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Sample records for binuclear non-heme iron

  1. Structure/function correlations over binuclear non-heme iron active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Edward I; Park, Kiyoung

    2016-09-01

    Binuclear non-heme iron enzymes activate O2 to perform diverse chemistries. Three different structural mechanisms of O2 binding to a coupled binuclear iron site have been identified utilizing variable-temperature, variable-field magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (VTVH MCD). For the μ-OH-bridged Fe(II)2 site in hemerythrin, O2 binds terminally to a five-coordinate Fe(II) center as hydroperoxide with the proton deriving from the μ-OH bridge and the second electron transferring through the resulting μ-oxo superexchange pathway from the second coordinatively saturated Fe(II) center in a proton-coupled electron transfer process. For carboxylate-only-bridged Fe(II)2 sites, O2 binding as a bridged peroxide requires both Fe(II) centers to be coordinatively unsaturated and has good frontier orbital overlap with the two orthogonal O2 π* orbitals to form peroxo-bridged Fe(III)2 intermediates. Alternatively, carboxylate-only-bridged Fe(II)2 sites with only a single open coordination position on an Fe(II) enable the one-electron formation of Fe(III)-O2 (-) or Fe(III)-NO(-) species. Finally, for the peroxo-bridged Fe(III)2 intermediates, further activation is necessary for their reactivities in one-electron reduction and electrophilic aromatic substitution, and a strategy consistent with existing spectral data is discussed. PMID:27369780

  2. Peroxo-Type Intermediates in Class I Ribonucleotide Reductase and Related Binuclear Non-Heme Iron Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Bell, Caleb B.; Clay, MIchael D.;

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a systematic study of chemically possible peroxo-type intermediates occurring in the non-heme di-iron enzyme class la ribonucleotide reductase, using spectroscopically calibrated computational chemistry. Density functional computations of equilibrium structures, Fe-O and O...... carboxylate conformations occurring during the O-2 reaction of this class of non-heme iron enzymes. Our procedure identifies and characterizes various possible candidates for peroxo intermediates experimentally observed along the ribonucleotide reductase dioxygen activation reaction. The study explores how...... a proton to a terminal carboxylate. ligand in the site which increases the electron affinity and triggers electron transfer to form X. Both pathways provide a mechanism for the activation of peroxy intermediates in binuclear non-heme iron enzymes for reactivity. The studies further show that water...

  3. Mono- and binuclear non-heme iron chemistry from a theoretical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokob, Tibor András; Chalupský, Jakub; Bím, Daniel; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C; Srnec, Martin; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2016-09-01

    In this minireview, we provide an account of the current state-of-the-art developments in the area of mono- and binuclear non-heme enzymes (NHFe and NHFe2) and the smaller NHFe(2) synthetic models, mostly from a theoretical and computational perspective. The sheer complexity, and at the same time the beauty, of the NHFe(2) world represents a challenge for experimental as well as theoretical methods. We emphasize that the concerted progress on both theoretical and experimental side is a conditio sine qua non for future understanding, exploration and utilization of the NHFe(2) systems. After briefly discussing the current challenges and advances in the computational methodology, we review the recent spectroscopic and computational studies of NHFe(2) enzymatic and inorganic systems and highlight the correlations between various experimental data (spectroscopic, kinetic, thermodynamic, electrochemical) and computations. Throughout, we attempt to keep in mind the most fascinating and attractive phenomenon in the NHFe(2) chemistry, which is the fact that despite the strong oxidative power of many reactive intermediates, the NHFe(2) enzymes perform catalysis with high selectivity. We conclude with our personal viewpoint and hope that further developments in quantum chemistry and especially in the field of multireference wave function methods are needed to have a solid theoretical basis for the NHFe(2) studies, mostly by providing benchmarking and calibration of the computationally efficient and easy-to-use DFT methods. PMID:27229513

  4. Non-heme iron enzymes: Contrasts to heme catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Edward I.; Decker, Andrea; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2003-01-01

    Non-heme iron enzymes catalyze a wide range of O2 reactions, paralleling those of heme systems. Non-heme iron active sites are, however, much more difficult to study because they do not exhibit the intense spectral features characteristic of the porphyrin ligand. A spectroscopic methodology was developed that provides significant mechanistic insight into the reactivity of non-heme ferrous active sites. These studies reveal a general mechanistic strategy used by these enzymes and differences i...

  5. Protein effects in non-heme iron enzyme catalysis: insights from multiscale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proos Vedin, Nathalie; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Many non-heme iron enzymes have similar sets of ligands but still catalyze widely different reactions. A key question is, therefore, the role of the protein in controlling reactivity and selectivity. Examples from multiscale simulations, primarily QM/MM, of both mono- and binuclear non-heme iron enzymes are used to analyze the stability of these models and what they reveal about the protein effects. Consistent results from QM/MM modeling are the importance of the hydrogen bond network to control reactivity and electrostatic stabilization of electron transfer from second-sphere residues. The long-range electrostatic effects on reaction barriers are small for many systems. In the systems where large electrostatic effects have been reported, these lead to higher barriers. There is thus no evidence of any significant long-range electrostatic effects contributing to the catalytic efficiency of non-heme iron enzymes. However, the correct evaluation of electrostatic contributions is challenging, and the correlation between calculated residue contributions and the effects of mutation experiments is not very strong. The largest benefits of QM/MM models are thus the improved active-site geometries, rather than the calculation of accurate energies. Reported differences in mechanistic predictions between QM and QM/MM models can be explained by differences in hydrogen bonding patterns in and around the active site. Correctly constructed cluster models can give results with similar accuracy as those from multiscale models, but the latter reduces the risk of drawing the wrong mechanistic conclusions based on incorrect geometries and are preferable for all types of modeling, even when using very large QM parts. PMID:27364958

  6. Non-heme iron availability of usual and improved meals from selected regions in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of non-heme iron in 12 usual and 12 improved meals from four selected regions in the Philippines was determined using in-vitro radiochemical method. Geometric mean values of 5.8 and 6.4% non-heme iron availability were obtained from one-day usual meals and meals improved to correct nutritional deficiencies, respectively. Comparison between usual and improved meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) for each region showed significant differences in non-heme iron availability for breakfast (Central Luzon, P.05). (author). 26 refs.; 3 tabs

  7. Effect of different drinks on the absorption of non-heme iron from composite meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, L; Rossander, L

    1982-04-01

    A study was made on the effect of various drinks on the absorption on non-heme iron. The drinks were taken with standard meals composed of a hamburger, string beans and mashed potatoes. In each series identical meals were served to the same subject either with water or with the drink under study, labelling the meals with two different radio-iron isotopes. A reduction in iron absorption was seen when serving tea (62 per cent) or coffee (35 per cent) with the meals. Orange juice increased the iron absorption (85 per cent). Pure alcohol and wine increased only slightly the percentage absorbed. Wine often has a high iron content, which increased significantly the amount of iron absorbed (three times). Milk and beer have no significant effect. Coca-Cola increased only slightly the absorption. The present studies clearly shows that the choice of drink drunk with a meal can markedly affect the absorption of non-heme iron. PMID:6896705

  8. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron (non-heme) test system. 862.1410 Section 862.1410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. Non-heme iron catalysts for the benzylic oxidation : a parallel ligand screening approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopstra, M; Hage, R; Kellogg, R.M.; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    Ethylbenzene and 4-ethylanisole were used as model substrates for benzylic oxidation with H2O2 or O-2 using a range of non-heme iron catalysts following a parallel ligand screening approach. Effective oxidation was found for Fe complexes based on tetra- and pentadentate nitrogen ligands affording th

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westre, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s{yields}3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  11. Mechanistic Investigation of a Non-Heme Iron Enzyme Catalyzed Epoxidation in (-)-4'-Methoxycyclopenin Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chen; Li, Jikun; Lee, Justin L; Cronican, Andrea A; Guo, Yisong

    2016-08-24

    Mechanisms have been proposed for α-KG-dependent non-heme iron enzyme catalyzed oxygen atom insertion into an olefinic moiety in various natural products, but they have not been examined in detail. Using a combination of methods including transient kinetics, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that AsqJ-catalyzed (-)-4'-methoxycyclopenin formation uses a high-spin Fe(IV)-oxo intermediate to carry out epoxidation. Furthermore, product analysis on (16)O/(18)O isotope incorporation from the reactions using the native substrate, 4'-methoxydehydrocyclopeptin, and a mechanistic probe, dehydrocyclopeptin, reveals evidence supporting oxo↔hydroxo tautomerism of the Fe(IV)-oxo species in the non-heme iron enzyme catalysis. PMID:27442345

  12. Structures of the multicomponent Rieske non-heme iron toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase enzyme system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structures of the three-component toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase system provide a model for electron transfer among bacterial Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenases. Bacterial Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases catalyze the initial hydroxylation of aromatic hydrocarbon substrates. The structures of all three components of one such system, the toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase system, have now been determined. This system consists of a reductase, a ferredoxin and a terminal dioxygenase. The dioxygenase, which was cocrystallized with toluene, is a heterohexamer containing a catalytic and a structural subunit. The catalytic subunit contains a Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster and mononuclear iron at the active site. This iron is not strongly bound and is easily removed during enzyme purification. The structures of the enzyme with and without mononuclear iron demonstrate that part of the structure is flexible in the absence of iron. The orientation of the toluene substrate in the active site is consistent with the regiospecificity of oxygen incorporation seen in the product formed. The ferredoxin is Rieske type and contains a [2Fe–2S] cluster close to the protein surface. The reductase belongs to the glutathione reductase family of flavoenzymes and consists of three domains: an FAD-binding domain, an NADH-binding domain and a C-terminal domain. A model for electron transfer from NADH via FAD in the reductase and the ferredoxin to the terminal active-site mononuclear iron of the dioxygenase is proposed

  13. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  14. Divergent non-heme iron enzymes in the nogalamycin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, Vilja; Selvaraj, Brinda; Niiranen, Laila; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-05-10

    Nogalamycin, an aromatic polyketide displaying high cytotoxicity, has a unique structure, with one of the carbohydrate units covalently attached to the aglycone via an additional carbon-carbon bond. The underlying chemistry, which implies a particularly challenging reaction requiring activation of an aliphatic carbon atom, has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unusual C5''-C2 carbocyclization is catalyzed by the non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)-dependent SnoK in the biosynthesis of the anthracycline nogalamycin. The data are consistent with a mechanistic proposal whereby the Fe(IV) = O center abstracts the H5'' atom from the amino sugar of the substrate, with subsequent attack of the aromatic C2 carbon on the radical center. We further show that, in the same metabolic pathway, the homologous SnoN (38% sequence identity) catalyzes an epimerization step at the adjacent C4'' carbon, most likely via a radical mechanism involving the Fe(IV) = O center. SnoK and SnoN have surprisingly similar active site architectures considering the markedly different chemistries catalyzed by the enzymes. Structural studies reveal that the differences are achieved by minor changes in the alignment of the substrates in front of the reactive ferryl-oxo species. Our findings significantly expand the repertoire of reactions reported for this important protein family and provide an illustrative example of enzyme evolution. PMID:27114534

  15. Feasibility of combining spectra with texture data of multispectral imaging to predict heme and non-heme iron contents in pork sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Qin, Hao; Shi, Kefu; Zhou, Cunliu; Chen, Conggui; Hu, Xiaohua; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To precisely determine heme and non-heme iron contents in meat product, the feasibility of combining spectral with texture features extracted from multispectral imaging data (405-970 nm) was assessed. In our study, spectra and textures of 120 pork sausages (PSs) treated by different temperatures (30-80 °C) were analyzed using different calibration models including partial least squares regression (PLSR) and LIB support vector machine (Lib-SVM) for predicting heme and non-heme iron contents in PSs. Based on a combination of spectral and textural features, optimized PLSR models were obtained with determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.912 for heme and of 0.901 for non-heme iron prediction, which demonstrated the superiority of combining spectra with texture data. Results of satisfactory determination and visualization of heme and non-heme iron contents indicated that multispectral imaging could serve as a feasible approach for online industrial applications in the future. PMID:26212953

  16. Mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad: recent developments in enzymology and modeling studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Iron-containing enzymes are one of Nature’s main means of effecting key biological transformations. The mononuclear non-heme iron oxygenases and oxidases have received the most attention recently, primarily because of the recent availability of crystal structures of many different enzymes and the st

  17. Inclusion of guava enhances non-heme iron bioavailability but not fractional zinc absorption from a rice-based meal in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13–15 y of age, from 2 government-run...

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of soybean lipoxygenase-1 : Influence of lipid hydroperoxide activation and lyophilization on the structure of the non-heme iron active site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Heijdt, L.M. van der; Feiters, M.C.; Navaratnam, S.; Nolting, H.-F.; Hermes, C.; Veldink, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the Fe K-edge of the non-heme iron site in Fe(II) as well as Fe(III) soybean lipoxygenase-1, in frozen solution or lyophilized, are presented; the latter spectra were obtained by incubation of the Fe(II) enzyme with its product hydroperoxide. An edge shift of about 23 eV

  19. Multinuclear non-heme iron complexes for double-strand DNA cleavage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; van den Berg, Tieme A.; de Bruijn, A. Dowine; Feringa, Ben L.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the antitumor drug BLM is believed to be related to the ability of the corresponding iron complex (Fe-BLM) to engage in oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage. The iron complex of the ligand N4Py (Fe-N4Py; N4Py - N,N-bis(2-pyridyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine has proven to be a par

  20. Inclusion of Guava Enhances Non-Heme Iron Bioavailability but Not Fractional Zinc Absorption from a Rice-Based Meal in Adolescents12

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Brahmam, Ginnela N.V.; Radhika, Madhari S.; Dripta, Roy Choudhury; Ravinder, Punjal; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Chen, Zhensheng; Hawthorne, Keli M.; Steven A. Abrams

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13–15 y of age, from 2 government-run residential schools. Participants were given a standardized rice meal (regular) and the same meal with 100 g of guava fruit (modified) with 57Fe on 2 consecutive days. A single oral dose of 58Fe i...

  1. Non-Heme Iron Absorption and Utilization from Typical Whole Chinese Diets in Young Chinese Urban Men Measured by a Double-Labeled Stable Isotope Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lichen; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Jun; Huang, Zhengwu; Gou, Lingyan; Wang, Zhilin; Ren, Tongxiang; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was to observe the non-heme iron absorption and biological utilization from typical whole Chinese diets in young Chinese healthy urban men, and to observe if the iron absorption and utilization could be affected by the staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. Materials and Methods Twenty-two young urban men aged 18–24 years were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups in which the staple food was rice and steamed buns, respectively. Each subject received 3 meals containing approximately 3.25 mg stable 57FeSO4 (the ratio of 57Fe content in breakfast, lunch and dinner was 1:2:2) daily for 2 consecutive days. In addition, approximately 2.4 mg 58FeSO4 was administered intravenously to each subject at 30–60 min after dinner each day. Blood samples were collected from each subject to measure the enrichment of the 57Fe and 58Fe. Fourteen days after the experimental diet, non-heme iron absorption was assessed by measuring 57Fe incorporation into red blood cells, and absorbed iron utilization was determined according to the red blood cell incorporation of intravenously infused 58Fe SO4. Results Non-heme iron intake values overall, and in the rice and steamed buns groups were 12.8 ±2.1, 11.3±1.3 and 14.3±1.5 mg, respectively; the mean 57Fe absorption rates were 11±7%, 13±7%, and 8±4%, respectively; and the mean infused 58Fe utilization rates were 85±8%, 84±6%, and 85±10%, respectively. There was no significantly difference in the iron intakes, and 57Fe absorption and infused 58Fe utilization rates between rice and steamed buns groups (all P>0.05). Conclusion We present the non-heme iron absorption and utilization rates from typical whole Chinese diets among young Chinese healthy urban men, which was not affected by the representative staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. This study will provide a basis for the setting of Chinese iron DRIs. PMID:27099954

  2. Synthesis of 5-hydroxyectoine from ectoine: crystal structure of the non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase EctD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reuter

    Full Text Available As a response to high osmolality, many microorganisms synthesize various types of compatible solutes. These organic osmolytes aid in offsetting the detrimental effects of low water activity on cell physiology. One of these compatible solutes is ectoine. A sub-group of the ectoine producer's enzymatically convert this tetrahydropyrimidine into a hydroxylated derivative, 5-hydroxyectoine. This compound also functions as an effective osmostress protectant and compatible solute but it possesses properties that differ in several aspects from those of ectoine. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD is a member of the non-heme iron(II-containing and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (EC 1.14.11. These enzymes couple the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate with the formation of a high-energy ferryl-oxo intermediate to catalyze the oxidation of the bound organic substrate. We report here the crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase EctD from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens in complex with Fe(3+ at a resolution of 1.85 A. Like other non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases, the core of the EctD structure consists of a double-stranded beta-helix forming the main portion of the active-site of the enzyme. The positioning of the iron ligand in the active-site of EctD is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. The side chains of the three residues forming this iron-binding site protrude into a deep cavity in the EctD structure that also harbours the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate-binding site. Database searches revealed a widespread occurrence of EctD-type proteins in members of the Bacteria but only in a single representative of the Archaea, the marine crenarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The EctD crystal structure reported here can serve as a template to guide further biochemical and structural studies of this biotechnologically interesting enzyme family.

