite formed by nitrification in the outer, oxygen-containing (aerobic) area of the activated sludge flocs is nearly simultaneously converted, by means of denitrification, into free nitrogen in the inner, oxygen-free (anoxic) area of the activate sludge flocs, without intermediate concentration of nitrate and nitrite in the system as in the case of conventional processes. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die biologische Stickstoffentfernung beim Belebtschlammverfahren ueber die Stufen der Nitrifikation und Dentrifikation ist durch viele in bestehenden Klaeranlagen gewonnene Betriebserfahrungen ausreichend bekannt. Mit einer neuen Messeinrichtung (BioBalance) wurde die Sicherheit geschaffen, dass SymBio-Verfahren im On-Line-Betrieb zu regeln. Der Vorteil dieses Verfahrens besteht in einer nahezu gleichzeitigen Umsetzung von im aeusseren, sauerstoffhaltigen (aeroben) Bereich der Belebtschlammflocken durch Nitrifikation gebildetem Nitrat oder Nitrit zu freiem Stickstoff im inneren, sauerstofffreien (anoxischen) Bereich der Belebtschlammflocke durch Dentrifikation, ohne Zwischenanreicherung von Nitrit und Nitrat im System wie bei herkoemmlichen Verfahren. (orig./SR)

  15. An Equivalent Emission Minimization Strategy for Causal Optimal Control of Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Zentner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges during the development of operating strategies for modern diesel engines is the reduction of the CO2 emissions, while complying with ever more stringent limits for the pollutant emissions. The inherent trade-off between the emissions of CO2 and pollutants renders a simultaneous reduction difficult. Therefore, an optimal operating strategy is sought that yields minimal CO2 emissions, while holding the cumulative pollutant emissions at the allowed level. Such an operating strategy can be obtained offline by solving a constrained optimal control problem. However, the final-value constraint on the cumulated pollutant emissions prevents this approach from being adopted for causal control. This paper proposes a framework for causal optimal control of diesel engines. The optimization problem can be solved online when the constrained minimization of the CO2 emissions is reformulated as an unconstrained minimization of the CO2 emissions and the weighted pollutant emissions (i.e., equivalent emissions. However, the weighting factors are not known a priori. A method for the online calculation of these weighting factors is proposed. It is based on the Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman (HJB equation and a physically motivated approximation of the optimal cost-to-go. A case study shows that the causal control strategy defined by the online calculation of the equivalence factor and the minimization of the equivalent emissions is only slightly inferior to the non-causal offline optimization, while being applicable to online control.

  16. Impact of Military JP-8 Fuel on Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Performance and Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-07

    Filipi, Z., Assanis, D., Kuo, T.-W., Najt, P., Rask, R. “New Heat Transfer Correlation for the HCCI Engine Derived from Measurements of...Impact of Military JP-8 Fuel on Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Performance and Emissions Gerald Fernandes1, Jerry Fuschetto1, Zoran Filipi1 and Dennis...with the operation of a diesel engine with JP- 8 fuel due to its lower density and viscosity, but few experimental studies suggest that kerosene

  17. Effects of ethanol on combustion and emissions of a gasoline engine operating with different combustion modes

    OpenAIRE

    Ojapah, MM; Zhao, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of fuel economy and CO2 emission legislations for passenger cars in many countries and regions has spurred the research and development of more efficient gasoline engines. The pumping loss at part-load operations is a major factor for the higher fuel consumption of spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines than the diesel engines. Various approaches have been identified to reduce the pumping loss at part-load operations, leading to improved fuel economy, including Early Intake Val...

  18. Development of tissue-engineered self-expandable aortic stent grafts (Bio stent grafts) using in-body tissue architecture technology in beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawajiri, Hidetake; Mizuno, Takeshi; Moriwaki, Takeshi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yamanami, Masashi; Kanda, Keiichi; Yaku, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to describe the development of tissue-engineered self-expandable aortic stent grafts (Bio stent graft) using in-body tissue architecture technology in beagles and to determine its mechanical and histological properties. The preparation mold was assembled by insertion of an acryl rod (outer diameter, 8.6 mm; length, 40 mm) into a self-expanding nitinol stent (internal diameter, 9.0 mm; length, 35 mm). The molds (n = 6) were embedded into the subcutaneous pouches of three beagles for 4 weeks. After harvesting and removing each rod, the excessive fragile tissue connected around the molds was trimmed, and thus tubular autologous connective tissues with the stent were obtained for use as Bio stent grafts (outer diameter, approximately 9.3 mm in all molds). The stent strut was completely surrounded by the dense collagenous membrane (thickness, ∼150 µm). The Bio stent graft luminal surface was extremely flat and smooth. The graft wall of the Bio stent graft possessed an elastic modulus that was almost two times higher than that of the native beagle abdominal aorta. This Bio stent graft is expected to exhibit excellent biocompatibility after being implanted in the aorta, which may reduce the risk of type 1 endoleaks or migration.

  19. Studies on exhaust emissions of catalytic coated spark ignition engine with adulterated gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralikrishna, M V S; Kishor, K; Venkata Ramana Reddy, Ch

    2006-04-01

    Adulteration of automotive fuels, especially, gasoline with cheaper fuels is widespread throughout south Asia. Some adulterants decrease the performance and life of the engine and increase the emission of harmful pollutants causing environmental and health problems. The present investigation is carried out to study the exhaust emissions from a single cylinder spark ignition (SI) engine with kerosene blended gasoline with different versions of the engine, such as conventional engine and catalytic coated engine with different proportions of the kerosene ranging from 0% to 40% by volume in steps of 10% in the kerosene-gasoline blend. The catalytic coated engine used in the study has copper coating of thickness 400 microns on piston and inner surface of the cylinder head. The pollutants in the exhaust, carbon monoxide (CO) and unburnt hydrocarbons (UBHC) are measured with Netel Chromatograph CO and HC analyzer at peak load operation of the engine. The engine is provided with catalytic converter with sponge iron as a catalyst to control the pollutants from the exhaust of the engine. An air injection is also provided to the catalytic converter to further reduce the pollutants. The pollutants found to increase drastically with adulterated gasoline. Copper-coated engine with catalytic converter significantly reduced pollutants, when compared to conventional engine.

  20. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith Hohn; Sarah R. Nuss-Warren

    2011-08-31

    This final report describes a project intended to identify, develop, test, and commercialize emissions control and monitoring technologies that can be implemented by E&P operators to significantly lower their cost of environmental compliance and expedite project permitting. Technologies were installed and tested in controlled laboratory situations and then installed and tested on field engines based on the recommendations of an industry-based steering committee, analysis of installed horsepower, analysis of available emissions control and monitoring technologies, and review of technology and market gaps. The industry-recognized solution for lean-burn engines, a low-emissions-retrofit including increased airflow and pre-combustion chambers, was found to successfully control engine emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub X}) and carbon monoxide (CO). However, the standard non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) system recognized by the industry was found to be unable to consistently control both NO{sub X} and CO emissions. The standard NSCR system was observed to produce emissions levels that changed dramatically on a day-to-day or even hour-to-hour basis. Because difficulties with this system seemed to be the result of exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensors that produced identical output for very different exhaust gas conditions, models were developed to describe the behavior of the EGO sensor and an alternative, the universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor. Meanwhile, an integrated NSCR system using an advanced, signal-conditioned UEGO sensor was tested and found to control both NO{sub X} and CO emissions. In conjunction with this project, advanced monitoring technologies, such as Ion Sense, and improved sensors for emissions control, such as the AFM1000+ have been developed and commercialized.

  1. Application of an EGR system in a direct injection diesel engine to reduce NOx emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Serio, D.; De Oliveira, A.; Sodré, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the application of an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system in a direct injection diesel engine operating with diesel oil containing 7% biodiesel (B7). EGR rates of up to 10% were applied with the primary aim to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions. The experiments were conducted in a 44 kW diesel power generator to evaluate engine performance and emissions for different load settings. The use of EGR caused a peak pressure reduction during the combustion process and a decrease in thermal efficiency, mainly at high engine loads. A reduction of NOx emissions of up to 26% was achieved, though penalizing carbon monoxide (CO) and total hydrocarbons (THC) emissions.

  2. Simulation Analysis of Combustion Parameters and Emission Characteristics of CNG Fueled HCCI Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Diaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The naturally aspirated compressed natural gas (CNG fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine operation region is narrow between heavy knock at rich air-fuel mixture side and misfire at the lean air-fuel mixture side. However, high activation energy is needed to attain autoignition temperature of CNG fueled HCCI engine. This paper seeks to provide guidance in overcoming challenges of CNG fueled HCCI engine by using CHEMKIN. It is used to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion process for different air-fuel mixture inlet temperature, relative air-fuel ratio of 2.5, and with hemispherical bowl types of combustion chambers. The variation of various properties like the peak cylinder pressure, peak cylinder temperature, CO emission, NO emission, soot emission, and HC emission are studied. It is necessary to develop new combustion models to simulate and predict all parameters with high accuracy.

  3. Performance and Emission Studies of a SI Engine using Distilled Plastic Pyrolysis Oil-Petrol Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Kareddula Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an experimental investigation is carried out to evaluate the use of plastic oil derived from waste plastic which used in a Spark Ignition engine. Experiments are conducted, the measured performance and emissions of plastic oil blends at different proportions are compared with the baseline operation of the SI engine running with gasoline fuel. Engine performance and exhaust gas emissions such as carbon monoxide, total unburned hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and oxides of nitrogen are measured. From the experiments it is observed that 50% Distilled Plastic Pyrolysis Oil (50%DPPO exhibits the substantial enhancement in brake power, brake thermal efficiency and reduction in brake specific fuel consumption running at full load conditions among different blends and pure petrol. There is also noticed decrement of carbon dioxide and unburned hydrocarbons emissions at the same blend. The experimental result shows that plastic oil shall conveniently be used as a substitute to gasoline in the existing SI engines without any modifications.

  4. Spark Ignition Engine Combustion, Performance and Emission Products from Hydrous Ethanol and Its Blends with Gasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaab O. El-Faroug

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the serviceability of hydrous ethanol as a clean, cheap and green renewable substitute fuel for spark ignition engines and discusses the comparative chemical and physical properties of hydrous ethanol and gasoline fuels. The significant differences in the properties of hydrous ethanol and gasoline fuels are sufficient to create a significant change during the combustion phase of engine operation and consequently affect the performance of spark-ignition (SI engines. The stability of ethanol-gasoline-water blends is also discussed. Furthermore, the effects of hydrous ethanol, and its blends with gasoline fuel on SI engine combustion characteristics, cycle-to-cycle variations, engine performance parameters, and emission characteristics have been highlighted. Higher water solubility in ethanol‑gasoline blends may be obviously useful and suitable; nevertheless, the continuous ability of water to remain soluble in the blend is significantly affected by temperature. Nearly all published engine experimental results showed a significant improvement in combustion characteristics and enhanced engine performance for the use of hydrous ethanol as fuel. Moreover, carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen emissions were also significantly decreased. It is also worth pointing out that unburned hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide emissions were also reduced for the use of hydrous ethanol. However, unregulated emissions such as acetaldehyde and formaldehyde were significantly increased.

  5. PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST GAS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS OF DIRECT INJECTION CNG-DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANBIR SINGH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing diesel engines are under stringent emission regulation particularly of smoke and particulate matter in their exhaust. Compressed Natural Gas and Diesel dual fuel operation is regarded as one of the best ways to control emissions from diesel engines and simultaneously saving petroleum based diesel fuel. Dual fuel engineis a conventional diesel engine which burn either gaseous fuel or diesel or both at the same time. In the present paper an experimental research was carried out on a laboratory single cylinder, four-stroke variable compression ratio, direct injection diesel engine converted to CNG-Diesel dual fuel mode to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of pure diesel first and then CNG-Diesel dual fuel mode. The measurements were recorded for the compression ratio of 15 and 17.5 at CNG substitution rates of 30% and 60% and varying theload from idle to rated load of 3.5kW in steps of 1 up to 3kW and then to 3.5kW. The results reveal that brake thermal efficiency of dual fuel engine is in the range of 30%-40% at the rated load of 3.5 kW which is 11%-13% higher than pure diesel engine for 30% and 60% CNG substitution rates. This trend is observed irrespective of the compression ratio of the engine. Brake specific fuel consumption of dual fuel engine is found better than pure diesel engine at all engine loads and for both CNG substitution rates. It is found that there is drastic reduction in CO, CO2, HC, NOx and smoke emissions in the exhaust of dual fuel engine at all loads and for 30% and 60% CNG substitution rates by employing some optimum operating conditions set forth for experimental investigations in this study.

  6. Experimental study of effects of oxygen concentration on combustion and emissions of diesel engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO MingFa; ZHANG QuanChang; ZHENG ZunQin; ZHANG Pang

    2009-01-01

    Effects of oxygen concentration on combustion and emissions of diesel engine are investigated by experiment. The intake oxygen concentration is controlled by adjusting CO2. The results show that very low levels of both soot and NOx emissions can be achieved by modulating the injection pressure, tim-ing, and boost pressure at the low levels of oxygen concentration. However, both CO and HC emissions and fuel consumption distinctly increase at the low levels of oxygen concentration. The results also indicate that NOx emissions strongly depend on oxygen concentration, while soot emissions strongly depend on injection pressure. Decreasing oxygen concentration is the most effective method to control NOx emissions. High injection pressure is necessary to reduce smoke emissions. High injection pres-sure can also decrease the CO and HC emissions and improve engine efficiency. With the increase of intake pressure, both NOx and smoke emissions decrease. However, it is necessary to use the appro-priate intake pressure in order to get the low HC and CO emissions with high efficiency.

  7. Experimental study of effects of oxygen concentration on combustion and emissions of diesel engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Effects of oxygen concentration on combustion and emissions of diesel engine are investigated by experiment.The intake oxygen concentration is controlled by adjusting CO2.The results show that very low levels of both soot and NOx emissions can be achieved by modulating the injection pressure,tim-ing,and boost pressure at the low levels of oxygen concentration.However,both CO and HC emissions and fuel consumption distinctly increase at the low levels of oxygen concentration.The results also indicate that NOx emissions strongly depend on oxygen concentration,while soot emissions strongly depend on injection pressure.Decreasing oxygen concentration is the most effective method to control NOx emissions.High injection pressure is necessary to reduce smoke emissions.High injection pres-sure can also decrease the CO and HC emissions and improve engine efficiency.With the increase of intake pressure,both NOx and smoke emissions decrease.However,it is necessary to use the appro-priate intake pressure in order to get the low HC and CO emissions with high efficiency.

  8. Systematic Development of Miniaturized (Bio)Processes using Process Systems Engineering (PSE) Methods and Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krühne, Ulrich; Larsson, Hilde; Heintz, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this work is on process systems engineering (PSE) methods and tools, and especially on how such PSE methods and tools can be used to accelerate and support systematic bioprocess development at a miniature scale. After a short presentation of the PSE methods and the bioprocess...... of substrate and product, which is otherwise difficult to access. In the last example, a new approach to the design of microbioreactor layouts using topology optimization is presented and discussed. Finally, the PSE methods are carefully discussed with respect to the complexity of the presented approaches...

  9. 40 CFR 1045.610 - What provisions apply to using engines already certified to Small SI emission standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... already certified to Small SI emission standards? 1045.610 Section 1045.610 Protection of Environment... engines already certified to Small SI emission standards? This section applies to marine engines that are identical to land-based engines certified under 40 CFR part 90 or 1054. See § 1045.605 for provisions...

  10. Bringing AMS radiocarbon into the Anthropocene: Potential and drawbacks in the determination of the bio-fraction in industrial emissions and in carbon-based products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quarta, Gianluca, E-mail: gianluca.quarta@unisalento.it [CEDAD (Centre for Dating and Diagnostics), Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento (Italy); Ciceri, Giovanni; Martinotti, Valter [Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico SpA, Milan (Italy); D’Elia, Marisa; Calcagnile, Lucio [CEDAD (Centre for Dating and Diagnostics), Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    In the frame of the general efforts to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions different efforts are being carried out to stimulate the use of non-fossil energy sources and raw materials. Among these a significant role is played by the use of waste in Waste to Energy (WTE) plants. In this case a relevant problem is related to the determination of the proportion between the bio and the fossil derived fraction in CO{sub 2} atmospheric emissions since only the share of energy derived from the bio-fraction combustion can be labelled as “renewable”. We discuss the potential of radiocarbon in this field by presenting the results of different campaigns carried out by analysing CO{sub 2} sampled at the stack of different power plants in Italy with different expected bio-content of the released carbon dioxide. The still open issues related to the calculation procedures and the achievable precision and accuracy levels are discussed.

  11. Effect of ethanol-gasoline blends on small engine generator energy efficiency and exhaust emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Yinn; Chang, Yuan-Yi; Hsieh, You-Ru

    2010-02-01

    This study was focused on fuel energy efficiency and pollution analysis of different ratios of ethanol-gasoline blended fuels (E0, E3, E6, and E9) under different loadings. In this research, the experimental system consisted of a small engine generator, a particulate matter measurement system, and an exhaust gas analyzer system. Different fuels, unleaded gasoline, and ethanol-gasoline blends (E0, E3, E6, and E9) were used to study their effects on the exhaust gas emission and were expressed as thermal efficiency of the small engine generator energy efficiency. The results suggested that particle number concentration increased as the engine loading increased; however, it decreased as the ethanol content in the blend increased. While using E6 as fuel, the carbon monoxide (CO) concentration was less than other fuels (E0, E3, and E9) for each engine loading. The average of CO concentration reduction by using E3, E6, and E9 is 42, 86, and 83%, respectively. Using an ethanol-gasoline blend led to a significant reduction in exhaust emissions by approximately 78.7, 97.5, and 89.46% of the mean average values of hydrocarbons (HCs) with E3, E6, and E9 fuels, respectively, for all engine loadings. Using an ethanol-gasoline blend led to a significant reduction in exhaust emissions by approximately 35, 86, and 77% of the mean average values of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with E3, E6, and E9 fuels, respectively, at each engine loading. The E6 fuel gave the best results of the exhaust emissions, and the E9 fuel gave the best results of the particle emissions and engine performance. The thermal efficiency of the small engine generator increased as the ethanol content in the blend increased and as the engine loading increased.

  12. Engineered xylose utilization enhances bio-products productivity in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai-Chi; Xiong, Wei; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Ungerer, Justin; Hank Juo, Suh-Hang; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2015-06-12

    Hydrolysis of plant biomass generates a mixture of simple sugars that is particularly rich in glucose and xylose. Fermentation of the released sugars emits CO2 as byproduct due to metabolic inefficiencies. Therefore, the ability of a microbe to simultaneously convert biomass sugars and photosynthetically fix CO2 into target products is very desirable. In this work, the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to glucose. Both the xylA (xylose isomerase) and xylB (xylulokinase) genes from Escherichia coli were required to confer xylose utilization, but a xylose-specific transporter was not required. Introducing xylAB into an ethylene-producing strain increased the rate of ethylene production in the presence of xylose. Additionally, introduction of xylAB into a glycogen-synthesis mutant enhanced production of keto acids. Moreover, isotopic tracer studies found that nearly half of the carbon in the excreted keto acids was derived from the engineered xylose metabolism, while the remainder was derived from CO2 fixation.

  13. Dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engines: Technology, performance, and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S. H.; Weaver, C. S.

    1994-11-01

    An investigation of current dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engine design, performance, and emissions was conducted. The most pressing technological problems associated with dual-fuel engine use were identified along with potential solutions. It was concluded that dual-fuel engines can achieve low NO(sub x) and particulate emissions while retaining fuel-efficiency and BMEP levels comparable to those of diesel engines. The investigation also examined the potential economic impact of dual-fuel engines in diesel-electric locomotives, marine vessels, farm equipment, construction, mining, and industrial equipment, and stand-alone electricity generation systems. Recommendations for further additional funding to support research, development, and demonstration in these applications were then presented.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Performance and Emissions of LPG as Dual Fuel in Diesel Engine Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohan Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The usage of diesel engine generating set (Gen set increasing day by day where the places without connection to power grid or emergency power supply when the grid fails. Worldwide dual fuel engines are becoming popular because of high performance and low emissions. LPG with diesel is a proven technology in case of vehicles, but in diesel engine power plants it is far so. The proposed work is concentrated on higher load of Diesel Engine Generator with LPG as dual fuel by keeping environmental concern. A test is conducted on performance of engine along with emissions at different proportions of Diesel and LPG including 100% diesel. An experimental set up is made with simple modifications on existing genset to supply LPG as secondary fuel into Diesel.

  15. Exhaust emissions of methanol and ethanol-unleaded gasoline blends in a spark-ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altun Şehmus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of unleaded gasoline and unleaded gasoline blended with 5% and 10% of ethanol or methanol on the performance and exhaust emissions of a spark-ignition engine were experimentally investigated. The engine tests were performed by varying the engine speed between 1000 and 4000 rpm with 500 rpm period at threefourth throttle opening position. The results showed that brakespecific fuel consumption increased while brake thermal efficiency, emissions of carbon monoxide (CO and hydrocarbon (HCs decreased with methanol-unleaded gasoline and ethanol-unleaded gasoline blends. It was found that a 10% blend of ethanol or methanol with unleaded gasoline works well in the existing design of engine and parameters at which engines are operating.

  16. Combustion, performance and emissions characteristics of a newly developed CRDI single cylinder diesel engine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avinash Kumar Agarwal; Paras Gupta; Atul Dhar

    2015-09-01

    For improving engine performance, combustion and controlling emissions from compression ignition (CI) engines, common rail direct injection (CRDI) technology offers limitless possibilities by controlling fuel injection parameters such as fuel injection pressure, start of injection (SOI) timing, rate of fuel injection and injection duration. CRDI systems available commercially are quite complex and use a large number of sensors, hardware and analytical circuits, which make them very expensive and unfeasible for cheaper single cylinder engines, typically used in agricultural sector and decentralized power sector. This paper covers experimental investigations of a simpler version of CRDI system developed for a constant-speed, single-cylinder engine. Modifications in the cylinder head for accommodating solenoid injector, designing injector driver circuit and development of high pressure stage controls were some of the engine modification and development tasks undertaken. SOI timing is an important parameter for improving engine's combustion characteristics. SOI timings were varied between 25° and 40° BTDC for investigating engine's performance, emissions and combustion characteristics. Advanced fuel injections showed higher heat release rate (HRR), cylinder pressure and rate of pressure rise (RoPR) because of relatively longer ignition delay experienced. Lowest brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) was obtained for 34° CA BTDC SOI. Reduction in engine out emissions except NOx was observed for advanced fuel injection timings for this newly developed CRDI system.

  17. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4203 Section 60.4203... Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4203 How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? Engines manufactured by...

  18. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to investigate the alternatives for producing a better replacement for the material used in catalytic converter. This paper aims at reviewing the present development and improvement on the catalytic converter used on the reduction of exhaust emission in order to meet the regulations and market demand. The use of new catalyst such as to replace the noble metal material of Platinum (Pt, Palladium (Pd and Rhodium (Rh has been reviewed. Material such as zeolite, nickel oxide and metal oxide has been found to effectively reduce the emission than the commercial converter. The preparation method of the catalyst has also evolved through the years as it is to ensure a good characteristic of a good monolith catalyst. Ultrasonic treatment with combination of electroplating technique, citrate method and Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO has been found as the latest novel preparation method on producing an effective catalyst in reducing the exhaust emission.

  19. Advanced biotechnology: metabolically engineered cells for the bio-based production of chemicals and fuels, materials, and health-care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2015-03-09

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in particular, have become established as important industrial workhorses in biotechnology. Recent years have seen tremendous progress in their advance into tailor-made producers, driven by the upcoming demand for sustainable processes and renewable raw materials. Here, the diversity and complexity of nature is simultaneously a challenge and a benefit. Harnessing biodiversity in the right manner through synergistic progress in systems metabolic engineering and chemical synthesis promises a future innovative bio-economy.

  20. Geoethics: what can we learn from existing bio-, ecological, and engineering ethics codes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Susan W.; Palka, John

    2014-05-01

    Many scientific disciplines are concerned about ethics, and codes of ethics for these professions exist, generally through the professional scientific societies such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Geological Institute (AGI), American Association of Petroleum Engineers (AAPE), National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), Ecological Society of America (ESA), and many others worldwide. These vary considerably in depth and specificity. In this poster, we review existing codes with the goal of extracting fundamentals that should/can be broadly applied to all geo-disciplines. Most of these codes elucidate a set of principles that cover practical issues such as avoiding conflict of interest, avoiding plagiarism, not permitting illegitimate use of intellectual products, enhancing the prestige of the profession, acknowledging an obligation to perform services only in areas of competence, issuing public statements only in an objective manner, holding paramount the welfare of the public, and in general conducting oneself honorably, responsibly, and lawfully. It is striking that, given that the work of these societies and their members is relevant to the future of the earth, few discuss in any detail ethical obligations regarding our relation to the planet itself. The AGU code, for example, only states that "Members have an ethical obligation to weigh the societal benefits of their research against the costs and risks to human and animal welfare and impacts on the environment and society." The NSPE and AGI codes go somewhat further: "Engineers are encouraged to adhere to the principles of sustainable development in order to protect the environment for future generations," and "Geoscientists should strive to protect our natural environment. They should understand and anticipate the environmental consequences of their work and should disclose the consequences of recommended actions. They should acknowledge that resource extraction and use are necessary

  1. Engineering 3D bio-artificial heart muscle: the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nikita M; Tao, Ze-Wei; Mohamed, Mohamed A; Hogan, Matt K; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi K

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies in left ventricular systolic dysfunction and end-stage heart failure include mechanical assist devices or transplant. The development of a tissue-engineered integrative platform would present a therapeutic option that overcomes the limitations associated with current treatment modalities. This study provides a foundation for the fabrication and preliminary viability of the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix (AVEM) model. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix was fabricated by culturing 4 million rat neonatal cardiac cells around an excised acellular ventricular segment. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix generated a maximum spontaneous contractile force of 388.3 μN and demonstrated a Frank-Starling relationship at varying pretensions. Histologic assessment displayed cell cohesion and adhesion within the AVEM as a result of passive cell seeding.

  2. The concept of bio-corona in modulating the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmeier, Dana; Stauber, Roland H; Docter, Dominic

    2016-05-15

    Besides the wide use of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in technical products, their application spectrum in biotechnology and biomedicine is steadily increasing. In complex physiological environments the physico-chemical properties and the behavior of nanoparticles (NPs) are challenging to characterize. Biomolecules rapidly adsorb to the nanomaterial, leading to the formation of the protein/biomolecule corona, which critically affects the nanomaterials' (patho)biological and technical identities. This formation can trigger an immune response and affect nanoparticles' toxicity and targeting capabilities. In this review, we provide a survey of recent findings on the (protein)corona-nanoparticle interaction and discuss how the corona modulates both cytotoxicity and the immune response as well as to improve the efficacy of targeted delivery of nanocarriers.

  3. Analysis of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions of the life cycle of bio-hydrogen applied to the Portuguese road transportation sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ana Filipa; Baptista, Patricia; Silva, Carla [IDMEC (Portugal). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In this work the main objective is to analyze energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions of biohydrogen for use in the transportation sector in Portugal. A life cycle assessment will be performed in order to evaluate bio-hydrogen pathways, having biodiesel and conventional fossil diesel as reference. The pathways were production of feedstock, pre-treatment, treatment, compression, distribution and applications. For the well-to-tank analysis the SimaPro 7.1 software and excel tools are used. This study includes not only a well-to-tank analysis but also a tank-to-wheel analysis (using ADVISOR software) estimating hydrogen consumption and electricity consumption of a fuel cell hybrid and a plug-in hybrid. Several bio-hydrogen feedstocks to produce hydrogen through fermentation processes will be considered: potato peels. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of Performance and Emission characteristics of Turbocharged Diesel Engine with Mullite as Thermal Barrier Coating

    OpenAIRE

    P. N. Shrirao; A. N. Pawar

    2011-01-01

    Tests were performed on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, diesel engine whose piston crown, cylinder head and valves were coated with a 0.5 mm thickness of 3Al2O3 .2SiO2 (mullite) (Al2O3= 60%, SiO2= 40%) over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAlY bond coat. Tests were carried out on standard engine (uncoated) and low heatrejection (LHR) engine with and without turbocharger. This paper is intended to emphasis on energy balance and emission characteristic for standard engine (uncoated) ...

  5. Emission characteristics of a heavy-duty diesel engine at simulated high altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Ge, Yunshan; Ma, Chaochen; Tan, Jianwei; Liu, Zhihua; Wang, Chu; Yu, Linxiao; Ding, Yan

    2011-08-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of altitude on the pollutant emissions of a diesel engine, an experimental research was carried out using an engine test bench with an altitude simulation system. The emissions of HC, CO, NOx, smoke, and particle number of a heavy-duty diesel engine were measured under steady state operating conditions at sea level and simulated altitudes of 1000 and 2000 m. The experimental results indicate that the high altitude increases the emissions of HC, CO and smoke of the diesel engine, the average increasing rates of which are 30%, 35% and 34% with addition of altitude of 1000 m, respectively. The effect of high altitudes on the NOx emission varies with the engine types and working conditions. At 1000 m the particles number emissions are 1.6 to 4.2 times the levels at the low altitude. The pattern of the particle size distributions at 1000 m is similar with that at sea-level, which is the mono-modal lognormal distribution with geometric mean diameter around 0.1 μm. However, the peak number concentrations of particles are bigger and the exhausted particles are smaller at the high altitude.

  6. Reduce NOx Emissions by Adsorber-Reduction Catalyst on Lean Burn Gasoline Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongpeng Yue

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a new catalyst system composed of traditional three way catalyst converter and adsorber-reduction catalysis converter on the emission characteristics and BSFC (Breake Specific Fuel Consumption- BSFCof a lean burn gasoline engine operated were investigated in this paper under different schemes of catalyst converter arrangement and different speeds and loads. The results show that the position of Three Way Catalyst is before the NOx adsorber Catalyst was the best scheme of catalyst converter arrangement. Which has the highest converter efficiency of reduction NOx emission in lean burn gasoline engine. The effects of speed on the exhaust emission and BSFC were also related to the ratio of lean burn time to rich burn time and the absolute value of both time of the adsorber-reduction catalyst converter. The load of the engine was the main influential factor to the exhaust emission characteristics and BSFC of lean burn gasoline engine, and the more load of the engine was, the more NOx emission , the less NOx conversion rate (CNOx and the better BSFC were.

  7. Hydrocarbon emissions from gas engine CHP-units. 2011 measurement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, G.H.J. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    In December 2009, the Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment (IandM) issued the Decree on Emission Limits for Middle Sized Combustion Installations (BEMS). This decree imposes a first-time emission limit value (ELV) of 1500 mg C/m{sup 3}{sub o} at 3% O{sub 2} for hydrocarbons emitted by gas engines. IandM used the findings of two hydrocarbon emission measurement programs, executed in 2007 and 2009, as a guideline for this initial ELV. The programs did reveal substantial variation in the hydrocarbon emissions of the gas engines tested. This variation, and especially the uncertainty as to the role of engine and/or other parameters causing such variation, was felt to hamper further policy development. IandM therefore commissioned KEMA to perform follow-up measurements on ten gas engine CHP-units in 2011. Aim of this 2011 program is to assess hydrocarbon emission variation in relation to engine parameters and process conditions including maintenance status, and to atmospheric conditions. The 2011 program comprised two identical measurement sessions, one in spring and one in winter.

  8. Engineering stable topography in dense bio-mimetic 3D collagen scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Alekseeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Topographic features are well known to influence cell behaviour and can provide a powerful tool for engineering complex, functional tissues. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of formation of a stable micro-topography on plastic compressed (PC collagen gels. The uni-directional fluid flow that accompanies PC of collagen gels creates a fluid leaving surface (FLS and a non-fluid leaving surface (non-FLS. Here we tested the hypothesis that the resulting anisotropy in collagen density and stiffness between FLS and non-FLS would influence the fidelity and stability of micro-grooves patterned on these surfaces. A pattern template of parallel-aligned glass fibres was introduced to the FLS or non-FLS either at the start of the compression or halfway through, when a dense FLS had already formed. Results showed that both early and late patterning of the FLS generated grooves that had depth (25 ±7 µm and 19 ±8 µm, respectively and width (55 ±11 µm and 50 ±12 µm, respectively which matched the glass fibre diameter (50 µm. In contrast, early and late patterning of the non-FLS gave much wider (151 ±50 µm and 89 ±14 µm, respectively and shallower (10 ±2.7 µm and 13 ±3.5 µm, respectively grooves than expected. The depth to width ratio of the grooves generated on the FLS remained unaltered under static culture conditions over 2 weeks, indicating that grooves were stable under long term active cell-mediated matrix remodelling. These results indicate that the FLS, characterised by a higher matrix collagen density and stiffness than the non-FLS, provides the most favourable mechanical surface for precise engineering of a stable micro-topography in 3D collagen hydrogel scaffolds.

  9. Emissions modelling for engine cycle and aircraft trajectory optimisation

    OpenAIRE

    Pervier, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The aviation industry is currently experiencing a growth rate of about 4% per annum and this trend is expected to continue into the future. One concern about this growth rate is the impact it will have on the environment particularly in terms of emissions of CO2, NOx and relatively recently also cirrus clouds induced by contrails. The ACARE has set emissions reduction targets of 50% reduction of CO2 and noise and 80% reduction of NOx by 2020 relative to Y2000 technology. Clean ...

  10. Experimental investigation of engine emissions with marine gas oil-oxygenate blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Md Nurun; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2010-07-15

    This paper investigates the diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions with marine gas oil-alternative fuel additive. Marine gas oil (MGO) was selected as base fuel for the engine experiments. An oxygenate, diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (DGM), and a biodiesel (BD) jatropha oil methyl ester (JOME) with a volume of 10% were blended with the MGO fuel. JOME was derived from inedible jatropha oil. Lower emissions with diesel-BD blends (soybean methyl ester, rapeseed methyl ester etc.) have been established so far, but the effect of MGO-BD (JOME) blends on engine performance and emissions has been a growing interest as JOME (BD) is derived from inedible oil and MGO is frequently used in maritime transports. No phase separation between MGO-DGM and MGO-JOME blends was found. The neat MGO, MGO-DGM and MGO-JOME blends are termed as MGO, Ox10 and B10 respectively. The experiments were conducted with a six-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged, direct-injection Scania DC 1102 (DI) diesel engine. The experimental results showed significant reductions in fine particle number and mass emissions, PM and smoke emissions with Ox10 and B10 fuels compared to the MGO fuel. Other emissions including total unburned hydrocarbon (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and engine noise were also reduced with the Ox10 and B10 fuels, while maintaining similar brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and thermal efficiency with MGO fuel. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions, on the other hand, were slightly higher with the Ox10 and B10 fuels at high engine load conditions.

  11. Effect of first and second generation biodiesel blends on engine performance and emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, A. K.; Rasul, M. G.; Bhuiya, M. M. K.; Islam, Rubayat

    2016-07-01

    The biodiesel is a potential source of alternative fuel which can be used at different proportions with diesel fuel. This study experimentally investigated the effect of blend percentage on diesel engine performance and emission using first generation (soybean) and second generation (waste cooking) biodiesel. The characterization of the biodiesel was done according to ASTM and EN standards and compared with ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. A multi-cylinder test bed engine coupled with electromagnetic dynamometer and 5 gas analyzer were used for engine performance and emission test. The investigation was made using B5, B10 and B15 blends for both biodiesels. The study found that brake power (BP) and brake torque (BT) slightly decreases and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) slightly increases with an increase in biodiesel blends ratio. Besides, a significant reduction in exhaust emissions (except NOx emission) was found for both biodiesels compared to ULSD. Soybean biodiesel showed better engine performance and emissions reduction compared with waste cooking biodiesel. However, NOx emission for B5 waste cooking biodiesel was lower than soybean biodiesel.

  12. [Preparation of ethanol-diesel fuel blends and exhausts emission characteristics in diesel engine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runduo; He, Hong; Zhang, Changbin; Shi, Xiaoyan

    2003-07-01

    The technology that diesel oil is partly substituted by ethanol can reduce diesel engine exhausts emission, especially fuel soot. This research is concentrated on preparation of ethanol-diesel blend fuel and exhausts emission characteristics using diesel engine bench. Absolute ethanol can dissolve into diesel fuel at an arbitrary ratio. However, a trace of water (0.2%) addition can lead to the phase separation of blends. Organic additive synthesized during this research can develop the ability of resistance to water and maintain the stability of ethanol-diesel-trace amounts of water system. The effects of 10%, 20%, and 30% ethanol-diesel fuel blends on exhausts emission, were compared with that of diesel fuel in direct injection (DI) diesel engine. The optimum ethanol percentage for ethanol-diesel fuel blends was 20%. Using 20% ethanol-diesel fuel blend with 2% additive of the total volume, bench diesel engine showed a large amount decrease of exhaust gas, e.g. 55% of Bosch smoke number, 70% of HC emission, and 45% of CO emission at 13 kW and 1540 r/min. Without the addition of additive, the blend of ethanol produced new organic compounds such as ethanol and acetaldehyde in tail gas. However, the addition of additive obviously reduced the emission of ethanol and acetaldehyde.

  13. Effect of first and second generation biodiesel blends on engine performance and emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, A. K., E-mail: azad.cqu@gmail.com, E-mail: a.k.azad@cqu.edu.au; Rasul, M. G., E-mail: m.rasul@cqu.edu.au; Bhuiya, M. M. K., E-mail: m.bhuiya@cqu.edu.au [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD 4702 (Australia); Islam, Rubayat, E-mail: rubayat12@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    The biodiesel is a potential source of alternative fuel which can be used at different proportions with diesel fuel. This study experimentally investigated the effect of blend percentage on diesel engine performance and emission using first generation (soybean) and second generation (waste cooking) biodiesel. The characterization of the biodiesel was done according to ASTM and EN standards and compared with ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. A multi-cylinder test bed engine coupled with electromagnetic dynamometer and 5 gas analyzer were used for engine performance and emission test. The investigation was made using B5, B10 and B15 blends for both biodiesels. The study found that brake power (BP) and brake torque (BT) slightly decreases and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) slightly increases with an increase in biodiesel blends ratio. Besides, a significant reduction in exhaust emissions (except NO{sub x} emission) was found for both biodiesels compared to ULSD. Soybean biodiesel showed better engine performance and emissions reduction compared with waste cooking biodiesel. However, NO{sub x} emission for B5 waste cooking biodiesel was lower than soybean biodiesel.

  14. Physical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    The f1me particulate matter (PM) emissions from nine commercial aircraft engine models were determined by plume sampling during the three field campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX). Ground-based measurements were made primarily at 30 m behind the engine ...

  15. Bio-inspired approach of the fluorescence emission properties in the scarabaeid beetle Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera): Modeling by transfer-matrix optical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Berthier, Serge; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-12-01

    Scales of the scarabaeid beetle Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera) contain fluorescent molecules embedded in a multilayer structure. The consequence of this source confinement is a modification of the fluorescence properties, i.e., an enhancement or inhibition of the emission of certain wavelengths. In this work, we propose a bio-inspired approach to this problem. In other words, we use numerical simulations based on the one-dimensional transfer-matrix formalism to investigate the influence of a Hoplia-like system on emission characteristics and, from the results, we deduce potential technical applications. We reveal that depending on the choice of some parameters (layer thickness, dielectric constant, and position of the emitting source in the structure), it is possible to enhance or inhibit the fluorescence emission for certain wavelengths. This observation could be of great interest to design new optical devices in the field of optoelectronic, solar cells, biosensors, etc.

  16. Primary Emission and the Potential of Secondary Aerosol Formation from Chinese Gasoline Engine Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Peng, Jianfei; Qin, Yanhong; Du, Zhuofei; Li, Mengjin; Zheng, Rong; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Lu, Sihua; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Limin; Guo, Song; Shao, Min; Wang, Yinhui; Shuai, Shijin

    2017-04-01

    Along with the urbanization and economic growth, vehicle population in China reached 269 million, ranked the second in the world in 2015. Gasoline vehicle is identified to be the main source for urban PM2.5 in China, accounting for 15%-31%. In this study the impact of fuel components on PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from a gasoline port fuel injection (PFI) engine and a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine are discussed. Results show that, higher proportion of aromatics, alkenes or sulfur in gasoline fuel will lead to higher PM emissions. The PM from the PFI engine mainly consists of OC and a small amount of EC and inorganic ions, while the PM discharge from the GDI engine mainly consists of EC, OM and a small amount of inorganic ions. Since the GDI engines can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, and it would become more and more popular in the near future. The characteristics of POM component, emission factors and source profile were investigated from GDI engine, particularly focused on the effect of engine speed, load and the catalyst, which will be very much helpful for source identification as source indicators. Chamber experiments were conducted to quantify the potential of secondary aerosol formation from exhaust of a PFI gasoline engine and China V gasoline fuel. During 4-5 h simulation, equivalent to10 days of atmospheric photo-oxidation in Beijing, the extreme SOA production was 426 ± 85 mg/kg fuel, with high precursors and OH exposure. 14% of SOA measured in the chamber experiments could be explained through the oxidation of speciated single-ring aromatics. Unspeciated precursors, such as intermediate-volatility organic compounds and semi-volatility organic compounds, might be significant for SOA formation from gasoline VOCs. We concluded that reduction of emissions of aerosol precursor gases from vehicles is essential to mediate pollution in China.

  17. Spark ignition engine performance and emissions in a high compression engine using biogas and methane mixtures without knock occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Montoya Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to use biogas in an internal combustion engine with high compression ratio and in order to get a high output thermal efficiency, this investigation used a diesel engine with a maximum output power 8.5 kW, which was converted to spark ignition mode to use it with gaseous fuels. Three fuels were used: Simulated biogas, biogas enriched with 25% and 50% methane by volume. After conversion, the output power of the engine decreased by 17.64% when using only biogas, where 7 kW was the new maximum output power of the engine. The compression ratio was kept at 15.5:1, and knocking did not occur during engine operation. Output thermal efficiency operating the engine in SI mode with biogas enriched with 50% methane was almost the same compared with the engine running in diesel-biogas dual mode at full load and was greater at part loads. The dependence of the diesel pilot was eliminated when biogas was used in the engine converted in SI mode. The optimum condition of experiment for the engine without knocking was using biogas enriched with 50% methane, with 12 degrees of spark timing advance and equivalence ratio of 0.95, larger output powers and higher values of methane concentration lead the engine to knock operation. The presence of CO2 allows operating engines at high compression ratios with normal combustion conditions. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and unburnt methane all in g/kWh decreased when the biogas was enriched with 50% methane.

  18. The Reduction of Smoke Emissions from Allison T56 Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Industry Aero-Space Technologies Australia,Manager/Librarian (2 copies) Ansett Airlines of Australia, Library Australian Airlines, Library Qantas Airways ...R EFER EN CES ................................................................................ 12 a APPENDIX 1. Analysis of Fuel Samples...50% increase in the mass emissions of smoke particles at that power setting. Further analysis of the information contained in Souza and Daley (1978

  19. Experimental evaluation of diesel engine performance and emission using blends of jojoba oil and diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huzayyin, A.S.; Rady, M.A.; Dawood, A. [Benha High Inst. of Technology (Egypt). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Technology; Bawady, A.H. [University of Ain Shams, Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Engineering

    2004-08-01

    An experimental evaluation of using jojoba oil as an alternate diesel engine fuel has been conducted in the present work. Measurements of jojoba oil chemical and physical properties have indicated a good potential of using jojoba oil as an alternative diesel engine fuel. Blending of jojoba oil with gas oil has been shown to be an effective method to reduce engine problems associated with the high viscosity of jojoba oil. Experimental measurements of different performance parameters of a single cylinder, naturally aspirated, direct injection, diesel engine have been performed using gas oil and blends of gas oil with jojoba oil. Measurements of engine performance parameters at different load conditions over the engine speed range have generally indicated a negligible loss of engine power, a slight increase in brake specific fuel consumption and a reduction in engine NO{sub x} and soot emission using blends of jojoba oil with gas oil as compared to gas oil. The reduction in engine soot emission has been observed to increase with the increase of jojoba oil percentage in the fuel blend. (Author)

  20. Particulate Matter Emission from Dual Fuel Diesel Engine Fuelled with Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelmasiak Zdzisław

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of examination of particulate matter emission from the Diesel engine FPT 1.3 MJT simultaneously fuelled with diesel oil and natural gas CNG. The basic premise for engine adaptation was the addition of a small amount of CNG to reduce exhaust gas opacity and particulate matter emission. At this assumption, diesel oil remained the basic fuel, with contribution amounting to 0,70-0,85 of total energy delivered to the engine. The dual fuel engine was examined using an original controller installed in the Diesel engine FPT 1.3 MJT which controlled the diesel fuel dose. The dose of the injected natural gas was controlled by changing the opening time of gas injectors at constant pressure in the gas collector. The examined issues included the exhaust gas opacity, and the total number and fractional distribution of the emitted particles. The measurements were performed at twenty selected measuring points corresponding to the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC test. The performed tests have demonstrated a positive effect of gas addition on exhaust gas opacity and particulate matter emission. Depending on test conditions, the exhaust gas opacity was reduced by 10÷92%, and the total number of particles by 30÷40%. The performed tests have revealed that a small addition of gas can reduce the load of the DPF filter, extend its lifetime, and increase engine reliability. Longer time intervals between successive DPF filter regenerations improve ecological properties of the engine.

  1. Improving fatty acid availability for bio-hydrocarbon production in Escherichia coli by metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fengming; Chen, Yu; Levine, Robert; Lee, Kilho; Yuan, Yingjin; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of producing fatty-acid-derived hydrocarbons in Escherichia coli. However, product titers and yields remain low. In this work, we demonstrate new methods for improving fatty acid production by modifying central carbon metabolism and storing fatty acids in triacylglycerol. Based on suggestions from a computational model, we deleted seven genes involved in aerobic respiration, mixed-acid fermentation, and glyoxylate bypass (in the order of cyoA, nuoA, ndh, adhE, dld, pta, and iclR) to modify the central carbon metabolic/regulatory networks. These gene deletions led to increased total fatty acids, which were the highest in the mutants containing five or six gene knockouts. Additionally, when two key enzymes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway were over-expressed, we observed further increase in strain △cyoA△adhE△nuoA△ndh△pta△dld, leading to 202 mg/g dry cell weight of total fatty acids, ~250% of that in the wild-type strain. Meanwhile, we successfully introduced a triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway into E. coli through heterologous expression of wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) enzymes. The added pathway improved both the amount and fuel quality of the fatty acids. These new metabolic engineering strategies are providing promising directions for future investigation.

  2. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles for bio- and nanotechnology: genetic engineering and biomimetics of bacterial magnetosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Claus; Schüler, Dirk; Faivre, Damien

    2007-02-12

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) have the ability to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field. This so-called magnetotaxis is a result of the presence of magnetosomes, organelles which comprise nanometer-sized intracellular crystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) enveloped by a membrane. Because of their unique characteristics, magnetosomes have a high potential for nano- and biotechnological applications, which require a specifically designed particle surface. The functionalization of magnetosomes is possible either by chemical modification of purified particles or by genetic engineering of magnetosome membrane proteins. The second approach is potentially superior to chemical approaches as a large variety of biological functions such as protein tags, fluorophores, and enzymes may be directly incorporated in a site-specific manner during magnetosome biomineralization. An alternative to the bacterial production of magnetosomes are biomimetic approaches, which aim to mimic the bacterial biomineralization pathway in vitro. In MTB a number of magnetosome proteins with putative functions in the biomineralization of the nanoparticles have been identified by genetic and biochemical approaches. The initial results obtained by several groups indicate that some of these proteins have an impact on nanomagnetite properties in vitro. In this article the key features of magnetosomes are discussed, an overview of their potential applications are given, and different strategies are proposed for the functionalization of magnetosome particles and for the biomimetism of their biomineralization pathway.

  3. Robust Emission Management Strategy to Meet Real-World Emission Requirements for HD Diesel Engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentink, P.; Nieuwenhof, R. van den; Kupper, F.; Willems, F.; Kooijman, D.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-duty diesel engines are used in different application areas, like long-haul, city distribution, dump truck and building and construction industry. For these wide variety of areas, the engine performance needs to comply with the real-world legislation limits and should simultaneously have a low

  4. Diesel engine performance and emission evaluation using emulsified fuels stabilized by conventional and gemini surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Nadeem; C. Rangkuti; K. Anuar; M.R.U. Haq; I.B. Tan; S.S. Shah [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar (Malaysia)

    2006-10-15

    Diesel engines exhausting gaseous emission and particulate matter have long been regarded as one of the major air pollution sources, particularly in metropolitan areas, and have been a source of serious public concern for a long time. The emulsification method is not only motivated by cost reduction but is also one of the potentially effective techniques to reduce exhaust emission from diesel engines. Water/diesel (W/D) emulsified formulations are reported to reduce the emissions of NOx, SOx, CO and particulate matter (PM) without compensating the engine's performance. Emulsion fuels with varying contents of water and diesel were prepared and stabilized by conventional and gemini surfactant, respectively. Surfactant's dosage, emulsification time, stirring intensity, emulsifying temperature and mixing time have been reported. Diesel engine performance and exhaust emission was also measured and analyzed with these indigenously prepared emulsified fuels. The obtained experimental results indicate that the emulsions stabilized by gemini surfactant have much finer and better-distributed water droplets as compared to those stabilized by conventional surfactant. A comparative study involving torque, engine brake mean effective pressure (BMEP), specific fuel consumption (SFC), particulate matter (PM), NOx and CO emissions is also reported for neat diesel and emulsified formulations. It was found that there was an insignificant reduction in engine's efficiency but on the other hand there are significant benefits associated with the incorporation of water contents in diesel regarding environmental hazards. The biggest reduction in PM, NOx, CO and SOx emission was achieved by the emulsion stabilized by gemini surfactant containing 15% water contents. 34 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Performance and Exhaust Emissions in a Natural-Gas Fueled Dual-Fuel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioji, Masahiro; Ishiyama, Takuji; Ikegami, Makoto; Mitani, Shinichi; Shibata, Hiroaki

    In order to establish the optimum fueling in a natural gas fueled dual fuel engine, experiments were done for some operational parameters on the engine performances and the exhaust emissions. The results show that the pilot fuel quantity should be increased and its injection timing should be advanced to suppress unburned hydrocarbon emission in the middle and low output range, while the quantity should be reduced and the timing retarded to avoid onset of knock at high loads. Unburned hydrocarbon emission and thermal efficiency are improved by avoiding too lean natural gas mixture by restricting intake charge air. However, the improvement is limited because the ignition of pilot fuel deteriorates with excessive throttling. It is concluded that an adequate combination of throttle control and equivalence ratio ensures low hydrocarbon emission and the thermal efficiency comparable to diesel operation.

  6. Acoustic Emission Sensing for Maritime Diesel Engine Performance and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    conditions is given in Figure 10. 2. Coefficient of variation . This is a measure of signal dispersion: A coefficient of variation metric...Misfire UNCLASSIFIED DST-Group-TN-1486 UNCLASSIFIED 16 Figure 11 Average coefficient of variation for rms AE signals Figure 12...increases in big end bearing clearance were not definitely identified from the acoustic emission signals. DST Group recommends that for any subsequent

  7. Effects of fossil diesel and biodiesel blends on the performances and emissions of agricultural tractor engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Milan D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth in the energy consumption has conditioned the need for discovering the alternative energy resources which would be adapted to the existing engine constructions and which would satisfy the additional criteria related to the renewability, ecology and reliability of use. Introduction of biodiesel has been the focus of attention over the last ten years. The aim of this research is to investigate the influence of biodiesel on the performances and exhaust gas emissions of medium power agricultural tractor engines (37-66 kW. The reason for the selection of this category is that those types of tractors are most frequently used in agriculture. In this research biodiesel produced from sunflower oil was blended with fossil diesel. Biodiesel, fossil diesel and fossil diesel blends with 15, 25, 50 and 75%v/v biodiesel were tested for their influence on the engine performances and emissions. The testing was performed on a four-cylinder diesel engine with 48 kW rated power. The experimental research on the engine performances was conducted in compliance with OECD test CODE 2, and the exhaust gas emissions were tested according to the ISO 8178-4, C1. The use of biodiesel and fossil diesel blends reduced the engine power with the increase of biodiesel share in the blend. However, the exception was the blend with 15%v/v biodiesel which induced a slight increase in the engine power. Depending on the share of biodiesel in the blend all blends fuels showed increased specific fuel consumption compared to the fossil diesel. Thermal efficiency increased as a result of more complete combustion of biodiesel and fossil diesel blends. The exhaust gas emissions implied that the addition of biodiesel reduced the content of CO2 and CO, as well as the temperature of exhaust gases, but it increased the emission of NOx.

  8. Diluted Operation of a Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine - Aiming at Improved Effciency, Emission and Maximum Load

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiadi, Mehrzad

    2011-01-01

    Most heavy-duty engines are diesel operated. Severe emission regulations, high fuel prices, high technology costs (e.g. catalysts, fuel injection systems) and unsustainably in supplying fuel are enough reasons to convenience engine developers to explore alternative technologies or fuels. Using natural gas/biogas can be a very good alternative due to the attractive fuel properties regarding emission reduction and engine operation. Heavy-duty diesel engines can be easily converted for natur...