  3. A hybrid density functional study of O-O bond cleavage and phenyl ring hydroxylation for a biomimetic non-heme iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Tomasz; Bassan, Arianna; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2004-05-17

    Density functional calculations using the B3LYP functional have been used to study the reaction mechanism of [Fe(Tp(Ph2))BF] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate; BF = benzoylformate) with dioxygen. This mononuclear non-heme iron(II) complex was recently synthesized, and it proved to be the first biomimetic complex reproducing the dioxygenase activity of alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent enzymes. Moreover, the enthalpy and entropy of activation for this biologically interesting process were derived from kinetic experiments offering a unique possibility for direct comparison of theoretical and experimental data. The results reported here support a mechanism in which oxidative decarboxylation of the keto acid is the rate-limiting step. This oxygen activation process proceeds on the septet potential energy surface through a transition state for a concerted O-O and C-C bond cleavage. In the next step, a high-valent iron-oxo species performs electrophilic attack on the phenyl ring of the Tp(Ph2) ligand leading to an iron(III)-radical sigma-complex. Subsequent proton-coupled electron-transfer yields an iron(II)-phenol intermediate, which can bind dioxygen and reduce it to a superoxide radical. Finally, the protonated superoxide radical leaves the first coordination sphere of the iron(III)-phenolate complex and dismutates to dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The calculated activation barrier (enthalpy and entropy) and the overall reaction energy profile agree well with experimental data. A comparison to the enzymatic process, which is suggested to occur on the quintet surface, has been made. PMID:15132638

  4. [Mono- and Binuclear Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-containing Ligands in Various Biosystems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, A F; Mikoyan, V D; Kubrina, L N; Borodulin, R R; Burgova, E N

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands, bound with modified bovine serum albumin with high amount of thiol groups, appeared in baker yeast or in animal tissues in the presence of exogenous or endogenous nitric oxide, respectively, are represented predominantly by EPR-silent binuclear form. This form can be transformed into EPR-active mononuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes with an increase in pH to basic values, into EPR-active form of mononuclear iron nitrosyl complexes in case of bielectronic recovery of the binuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes or under the action of dithiocarbamate derivatives. The latter induced the transformation of dinitrosyl iron complexes into EPR-active mononitrosyl iron complexes with dithiocarbamates. A significant amount of binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands in living systems and identical biological activity of these complexes and endogenous nitric oxide systems allow of considering endogenous binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes as a "working form" of endogenous nitric oxide recognized now as a universal regulator of biological processes. PMID:26394474

  5. Electronic Structure Modulation in an Exceptionally Stable Non-Heme Nitrosyl Iron(II) Spin-Crossover Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro-López, Lucía; Ortega-Villar, Norma; Muñoz, M Carmen; Molnár, Gábor; Cirera, Jordi; Moreno-Esparza, Rafael; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor M; Bousseksou, Azzedine; Ruiz, Eliseo; Real, José A

    2016-08-26

    The highly stable nitrosyl iron(II) mononuclear complex [Fe(bztpen)(NO)](PF6 )2 (bztpen=N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine) displays an S=1/2↔S=3/2 spin crossover (SCO) behavior (T1/2 =370 K, ΔH=12.48 kJ mol(-1) , ΔS=33 J K(-1)  mol(-1) ) stemming from strong magnetic coupling between the NO radical (S=1/2) and thermally interconverted (S=0↔S=2) ferrous spin states. The crystal structure of this robust complex has been investigated in the temperature range 120-420 K affording a detailed picture of how the electronic distribution of the t2g -eg orbitals modulates the structure of the {FeNO}(7) bond, providing valuable magneto-structural and spectroscopic correlations and DFT analysis. PMID:27416745

  6. The effect of soy products in the diet on retention of non-heme iron from radiolabeled test meals fed to marginally iron-deficient young rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diets based either on casein or soy products and containing about 25 ppm iron were fed to weanling rats for 13 days. Rats were fasted overnight and fed a 59Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal the morning of day 14. On day 21 less 59Fe was retained by rats fed various diets based on selected soy products than by rats fed the casein-based diet. A similar adverse effect of diet components on 59Fe retention from a casein test meal was observed for lactalbumin and for psyllium husk. No adverse effect of diet on 59Fe retention was observed for the fiber of soy cotyledons or for rapeseed protein concentrate. For a commercial soy protein isolated (SPI) fed throughout the 21-day experiment, the adverse effect of diet on 59Fe retention was observed to the sum of the effect of dietary SPI previous to the 59Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal fed on day 14 and the effect of dietary SPI subsequent to the casein test meal. An effect of dietary soy products on 59Fe retention from a casein test meal was not observed with diets containing higher iron levels (83 ppm) or when diets were fed for a longer period prior to the test meal (56 days). The present work shows that in some circumstances the concept of iron bioavailability must be expanded to include not only the influence of meal composition, but also the influence of diet previous to and subsequent to a meal

  7. The effect of soy products in the diet on retention of non-heme iron from radiolabeled test meals fed to marginally iron-deficient young rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Diets based either on casein or soy products and containing about 25 ppm iron were fed to weanling rats for 13 days. Rats were fasted overnight and fed a {sup 59}Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal the morning of day 14. On day 21 less {sup 59}Fe was retained by rats fed various diets based on selected soy products than by rats fed the casein-based diet. A similar adverse effect of diet components on {sup 59}Fe retention from a casein test meal was observed for lactalbumin and for psyllium husk. No adverse effect of diet on {sup 59}Fe retention was observed for the fiber of soy cotyledons or for rapeseed protein concentrate. For a commercial soy protein isolated (SPI) fed throughout the 21-day experiment, the adverse effect of diet on {sup 59}Fe retention was observed to the sum of the effect of dietary SPI previous to the {sup 59}Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal fed on day 14 and the effect of dietary SPI subsequent to the casein test meal. An effect of dietary soy products on {sup 59}Fe retention from a casein test meal was not observed with diets containing higher iron levels (83 ppm) or when diets were fed for a longer period prior to the test meal (56 days). The present work shows that in some circumstances the concept of iron bioavailability must be expanded to include not only the influence of meal composition, but also the influence of diet previous to and subsequent to a meal.

  8. Reactivity of the binuclear non-heme iron active site of delta(9) desaturase studied by large-scale multireference ab initio calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chalupský, Jakub; Rokob, Tibor András; Kurashige, Y.; Yanai, T.; Solomon, E. I.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Srnec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 45 (2014), s. 15977-15991. ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : DMRG-CASPT2 * ab initio calculations * reaction mechanisms Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.113, year: 2014

  9. XAFS Characterization of the Binuclear Iron Complex in Overexchanged Fe/ZSM5 -Structure and Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Battiston, A.A.; Bitter, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized, with emphasis on XAFS spectroscopy, one of the most promising DeNOx catalysts, i.e., Fe/ZSM5 prepared through the FeCl_{3} sublimation technique. XAFS is a very useful tool for this purpose since it is element specific and can be used in situ, namely, in the presence of the reactants and at reaction temperature. In this communication it will be pointed out that the as-synthesized Fe/ZSM5 catalyst contains stable binuclear iron oxo/hydroxo-complexes. The reaction of thes...

  10. Discovery of a Promiscuous Non-Heme Iron Halogenase in Ambiguine Alkaloid Biogenesis: Implication for an Evolvable Enzyme Family for Late-Stage Halogenation of Aliphatic Carbons in Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Zhu, Qin; Ittiamornkul, Kuljira; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-05-01

    The elucidation of enigmatic enzymatic chlorination timing in ambiguine indole alkaloid biogenesis led to the discovery and characterization of AmbO5 protein as a promiscuous non-heme iron aliphatic halogenase. AmbO5 was shown capable of selectively modifying seven structurally distinct ambiguine, fischerindole and hapalindole alkaloids with chlorine via late-stage aliphatic C-H group functionalization. Cross-comparison of AmbO5 with a previously characterized aliphatic halogenase homolog WelO5 that has a restricted substrate scope led to the identification of a C-terminal sequence motif important for substrate tolerance and specificity. Mutagenesis of 18 residues of WelO5 within the identified sequence motif led to a functional mutant with an expanded substrate scope identical to AmbO5, but an altered substrate specificity from the wild-type enzymes. These observations collectively provide evidence on the evolvable nature of AmbO5/WelO5 enzyme duo in the context of hapalindole-type alkaloid biogenesis and implicate their promise for the future development of designer biocatalysis for the selective late-stage modification of unactivated aliphatic carbon centers in small molecules with halogens. PMID:27027281

  11. AB INITIO STUDY OF THE POSSIBLE SINGLE-CENTER UNITS FOR BINUCLEAR IRON COMPLEX [Fe2(bpym3Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihonovschi Andrei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In present work we study two possible single-center units for binuclear iron complex Fe2(bpym3Cl4 –[Fe(bpym3]2+ and Fe(bpym2Cl2. The obtained ground states for both studied systems are singlet states. In the case of Fe(bpym2Cl2 the lowest excited states were calculated to be 240cm-1 (triplet and 660cm-1 (quintet above the ground state and so are placed according to Lande rule. These states could be populated at room temperatures. For [Fe(bpym3]2+ first excited state was found to be about 6000cm-1 above the ground state and so cannot be populated at normal temperatures.

  12. MAGNETIC PROPERTIES AND ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BINUCLEAR ORGANO-IRON SANDWICHES

    OpenAIRE

    Guillin, J.; Desbois, M.; Lacoste , M; Astruc, D.; Varret, F.

    1988-01-01

    Bi-iron electron reservoirs complexes, of sandwich structure, have been studied in the 36, 37, 38 e- states, by Mössbauer spectroscopy in external magnetic fields. The nature of the various couplings between the 19 e- subunits has been elucidated, and correlated to the electron transfer to the bridge in the mixed valence state.

  13. Reversible Dissociation and Ligand-Glutathione Exchange Reaction in Binuclear Cationic Tetranitrosyl Iron Complex with Penicillamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Syrtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparative study of the decomposition of two nitrosyl iron complexes (NICs with penicillamine thiolic ligands [Fe2(SC5H11NO22(NO4]SO4·5H2O (I and glutathione- (GSH- ligands [Fe2(SC10H17N3O62(NO4]SO4·2H2O (II, which spontaneously evolve to NO in aqueous medium. NO formation was measured by a sensor electrode and by spectrophotometric methods by measuring the formation of a hemoglobin- (Hb- NO complex. The NO evolution reaction rate from (I  k1 = (4.6 ± 0.1·10−3 s−1 and the elimination rate constant of the penicillamine ligand k2 = (1.8 ± 0.2·10−3 s−1 at 25°C in 0.05 M phosphate buffer,  pH 7.0, was calculated using kinetic modeling based on the experimental data. Both reactions are reversible. Spectrophotometry and mass-spectrometry methods have firmly shown that the penicillamine ligand is exchanged for GS− during decomposition of 1.5·10−4 M (I in the presence of 10−3 M GSH, with 76% yield in 24 h. As has been established, such behaviour is caused by the resistance of (II to decomposition due to the higher affinity of iron to GSH in the complex. The discovered reaction may impede S-glutathionylation of the essential enzyme systems in the presence of (I and is important for metabolism of NIC, connected with its antitumor activity.

  14. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mallayan Palaniandavar; Kusalendiran Visvaganesan

    2011-03-01

    Catechol dioxygenases are responsible for the last step in the biodegradation of aromatic molecules in the environment. The iron(II) active site in the extradiol-cleaving enzymes cleaves the C-C bond adjacent to the hydroxyl group, while the iron(III) active site in the intradiol-cleaving enzymes cleaves the C-C bond in between two hydroxyl groups. A series of mononuclear iron(III) complexes of the type [Fe(L)Cl3], where L is the linear -alkyl substituted bis(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)amine, -alkyl substituted -(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine, linear tridentate 3N ligands containing imidazolyl moieties and tripodal ligands containing pyrazolyl moieties have been isolated and studied as structural and functional models for catechol dioxygenase enzymes. All the complexes catalyse the cleavage of catechols using molecular oxygen to afford both intra- and extradiol cleavage products. The rate of oxygenation depends on the solvent and the Lewis acidity of iron(III) center as modified by the sterically demanding -alkyl groups. Also, our studies reveal that stereo-electronic factors like the Lewis acidity of the iron(III) center and the steric demand of ligands, as regulated by the -alkyl substituents, determine the regioselectivity and the rate of dioxygenation. In sharp contrast to all these complexes, the pyrazole-containing tripodal ligand complexes yield mainly the oxidized product benzoquinone.

  15. Formation of nitrosyl non-heme iron-sulphur complexes of a mitrochondria electron-transport chain in a liver and kidneys under prolonged permanent action of radiation contamination in the Chernobyl region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No-complexes with iron-sulfur protein of the N-type (EPR signal g=2.03 at 77 K) have been revealed in a mitochondria electron transport chain in a liver and kidneys of animals which were hold for 1.5 years in the Chernobyl area under action of low intensity ionizing radiation as a result of incorporated radionuclides. These alterations in protein give evidence of changes in oxidation and phosphorylation in tissues

  16. Prospects for three-electron donor boronyl (BO) ligands and dioxodiborene (B2O2) ligands as bridging groups in binuclear iron carbonyl derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce

    2012-08-20

    Recent experimental work (2010) on (Cy(3)P)(2)Pt(BO)Br indicates that the oxygen atom of the boronyl (BO) ligand is more basic than that in the ubiquitous CO ligand. This suggests that bridging BO ligands in unsaturated binuclear metal carbonyl derivatives should readily function as three-electron donor bridging ligands involving both the oxygen and the boron atoms. In this connection, density functional theory shows that three of the four lowest energy singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) structures have such a bridging η(2)-μ-BO group as well as a formal Fe-Fe single bond. In addition, all four of the lowest energy singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(6) structures have two bridging η(2)-μ-BO groups and formal Fe-Fe single bonds. Other Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(n) (n = 7, 6) structures are found in which the two BO groups have coupled to form a bridging dioxodiborene (B(2)O(2)) ligand with B-B bonding distances of ~1.84 Å. All of these Fe(2)(μ-B(2)O(2))(CO)(n) structures have long Fe···Fe distances indicating a lack of direct iron-iron bonding. One of the singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) structures has such a bridging dioxodiborene ligand with cis stereochemistry functioning as a six-electron donor to the pair of iron atoms. In addition, the lowest energy triplet structures for both Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) and Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(6) have bridging dioxodiborene ligands with trans stereochemistry functioning as a four-electron donor to the pair of iron atoms. PMID:22862812

  17. Structural characterization of an enantiopure hydroxo-bridged binuclear iron(III) complex with empty one-dimensional helical channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Akhtarul; Nethaji, Munirathinum; Ray, Manabendra

    2005-03-01

    A H-bond capable chiral tetradentate ligand, Fe3+, and acetate ion assembles into a hydroxo-bridged binuclear complex with the formula [FeIII2(mu-OH)(mu-OAc)(S-L)2] x 4H2O (1) where H2S-L = S-2-(2-hydroxy-benzylamino)-3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-propionic acid. The crystal of 1 contains right-handed one-dimensional (1D) helical channels with 7.3-9.8 A diameter. A similar reaction with a ligand having opposite chirality forms the complex with left-handed helical channels (1a). Heating the crystals of 1 at 95 degrees C under reduced pressure selectively removes three waters from the channel forming an enantiopure porous crystal with empty channels (solvent accessible voids 18% v/v). Intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the imidazole N-H and phenolate oxygen in 1-2 forms a C6 symmetric helix with bridging hydroxo groups pointing inside the channels. All the H-bond capable atoms in the ligand along with one water molecule form an extended H-bonded network throughout the crystal. Exposing the empty channels of 2 to iodine vapor indicates partial filling of the channels with iodine. Crystal data for 1 x 4H2O include the following: hexagonal, P61, a = b = 13.164(3) A, c = 36.305 (11) A, alpha = beta = 90 degrees , gamma = 120 degrees , Z = 6, R1 = 0.0387, wR2 = 0.0842. Crystal data for 1a x 2H2O include the following: hexagonal, P6(5), a = b = 13.151(4) A, c = 36.558(2) A, alpha = beta = 90 degrees , gamma = 120 degrees , Z = 6, R1 = 0.0416, wR2 = 0.1190. Crystal data for 2 x H2O include the following: hexagonal, P61, a = b = 13.160(7) A, c = 36.559 (4) A, alpha = beta = 90 degrees , gamma = 120 degrees , Z = 6, R1 = 0.0574, wR2 = 0.1423. PMID:15732970

  18. Binuclear iron(II) cage complexes as electrocatalysts of hydrogen evolution reaction in different hydrogen-producing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe(II) oximehydrazonate bis-clathrochelates are electrocatalysts for H2 production. • Dependence of electrocatalytic 2H+/H2 process on pKa of H-acid is observed. • General kinetic scheme of 2H+/H2 process persists irrespective of source of H+ ions. • Protonation of two electrochemically generated iron(I) centers is rate-limiting stage. - Abstract: The kinetic study of the electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the presence of the α-oximehydrazonate iron(II) bis-clathrochelates in different media (including aqueous solutions) with various H-acids as the source of H+ ions showed that the rate-limiting stage of such electrocatalytic 2H+/H2 reaction is the protonation of two encapsulated electrochemically generated iron(I) metallocenters and the general kinetic scheme of this process persists irrespective of a source of H+ ions

  19. Structural and electronic characterization of non-heme Fe(II)-nitrosyls as biomimetic models of the Fe(B) center of bacterial nitric oxide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berto, Timothy C; Hoffman, Melissa B; Murata, Yuki; Landenberger, Kira B; Alp, E Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2011-10-26

    The detoxification of nitric oxide (NO) by bacterial NO reductase (NorBC) has gained much attention as this reaction provides a paradigm as to how NO can be detoxified anaerobically in cells. However, a clear mechanistic picture of how the heme/non-heme active site of NorBC activates NO is lacking, mostly as a result of insufficient knowledge about the properties of the non-heme iron(II)-NO adduct. Here we report the first biomimetic model complexes for this species that closely resemble the coordination environment found in the protein, using the ligands BMPA-Pr and TPA. The systematic investigation of these compounds allowed us to gain key insight into the electronic structure and geometric properties of high-spin non-heme iron(II)-NO adducts. In particular, we show how small changes in the ligand environment of iron could be used by NorBC to greatly modulate the properties, and hence, the reactivity of this species. PMID:21630658

  20. Rieske business: Structure-function of Rieske non-heme oxygenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases (RO) catalyze stereo- and regiospecific reactions. Recently, an explosion of structural information on this class of enzymes has occurred in the literature. ROs are two/three component systems: a reductase component that obtains electrons from NAD(P)H, often a Rieske ferredoxin component that shuttles the electrons and an oxygenase component that performs catalysis. The oxygenase component structures have all shown to be of the α3 or α3β3 types. The transfer of electrons happens from the Rieske center to the mononuclear iron of the neighboring subunit via a conserved aspartate, which is shown to be involved in gating electron transport. Molecular oxygen has been shown to bind side-on in naphthalene dioxygenase and a concerted mechanism of oxygen activation and hydroxylation of the ring has been proposed. The orientation of binding of the substrate to the enzyme is hypothesized to control the substrate selectivity and regio-specificity of product formation

  1. Non Heme System Asymmetric Epoxidation Reaction Made Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Chinese Academy of Sciences "Hundred Talents Program", the Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation State Key Laboratory of biological and Biomimetic Catalytic task group has recently developed a new type of non heme enzyme simulation system, the system uses the benz- imidazole instead of four nitrogen ligands pyridine units, natural proline derivatives two amine instead of HMDA skeleton, the manganese complexes in asymmetric epoxidation reaction shown high activity, but in 1/10000 the amount of catalyst under conditions of high selectivity to obtain corresponding product, TON (Turnover numbers) up to 9600, TOF (Turnover frequency) up to 59000 h-1. It is currently reported the highest activity in epoxidation catalyst. Use the H202/AcOH or peracetic acid as oxidant, 180 isotope la- beling experiments, were found different degrees of 180 isotope labeling of epoxy products, won the first direct evidence of response is obtained by the high Mn O intermediates in the process, the work was pub- lished recently in Chem. Eur. J. (Chem. Eur. J. 2012, 18, 6750--6753. ).

  2. The FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene codes for a novel member of the non-heme dioxygenase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Navarro Miguel A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene have been associated with an increased risk of obesity. However, the function of its protein product has not been experimentally studied and previously reported sequence similarity analyses suggested the absence of homologs in existing protein databases. Here, we present the first detailed computational analysis of the sequence and predicted structure of the protein encoded by FTO. Results We performed a sequence similarity search using the human FTO protein as query and then generated a profile using the multiple sequence alignment of the homologous sequences. Profile-to-sequence and profile-to-profile based comparisons identified remote homologs of the non-heme dioxygenase family. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that human FTO is a member of the non-heme dioxygenase (Fe(II- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases superfamily. Amino acid conservation patterns support this hypothesis and indicate that both 2-oxoglutarate and iron should be important for FTO function. This computational prediction of the function of FTO should suggest further steps for its experimental characterization and help to formulate hypothesis about the mechanisms by which it relates to obesity in humans.

  3. 3-Ketosteroid 9 alpha-hydroxylase enzymes : Rieske non-heme monooxygenases essential for bacterial steroid degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrusma, Mirjan; van der Geize, Robert; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2014-01-01

    Various micro-organisms are able to use sterols/steroids as carbon- and energy sources for growth. 3-Ketosteroid 9 alpha-hydroxylase (KSH), a two component Rieske non-heme monooxygenase comprised of the oxygenase KshA and the reductase KshB, is a key-enzyme in bacterial steroid degradation. It initi

  4. Special delivery: distributing iron in the cytosol of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Philpott, Caroline C.; Ryu, Moon-Suhn

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of proteins that require iron cofactors for activity. These iron enzymes are located in essentially every subcellular compartment; thus, iron cofactors must travel to every compartment in the cell. Iron cofactors exist in three basic forms: Heme, iron–sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions (also called non-heme iron). Iron ions taken up by the cell initially enter a kinetically labile, exchangeable pool that is referred to as the labile iron pool. The majority...

  5. The Catalytic Mechanisms of Binuclear Metallohydrolases

    OpenAIRE

    Mitic, Natasa; Smith, Sarah J.; Neves, Ademir; Guddat, Luke W.; Gahan, Lawrence R; Schenk, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a structurally diverse group of enzymes that use binuclear metal ion centers to catalyze the hydrolysis of amides and esters of carboxylic and phosphoric acids. Representatives are listed in Table 1, together with their metal ion composition and, if known, their metabolic role(s). Several of these enzymes are either targets for drug design against a wide variety of human disorders, including osteoporosis, cancer, cystic fibrosis, and depres...