  9. Bio-Inspired/-Functional Colloidal Core-Shell Polymeric-Based NanoSystems: Technology Promise in Tissue Engineering, Bioimaging and NanoMedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad S. Haidar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern breakthroughs in the fields of proteomics and DNA micro-arrays have widened the horizons of nanotechnology for applications with peptides and nucleic acids. Hence, biomimetic interest in the study and formulation of nanoscaled bio-structures, -materials, -devices and -therapeutic agent delivery vehicles has been recently increasing. Many of the currently–investigated functionalized bio-nanosystems draw their inspiration from naturally-occurring phenomenon, prompting the integration of molecular signals and mimicking natural processes, at the cell, tissue and organ levels. Technologically, the ability to obtain spherical nanostructures exhibiting combinations of several properties that neither individual material possesses on its own renders colloidal core-shell architectured nanosystems particularly attractive. The three main developments presently foreseen in the nanomedicine sub-arena of nanobiotechnology are: sensorization (biosensors/ biodetection, diagnosis (biomarkers/bioimaging and drug, protein or gene delivery (systemic vs. localized/targeted controlled–release systems. Advances in bio-applications such as cell-labelling/cell membrane modelling, agent delivery and targeting, tissue engineering, organ regeneration, nanoncology and immunoassay strategies, along the major limitations and potential future and advances are highlighted in this review. Herein, is an attempt to address some of the most recent works focusing on bio-inspired and -functional polymeric-based core-shell nanoparticulate systems aimed for agent delivery. It is founded, mostly, on specialized research and review articles that have emerged during the last ten years.

  10. Combustion Engines Development Mixture Formation, Combustion, Emissions and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Christian; Teichmann, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    In the development of engines and vehicles it is nowadays standard practice to use commercially available computing programmes for simulation, not only of the transient reaction of vehicles or of the complete driveshaft, but also of the highly unsteady processes in the combustion chamber of an engine. Normally the source code is not available for these computing programmes and it takes too much time to study the respective specifications, so the users often do not have sufficient knowledge about the physical and chemical contents of the approaches that the programmes are based on. We have often been faced with this fact in talks to employees or in discussions during the presentation of results of simulation. Therefore it is our aim to point out different physical and chemical approaches and to show the possibilities and limits of the models used.

  11. Performance and Emission Assessment of Multi Cylinder Diesel Engine using Surfactant Enhanced Water in Diesel Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Mohammed Yahaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A four stroke, four cylinder, In-direct injection diesel engine was used to study the effect of emulsified diesel fuel with 5% water by volume on the engine performance and on the main pollutant emissions. The experiments were conducted in the speed range from 1000 to 4500 rpm at full load conditions. It was found that, in general, using emulsified fuel improves the engine performance with slight increase in emissions. While the BSFC has a minimum value for 5% water and at all rpm, the torque, the power and the BMEP are found to have maximum values under these conditions when compared conve ntional disel. CO2 was found to increase with engine speed whereas increase in CO and NOX were minimum. In this work water in diesel emulsion was prepared by a mechanical homogenizer and their physical and chemical properties were examined.

  12. Optimization of Performance and Emission Characteristics of Diesel Engine with Biodiesel Using Grey-Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Pohit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine performances and emission characteristics of Karanja oil methyl ester blended with diesel were carried out on a variable compression diesel engine. In order to search for the optimal process response through a limited number of experiment runs, application of Taguchi method in combination with grey relational analysis had been applied for solving a multiple response optimization problem. Using grey relational grade and signal-to-noise ratio as a performance index, a particular combination of input parameters was predicted so as to achieve optimum response characteristics. It was observed that a blend of fifty percent was most suitable for use in a diesel engine without significantly affecting the engine performance and emissions characteristics.

  13. Selective Binding of Genomic Escherichia coli DNA with ZnO Leads to White Light Emission: A New Aspect of Nano-Bio Interaction and Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumita; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Das, Partha Pratim; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2017-01-11

    Here, we report for the first time, a novel and intriguing application of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the area of optics by demonstrating white light emission by tuning the emission of a nanomaterial, ZnO rods, exhibiting surface defects, in the presence of genomic Escherichia coli DNA with a comparatively high quantum efficiency. In order to understand the DNA specificity, we have also studied the interaction of ZnO with CT, and ML DNA, ss EC DNA, synthetic polynucleotides and different mononucleosides and bases. Further, in order to understand the effect of particle shape and defects present in ZnO, we have also extended our study with ZnO rods prepared at higher temperature exhibiting red emission and ZnO particles exhibiting yellow emission. Interestingly, none of the above studies resulted in white light emission from ZnO-DNA complex. Our studies unequivocally confirmed that the concentration and the nature of DNA and ZnO together plays a crucial role in obtaining CIE coordinates (0.33, 0.33) close to white light. The much enhanced melting temperature (Tm) of EC DNA and the energetics factors confirm enhanced hydrogen bonding of ZnO with EC DNA leading to a new emission band. Our experimental observations not only confirm the selective binding of ZnO to EC DNA but also open a new perspective for developing energy saving light emitting materials through nano-bio interactions.

  14. Engineered emissivity of textile fabrics by the inclusion of ceramic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Matthew A; Anderson, David M; Beckham, Haskell W; Brennan, James F

    2016-05-16

    Composite textile materials, created from a blend of different fibers, have long been used to engineer the properties and performance of fabrics to combine comfort with functionality, such as to create materials with differing optical properties. Some changes to the optical properties of materials in the infrared are subtle and difficult to measure. We present a measurement technique, experimental apparatus, and associated data analysis procedure for detecting small changes in the emissivity of fabrics in the mid-infrared wavelength range (7.5-14 µm). Using this technique, we demonstrate that the emissivity of polyester fabric can be engineered controllably via the inclusion of ceramic microparticles within the fabric fibers.

  15. Lowering USAF Diesel Engine NOx Emissions With Utilizing B20 Biodiesel Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    6.5L engine. Table 2. IS0 8178 Weighted Average B20 Emission Deviations from DF-2 Certification Fuel 6.5L HMMWV Engine UHC CO NOx CO2 Smoke g/hp-hr g/hp...manifold CO2. Most data was obtained in triplicate runs. The UHC , CO, NOx, and Smoke emission values were similar to values reported in the...Base Timing (0) and Base EGR (0%) UHC [g/kWh] CO [g/kWh] CO2 [g/kWh] NOx [g/kWh] Smoke [AVL] BSFC [g/kWh] EGR Target [%] EGR Target [%] EGR Target

  16. Primary and Aggregate Size Distributions of PM in Tail Pipe Emissions form Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masataka; Amagai, Kenji; Nakaji, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shinji

    Particulate matter (PM) emission exhausted from diesel engine should be reduced to keep the clean air environment. PM emission was considered that it consisted of coarse and aggregate particles, and nuclei-mode particles of which diameter was less than 50nm. However the detail characteristics about these particles of the PM were still unknown and they were needed for more physically accurate measurement and more effective reduction of exhaust PM emission. In this study, the size distributions of solid particles in PM emission were reported. PMs in the tail-pipe emission were sampled from three type diesel engines. Sampled PM was chemically treated to separate the solid carbon fraction from other fractions such as soluble organic fraction (SOF). The electron microscopic and optical-manual size measurement procedures were used to determine the size distribution of primary particles those were formed through coagulation process from nuclei-mode particles and consisted in aggregate particles. The centrifugal sedimentation method was applied to measure the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Aerodynamic diameters of nano and aggregate particles were measured with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The peak aggregate diameters detected by SMPS were fallen in the same size regime as the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Both of primary and Stokes diameters of dry-soot decreased with increases of engine speed and excess air ratio. Also, the effects of fuel properties and engine types on primary and aggregate particle diameters were discussed.

  17. Combustion, emission and engine performance characteristics of used cooking oil biodiesel - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enweremadu, C.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa); Rutto, H.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    As the environment degrades at an alarming rate, there have been steady calls by most governments following international energy policies for the use of biofuels. One of the biofuels whose use is rapidly expanding is biodiesel. One of the economical sources for biodiesel production which doubles in the reduction of liquid waste and the subsequent burden of sewage treatment is used cooking oil (UCO). However, the products formed during frying, such as free fatty acid and some polymerized triglycerides, can affect the transesterification reaction and the biodiesel properties. This paper attempts to collect and analyze published works mainly in scientific journals about the engine performance, combustion and emissions characteristics of UCO biodiesel on diesel engine. Overall, the engine performance of the UCO biodiesel and its blends was only marginally poorer compared to diesel. From the standpoint of emissions, NOx emissions were slightly higher while un-burnt hydrocarbon (UBHC) emissions were lower for UCO biodiesel when compares to diesel fuel. There were no noticeable differences between UCO biodiesel and fresh oil biodiesel as their engine performances, combustion and emissions characteristics bear a close resemblance. This is probably more closely related to the oxygenated nature of biodiesel which is almost constant for every biodiesel (biodiesel has some level of oxygen bound to its chemical structure) and also to its higher viscosity and lower calorific value, which have a major bearing on spray formation and initial combustion. (author)

  18. Reductions in particulate and NO(x) emissions by diesel engine parameter adjustments with HVO fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happonen, Matti; Heikkilä, Juha; Murtonen, Timo; Lehto, Kalle; Sarjovaara, Teemu; Larmi, Martti; Keskinen, Jorma; Virtanen, Annele

    2012-06-01

    Hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) diesel fuel is a promising biofuel candidate that can complement or substitute traditional diesel fuel in engines. It has been already reported that by changing the fuel from conventional EN590 diesel to HVO decreases exhaust emissions. However, as the fuels have certain chemical and physical differences, it is clear that the full advantage of HVO cannot be realized unless the engine is optimized for the new fuel. In this article, we studied how much exhaust emissions can be reduced by adjusting engine parameters for HVO. The results indicate that, with all the studied loads (50%, 75%, and 100%), particulate mass and NO(x) can both be reduced over 25% by engine parameter adjustments. Further, the emission reduction was even higher when the target for adjusting engine parameters was to exclusively reduce either particulates or NO(x). In addition to particulate mass, different indicators of particulate emissions were also compared. These indicators included filter smoke number (FSN), total particle number, total particle surface area, and geometric mean diameter of the emitted particle size distribution. As a result of this comparison, a linear correlation between FSN and total particulate surface area at low FSN region was found.

  19. Effectiveness of emission control technologies for auxiliary engines on ocean-going vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Varalakshmi; Nigam, Abhilash; Welch, William A; Miller, J Wayne; Cocker, David R

    2011-01-01

    Large auxiliary engines operated on ocean-going vessels in transit and at berth impact the air quality of populated areas near ports. This paper presents new information on the comparison of emission ranges from three similar engines and the effectiveness of three control technologies: switching to cleaner burning fuels, operating in the low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) mode, and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). In-use measurements of gaseous (NOx, carbon monoxide [CO], carbon dioxide [CO2]) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5; total and speciated) emissions were made on three auxiliary engines on post-PanaMax class container vessels following the International Organization for Standardization-8178-1 protocol. The in-use NOx emissions for the MAN B&W 7L32/40 engine family vary from 15 to 21.1 g/kW-hr for heavy fuel oil and 8.9 to 19.6 g/kW-hr for marine distillate oil. Use of cleaner burning fuels resulted in NOx reductions ranging from 7 to 41% across different engines and a PM2.5 reduction of up to 83%. The NOx reductions are a consequence of fuel nitrogen content and engine operation; the PM2.5 reduction is attributed to the large reductions in the hydrated sulfate and organic carbon (OC) fractions. As expected, operating in the low-NOx mode reduced NOx emissions by approximately 32% and nearly doubled elemental carbon (EC) emissions. However, PM2.5 emission factors were nearly unchanged because the EC emission factor is only approximately 5% of the total PM2.5 mass. SCR reduced the NOx emission factor to less than 2.4 g/kW-hr, but it increased the PM2.5 emissions by a factor of 1.5-3.8. This increase was a direct consequence of the conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfate emissions on the SCR catalyst. The EC and OC fractions of PM2.5 reduced across the SCR unit.

  20. EFFECT OF INJECTION PRESSURE ON PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS OF CNG DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.NAGESWARA RAO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A single-cylinder diesel engine has been converted into a dual-fuel engine to operate with natural gas together with a pilot injection of diesel fuel used to ignite the CNG–air charge. The CNG was inducted into the combustion chamber via intake manifold. The engine, operating in dual-fuel mode, has been tested on a wide range of operating conditions spanning different values of engine load at constant speed at different injector opening pressures for the pilot fuel (diesel. For all the tested operating conditions, the effect of CNG and diesel fuel injection pressure, together with the amount of fuel injected during the pilot injection, were analyzed on the engine performance, in terms of brake thermal efficiency and emission levels. An experimental investigation was carried out to find out the effect of injection pressure on performance and emissions of a diesel engine operated with CNG inducted into the engine. Behavior of the dual fuel engine at 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% substitution of CNG with respect to diesel was examined and compared them at different injection pressures

  1. Reduction in NO{sub x} emission of diesel engines by in-cylinder catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikov, M.G.; Draper, P.H.; Chattha, J.A. [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology (Pakistan); Vasilev, I.P.; Gavrilenko, P.N. [East Ukrainian National University (Ukraine)

    2003-07-01

    In-cylinder catalysis as a method for reducing the nitrogen oxides emission of diesel engines has been investigated experimentally. Desirable effects could be achieved only when intensive interaction of combustion products with the catalyst-coated surface was provided. It was found that a design based on a combustion chamber of variable geometry could give useful results, particularly for non-turbocharged engines. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Scotto

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  3. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  4. Effect of hydroxy (HHO) gas addition on performance and exhaust emissions in compression ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Ali Can; Uludamar, Erinc; Aydin, Kadir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, hydroxy gas (HHO) was produced by the electrolysis process of different electrolytes (KOH{sub (aq)}, NaOH{sub (aq)}, NaCl{sub (aq)}) with various electrode designs in a leak proof plexiglass reactor (hydrogen generator). Hydroxy gas was used as a supplementary fuel in a four cylinder, four stroke, compression ignition (CI) engine without any modification and without need for storage tanks. Its effects on exhaust emissions and engine performance characteristics were investigated. Experiments showed that constant HHO flow rate at low engine speeds (under the critical speed of 1750 rpm for this experimental study), turned advantages of HHO system into disadvantages for engine torque, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) emissions and specific fuel consumption (SFC). Investigations demonstrated that HHO flow rate had to be diminished in relation to engine speed below 1750 rpm due to the long opening time of intake manifolds at low speeds. This caused excessive volume occupation of hydroxy in cylinders which prevented correct air to be taken into the combustion chambers and consequently, decreased volumetric efficiency was inevitable. Decreased volumetric efficiency influenced combustion efficiency which had negative effects on engine torque and exhaust emissions. Therefore, a hydroxy electronic control unit (HECU) was designed and manufactured to decrease HHO flow rate by decreasing voltage and current automatically by programming the data logger to compensate disadvantages of HHO gas on SFC, engine torque and exhaust emissions under engine speed of 1750 rpm. The flow rate of HHO gas was measured by using various amounts of KOH, NaOH, NaCl (catalysts). These catalysts were added into the water to diminish hydrogen and oxygen bonds and NaOH was specified as the most appropriate catalyst. It was observed that if the molality of NaOH in solution exceeded 1% by mass, electrical current supplied from the battery increased dramatically due to the too much

  5. Experimental investigation on performance and exhaust emissions of castor oil biodiesel from a diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeefard, M H; Etgahni, M M; Meisami, F; Barari, A

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, produced from plant and animal oils, is an important alternative to fossil fuels because, apart from dwindling supply, the latter are a major source of air pollution. In this investigation, effects of castor oil biodiesel blends have been examined on diesel engine performance and emissions. After producing castor methyl ester by the transesterification method and measuring its characteristics, the experiments were performed on a four cylinder, turbocharged, direct injection, diesel engine. Engine performance (power, torque, brake specific fuel consumption and thermal efficiency) and exhaust emissions were analysed at various engine speeds. All the tests were done under 75% full load. Furthermore, the volumetric blending ratios of biodiesel with conventional diesel fuel were set at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30%. The results indicate that lower blends of biodiesel provide acceptable engine performance and even improve it. Meanwhile, exhaust emissions are much decreased. Finally, a 15% blend of castor oil-biodiesel was picked as the optimized blend of biodiesel-diesel. It was found that lower blends of castor biodiesel are an acceptable fuel alternative for the engine.

  6. Compressed Biogas-Diesel Dual-Fuel Engine Optimization Study for Ultralow Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Koten

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to find out the optimum operating conditions in a diesel engine fueled with compressed biogas (CBG and pilot diesel dual-fuel. One-dimensional (1D and three-dimensional (3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD code and multiobjective optimization code were employed to investigate the influence of CBG-diesel dual-fuel combustion performance and exhaust emissions on a diesel engine. In this paper, 1D engine code and multiobjective optimization code were coupled and evaluated about 15000 cases to define the proper boundary conditions. In addition, selected single diesel fuel (dodecane and dual-fuel (CBG-diesel combustion modes were modeled to compare the engine performances and exhaust emission characteristics by using CFD code under various operating conditions. In optimization study, start of pilot diesel fuel injection, CBG-diesel flow rate, and engine speed were optimized and selected cases were compared using CFD code. CBG and diesel fuels were defined as leading reactants using user defined code. The results showed that significantly lower NOx emissions were emitted under dual-fuel operation for all cases compared to single-fuel mode at all engine load conditions.

  7. Effect of engine parameters on NOx emissions with Jatropha biodiesel as fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jindal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Depleting petroleum reserves on the earth and increasing concerns about the environment leads to the quest for fuels which are eco-friendly and safe for human beings. It is now well established that lower blends of biodiesel and diesel works well in the existing engines without any modifications. Use of the higher blends is restricted due to loss of efficiency and long term problems in the engine. For using higher blends of biodiesel, the engine operating parameters must be changed for recovery of power and efficiency. But these changes may affect the emissions. This study targets on investigating the effects of the engine operating parameters viz. compression ratio, fuel injection pressure, injection timing and engine speed on emissions of NOx with pure biodiesel as fuel in a small diesel engine commonly used in agricultural applications. It is found that the combined increase of compression ratio and injection pressure and retarding injection results in lower emissions of NOx as compared to the diesel fuel.

  8. Experimental investigation on NOx and green house gas emissions from a marine auxiliary diesel engine using ultralow sulfur light fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peng; Tan, Qinming; Zhang, Chunhui; Wei, Lijiang; He, Xianzhong; Cao, Erming; Jiang, Kai

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, marine auxiliary diesel engine has been widely used to produce electricity in the large ocean-going ship. One of the main technical challenges for ocean-going ship is to reduce pollutant emissions from marine auxiliary diesel engine and to meet the criteria of disposal on ships pollutants of IMO (International Maritime Organization). Different technical changes have been introduced in marine auxiliary diesel engine to apply clean fuels to reduce pollutant emissions. The ultralow sulfur light fuel will be applied in diesel engine for emission reductions in China. This study is aimed to investigate the impact of fuel (ultralow sulfur light fuel) on the combustion characteristic, NOx and green house gas emissions in a marine auxiliary diesel engine, under the 50%-90% engine speeds and the 25%-100% engine torques. The experimental results show that, in the marine auxiliary diesel engine, the cylinder pressure and peak heat release rate increase slightly with the increase of engine torques, while the ignition advances and combustion duration become longer. With the increases of the engine speed and torque, the fuel consumption decreases significantly, while the temperature of the exhaust manifold increases. The NOx emissions increase significantly with the increases of the engine speed and torque. The NO emission increases with the increases of the engine speed and torque, while the NO2 emission decreases. Meanwhile, the ratio of NO2 and NO is about 1:1 when the diesel engine operated in the low speed and load, while the ratio increases significantly with the increases of engine speed and torque, due to the increase of the cylinder temperature in the diffusive combustion mode. Moreover, the CO2 emission increases with the increases of engine speed and torque by the use of ultralow sulfur light fuel.

  9. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain(V):Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xu-hui; SAKAMOTO Kazuhiko; WANG Wei; GAO Shi-dong; ISOBE Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity(ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements(Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements(Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0%-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil.

  10. Photon Emission Rate Engineering using Graphene Nanodisc Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Anshuman; Reid, M T Homer; Fang, Nicholas X

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses plasmon modes formed in a cavity composed of two graphene discs placed vertically on top of each other with a finite separation in between. Firstly, we show that two distinct plasmon hybridization modes can be excited in this system, using normally incident plane wave. These are the dark and bright modes. Secondly, we demonstrate extremely high decay rate enhancement factors for quantum emitters placed inside and near such a cavity. The engineering of the radiative decay rates, via gate voltage tuning of the graphene discs and position and orientation of the emitter, is demonstrated.

  11. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Sarah R. Nuss-Warren

    2006-07-01

    Continuing work in controlled testing uses a one cylinder Ajax DP-115 (a 13.25 in bore x 16 in stroke, 360 rpm engine) to assess a sequential analysis and evaluation of a series of engine upgrades. As with most of the engines used in the natural gas industry, the Ajax engine is a mature engine with widespread usage throughout the gas gathering industry. The end point is an assessment of these technologies that assigns a cost per unit reduction in NOX emissions. Technologies including one pre-combustion chamber, in-cylinder sensors, the means to adjust the air-to-fuel ratio, and modification of the air filter housing have been evaluated in previous reports. Current work focuses on final preparations for testing pre-combustion chambers with different characteristics and using mid-to-high-pressure fuel valves and initial runs of these tests. By using the Ajax DP-115 these tests are completed in a low-cost and efficient manner. The various technologies can be quickly exchanged with different hardware, and it is inexpensive to run the engine. Progress in moving toward field testing is discussed, and changes to the first planned field test are presented. Although changes have been made to the previous plan, it is expected that several new sites will be selected soon. Field tests will begin in the next quarter.

  12. Use of an additive in biofuel to evaluate emissions, engine component wear and lubrication characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalam, M.A.; Majsuki, H.H. [Malaya Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments carried out to evaluate the effect of adding an anticorrosion additive to blended biofuel and lubricating oil on emissions, engine component wear and lubrication characteristics. The blended biofuels consist of 7.5 and 15 per cent palm olein (PO) with ordinary diesel oil (OD). Pure OD was used for comparison purposes. Exhaust emission gases such as NO{sub x}, CO and hydrocarbons (HCs) were measured by an exhaust emission analyser for engine operation on 50 per cent throttle at speeds of 800-3600 r/min. To measure engine component wear and lubricating oil characteristics, the engine was operated at 50 per cent throttle at a speed of 2000 r/min for a period of 100 h with each of the fuel samples. The same lubricating oil, conventional SAE 40, was used in all the fuels. A multielement oil analyser (MOA) was used to measure the increase in wear of metals (Fe, Cu, Al, Pd) and the decrease in lubricating oil additives (Zn, Ca) in the lubricating oil used. An ISL automatic Houillon viscometer (ASTM D445) and potentiometric titration (ASTM D2896) were used to measure viscosity and total base number (TBN) respectively. The results show that the addition of anticorrosion additive with biofuel and lubricating oil improves the emission and engine wear characteristics; both the exhaust emission gases (NO{sub x}, CO and HCs) and the wear of metals (Fe, Cu, Al and Pd) decrease with the blended fuels in comparison with the base fuel OD. Detailed results, including engine brake power, are discussed. (Author)

  13. 40 CFR 1042.101 - Exhaust emission standards for Category 1 engines and Category 2 engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the duty cycle specified in § 1042.505(b)(1), except for variable-speed propulsion marine engines used...), except for variable-speed marine engines used with controllable-pitch propellers or with electrically... NOX+HC standards. (D) Subzones 2 and 3: 1.9 for PM and CO standards. (iii) For variable-speed marine...

  14. 9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

    2003-08-24

    The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

  15. Exhaust emissions reduction from diesel engine using combined Annona-Eucalyptus oil blends and antioxidant additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil, R.; Silambarasan, R.; Pranesh, G.

    2017-03-01

    The limited resources, rising petroleum prices and depletion of fossil fuel have now become a matter of great concern. Hence, there is an urgent need for researchers to find some alternate fuels which are capable of substituting partly or wholly the higher demanded conventional diesel fuel. Lot of research work has been conducted on diesel engine using biodiesel and its blends with diesel as an alternate fuel. Very few works have been done with combination of biodiesel-Eucalypts oil without neat diesel and this leads to lots of scope in this area. The aim of the present study is to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, direct injection, compression ignition engine using eucalyptus oil-biodiesel as fuel. The presence of eucalyptus oil in the blend reduces the viscosity and improves the volatility of the blends. The methyl ester of Annona oil is blended with eucalypts oil in 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 %. The performance and emission characteristics are evaluated by operating the engine at different loads. The performance characteristics such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas temperature are evaluated. The emission constituents measured are Carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and Smoke. It is found that A50-Eu50 (50 Annona + 50 % Eucalyptus oil) blend showed better performance and reduction in exhaust emissions. But, it showed a very marginal increase in NOx emission when compared to that of diesel. Therefore, in order to reduce the NOx emission, antioxidant additive (A-tocopherol acetate) is mixed with Annona-Eucalyptus oil blends in various proportions by which NOx emission is reduced. Hence, A50-Eu50 blend can be used as an alternate fuel for diesel engine without any modifications.

  16. Exhaust emissions reduction from diesel engine using combined Annona-Eucalyptus oil blends and antioxidant additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil, R.; Silambarasan, R.; Pranesh, G.

    2016-07-01

    The limited resources, rising petroleum prices and depletion of fossil fuel have now become a matter of great concern. Hence, there is an urgent need for researchers to find some alternate fuels which are capable of substituting partly or wholly the higher demanded conventional diesel fuel. Lot of research work has been conducted on diesel engine using biodiesel and its blends with diesel as an alternate fuel. Very few works have been done with combination of biodiesel-Eucalypts oil without neat diesel and this leads to lots of scope in this area. The aim of the present study is to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, direct injection, compression ignition engine using eucalyptus oil-biodiesel as fuel. The presence of eucalyptus oil in the blend reduces the viscosity and improves the volatility of the blends. The methyl ester of Annona oil is blended with eucalypts oil in 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 %. The performance and emission characteristics are evaluated by operating the engine at different loads. The performance characteristics such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas temperature are evaluated. The emission constituents measured are Carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and Smoke. It is found that A50-Eu50 (50 Annona + 50 % Eucalyptus oil) blend showed better performance and reduction in exhaust emissions. But, it showed a very marginal increase in NOx emission when compared to that of diesel. Therefore, in order to reduce the NOx emission, antioxidant additive (A-tocopherol acetate) is mixed with Annona-Eucalyptus oil blends in various proportions by which NOx emission is reduced. Hence, A50-Eu50 blend can be used as an alternate fuel for diesel engine without any modifications.

  17. COLD START CHARACTERISTICS STUDY BASED ON REAL TIME NO EMISSIONS IN AN LPG SI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingli Zu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Normally, cylinder pressure was used as a criterion of combustion occurrence, while in some conditions, it may be unreliable when identifying lean mixture combustion. This is particularly important for fuels like liquefied petroleum gas, which has good capacity for lean combustion. In this study, a fast response NO detector, based on the chemiluminescence method, was used to measure real time NO emissions in order to evaluate the technique as a criterion for establishing combustion occurrence. Test results show that real time NO emissions can be used to identify the cylinder combustion and misfire occurrence during engine cranking, and real time NO emissions can be used to understand the combustion and misfire occurrence. Real time NO emissions mostly happened in first several cycles during cold start, and NO emissions increased with the spark timing advancing.