  6. Assignment of Soret MLCT band of reduced form of copper binuclear cluster in cytochrome c oxidase film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Low concentration of dithionite results in the reduction of Cu-Cu binuclear and heme a active sites of the cytochrome c oxidase thin solid film immersed in the acidic phosphate buffer, but Fe-Cu binuclear center keeps in the oxidation state. It manifests as a negative peak at 426 nm and a positive one at ~408 nm in the difference spectra induced by dithionite. The former implies decrease of the oxidized form of heme a center, that is, Fea3+→Fea2+. And the latter results from the contribution of metal-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition in the reduced binuclear Cu-Cu cluster, rather than from that of heme a center. This stronger Soret MLCT band must be helpful to overcoming the difficulty in distinguishing the weaker copper sign from the stronger one of iron when studying copper-iron protein.

  7. The "innocent" role of Sc3+ on a non-heme Fe catalyst in an O2 environment

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanism proposed for the formation of an oxoiron(iv) complex [Fe IV(TMC)O]2+ (P) (TMC = 1,4,8,11-tetramethylcyclam) starting from a non-heme reactant complex [FeII(TMC)]2+ (R) and O2 in the presence of acid H+ and reductant BPh4 -. We also addressed the possible role of redox-inactive Sc3+ as a replacement for H+ acid in this reaction to trigger the formation of P. Our computational results substantially confirm the proposed mechanism and, more importantly, support that Sc 3+ could trigger the O2 activation, mainly dictated by the availability of two electrons from BPh4 -, by forming a thermodynamically stable Sc3+-peroxo-Fe3+ core that facilitates O-O bond cleavage to generate P by reducing the energy barrier. These insights may pave the way to improve the catalytic reactivity of metal-oxo complexes in O2 activation at non-heme centers. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  8. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius J. R. Lane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB; may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism.

  9. Improvement of bioavailability for iron from vegetarian meals by ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two kinds of iron in the diet with respect to the mechanism of absorption, heme-iron which is present as haemoglobin or myoglobin in meat and blood products, and, non-heme iron which is the main source of dietary iron. The bioavailability of the non-heme food iron is much lower than heme-iron. Vegetarian diets contain only non-heme iron. Iron intake from vegetarian meals are generally satisfied with the requirements, however, the bioavailabilities for non-heme iron is determined not only by iron content byt also the balance between different dietary factors enhancing and inhibiting iron absorption. The main enhancing factor in vegetarian meals is ascorbic acid in fruits and vegetables, inhibitors are phytate in cereals and grains, and tannins in some spices and vegetables. It has been reported that iron deficiency is one of the common micronutrient problems associated with unplanned vegetarian diets. In the present study the absorption of non-heme iron was measured from 2 vegetarian meals containing considerable amounts of phytate and tannin. The extrinsic tay method (59Fe/ 55Fe) was used to labelled the non-heme iron. The mean percentage absorption of non-heme iron from both meals was slightly different due to differences in their dietary contents. Their initial percentages iron absorption were apparent low (3.5% and 4.1%), however, the absorption progressively increased with increase in the level of ascorbic acid, 2-3 times with 100 mg and 4-5 times with 200 mg of ascorbic acid. The average amount of iron absorbed per 2000 kcal increased from 0.37 mg to 0.86 mg and 1.45 mg with the addition of 100 mg and 200 mg ascorbic acid respectively (p < 0.001). Considering the limited caloric intakes and the iron content in the meals, the amount of iron absorbed from vegetarian meals without ascorbic acid was not able to meet certain requirements for children, adolescents and menstruating women. The minimal requirement for dietary iron needed to be absorbed is 0

  10. Oxidation Reactions with Bioinspired Mononuclear Non-Heme Metal-Oxo Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Xenia; Monte-Pérez, Inés; Ray, Kallol

    2016-06-27

    The selective functionalization of strong C-H bonds and the oxidation of water by cheap and nontoxic metals are some of the key targets of chemical research today. It has been proposed that high-valent iron-, manganese-, and copper-oxo cores are involved as reactive intermediates in important oxidation reactions performed by biological systems, thus making them attractive targets for biomimetic synthetic studies. The generation and characterization of metal-oxo model complexes of iron, manganese, and copper together with detailed reactivity studies can help in understanding how the steric and electronic properties of the metal centers modulate the reactivity of the metalloenzymes. This Review provides a focused overview of the advances in the chemistry of biomimetic high-valent metal-oxo complexes from the last 5-10 years that can be related to our understanding of biological systems. PMID:27311082

  11. Preconceptional Iron Intake and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Anne Marie; Mitchell, Allen A.; Werler, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the impact of preconceptional heme and non-heme iron on gestational diabetes mellitius (GDM) in the Boston University Slone Epidemiology Birth Defects Study (BDS). This retrospective cohort analysis included 7229 participants enrolled in the BDS between 1998 and 2008 who gave birth to non-malformed infants and were free of pre-existing diabetes. All data were collected through structured interviews conducted within 6 months of delivery. Calorie-adjusted and multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. Preconceptional dietary heme iron was modestly associated with an elevated risk of GDM among those (multivariable OR comparing the fifth quintile to the first: 1.55; 95% CI 0.98, 2.46). Conversely, preconceptional dietary non-heme iron was associated with a decreased risk of GDM among those in the fifth quintile of intake compared to the first (multivariable OR: 0.48; 95% CI 0.28, 0.81). Women who consumed supplemental iron during preconception also had a decreased risk of GDM (multivariable OR: 0.78; 95% CI 0.60, 1.02). In conclusion, our data support a positive association between preconceptional heme iron intake and GDM and an inverse association between preconceptional non-heme iron intake from foods and preconceptional intake from supplements. PMID:27231921

  12. Preconceptional Iron Intake and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Anne Marie; Mitchell, Allen A; Werler, Martha M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the impact of preconceptional heme and non-heme iron on gestational diabetes mellitius (GDM) in the Boston University Slone Epidemiology Birth Defects Study (BDS). This retrospective cohort analysis included 7229 participants enrolled in the BDS between 1998 and 2008 who gave birth to non-malformed infants and were free of pre-existing diabetes. All data were collected through structured interviews conducted within 6 months of delivery. Calorie-adjusted and multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. Preconceptional dietary heme iron was modestly associated with an elevated risk of GDM among those (multivariable OR comparing the fifth quintile to the first: 1.55; 95% CI 0.98, 2.46). Conversely, preconceptional dietary non-heme iron was associated with a decreased risk of GDM among those in the fifth quintile of intake compared to the first (multivariable OR: 0.48; 95% CI 0.28, 0.81). Women who consumed supplemental iron during preconception also had a decreased risk of GDM (multivariable OR: 0.78; 95% CI 0.60, 1.02). In conclusion, our data support a positive association between preconceptional heme iron intake and GDM and an inverse association between preconceptional non-heme iron intake from foods and preconceptional intake from supplements. PMID:27231921

  13. Iron accumulation with age, oxidative stress and functional decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Xu

    Full Text Available Identification of biological mediators in sarcopenia is pertinent to the development of targeted interventions to alleviate this condition. Iron is recognized as a potent pro-oxidant and a catalyst for the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems. It is well accepted that iron accumulates with senescence in several organs, but little is known about iron accumulation in muscle and how it may affect muscle function. In addition, it is unclear if interventions which reduced age-related loss of muscle quality, such as calorie restriction, impact iron accumulation. We investigated non-heme iron concentration, oxidative stress to nucleic acids in gastrocnemius muscle and key indices of sarcopenia (muscle mass and grip strength in male Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL or a calorie restricted diet (60% of ad libitum food intake starting at 4 months of age at 8, 18, 29 and 37 months of age. Total non-heme iron levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats increased progressively with age. Between 29 and 37 months of age, the non-heme iron concentration increased by approximately 200% in AL-fed rats. Most importantly, the levels of oxidized RNA in gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats were significantly increased as well. The striking age-associated increase in non-heme iron and oxidized RNA levels and decrease in sarcopenia indices were all attenuated in the calorie restriction (CR rats. These findings strongly suggest that the age-related iron accumulation in muscle contributes to increased oxidative damage and sarcopenia, and that CR effectively attenuates these negative effects.

  14. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  15. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 °C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  16. Nitrous Oxide Decomposition on the Binuclear $\\left$ Center in Fe-ZSM-5 Zeolite

    OpenAIRE

    Guesmi, Hazar; Berthomieu, Dorothee; Kiwi-Minsker, Dorothee

    2008-01-01

    The reaction mechanism for nitrous oxide (${N}_{2}O$) direct decomposition into molecular nitrogen and oxygen was studied on binuclear iron sites in Fe-ZSM-5 zeolite using the density functional theory (DFT). Starting from the hydroxylated bi-iron complex ${\\left}^{+}$, a reductive dehydroxylation pathway was proposed to justify the formation of the active site ${\\left}^{+}$. The latter contains two FeII ions linked via oxo and hydroxo bridges, ${{Z}^{-}\\left}^{+}$, and for the first time was...

  17. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  18. Special Delivery: Distributing Iron in the Cytosol of Mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C Philpott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of proteins that require iron cofactors for activity. These iron enzymes are located in essentially every subcellular compartment; thus, iron cofactors must travel to every compartment in the cell. Iron cofactors exist in three basic forms: Heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions (also called non-heme iron. Iron ions taken up by the cell initially enter a kinetically labile, exchangeable pool that is referred to as the labile iron pool. The majority of the iron in this pool is delivered to mitochondria, where it is incorporated into heme and iron-sulfur clusters, as well as non-heme iron enzymes. These cofactors must then be distributed to nascent proteins in the mitochondria, cytosol, and membrane-bound organelles. Emerging evidence suggests that specific systems exist for the distribution of iron cofactors within the cell. These systems include membrane transporters, protein chaperones, specialized carriers, and small molecules. This review focuses on the distribution of iron ions in the cytosol and will highlight differences between the iron distribution systems of simple eukaryotes and mammalian cells.

  19. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seafood, and foods that contain vitamin C , like citrus fruits, strawberries, sweet peppers, tomatoes, and broccoli. What ... diets. What are some effects of iron on health? Scientists are studying iron to understand how it ...

  20. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to...... present and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation...

  1. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat; Alteracoes provocadas pela irradiacao e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter Arthur [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br

    2007-04-15

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  2. Reactivity of pentacoordinate ferrous porphyrins with exo-bidentate nitrogenous bases. Mononuclear and binuclear complexes in dynamic equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of several exo-bidentate nitrogenous bases with thiocarbonyl(5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphinato)iron(II) afforded six-coordinate mononuclear and binuclear porphyrin complexes in dynamic equilibrium. This reaction was carried out in halocarbon solvents and monitored both spectrally and electrochemically. Within the potential limits of the solvent/supporting electrolyte system, each complex underwent at least four separate electron-transfer reactions with retention of the thiocarbonyl ligand. An electron-transfer pathway is presented and supported by the combined results of infrared and electronic absorption spectra, variable-temperature proton NMR, variable-temperature electrochemical, and spectroelectrochemical experiments. 46 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  3. Steady-state kinetics and spectroscopic characterization of enzyme-tRNA interactions for the non-heme diiron tRNA-monooxygenase, MiaE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Bishnu P; Corder, Andra L; Zhang, Siai; Foss, Frank W; Pierce, Brad S

    2015-01-20

    MiaE [2-methylthio-N(6)-isopentenyl-adenosine(37)-tRNA monooxygenase] isolated from Salmonella typhimurium is a unique non-heme diiron enzyme that catalyzes the O2-dependent post-transcriptional allylic hydroxylation of a hypermodified nucleotide (ms(2)i(6)A37) at position 37 of selected tRNA molecules to produce 2-methylthio-N(6)-(4-hydroxyisopentenyl)-adenosine(37). In this work, isopentenylated tRNA substrates for MiaE were produced from small RNA oligomers corresponding to the anticodon stem loop (ACSL) region of tRNA(Trp) using recombinant MiaA and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate. Steady-state rates for MiaE-catalyzed substrate hydroxylation were determined using recombinant ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin reductase (FdR) to provide a catalytic electron transport chain (ETC) using NADPH as the sole electron source. As with previously reported peroxide-shunt assays, steady-state product formation retains nearly stoichiometric (>98%) E stereoselectivity. MiaE-catalyzed i(6)A-ACSL(Trp) hydroxylation follows Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics with kcat, KM, and V/K determined to be 0.10 ± 0.01 s(-1), 9.1 ± 1.5 μM, and ∼11000 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. While vastly slower, MiaE-catalyzed hydroxylation of free i(6)A nucleoside could also be observed using the (Fd/FdR)-ETC assay. By comparison to the V/K determined for i(6)A-ACSL substrates, an ∼6000-fold increase in enzymatic efficiency is imparted by ACSL(Trp)-MiaE interactions. The impact of substrate tRNA-MiaE interactions on protein secondary structure and active site electronic configuration was investigated using circular dichroism, dual-mode X-band electron paramagnetic resonance, and Mössbauer spectroscopies. These studies demonstrate that binding of tRNA to MiaE induces a protein conformational change that influences the electronic structure of the diiron site analogous to what has been observed for various bacterial multicomponent diiron monooxygenases upon titration with their corresponding effector

  4. Electronic Structure of the Ferryl Intermediate in the α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2: Contributions to H Atom Abstraction Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Matthews, Megan L; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J Martin; Solomon, Edward I

    2016-04-20

    Low temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy in combination with quantum-chemical calculations are used to define the electronic structure associated with the geometric structure of the Fe(IV)═O intermediate in SyrB2 that was previously determined by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy. These studies elucidate key frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and their contribution to H atom abstraction reactivity. The VT MCD spectra of the enzymatic S = 2 Fe(IV)═O intermediate with Br(-) ligation contain information-rich features that largely parallel the corresponding spectra of the S = 2 model complex (TMG3tren)Fe(IV)═O (Srnec, M.; Wong, S. D.; England, J; Que, L; Solomon, E. I. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2012, 109, 14326-14331). However, quantitative differences are observed that correlate with π-anisotropy and oxo donor strength that perturb FMOs and affect reactivity. Due to π-anisotropy, the Fe(IV)═O active site exhibits enhanced reactivity in the direction of the substrate cavity that proceeds through a π-channel that is controlled by perpendicular orientation of the substrate C-H bond relative to the halide-Fe(IV)═O plane. Also, the increased intrinsic reactivity of the SyrB2 intermediate relative to the ferryl model complex is correlated to a higher oxyl character of the Fe(IV)═O at the transition states resulting from the weaker ligand field of the halogenase. PMID:27021969

  5. Electronic Structure of the Ferryl Intermediate in the α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2: Contributions to H Atom Abstraction Reactivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, S. D.; Matthews, M. L.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J. M.; Solomon, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 15 (2016), s. 5110-5122. ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ferryl intermediate * syringomycin halogenase * electronic structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.113, year: 2014

  6. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanczyc, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.hanczyc@chalmers.se

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Interactions of binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes with amyloid fibrils. • Dimer ruthenium(II) compounds are sensitive amyloid fibrils biomarkers. • Recognition of amyloid-chromophore adducts by two-photon excited emission. - Abstract: Metal–organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11′-bidppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  7. Hydrolytic activity of -alkoxide/acetato-bridged binuclear Cu(II) complexes towards carboxylic acid ester

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weidong Jiang; Bin Xu; Zhen Xiang; Shengtian Huang; Fuan Liu; Ying Wang

    2013-09-01

    Two -alkoxide/acetate-bridged small molecule binuclear copper(II) complexes were synthesized, and used to promote the hydrolysis of a classic carboxylic acid ester, -nitrophenyl picolinate (PNPP). Both binuclear complexes exhibited good hydrolytic reactivity, giving rise to . 15547- and 17462-fold acceleration over background value for PNPP hydrolysis at neutral conditions, respectively. For comparing, activities of the other two mononuclear analogues were evaluated, revealing that binuclear complexes show approximately 150- and 171-fold kinetic advantage over their mononuclear analogues.

  8. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased ∼2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, 54Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. 54Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected 54Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration

  9. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  10. [The role of iron as a deficient element].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, K

    1989-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element. In its heme-form as well as in its non heme-form it is a part of enzymes and hemoproteins. For a safe and adequate dietary intake 10-18 mg of iron are recommended daily. Frequently, this quantity is not available: approximately 20% of the world population is iron-deficient. In this state the enteral transfer capacity for toxic metals, e.g., Cd and Pb, is increased and the adaptation to physical strain as well as the immunological responses are depressed. Alterations of body iron-stores are almost exclusively balanced by adequate adaptation of the enteral iron-transfer capacity. The mechanism of this adaptation process can neither be satisfactorily explained by the "mucosal block hypothesis", nor by the "mucosal transferrin hypothesis". When the time-course of iron storage and its relation to intestinal iron transfer was investigated after i.v. iron administration to iron-deficient rats, the results indicated that the process of adaptation is located in the intestinal mucosa. Intestinal iron loading is decreased in iron deficiency, whereas the iron transfer into the organism is increased. Further investigation is necessary to find out by which mechanism the iron manages to bypass existing mucosal storage capacity in this situation. The geographical distribution of iron deficiency is influenced by a variety of local factors. Still, the paramount causes of iron-deficiency are unbalanced iron losses and the lack of bioavailable iron in the diet. The bioavailability of non heme iron is influenced by the composition of the diet. The effect of promotors of iron absorption, such as meat, amino acids, polycarbonic acids and ascorbate is opposed by the influence of inhibitors, such as bran, soya products, vegetables and egg-dishes. Iron losses are mainly due to blood losses. Thus, the wide distribution of hookworm diseases in tropical areas contributes significantly to the endemic iron-deficiency in these regions. A more physiological loss

  11. Synthesis, spectral and magnetic studies of mono- and bi-nuclear metal complexes of a new bis(tridentate NO2) Schiff base ligand derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and ethanolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2009-07-01

    A new bis(tridentate NO2) Schiff base ligand, H4L, was prepared by the reaction of the bifunctional carbonyl compound; 4,6-diacetylresorcinol (DAR) with ethanolamine. The ligand reacted with iron(III), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), cerium(III) and uranyl(VI) ions, in absence and in presence of LiOH, to yield mono- and bi-nuclear complexes with different coordinating sites. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. In absence of LiOH, mononuclear complexes (2, 3 and 5-9) as well as binuclear complexes (1 and 4) were obtained. In mononuclear complexes, the ligand acted as a neutral, mono- and di-basic/bi- and tetra-dentate ligand while in binuclear complexes (1 and 4), the ligand acted as a bis(mono- or di-basic/tridentate) ligand. On the other hand, in presence of LiOH, only binuclear complexes (10-15) were obtained in which the ligand acted as a bis(dibasic tridentate) ligand. The metal complexes exhibited different geometrical arrangements such as octahedral, tetrahedral, square planar, square pyramidal and pentagonal bipyramidal arrangements.

  12. Magnetic and luminescent binuclear double-stranded helicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucos, Paula; Tuna, Floriana; Sorace, Lorenzo; Matei, Iulia; Maxim, Catalin; Shova, Sergiu; Gheorghe, Ruxandra; Caneschi, Andrea; Hillebrand, Mihaela; Andruh, Marius

    2014-07-21

    Three new binuclear helicates, [M2L2]·3DMF (M = Co(II), 1, Zn(II), 3) and [Cu2L2]·DMF·0.4H2O (2), have been assembled using the helicand H2L that results from the 2:1 condensation reaction between o-vanillin and 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether. The metal ions within the binuclear helicates are tetracoordinated with a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Direct current magnetic characterization and EPR spectroscopy of the Co(II) derivative point to an easy axis type anisotropy for both Co(II) centers, with a separation of at least 55 K between the two doublets. Dynamic susceptibility measurements evidence slow relaxation of the magnetization in an applied dc field. Since the distance between the cobalt ions is quite large (11.59 Å), this is attributed in a first instance to the intrinsic properties of each Co(II) center (single-ion magnet behavior). However, the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate and the absence of slow dynamics in the Zn(II)-doped sample suggest that neither the simple Orbach mechanism nor Raman or direct processes can account for the relaxation, and collective phenomena have to be invoked for the observed behavior. Finally, due to the rigidization of the two organic ligands upon coordination, the pure zinc derivative exhibits fluorescence emission in solution, which was analyzed in terms of fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes. PMID:24998701

  13. Measuring the Orientation of Taurine in the Active Site of the Non-Heme Fe (II)/α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Taurine Hydroxylase (TauD) using Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Thomas M.; Grzyska, Piotr K.; Hausinger, Robert P.; McCracken, John

    2013-01-01

    The position and orientation of taurine near the non-heme Fe(II) center of the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) dependent taurine hydroxylase (TauD) was measured using Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. TauD solutions containing Fe(II), α-KG, and natural abundance taurine or specifically deuterated taurine were prepared anaerobically and treated with nitric oxide (NO) to make an S=3/2 {FeNO}7 complex that is suitable for robust analysis with EPR spectroscopy. Using ratios of E...

  14. Structure and Bonding in Binuclear Metal Carbonyls. Classical Paradigms vs. Insights from Modern Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1053, SI (2015), s. 195-213. ISSN 2210-271X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : binuclear metal carbonyls * DAFH analysis * 18-electron rule Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.545, year: 2014

  15. A study of intracellular iron metabolism using pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone and other synthetic chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbit reticulocytes with a high level of non-heme radioiron induced by preincubation with isonicotinic acid hydrazide and transferrin-bound 59Fe, were reincubated with various synthetic chelating agents and the amount of radioiron released from the cells was determined. Some substances, especially derivatives of pyridoxal or 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and isonicotinic acid hydrazide or benzhydrazide, were found to mobilize significantly iron from 59Fe-labelled reticulocytes. Iron mobilizaiton from reticulocytes by pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone requires ATP to be produced by cells and is completely blocked by low temperatute (40C). Although the effect of desferrioxamine is also prevented by low temperature, modest iron mobilization due to this chelator seems to occur independently of ATP production in reticulocytes. Pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone mobilized iron mainly from mitochondria and in part also from ferritin. Although 2,2'-bipyridine seems to enter reticulocyte mitochondria and bind iron there, this chelator is not able to relaease iron either from mitochondria or from the cells. Reticulocytes with a high level of non-heme radioiron are envisaged as a useful system for testing biological effectiveness of various iron chelators. Pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone was shown to be an effective in vivo chelator since its adminstration to mice decreased 59Fe radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney. (Auth.)

  16. Reactivity of Binuclear Fe-Complexes in Over-Exhanged Fe/ZSM5 Studied by In Situ XAFS Spectroscopy : Part 1: Heat Treatment in He and O2

    OpenAIRE

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Battiston, A.A.; Bitter, J.H.; Heijboer, W.M.; Groot, F.M.F. de

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the iron species in mildly calcined over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5, prepared by CVD of FeCl3, was studied during heat treatments in He or O2/He (50:50) by coupling in situ Fe K edge HR-XANES and EXAFS. The majority of iron appears to be present as Fe-binuclear complexes. EXAFS shows that the closest Fe---O shell in the complexes can be described with a [HO---Fe---O---Fe---OH]2+ core. Heating to a moderate temperature (up to ~150 °C) results in the desorption of water from the Fe-coor...

  17. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pizarro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers´ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001. The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers´ requirements of this micronutrient.

  18. Ndfip2 is a potential regulator of the iron transporter DMT1 in the liver

    OpenAIRE

    Foot, Natalie J.; Kelly M. Gembus; Kimberly Mackenzie; Sharad Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of divalent metal ion transporter DMT1, the primary non-heme iron importer in mammals, is critical for maintaining iron homeostasis. Previously we identified ubiquitin-dependent regulation of DMT1 involving the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases and the Ndfip1 and Ndfip2 adaptors. We also established the in vivo function of Ndfip1 in the regulation of DMT1 in the duodenum of mice. Here we have studied the function of Ndfip2 using Ndfip2-deficient mice. The DMT1 protein levels in...

  19. Electronic structure and spectra of binuclear bridged nitrosyl ruthenium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The B3LYP method in the LanL2DZ basis set was used to carry out geometry optimization for the binuclear bridged complexes [RuCl4(NO)(μ-Pyz)Ru(P)(CO)]-, [Ru(Bipy)2(NO)(μ-Pyz)Ru(NH3)5]5+, and [(NC)Ru(Py)4(μ-CN)Ru(Py)4NO]3+ (Pyz is pyrazine; P is porphinate). The electronic spectra of the complexes were calculated by the TDDFT and CINDO-CI methods with allowance for solvation effects. The ground-state electronic configurations of the two ruthenium atoms in these compounds were shown to be different. Among the lower excited states of all complexes, states with essentially weakened Ru-NO bonds were found. The strong absorption in the visible region of the spectrum of [Ru(Py)4NO-CN-Ru(Py)4CN]3+ is due to the interfragment electron transfer RuII → {RuNO} accompanied by weakening of the bond between nitrogen oxide and the complex

  20. Syntheses of Binuclear Copper(Ⅰ)Complexes Containing Benzimidazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying-Fan; ZHAO Dong; GUO Li-Bing; ZHENG Xin; SUN Yu-An

    2005-01-01

    A binuclear copper(Ⅰ) complex [Cu2(dppm)2(C7H6N2)2](NO3)2 (C7H6N2 = benzimidazole, dppm = Ph2PCH2PPh2) has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography.The crystal belongs to monoclinic, space group C2/c with a = 14.167(3), b = 21.209(4), c =20.680(4) A, β = 103.93(3)°, C32H28CuN3O3P2, Mr = 628.05, Z = 8,μ = 0.868 mm-1, V = 6031 (2)(。A)3,F(000) = 2592, Dc= 1.383 g/cm3, R = 0.0593 and wR = 0.1736.A total of 5297 independent reflec tions were collected, of which 3503 were observed with I > 2σ(I).The central copper atom is tri-coordinated by phosphorus atoms from bridging dppm and nitrogen atom from benzimidazole.In the coordination sphere, the bond lengths of Cu-P(1) and Cu-P(2) are 2.2607(17) and 2.2503(16)(。A),respectively and the P-Cu-P bond angle is 127.26(6)°.

  1. Iron absorption from adequate Filipino meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron absorption from adequate Filipino meals representing the three major island groups of the Philippines (Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao) was studied using double isotope extrinsic tag method. Mean iron absorption of the one-day meal for Metro Manila was 6.6 ± 1.26%, Central Visayas, 6.3 ± 1.15% and Southern Mindanao, 6.4 ± 1.19%. Comparison between meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner) for each region as well as one-day meal for the three regions showed no significant differences (P > .01). Correlation tests done between iron absorption and the following iron enhancers: ascorbic acid, amount of fish, meat or poultry and inhibitors: phytic acid and tannic acid did not give significant results. The overall bar x of 6.4 ± 1.20% may be used as the non-heme iron absorption level from an adequate Filipino meal. This value can be considered as one of the bases for arriving at recommended dietary allowances for iron among Filipinos instead of the 10% iron absorption assumed in 1976

  2. Effect of dietary iron loading on recognition memory in growing rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murui Han

    Full Text Available While nutritional and neurobehavioral problems are associated with both iron deficiency during growth and overload in the elderly, the effect of iron loading in growing ages on neurobehavioral performance has not been fully explored. To characterize the role of dietary iron loading in memory function in the young, weanling rats were fed iron-loading diet (10,000 mg iron/kg diet or iron-adequate control diet (50 mg/kg for one month, during which a battery of behavioral tests were conducted. Iron-loaded rats displayed elevated non-heme iron levels in serum and liver, indicating a condition of systemic iron overload. In the brain, non-heme iron was elevated in the prefrontal cortex of iron-loaded rats compared with controls, whereas there was no difference in iron content in other brain regions between the two diet groups. While iron loading did not alter motor coordination or anxiety-like behavior, iron-loaded rats exhibited a better recognition memory, as represented by an increased novel object recognition index (22% increase from the reference value than control rats (12% increase; P=0.047. Western blot analysis showed an up-regulation of dopamine receptor 1 in the prefrontal cortex from iron-loaded rats (142% increase; P=0.002. Furthermore, levels of glutamate receptors (both NMDA and AMPA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR were significantly elevated in the prefrontal cortex of iron-loaded rats (62% increase in NR1; 70% increase in Glu1A; 115% increase in nAChR. Dietary iron loading also increased the expression of NMDA receptors and nAChR in the hippocampus. These results support the idea that iron is essential for learning and memory and further reveal that iron supplementation during developmental and rapidly growing periods of life improves memory performance. Our investigation also demonstrates that both cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission pathways are regulated by dietary iron and provides a molecular basis for the

  3. Binuclear bromide complex of Bi(III): Thermally induced changes in optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonin, Sergey A.; Sokolov, Maxim N.; Rakhmanova, Marianna E.; Smolentsev, Anton I.; Pishchur, Denis P.; Korolkov, Ilya V.; Kozlova, Svetlana G.; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-05-01

    Binuclear bromobismuthate complex (H2bipy)2[Bi2Br10] (1) displays the optical properties: 1) thermochromism, 2) disappearance/appearance of luminescence at 298/77 K. To investigate this feature, a combination of X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and quantum chemical calculations has been used.

  4. Formation of high-valent iron-oxo species in superoxide reductase: characterization by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, Florence; Tremey, Emilie; von Stetten, David; Rat, Stéphanie; Duval, Simon; Carpentier, Philippe; Clemancey, Martin; Desbois, Alain; Nivière, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR), a non-heme mononuclear iron protein that is involved in superoxide detoxification in microorganisms, can be used as an unprecedented model to study the mechanisms of O2 activation and of the formation of high-valent iron-oxo species in metalloenzymes. By using resonance Raman spectroscopy, it was shown that the mutation of two residues in the second coordination sphere of the SOR iron active site, K48 and I118, led to the formation of a high-valent iron-oxo species when the mutant proteins were reacted with H2O2. These data demonstrate that these residues in the second coordination sphere tightly control the evolution and the cleavage of the O-O bond of the ferric iron hydroperoxide intermediate that is formed in the SOR active site. PMID:24777646

  5. Conserved balance of hepatocyte nuclear DNA content in mononuclear and binuclear hepatocyte populations during the course of chronic viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidenori Toyoda; Takashi Kumada; Olivier Bregerie; Christian Brechot; Chantal Desdouets

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the percentages of hepatocytes with increased nuclear DNA content, i.e., tetraploid (4n) and octoploid (8n) nuclei, and then compared mononuclear and binuclear hepatocyte populations:METHODS: The percentages of mononuclear diploid(2n), 4n, and 8n hepatocytes and those of binuclear 2× 2n, 2 × 4n, and 2 × 8n hepatocytes were determined with a method that can simultaneously measure hepatocyte nuclear DNA content and binuclearity in 62patients with chronic hepatitis B or C. The percentage of 4n and 8n hepatocytes in the mononuclear hepatocyte population was compared with the percentage of 2 ×4n and 2 × 8n hepatocytes in the binuclear hepatocyte population.RESULTS: The percentages of 4n and 8n hepatocytes in mononuclear hepatocytes and 2 × 4n and 2 × 8n hepatocytes in binuclear hepatocytes were similar,regardless of the activity or fibrosis grade of chronic hepatitis and regardless of the infecting virus.CONCLUSION: The distribution of nuclear DNA content within mononuclear and binuclear hepatocyte populations was conserved during the course of chronic viral hepatitis.

  6. A switch in the electron transfer from heme a to binuclear centre of cytochrome c oxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敖金; 徐建兴

    2002-01-01

    New experimental evidence that a switch controls the reduction of the heme a3-CuB binuclear centre has beenobserved in the N2-dried thin film of purified cytochrome oxidase. When immersing the enzyme film into the acidphosphate buffer with extremely low concentration of dithionite, a spectrum was given to show a reduction of heme awith no electrons resting on CuA. By increasing dithionite, electrons could be accumulated gradually on CuA, but thebinuclear centre still remains in the oxidized state. When the accumulation of electrons on CuA and/or heme a exceededa threshold, a turnover of reduction of the binuclear centre and oxidation of heme a occurred abruptly. This switch-likeaction is pH-dependent.

  7. Measuring the orientation of taurine in the active site of the non-heme Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent taurine hydroxylase (TauD) using electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Thomas M; Grzyska, Piotr K; Hausinger, Robert P; McCracken, John

    2013-09-12

    The position and orientation of taurine near the non-heme Fe(II) center of the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)-dependent taurine hydroxylase (TauD) was measured using Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. TauD solutions containing Fe(II), α-KG, and natural abundance taurine or specifically deuterated taurine were prepared anaerobically and treated with nitric oxide (NO) to make an S = 3/2 {FeNO}(7) complex that is suitable for robust analysis with EPR spectroscopy. Using ratios of ESEEM spectra collected for TauD samples having natural abundance taurine or deuterated taurine, (1)H and (14)N modulations were filtered out of the spectra and interactions with specific deuterons on taurine could be studied separately. The Hamiltonian parameters used to calculate the amplitudes and line shapes of frequency spectra containing isolated deuterium ESEEM were obtained with global optimization algorithms. Additional statistical analysis was performed to validate the interpretation of the optimized parameters. The strongest (2)H hyperfine coupling was to a deuteron on the C1 position of taurine and was characterized by an effective dipolar distance of 3.90 ± 0.25 Å from the {FeNO}(7) paramagnetic center. The principal axes of this C1-(2)H hyperfine coupling and nuclear quadrupole interaction tensors were found to make angles of 26 ± 5 and 52 ± 17°, respectively, with the principal axis of the {FeNO}(7) zero-field splitting tensor. These results are discussed within the context of the orientation of substrate taurine prior to the initiation of hydrogen abstraction. PMID:23937570

  8. Ethylene polymerization in supercritical carbon dioxide with binuclear nickel(II) catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Guironnet, Damien; Friedberger, Tobias; Mecking, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    A series of new, highly fluorinated neutral (kappa(2)-N,O) chelated Ni(II) binuclear complexes based on salicylaldimines bridged in p-position of the N-aryl group were prepared. The complexes are single-component catalyst precursors for ethylene polymerization in supercritical carbon dioxide and toluene. Solubility of the catalyst precursors in supercritical carbon dioxide is effected by a large number of up to 18 trifluoromethyl groups per molecule. Semicrystalline polyethylene with a low de...

  9. Binuclear magnesium amidoborane complexes : characterization of a trinuclear thermal decomposition product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spielmann, Jan; Harder, Sjoerd

    2011-01-01

    The bis-beta-diketimine with a meta-phenylene bridge (META-H-2: DIPPN(H)CMeCHCMeN-C6H4-NCMeCHCMeN(H)DIPP; DIPP = 2,6-iPr-C6H3) reacted with two equivalents of nBu(2)Mg to give the bis-beta-diketiminate complex META-(MgnBu)(2). The latter binuclear magnesium complex was converted to META-[MgNH(iPr)BH

  10. Reactivity of Fe-binuclear complexes in over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5, studied by in situ XAFS spectroscopy - part 1: Heat treatment in He and O2.

    OpenAIRE

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Battiston, A.A.; Bitter, J.H.; Heijboer, W.M.; Groot, F.M.F. de

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the iron species in mildly calcined over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5, prepared by CVD of FeCl3, was studied during heat treatments in He or O2/He (50:50) by coupling in situ Fe K edge HR-XANES and EXAFS. The majority of iron appears to be present as Fe-binuclear complexes. EXAFS shows that the closest Fe–O shell in the complexes can be described with a [HO–Fe–O–Fe–OH]2+ core. Heating to a moderate temperature (up to ∼ 150 ◦C) results in the desorption of water from the Fe-coordination ...

  11. Iron and Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Melike Sezgin Evim; Birol Baytan; Adalet Meral Güneş

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms except some bacteria. A great number of new articles related to the iron metabolism have been published in recent years explaining new findings. Hepsidine, a peptide hormon, that is recently found, regulates iron methabolism by effecting iron absorbsion from gut, secreting iron from hepatic store and flows iron from macrophages. Hepsidin blockes to effluxe iron from cells by bounding to ferroportin and by inducing ferroportin destru...

  12. Genome Mining in Streptomyces. Elucidation of the Role of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases and Non- Heme Iron-Dependent Dehydrogenase/Oxygenases in the Final Steps of the Biosynthesis of Pentalenolactone and Neopentalenolactone†

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Myung-Ji; Zhu, Dongqing; Endo, Saori; Ikeda, Haruo; Cane, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The pentalenolactone biosynthetic gene clusters have been cloned and sequenced from two known producers of the sesquiterpenoid antibiotic pentalenolactone, Streptomyces exfoliatus UC5319 and S. arenae TÜ469. The recombinant enzymes PenE and PntE, from S. exfoliatus and S. arenae, respectively, catalyze the flavin-dependent Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 1-deoxy-11-oxopentalenic acid (7) to pentalenolactone D (8). Recombinant PenD, PntD, and PtlD, the latter from S. avermitilis, each catalyze th...

  13. Comparison between the availability of iron in the presence of vitamin a and β-carotene in foods and medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cristina Camargo Martini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to verify the availability of iron in the presence of vitamin A as components of foods and in combinations with medicines. The iron available was measured in the presence of vitamin A in foods - common bean (B, beef liver (Li and carrot (C - and medicines - Fer-In-Sol® (Fer (Mead Johnson, Arovit® (A (Roche and Neutrofer® (N (Sigma Pharma - as well as in combinations of both. β-carotene, vitamin A, total iron, heme and non heme iron, percentage of dialyzable iron and amount of dialyzable iron was determined. Vitamin A and β-carotene had a positive effect on the percentage of iron dialysis. Carrot and liver had a better percentage of dialyzable iron than their respective medicine at similar concentrations. Therefore, we can conclude that there has been an influence of vitamin A over the dialysis of iron, being the mixtures containing liver the ones which achieved the highest concentrations of dialyzable iron, and also that, according to the amounts needed to obtain the daily recommended intake of iron, they are good for consumption.