  18. Performance and emission study on DICI and HCCI engine using raw pongamia oil and diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the performance and emission characteristics of pongamia oil and diesel fuelled direct injection compression ignition (DICI and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine. The primary objective of the work is to investigate the feasibility of application of unmodified pongamia oil in Diesel engine and to estimate the maximum fraction of diesel fuel replaced by the neat pongamia oil. This investigation also deals with the HCCI operation using unmodified pongamia oil. In DICI mode the neat pongamia oil is admitted into the engine in the form of pongamia oil and diesel blends. The blend that offers highest diesel replacement is considered as the test blend and it is tested further to find its maximum possible brake thermal efficiency by changing the engine operating parameters. The selected maximum blend is then tested in the new setting of the engine to determine the maximum possible performance and emission characteristics. The conventional emissions of DICI engine such as NO and smoke are disappeared in the homogeneous charge compression ignition mode of operation. The HCCI engine tested in the present work is fuelled by 40% neat pongamia oil and 60% diesel fuel through direct injection and vapour induction, respectively. The ignition or combustion phasing of the HCCI operation is carried out by the exhaust gas recirculation method. The amount of exhaust gas re-circulation governs the timing of combustion. The results of the experiments show that the neat pongamia oil performed well in HCCI mode and offered approximately ten times lower NO and smoke emission. Finally, the results of the DICI mode and HCCI mode are compared with each other to reveal the truths of neat pongamia oil in heterogeneous and homogeneous combustion.

  19. Emission factors for gaseous and particulate pollutants from offshore diesel engine vessels in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yingjun; Tian, Chongguo; Lou, Diming; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Matthias, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Shipping emissions have significant influence on atmospheric environment as well as human health, especially in coastal areas and the harbour districts. However, the contribution of shipping emissions on the environment in China still need to be clarified especially based on measurement data, with the large number ownership of vessels and the rapid developments of ports, international trade and shipbuilding industry. Pollutants in the gaseous phase (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, total volatile organic compounds) and particle phase (particulate matter, organic carbon, elemental carbon, sulfates, nitrate, ammonia, metals) in the exhaust from three different diesel-engine-powered offshore vessels in China (350, 600 and 1600 kW) were measured in this study. Concentrations, fuel-based and power-based emission factors for various operating modes as well as the impact of engine speed on emissions were determined. Observed concentrations and emission factors for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, total volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter were higher for the low-engine-power vessel (HH) than for the two higher-engine-power vessels (XYH and DFH); for instance, HH had NOx EF (emission factor) of 25.8 g kWh-1 compared to 7.14 and 6.97 g kWh-1 of DFH, and XYH, and PM EF of 2.09 g kWh-1 compared to 0.14 and 0.04 g kWh-1 of DFH, and XYH. Average emission factors for all pollutants except sulfur dioxide in the low-engine-power engineering vessel (HH) were significantly higher than that of the previous studies (such as 30.2 g kg-1 fuel of CO EF compared to 2.17 to 19.5 g kg-1 fuel in previous studies, 115 g kg-1 fuel of NOx EF compared to 22.3 to 87 g kg-1 fuel in previous studies and 9.40 g kg-1 fuel of PM EF compared to 1.2 to 7.6 g kg-1 fuel in previous studies), while for the two higher-engine-power vessels (DFH and XYH), most of the average emission factors for pollutants were comparable to the results of the previous studies, engine type was

  20. Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis for Bio-Liquid Jet Fuel from Open Pond-Based Micro-Algae under China Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiliang Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A life-cycle analysis (LCA of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and energy use was performed to study bio-jet fuel (BJF production from micro-algae grown in open ponds under Chinese conditions using the Tsinghua University LCA Model (TLCAM. Attention was paid to energy recovery through biogas production and cogeneration of heat and power (CHP from the residual biomass after oil extraction, including fugitive methane (CH4 emissions during the production of biogas and nitrous oxide (N2O emissions during the use of digestate (solid residue from anaerobic digestion as agricultural fertilizer. Analyses were performed based on examination of process parameters, mass balance conditions, material requirement, energy consumptions and the realities of energy supply and transport in China (i.e., electricity generation and heat supply primarily based on coal, multiple transport modes. Our LCA result of the BJF pathway showed that, compared with the traditional petrochemical pathway, this new pathway will increase the overall fossil energy use and carbon emission by 39% and 70%, respectively, while decrease petroleum consumption by about 84%, based on the same units of energy service. Moreover, the energy conservation and emission reduction benefit of this new pathway may be accomplished by two sets of approaches: wider adoption of low-carbon process fuels and optimization of algae cultivation and harvest, and oil extraction processes.

  1. Unregulated emissions from diesel engine with particulate filter using Fe-based fuel borne catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Ge, Yunshan; Zhang, Tiezhu; Zhang, Jipeng; Tan, Jianwei; Zhang, Hongxin

    2014-10-01

    The alteration and formation of toxic compounds and potential changes in the toxicity of emissions when using after-treatment technologies have gained wide attention. Volatile organic compound (VOC), carbonyl compound and particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions were tested at European Steady State Cycle (ESC) to study unregulated emissions from a diesel engine with a fuel-borne catalyst and diesel particulate filter (FBC-DPF). An Fe-based fuel-borne catalyst was used for this study. According to the results, brake specific emissions of total VOCs without and with DPF were 4.7 and 4.9mg/kWh, respectively, showing a 4.3% increase. Benzene and n-undecane emissions increased and toluene emission decreased, while other individual VOC emissions basically had no change. When retrofitted with the FBC-DPF, total carbonyl compound emission decreased 15.7%, from 25.8 to 21.8mg/kWh. The two highest carbonyls, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were reduced from 20.0 and 3.7 to 16.5 and 3.3mg/kWh respectively. The specific reactivity (SR) with DPF was reduced from 6.68 to 6.64mg/kWh. Total particle-phase PAH emissions decreased 66.4% with DPF compared to that without DPF. However, the Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) with DPF had increased from 0.016 to 0.030mg/kWh. Fluoranthene and Pyrene had the greatest decrease, 91.1% and 88.4% respectively. The increase of two- and three-ring PAHs with DPF indicates that the fuel-borne catalyst caused some gas-phase PAHs to adsorb on particles. The results of this study expand the knowledge of the effects of using a particulate filter and a Fe-based fuel-borne catalyst on diesel engine unregulated emissions.

  2. Effects of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel fuel properties and emissions in a diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Cuenca, F.; Gomez-Marin, M. [Compania Logistica de Hidrocarburos (CLH), Central Laboratory, Mendez Alvaro 44, 28045 Madrid (Spain); Folgueras-Diaz, M.B., E-mail: belenfd@uniovi.es [Department of Energy, University of Oviedo, Independencia 13, 33004 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel fuel properties. {yields} Effect of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel engine specific consumption and emissions. {yields} Blends with {<=}4 wt.% of oxygen do not change substantially diesel fuel quality. {yields} Blends with 1 and 2.5 wt.% of oxygen reduce CO and HC emissions, but not smoke. - Abstract: The effect of ethylene glycol ethers on both the diesel fuel characteristics and the exhaust emissions (CO, NO{sub x}, smoke and hydrocarbons) from a diesel engine was studied. The ethers used were monoethylene glycol ethyl ether (EGEE), monoethylene glycol butyl ether (EGBE), diethylene glycol ethyl ether (DEGEE). The above effect was studied in two forms: first by determining the modification of base diesel fuel properties by using blends with oxygen concentration around 4 wt.%, and second by determining the emission reductions for blends with low oxygen content (1 wt.%) and with 2.5 wt.% of oxygen content. The addition of DEGEE enhances base diesel fuel cetane number, but EGEE and EGBE decrease it. For concentrations of {>=}4 wt.% of oxygen, EGEE and diesel fuel can show immiscibility problems at low temperatures ({<=}0 {sup o}C). Also, every oxygenated compound, according to its boiling point, modifies the distillation curve at low temperatures and the distillate percentage increases. These compounds have a positive effect on diesel fuel lubricity, and slightly decrease its viscosity. Blends with 1 and 2.5 wt.% oxygen concentrations were used in order to determine their influence on emissions at both full and medium loads and different engine speeds. Generally, all compounds help to reduce CO, and hydrocarbon emissions, but not smoke. The best results were obtained for blends with 2.5 wt.% of oxygen. At this concentration, the additive efficiency in decreasing order was EGEE > DEGEE > EGBE for CO emissions and DGEE > EGEE > EGBE for hydrocarbon emissions. For NO{sub x}, both its behaviour and the

  3. USAF Aircraft Engine Emission Goals: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    with regard to smoke. The J79 engine combustion system, a current rich burn cannular design, exhibited extreme smoke number sensitivity to fuel hydrogen...AND/RD 1 HQ USAFE/SGP 1 NASA Lewis Research Center 1 HQ PACAF/SGPE 1 AEDC/DDTR 1 HQ MAC/SGPE 1 EPA/SDSB 1 HQ AAC/ SGB 1 EPA 1I1 HQ AFLC/ SGB 1 AVRADCOM...DTIC/DDA 2 AFIT/Library 1 HQ AFSC/ SGB 1 AFIT/DE 1 NEPSS 1 USN Chief, R&D/EQ 1 AEDC/DOTR 1 OEHL/CC 2 HO USAF/LEEVP 1 HQ AFESC/DEV 1 OASD/(I&L)EES 1

  4. Disturbance rejection in diesel engines for low emissions and high fuel efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Criens, C.H.A.; Willems, F.P.T.; Keulen, T.A.C. van; Steinbuch, M.

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents a novel and time-efficient control design for modern heavy-duty diesel engines using a variable geometry turbine and an exhaust gas recirculation valve. The goal is to simultaneously and robustly achieve low fuel consumption and low emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particul

  5. An experiment study of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion and emission in a gasoline engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianyong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI technology has exhibited high potential to reduce fuel consumption and NOx emissions over normal spark ignition engines significantly. Optimized kinetic process (OKP technology is implemented to realize HCCI combustion in a port fuel injection gasoline engine. The combustion and emission characteristics are investigated with variation of intake air temperature, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR rate and intake air pressure. The results show that intake air temperature has great influence on HCCI combustion characteristic. Increased intake air temperature results in advance combustion phase, shorten combustion duration, and lower indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP. Increased EGR rate retards combustion start phase and prolongs combustion duration, while maximum pressure rising rate and NOx emission are reduced with increase of EGR rate. In the condition with constant fuel flow quantity, increased air pressure leads to retarded combustion phase and lower pressure rising rate, which will reduce the engine knocking tendency. In the condition with constant air fuel ratio condition, fuel injection quantity increases as intake air pressure increases, which lead to high heat release rate and high emission level. The optimal intake air temperature varies in different operating area, which can be tuned from ambient temperature to 220℃ by heat management system. The combination of EGR and air boost technology could expand operating area of HCCI engine, which improve indicated mean effective pressure from maximum 510kPa to 720kPa.

  6. PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF CI ENGINE FUELLED WITH NON EDIBLE VEGETABLE OIL AND DIESEL BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. ELANGO

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine which is fuelled with different blends of jatropha oil and diesel (10–50%. A single cylinder four stroke diesel engine was used for the experiments at various loads and speed of 1500 rpm. An AVL 5 gas analyzer and a smoke meter were used for the measurements of exhaust gas emissions. Engine performance (specific fuel consumption SFC, brake thermal efficiency, and exhaust gas temperature and emissions (HC, CO, CO2, NOx and Smoke Opacity were measured to evaluate and compute the behaviour of the diesel engine running on biodiesel. The results showed that the brake thermal efficiency of diesel is higher at all loads. Among the blends maximum brake thermal efficiency and minimum specific fuel consumption were found for blends upto 20% Jatropha oil. The specific fuel consumption of the blend having 20% Jatropha oil and 80% diesel (B20 was found to be comparable with the conventional diesel. The optimum blend is found to be B20 as the CO2 emissions were lesser than diesel while decrease in brake thermal efficiency is marginal.

  7. Under actuated air path control of diesel engines for low emissions and high efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Criens, C.; Willems, F.P.T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for feedback control using the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve and Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT) of a diesel engine. The controller effectively counteracts disturbances in NOx and PM emissions while maintaining the fuel efficiency. It is shown that by using a

  8. Integrated energy and emission management for heavy-duty diesel engines with waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Rascanu, G.; Feru, E.

    2015-01-01

    Rankine-cycleWasteHeatRecovery (WHR)systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine andWHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel en

  9. Speciation Profiles and Toxic Emission Factors for Nonroad Engines: DRAFT REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document details the research and development behind how MOVES2014a estimates air toxic emissions for nonroad engines and equipment run on conventional gasoline without ethanol (E0) and gasoline blended with 10% ethanol (E10) as well as diesel fuel, compressed natural gas (C...

  10. Integrated energy and emission management for heavy-duty diesel engines with waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Cloudt, R.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue consumpt

  11. Biodiesel soot incandescence and NO emission studied in an optical engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein-Douwel, R.J.H.; Donkerbroek, A.J.; Vliet, A.P. van; Boot, M.D.; Somers, L.M.T.; Baert, R.S.G.; Dam, N.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2009-01-01

    High-speed imaging and thermodynamical characterization are applied to an optically accessible, heavy-duty diesel engine in order to compare soot incandescence and NO emission behaviour of four bioderived fuels: rapeseed-methylester, Jatropha oil (pure), Jatropha-methylester and a 50/50 blend of

  12. Study on the Combustion Process and Emissions of a Turbocharged Diesel Engine with EGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Deqing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high pressure EGR system was adopted to a turbocharged inter-cooled diesel engine, to analyze its combustion and emission characteristics under the condition of different loads and constant speed. Under the same steady operating mode, with the increase of EGR rate, the temperature of compressed gas ascended, the ignition delay was shortened, the pressure and temperature of the burned gas descended, and the combustion process was prolonged. According to the experimental data, it was found that, at the same EGR rate, lower the load of engine was, lower the temperature in cylinder, and higher the increase rate of CO was. However, the increase rate of HC present a falling trend. The decrease rate of the specific emission of NOx linearly varied with EGR rate with a slope of 1.651. The increase rate of smoke opacity behaved a second-order polynomial uprising trend, and the higher the load was, the sharpener the smoke opacity deteriorated, with the increase of EGR rate. From the point of emission view, the engine with EGR system can achieve the lesser exhaust emissions in some operations by adjusting the engine parameters.

  13. IDI diesel engine performance and exhaust emission analysis using biodiesel with an artificial neural network (ANN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Prasada Rao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its fuel properties and compatibility. This study investigates the performance and emission characteristics of single cylinder four stroke indirect diesel injection (IDI engine fueled with Rice Bran Methyl Ester (RBME with Isopropanol additive. The investigation is done through a combination of experimental data analysis and artificial neural network (ANN modeling. The study used IDI engine experimental data to evaluate nine engine performance and emission parameters including Exhaust Gas Temperature (E.G.T, Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC, Brake Thermal Efficiency (B.The and various emissions like Hydrocarbons (HC, Carbon monoxide (CO, Carbon dioxide (CO2, Oxygen (O2, Nitrogen oxides (NOX and smoke. For the ANN modeling standard back propagation algorithm was found to be the optimum choice for training the model. A multi-layer perception (MLP network was used for non-linear mapping between the input and output parameters. It was found that ANN was able to predict the engine performance and exhaust emissions with a correlation coefficient of 0.995, 0.980, 0.999, 0.985, 0.999, 0.999, 0.980, 0.999, and 0.999 for E.G.T, BSFC, B.The, HC, O2, CO2, CO, NOX, smoke respectively.

  14. Impact of alternative fuels on emissions characteristics of a gas turbine engine - part 2: volatile and semivolatile particulate matter emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul I; Allan, James D; Lobo, Prem; Coe, Hugh; Christie, Simon; Wilson, Christopher; Hagen, Donald; Whitefield, Philip; Raper, David; Rye, Lucas

    2012-10-02

    The work characterizes the changes in volatile and semivolatile PM emissions from a gas turbine engine resulting from burning alternative fuels, specifically gas-to-liquid (GTL), coal-to-liquid (CTL), a blend of Jet A-1 and GTL, biodiesel, and diesel, to the standard Jet A-1. The data presented here, compares the mass spectral fingerprints of the different fuels as measured by the Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. There were three sample points, two at the exhaust exit plane with dilution added at different locations and another probe located 10 m downstream. For emissions measured at the downstream probe when the engine was operating at high power, all fuels produced chemically similar organic PM, dominated by C(x)H(y) fragments, suggesting the presence of long chain alkanes. The second largest contribution came from C(x)H(y)O(z) fragments, possibly from carbonyls or alcohols. For the nondiesel fuels, the highest loadings of organic PM were from the downstream probe at high power. Conversely, the diesel based fuels produced more organic material at low power from one of the exit plane probes. Differences in the composition of the PM for certain fuels were observed as the engine power decreased to idle and the measurements were made closer to the exit plane.

  15. Towards Ideal NOx and CO2 Emission Control Technology for Bio-Oils Combustion Energy System Using a Plasma-Chemical Hybrid Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, M.; Fujishima, H.; Yamato, Y.; Kuroki, T.; Tanaka, A.; Otsuka, K.

    2013-03-01

    A pilot-scale low-emission boiler system consisting of a bio-fuel boiler and plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal system is investigated. This system can achieve carbon neutrality because the bio-fuel boiler uses waste vegetable oil as one of the fuels. The plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal system has two processes: NO oxidation by ozone produced from plasma ozonizers and NO2 removal using a Na2SO3 chemical scrubber. Test demonstrations of the system are carried out for mixed oils (mixture of A-heavy oil and waste vegetable oil). Stable combustion is achieved for the mixed oil (20 - 50% waste vegetable oil). Properties of flue gas—e.g., O2, CO2 and NOx—when firing mixed oils are nearly the same as those when firing heavy oil for an average flue gas flow rate of 1000 Nm3/h. NOx concentrations at the boiler outlet are 90 - 95 ppm. Furthermore, during a 300-min continuous operation when firing 20% mixed oil, NOx removal efficiency of more than 90% (less than 10 ppm NOx emission) is confirmed. In addition, the CO2 reduction when heavy oil is replaced with waste vegetable oil is estimated. The system comparison is described between the plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal and the conventional technology.

  16. An Experimental Study of Emission and Combustion Characteristics of Marine Diesel Engine with Fuel Injector Malfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper shows the results of the laboratory study on the relation between chosen malfunctions of a fuel injector and composition of exhaust gas from the marine engine. The object of research is a marine 3-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection diesel engine with an intercooler system. The engine was loaded with a generator and supercharged. The generator was electrically connected to the water resistance. The engine operated with a load between 50 kW and 250 kW at a constant speed. The engine load and speed, parameters of the turbocharger, systems of cooling, fuelling, lubricating and air exchange, were measured. Fuel injection and combustion pressures in all cylinders of the engine were also recorded. Exhaust gas composition was recorded by using a electrochemical gas analyzer. Air pressure, temperature and humidity were also recorded. Emission characteristics of the engine were calculated according to ISO 8178 standard regulations. During the study the engine operated at the technical condition recognized as „working properly” and with simulated fuel injector malfunctions. Simulation of malfunctions consisted in the increasing and decreasing of fuel injector static opening pressure, decalibration of fuel injector holes and clogging 2 neighboring of 9 fuel injector holes on one of 3 engine cylinders.

  17. 40 CFR 1042.320 - What happens if one of my production-line engines fails to meet emission standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-line engines fails to meet emission standards? 1042.320 Section 1042.320 Protection of Environment... if one of my production-line engines fails to meet emission standards? (a) If you have a production... an initial failed test if all of the following are true: (1) The catalyst was in a green...

  18. Performance and emissions of an engine fuelled with a biodiesel fuel produced from animal fats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymaz Imdat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil reserves which are located around the world are declining day by day, so new alternative energy sources must be invented for engines of internal combustion and compression ignition, so biodiesel that is an alternative fuel source for diesel engines and it is a renewable energy resource. Biodiesel is a fuel made from vegetable oils, animals’ fats and waste oils. In this study, physical and chemical properties of biodiesel were analyzed and matched to the diesel fuel. In the experimental study, biodiesel was made from animal fats and compared to diesel fuel. Its effects on engine performance and emissions are studied. A single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injected diesel engine with air cooling system are used as test equipment in different cycles. After the experimental study, it is concluded that the reduction of the emissions of CO and HC as biodiesel has the advantage of emission output. Environmentalist property of biodiesel is the most important characteristic of it. But the sight of engine performance diesel fuel has more advantage to biodiesel fuel.

  19. Emission reduction in SI engine using ethanol – gasoline blends on thermal barrier coated pistons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Ananda Srinivasan and C.G.Saravanan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of ethanol and unleaded gasoline with Isoheptanol blends on multi- cylinder SI engine were investigated. The test fuels were prepared using 99.9% pure ethanol and unleaded gasoline with Isoheptanol blend, in the ratio of E 60 + 2.0 Isoheptanol, E 50 + 1.0 Isoheptanol. In this work the performance, emission and combustion tests were conducted in multi-cylinder petrol engine. The experimental results reveal an increase in brake thermal efficiency on the use of test fuel. In the emission test, CO is found slightly decreased, while HC increased moderately and CO2 and NOx are appreciably reduced, when compared to the sole fuel. The second part of the investigation is carried out in the same engine with Alumina Titania coated crown of the pistons, to gain more inside improvement of engine performance and in-cylinder pressure for coated pistons. The experiment is repeated along with fuel additives and ethanol blends in the same blended ratio to analyse the performance and combustion characteristics of the engine. The results show marginal increase in brake thermal efficiency and reduction in CO, NOx, HC and CO2 emissions. In this study, combustion analyses are made with the help of AVL combustion analyzer, in which cylinder pressure, heat release rate and cumulative heat release are performed.

  20. The Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Diesel Engine Performance and Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D.; Majumdar, G.; Sen, R. S.; Ghosh, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of coating thickness on performance and emission of a diesel engine including comparisons with results from an uncoated piston diesel engine. Primarily three piston crowns were coated with Al2O3 (bond coat) of 100 μm thickness each by using Plasma spray coating technique. Then these piston crowns were coated with partially stabilized zirconia with a thickness of 250, 350, 450 μm respectively by using the same technique over the bond coat. These pistons inserted into the cylinder of a diesel engine one by one to collect the combustion and emission data. Then these data were compared with standard diesel engine. It was observed that the thermal efficiency increased with increasing load levels, whereas specific fuel consumption reduced with increasing load. However, it was observed that harmful gases and particulates like CO, smoke and HC were reduced in case of all types of coated piston engine with the increase of load. Increased amount of NOX emission was reported during the experimentation.

  1. Nanoparticle emissions from a heavy-duty engine running on alternative diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Juha; Virtanen, Annele; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Murtonen, Timo

    2009-12-15

    We have studied the effect of three different fuels (fossil diesel fuel (EN590); rapeseed methyl ester (RME); and synthetic gas-to-liquid (GTL)) on heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Our main focus was on nanoparticle emissions of the engine. Our results show that the particle emissions from a modern diesel engine run with EN590, GTL, or RME consisted of two partly nonvolatile modes that were clearly separated in particle size. The concentration and geometric mean diameter of nonvolatile nucleation mode cores measured with RME were substantially greater than with the other fuels. The soot particle concentration and soot particle size were lowest with RME. With EN590 and GTL, a similar engine load dependence of the nonvolatile nucleation mode particle size and concentration imply a similar formation mechanism of the particles. For RME, the nonvolatile core particle size was larger and the concentration dependence on engine load was clearly different from that of EN590 and GTL. This indicates that the formation mechanism of the core particles is different for RME. This can be explained by differences in the fuel characteristics.

  2. Cold Start Emissions of Spark-Ignition Engines at Low Ambient Temperatures as an Air Quality Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielaczyc Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available SI engines are highly susceptible to excess emissions when started at low ambient temperatures. This phenomenon has multiple air quality and climate forcing implications. Direct injection petrol engines feature a markedly different fuelling strategy, and so their emissions behaviour is somewhat different from indirect injection petrol engines. The excess emissions of direct injection engines at low ambient temperatures should also differ. Additionally, the direct injection fuel delivery process leads to the formation of PM, and DISI engines should show greater PM emissions at low ambient temperatures. This study reports on laboratory experiments quantifying excess emissions of gaseous and solid pollutants over a legislative driving cycle following cold start at a low ambient temperature for both engine types. Over the legislative cycle for testing at -7°C (the UDC, emissions of HC, CO, NOx and CO2 were higher when tested at -7°C than at 24°C. Massive increases in emissions of HC and CO were observed, together with more modest increases in NOx and CO2 emissions. Results from the entire driving cycle showed excess emissions in both phases (though they were much larger for the UDC. The DISI vehicle showed lower increases in fuel consumption than the port injected vehicles, but greater increases in emission of HC and CO. DISI particle number emissions increased by around 50%; DISI particle mass by over 600%. The observed emissions deteriorations varied somewhat by engine type and from vehicle to vehicle. Excesses were greatest following start-up, but persisted, even after several hundred seconds’ driving. The temperature of the intake air appeared to have a limited but significant effect on emissions after the engine has been running for some time. All vehicles tested here comfortably met the relevant EU limits, providing further evidence that these limits are no longer challenging and need updating.

  3. Enhanced Emission Performance and Fuel Efficiency for HD Methane Engines. Literature Study. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broman, R.; Staalhammar, P.; Erlandsson, L.

    2010-05-15

    A literature survey has been conducted in order to define state-of-the-art for methane fuelled engines to be used in heavy duty vehicles. Use of methane can be favourable to increase security of supply and mitigate CO2 emissions, especially when the methane origins from biomass. Furthermore, methane used as a fuel in heavy duty engines has a potential to reduce toxic exhaust emissions. Historically, use of methane in heavy duty engines has often been hampered by poor efficiency, i.e. high fuel consumption when using the Otto-cycle. However, current generation technology engines might be within 5-10 % of the efficiency of Diesel engine technology. In this context it is worth mentioning that compliance-driven changes for meeting future emission regulations for Diesel engines may have a negative impact on fuel efficiency, thereby narrowing the gap. This may present an opportunity for heavy methane fuelled engines. The reliability and durability of the exhaust aftertreatment devices for methane fuelled engines has also given rise to some concerns. Some concepts are performing acceptable while others do not meet expectations. This is partly due to difficulties in handling methane in the aftertreatment device and partly to issues in the design of the ignition system. Methane is a fuel used worldwide and has a potential to be an important complement to Diesel oil. There are two categories of HD methane engines available to end-users: Retrofitted engines, which often include computer controlled retrofit systems developed as 'bolt-on' technologies that can be removed if necessary, to resell the vehicle with a normal diesel engine, and those developed specifically for and in conjunction with engine manufacturers and delivered to customers as factory-built engines or vehicles (OEM). Additionally, both these categories can include engines that use the Otto- or Diesel combustion cycles. When adapting a HD Diesel engine to run on methane there are two options, either

  4. Screening analysis and selection of emission reduction concepts for intermittent combustion aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezy, B. J.; Meyers, J. E.; Tucker, J. R.; Stuckas, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to screen, evaluate, and select three engine exhaust emission reduction concepts from a group of 14 candidate alternatives. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to survey the emission reduction technology state-of-the-art and establish contact with firms working on intermittent combustion engine development and pollution reduction problems. Concept development, advantages, disadvantages, and expected emission reduction responses are stated. A set of cost effectiveness criteria was developed, appraised for relative importance, and traded off against each concept so that its merit could be determined. A decision model was used to aid the evaluators in managing the criteria, making consistent judgements, calculating merit scores, and ranking the concepts. An Improved Fuel Injection System, Improved Cooling Combustion Chamber, and a Variable Timing Ignition System were recommended to NASA for approval and further concept development. An alternate concept, Air Injection, was also recommended.