  14. Iron management and production of electricity by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgosa, Filipe; Tavares, Pedro; Pereira, Alice S

    2015-10-01

    The increasing dependency on fossil fuels has driven researchers to seek for alternative energy sources. Renewable energy sources such as sunlight, wind, or water are the most common. However, since the 1990s, other sources for energy production have been studied. The use of microorganisms such as bacteria or archaea to produce energy is currently in great progress. These present several advantages even when compared with other renewable energy sources. Besides the energy production, they are also involved in bioremediation such as the removal of heavy metal contaminants from soils or wastewaters. Several research groups have demonstrated that these organisms are able to interact with electrodes via heme and non-heme iron proteins. Therefore, the role of iron as well as iron metabolism in these species must be of enormous relevance. Recently, the influence of cellular iron regulation by Fur in the Geobacter sulfurreducens growth and ability to produce energy was demonstrated. In this review, we aim to briefly describe the most relevant proteins involved in the iron metabolism of bacteria and archaea and relate them and their biological function with the ability of selected organisms to produce energy. PMID:26278535

  15. Efficient Negishi coupling reactions of aryl chlorides catalyzed by binuclear and mononuclear nickel-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhenxing; Zhou, Yongbo; Chen, Wanzhi

    2008-11-01

    We describe the first nickel-N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed Negishi cross-coupling reaction of a variety of unactivated aryl chlorides, heterocyclic chlorides, aryl dichlorides, and vinyl chloride. The mononuclear and binuclear nickel-NHC complexes supported by heteroarene-functionalized NHC ligands are found to be highly efficient for the coupling of unactivated aryl chlorides and organozinc reagents, leading to biaryls and terphenyls in good to excellent yields under mild conditions. For all aryl chlorides, the binuclear nickel catalysts show activities higher than those of mononuclear nickel complexes because of possible bimetallic cooperative effect. PMID:18841915

  16. Structure and activity of the anticaking agent iron(iii) meso-tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Arno A C; Granneman, Sanne J C; Feiters, Martin C; Verwer, Paul; Jiang, Shanfeng; Meijer, Jan A M; van Enckevort, Willem J P; Vlieg, Elias

    2016-04-12

    Iron(iii) meso-tartrate, a metal-organic complex, is a new anticaking agent for sodium chloride. A molecular structure in solution is proposed, based on a combination of experimental and molecular modelling results. We show that the active complex is a binuclear iron(iii) complex with two bridging meso-tartrate ligands. The iron atoms are antiferromagnetically coupled, resulting in a reduced paramagnetic nature of the solution. In solution, a water molecule coordinates to each iron atom as a sixth ligand, resulting in an octahedral symmetry around each iron atom. When the water molecule is removed, a flat and charged site is exposed, matching the charge distribution of the {100} sodium chloride crystal surface. This charge distribution is also found in the iron(iii) citrate complex, another anticaking agent. This gives a possible adsorption geometry on the crystal surface, which in turn explains the anticaking activity of the iron(iii) meso-tartrate complex. PMID:26974191

  17. Synergy and destructive interferences between local magnetic anisotropies in binuclear complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic anisotropy is responsible for the single molecule magnet behavior of transition metal complexes. This behavior is characterized by a slow relaxation of the magnetization for low enough temperatures, and thus for a possible blocking of the magnetization. This bistable behavior can lead to possible technological applications in the domain of data storage or quantum computing. Therefore, the understanding of the microscopic origin of magnetic anisotropy has received a considerable interest during the last two decades. The presentation focuses on the determination of the anisotropy parameters of both mono-nuclear and bi-nuclear types of complexes and on the control and optimization of the anisotropic properties. The validity of the model Hamiltonians commonly used to characterize such complexes has been questioned and it is shown that neither the standard multispin Hamiltonian nor the giant spin Hamiltonian are appropriate for weakly coupled ions. Alternative models have been proposed and used to properly extract the relevant parameters. Rationalizations of the magnitude and nature of both local anisotropies of single ions and the molecular anisotropy of polynuclear complexes are provided. The synergy and interference effects between local magnetic anisotropies are studied in a series of binuclear complexes

  18. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  19. Synergy and destructive interferences between local magnetic anisotropies in binuclear complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guihéry, Nathalie; Ruamps, Renaud [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques, UMR5625, University of Toulouse 3, Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Maurice, Rémi [SUBATECH, IN2P3/EMN Nantes/University of Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722 44307, Nantes, Cedex 3 (France); Graaf, Coen de [University Rovira i Virgili, Marcelli Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2015-12-31

    Magnetic anisotropy is responsible for the single molecule magnet behavior of transition metal complexes. This behavior is characterized by a slow relaxation of the magnetization for low enough temperatures, and thus for a possible blocking of the magnetization. This bistable behavior can lead to possible technological applications in the domain of data storage or quantum computing. Therefore, the understanding of the microscopic origin of magnetic anisotropy has received a considerable interest during the last two decades. The presentation focuses on the determination of the anisotropy parameters of both mono-nuclear and bi-nuclear types of complexes and on the control and optimization of the anisotropic properties. The validity of the model Hamiltonians commonly used to characterize such complexes has been questioned and it is shown that neither the standard multispin Hamiltonian nor the giant spin Hamiltonian are appropriate for weakly coupled ions. Alternative models have been proposed and used to properly extract the relevant parameters. Rationalizations of the magnitude and nature of both local anisotropies of single ions and the molecular anisotropy of polynuclear complexes are provided. The synergy and interference effects between local magnetic anisotropies are studied in a series of binuclear complexes.

  20. Ndfip2 is a potential regulator of the iron transporter DMT1 in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Natalie J.; Gembus, Kelly M.; Mackenzie, Kimberly; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of divalent metal ion transporter DMT1, the primary non-heme iron importer in mammals, is critical for maintaining iron homeostasis. Previously we identified ubiquitin-dependent regulation of DMT1 involving the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases and the Ndfip1 and Ndfip2 adaptors. We also established the in vivo function of Ndfip1 in the regulation of DMT1 in the duodenum of mice. Here we have studied the function of Ndfip2 using Ndfip2-deficient mice. The DMT1 protein levels in the duodenum were comparable in wild type and Ndfip2−/− mice, as was the transport activity of isolated enterocytes. A complete blood examination showed no significant differences between wild type and Ndfip2−/− mice in any of the hematological parameters measured. However, when fed a low iron diet, female Ndfip2−/− mice showed a decrease in liver iron content, although they maintained normal serum iron levels and transferrin saturation, compared to wild type female mice that showed a reduction in serum iron and transferrin saturation. Ndfip2−/− female mice also showed an increase in DMT1 expression in the liver, with no change in male mice. We suggest that Ndfip2 controls DMT1 in the liver with female mice showing a greater response to altered dietary iron than the male mice. PMID:27048792

  1. Synthesis of four binuclear copper(II) complexes: Structure, anticancer properties and anticancer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jinxu; Liang, Shichu; Gou, Yi; Zhang, Zhenlei; Zhou, Zuping; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) compounds are a promising candidate for next generation metal anticancer drugs and have been extensively studied. Therefore, four binuclear copper(II) compounds derived from Schiff base thiosemicarbazones (L1-L4), namely [CuCl(L1)]2 (C1), [CuNO3(L2)]2 (C2), [Cu(NCS) (L3)]2 (C3) and [Cu(CH3COO) (L4)]2 (C4) were synthesized and characterized. Four of these compounds showed very high cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines in vitro. These Cu(II) compounds strongly promoted the apoptosis of BEL-7404 cells. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), change in mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis revealed that Cu compounds could induce cancer cell apoptosis through the intrinsic ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway accompanied by the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:25899339

  2. π-π Stacking and ferromagnetic coupling mechanism on a binuclear Cu(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yan-Hui; Yu, Li; Shi, Jing-Min; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Hu, Tai-Qiu; Zhang, Gui-Qiu; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng

    2011-02-21

    The ferromagnetic couplings were observed in an unpublished crystal that consists of binuclear copper(II) complexes, namely, [Cu(2)(μ(1,3)-SCN)(2)(PhenOH)(OCH(3))(2)(HOCH(3))(2)] (PhenOH = 2-hydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline), and in the binuclear complex Cu(ii) ion assumes a distorted octahedral geometry and thiocyanate anion functions as a μ(1,3)-SCN(-) equatorial-axial (EA) bridging ligand. The analysis for the crystal structure indicates that there are three types of magnetic coupling pathways, in which two pathways involve π-π stacking between the adjacent complexes and the third one is the μ(1,3)-SCN(-) bridged pathway. The fitting for the data of the variable-temperature magnetic susceptibilities shows that there is a ferromagnetic coupling between adjacent Cu(II) ions with J = 50.02 cm(-1). Theoretical calculations reveal that the two types of π-π stacking resulted in ferromagnetic couplings with J = 4.16 cm(-1) and J = 2.75 cm(-1), respectively, and the bridged thiocyanate anions pathway led to a weaker ferromagnetic interaction with J = 0.88 cm(-1). The theoretical calculations also indicate that the ferromagnetic coupling sign from the two types of π-π stacking does not accord with McConnell I spin-polarization mechanism. The analysis for the Wiberg bond indexes that originate from the π-π stacking atoms indicates that the Wiberg bond indexes are relevant to the associated magnetic coupling magnitude and the Wiberg bond index is one of the key factors that dominates the associated magnetic coupling magnitude. PMID:21212898

  3. Caco-2 cell acquisition of dietary iron(III invokes a nanoparticulate endocytic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora I A Pereira

    Full Text Available Dietary non-heme iron contains ferrous [Fe(II] and ferric [Fe(III] iron fractions and the latter should hydrolyze, forming Fe(III oxo-hydroxide particles, on passing from the acidic stomach to less acidic duodenum. Using conditions to mimic the in vivo hydrolytic environment we confirmed the formation of nanodisperse fine ferrihydrite-like particles. Synthetic analogues of these (~ 10 nm hydrodynamic diameter were readily adherent to the cell membrane of differentiated Caco-2 cells and internalization was visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, Caco-2 exposure to these nanoparticles led to ferritin formation (i.e., iron utilization by the cells, which, unlike for soluble forms of iron, was reduced (p=0.02 by inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Simulated lysosomal digestion indicated that the nanoparticles are readily dissolved under mildly acidic conditions with the lysosomal ligand, citrate. This was confirmed in cell culture as monensin inhibited Caco-2 utilization of iron from this source in a dose dependent fashion (p<0.05 whilet soluble iron was again unaffected. Our findings reveal the possibility of an endocytic pathway for acquisition of dietary Fe(III by the small intestinal epithelium, which would complement the established DMT-1 pathway for soluble Fe(II.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a new complex binuclear of binuclear of Pd(II) containing the antibiotic oxy tetracycline; Sintese e caracterizacao de um novo complexo bimetalico de Pd(II) contendo o antibiotico oxitetraciclina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Wendell, E-mail: wg@iqufu.ufu.b [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Fontes, Ana Paula Soares [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Pereira-Maia, Elene Cristina [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    This article reports the synthesis and characterization of a new binuclear complex of palladium (II) containing the antibiotic oxytetracycline. The complex was characterized by the usual techniques of analysis. With respect to sites of coordination, the IR spectral data suggests the involvement the oxygen of the amide group and the oxygen of the neighbor hydroxyl group at ring A and to the carbonyl oxygen at C11 and the hydroxyl group at C12. (author)

  5. Isotope aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from human diets consumed in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency anaemia is an important health problem in Peru, which affects approximately 25% of the population. The most vulnerable groups are children below 5 years of age and pregnant women, of whom 64% and 53% respectively are anemic. The main reason for this deficiency is inadequate iron intake. Heme iron consumption is very low, and non-heme iron is virtually the only source of iron in the diet. Despite regional differences in food consumption, wheat, salt and sugar are widely consumed in all areas. Wheat is likely to be the most suitable food vehicle for iron fortification due to the processing required. Based on the recent food consumption surveys conducted in Lima by the IIN, we selected examples of typical main meals and measured iron bioavailability in the diet using an extrinsic tag method with 1.5 μCi of 59Fe and 5 μCi of 55Fe as markers. Coffee with bread and butter for breakfast, noodle soup with vegetables, rice with seasoned tripe (cow), bread and lemonade for lunch; and noodle soup with vegetables and bread for dinner were used to measure iron absorption. Thirteen adults in apparent good health, 5 male and 8 female, with normal hemoglobin levels participated in the study. The mean iron absorption from breakfast was 4.2% ± 4.1; from lunch 14.65% ± 10/95, and from dinner 5.1% ± 2.84. The presence of heme iron from tripe and ascorbic acid from lemonade improved iron absorption. (author). 17 refs, 3 tabs

  6. Synthesis and Structural Determination of Binuclear Nine-Coordinate K4[Y2(Httha)2]·14H2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A Y3+ complex with triethylenetetraaminehexaacetic acid was prepared and its composition and structure were determined as K4[Y2(Httha)2]*14H2O by elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray four circle diffraction analysis. In the binuclear complex, the two YN3O6 parts all form nine-coordinate monocapped square anti prismatic structures. There are a lot of water molecules in the unit cell which form hydrogen bonds.

  7. Binuclear Metal Centers in Plant Purple Acid Phosphatases: Fe-Mn in Sweet Potato and Fe-Zn in Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Gerhard; Ge, Yubin; Carrington, Lyle E; Wynne, Ceridwen J.; Searle, Iain R.; Carroll, Bernard J; Hamilton, Susan E.; de Jersey, John

    1999-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases comprise a family of binuclear metal-containing acid hydrolases, representatives of which have been found in animals, plants, and fungi. The goal of this study was to characterize purple acid phosphatases from sweet potato tubers and soybean seeds and to establish their relationship with the only well-characterized plant purple acid phosphatase, the FeIII–ZnII-containing red kidney bean enzyme. Metal analysis indicated the presence in the pu...

  8. The synthesis and characterization of organometallic copolymers with Mn-Re binuclear transition-metal group in the side chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhi; FENG Gang; BAI Zhifeng; MA Yongqiang; CHANG Weixing; LI Jing

    2006-01-01

    Novel organometallic copolymers with Mn-Re binuclear transition-metal groups in the side chain are synthesized and characterized. The structure and properties of the copolymers are characterized by GPC, DSC, TG, NMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis spectra and elemental analysis. The glass transition temperature and UV-Vis spectra properties of these three organometallic copolymers are found to be different from the normal polystyrene. New synthetic strategy for the synthesis of organometallic copolymer is developed.

  9. XAFS Study of the Ferro- and Antiferromagnetic Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes of Azomethine Based Tridentate Ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binuclear copper complexes are known to be models for metalloenzymes containing copper active sites, and some of them are of considerable interest due to their magnetic and charge transfer properties. The reactions of the complex formation of bibasic tridentate heterocyclic imines with copper acetate leads to two types of chelates with mono deprotonated ligands and with totally deprotonated ligands. Cu K-edge EXAFS has been applied to determine the local structure around the metal center in copper(II) azomethine complexes with five tridentate ligands: 1-(salycilideneimino)- or 1-(2-tosylaminobenzilideneimino)-2-amino(oxo, thio)benzimidazoles. It has been found that some of the chelates studied are bridged binuclear copper complexes, and others are mononuclear complexes. The copper-copper interatomic distances in the bridged binuclear copper complexes were found to be 2.85-3.01 A. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility data indicate the presence of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions within the dimer, the former is dominating at low temperatures and the latter at high temperatures

  10. Synthesis, structure and photophysical properties of a binuclear Zn(II) complex based on 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand with naphthyl unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Guozan, E-mail: yuanguozan@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Shan, Weilong; Chen, Jiangbo; Tian, Yulan; Wang, Haitao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China)

    2015-04-15

    A 2-substituted-8-hydroxyquinoline ligand (E)-2-[2-naphthyl-ethenyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline (HL) was synthesized and characterized by LC–MS, NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Using a solvothermal method, a binuclear complex [Zn{sub 2}L{sub 4}] (1) was fabricated by self-assembly of Zn(II) ion with ligand HL. X-ray structural analysis shows that the binuclear Zn(II) units are linked into 1D chain along the b axis via aromatic stacking. The coordination assembly of zinc salt and HL in solutions was investigated by UV–vis and photoluminescence (PL). Additionally, we also studied the thermal stability and photophysical properties of (fluorescent emission and lifetime) complex 1. The experimental results show that the complex 1 emits yellow luminescence in the solid state. - Highlights: • Ligand HL and binuclear complex 1 were synthesized and characterized. • Complex 1 features a 2D network constructed by non-covalent interactions. • Complex 1 emits yellow luminescence in the solid state.

  11. Synthesis, structure and photophysical properties of a binuclear Zn(II) complex based on 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand with naphthyl unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2-substituted-8-hydroxyquinoline ligand (E)-2-[2-naphthyl-ethenyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline (HL) was synthesized and characterized by LC–MS, NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Using a solvothermal method, a binuclear complex [Zn2L4] (1) was fabricated by self-assembly of Zn(II) ion with ligand HL. X-ray structural analysis shows that the binuclear Zn(II) units are linked into 1D chain along the b axis via aromatic stacking. The coordination assembly of zinc salt and HL in solutions was investigated by UV–vis and photoluminescence (PL). Additionally, we also studied the thermal stability and photophysical properties of (fluorescent emission and lifetime) complex 1. The experimental results show that the complex 1 emits yellow luminescence in the solid state. - Highlights: • Ligand HL and binuclear complex 1 were synthesized and characterized. • Complex 1 features a 2D network constructed by non-covalent interactions. • Complex 1 emits yellow luminescence in the solid state

  12. Effect of the most common spices and herbs in typical northwestern Thai diet on human iron absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in rural Northeast (NE) region is one of the highest in Thailand. The typical NE diets are plant-based. Non-heme iron is the major form in plant source. The bioavailability of non-heme iron depends largely on the presence of enhancers, e.g. ascorbic acid, animal protein, organic acid and inhibitors, e.g. polyphenolic compounds including tannin, phytate in the food matrix of composite meals. The habitual NE Thai dishes consist of a variety of chili dips usually consumed with substantial amount of vegetables and spices. High contents of iron inhibitors such as phytate and polyphenolic compounds including tannin in these herbs and spices may profoundly influence iron bioavailability in the northeast population. However, this inhibitory effect can partially be compensated in vivo by their effect on increasing gastric emptying time and enhancing gastric acid secretion. Although spices and herbs are used in abundance in the developing world and are likely to affect iron absorption in these regions, no systematic investigations in humans have been performed to date. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of the most common herbs and spices in typical Northeast diets on human iron absorption by stable isotope techniques. A series of studies will be conducted beginning with the identification of relevant spices and herbs commonly used in Thai habitual diets by 24 hours recall together with food frequency of consumption of popular local dishes. Later, the amount of spices/herbs per serving in popular dishes will be quantified by weighing method followed by the selection of spices/herbs. Food specimens collected in dry and rainy season will be analyzed individually for ascorbic acid, phytate, polyphenol and tannin contents. The three most relevant spices/herbs in the diet will be studied individually. First, the iron absorption from a basic test meal (plain white rice) with and without added spice/herb will be determined

  13. Quantum entanglement in nitrosyl iron complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent magnetic susceptibility measurements for polycrystalline samples of binuclear nitrosyl iron complexes, [Fe2(C3H3N2S)2(NO)4] (I) and [Fe2(SC3H5N2)2(NO)4] (II), suggest that quantum-mechanical entanglement of the spin degrees of freedom exists in these compounds. Entanglement E exists below the temperature TE that we have estimated for complexes I and II to be 80-90 and 110-120 K, respectively. Using an expression of entanglement in terms of magnetic susceptibility for a Heisenberg dimer, we find the temperature dependence of the entanglement for complex II. Having arisen at the temperature TE, the entanglement increases monotonically with decreasing temperature and reaches 90-95% in this complex at T = 25 K, when the side effects are still small

  14. Electrochemistry of Simple Organometallic Models of Iron-Iron Hydrogenases in Organic Solvent and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloaguen, Frederic

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic models of the active site of iron-iron hydrogenases are currently the subjects of numerous studies aimed at developing H2-production catalysts based on cheap and abundant materials. In this context, the present report offers an electrochemist's view of the catalysis of proton reduction by simple binuclear iron(I) thiolate complexes. Although these complexes probably do not follow a biocatalytic pathway, we analyze and discuss the interplay between the reduction potential and basicity and how these antagonist properties impact the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer to the metal centers. This question is central to any consideration of the activity at the molecular level of hydrogenases and related enzymes. In a second part, special attention is paid to iron thiolate complexes holding rigid and unsaturated bridging ligands. The complexes that enjoy mild reduction potentials and stabilized reduced forms are promising iron-based catalysts for the photodriven evolution of H2 in organic solvents and, more importantly, in water. PMID:26641526

  15. Strong DNA deformation required for extremely slow DNA threading intercalation by a binuclear ruthenium complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Westerlund, Fredrik; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA intercalation by threading is expected to yield high affinity and slow dissociation, properties desirable for DNA-targeted therapeutics. To measure these properties, we utilize single molecule DNA stretching to quantify both the binding affinity and the force-dependent threading intercalation kinetics of the binuclear ruthenium complex Δ,Δ-[μ‐bidppz‐(phen)4Ru2]4+ (Δ,Δ-P). We measure the DNA elongation at a range of constant stretching forces using optical tweezers, allowing direct characterization of the intercalation kinetics as well as the amount intercalated at equilibrium. Higher forces exponentially facilitate the intercalative binding, leading to a profound decrease in the binding site size that results in one ligand intercalated at almost every DNA base stack. The zero force Δ,Δ-P intercalation Kd is 44 nM, 25-fold stronger than the analogous mono-nuclear ligand (Δ-P). The force-dependent kinetics analysis reveals a mechanism that requires DNA elongation of 0.33 nm for association, relaxation to an equilibrium elongation of 0.19 nm, and an additional elongation of 0.14 nm from the equilibrium state for dissociation. In cells, a molecule with binding properties similar to Δ,Δ-P may rapidly bind DNA destabilized by enzymes during replication or transcription, but upon enzyme dissociation it is predicted to remain intercalated for several hours, thereby interfering with essential biological processes. PMID:25245944

  16. Electrochemical sensors based on binuclear cobalt phthalocyanine/surfactant/ordered mesoporous carbon composite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) composite modified electrode was fabricated for the first time. Binuclear cobalt phthalocyaninehexasulfonate sodium salt (bi-CoPc) can be adsorbed onto didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)/OMC film by ion exchange. UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the composite film. The cyclic voltammograms demonstrate that the charge transfer of bi-CoPc is promoted by the presence of OMC. Further study indicated that bi-CoPc/DDAB/OMC film is the excellent electrocatalyst for the electrochemical reduction of oxygen in a neutral aqueous solution and hemoglobin (Hb) at lower concentrations. Additionally, as an amperometric 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) sensor, this modified electrode shows a wider linear range (2.5 x 10-6 to 1.4 x 10-4 M), high sensitivity (16.5 μA mM-1) and low detection limit of 0.6 μM (S/N = 3). All these confirm the fact that the new composite film may have wide potential applications in biofuel cells, biological and environmental sensors.

  17. Allosteric effects in binuclear homo- and heterometallic triple-stranded lanthanide podates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick E; Canard, Gabriel; Koeller, Sylvain; Bocquet, Bernard; Piguet, Claude

    2012-09-17

    This work illustrates a simple approach for deciphering and exploiting the various free energy contributions to the global complexation process leading to the binuclear triple-stranded podates [Ln(2)(L9)](6+) (Ln is a trivalent lanthanide). Despite the larger microscopic affinities exhibited by the binding sites for small Ln(3+), the stability constants measured for [Ln(2)(L9)](6+) decrease along the lanthanide series; a phenomenon which can be ascribed to the severe enthalpic penalty accompanying the intramolecular cyclization around small Ln(III), combined with increasing anticooperative allosteric interligand interactions. Altogether, the microscopic thermodynamic characteristics predict β(1,1,1)(La,Lu,L9)/β(1,1,1)(Lu,La,L9) = 145 for the ratio of the formation constants of the target heterobimetallic [LaLu(L9)](6+) and [LuLa(L9)](6+) microspecies, a value in line with the quantitative preparation (>90%) of [LaLu(L9)](6+) at millimolar concentrations. Preliminary NMR titrations indeed confirm the rare thermodynamic programming of a pure heterometallic f-f' complex. PMID:22946598

  18. Synthesis, spectral and electrochemical studies of binuclear Ru(III) complexes containing dithiosemicarbazone ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchana Devi, A.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of several new octahedral binuclear ruthenium(III) complexes of the general composition [(EPh3)2(X)Ru-L-Ru(X)(EPh3)2] containing benzene dithiosemicarbazone ligands (where E = P or As; X = Cl or Br; L = binucleating ligands) is presented. All the complexes have been fully characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy together with magnetic susceptibility measurements. IR study shows that the dithiosemicarbazone ligands behave as dianionic tridentate ligands coordinating through the oxygen atom of the deprotonated phenolic group, nitrogen atom of the azomethine group and thiolate sulphur. In DMF solution, all the complexes exhibit intense d-d transition and ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transition in the visible region. The magnetic moment values of the complexes are in the range 1.78-1.82 BM, which reveals the presence of one unpaired electron on each metal ion. The EPR spectra of the liquid samples at LNT show the presence of three different 'g' values (gx ≠ gy ≠ gz) indicate a rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion. All the complexes exhibit two quasi-reversible one electron oxidation responses (RuIII-RuIII/RuIII-RuIV; RuIII-RuIV/RuIV-RuIV) within the E1/2 range of 0.61-0.74 V and 0.93-0.98 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl.

  19. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-03-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d0f0 uranyl ion [UO2]2+ in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo groups to form new covalent bonds remain rare. Here, we describe the synthesis, structure, reactivity and magnetic properties of a binuclear uranium-oxo complex. Formed through a combination of reduction and oxo-silylation and migration from a trans to a cis position, the new butterfly-shaped Si-OUO2UO-Si molecule shows remarkably strong UV-UV coupling and chemical inertness, suggesting that this rearranged uranium oxo motif might exist for other actinide species in the environment, and have relevance to the aggregation of actinide oxide clusters.

  20. Synthesis and antitumor activity of iodo-bridged-binuclear platinum complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Iodo-bridged binuclear platinum(II) com- plex[Pt((◇)-NH2)I2]2(BPA) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity, differential thermal analysis, IR, UV and 1HNMR spectra techniques. The cytotoxicity of the complex was tested by MTT and SRB assays. The results show that complex BPA demonstrates better cytotoxicity than that of the clinically established cisplatin against EJ, HCT-8, BGC-823, HL-60 and MCF-7 cell lines. The complex BPA at concentrations of 1.00 and 2.00 μmol/L induces G1 cell cycle arrest in HL-60 cells. The level of total platinum bound to DNA in HL-60 cells is significantly higher than that of cisplatin under the same experimental conditions. Acute toxicity experimental results indiacte that LD50 of BPA is 815.3 mg/kg by intraperitoneal administration. BPA at dose of 12 mg/kg significantly inhibits the growth of nude mice implanted by human A2780 and HCT-116 carcinomas, and inhibition rate is similar to that of cisplatin at dose of 4 mg/kg by intraperitoneal administration. BPA at dose of 20 mg/kg inhibits the growth of nude mice implanted by human A549 carcinomas, but there was no significant statistical difference.

  1. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral found in many over-the-counter supplements. Iron overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ... This can be by accident or on purpose. Iron overdose is especially dangerous for children. A severe ...

  2. Studies on iron absorption and retention in malnourished Indian subjects, using Fe-59 and whole-body counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gastrointestinal absorption of iron under various conditions in representatives of the Indian population, and several related matters, have been investigated. Percentage absorption was determined by whole-body counting of 59Fe, or by measuring the concentration of 55Fe in the blood, at about two weeks after administration of the respective tracer. It was confirmed or established that: (1) food or supplemental iron, if available at all, tends to be absorbed from the intestines as if present there in one of two alternative pools: heme and non heme; (2) 30%-50% of iron measured chemically in Indian foods appears to be in an unavailable form, for example as a contaminant in adventitiously present dust; (3) fortification of the diet with iron may be feasible by adding FePO4 + 2 molar NaHSO4 to common salt under suitable conditions; (4) monkeys appear to be sufficiently similar to humans in their iron absorption characteristics that they may be the best available non-human model for preliminary experimental investigations of iron absorption; and (5) a promising preparative method for liquid scintillation counting of 55Fe present in blood is to extract it into toluene in the presence of di (2-ethyl-hexyl) phosphate (HDEHP)

  3. Synthesis and Characterisation of New Symmetrical Binucleating Ligands and Their Binuclear Copper(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jothivenkatachalam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New symmetrical binucleating ligands N,N-bis[2-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(4-methyl-piperazinomethylbenzyl]-alkylamines L1 and L2 and their copper(II complexes [Cu2L(X2]·2H2O, where X = CH3COO−, C6H5COO−, Cl−, and ClO4-, were prepared and characterised. All the complexes undergo quasi-reversible reduction at negative potential (E = −0.48 to −1.02 V. The acetate and benzoate complexes undergo a two-step single electron transfer at –0.48 to –0.60 V and −0.9 to −1.02 V. The chloro and perchlorate complexes undergo a single step two-electron transfer at −0.55 to −0.75 V. Variable temperature magnetic studies show the presence of weak exchange interaction for acetate (−2 J around 25 to 40 cm−1 and benzoate (−2 J around 45 to 55 cm−1 bridged complexes and no exchange interaction is found for chloro and perchlorate complexes. ESR spectra of chloro and perchlorate complexes are like mononuclear copper(II complexes with hyperfine splitting (A = 165 ± 5, g∥ = 2.17–2.23, and g⊥ = 2.05–2.10. The ESR spectra of acetate and benzoate complexes are like binuclear copper(II complexes with broad signal (g = 2.2.

  4. Synthesis, Spectroscopic, and Antimicrobial Studies of Binuclear Metallocene (M = Ti, Zr, or Hf) Derivatives of Bis(mercaptoazoles)

    OpenAIRE

    Akhilesh Kumar Srivastava; Chandra Mohan Tripathi; Om Prakash Pandey; Soumitra Kumar Sengupta; Shilpi Sinha

    2007-01-01

    The reactions of (η5−C5H5)2MCl2 (M = Ti, Zr, or Hf) with mercaptoazoles (LH2), namely, bis(mercaptotriazoles), bis(mercap-tooxadiazoles), and bis(mercaptothiadiazoles) in 2 : 1 molar ratio, respectively, have been studied in dry tetrahydrofuran in the presence of n-butylamine and the binuclear complexes of the type [{(η−C5H5)2M}2(L)] (M = Ti/Zr/Hf) are obtained. Tentative structural conclusions are drawn for the reaction products based upon elemental analysis, elec...

  5. Electrochemical behavior of mononuclear and binuclear compounds from ruthenium amines and cyanoferrates with 4,4'-dithiodipyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formals potentials of half-wave for d sup(5) - d sup(6) coupling on [Fe (CN) sub(5) DTDP] sup(2-/3-), [Ru (CN) sub(5) DTDP/ sup(-2-/3-) and [Ru (NH sub(3) sub(5) DTDP] sup(3+/2+) monomeric systems and the formals potentials of half-wave for 1 electron sequential processes, with Kc calculation, in [(CN) sub(5) Fe DTDP Fe (CN) sub(5)] sup(4-/5-/6-) and [(NH sub(3)) sub(5) Ru DTDP Ru (NH sub(3)) sub(5)] sup(6+/5+/4+) binuclear systems were determined. (author)

  6. Iron repletion relocalizes hephaestin to a proximal basolateral compartment in polarized MDCK and Caco2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Min [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Columbia, NY (United States); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Attieh, Zouhair K. [Department of Laboratory Science and Technology, American University of Science and Technology, Ashrafieh (Lebanon); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Son, Hee Sook [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Chonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Huijun [Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province (China); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bacouri-Haidar, Mhenia [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences (I), Lebanese University, Hadath (Lebanon); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vulpe, Chris D., E-mail: vulpe@berkeley.edu [Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin localizes in the perinuclear space in non-polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin localizes in the perinuclear space in iron deficient and polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin with apical iron moves near to basolateral membrane of polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peri-basolateral location of hephaestin is accessible to the extracellular space. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin is involved in iron mobilization from the intestine to circulation. -- Abstract: While intestinal cellular iron entry in vertebrates employs multiple routes including heme and non-heme routes, iron egress from these cells is exclusively channeled through the only known transporter, ferroportin. Reduced intestinal iron export in sex-linked anemia mice implicates hephaestin, a ferroxidase, in this process. Polarized cells are exposed to two distinct environments. Enterocytes contact the gut lumen via the apical surface of the cell, and through the basolateral surface, to the body. Previous studies indicate both local and systemic control of iron uptake. We hypothesized that differences in iron availability at the apical and/or basolateral surface may modulate iron uptake via cellular localization of hephaestin. We therefore characterized the localization of hephaestin in two models of polarized epithelial cell lines, MDCK and Caco2, with varying iron availability at the apical and basolateral surfaces. Our results indicate that hephaestin is expressed in a supra-nuclear compartment in non-polarized cells regardless of the iron status of the cells and in iron deficient and polarized cells. In polarized cells, we found that both apical (as FeSO{sub 4}) and basolateral iron (as the ratio of apo-transferrin to holo-transferrin) affect mobilization of hephaestin from the supra-nuclear compartment. We find that the presence of apical iron is essential for relocalization of hephaestin to a

  7. Synthesis, Spectroscopic, and Antimicrobial Studies of Binuclear Metallocene (M = Ti, Zr, or Hf Derivatives of Bis(mercaptoazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Kumar Srivastava

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of (η5−C5H52MCl2 (M = Ti, Zr, or Hf with mercaptoazoles (LH2, namely, bis(mercaptotriazoles, bis(mercap-tooxadiazoles, and bis(mercaptothiadiazoles in 2 : 1 molar ratio, respectively, have been studied in dry tetrahydrofuran in the presence of n-butylamine and the binuclear complexes of the type [{(η−C5H52M}2(L] (M = Ti/Zr/Hf are obtained. Tentative structural conclusions are drawn for the reaction products based upon elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic moment, and spectral data (UV-Vis, IR, H1 NMR, and C13 NMR. FAB-mass spectra of few complexes of each series were also carried out to confirm the binuclear structures. Studies were conducted to assess the growth-inhibiting potential of the complexes synthesized, and the ligands against various fungal and bacterial strains.

  8. Spectroscopic investigations of new binuclear transition metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and 3-amino-1-propanol or 1,3-diamino-propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Adel A. A.; Saleh, Akila A.; Adly, Omima M. I.

    2007-11-01

    The bifunctional carbonyl compound; 4,6-diacetylresorcinol (DAR) serves as precursor for the formation of different Schiff base ligands, which are either di- or tetra-basic with two symmetrical sets of either O 2N or N 2O tridentate chelating sites. The condensation of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with 3-amino-1-propanol (3-AP) or 1,3-diaminopropane (DAP), yields the corresponding hexadentate Schiff base ligands, abbreviated as H 4L a and H 2L b, respectively. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, mass, 1H NMR and electronic spectra. Reaction of the Schiff base ligands with copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), iron(III), chromium(III), vanadyl(IV) and uranyl(VI) ions in 1:2 molar ratio afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. A variety of binuclear complexes for the metal complexes were obtained with the ligands in its di- or tetra-deprotonated forms. The structures of the newly prepared complexes were identified by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic, mass, 1H NMR and ESR spectra as well as magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The bonding sites are the azomethine and amino nitrogen atoms, and phenolic and alcoholic oxygen atoms. The metal complexes exhibit different geometrical arrangements such as square planar, tetrahedral, square pyramid and octahedral arrangement.

  9. Iron Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drug called an iron chelator to remove excess iron from your body because of transfusion-dependent anemias. Be sure to talk with your doctor about the potential benefits and risks of using these drugs. Previous Article ...

  10. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  11. Nanocompounds of iron and zinc: their potential in nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Michael B.; Hilty, Florentine M.

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies suggest nanostructured oxides and phosphates of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn may be useful for nutritional applications. These compounds may have several advantages over existing fortificants, such as ferrous sulfate (FeSO4), NaFeEDTA and electrolytic iron. Because of their very low solubility and formation of soft agglomerates of micron size at neutral pH as well as their light native color, they tend to be less reactive in difficult-to-fortify foods and thus have superior sensory performance. At gastric pH the soft agglomerates break up and the Fe compounds rapidly and completely dissolve due to their very high surface area. This results in in vitro solubility and in vivo bioavailability comparable to FeSO4. Doping with Mg and/or Ca may increase solubility and improve sensory characteristics by lightening color. Feeding the nanostructured compounds at 150-400 µg Fe day-1 for 15 days to weanling rats in two studies did not induce measurable histological or biochemical adverse effects. No significant Fe was detected in the submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract or lymphatic tissues, suggesting that the nanosized Fe is absorbed through usual non-heme Fe absorption pathways. Thus, these novel compounds show promise as food fortificants or supplements.

  12. Exogenous ferrous iron is required for the nitric oxide-catalysed destruction of the iron-sulphur centre in adrenodoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voevodskaya, Nina V; Serezhenkov, Vladimir A; Cooper, Chris E; Kubrina, Lioudmila N; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2002-01-01

    No effects of gaseous NO added at a pressure of 19.95 kPa on the stability of the binuclear iron-sulphur centre (ISC) of reduced iron-sulphur protein adrenodoxin (0.2 mM) have been observed using the EPR method. However, the incubation of the protein with NO in the presence of ferrous iron (1.8 mM) led to complete ISC degradation, accompanied by the formation of protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs; 0.3+/-0.1 mM). Similar results were obtained when low-molecular-mass DNIC with phosphate or cysteine (1.8 mM) were added to solutions of pre-reduced adrenodoxin. The degradation of the ISC was suggested to be due to the attack of the Fe(+)(NO(+))(2) group from low-molecular-mass DNICs added or formed during the interaction between NO and ferrous ions on the thiol groups in active centres of adrenodoxin. This attack leads to a release of endogenous iron from the centres, which is capable of forming both low-molecular-mass and protein-bound DNIC, thereby ensuring further ISC degradation. PMID:12169095

  13. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  14. Gastric digestion of pea ferritin and modulation of its iron bioavailability by ascorbic and phytic acids in caco-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satyanarayana Bejjani; Raghu Pullakhandam; Ravinder Punjal; K Madhavan Nair

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To understand the digestive stability and mechanism of release and intestinal uptake of pea ferritin iron in caco-2 cell line model.METHODS: Pea seed ferritin was purified using salt fractionation followed by gel filtration chromatography.The bioavailability of ferritin iron was assessed using coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model in the presence or absence of ascorbic acid and phytic acid.Caco-2 cell ferritin formation was used as a surrogate marker of iron uptake. Structural changes of pea ferritin under simulated gastric pH were characterized using electrophoresis, gel filtration and circular dichroism spectroscopy.RESULTS: The caco-2 cell ferritin formation was significantly increased (P < 0.001) with FeSO4 (19.3±9.8 ng/mg protein) and pea ferritin (13.9 ± 6.19 ng/mg protein) compared to the blank digest (3.7 ± 1.8 ng/mg protein). Ascorbic acid enhanced while phytic acid decreased the pea ferritin iron bioavailability. However,either in the presence or absence of ascorbic acid, the ferritin content of caco-2 cells was significantly less with pea ferritin than with FeSO4. At gastric pH, no band corresponding to ferritin was observed in the presence of pepsin either on native PAGE or SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration chromatography and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a pH dependent loss of quaternary and secondary structure.CONCLUSION: Under gastric conditions, the iron core of pea ferritin is released into the digestive medium due to acid induced structural alterations and dissociation of protein. The released iron interacts with dietary factors leading to modulation of pea ferritin iron bioavailability,resembling the typical characteristics of non-heme iron.

  15. Spectral and Electroluminescent Properties of Binuclear Zinc Complexes with Halogen-Substituted Derivatives of 1,2,4-Triazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylova, T. N.; Degtyarenko, K. M.; Samsonova, L. G.; Gadirov, R. M.; Gusev, A. N.; Shul'gin, V. F.; Meshkova, S. B.

    2015-03-01

    Spectral properties of binuclear zinc complexes in chloroform solutions and polyvinylcarbazole (PVC) films are investigated. It is demonstrated that incorporation of a halogen atom (chlorine or bromine) in a ligand benzene ring leads to a small shift of the spectrum toward the red region and a reduction of the fluorescence quantum yield. The fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra at T = 77K are investigated. The fluorescence undergoes a blue shift of about 30 nm and multiply increases in the intensity, and the phosphorescence is observed at 540-580 nm. The phosphorescence lifetime is estimated. The electroluminescent properties of metal complexes in structures with thermal vacuum spin coating of complexes and in PVC films are investigated.