  5. Impact of Bulldozer's Engine Load Factor on Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emission and Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kecojevic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Bulldozers consume a large amount of diesel fuel and consequently produce a significant quantity of CO2. Environmental and economic cost issues related to fuel consumption and CO2 emission represent a substantial challenge to the mining industry. Approach: Impact of engine load conditions on fuel consumption and the subsequent CO2 emission and cost was analyzed for Caterpillar bulldozers. Results were compared with the data on bulldozers' fuel consumption from an operating coal surface mine in the United States. Results: There is a strong linear correlation among power, fuel consumption and engine load factor. Reduction in load factor by 15% may significantly reduce the fuel consumption and the CO2 emission. Conclusion/Recommendation: Application of appropriate bulldozer's load factor may help mine operators manage fuel consumption, cost and environmental burden.

  6. The influence of thermal regime on gasoline direct injection engine performance and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahu, C. I.; Tarulescu, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental research regarding to the effects of a low thermal regime on fuel consumption and pollutant emissions from a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine. During the experimental researches, the temperature of the coolant and oil used by the engine were modified 4 times (55, 65, 75 and 85 oC), monitoring the effects over the fuel consumption and emissions (CO2, CO and NOx). The variations in temperature of the coolant and oil have been achieved through AVL coolant and oil conditioning unit, integrated in the test bed. The obtained experimental results reveals the poor quality of exhaust gases and increases of fuel consumption for the gasoline direct injection engines that runs outside the optimal ranges for coolant and oil temperatures.

  7. Effects of Diary Scum Oil Methyl Ester on a DI Diesel Engine Performance and Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Varghese Babu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is recognized as a clean alternative fuel or as a fuel additive to reduce pollutant emission from CI engine and minimum cost so there is need for producing biodiesel other than from seed oil. In this study the diary waste scum were used as the raw material to produce biodiesel. Scum oil methyl ester (SOME is produced in laboratory by tranestrification process. The properties of SOME thus obtained are comparable with ASTM biodiesel standards. Experiments has been carried out to estimate the performance, emission and combustion characteristics of a single cylinder; four stroke diesel engine fuelled with scum biodiesel and its blends with standard diesel. Tests has been conducted using the fuel blends of 10%, 20%, 30% and 100% biodiesel with standard diesel, with an engine speed of 1500 rpm, fixed compression ratio 17.5 and at different loading conditions. The performance parameters elucidated includes brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption, and exhaust gas temperature.

  8. Performance and Emissions of Internal Combustion Engine Fuelled With CNG - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Darade

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of alternative fuels such as natural gases has become very essential because of the continuously decrease in the petroleum reserves and also their contribution for pollutants. In this paper, a survey of research papers on the utilization of Compressed Natural Gas in the Internal Combustion engines along with its effects on the performance and emissions is done. It is revealed that the performance characteristics except thermal efficiency and exhaust temperature, various other performance parameters like brake mean effective pressure, power, torque and brake specific fuel consumption are decreased for CNG fuelled engine while the emission characteristics of unburnt hydrocarbon, Carbon monoxide and Carbon-di-oxide except nitrogen oxides are better for CNG compared to petrol and diesel engines. The improvement in performance is observed with the addition of hydrogen.

  9. Influence Of Aircraft Engine Exhaust Emissions At A Global Level And Preventive Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Golubić

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The work considers the differences in the aircraft engine exhaustemissions, as well as the impact of the emissions on theenvironment depending on several factors. These include theage of the engine, i. e. technical refinement, engine operating regimesat different thrusts during time periods: takeoff, climb,approach, etc. Also, the exhaust emissions do not have thesame influence on different atmospheric layers. The pollutantsemitted at higher altitudes during cruising have become agreater problem, although the volume of pollutants is smaller,due to the chemical complexity and sensitivity of these layers ascompared to the lower layers of atmosphere. One of the reasonswhy these problems have long remained outside the focus of interestof the environmentalists is that the air transport of goodsand people is performed at high altitudes, so that the pollutionof atmosphere does not present a direct threat to anyone, sincethe environment is being polluted at a global level and thereforeis more difficult to notice at the local level.

  10. Effects of the biodiesel blend fuel on aldehyde emissions from diesel engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-Yu; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Chien, Shu-Mei

    Interest in use of biodiesel fuels derived from vegetable oils or animal fats as alternative fuels for petroleum-based diesels has increased due to biodiesels having similar properties of those of diesels, and characteristics of renewability, biodegradability and potential beneficial effects on exhaust emissions. Generally, exhaust emissions of regulated pollutants are widely studied and the results favor biodiesels on CO, HC and particulate emissions; however, limited and inconsistent data are showed for unregulated pollutants, such as carbonyl compounds, which are also important indicators for evaluating available vehicle fuels. For better understanding biodiesel, this study examines the effects of the biodiesel blend fuel on aldehyde chemical emissions from diesel engine exhausts in comparison with those from the diesel fuel. Test engines (Mitsubishi 4M40-2AT1) with four cylinders, a total displacement of 2.84 L, maximum horsepower of 80.9 kW at 3700 rpm, and maximum torque of 217.6 N m at 2000 rpm, were mounted and operated on a Schenck DyNAS 335 dynamometer. Exhaust emission tests were performed several times for each fuel under the US transient cycle protocol from mileages of 0-80,000 km with an interval of 20,000 km, and two additional measurements were carried out at 40,000 and 80,000 km after maintenance, respectively. Aldehyde samples were collected from diluted exhaust by using a constant volume sampling system. Samples were extracted and analyzed by the HPLC/UV system. Dominant aldehydes of both fuels' exhausts are formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. These compounds together account for over 75% of total aldehyde emissions. Total aldehyde emissions for B20 (20% waste cooking oil biodiesel and 80% diesel) and diesel fuels are in the ranges of 15.4-26.9 mg bhp-h -1 and 21.3-28.6 mg bhp-h -1, respectively. The effects of increasing mileages and maintenance practice on aldehyde emissions are insignificant for both fuels. B20 generates slightly less emission than

  11. Combustion Dynamics and Control for Ultra Low Emissions in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Future aircraft engines must provide ultra-low emissions and high efficiency at low cost while maintaining the reliability and operability of present day engines. The demands for increased performance and decreased emissions have resulted in advanced combustor designs that are critically dependent on efficient fuel/air mixing and lean operation. However, all combustors, but most notably lean-burning low-emissions combustors, are susceptible to combustion instabilities. These instabilities are typically caused by the interaction of the fluctuating heat release of the combustion process with naturally occurring acoustic resonances. These interactions can produce large pressure oscillations within the combustor and can reduce component life and potentially lead to premature mechanical failures. Active Combustion Control which consists of feedback-based control of the fuel-air mixing process can provide an approach to achieving acceptable combustor dynamic behavior while minimizing emissions, and thus can provide flexibility during the combustor design process. The NASA Glenn Active Combustion Control Technology activity aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines by providing experiments tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. The intent is to allow the technology maturity of active combustion control to advance to eventual demonstration in an engine environment. Work at NASA Glenn has shown that active combustion control, utilizing advanced algorithms working through high frequency fuel actuation, can effectively suppress instabilities in a combustor which emulates the instabilities found in an aircraft gas turbine engine. Current efforts are aimed at extending these active control technologies to advanced ultra-low-emissions combustors such as those employing multi-point lean direct injection.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPOSITION AND TOXICITY OF ENGINE EMISSION SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (1)Mauderly, J; Seagrave, J; McDonald; J (2)Eide,I (3)Zielinska, B (4)Lawson, D

    2003-08-24

    Differences in the lung toxicity and bacterial mutagenicity of seven samples from gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions were reported previously [1]. Filter and vapor-phase semivolatile organic samples were collected from normal and high-emitter gasoline and diesel vehicles operated on chassis dynamometers on the Unified Driving Cycle, and the compositions of the samples were measured in detail. The two fractions of each sample were combined in their original mass collection ratios, and the toxicity of the seven samples was compared by measuring inflammation and tissue damage in rat lungs and mutagenicity in bacteria. There was good agreement among the toxicity response variables in ranking the samples and demonstrating a five-fold range of toxicity. The relationship between chemical composition and toxicity was analyzed by a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLS, also known as projection to latent surfaces). The PCA /PLS analysis revealed the chemical constituents co-varying most strongly with toxicity and produced models predicting the relative toxicity of the samples with good accuracy. The results demonstrated the utility of the PCA/PLS approach, which is now being applied to additional samples, and it also provided a starting point for confirming the compounds that actually cause the effects.

  13. Effects of Biofuel and Variant Ambient Pressure on FlameDevelopment and Emissions of Gasoline Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Akasha; Khalid, Amir; Sapit, Azwan; Samsudin, Dahrum

    2016-11-01

    There are many technologies about exhaust emissions reduction for wide variety of spark ignition (SI) engine have been considered as the improvement throughout the combustion process. The stricter on legislation of emission and demands of lower fuel consumption needs to be priority in order to satisfy the demand of emission quality. Besides, alternative fuel such as methanol-gasoline blends is used as working fluid in this study due to its higher octane number and self-sustain concept which capable to contribute positive effect to the combustion process. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of methanol-gasoline fuel with different blending ratio and variant ambient pressures on flame development and emission for gasoline engine. An experimental study is carried towards to the flame development of methanol-gasoline fuel in a constant volume chamber. Schlieren optical visualization technique is a visual process that used when high sensitivity is required to photograph the flow of fluids of varying density used for captured the combustion images in the constant volume chamber and analysed through image processing technique. Apart from that, the result showed combustion burn rate increased when the percentage of methanol content in gasoline increased. Thus, high percentage of methanol-gasoline blends gave greater flame development area. Moreover, the emissions of CO, NOX and HC are performed a reduction when the percentage of methanol content in gasoline is increased. Contrarily, the emission of Carbon dioxide, CO2 is increased due to the combustion process is enhanced.

  14. Quantification of aldehydes emissions from alternative and renewable aviation fuels using a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hu; Altaher, Mohamed A.; Wilson, Chris W.; Blakey, Simon; Chung, Winson; Rye, Lucas

    2014-02-01

    In this research three renewable aviation fuel blends including two HEFA (Hydrotreated Ester and Fatty Acid) blends and one FAE (Fatty Acids Ethyl Ester) blend with conventional Jet A-1 along with a GTL (Gas To Liquid) fuel have been tested for their aldehydes emissions on a small gas turbine engine. Three strong ozone formation precursors: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein were measured in the exhaust at different operational modes and compared to neat Jet A-1. The aim is to assess the impact of renewable and alternative aviation fuels on aldehydes emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines so as to provide informed knowledge for the future deployment of new fuels in aviation. The results show that formaldehyde was a major aldehyde species emitted with a fraction of around 60% of total measured aldehydes emissions for all fuels. Acrolein was the second major emitted aldehyde species with a fraction of ˜30%. Acetaldehyde emissions were very low for all the fuels and below the detention limit of the instrument. The formaldehyde emissions at cold idle were up to two to threefold higher than that at full power. The fractions of formaldehyde were 6-10% and 20% of total hydrocarbon emissions in ppm at idle and full power respectively and doubled on a g kg-1-fuel basis.

  15. Emission of a compression ignition engine fuelled by diesel and imitated syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Bahaaddein Kamal M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Karim, Zainal Ambri B. A.

    2012-06-01

    Biomass can be converted into a useful source of energy through gasification. The gasification product, known as synthesis gas or syngas, composition of syngas may fluctuate due to many factors such as operational errors of the gasifier as well as the type of feedstock used or may be due to the feeding rate fluctuation. Therefore it would be difficult to assess the effect of syngas composition and diesel replacement ratio to the emission when combusted in dual fuel syngas - diesel compression ignition engine. In order to overcome this problem controllable composition and conditions of imitated syngas was used in this study by selective three compositions of syngas close to the real conditions. The objective of this study is to determine the exhaust emissions of a compression ignition engine fuelled with diesel and imitated syngas at different compositions and diesel replacement ratios to determine the most appropriate composition of syngas and diesel replacement ratio which will give less emission. The test results on syngas emission are compared with the results of diesel. CO2 and NOX emission level was reduced on syngas dual fuel mode, but there were increases in CO and THC emissions throughout all syngas compositions examined due to poor combustion efficiency of dual fuel operation.

  16. Engineering BioInformatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ With the completion of human genome sequencing, a new era of bioinformatics st arts. On one hand, due to the advance of high throughput DNA microarray technol ogies, functional genomics such as gene expression information has increased exp onentially and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Conventional m eans of storing, analysing and comparing related data are already overburdened. Moreover, the rich information in genes , their functions and their associated wide biological implication requires new technologies of analysing data that employ sophisticated statistical and machine learning algorithms, powerful com puters and intensive interaction together different data sources such as seque nce data, gene expression data, proteomics data and metabolic pathway informati on to discover complex genomic structures and functional patterns with other bi ological process to gain a comprehensive understanding of cell physiology.

  17. Operation of marine diesel engines on biogenic fuels: modification of emissions and resulting climate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Lauer, Peter; Fritsche, Uwe; Hasselbach, Jan; Lichtenstern, Michael; Schlager, Hans; Fleischer, Fritz

    2011-12-15

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO(2), NO(x), hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fuel life cycle analysis which included land use changes associated with the growth of energy plants. Emissions of CO(2) and NO(x) per kWh were found to be similar for fossil fuels and biogenic fuels. PM mass emission was reduced to 10-15% of HFO emissions for all low-sulfur fuels including MGO as a fossil fuel. Black carbon emissions were reduced significantly to 13-30% of HFO. Changes in emissions were predominantly related to particulate sulfate, while differences between low-sulfur fossil fuels and low-sulfur biogenic fuels were of minor significance. GHG emissions from the biogenic fuel life cycle (FLC) depend crucially on energy plant production conditions and have the potential of shifting the overall GHG budget from positive to negative compared to fossil fuels.

  18. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, Dennis N. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Atreya, Arvind [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chen, Jyh-Yuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cheng, Wai K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dibble, Robert W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Edwards, Chris [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Filipi, Zoran S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gerdes, Christian [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Im, Hong [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lavoie, George A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wooldridge, Margaret S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-12-31

    The objective of the University consortium was to investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines and develop methods to extend those boundaries to improve the fuel economy of these engines, while operating with ultra low emissions. This work involved studies of thermal effects, thermal transients and engine management, internal mixing and stratification, and direct injection strategies for affecting combustion stability. This work also examined spark-assisted Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and exhaust after-treatment so as to extend the range and maximize the benefit of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI)/ Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) operation. In summary the overall goals were; Investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines; Develop methods to extend LTC boundaries to improve the fuel economy of HCCI engines fueled on gasoline and alternative blends, while operating with ultra low emissions; and Investigate alternate fuels, ignition and after-treatment for LTC and Partially Premixed compression Ignition (PPCI) engines.

  19. Diesel particle filter and fuel effects on heavy-duty diesel engine emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Matthew A; Dane, A John; Williams, Aaron; Ireland, John; Luecke, Jon; McCormick, Robert L; Voorhees, Kent J

    2010-11-01

    The impacts of biodiesel and a continuously regenerated (catalyzed) diesel particle filter (DPF) on the emissions of volatile unburned hydrocarbons, carbonyls, and particle associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-PAH, were investigated. Experiments were conducted on a 5.9 L Cummins ISB, heavy-duty diesel engine using certification ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD, S ≤ 15 ppm), soy biodiesel (B100), and a 20% blend thereof (B20). Against the ULSD baseline, B20 and B100 reduced engine-out emissions of measured unburned volatile hydrocarbons and PM associated PAH and nitro-PAH by significant percentages (40% or more for B20 and higher percentage for B100). However, emissions of benzene were unaffected by the presence of biodiesel and emissions of naphthalene actually increased for B100. This suggests that the unsaturated FAME in soy-biodiesel can react to form aromatic rings in the diesel combustion environment. Methyl acrylate and methyl 3-butanoate were observed as significant species in the exhaust for B20 and B100 and may serve as markers of the presence of biodiesel in the fuel. The DPF was highly effective at converting gaseous hydrocarbons and PM associated PAH and total nitro-PAH. However, conversion of 1-nitropyrene by the DPF was less than 50% for all fuels. Blending of biodiesel caused a slight reduction in engine-out emissions of acrolein, but otherwise had little effect on carbonyl emissions. The DPF was highly effective for conversion of carbonyls, with the exception of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde emissions were increased by the DPF for ULSD and B20.

  20. Load-Dependent Emission Factors and Chemical Characteristics of IVOCs from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Eben S; Sappok, Alexander G; Wong, Victor W; Kroll, Jesse H

    2015-11-17

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of mobile-source emissions requires the characterization of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs), relatively-low-vapor-pressure gas-phase species that may generate secondary organic aerosol with high yields. Due to challenges associated with IVOC detection and quantification, IVOC emissions remain poorly understood at present. Here, we describe measurements of the magnitude and composition of IVOC emissions from a medium-duty diesel engine. Measurements are made on an engine dynamometer and utilize a new mass-spectrometric instrument to characterize the load dependence of the emissions in near-real-time. Results from steady-state engine operation indicate that IVOC emissions are highly dependent on engine power, with highest emissions at engine idle and low-load operation (≤25% maximum rated power) with a chemical composition dominated by saturated hydrocarbon species. Results suggest that unburned fuel components are the dominant IVOCs emitted at low loads. As engine load increases, IVOC emissions decline rapidly and become increasingly characterized by unsaturated hydrocarbons and oxygenated organics, newly formed from incomplete combustion processes at elevated engine temperatures and pressures. Engine transients, including a cold-start ignition and engine acceleration, show IVOC emission profiles that are different in amount or composition compared to steady-state combustion, underscoring the utility of characterizing IVOC emissions with high time resolution across realistic engine operating conditions. We find possible evidence for IVOC losses on unheated dilution and sampling surfaces, which need to be carefully accounted for in IVOC emission studies.

  1. Systematic metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for high-yield production of fuel bio-chemical 2,3-butanediol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youqiang; Chu, Haipei; Gao, Chao; Tao, Fei; Zhou, Zikang; Li, Kun; Li, Lixiang; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2014-05-01

    The production of biofuels by recombinant Escherichia coli is restricted by the toxicity of the products. 2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BD), a platform and fuel bio-chemical with low toxicity to microbes, could be a promising alternative for biofuel production. However, the yield and productivity of 2,3-BD produced by recombinant E. coli strains are not sufficient for industrial scale fermentation. In this work, the production of 2,3-BD by recombinant E. coli strains was optimized by applying a systematic approach. 2,3-BD biosynthesis gene clusters were cloned from several native 2,3-BD producers, including Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, and Enterobacter cloacae, inserted into the expression vector pET28a, and compared for 2,3-BD synthesis. The recombinant strain E. coli BL21/pETPT7-EcABC, carrying the 2,3-BD pathway gene cluster from Enterobacter cloacae, showed the best ability to synthesize 2,3-BD. Thereafter, expression of the most efficient gene cluster was optimized by using different promoters, including PT7, Ptac, Pc, and Pabc. E. coli BL21/pET-RABC with Pabc as promoter was superior in 2,3-BD synthesis. On the basis of the results of biomass and extracellular metabolite profiling analyses, fermentation conditions, including pH, agitation speed, and aeration rate, were optimized for the efficient production of 2,3-BD. After fed-batch fermentation under the optimized conditions, 73.8g/L of 2,3-BD was produced by using E. coli BL21/pET-RABC within 62h. The values of both yield and productivity of 2,3-BD obtained with the optimized biological system are the highest ever achieved with an engineered E. coli strain. In addition to the 2,3-BD production, the systematic approach might also be used in the production of other important chemicals through recombinant E. coli strains.

  2. Cyanobacteria: A Precious Bio-resource in Agriculture, Ecosystem, and Environmental Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Kumar, Arun; Rai, Amar N; Singh, Devendra P

    2016-01-01

    Keeping in view, the challenges concerning agro-ecosystem and environment, the recent developments in biotechnology offers a more reliable approach to address the food security for future generations and also resolve the complex environmental problems. Several unique features of cyanobacteria such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high biomass yield, growth on non-arable lands and a wide variety of water sources (contaminated and polluted waters), generation of useful by-products and bio-fuels, enhancing the soil fertility and reducing green house gas emissions, have collectively offered these bio-agents as the precious bio-resource for sustainable development. Cyanobacterial biomass is the effective bio-fertilizer source to improve soil physico-chemical characteristics such as water-holding capacity and mineral nutrient status of the degraded lands. The unique characteristics of cyanobacteria include their ubiquity presence, short generation time and capability to fix the atmospheric N2. Similar to other prokaryotic bacteria, the cyanobacteria are increasingly applied as bio-inoculants for improving soil fertility and environmental quality. Genetically engineered cyanobacteria have been devised with the novel genes for the production of a number of bio-fuels such as bio-diesel, bio-hydrogen, bio-methane, synga, and therefore, open new avenues for the generation of bio-fuels in the economically sustainable manner. This review is an effort to enlist the valuable information about the qualities of cyanobacteria and their potential role in solving the agricultural and environmental problems for the future welfare of the planet.

  3. Cyanobacteria: A Precious Bio-resource in Agriculture, Ecosystem, and Environmental Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Kumar, Arun; Rai, Amar N.; Singh, Devendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Keeping in view, the challenges concerning agro-ecosystem and environment, the recent developments in biotechnology offers a more reliable approach to address the food security for future generations and also resolve the complex environmental problems. Several unique features of cyanobacteria such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high biomass yield, growth on non-arable lands and a wide variety of water sources (contaminated and polluted waters), generation of useful by-products and bio-fuels, enhancing the soil fertility and reducing green house gas emissions, have collectively offered these bio-agents as the precious bio-resource for sustainable development. Cyanobacterial biomass is the effective bio-fertilizer source to improve soil physico-chemical characteristics such as water-holding capacity and mineral nutrient status of the degraded lands. The unique characteristics of cyanobacteria include their ubiquity presence, short generation time and capability to fix the atmospheric N2. Similar to other prokaryotic bacteria, the cyanobacteria are increasingly applied as bio-inoculants for improving soil fertility and environmental quality. Genetically engineered cyanobacteria have been devised with the novel genes for the production of a number of bio-fuels such as bio-diesel, bio-hydrogen, bio-methane, synga, and therefore, open new avenues for the generation of bio-fuels in the economically sustainable manner. This review is an effort to enlist the valuable information about the qualities of cyanobacteria and their potential role in solving the agricultural and environmental problems for the future welfare of the planet. PMID:27148218

  4. Dynamic Probabilistic Modeling of Environmental Emissions of Engineered Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tian Yin; Bornhöft, Nikolaus A; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Nowack, Bernd

    2016-05-03

    The need for an environmental risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials (ENM) necessitates the knowledge about their environmental concentrations. Despite significant advances in analytical methods, it is still not possible to measure the concentrations of ENM in natural systems. Material flow and environmental fate models have been used to provide predicted environmental concentrations. However, almost all current models are static and consider neither the rapid development of ENM production nor the fact that many ENM are entering an in-use stock and are released with a lag phase. Here we use dynamic probabilistic material flow modeling to predict the flows of four ENM (nano-TiO2, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT) to the environment and to quantify their amounts in (temporary) sinks such as the in-use stock and ("final") environmental sinks such as soil and sediment. Caused by the increase in production, the concentrations of all ENM in all compartments are increasing. Nano-TiO2 had far higher concentrations than the other three ENM. Sediment showed in our worst-case scenario concentrations ranging from 6.7 μg/kg (CNT) to about 40 000 μg/kg (nano-TiO2). In most cases the concentrations in waste incineration residues are at the "mg/kg" level. The flows to the environment that we provide will constitute the most accurate and reliable input of masses for environmental fate models which are using process-based descriptions of the fate and behavior of ENM in natural systems and rely on accurate mass input parameters.

  5. Methodology to estimate particulate matter emissions from certified commercial aircraft engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayson, Roger L; Fleming, Gregg G; Lovinelli, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Today, about one-fourth of U.S. commercial service airports, including 41 of the busiest 50, are either in nonattainment or maintenance areas per the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. U.S. aviation activity is forecasted to triple by 2025, while at the same time, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is evaluating stricter particulate matter (PM) standards on the basis of documented human health and welfare impacts. Stricter federal standards are expected to impede capacity and limit aviation growth if regulatory mandated emission reductions occur as for other non-aviation sources (i.e., automobiles, power plants, etc.). In addition, strong interest exists as to the role aviation emissions play in air quality and climate change issues. These reasons underpin the need to quantify and understand PM emissions from certified commercial aircraft engines, which has led to the need for a methodology to predict these emissions. Standardized sampling techniques to measure volatile and nonvolatile PM emissions from aircraft engines do not exist. As such, a first-order approximation (FOA) was derived to fill this need based on available information. FOA1.0 only allowed prediction of nonvolatile PM. FOA2.0 was a change to include volatile PM emissions on the basis of the ratio of nonvolatile to volatile emissions. Recent collaborative efforts by industry (manufacturers and airlines), research establishments, and regulators have begun to provide further insight into the estimation of the PM emissions. The resultant PM measurement datasets are being analyzed to refine sampling techniques and progress towards standardized PM measurements. These preliminary measurement datasets also support the continued refinement of the FOA methodology. FOA3.0 disaggregated the prediction techniques to allow for independent prediction of nonvolatile and volatile emissions on a more theoretical basis. The Committee for Aviation Environmental Protection of the International Civil

  6. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF COMBUSTION, PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF DI DIESEL ENGINE UNDER HCCI MODE WITH POROUS MEDIUM COMBUSTION

    OpenAIRE

    Kannan, C.; P TAMILPORAI

    2010-01-01

    In recent times, homogeneous combustion has been a proven technology to attain high efficient and low emission engines. Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are able to have efficiencies as high as Compression Ignition, Direct Injection (CIDI) engines, while producing ultra-low emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM).HCCI combustion is achieved by controlling the temperature, pressure and composition of the fuel-air mixture so that it spontaneously gets...

  7. Study of Miller timing on exhaust emissions of a hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO)-fueled diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Juha; Happonen, Matti; Murtonen, Timo; Lehto, Kalle; Sarjovaara, Teemu; Larmi, Martti; Keskinen, Jorma; Virtanen, Annele

    2012-11-01

    The effect of intake valve closure (IVC) timing by utilizing Miller cycle and start of injection (SOI) on particulate matter (PM), particle number and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions was studied with a hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO)-fueled nonroad diesel engine. HVO-fueled engine emissions, including aldehyde and polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions, were also compared with those emitted with fossil EN590 diesel fuel. At the engine standard settings, particle number and NOx emissions decreased at all the studied load points (50%, 75%, and 100%) when the fuel was changed from EN590 to HVO. Adjusting IVC timing enabled a substantial decrease in NOx emission and combined with SOI timing adjustment somewhat smaller decrease in both NOx and particle emissions at IVC -50 and -70 degrees CA points. The HVO fuel decreased PAH emissions mainly due to the absence of aromatics. Aldehyde emissions were lower with the HVO fuel with medium (50%) load. At higher loads (75% and 100%), aldehyde emissions were slightly higher with the HVO fuel. However, the aldehyde emission levels were quite low, so no clear conclusions on the effect of fuel can be made. Overall, the study indicates that paraffinic HVO fuels are suitable for emission reduction with valve and injection timing adjustment and thus provide possibilities for engine manufacturers to meet the strictening emission limits.

  8. 76 FR 45011 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Proposed Emission Standards and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ...-7742. DOI: 10.1021/es101325r. The formation of fine particulate matter, i.e., PM 2.5 , from emission of... to the Chicago Convention).\\10\\ \\10\\ ICAO, ``Aircraft Engine Emissions,'' International Standards and... docket EPA- HQ-OAR-2010-0687, May 10, 2011. Table 1--Current National NOX Emissions From Commercial...

  9. Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biruduganti, Munidhar S.; Gupta, Sreenath Borra; Sekar, R. Raj; McConnell, Steven S.

    2008-11-25

    A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

  10. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Diesel Engine Operation and NOx Emission: A Thermodynamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompop Jarungthammachote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The worldwide increasing energy demand and the environmental problem due to greenhouse gas emission, especially produced from fossil fuel combustion, have promoted research work to solve these crises. Diesel engine has proven to be one of the most effective energy conversion systems. It is widely used for power generation, land vehicles and marine power plant. To reduce diesel fuel consumption, an alternative energy sources, such as Hydrogen (H2, is promoted to use as dual-fuel system. H2 is considered as a fuel for future because it is more environmental friendly compared to carbon-based fuel. However, the most exiting diesel engines were designed for using diesel fuel. Feeding H2-diesel dual fuel to the engine, it is required to study its effect on engine operation parameters. Moreover, it is also an interesting point to observe the engine emission when H2-diesel dual fuel is used. Approach: The thermodynamic modeling was used to simulate the operating parameters, i.e., cylinder pressure and gas temperature. Finite different method was employed to find the solution. The H2 supply and EGR were varied. The pressure and temperature were observed. For NOx emission, which is a major problem for use of diesel engine, the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation was conducted to find the mole fraction of gas species in the exhaust gas. The mole fraction of NO and NO2 were combined to present as the mole fraction of NOx. Results: The simulation showed that at 5% EGR, increase of H2 caused increasing of cylinder pressure and temperature. It also increased NOx in exhaust gas. However, when H2 was fixed at 10%, increasing EGR led reducing of cylinder pressure and temperature. The mole fraction of NOx decreased with increasing EGR. Conclusion: The H2 supplied to the engine provided positive effect on the engine power indicated by increasing pressure and temperature. However, it showed the negative effect on NOx emission. Use of EGR was

  11. Improvement of engine emissions with conventional diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Md Nurun; Akhter, Md Shamim; Zaglul Shahadat, Mhia Md

    2006-02-01

    In this report combustion and exhaust emissions with neat diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends have been investigated. In the investigation, firstly biodiesel from non-edible neem oil has been made by esterification. Biodiesel fuel (BDF) is chemically known as mono-alkyl fatty acid ester. It is renewable in nature and is derived from plant oils including vegetable oils. BDF is non-toxic, biodegradable, recycled resource and essentially free from sulfur and carcinogenic benzene. In the second phase of this investigation, experiment has been conducted with neat diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends in a four stroke naturally aspirated (NA) direct injection (DI) diesel engine. Compared with conventional diesel fuel, diesel-biodiesel blends showed lower carbon monoxide (CO), and smoke emissions but higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission. However, compared with the diesel fuel, NOx emission with diesel-biodiesel blends was slightly reduced when EGR was applied.

  12. Large eddy simulation of air pollution produced by aircraft engine emissions inside the airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synylo, Kateryna [National Aviation University (Ukraine)], email: synylo@nau.edu.ua

    2011-07-01

    With the increase of air traffic movement, air pollution from airport emissions has become an important concern. In the past, various research has been undertaken on the impact of aircraft engines on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, however the impact that emissions have on airports themselves is not taken into account by the most frequently used monitoring software programs. The aim of this paper is to present the use of a CFD simulation to determine the dynamic and fluid mechanics characteristics of aircraft emissions near the ground. The CFD simulation was carried out using Fluent 6.3 software and the effects of counter-rotating vortices and wind conditions on fulfilled gases jet. It was found that numerical simulation is able to resolve difficult equations and provide realistic results. This study demonstrated that the use of CFD computation could be used to improve local air quality modeling and assessment of the impact of aircraft emissions at airports.

  13. Experimental investigation of nitrogen based emissions from an ammonia fueled SI-engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlye, Fredrik Ree; Ivarsson, Anders; Schramm, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This study concerns nitrogen based emissions from a hydrogen enriched ammonia fueled SI engine. These emissions deserve special attention as their formation may differ from conventional HC combustion due to the nitrogen content in the fuel. A range of experiments are conducted with a single...... with gasoline, but has a relatively low share of the total NOx emissions (3-4%). Nitrous oxide is a product of NH2 reacting with NO 2 and NH reacting with NO. The magnitude is largely affected by ignition timing due to the temperature development during expansion and the amount of excess air, as increased...... oxygen availability stimulates the formation of the NH2 radical and the levels of NO2 are higher. Under ideal operating conditions (MBT ignition timing) N2O levels are very low. The dominating contributors to unburned ammonia are chamber crevices as the magnitude of these emissions is greatly affected...

  14. 40 CFR 91.113 - Requirement of certification-emission control information label and engine identification number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 91.113 Requirement of... during engine life; (4) Be written in English; and (5) Be located so as to be readily visible to the average person after the engine is installed in the marine vessel. (b) If the marine vessel obscures...

  15. 75 FR 36034 - Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Lead Emissions From Piston-Engine Aircraft Using Leaded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ...-Engine Aircraft Using Leaded Aviation Gasoline; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental... Rulemaking on Lead Emissions From Piston-Engine Aircraft Using Leaded Aviation Gasoline (hereinafter referred...-engine aircraft, or if insufficient information exists, to commence a study. In addition to...

  16. Emissions from Petrol Engine Fueled Gasoline–Ethanol–Methanol (GEM Ternary mixture as Alternative Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavelu Saravana Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demands of petroleum fuels due to the rapid development automotive society coupled with the environmental pollution issues have inspired the efforts on exploring alternative fuels for internal combustion engines. Bioethanol obtained from biomass and bioenergy crops has been proclaimed as one of the feasible alternative to gasoline. In this study, the effect of gasoline–ethanol–methanol (GEM ternary blend on the emission characteristics of petrol engine was studied. Three different fuel blends, namely, E0 (gasoline, G75E21M4 (75% gasoline, 21% hydrous ethanol and 4% methanol and E25 (25% anhydrous ethanol and 75% gasoline were tested in a 1.3-l K3-VE spark-ignition engine. The results indicate that, when G75E21M4 fuel blend was used, a significant drop in CO, CO2, NOx and HC emissions by about 42%, 15%, 7% and 5.2% compared to E0, respectively. Moreover, the emission results for G75E21M4 are marginally lower than E25 whereas; HC emission was slightly higher than E25.

  17. Effects of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel on combustion and emissions of direct injection diesel engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongcheng HUANG; Shangxue WANG; Longbao ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    Effects of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) diesel fuel on the combustion and emission characteristics of a single-cylinder direct injection diesel engine under different fuel delivery advance angles were investigated. The experi-mental results show that F-T diesel fuel exhibits shorter ignition delay, lower peak values of premixed burning rate, lower combustion pressure and pressure rise rate, and higher peak value of diffusion burning rate than con-ventional diesel fuel when the engine remains unmodified. In addition, the unmodified engine with F-T diesel fuel has lower brake specific fuel consumption and higher effective thermal efficiency, and presents lower HC, CO, NOx and smoke emissions than conventional diesel fuel. When fuel delivery advance angle is retarded by 3 crank angle degrees, the combustion duration is obviously shor-tened; the peak values of premixed burning rate, the com-bustion pressure and pressure rise rate are further reduced; and the peak value of diffusion burning rate is further increased for F-T diesel fuel operation, Moreover, the retardation of fuel delivery advance angle results in a further significant reduction in NOx emissions with no penalty on specific fuel consumption and with much less penalty on HC, CO and smoke emissions.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF COLD START EMISSIONS USING ELECTRICALLY HEATED CATALYSTS IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bhaskar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The population of spark-ignition vehicles in urban areas is very high and is increasing rapidly due to their convenience for short distance transportation. These vehicles are major sources of urban air pollution compared to vehicles with diesel engines. Catalytic converters are used to control their emissions but they attain their maximum conversion rates of about 80%¬–90% under optimum operating conditions and are not effective during cold start conditions. The objective of the present work is to demonstrate that an electrically heated catalyst (EHC in combination with a traditional converter can achieve the Low and Ultra Low Emission Vehicle (LEV, ULEV standards. Experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of various metal oxides in EHC and design parameters to reduce cold-start emissions of a multi-cylinder SI engine. It is observed that EHC reduces cold-start hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions when used with an existing catalytic converter. The maximum CO and HC reductions were achieved with copper oxide as the catalyst in EHC with air injection of 80 lpm for 40 sec after cold start of the engine.

  19. Study of thermal and emission performance of small gasifier-dual-fuel engine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, P.P.; Bhave, A.G.; Kapse, D.V.; Shashikantha (Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    Performance of a downdraft, biomass gasifier-engine system is reported. Two types of diesel (direct injected and indirect injected) engines used in agricultural applications have been operated with the same gasifier system in the producer gas-cum-diesel, dual-fuel mode. The biomass used in these investigations is Subabool (Leucaena leucocephala). The systems have been evaluated with reference to their thermal, power and emission performance levels. Percentage diesel replacement at different loads has been evaluated as a parameter of interest. It was observed that the various performance facets of dual-fuel operation are considerably influenced by the engine design and operating parameters such as the design of the cooling-cleaning system, especially its volume, which is an important parameter determining the level of diesel replacement as well as the power capacity under dual-fuel mode. The low speed engine was found to be more sensitive to the volume of cooling-cleaning system. (author).

  20. Regulated and unregulated emissions from a diesel engine fueled with diesel fuel blended with diethyl adipate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruijun; Cheung, C. S.; Huang, Zuohua; Wang, Xibin

    2011-04-01

    Experiments were carried out on a four-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine operating on Euro V diesel fuel blended with diethyl adipate (DEA). The blended fuels contain 8.1%, 16.4%, 25% and 33.8% by volume fraction of DEA, corresponding to 3%, 6%, 9% and 12% by mass of oxygen in the blends. The engine performance and exhaust gas emissions of the different fuels were investigated at five engine loads at a steady speed of 1800 rev/min. The results indicated an increase of brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency when the engine was fueled with the blended fuels. In comparison with diesel fuel, the blended fuels resulted in an increase in hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO), but a decrease in particulate mass concentrations. The nitrogen oxides (NO x) emission experienced a slight variation among the test fuels. In regard to the unregulated gaseous emissions, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde increased, while 1,3-butadiene, ethene, ethyne, propylene and BTX (benzene, toluene and xylene) in general decreased. A diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) was found to reduce significantly most of the investigated unregulated pollutants when the exhaust gas temperature was sufficiently high.

  1. Prediction models for performance and emissions of a dual fuel CI engine using ANFIS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Adarsh Rai; P Srinivasa Pai; B R Shrinivasa Rao

    2015-04-01

    Dual fuel engines are being used these days to overcome shortage of fossil fuels and fulfill stringent exhaust gas emission regulations. They have several advantages over conventional diesel engines. In this context, this paper makes use of experimental results obtained from a dual fuel engine for developing models to predict performance and emission parameters. Conventional modelling efforts to understand the relationships between the input and the output variables, requires thermodynamic analysis which is complex and time consuming. As a result, efforts have been made to use artificial intelligence modelling techniques like fuzzy logic, Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Genetic Algorithm (GA), etc. This paper uses a neuro fuzzy modelling technique, Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) for developing prediction models for performance and emission parameter of a dual fuel engine. Percentage load, percentage Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Injection Timing (IT) have been used as input parameters, whereas output parameters include Brake Specific Energy Consumption (BSEC), Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE), Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) and smoke. In order to further improve the prediction accuracy of the model, GA has been used to optimize ANFIS. GA optimized ANFIS gives higher prediction accuracy of more than 90% for all parameters except for smoke, where there is a substantial improvement from 46.67% to 73.33%, when compared to conventional ANFIS model.

  2. Integrated Energy and Emission Management for Diesel Engines with Waste Heat Recovery Using Dynamic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Frank

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rankine-cycle Waste Heat Recovery (WHR systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine and WHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel engine with WHR system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing online the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue consumption. Contrary to other control studies, the proposed control strategy optimizes overall engine-aftertreatment-WHR system performance and deals with emission constraints. From simulations, the potential of this IPC strategy is demonstrated over a World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC using a high-fidelity simulation model. These results are compared with a state-of-the-art baseline engine control strategy. By applying the IPC strategy, an additional 2.6% CO2 reduction is achieved compare to the baseline strategy, while meeting the tailpipe NOx emission limit. In addition, the proposed low-level WHR controller is shown to deal with the cold start challenges.

  3. Comparison of Propane and Methane Performance and Emissions in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

  4. Extractive sampling and optical remote sensing of F100 aircraft engine emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Kenneth; Goodwin, Bradley; Joseph, Darrell; Tefend, Matthew; Satola, Jan; Kagann, Robert; Hashmonay, Ram; Spicer, Chester; Holdren, Michael; Mayfield, Howard

    2009-05-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) has initiated several programs to develop and evaluate techniques to characterize emissions from military aircraft to meet increasingly stringent regulatory requirements. This paper describes the results of a recent field study using extractive and optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques to measure emissions from six F-15 fighter aircraft. Testing was performed between November 14 and 16, 2006 on the trim-pad facility at Tyndall Air Force Base in Panama City, FL. Measurements were made on eight different F100 engines, and the engines were tested on-wing of in-use aircraft. A total of 39 test runs were performed at engine power levels that ranged from idle to military power. The approach adopted for these tests involved extractive sampling with collocated ORS measurements at a distance of approximately 20-25 nozzle diameters downstream of the engine exit plane. The emission indices calculated for carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, and several volatile organic compounds showed very good agreement when comparing the extractive and ORS sampling methods.

  5. Evaluation of engine performance and emission with methyl ester of Karanja oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Gangil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel has been considered as potential alternative to petroleum diesel with the renewable origin for the existing compression ignition engine. The main objective of the present work is evaluating performance and emission characteristics of diesel engine for various blends (B20, B40, B60, B80 and B100 of Karanja biodiesel and commercial diesel. The experimental investigation was carried out in IC (internal combustion at variable loads and compared with conventional diesel fuel with respect to engine performance parameters i.e. brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC, brake specific power consumption (BSEC, brake thermal efficiency (η-B.Th, for varying load conditions. The results obtained indicated the better fuel properties and engine performance at B40. For all cases, BSFC reduced with increase in load. It can be observed that the BSEC for various blends is lower as compared with that of diesel fuel. The availability of oxygen in the Karanja oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blend may be the reason for the lower BSEC. Brake thermal efficiency is increased due reduced heat loss with increased in load. It was found that the emission level of CO and HC level decreased with increased in blend proportion in diesel fuel. NOx emission increased with increase in blend proportion in diesel fuel.

  6. Investigation of Performance and Emissions Effects of Waste Vegetable Oil Methyl Ester in A Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya ULUSOY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study engine and emission performance of a 4-stroke, 4 cylinder, direct injection 62,5 kW engine, with three different biodiesel blends (B25, B50, B75,  was compared with those obtained with use of normal diesel (B0 through a 8-mode experimental test procedure, in convention with ISO 8178-C1. The results of the study showed that, performance and emission values of biodiesel fuels produced from vegetable oil and those obtained with diesel fuel (B0 are very close to each other.  In this context, the waste cooking oil, which is a serious risk to the environment and should be collected according to related legistlative measures,  could be processed to and used as biodiesel without creating any significant loss in terms of engine performance, while providing significant advantages in terms of engine emissions. These results revealed that, waste frying oils can be used as diesel fuel and to create an adding value for the economy instead of being potential environmental risk. 

  7. Removal of Sulfur from Natural Gas to Reduce Particulate Matter Emission from a Turbine Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Brent Loren

    The present work investigates the effect of natural gas fuel sulfur on particulate emissions from stationary gas turbine engines used for electricity generation. Fuel sulfur from standard line gas was scrubbed using a system of fluidized reactor beds containing a specially designed activated carbon purpose built for sulfur absorption. A sulfur injection system using sonic orifices was designed and constructed to inject methyl mercaptan into the scrubbed gas stream at varying concentrations. Using these systems, particulate emissions created by various fuel sulfur levels between 0 and 8.3 ppmv were investigated. Particulate samples were collected from a Capstone C65 microturbine generator system using a Horiba MDLT-1302TA micro dilution tunnel and analyzed using a Horiba MEXA-1370PM particulate analyzer. In addition, ambient air samples were collected to determine incoming particulate levels in the combustion air. The Capstone C65 engine air filter was also tested for particulate removal efficiency by sampling downstream of the filter. To further differentiate the particulate entering the engine in the combustion air from particulate being emitted from the exhaust stack, two high efficiency HEPA filters were installed to eliminate a large portion of incoming particulate. Variable fuel sulfur testing showed that there was a strong correlation between total particulate emission factor and fuel sulfur concentration. Using eleven variable sulfur tests, it was determined that an increase of 1 ppmv fuel sulfur will produce an increase of approximately 3.2 microg/m3 total particulate. Also, the correlation also predicted that, for this particular engine, the total particulate emission factor for zero fuel sulfur was approximately 19.1 microg/m3. With the EC and OC data removed, the correlation became 3.1 microg/m3 of sulfur particulate produced for each ppmv of fuel sulfur. The correlation also predicted that with no fuel sulfur present, 6.6 microg/m3 of particulate will

  8. Genotoxic potential of organic extracts from particle emissions of diesel and rapeseed oil powered engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topinka, Jan; Milcova, Alena; Schmuczerova, Jana; Mazac, Martin; Pechout, Martin; Vojtisek-Lom, Michal

    2012-07-07

    The present study was performed to identify possible genotoxicity induced by organic extracts from particulate matter in the exhaust of two typical diesel engines run on diesel fuel and neat heated fuel-grade rapeseed oil: a Cummins ISBe4 engine tested using the World Harmonized Steady State Test Cycle (WHSC) and modified Engine Steady Cycle (ESC) and a Zetor 1505 engine tested using the Non-Road Steady State Cycle (NRSC). In addition, biodiesel B-100 (neat methylester of rapeseed oil) was tested in the Cummins engine run on the modified ESC. Diluted exhaust was sampled with high-volume samplers on Teflon coated filters. Filters were extracted with dichlormethane (DCM) and DNA adduct levels induced by extractable organic matter (EOM) in an acellular assay of calf thymus DNA coupled with (32)P-postlabeling in the presence and absence of rat liver microsomal S9 fraction were employed. Simultaneously, the chemical analysis of 12 priority PAHs in EOM, including 7 carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) was performed. The results suggest that diesel emissions contain substantially more total PAHs than rapeseed oil emissions (for the ESC) or that these concentrations were comparable (for the WHSC and NRSC), while c-PAHs levels were comparable (for the ESC) or significantly higher (for the WHSC and NRSC) for rapeseed oil emissions. DNA adduct levels induced by diesel and rapeseed oil derived EOM were comparable, but consistently slightly higher for diesel than for rapeseed oil. Highly significant correlations were found between 12 priority PAHs concentrations and DNA adduct levels (0.980; pparticulate emissions from the combustion of rapeseed oil is significant and is comparable to that from the combustion of diesel fuel. A more detailed study is ongoing to verify and extent these preliminary findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analytical study to minimize the engine exhaust emissions and safe knock limit of CNG powered four-stroke SI engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeewan V. Tirkey, H.N. Gupta, S.K. Shukla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, theoretical analysis has been done to minimise engine emissions and safe knock limit by changing some operational and design parameters such as equivalence ratio, spark plug location, compression ratio, and cylinder diameter by using computer simulation model. For this purpose a zero dimensional knock model, two zone combustion model(one in front and one behind the flame front, and gas dynamic model have been incorporated. Subsequently, the Nitric Oxide exhaust emission concentrations have been predicted by using the rate kinetic model in the power cycle and along the exhaust pipes. Furthermore, Carbon Monoxide is computed under chemical equilibrium condition and then empirical adjustment is made for kinetic behaviours based upon experimental results. It is inferred that the value of cylinder pressure data, BMEP, BSFC obtained by using computer simulation model based on theoretical analysis are in closer agreement with those which are obtained by previous studies.

  10. Engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Includes papers in the following fields: Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical...

  11. Performance, emission and combustion analysis of a compression ignition engine using biofuel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ors Ilker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects on performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of adding biodiesel and bioethanol to diesel fuel. Diesel fuel and blend fuels were tested in a water-cooled compression ignition engine with direct injection. Test results showed that brake specific fuel consumption and volumetric efficiency increased by about 30.6% and 3.7%, respectively, with the addition of bioethanol to binary blend fuels. The results of the blend fuel’s combustion analysis were similar to the diesel fuel’s results. Bioethanol increased maximal in-cylinder pressure compared to biodiesel and diesel fuel at both 1400 rpm and 2800 rpm. Emissions of CO increased by an amount of about 80% for fuels containing a high level of bioethanol when compared to CO emissions for diesel fuel. Using biodiesel, NO emissions increased by an average of 31.3%, HC emissions decreased by an average of 39.25%, and smoke opacity decreased by an average of 6.5% when compared with diesel fuel. In addition, when using bioethanol, NO emissions and smoke opacity decreased by 55% and 17% on average, respectively, and HC emissions increased by an average of 53% compared with diesel fuel.

  12. Mitigation of PAH and nitro-PAH emissions from nonroad diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Gerald; Wall, John C; Ottinger, Nathan A; McGuffin, Dana

    2015-03-17

    More stringent emission requirements for nonroad diesel engines introduced with U.S. Tier 4 Final and Euro Stage IV and V regulations have spurred the development of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. In this study, several aftertreatment configurations consisting of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC), diesel particulate filters (DPF), Cu zeolite-, and vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts, and ammonia oxidation (AMOX) catalysts are evaluated using both Nonroad Transient (NRTC) and Steady (8-mode NRSC) Cycles in order to understand both component and system-level effects of diesel aftertreatment on emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitrated derivatives (nitro-PAH). Emissions are reported for four configurations including engine-out, DOC+CuZ-SCR+AMOX, V-SCR+AMOX, and DOC+DPF+CuZ-SCR+AMOX. Mechanisms responsible for the reduction, and, in some cases, the formation of PAH and nitro-PAH compounds are discussed in detail, and suggestions are provided to minimize the formation of nitro-PAH compounds through aftertreatment design optimizations. Potency equivalency factors (PEFs) developed by the California Environmental Protection Agency are then applied to determine the impact of aftertreatment on PAH-derived exhaust toxicity. Finally, a comprehensive set of exhaust emissions including criteria pollutants, NO2, total hydrocarbons (THC), n-alkanes, branched alkanes, saturated cycloalkanes, aromatics, aldehydes, hopanes and steranes, and metals is provided, and the overall efficacy of the aftertreatment configurations is described. This detailed summary of emissions from a current nonroad diesel engine equipped with advanced aftertreatment can be used to more accurately model the impact of anthropogenic emissions on the atmosphere.

  13. A comprehensive study on the emission characteristics of E-diesel dual-fuel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Avinash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Each year, the ultimate goal of emission legislation is to force technology to the point where a practically viable zero emission vehicle becomes a reality. Albeit the direction to reach this target is a formidable challenge, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI is a new combustion concept to produce ultra low nitrogen oxides (NOx and smoke emissions. By the way, an endeavor has been made in this work to achieve a simultaneous reduction in both NOx and smoke levels in a direct injection compression ignition engine converted to operate on premixed charge compression ignition mode. Indeed, these promises were made possible in this work by preparing premixed fuel–air mixture outside the engine cylinder. For this purpose, ethanol was injected in the intake port at various premixed ratios (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% and conventional diesel was injected as usual. It was extrapolated from the experimental results that e-diesel operation can significantly reduce NOx and smoke levels. In addition, NOx and smoke levels reduced in this experimental study with increase in premixed fraction. Nevertheless, unburned hydrocarbons (UBHC and carbon monoxide (CO emissions exhibited reverse trend with increase in premixed fraction and the maximum value of HC and CO emission levels was noted with 30% premixed fraction.

  14. Internal combustion engine run on biogas is a potential solution to meet Indonesia emission target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Indonesia has released two different Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets. The first target, released in 2009, is reduction GHG emissions 26% from Business-as-Usual (BAU) level using own budget and up 41% if supported international aids by 2020. The second target is reduction 29% and 41% from BAU by 2030 using own budget and with international support, respectively. In this paper, the BAU emissions and emissions reduction target of these two targets are elaborated. In addition, the characteristics of emissions from transportation sector are discussed. One of the potential mitigation actions is switching fuel in transportation sector. The results the most promising mitigation action in the transportation is switching oil fuel with biofuel. The Government of Indonesia (GoI) focuses on using biodiesel and bioethanol to run internal combustion engine in transportation sector and biogas is aimed to fuel power plant unit. However, there is very limited of success stories on using biogas in the power plant. The barriers and challenges will be discussed here. It is suggested to run internal combustion engine with biogas.