  16. Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization of a High-Spin {FeNO}(6) Complex with an Iron(IV)-NO(-) Electronic Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Amy L; Zhang, Bo; Krebs, Carsten; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2016-06-01

    Although the interaction of low-spin ferric complexes with nitric oxide has been well studied, examples of stable high-spin ferric nitrosyls (such as those that could be expected to form at typical non-heme iron sites in biology) are extremely rare. Using the TMG3 tren co-ligand, we have prepared a high-spin ferric NO adduct ({FeNO}(6) complex) via electrochemical or chemical oxidation of the corresponding high-spin ferrous NO {FeNO}(7) complex. The {FeNO}(6) compound is characterized by UV/Visible and IR spectroelectrochemistry, Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and DFT calculations. The data show that its electronic structure is best described as a high-spin iron(IV) center bound to a triplet NO(-) ligand with a very covalent iron-NO bond. This finding demonstrates that this high-spin iron nitrosyl compound undergoes iron-centered redox chemistry, leading to fundamentally different properties than corresponding low-spin compounds, which undergo NO-centered redox transformations. PMID:27101151

  17. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  18. Reversal of HO-1 related cytoprotection with increased expression is due to reactive iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttner, D M; Dennery, P A

    1999-10-01

    It is often postulated that the cytoprotective nature of heme oxygenase (HO-1) explains the inducible nature of this enzyme. However, the mechanisms by which protection occurs are not verified by systematic evaluation of the physiological effects of HO. To explain how induction of HO-1 results in protection against oxygen toxicity, hamster fibroblasts (HA-1) were stably transfected with a tetracycline response plasmid containing the full-length rat HO-1 cDNA construct to allow for regulation of gene expression by varying concentrations of doxycycline (Dox). Transfected cells were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O(2)/5% CO2) for 24 h and several markers of oxidative injury were measured. With varying concentrations of Dox, HO activity was regulated between 3- and 17-fold. Despite cytoprotection with low (less than fivefold) HO activity, high levels of HO-1 expression (greater than 15-fold) were associated with significant oxygen cytotoxicity. Levels of non-heme reactive iron correlated with cellular injury in hyperoxia whereas lower levels of heme were associated with cytoprotection. Cellular levels of cyclic GMP and bilirubin were not significantly altered by modification of HO activity, precluding a substantial role for activation of guanylate cyclase by carbon monoxide or for accumulation of bile pigments in the physiological consequences of HO-1 overexpression. Inhibition of HO activity or chelation of cellular iron prior to hyperoxic exposure decreased reactive iron levels in the samples and significantly reduced oxygen toxicity. We conclude that there is a beneficial threshold of HO-1 overexpression related to the accumulation of reactive iron released in the degradation of heme. Therefore, despite the ready induction of HO-1 in oxidant stress, accumulation of reactive iron formed makes it unlikely that exaggerated expression of HO-1 is a cytoprotective response. PMID:10506583

  19. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES...... understand iron metabolism in elderly HF patients....

  20. Synthesis and characterization of bioactive binuclear transition metal complexes of Schiff base ligand derived from 4-amino-pyrimidine-2-one, diacetyl and glycine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Abhay Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel binuclear transition metal complexes was synthesized by reaction of a Schiff base ligand (1-Methyl-2-(2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-pyrimidin-4-ylimino-propylideneamino-acetic acid (LaH derived from 4-amino-pyrimidine-2-one, diacetyl, glycine and corresponding chloride salt of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Zn(II metals in 1:1 (metal : ligand molar ratio. The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurement, magnetic moment measurement and various spectral studies viz. IR, UV-visible, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, EPR and ESI-MS. Molar conductance measurement data revealed non-electrolytic nature of metal complexes. Electronic absorption spectral data, electronic paramagnetic resonance parameters and magnetic moment values revealed an octahedral geometry for binuclear metal complexes. Cyclic voltammetric study of Ni(II complex shows a couple of one electron anodic responses near 0.70 V and 1.10 V. In vitro biological activity of Schiff base ligand and binuclear complexes has been checked against bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi and fungi (Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis to assess their antibacterial and antifungal properties.

  1. Syntheses and Crystal Structures of Mono- and Binuclear Copper( Ⅱ ) Mixed-ligand Complexes Involving Schiff Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The mononuclear copper(Ⅱ) complex [Cu(L)(2-AP)] 1 and binuclear copper(Ⅱ)complex [Cu(L)(py)]2 2 (L = C1oH1 1O5NS, taurine o-vanillin, py = prydine, 2-AP = 2-aminopyridine)with mixed ligand have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. Crystal data for 1: orthorhombic, space group Pbca with a = 11.921(4), b = 15.816(6), c = 17.076(6) (A), V=3219.7(19) (A)3, C15H17CuN3O5S, Z = 8, Mr = 414.92, Dc = 1.712 g/cm3,μ(MoKα) = 1.520 mm-1,F(000) = 1704, the final R = 0.0300 and wR = 0.0705 for 2840 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I);and crystal data for 2: monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 7.929(3), b = 17.038(5), c = 11.734(4)(A), β = 98.162(6)°, V = 1569.1 (9) (A)3, C15H16CuN2O5S, Z = 4, Mr = 399.90, Dc = 1.693 g/cm3, F(000)= 820,μ(MoKα) = 1.554 mm-1, the final R = 0.0351 and wR = 0.0848 for 2767 observed reflections (I > 2o(I)). The molecular structure of complex 1 consists of one tetra-coordinated Cu(Ⅱ) atom generating a slightly distorted square plane, and a one-dimensional chain structure is formed by intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 consists of a diphenolic hydroxyl O-bridged binuclear copper(Ⅱ) structure. The crystal structures of complexes 1 and 2 reveal that the coordinate copper centers are bound to both nitrogen and oxygen atom donors. The usual N,O-trans arrangement of ligands is observed in both cases.

  2. Theoretical study on homoleptic mononuclear and binuclear ruthenium carbonyls Ru(CO)n(n=3―5) and Ru2(CO)n(n=8,9)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Homoleptic mononuclear and binuclear ruthenium carbonyls Ru(CO)n(n=3―5) and Ru2(CO)n(n=8,9) have been investigated using density functional theory.Sixteen isomers are obtained.For Ru(CO)5,the lowest-energy structure is the singlet D3h trigonal bipyramid.Similar to Os(CO)5,the distorted square pyramid isomer with C2v symmetry lies ~7 kJ·mol-1 higher in energy.For the unsaturated mononuclear ruthenium carbonyls Ru(CO)4 and Ru(CO)3,a singlet structure with C2v symmetry and a Cs bent Tshaped structure are the lowest-energy structures,respectively.The global minimum for the Ru2(CO)9 is a singly bridged(CO)4Ru(μ-CO)Ru(CO)4 structure.A triply bridged Ru2(CO)6(μ-CO)3 structure analogous to the known Fe2(CO)9 structure is predicted to lie very close in energy to the global minimum.For Ru2(CO)8,the doubly bridged C2 structure is predicted to be the global minimum.For the lowest-energy structures of M2(CO)n(M=Fe,Ru,Os,n=9,8),it is found that both iron and ruthenium are favored to form structures containing more bridging carbonyl groups,while osmium prefers to have structures with less bridging carbonyl groups.The study of dissociation energy shows that the dissociation of Ru2(CO)9 into the mononuclear fragments Ru(CO)5+Ru(CO)4 is a less energetically demanding process than the dissociation of one carbonyl group from Ru2(CO)9 to give Ru2(CO)8.

  3. Ferromagnetic interactions in EO-azido-bridged binuclear transition metal(Ⅱ)systems:Syntheses,crystal structures and magnetostructural correlations%Ferromagnetic interactions in EO-azido-bridged binuclear transition metal(Ⅱ)systems: Syntheses,crystal structures and magnetostructural correlations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ShiYuan; WANG BingWu; XU Na; SHI Wei; GAO Song; CHENG Peng

    2012-01-01

    Three new isostructural binuclear transition metal complexes with azido ion and 1,2-bis(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazol-l-yl)ethane(bppe),formulated as[M2(N3)2(bppe)2](ClO4)2(M =Co,1; Ni,2; Cu,3),were successfully synthesized.They were structurally and magnetically characterized.In 1-3,the double azido ions link two adjacent octahedral metal centers together in the end-to-on mode(EO),with the M-NEo-M angles of 99.41°,100.24° and 99.80°,respectively.The co-ligand bppe acts as terminal ligand to saturate the remaining coordination sites.The magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated in the temperature range of 2-300 K.Fitting of the magnetic susceptibility data revealed the occurrence of the strong ferromagnetic interactions[J =26.32 cm-1(1),J =38.23 cm-1(2)and J =139.83 cm-1(3)].Density functional theory calculations have been performed on 1-3 to provide a magneto-structural correlation of the ferromagnetic behavior.

  4. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...... System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course of...... situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3...

  5. Visible Light Absorption of Binuclear TiOCoII Charge-Transfer UnitAssembled in Mesoporous Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

    2007-01-30

    Grafting of CoII(NCCH3)2Cl2 onto mesoporous Ti-MCM-41 silicain acetonitrile solution affords binuclear Ti-O-CoII sites on the poresurface under complete replacement of the precursor ligands byinteractions with anchored Ti centers and the silica surface. The CoIIligand field spectrum signals that the Co centers are anchored on thepore surface in tetrahedral coordination. FT-infrared action spectroscopyusing ammonia gas adsorption reveals Co-O-Si bond modes at 831 and 762cm-1. No Co oxide clusters are observed in the as-synthesized material.The bimetallic moieties feature an absorption extending from the UV intothe visible to about 600 nm which is attributed to the TiIV-O-CoII?3TiIII-O-CoIII metal-to-metal charge-transfer (MMCT) transition. Thechromophore is absent in MCM-41 containing Ti and Co centers isolatedfrom each other; this material was synthesized by grafting CoII onto aTi-MCM-41 sample with the Ti centers protected by a cyclopentadienylligand. The result indicates that the appearance of the charge-transferabsorption requires that the metal centers are linked by an oxo bridge,which is additionally supported by XANES spectroscopy. The MMCTchromophore of Ti-O-CoII units has sufficient oxidation power to serve asvisible light electron pump for driving multi-electron transfer catalystsof demanding uphill reactions such as water oxidation.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and spectrochemical studies on a few binuclear -oxo molybdenum(V) complexes of pyrimidine derived Schiff base ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samik Gupta; Somnath Roy; Tarak Nath Mandal; Kinsuk Das; Sangita Ray; Ray J Butcher; Susanta Kumar Kar

    2010-03-01

    Ten new binuclear singly oxo-bridged molybdenum complexes (complexes 1-10) were prepared using five pyrimidine derived Schiff base ligands and two Mo(V) precursors (NH4)2MoOCl5 and (NH4)2MoOBr5. The ligands are prepared by the condensation of 4,6-dimethyl 2-hydrazino pyrimidine with salicylaldehyde (for HL1), -hydroxy acetophenone (for HL2) and substituted salicylaldehydes (for HL3, HL4 and HL5) respectively. These ligands are already reported as good donors for Mo(VI) state. The -oxo Mo(V) complexes reported here bears a distorted octahedral geometry around each Mo atom with either N2O2Cl or N2O2Br chromophores. Fine variations in the spectroscopic behaviour of the complexes are observed in accordance with the varying electron donating properties of the ligands. All the complexes are unstable in solution and X-ray quality crystal of complex 1 could be isolated. All the complexes are characterized by IR and UV-Vis spectra.

  7. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Binuclear Silver(Ⅰ)Complex with 2-nitro-(2-pyridylsulfanylmethyl)benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The reaction of 2-nitro-(2-pyridylsulfanylmethyl)benzene L with silver nitrate produces a centrosymmetric binuclear complex bis(2-nitro-(2-pyridylsulfanylmethyl)benzene-N,S)-bis(nitrato-O,O)-disilver(Ⅰ), [AgLNO3]2 1. The crystal is of triclinic, space group P1, with a = 7.383(3), b = 8.340(3), c = 12.003(4) A, a = 95.069(6), β = 93.498(5), γ = 102.734(6)°, C24H2oAg2N6-O10S2, Mr= 832.32, V= 715.6(4) A3, Z = 1, Dc = 1.931 g/cm3, F(000) = 412, μ = 1.581 mm-1, R=0.0351 and wR = 0.0749 Each silver atom is tetrahedrally coordinated by two O atoms from bidentate nitrate, one S atom from a ligand and one N atom from another ligand. Furthermore, AgAg interactions have been observed in the complex.

  8. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  9. Health effects of different dietary iron intakes: a systematic literature review for the 5th Nordic Nutrition Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Domellöf

    2013-07-01

    ID and IDA in pregnant women can be effectively prevented by iron supplementation at a dose of 40 mg/day from week 18–20 of gestation. There is probable evidence that a high intake of heme iron, but not total dietary, non-heme or supplemental iron, is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D and gestational diabetes. Conclusions : Overall, the evidence does not support a change of the iron intakes recommended in the NNR 4. However, one could consider adding recommendations for infants below 6 months of age, low birth weight infants and pregnant women.

  10. Iron-sulfur cluster damage by the superoxide radical in neural tissues of the SOD1(G93A) ALS rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Mojović, Miloš; Stamenković, Stefan; Jovanović, Miloš; Selaković, Vesna; Andjus, Pavle; Bačić, Goran

    2016-07-01

    Extensive clinical investigations, in hand with biochemical and biophysical research, have associated brain iron accumulation with the pathogenesis of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease. The origin of iron is still not identified, but it is proposed that it forms redox active complexes that can participate in the Fenton reaction generating the toxic hydroxyl radical. In this paper, the state of iron in the neural tissues isolated from SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats was investigated using low temperature EPR spectroscopy and is compared with that of nontransgenic (NTg) littermates. The results showed that iron in neural tissues is present as high- and low-spin, heme and non-heme iron. It appears that the SOD1(G93A) rat neural tissues were most likely exposed in vivo to higher amounts of reactive oxygen species when compared to the corresponding NTg tissues, as they showed increased oxidized [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster content relative to [4Fe-4S](1+). Also, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was found to be reduced in these tissues, which may be associated with the observed uncoupling of heme a3 Fe and CuB in the O2-reduction site of the enzyme. Furthermore, the SOD1(G93A) rat spinal cords and brainstems contained more manganese, presumably from MnSOD, than those of NTg rats. The addition of potassium superoxide to all neural tissues ex vivo, led to the [4Fe-4S]→[3Fe-4S] cluster conversion and concurrent release of Fe. These results suggest that the superoxide anion may be the cause of the observed oxidative damage to SOD1(G93A) rat neural tissues and that the iron-sulfur clusters may be the source of poorly liganded redox active iron implicated in ALS pathogenesis. Low temperature EPR spectroscopy appears to be a valuable tool in assessing the role of metals in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27130034

  11. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron and ... enough iron in their daily diets. How Much Iron Do Kids Need? Kids require different amounts of ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, ... iron supplements and multivitamins to improve her iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such ...

  13. Iron Polymerization and Arsenic Removal During In-Situ Iron Electrocoagulation in Synthetic Bangladeshi Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, C. M.; Pena, J.; Addy, S.; Gadgil, A.

    2010-12-01

    Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contamination in groundwater drinking supplies. The majority of affected people live in rural Bangladesh. Electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes is a promising arsenic removal strategy that is based on the generation of iron precipitates with a high affinity for arsenic through the electrochemical dissolution of a sacrificial iron anode. Many studies of iron hydrolysis in the presence of co-occurring ions in groundwater such as PO43-, SiO44-, and AsO43- suggest that these ions influence the polymerization and formation of iron oxide phases. However, the combined impact of these ions on precipitates generated by EC is not well understood. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to examine EC precipitates generated in synthetic Bangladeshi groundwater (SBGW). The iron oxide structure and arsenic binding geometry were investigated as a function of EC operating conditions. As and Fe k-edge spectra were similar between samples regardless of the large range of current density (0.02, 1.1, 5.0, 100 mA/cm2) used during sample generation. This result suggests that current density does not play a large role in the formation EC precipitates in SBGW. Shell-by-shell fits of Fe K-edge data revealed the presence of a single Fe-Fe interatomic distance at approximately 3.06 Å. The absence of longer ranged Fe-Fe correlations suggests that EC precipitates consist of nano-scale chains (polymers) of FeO6 octahedra sharing equatorial edges. Shell-by-shell fits of As K-edge spectra show arsenic bound in primarily bidentate, binuclear corner sharing complexes. In this coordination geometry, arsenic prevents the formation of FeO6 corner-sharing linkages, which are necessary for 3-dimensional crystal growth. The individual and combined effects of other anions, such as PO43- and SiO44- present in SBGW are currently being investigated to determine the role of these ions in stunting crystal growth. The results provided by this

  14. Identification of a hydroxide ligand at the iron center of ribonucleotide reductase by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonance Raman spectrum of protein B2 of ribonucleotide reductase from Escherichia coli shows several features related to its oxo-bridged binuclear iron center. A peak at 492 cm-1 is assigned to the symmetric stretch of the Fe-O-Fe moiety on the basis of its 13-cm-1 shift to lower energy upon 18O substitution. The 18O species shows an additional peak at 731 cm-1, which is a good candidate for the asymmetric stretch of the Fe-O-Fe moiety. Its exact location in the 16O species is obscured by the presence of a protein tryptophan vibration at 758 cm-1. A third resonance-enhanced peak at 598 cm-1 is identified as an Fe-OH vibration on the basis of its 24-cm-1 shift to lower energy in H218O, its 2-cm-1 shift to lower energy in D2O, and its pH-dependent intensity. A hydrogen-bonded μ-oxo bridge similar to that in hemerythrin is suggested by the unusually low frequency for the Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretch and the 3-cm-1 shift to higher energy of nu/sub s/ (Fe-O-Fe), an Fe-O-Fe angle of 1380 can be calculated. This small angle suggests that the iron center consists of a tribridged core as in hemerythrin. A model for the binuclear iron center of ribonucleotide reductase is presented in which the hydroxide ligand sites provide an explanation for the half-of-sites reactivity of the enzyme

  15. Iron homeostasis and nutritional iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-04-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins encoded in iron responsive element (IRE)-mRNA. The noncoding IRE-mRNA structures bind protein repressors, IRP1 or 2, during iron deficiency. Integration of the IRE-RNA in translation regulators (near the cap) or turnover elements (after the coding region) increases iron uptake (DMT1/TRF1) or decreases iron storage/efflux (FTN/FPN) when IRP binds. An antioxidant response element in FTN DNA binds Bach1, a heme-sensitive transcription factor that coordinates expression among antioxidant response proteins like FTN, thioredoxin reductase, and quinone reductase. FTN, an antioxidant because Fe(2+) and O(2) (reactive oxygen species generators) are consumed to make iron mineral, is also a nutritional iron concentrate that is an efficiently absorbed, nonheme source of iron from whole legumes. FTN protein cages contain thousands of mineralized iron atoms and enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, an absorption mechanism distinct from transport of nonheme iron salts (ferrous sulfate), iron chelators (ferric-EDTA), or heme. Recognition of 2 nutritional nonheme iron sources, small and large (FTN), will aid the solution of iron deficiency, a major public health problem, and the development of new policies on iron nutrition. PMID:21346101

  16. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: Synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M.; Ramesh, R.

    2015-03-01

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E = P or As; X = Cl or Br; L = NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d5) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx ≠ gy ≠ gz) at 77 K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (RuIII-RuIII/RuIV-RuIV; RuIII-RuIII/RuII-RuII) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86 V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent RuVdbnd O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle.