  15. Towards the regulation of aerosol emissions by their potential health impact: Assessing adverse effects of aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine emissions by combining comprehensive data on the chemical composition and their toxicological effects on human lung cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Streibel, T.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Rheda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Czech, H.; Tiita, P.; Jalava, P.; Kasurinen, S.; Schwemer, T.; Yli-Prilä, P.; Tissari, J.; Lamberg, H.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ship engine emissions are important regarding lung and cardiovascular diseases in coastal regions worldwide. Bio mass burning is made responsible for adverse health effects in many cities and rural regions. The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. Typical lung cell responses to combustion aerosols include inflammation and apoptosis, but a molecular link with the specific chemical composition in particular of ship emissions has not been established. Through an air-liquid interface exposure system (ALI), we exposed human lung cells at-site to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on common heavy fuel oil (HFO) and cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF) as well as to emissions of wood combustion compliances. A special field deployable ALI-exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for this study. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling to characterise the cellular responses. The HFO ship emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds (transition metals, organic toxicants) and particle masses. The cellular responses included inflammation and oxidative stress. Surprisingly, the DF ship emissions, which predominantly contain rather "pure" carbonaceous soot and much less known toxicants, induced significantly broader biological effects, affecting essential cellular pathways (e.g., mitochondrial function and intracellular transport). Therefore the use of distillate fuels for shipping (this is the current emission reduction strategy of the IMO) appears insufficient for diminishing health effects. The study suggests rather reducing the particle emissions

  16. Performance and emissions analysis on using acetone–gasoline fuel blends in spark-ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Elfasakhany

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, new blended fuels were formed by adding 3–10 vol. % of acetone into a regular gasoline. According to the best of the author's knowledge, it is the first time that the influence of acetone blends has been studied in a gasoline-fueled engine. The blended fuels were tested for their energy efficiencies and pollutant emissions using SI (spark-ignition engine with single-cylinder and 4-stroke. Experimental results showed that the AC3 (3 vol.% acetone + 97 vol.% gasoline blended fuel has an advantage over the neat gasoline in exhaust gases temperature, in-cylinder pressure, brake power, torque and volumetric efficiency by about 0.8%, 2.3%, 1.3%, 0.45% and 0.9%, respectively. As the acetone content increases in the blends, as the engine performance improved where the best performance obtained in this study at the blended fuel of AC10. In particular, exhaust gases temperature, in-cylinder pressure, brake power, torque and volumetric efficiency increase by about 5%, 10.5%, 5.2%, 2.1% and 3.2%, respectively, compared to neat gasoline. In addition, the use of acetone with gasoline fuel reduces exhaust emissions averagely by about 43% for carbon monoxide, 32% for carbon dioxide and 33% for the unburnt hydrocarbons. The enhanced engine performance and pollutant emissions are attributed to the higher oxygen content, slight leaning effect, lower knock tendency and high flame speeds of acetone, compared to the neat gasoline. Finally the mechanism of acetone combustion in gasoline-fueled engines is proposed in this work; two main pathways for acetone combustion are highlighted; furthermore, the CO, CO2 and UHC (unburnt hydrocarbons mechanisms of formation and oxidation are acknowledged. Such acetone mechanism is employed for further understanding acetone combustion in spark-ignition engines.

  17. A study on the performance and emission characteristics of esterified pinnai oil tested in VCR engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok Kumar, T; Chandramouli, R; Mohanraj, T

    2015-11-01

    Biodiesel is a clean renewable fuel derived from vegetable oils and animal fats. It is biodegradable, oxygenated, non toxic and free from sulfur and aromatics. The biodiesel prepared from pinnai oil undergoes acid esterification followed by alkaline transesterification process. The fatty acid methyl esters components were identified using gas chromatography and compared with the standard properties. The properties of biodiesel are comparable with diesel. The yield of the biodiesel production depends upon the process parameters such as reaction temperature, pH, time duration and amount of catalyst. The yield of biodiesel by transesterification process was 73% at 55°C. This fuel was tested in a variable compression ratio engine with blend ratios of B10 and B20. During the test runs the compression ratio of the engine was varied from 15:1 to 18:1 and the torque is adjusted from zero to maximum value of 22Nm. The performance characteristics such as the brake thermal efficiency, brake specific energy consumption and exhaust gas temperature of the engine are analyzed. The combustion characteristics of biodiesel like ignition delay, combustion duration and maximum gas temperature and the emission characteristics are also analyzed. The performance characteristics, combustion characteristics and engine emission are effective in the variable compression ratio engine with biodiesel and it is compared with diesel.

  18. Particle and NO{sub x} Emissions from a HVO-Fueled Diesel Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happonen, M.

    2012-10-15

    Concerns about oil price, the strengthening climate change and traffic related health effects are all reasons which have promoted the research of renewable fuels. One renewable fuel candidate is diesel consisting of hydrotreated vegetable oils (HVO). The fuel is essentially paraffinic, has high cetane number (>80) and contains practically no oxygen, aromatics or sulphur. Furthermore, HVO fuel can be produced from various feedstocks including palm, soybean and rapeseed oils as well as animal fats. HVO has also been observed to reduce all regulated engine exhaust emissions compared to conventional diesel fuel. In this thesis, the effect of HVO fuel on engine exhaust emissions has been studied further. The thesis is roughly divided into two parts. The first part explores the emission reductions associated with the fuel and studies techniques which could be applied to achieve further emission reductions. One of the studied techniques was adjusting engine settings to better suit HVO fuel. The settings chosen for adjustments were injection pressure, injection timing, the amount of EGR and the timing of inlet valve closing (with constant inlet air mass flow, i.e. Miller timing). The engine adjustments were also successfully targeted to reduce either NO{sub x} or particulate emissions or both. The other applied emission reduction technique was the addition of oxygenate to HVO fuel. The chosen oxygenate was di-n-pentyl ether (DNPE), and tested fuel blend included 20 wt-% DNPE and 80 wt-% HVO. Thus, the oxygen content of the resulting blend was 2 wt-%. Reductions of over 25 % were observed in particulate emissions with the blend compared to pure HVO while NOx emissions altered under 5 %. On the second part of this thesis, the effect of the studied fuels on chosen surface properties of exhaust particles were studied using tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) techniques and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The studied surface properties were oxidizability and

  19. Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; P. Lauer; Fritsche, U.; Hasselbach, J.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Fleischer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fue...

  20. Performance and emissions analysis on using acetone–gasoline fuel blends in spark-ignition engine

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this study, new blended fuels were formed by adding 3–10 vol. % of acetone into a regular gasoline. According to the best of the author's knowledge, it is the first time that the influence of acetone blends has been studied in a gasoline-fueled engine. The blended fuels were tested for their energy efficiencies and pollutant emissions using SI (spark-ignition) engine with single-cylinder and 4-stroke. Experimental results showed that the AC3 (3 vol.% acetone + 97 vol.% gasoline) blended fu...

  1. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of nine engine models were sampled during the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (AP...

  2. Experimental study on the effect of varying syngas composition on the emissions of dual fuel CI engine operating at various engine speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, B. K. M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Karim, Z. A. A.; Hagos, F. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Using syngas as a supplement fuel of diesel in dual fuel mode is a proposed solution in the effort to protect the environment and control the serious threats posed by greenhouse gas emissions from compression ignition engines. The objective of this study was to experimentally examine the effect of syngas composition on the exhaust emission of dual fuel compression ignition (CI) engine at various engine speeds, and to compare the operating ranges of imitated syngas versus pure diesel. The study was conducted using a naturally aspirated, two strokes, single cylinder 3.7 kW diesel engine operated at speeds of 1200, 2000 and 3000 rpm. The engine was tested with three different syngas compositions. Diesel fuel was partially substituted by syngas through the air inlet. The test results disclose the impact of using syngas in CI engines on emission of CO2, NOx, unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The experimental measurements confirmed that all syngas compositions are capable of reducing the emissions of CO2 and NOX compared with diesel fuel. Wide range of diesel replacement ratios (up to 72%) was attained without any penalty. Syngas with composition of 49% N2, 12% CO2, 25% CO, 10% H2, and 4% CH4 reduced the emissions of CO2 and NOx at engine speed of 1200 rpm up to 1% and 108 ppm, respectively. The lowest emission of UHC and NOx was emitted when the engine was operating at speed of 2000 rpm and 3000 rpm, respectively with composition of 38% N2, 8% Co2, 29% CO, 19% H2, and 6% CH4. Therefore, syngas could be a promising technique for controlling NOx emissions in CI engines. However, hydrogen content in syngas is important parameter that needs to be further investigation for its effect.

  3. Study of CNG/diesel dual fuel engine's emissions by means of RBF neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘震涛; 费少梅

    2004-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to resolve the serious environmental pollution and inevitable declining of energy resources. A review of Chinese fuel reserves and engine technology showed that compressed natural gas (CNG)/diesel dual fuel engine (DFE) was one of the best solutions for the above problems at present. In order to study and improve the emission performance of CNG/diesel DFE, an emission model for DFE based on radial basis function (RBF) neural network was developed which was a black-box input-output training data model not require priori knowledge. The RBF centers and the connected weights could be selected automatically according to the distribution of the training data in input-output space and the given approximating error. Studies showed that the predicted results accorded well with the experimental data over a large range of operating conditions from low load to high load. The developed emissions model based on the RBF neural network could be used to successfully predict and optimize the emissions performance of DFE. And the effect of the DFE main performance parameters, such as rotation speed, load, pilot quantity and injection timing, were also predicted by means of this model. In resume, an emission prediction model for CNG/diesel DFE based on RBF neural network was built for analyzing the effect of the main performance parameters on the CO, NOx emissions of DFE. The predicted results agreed quite well with the traditional emissions model, which indicated that the model had certain application value, although it still has some limitations, because of its high dependence on the quantity of the experimental sample data.

  4. Study of CNG/diesel dual fuel engine's emissions by means of RBF neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-tao; Fei, Shao-mei

    2004-08-01

    Great efforts have been made to resolve the serious environmental pollution and inevitable declining of energy resources. A review of Chinese fuel reserves and engine technology showed that compressed natural gas (CNG)/diesel dual fuel engine (DFE) was one of the best solutions for the above problems at present. In order to study and improve the emission performance of CNG/diesel DFE, an emission model for DFE based on radial basis function (RBF) neural network was developed which was a black-box input-output training data model not require priori knowledge. The RBF centers and the connected weights could be selected automatically according to the distribution of the training data in input-output space and the given approximating error. Studies showed that the predicted results accorded well with the experimental data over a large range of operating conditions from low load to high load. The developed emissions model based on the RBF neural network could be used to successfully predict and optimize the emissions performance of DFE. And the effect of the DFEmain performance parameters, such as rotation speed, load, pilot quantity and injection timing, were also predicted by means of this model. In resumé, an emission prediction model for CNG/diesel DFE based on RBF neural network was built for analyzing the effect of the main performance parameters on the CO, NOx, emissions of DFE. The predicted results agreed quite well with the traditional emissions model, which indicated that the model had certain application value, although it still has some limitations, because of its high dependence on the quantity of the experimental sample data.

  5. Study on Emission and Performance of Diesel Engine Using Castor Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2014-01-01

    performance of diesel engine using the castor biodiesel and its blend with diesel from 0% to 40% by volume. The acid-based catalyzed transesterification system was used to produce castor biodiesel and the highest yield of 82.5% was obtained under the optimized condition. The FTIR spectrum of castor biodiesel indicates the presence of C=O and C–O functional groups, which is due to the ester compound in biodiesel. The smoke emission test revealed that B40 (biodiesel blend with 40% biodiesel and 60% diesel had the least black smoke compared to the conventional diesel. Diesel engine performance test indicated that the specific fuel consumption of biodiesel blend was increased sufficiently when the blending ratio was optimized. Thus, the reduction in exhaust emissions and reduction in brake-specific fuel consumption made the blends of caster seed oil (B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and could help in controlling air pollution.

  6. Electro-mechanical engineering of non-classical photon emissions from single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, Bianca; Zallo, Eugenio; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW-Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Trotta, Rinaldo; Rastelli, Armando [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Indistinguishable photons and entangled photon pairs are the key elements for quantum information applications, for example, building a quantum repeater. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are promising candidates for the creation of such non-classical photon emissions, and offer the possibility to be integrated into solid state devices. However, due to the random nature of the self-assembled growth process, post-growth treatments are required to engineer the exciton state in the QDs (e.g. energies, exciton lifetimes, and fine structure splittings). In this work, we study the electro-mechanical engineering of the exciton lifetime, emission energy in the QDs, with the aim to produce single photons with higher indistinguishability. Also we present a recent experimental study on the statistical properties of fine structure splittings in the QD ensemble, in order to gain a deeper understanding of how to generate entangled photon pairs using semiconductor QDs.

  7. Nonintrusive optical measurements of aircraft engine exhaust emissions and comparison with standard intrusive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, K; Heland, J; Lister, D H; Wilson, C W; Howes, R J; Falk, R S; Lindermeir, E; Birk, M; Wagner, G; Haschberger, P; Bernard, M; Legras, O; Wiesen, P; Kurtenbach, R; Brockmann, K J; Kriesche, V; Hilton, M; Bishop, G; Clarke, R; Workman, J; Caola, M; Geatches, R; Burrows, R; Black, J D; Hervé, P; Vally, J

    2000-01-20

    Nonintrusive systems for the measurement on test rigs of aeroengine exhaust emissions required for engine certification (CO, NO(x), total unburned hydrocarbon, and smoke), together with CO(2) and temperature have been developed. These results have been compared with current certified intrusive measurements on an engine test. A spectroscopic database and data-analysis software has been developed to enable Fourier-transform Infrared measurement of concentrations of molecular species. CO(2), CO, and NO data showed agreement with intrusive techniques of approximately ?30%. A narrow-band spectroscopic device was used to measure CO(2) (with deviations of less than ?10% from the intrusive measurement), whereas laser-induced incandescence was used to measure particles. Future improvements to allow for the commercial use of the nonintrusive systems have been identified and the methods are applicable to any measurement of combustion emissions.

  8. Bioethanol-gasoline fuel blends: exhaust emissions and morphological characterization of particulate from a moped engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seggiani, Maurizia; Prati, M Vittoria; Costagliola, M Antonietta; Puccini, Monica; Vitolo, Sandra

    2012-08-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of gasoline-ethanol blends on the exhaust emissions in a catalyst-equipped four-stroke moped engine. The ethanol was blended with unleaded gasoline in at percentages (10, 15, and 20% v/v). The regulated pollutants and the particulate matter emissions were evaluated over the European ECE R47 driving cycle on the chassis dynamometer bench. Particulate matter was characterized in terms of total mass collected on filters and total number ofparticles in the range 7 nm-10 microm measured by electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI). In addition, particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emissions were evaluated to assess the health impact of the emitted particulate. Finally, an accurate morphological analysis was performed on the particulate by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with a digital image-processing/data-acquisition system. In general, CO emission reductions of 60-70% were obtained with 15 and 20% v/v ethanol blends, while the ethanol use did not reduce hydrocarbon (HC) and NOx emissions. No evident effect of ethanol on the particulate mass emissions and associated PAHs emissions was observed. Twenty-one PAHs were quantified in the particulate phase with emissions ranging from 26 to 35 microg/km and benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) emission factors from 2.2 to 4.1 microg/km. Both particulate matter and associated PAHs with higher carcinogenic risk were mainly emitted in the submicrometer size range (<0.1 microm). On the basis of the TEM observations, no relevant effect of the ethanol use on the particulate morphology was evidenced, showing aggregates composed ofprimary particles with mean diameters in the range 17.5-32.5 nm.

  9. Modeling of heat release and emissions from droplet combustion of multi component fuels in compression ignition engines

    OpenAIRE

    Ivarsson, Anders; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    This PhD dissertation was carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in Department of Mechanical Engineering and supervised by Associate Professor Jesper Schramm. The PhD project was funded by the Technical University of Denmark. Demands on reducing the fuel consumption and harmful emissions from the compression ignition engines (CI engines or diesel engines) are continuously increased. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the e...

  10. Emissions and Total Energy Consumption of a Multicylinder Piston Engine Running on Gasoline and a Hydrogen-gasoline Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A multicylinder reciprocating engine was used to extend the efficient lean operating range of gasoline by adding hydrogen. Both bottled hydrogen and hydrogen produced by a research methanol steam reformer were used. These results were compared with results for all gasoline. A high-compression-ratio, displacement production engine was used. Apparent flame speed was used to describe the differences in emissions and performance. Therefore, engine emissions and performance, including apparent flame speed and energy lost to the cooling system and the exhaust gas, were measured over a range of equivalence ratios for each fuel. All emission levels decreased at the leaner conditions. Adding hydrogen significantly increased flame speed over all equivalence ratios.

  11. Validation of some engine combustion and emission parameters of a bioethanol fuelled DI diesel engine using theoretical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugan Sivalingam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Earlier reports indicate that ethanol/bioethanol can replace conventional diesel fuel by 15%, when it is emulsified with diesel and used as an alternative fuel in a compression ignition (CI engine. In this study, initially BMDE15, a bioethanol emulsion containing 15% bioethanol, 84% diesel and 1% surfactant was characterised for its fuel properties and compared with those of diesel fuel properties. The numerical value indicates the percentage of bioethanol in the BMDE15 emulsion. For the investigation, bioethanol was obtained from the Mahua Indica flower which was collected from the Madhuca Indica tree, and it was produced from fermentation process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, the BMDE15 emulsion was tested in a single cylinder, four stroke, air cooled, DI diesel engine developing a power of 4.4 kW at a rated speed of 1500 rpm. Two important combustion parameters: cylinder pressure and ignition delay, and two important emission parameters: nitric oxide (NO and smoke emissions were determined and compared with those of diesel operation at all loads. The experimental results were validated using mathematical modelling, and the analysis of the results is presented in this paper.

  12. Effect of Biodiesel on Diesel Engine Nitrogen Oxide and Other Regulated Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    process of base - catalyzed transesterification at low temperature (150°F), low pressure (20 pounds per sq in [psi]) and with a high conversion...4 LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. Emission impacts of B20 for Soybean- Based Biodiesel Added to an Average Base ...Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base for making the arrangements to supply most of the diesel engines tested in this project. Camp Pendleton was able

  13. Ultra High Bypass Ratio Engine Research for Reducing Noise, Emissions, and Fuel Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Schweitzer, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A pictorial history of NASA development of advanced engine technologies for reducing environmental emissions and increasing performance from the 1970s to 2000s is presented. The goals of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Program portion of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program are discussed, along with the areas of investigation currently being pursued by the Ultra High Bypass Partnership Element of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Program.

  14. Intermediate Volatility Organic Compound Emissions from On-Road Gasoline Vehicles and Small Off-Road Gasoline Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunliang; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Presto, Albert A; Hennigan, Christopher J; May, Andrew A; Robinson, Allen L

    2016-04-19

    Dynamometer experiments were conducted to characterize the intermediate volatility organic compound (IVOC) emissions from a fleet of on-road gasoline vehicles and small off-road gasoline engines. IVOCs were quantified through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of adsorbent samples collected from a constant volume sampler. The dominant fraction (>80%, on average) of IVOCs could not be resolved on a molecular level. These unspeciated IVOCs were quantified as two chemical classes (unspeciated branched alkanes and cyclic compounds) in 11 retention-time-based bins. IVOC emission factors (mg kg-fuel(-1)) from on-road vehicles varied widely from vehicle to vehicle, but showed a general trend of lower emissions for newer vehicles that met more stringent emission standards. IVOC emission factors for 2-stroke off-road engines were substantially higher than 4-stroke off-road engines and on-road vehicles. Despite large variations in the magnitude of emissions, the IVOC volatility distribution and chemical characteristics were consistent across all tests and IVOC emissions were strongly correlated with nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), primary organic aerosol and speciated IVOCs. Although IVOC emissions only correspond to approximately 4% of NMHC emissions from on-road vehicles over the cold-start unified cycle, they are estimated to produce as much or more SOA than single-ring aromatics. Our results clearly demonstrate that IVOCs from gasoline engines are an important class of SOA precursors and provide observational constraints on IVOC emission factors and chemical composition to facilitate their inclusion into atmospheric chemistry models.

  15. The Fault Diagnosis of Bora Engine CH Emissions based on Neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Along with an increase of the automobile possession quantity, the air pollution caused by the pollutant of the automobile emissions is serious day by day. The emission diagnosis become the important technology for guaranteeing the human sustainable development. The article introduces the reasons of CH excessive emissions in vehicle discharge of pollutants, the impact which CH excessive emissions have on our environment, expounds the advantages of SOM neural network and BP neural network, briefly describes why these two tools are applied to the project. In the article, diagnostic procedures are written by MATLAB software, parameters are analyzed which influence CH emission of a particular model engine. In the article, Volkswagen Bora acts as experimental models, the data stream is extracted, then the data are classified, trained and operated, the diagnostic results and diagnostic accuracy are finally obtained. Through SOM, the accuracy rate of fault sample data diagnostic is 73.3% and BP is 65.1%. The results of sample show that: SOM neural network can quickly and accurately diagnose the reasons of the CH excessive emissions in vehicle discharge of pollutants.

  16. Emissions characteristics of a diesel engine operating on biodiesel and biodiesel blended with ethanol and methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Cheung, C S; Zhang, W G; Huang, Zhen

    2010-01-15

    Euro V diesel fuel, pure biodiesel and biodiesel blended with 5%, 10% and 15% of ethanol or methanol were tested on a 4-cylinder naturally-aspirated direct-injection diesel engine. Experiments were conducted under five engine loads at a steady speed of 1800 r/min. The study aims to investigate the effects of the blended fuels on reducing NO(x) and particulate. On the whole, compared with Euro V diesel fuel, the blended fuels could lead to reduction of both NO(x) and PM of a diesel engine, with the biodiesel-methanol blends being more effective than the biodiesel-ethanol blends. The effectiveness of NO(x) and particulate reductions is more effective with increase of alcohol in the blends. With high percentage of alcohol in the blends, the HC, CO emissions could increase and the brake thermal efficiency might be slightly reduced but the use of 5% blends could reduce the HC and CO emissions as well. With the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), the HC, CO and particulate emissions can be further reduced.

  17. Carbonaceous aerosol in jet engine exhaust: emission characteristics and implications for heterogeneous chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.P.; Kaercher, B. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Wessling (Germany). Institut fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Stroem, J. [Stockholm University (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1999-08-01

    Characteristic parameters of black carbon aerosol (BC) emitted from jet engine were measured during ground tests and in-flight behind the same aircraft. Size distribution features were a primary BC mode at a model diameter D {approx} 0.045 {mu}m, and a BC agglomeration mode at D < 0.2 {mu}m. The total BC number concentration at the engine exit was 2.9 x 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} with good agreement between model results and in-flight measured number concentrations of non-volatile particles with D {>=} 0.014 {mu}m. A comparison between total number concentration of BC particles and the non-volatile fraction of the total aerosol at the exit plane suggests that the non-volatile fraction of jet engine exhaust aerosol consists almost completely of BC. In-flight BC mass emission indices ranged from 0.11 to 0.15 g BC (kg fuel){sup -1}. The measured in-flight particle emission value was 1.75 {+-} 0.15 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} with corresponding ground test values of 1.0-8.7 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}. Both size distribution properties and mass emission indices can be scaled from ground test to in-flight conditions. Implications for atmosphere BC loading, BC and cirrus interaction and the potential of BC for perturbation of atmospheric chemistry are briefly outlined. (author)

  18. ANALYSIS OF HYDROCARBON TREATING SYSTEM TO THE EMISSION OFF SPARK-IGNITION FOUR-STROKE ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binyamin Binyamin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of carbon monoxide (CO, unburnthydrocarbon (UHC emission and fuel consumption on spark-ignition four-stroke engine is continuously attempted. The purposes from this research were to determine the effect of Hydrocarbon Treating System (HTS  on levels of CO, UHC and fuel consumption. This is an experimental research. Its is conducted by comparing the exhaust pollutant concentration such as carbon monoxide, unburnt hydrocarbon and also fuel consumption between standard engine setting and Hydrocarbon Treating System applied. The research variable are HTS flow rate from Q1 = 0 cc/s (without HTS, Q2 = 1,5 cc/s, Q3 = 2 cc/s, Q4 = 2,5 cc/s, and Q5 = 33 cc/s. The research will be done in three conditions which are low, medium and high rotation. The result showed that Hydrocarbon Threating System decrease fuel consumption up to 19,43% with flow rate Q5 = 3 cc/s, but on the other hand it increase CO emission up to 80.84% with flow rate Q5 = 3 cc/s and UHC emission level up to 124.75% with flow rate Q5 = 3 cc/s from engine standart condition.

  19. The effect of clove oil and diesel fuel blends on the engine performance and exhaust emissions of a compression-ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbarawa, Makame [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2010-11-15

    Diesel engines provide the major power source for transportation in the world and contribute to the prosperity of the worldwide economy. However, recent concerns over the environment, increasing fuel prices and the scarcity of fuel supplies have promoted considerable interest in searching for alternatives to petroleum based fuels. Based on this background, the main purpose of this investigation is to evaluate clove stem oil (CSO) as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. To this end, an experimental investigation was performed on a four-stroke, four-cylinder water-cooled direct injection diesel engine to study the performance and emissions of an engine operated using the CSO-diesel blended fuels. The effects of the CSO-diesel blended fuels on the engine brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), specific energy consumption (SEC), exhaust gas temperatures and exhaust emissions were investigated. The experimental results reveal that the engine brake thermal efficiency and BSFC of the CSO-diesel blended fuels were higher than the pure diesel fuel while at the same time they exhibited a lower SEC than the latter over the entire engine load range. The variations in exhaust gas temperatures between the tested fuels were significant only at medium speed operating conditions. Furthermore, the HC emissions were lower for the CSO-diesel blended fuels than the pure diesel fuel whereas the NO{sub x} emissions were increased remarkably when the engine was fuelled with the 50% CSO-diesel blended fuel. (author)

  20. The study of envorinmental state on road intersections based on emissions of car engines in Zhytomyr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titarenko V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the studies of environmental conditions on road intersections based on car engine emissions in Zhitomir. Statistical methods were used to determine the intensity of traffic flows based on transport emissions according to video monitoring records. Intersections with the highest intensity of traffic flows, where there is a high risk of car emissions accumulation above the applicable standard, were chosen for the assessment of ecological sustainability. Calculation of pollution was done for the intersection of Nebesnoi Sotni street and M. Grushevskogo street. The results of calculation were compared with the limit of affordable concentration and conclusions that emphasize difficulty of the problem and the emergence of its solving. The system of ecological safety in Zhitomir requires significant improvements taking into account the exceeding of factual values of pollution over normative values. Recommendations concerning of ecological sustainability of intersections can be developed through the optimization of traffic flows with the use of intellectual traffic systems.

  1. Emission comparison of urban bus engine fueled with diesel oil and 'biodiesel' blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrio-Baldassarri, Luigi; Battistelli, Chiara L; Conti, Luigi; Crebelli, Riccardo; De Berardis, Barbara; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Gambino, Michele; Iannaccone, Sabato

    2004-07-05

    The chemical and toxicological characteristics of emissions from an urban bus engine fueled with diesel and biodiesel blend were studied. Exhaust gases were produced by a turbocharged EURO 2 heavy-duty diesel engine, operating in steady-state conditions on the European test 13 mode cycle (ECE R49). Regulated and unregulated pollutants, such as carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrated derivatives (nitro-PAHs), carbonyl compounds and light aromatic hydrocarbons were quantified. Mutagenicity of the emissions was evaluated by the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay. The effect of the fuels under study on the size distribution of particulate matter (PM) was also evaluated. The use of biodiesel blend seems to result in small reductions of emissions of most of the aromatic and polyaromatic compounds; these differences, however, have no statistical significance at 95% confidence level. Formaldehyde, on the other hand, has a statistically significant increase of 18% with biodiesel blend. In vitro toxicological assays show an overall similar mutagenic potency and genotoxic profile for diesel and biodiesel blend emissions. The electron microscopy analysis indicates that PM for both fuels has the same chemical composition, morphology, shape and granulometric spectrum, with most of the particles in the range 0.06-0.3 microm.

  2. Engine emissions and combustion analysis of biodiesel from East African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Maina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental, availability and financial problems associated with fossil fuels encourage the manufacture and use of biodiesel. In this study, vegetable oil was extracted from Jatropha curcas seeds sourced from Kenya and Tanzania. A two-step acid base catalytic transesterification process was used to produce biodiesel because of the amount of free fatty acids present in the oil. The test rig used in the experiments was an Audi, 1.9-litre, turbocharged direct injection, compression ignition engine. Emissions were measured using an Horiba emission analyser system while combustion data was collected by a data acquisition system, from which cylinder pressure and rate of heat release of the test engine in every crank angle were calculated. The two biodiesels showed better emission characteristics than the fossil diesel included in the tests for comparison purposes. Cylinder pressure and heat release of the biodiesel were also within acceptable ranges. However, the emission and combustion characteristics differed between the two biodiesels a result likely related to their different origins. These findings prove that the source of biodiesel is an important factor to consider.

  3. A Close Analysis of Developments in Diesel Engine Emission Reduction Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Ahuja

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engines have the potential to significantly increase vehicle fuel economy and decrease CO 2 emissions; however, efficient removal of NO x and particulate matter from the engine exhaust is required to meet stringent emission standards. Diesel aftertreatment systems being used consists of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC, a urea-based Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR catalyst and a diesel particulate filter (DPF, and is widely used to meet the most recent NO x (nitrogen oxides comprising NO and NO 2 and particulate matter (PM emission standards for medium and heavy-duty sport utility and truck vehicles. The most efficient way and the best available technology (BAT to radically reduce the critical Diesel emission components particles (PM&NP and nitric oxides (NO x are combined exhaust gas aftertreatment systems (DPF+SCR. SCR (selective catalytic reduction is regarded as the most efficient deNO x -system, diesel particle filters are most efficient for soot abatement. Today, several suppliers offer combined systems for retrofitting of HD vehicles.

  4. Artificial neural network modeling of jatropha oil fueled diesel engine for emission predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Thirunavukkarasu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with artificial neural network modeling of diesel engine fueled with jatropha oil to predict the unburned hydrocarbons, smoke, and NOx emissions. The experimental data from the literature have been used as the data base for the proposed neural network model development. For training the networks, the injection timing, injector opening pressure, plunger diameter, and engine load are used as the input layer. The outputs are hydrocarbons, smoke, and NOx emissions. The feed forward back propagation learning algorithms with two hidden layers are used in the networks. For each output a different network is developed with required topology. The artificial neural network models for hydrocarbons, smoke, and NOx emissions gave R2 values of 0.9976, 0.9976, and 0.9984 and mean percent errors of smaller than 2.7603, 4.9524, and 3.1136, respectively, for training data sets, while the R2 values of 0.9904, 0.9904, and 0.9942, and mean percent errors of smaller than 6.5557, 6.1072, and 4.4682, respectively, for testing data sets. The best linear fit of regression to the artificial neural network models of hydrocarbons, smoke, and NOx emissions gave the correlation coefficient values of 0.98, 0.995, and 0.997, respectively.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Particle Sampling Probes for Emission Measurements of Aircraft Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Poshin; Chen, Da-Ren; Sanders, Terry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Considerable attention has been recently received on the impact of aircraft-produced aerosols upon the global climate. Sampling particles directly from jet engines has been performed by different research groups in the U.S. and Europe. However, a large variation has been observed among published data on the conversion efficiency and emission indexes of jet engines. The variation results surely from the differences in test engine types, engine operation conditions, and environmental conditions. The other factor that could result in the observed variation is the performance of sampling probes used. Unfortunately, it is often neglected in the jet engine community. Particle losses during the sampling, transport, and dilution processes are often not discussed/considered in literatures. To address this issue, we evaluated the performance of one sampling probe by challenging it with monodisperse particles. A significant performance difference was observed on the sampling probe evaluated under different temperature conditions. Thermophoretic effect, nonisokinetic sampling and turbulence loss contribute to the loss of particles in sampling probes. The results of this study show that particle loss can be dramatic if the sampling probe is not well designed. Further, the result allows ones to recover the actual size distributions emitted from jet engines.

  6. Development and applications of various optimization algorithms for diesel engine combustion and emissions optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, Ryan M.

    For this work, Hybrid PSO-GA and Artificial Bee Colony Optimization (ABC) algorithms are applied to the optimization of experimental diesel engine performance, to meet Environmental Protection Agency, off-road, diesel engine standards. This work is the first to apply ABC optimization to experimental engine testing. All trials were conducted at partial load on a four-cylinder, turbocharged, John Deere engine using neat-Biodiesel for PSO-GA and regular pump diesel for ABC. Key variables were altered throughout the experiments, including, fuel pressure, intake gas temperature, exhaust gas recirculation flow, fuel injection quantity for two injections, pilot injection timing and main injection timing. Both forms of optimization proved effective for optimizing engine operation. The PSO-GA hybrid was able to find a superior solution to that of ABC within fewer engine runs. Both solutions call for high exhaust gas recirculation to reduce oxide of nitrogen (NOx) emissions while also moving pilot and main fuel injections to near top dead center for improved tradeoffs between NOx and particulate matter.

  7. Effect of hydroxy (HHO gas addition on gasoline engine performance and emiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. EL-Kassaby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to construct a simple innovative HHO generation system and evaluate the effect of hydroxyl gas HHO addition, as an engine performance improver, into gasoline fuel on engine performance and emissions. HHO cell was designed, fabricated and optimized for maximum HHO gas productivity per input power. The optimized parameters were the number of neutral plates, distance between them and type and quantity of two catalysts of Potassium Hydroxide (KOH and sodium hydroxide (NaOH. The performance of a Skoda Felicia 1.3 GLXi gasoline engine was evaluated with and without the optimized HHO cell. In addition, the CO, HC and NOx emissions were measured using TECNO TEST exhaust gas analyzer TE488. The results showed that the HHO gas maximum productivity of the cell was 18 L/h when using 2 neutrals plates with 1 mm distance and 6 g/L of KOH. The results also showed 10% increment in the gasoline engine thermal efficiency, 34% reduction in fuel consumption, 18% reduction in CO, 14% reduction in HC and 15% reduction in NOx.

  8. PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A CI ENGINE OPERATED ON VEGETABLE OILS AS ALTERNATIVE FUELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rajagopal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental analysis was done using a four-stroke, single cylinder, constant speed, water-cooled diesel engine, which was interfaced with Engine software. Performance and emission characteristics were evaluated for three non-edible vegetable oils, i.e. thumba, jojoba, neem oil, as well as jojoba methyl ester, to study the effect of injection pressure at 205, 220, 240 and 260 bar with a variation in injection timing at 23°bTDC and 28°bTDC. The performance of jojoba methyl ester improved with an increase in injection pressure. A maximum brake thermal efficiency of 29.72% was obtained with lower emissions compared to the other vegetable oils; this might be explained by low viscosity and better combustion. Further investigations were carried out with a new lubricant, SAE 5W-30, which improved the performance of the CI engine by 1.59%. All of the abovementioned investigations were fruitful and these results are expected to lead to substantial contributions in the development of a viable vegetable oil engine.

  9. Fine particulate emissions of internal combustion engines; Feinpartikel-Emissionen von Verbrennungsmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, A. [TTM Technik Thermische Maschinen, Niederrohrdorf (Switzerland)

    2000-06-01

    The contribution presents data on particulate emissions of road vehicles, e.g. emission factors, scattering ranges, grain sizes, constituents. Spark ignition engines, diesel engines, four-stroke gas engines and two-stroke spark ignition engines are considered. Abrasion of brakes and tyres is mentioned as well as the effects on human lungs. Standardisation efforts so far are mentioned in the contribution. [German] Im Beitrag wird zunaechst der Begriff 'Feinpartikel' definiert. Das heisst, wie fein sind die Feinpartikel, welche Eigenschaften sie haben und warum sie im vorliegenden Zusammenhang von zunehmender Bedeutung sind. Partikel treten entsprechend ihrem Entstehungsprozess bevorzugt in drei Bereichen auf. Man spricht haeufig von drei-modalen-Verteilung: Nuklei-Modus, Akkumulations-Modus, Grobpartikel. Im Beitrag werden Zahlenwertangaben ueber die Partikelemissionen des Strassenverkehrs gemacht, etwa wie: Emissionsfaktoren, Streubereiche, Korngroessen und Inhaltsstoffe. Betrachtet werden die Motorentypen: Otto-, Diesel- und Otto-Gasmotor (Viertakter), sowie Zweitakt-Ottomotoren. Darueber hinaus werden Brems- und Reifenabriebe sowie Partikel aus Kupplungsverschleiss detailliert angesprochen. Der Mechanismus der Auswirkungen auf die menschliche Lunge wird ausfuehrlich erklaert. Erste Ansaetze zur Standardisierung der Feinpartikelemission haben sich mit Ruecksicht auf die gesundheitlichen Wirkungen bereits entwickelt und werden im Beitrag erwaehnt. (AFK)

  10. Experimental Investigation of Hydrogen Enrichment on Performance and Emission Behaviour of Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Pullagura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous induction of hydrogen in compression ignition engine offers an advantage of proper mixing with air results in proper combustion. In the present study hydrogen at the constant flow rate of 4 1pm was inducted in the intake, a distance of 40 cm from the intake manifold, along with air. Two different fuels, one i.e.40% blend of used transformer oil (UTO 40 and 60% diesel fuel and the second was neat Used transformer oil (UTO 100 were tested as main fuels in single cylinder, 4-stroke, air cooled direct injection diesel engine developing a power of 4.4 KW, rated speed of 1500 rpm. The performance and emission parameters of the engine were obtained in the investigation and compared with the diesel fuel are presented in this paper

  11. Ground based measurements of particulate emissions from supersonic transports. Concorde olympus engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitefield, Ph.D.; Hagen, D.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Lab.; Lilenfeld, H.V. [McDonnell Douglas Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The application of a mobile aerosol monitoring facility, the Mobile Aerosol Sampling System (MASS) is described to characterize engine aerosol emissions from the Rolls Royce Olympus Engine. The multi-configurational MASS has been employed in both ground and airborne field operations. It has been successfully flown on research aircrafts. In ground tests the MASS has participated in numerous jet engine related ground tests, and has been deployed to resolve aerosol generation problems in a high power chemical laser system. In all cases the measurements were made on samples taken from a harsh physical and chemical environment, with both high and low temperature and pressure, and in the presence of highly reactive gases. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  12. Studies on exhaust emissions of mahua oil operated compression ignition engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilan, N; Reddy, R P

    2009-07-01

    The world is confronted with fossil fuel depletion and environmental degradation. The energy demand and pollution problems lead to research for an alternative renewable energy sources. Vegetable oils and biodiesel present a very promising alternative fuel to diesel. In this work, an experimental work was carried out to study the feasibility of using raw mahua oil (MO) as a substitute for diesel in dual fuel engine. A single cylinder diesel engine was modified to work in dual fuel mode and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was used as primary fuel and mahua oil was used as pilot fuel. The results show that the performance of the dual fuel engine at the injector opening pressure of 220 bar and the advanced injection timing of 30 degrees bTDC results in performance close to diesel base line (DBL) operation and lower smoke and oxides of nitrogen emission.

  13. Impact of Emissions of Marine Diesel Engines to Air Pollution on the Example of the Yugoslav River Shipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Ljevaja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the impact which marine diesel engines have on air pollution. The combustion of fossil fuels for marine diesel engines produces emission of various greenhouse gases; including carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O, carbon monoxide (CO, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs, and sulphur dioxide (SO2. Gas emission calculation is shown on the example of the Yugoslav river shipping with two methods for calculating harmful emissions of the marine diesel engines. Technologies for reduction of harmful emissions of marine diesel engines and other engines are also presented, as well as the implementation of those technologies, using the example of the Yugoslav river shipping. One of the objectives of this paper is to determine the actual condition of the fleet, as well as the impact it has on air pollution in Serbia, as a country which plans to become a member of the European Union. A measurement on diesel engines of different production date was done with a special device, in order to get the results that represent reality (about harmful emissions in Serbia. Final task of this paper is to collect information in order to reduce harmful emissions of the marine diesel engines, along with preservation of the environment.

  14. On the effect of emissions from aircraft engines on the state of the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    Full Text Available Emissions from aircraft engines include carbon dioxide, water vapour, nitrogen oxides, sulphur components and various other gases and particles. Such emissions from high-flying global civil subsonic air traffic may cause anthropogenic climate changes by an increase of ozone and cloudiness in the upper troposphere, and by an enhanced greenhouse effect. The absolute emissions by air traffic are small (a few percent of the total compared to surface emissions. However, the greenhouse effect of emitted water and of nitrogen oxides at cruise altitude is potentially large compared to that of the same emissions near the earth's surface because of relatively large residence times at flight altitudes, low background concentrations, low temperature, and large radiative efficiency. Model computations indicate that emission of nitrogen oxides has doubled the background concentration in the upper troposphere between 40°N and 60°N. Models also indicate that this causes an increase of ozone by about 5-20%. Regionally, the observed annual mean change in cloudiness is 0.4%. It is estimated that the resultant greenhouse effect of changes in ozone and thin cirrus cloud cover causes a climatic surface temperature change of 0.01-0.1 K. These temperature changes are small compared to the natural variability. Recent research indicates that the emissions at cruise altitude may increase the amount of stratospheric aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds and thereby have an impact on the atmospheric environment. Air traffic is increasing about 5-6% per year, fuel consumption by about 3%, hence the effects of the related emissions are expected to grow. This paper surveys the state of knowledge and describes several results from recent and ongoing research.

  15. Bio-tarp alternative daily cover prototypes for methane oxidation atop open landfill cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L; Besnard, Fabien; Bogner, Jean; Hilger, Helene

    2011-05-01

    Final landfill covers are highly engineered to prevent methane release into the atmosphere. However, methane production begins soon after waste placement and is an unaddressed source of emissions. The methane oxidation capacity of methanotrophs embedded in a "bio-tarp" was investigated as a means to mitigate methane release from open landfill cells. The bio-tarp would also serve as an alternative daily cover during routine landfill operation. Evaluations of nine synthetic geotextiles identified two that would likely be suitable bio-tarp components. Pilot tarp prototypes were tested in continuous flow systems simulating landfill gas conditions. Multilayered bio-tarp prototypes consisting of alternating layers of the two geotextiles were found to remove 16% of the methane flowing through the bio-tarp. The addition of landfill cover soil, compost, or shale amendments to the bio-tarp increased the methane removal up to 32%. With evidence of methane removal in a laboratory bioreactor, prototypes were evaluated at a local landfill using flux chambers installed atop intermediate cover at a landfill. The multilayered bio-tarp and amended bio-tarp configurations were all found to decrease landfill methane flux; however, the performance efficacy of bio-tarps was not significantly different from controls without methanotrophs. Because highly variable methane fluxes at the field site likely confounded the test results, repeat field testing is recommended under more controlled flux conditions.

  16. An experimental study on the effect of using gas-to-liquid (GTL fuel on diesel engine performance and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Bassiony

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas to Liquid (GTL fuel is considered one of the most propitious clean alternative fuels for the diesel engines. The aim of this study was to experimentally compare the performance and emissions of a diesel engine fueled by GTL fuel, diesel, and a blend of GTL and diesel fuels with a mixing ratio of 1:1 by volume (G50 at various engine load and speed conditions. Although using the GTL and G50 fuels decreased slightly the engine maximum power compared to the diesel fuel, both the engine brake thermal efficiency and engine brake specific fuel consumption were improved. In addition, using the GTL and G50 fuels as alternatives to the diesel resulted in a significant decrease in engine CO, NOx, and SO2 emissions.

  17. BioSimplify: an open source sentence simplification engine to improve recall in automatic biomedical information extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    BioSimplify is an open source tool written in Java that introduces and facilitates the use of a novel model for sentence simplification tuned for automatic discourse analysis and information extraction (as opposed to sentence simplification for improving human readability). The model is based on a "shot-gun" approach that produces many different (simpler) versions of the original sentence by combining variants of its constituent elements. This tool is optimized for processing biomedical scientific literature such as the abstracts indexed in PubMed. We tested our tool on its impact to the task of PPI extraction and it improved the f-score of the PPI tool by around 7%, with an improvement in recall of around 20%. The BioSimplify tool and test corpus can be downloaded from https://biosimplify.sourceforge.net.

  18. Investigation of engine performance and emissions of a diesel engine with a blend of marine gas oil and synthetic diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Md Nurun; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions with marine gas oil (MGO) and a blend of MGO and synthetic diesel fuel. Ten per cent by volume of Fischer-Tropsch (FT), a synthetic diesel fuel, was added to MGO to investigate its influence on the diesel engine performance and emissions. The blended fuel was termed as FT10 fuel, while the neat (100 vol%) MGO was termed as MGO fuel. The experiments were conducted with a fourstroke, six-cylinder, turbocharged, direct injection, Scania DC 1102 diesel engine. It is interesting to note that all emissions including smoke (filter smoke number), total particulate matter (TPM), carbon monoxide (CO), total unburned hydrocarbon (THC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and engine noise were reduced with FT10 fuel compared with the MGO fuel. Diesel fine particle number and mass emissions were measured with an electrical low pressure impactor. Like other exhaust emissions, significant reductions in fine particles and mass emissions were observed with the FT10 fuel. The reduction was due to absence of sulphur and aromatic compounds in the FT fuel. In-cylinder gas pressure and engine thermal efficiency were identical for both FT10 and MGO fuels.

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, R. D.; Rutland, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NO(x), and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model, and preliminary soot modeling results are described. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme was developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations were made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-value engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons were made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results were obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  20. Enhanced Emission Performance and Fuel Efficiency for HD Methane Engines. Literature Study. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broman, R.; Staalhammar, P.; Erlandsson, L.

    2010-05-15

    A literature survey has been conducted in order to define state-of-the-art for methane fuelled engines to be used in heavy duty vehicles. Use of methane can be favourable to increase security of supply and mitigate CO2 emissions, especially when the methane origins from biomass. Furthermore, methane used as a fuel in heavy duty engines has a potential to reduce toxic exhaust emissions. Historically, use of methane in heavy duty engines has often been hampered by poor efficiency, i.e. high fuel consumption when using the Otto-cycle. However, current generation technology engines might be within 5-10 % of the efficiency of Diesel engine technology. In this context it is worth mentioning that compliance-driven changes for meeting future emission regulations for Diesel engines may have a negative impact on fuel efficiency, thereby narrowing the gap. This may present an opportunity for heavy methane fuelled engines. The reliability and durability of the exhaust aftertreatment devices for methane fuelled engines has also given rise to some concerns. Some concepts are performing acceptable while others do not meet expectations. This is partly due to difficulties in handling methane in the aftertreatment device and partly to issues in the design of the ignition system. Methane is a fuel used worldwide and has a potential to be an important complement to Diesel oil. There are two categories of HD methane engines available to end-users: Retrofitted engines, which often include computer controlled retrofit systems developed as 'bolt-on' technologies that can be removed if necessary, to resell the vehicle with a normal diesel engine, and those developed specifically for and in conjunction with engine manufacturers and delivered to customers as factory-built engines or vehicles (OEM). Additionally, both these categories can include engines that use the Otto- or Diesel combustion cycles. When adapting a HD Diesel engine to run on methane there are two options, either

  1. Influence of Compression Ratio on the Performance and Emission Characteristics of Annona Methyl Ester Operated DI Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Ramalingam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find the optimum performance and emission characteristics of single cylinder variable compression ratio (VCR engine with different blends of Annona methyl ester (AME as fuel. The performance parameters such as specific fuel consumption (SFC, brake thermal efficiency (BTE, and emission levels of HC, CO, Smoke, and NOx were compared with the diesel fuel. It is found that, at compression ratio of 17: 1 for A20 blended fuel (20% AME + 80% Diesel shows better performance and lower emission level which is very close to neat diesel fuel. The engine was operated with different values of compression ratio (15, 16, and 17 to find out best possible combination for operating engine with blends of AME. It is also found that the increase of compression ratio increases the BTE and reduces SFC and has lower emission without any engine in design modifications.

  2. Effectiveness of oxygen enriched hydrogen-HHO gas addition on DI diesel engine performance, emission and combustion characteristics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Premkartikkumar S.R; Annamalai K; Pradeepkumar A.R

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, more researches focus on protecting the environment. Present investigation concern with the effectiveness of Oxygen Enriched hydrogen- HHO gas addition on performance, emission and combustion characteristics of a DI diesel engine...

  3. Emissions of PCDD/Fs, PCBs, and PAHs from legacy on-road heavy-duty diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroo, Christopher A; Schenk, Charles R; Sanchez, L James; McDonald, Joseph; Smith, Peter L

    2012-11-01

    Exhaust emissions of seventeen 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) congeners, tetra-octa PCDD/F homologues, 12 WHO 2005 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, mono-nona chlorinated biphenyl homologues, and 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from three legacy diesel engines were investigated. The three engines tested were a 1985 model year GM 6.2J-series engine, a 1987 model year Detroit Diesel Corporation 6V92 engine, and a 1993 model year Cummins L10 engine. Results were compared to United States' mobile source inventory for on-road diesel engines, as well as historic and modern diesel engine emission values. The test fuel contained chlorine at 9.8 ppm which is 1.5 orders of magnitude above what is found in current diesel fuel and 3900 ppm sulfur to simulate fuels that would have been available when these engines were produced. Results indicate PCDD/F emissions of 13.1, 7.1, and 13.6 pg International Toxic Equivalency (I-TEQ)L(-1) fuel consumed for the three engines respectively, where non-detects are equal to zero. This compares with a United States' mobile source on-road diesel engine inventory value of 946 pg I-TEQL(-1) fuel consumed and 1.28 pg I-TEQL(-1) fuel consumed for modern engines equipped with a catalyzed diesel particle filter and urea selective catalytic reduction. PCB emissions are 2 orders of magnitude greater than modern diesel engines. PAH results are representative of engines from this era based on historical values and are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than modern diesel engines.

  4. Fuel and emissions properties of Stirling engine operated with wood powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akio Nishiyama; Hidetoshi Shimojima; Akira Ishikawa; Yoshinori Itaya; Shinji Kambara; Hiroshi Moritomi; Shigekatsu Mori [C-Tech Corporation Ltd., Nagoya (Japan). Engineering Development Group

    2007-10-15

    From viewpoints of the environment and fuel cost reduction, small-scale biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants are in demand, especially wood-waste fueled system, which are simple to operate and maintenance-free with high thermal efficiency similar to oil fired units. These are requested by wood and other industries located in mountainous region. To meet these requirements, a Stirling engine CHP system combined with simplified biomass combustion process with pulverized wood powder was developed. In an R&D project started in 2004 considering wood powder properties as a fuel, combustion performance and emissions in combustion flue gas were tested using combustion test apparatus with commercial size units. The wood powder combustion system was modified and optimized during the combustion test results, and the design of the demonstration plant combined with 55 kW{sub e} Stirling engine power unit was considered. The demonstration plant was finally completed in March of 2006, and test operation has been progressed for the future commercial CHP system. In the wood powder combustion test, wood powder of less than 500 {mu}m is mainly used, and a combustion chamber length of 3 m is applied. In these conditions, the air ratio can be reduced to 1.1 without increasing CO emission of less than 10 ppm and combustion efficiency of 99.9%. In the same conditions, NOx emission is estimated to be less than 120 ppm (6% O{sub 2} basis). Wood powder was confirmed to have excellent properties as a fuel for Stirling engine CHP system. This paper summarizes the wood powder combustion test, and presents the evaluation of the burner design parameters for the biomass Stirling engine system. 28 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Bio-Degradable Plastics Impact On Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.SUBRAMANI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of biodegradable polymers and more particularly that of polymers obtained from renewable resources such as the polysaccharides (e.g., starch have long been recognized. However, these biodegradable polymers have been largely used in some applications (e.g., food industry and have not found extensive applications in the packaging industries to replace conventional plastic materials, although they could be an interesting way to overcome the limitation of the petrochemical resources in the future. The fossil fuel and gas could be partially replaced by greener agricultural sources, which should participate in the reduction of CO2 emissions. Bio-based and biodegradable plastics can form the basis for environmentally preferable, sustainable alternative to current materials based exclusively on petroleum feed stocks. These bio-based materials offer value in the sustainability/life-cycle equation by being a part of the biological carbon cycle, especially as it relates to carbon-based polymeric materials such as plastics, water soluble polymers and other carbon based products like lubricants, biodiesel, and detergents. Identification and quantification of bio based content uses radioactive C-14 signature. Biopolymers are generally capable of being utilized by living matter (biodegraded, and so can be disposed in safe and ecologically sound ways through disposal processes (waste management like composting, soil application, and biological wastewater treatment. Single use, short-life, disposable products can be engineered to be bio-based and biodegradable.

  6. PM emissions measurements of in-service commercial aircraft engines during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.; Raper, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the results of the physical characterization of aircraft engine PM emission measurements conducted during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Engine exit plane PM emissions were sampled from on-wing engines on several in-service commercial transport aircraft from the fleet of Delta Airlines. The size distributions were lognormal in nature with a single mode. The geometric mean diameter was found to increase with increasing engine thrust, ranging from 15 nm at idle to 40 nm at takeoff. PM number- and mass-based emission indices were observed to be higher at the idle conditions (4% and 7%), lowest at 15%-30% thrust, and then increase with increasing thrust. Emissions measurements were also conducted during an advected plume study where over 300 exhaust plumes generated by a broad mix of commercial transports were sampled 100-350 m downwind from aircraft operational runways during normal airport operations. The range of values measured at take-off for the different engine types in terms of PM number-based emission index was between 7 × 1015-9 × 1017 particles/kg fuel burned, and that for PM mass-based emission index was 0.1-0.6 g/kg fuel burned. PM characteristics of aircraft engine specific exhaust were found to evolve over time as the exhaust plume expands, dilutes with ambient air, and cools. The data from these measurements will enha