  17. N,N-Diethylamine appended binuclear Zn(ii) complexes: highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensors for picric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Ashish; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2016-05-28

    Novel binuclear Zn(ii) complexes (1-2) derived from bis-chelating salen type ligands (H2L(1) and H2L(2)) possessing N,N-diethylamine moieties on the periphery of the molecules have been synthesized and thoroughly characterized by satisfactory elemental analyses and spectral (FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, UV-vis, fluorescence and ESI-MS) studies. The structures of H2L(1) and 1 have been authenticated by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Complexes 1 and 2 strongly fluoresce and act as highly selective and sensitive chemosensors for picric acid in different organic as well as aqueous media. Both 1 and 2 showed strong potential to detect traces of PA in vapour/solid phase through contact mode analysis. Spectral and theoretical (DFT) studies suggested that the observed fluorescence quenching may be associated with ground state (GS) charge transfer as well as electrostatic interactions between 1/2 and PA. The fluorescence lifetime for the representative complex 1 displayed a double exponential curve and unaltered lifetime (τav, 0.63 nm) in the absence and presence of PA and strongly suggested that quenching follows a static mechanism. Further, DFT calculations on 1 and 2 strongly supported the static mechanism through GS charge transfer between complexes and PA. In addition, (1)H NMR spectral studies on 1-2 in the presence of PA firmly advocated strong hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking between the phenolic rings of 1-2 and the aromatic ring of PA. These complexes are capable of detecting PA either individually or in a competitive environment of other nitro- explosives. Florescence spectral studies on the model complex M lacking N,N-diethylamine groups revealed moderate selectivity and sensitivity towards PA and supported the key role of N,N-diethylamine moieties in the selectivity and sensitivity of complexes. PMID:27114325

  18. DNA-binding, catalytic oxidation, C—C coupling reactions and antibacterial activities of binuclear Ru(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes: Synthesis and spectral characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Arumugam Manimaran; Chinnasamy Jayabalakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    New hexa-coordinated binuclear Ru(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes of the type {[(B)(EPh3)(CO)ClRu]2L} (where, E = P or As; B = PPh3 or AsPh3 or pyridine; L = mononucleating NS donor of N-substituted thiosemicarbazones) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–vis and 31P{1H} NMR cyclic voltammetric studies. The DNA-binding studies of Ru(II) complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV–vis, viscosity measurements, gel-electrophoresis and fluor...

  19. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Fine-mapping and genetic analysis of the loci affecting hepatic iron overload in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Guo

    Full Text Available The liver, as the major organ for iron storage and production of hepcidin, plays pivotal roles in maintaining mammalian iron homeostasis. A previous study showed that Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs on chromosome 7 (Chr7 and 16 (Chr16 may control hepatic non-heme iron overload in an F2 intercross derived from C57BL/6J (B6 and SWR/J (SWR mice. In this study, we aimed to validate the existence of these loci and identify the genes responsible for the phenotypic variations by generating congenic mice carrying SWR chromosome segments expanding these QTLs (D7Mit68-D7Mit71 and D16Mit125-D16Mit185, respectively. We excluded involvement of Chr7 based on the lack of iron accumulation in congenic mice. In contrast, liver iron accumulation was observed in Chr16 congenic mice. Through use of a series of subcongenic murine lines the interval on Chr16 was further fine-mapped to a 0.8 Mb segment spanning 11 genes. We found that the mRNA expression pattern in the liver remained unchanged for all 11 genes tested. Most importantly, we detected 4 missense mutations in 3 candidate genes including Sidt1 (P172R, Spice1(R708S, Boc (Q1051R and Boc (S450-insertion in B6 allele in the liver of SWR homozygous congenic mice. To further delineate potential modifier gene(s, we reconstituted seven candidate genes, Sidt1, Boc, Zdhhc23, Gramd1c, Atp6v1a, Naa50 and Gtpbp8, in mouse liver through hydrodynamic transfection. However, we were unable to detect significant changes in liver iron levels upon reconstitution of these candidate genes. Taken together, our work provides strong genetic evidence of the existence of iron modifiers on Chr16. Moreover, we were able to delineate the phenotypically responsible region to a 0.8 Mb region containing 11 coding genes, 3 of which harbor missense mutations, using a series of congenic mice.

  1. Human iron transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Garrick, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Human iron transporters manage iron carefully because tissues need iron for critical functions, but too much iron increases the risk of reactive oxygen species. Iron acquisition occurs in the duodenum via divalent metal transporter (DMT1) and ferroportin. Iron trafficking depends largely on the transferrin cycle. Nevertheless, non-digestive tissues have a variety of other iron transporters that may render DMT1 modestly redundant, and DMT1 levels exceed those needed for the just-mentioned task...

  2. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  3. Highly Selective Salicylate Membrane Electrode Based on N,N'-(Aminoethyl)ethylenediamide Bis(2-salicylideneimine) Binuclear Copper(Ⅱ) Complex as Neutral Carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN, Ai-Li; CHAI, Ya-Qin; YUAN, Ruo; GUI, Guo-Feng

    2006-01-01

    A new ion selective electrode for salicylate based on N,N'-(aminoethyl)ethylenediamide bis(2-salicylideneimine)binuclear copper(Ⅱ) complex [Cu(Ⅱ)2-AEBS] as an ionophore was developed. The electrode has a linear range from 1.0 × 10-1 to 5.0 × 10-7 mol· L-1 with a near-Nemstian slope of (-55 ± 1) mV/decade and a detection limit of 2.0 ×10-7 mol·L-1 in phosphorate buffer solution of pH 5.0 at 25 ℃. It shows good selectivity for Sal and displays anti-Hofmeister selectivity sequence: Sal- > SCN-> ClO4-> I- > NO2- > Br- > NO3- > Cl- > SO32- > SO42-The proposed sensor based on binuclear copper(Ⅱ)complex has a fast response time of 5-10 s and can be used for at least 2 months without any major deviation. The response mechanism is discussed in view of the alternating current (AC) impedance technique and the UV-vis spectroscopy technique. The effect of the electrode membrane compositions and the experimental conditions were studied. The electrode has been successfully used for the determination of salicylate ion in drug pharmaceutical preparations.

  4. Water displacement by cyanogold complexes in binuclear nickel(II) compounds based on bridging oxalate. Synthesis, structural diversity, magnetic properties, and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoria, Pablo; Muga, Iñaki; Gutiérrez-Zorrilla, Juan M; Luque, Antonio; Román, Pascual; Lezama, Luis; Zúniga, F Javier; Beitia, Javier I

    2003-02-24

    Several cyanogold complexes react with the binuclear nickel complex [(Ni(dien)(H(2)O))(2)(mu-ox)](PF(6))(2).2H(2)O to give the compounds [(Ni(dien)(H(2)O))(2)(mu-ox)]Br(2) (1), [(Ni(dien)(Au(CN)(2)))(2)(mu-ox)] (2), and [(Ni(dien))(2)(mu-ox)(mu-Au(CN)(4))](PF(6)) (3) (dien, diethilenetriamine; ox, oxalate). In the case of compounds 2 and 3, water displacement by the corresponding cyanogold complex takes place, whereas compound 1 is formed by a substitution of the anion. The crystal structures of compounds 1 and 2 present a 2D arrangement where the layers are connected by van der Waals forces (1) or N-H.Ntbd1;C hydrogen bonds (2), where each binuclear complex is hydrogen bonded to its neighbors, whereas compound 3 presents a novel structure where the tetracyanoaurate acts as a bridging ligand to give a polymeric compound. Magnetic studies of these compounds reveal an antiferromagnetic behavior. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed on isolated models of compounds 2 and 3 in order to gain some insight about the different behavior of the [Au(CN)(2)](-) and [Au(CN)(4)](-) groups as ligands and proton acceptors in hydrogen bonds. PMID:12588126

  5. Comparison of reactivity of Pt(II) center in the mononuclear and binuclear organometallic diimineplatinum complexes toward oxidative addition of methyl iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    The reactivities of Pt(II) center in a series of organometallic mononuclear Pt(II), binuclear Pt(II) and binuclear mixed-valence Pt(II)-Pt(IV) complexes toward oxidative addition of MeI have been compared from a theoretical point of view. The nucleophilicity index and electron-donation power were calculated for each of these complexes. The energies of HOMO and dZ2 orbital were determined for these complexes. Very good correlations were found between logk2 (k2 is the experimentally determined second order rate constant for the oxidative addition of MeI on these complexes) and nucleophilicity index or electron-donation power for these complexes. The correlation between logk2 and the energy of HOMO or the energy of dZ2 orbital were also very good. The condensed-to-atom Fukui functions for electrophilic attack on these complexes showed that the Pt(II) center is the preferred site for the oxidative addition of MeI. All of these observations are in agreement with the proposed SN2 type mechanism in the oxidative addition of MeI on the Pt(II) center in these complexes.

  6. Mononuclear thiocyanate containing nickel(II) and binuclear azido bridged nickel(II) complexes of N4-coordinate pyrazole based ligand: Syntheses, structures and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Ankita; Monfort, Montserrat; Kumar, Sujit Baran

    2013-10-01

    Two mononuclear nickel(II) complexes [NiL1(NCS)2] (1) and [NiL2(NCS)2] (2) and two azido bridged binuclear nickel(II) complexes [Ni(()2()2] (3) and [Ni(()2()2] (4), where L1, L2, L1‧ and L2‧ are N,N-diethyl-N‧,N‧-bis((3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (L1), N,N-bis((1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl)-N‧,N‧-diethylethane-1,2-diamine (L2), N,N-diethyl-N‧-((3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (L1‧) and N-((1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl)-N‧,N‧-diethylethane-1,2-diamine (L2‧) have been synthesized and characterized by microanalyses and physico-chemical methods. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that complexes 1 and 2 are mononuclear NCS- containing Ni(II) complex with octahedral geometry and complexes 3 and 4 are end-on (μ-1,1) azido bridged binuclear Ni(II) complexes with distorted octahedral geometry. Variable temperature magnetic studies of the complexes 3 and 4 display ferromagnetic interaction with J values 19 and 32 cm-1, respectively.

  7. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Anti-plasmodial activity of aroylhydrazone and thiosemicarbazone iron chelators: effect on erythrocyte membrane integrity, parasite development and the intracellular labile iron pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcourt, Asikiya; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Kwagyan, John; Adenuga, Babafemi B; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Lovejoy, David B; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2013-12-01

    Iron chelators inhibit the growth of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in culture and in animal and human studies. We previously reported the anti-plasmodial activity of the chelators, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4mT), and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4pT). In fact, these ligands showed greater growth inhibition of chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine-resistant (7G8) strains of P. falciparum in culture compared to desferrioxamine (DFO). The present study examined the effects of 311, N4mT and N4pT on erythrocyte membrane integrity and asexual parasite development. While the characteristic biconcave disk shape of the erythrocytes was unaffected, the chelators caused very slight hemolysis at IC50 values that inhibited parasite growth. The chelators 311, N4mT and N4pT affected all stages of the intra-erythrocytic development cycle (IDC) of P. falciparum in culture. However, while these ligands primarily affected the ring-stage, DFO inhibited primarily trophozoite and schizont-stages. Ring, trophozoite and schizont-stages of the IDC were inhibited by significantly lower concentrations of 311, N4mT, and N4pT (IC50=4.45±1.70, 10.30±4.40, and 3.64±2.00μM, respectively) than DFO (IC50=23.43±3.40μM). Complexation of 311, N4mT and N4pT with iron reduced their anti-plasmodial activity. Estimation of the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP) in erythrocytes showed that the chelation efficacy of 311, N4mT and N4pT corresponded to their anti-plasmodial activities, suggesting that the LIP may be a potential source of non-heme iron for parasite metabolism within the erythrocyte. This study has implications for malaria chemotherapy that specifically disrupts parasite iron utilization. PMID:24028863

  9. Iron(III) complexes of certain tetradentate phenolate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mallayan Palaniandavar; Marappan Velusamy; Ramasamy Mayilmurugan

    2006-11-01

    Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (CTD) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCD) are bacterial non-heme iron enzymes, which catalyse the oxidative cleavage of catechols to cis, cis-muconic acids with the incorporation of molecular oxygen via a mechanism involving a high-spin ferric centre. The iron(III) complexes of tripodal phenolate ligands containing N3O and N2O2 donor sets represent the metal binding region of the iron proteins. In our laboratory iron(III) complexes of mono- and bisphenolate ligands have been studied successfully as structural and functional models for the intradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenase enzymes. The single crystal X-ray crystal structures of four of the complexes have been determined. One of the bis-phenolato complexes contains a FeN2O2Cl chromophore with a novel trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry. The Fe-O-C bond angle of 136.1° observed for one of the iron(III) complex of a monophenolate ligand is very similar to that in the enzymes. The importance of the nearby sterically demanding coordinated -NMe2 group has been established and implies similar stereochemical constraints from the other ligated amino acid moieties in the 3,4-PCD enzymes, the enzyme activity of which is traced to the difference in the equatorial and axial Fe-O(tyrosinate) bonds (Fe-O-C, 133, 148°). The nature of heterocyclic rings of the ligands and the methyl substituents on them regulate the electronic spectral features, FeIII/FeII redox potentials and catechol cleavage activity of the complexes. Upon interacting with catecholate anions, two catecholate to iron(III) charge transfer bands appear and the low energy band is similar to that of catechol dioxygenase-substrate complex. Four of the complexes catalyze the oxidative cleavage of H2DBC by molecular oxygen to yield intradiol cleavage products. Remarkably, the more basic N-methylimidazole ring in one of the complexes facilitates the rate-determining productreleasing phase of the catalytic reaction. The present

  10. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so ... ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron dextran (Dexferrum, Infed, Proferdex), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit); any other medications; or any ...

  11. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so ... carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other medications; or any ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... refers to a condition in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood ... iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used up. ...

  13. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  14. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Iron-rich foods include: Chicken and turkey Dried lentils, peas, and beans Fish Meats (liver is the ... and egg yolks are high sources of iron. Flour, bread, and some cereals are fortified with iron. ...

  15. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential phar...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  17. Chemistry of a binuclear cadmium(II) hydroxide complex: formation from water, CO(2) reactivity, and comparison to a zinc analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Russell A; McAlexander, Lenore H; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2002-12-16

    Treatment of the bmnpa (N,N-bis-2-(methylthio)ethyl-N-((6-neopentylamino-2-pyridyl)methyl)amine) ligand with equimolar amounts of Cd(ClO(4))(2).5H(2)O and Me(4)NOH.5H(2)O in CH(3)CN yielded the binuclear cadmium hydroxide complex [((bmnpa)Cd)(2)(mu-OH)(2)](ClO(4))(2).CH(3)CN (1). Complex 1 may also be prepared (a) by treatment of a CH(3)CN solution of (bmnpa)Cd(ClO(4))(2) (2) with 1 equiv of n-BuLi, followed by treatment with water or (b) from 2 in the presence of 1 equiv each of water and NEt(3). The hydroxide derivative 1 is not produced from 2 and water in the absence of an added base. Complex 1 possesses a binuclear structure in the solid state with hydrogen-bonding and CH/pi interactions involving the bmnpa ligand. The overall structural features of 1 differ from the halide derivative [((bmnpa)Cd)(2)(mu-Cl)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (3), particularly in that the Cd(2)(mu-OH)(2) core of 1 is symmetric whereas the Cd(2)(mu-Cl)(2) core of 3 is asymmetric. In acetonitrile solution, 1 behaves as a 1:2 electrolyte and retains a binuclear structure and secondary hydrogen-bonding and CH/pi interactions, whereas 3 is a 1:1 electrolyte, indicating formation of a mononuclear [(bmnpa)CdCl]ClO(4) species in solution. Treatment of 1 with CO(2) in anhydrous CH(3)CN yields the bridging carbonate complex [((bmnpa)Cd)(2)(mu-CO(3))](ClO(4))(2).CH(3)CN (4). Treatment of a chemically similar zinc hydroxide complex, [((benpa)Zn)(2)(mu-OH)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (benpa = N,N-bis-2-(ethylthio)ethyl-N-((6-neopentylamino-2-pyridyl)methyl)amine, with CO(2) also results in the formation of a carbonate derivative, [((benpa)Zn)(2)(mu-CO(3))](ClO(4))(2) (5), albeit the coordination mode of the bridging carbonate moiety is different. Treatment of 4 with added water results in no reaction, whereas 5 under identical conditions will undergo reaction to yield the zinc hydroxide complex [((benpa)Zn)(2)(mu-OH)(2)](ClO(4))(2). PMID:12470076

  18. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep...

  19. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... contours are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  20. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  1. Synthesis, structure and crystal packing of a clothespin-shaped binuclear trans-bis(2-amino- troponato)palladium(II) complex bearing m-xylidene linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Masaya; Komiya, Naruyoshi; Naota, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    A clothespin-shaped binuclear trans-bis(2-aminotroponato)palladium(II) complex doubly linked with m-xylidene spacers [Pd2(C22H18N2O2)2] (1), has been synthesized and fully characterized using 1H and 13C NMR, FT-IR, high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis unequivocally established the specific structure of 1, including its trans-coordination, anti-conformation and three-dimensional clothespin-like shape, and confirmed highly regular crystal packing resulting from consecutive intermolecular π-stacking and CH-π interactions between the coordination platforms and the linkers.

  2. Structural study of two N(4)-substituted thiosemicarbazones prepared from 1-phenyl-1,2-propanedione-2-oxime and their binuclear nickel(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Werner; Jasinski, Jerry P.; Woudenberg, Richard; Goldberg, Karen I.; West, Douglas X.

    2002-05-01

    The crystal structures of the oxime/thiosemicarbazones 1-phenyl-1-{ N(4)-methyl- and 1-phenyl-1-{ N(4)-ethylthiosemicarbazone}-2-oximepropane, H 2Po4M and H 2Po4E, were found to have the oxime and thiosemicarbazone moieties on opposite sides of the carbon-carbon backbone. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding involves the oxime function forming a symmetrical dimer for both compounds. The structures of the binuclear nickel(II) complexes, [Ni(Po4M)] 2 and [Ni(Po4E)] 2, show that bridging by the oximato N-O results in a centrosymmetric arrangement of the two planar nickel centers in each complex. The coordinated thiosemicarbazonato moieties undergo the expected changes in bond distances and angles compared to H 2Po4M and H 2Po4E.

  3. Structure of a Novel Phosphotriesterase from Sphingobium sp. TCM1: A Familiar Binuclear Metal Center Embedded in a Seven-Bladed β-Propeller Protein Fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabanglo, Mark F; Xiang, Dao Feng; Bigley, Andrew N; Raushel, Frank M

    2016-07-19

    A novel phosphotriesterase was recently discovered and purified from Sphingobium sp. TCM1 (Sb-PTE) and shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of organophosphate esters with a catalytic efficiency that exceeds 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydrolysis of triphenyl phosphate. The enzyme was crystallized and the three-dimensional structure determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (Protein Data Bank entry 5HRM ). The enzyme adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller protein fold, and three disulfide bonds were identified between Cys-146 and Cys-242, Cys-411 and Cys-443, and Cys-542 and Cys-559. The active site of Sb-PTE contains a binuclear manganese center that is nearly identical to that of the structurally unrelated phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta (Pd-PTE). The two metal ions in the active site are bridged to one another by Glu-201 and a water molecule. The α-metal ion is further coordinated to the protein by interactions with His-389, His-475, and Glu-407, whereas the β-metal ion is further liganded to His-317 and His-258. Computational docking of mimics of the proposed pentavalent reaction intermediates for the hydrolysis of organophosphates was used to provide a model for the binding of chiral substrates in the active site of Sb-PTE. The most striking difference in the catalytic properties of Sb-PTE, relative to those of Pd-PTE, is the enhanced rate of hydrolysis of organophosphate esters with substantially weaker leaving groups. The structural basis for this difference in the catalytic properties between Sb-PTE and Pd-PTE, despite the nearly identical binuclear metal centers for the activation of the substrate and nucleophilic water molecule, is at present unclear. PMID:27353520

  4. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  5. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  7. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  8. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura,Ikuro; Yamana,Masatoshi; NNishishita,Akira; Sugiyama,Motoharu; Miyata, Akira

    1980-01-01

    A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  9. Mammalian iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory Jon; Vulpe, Christopher D

    2009-10-01

    Iron is essential for basic cellular processes but is toxic when present in excess. Consequently, iron transport into and out of cells is tightly regulated. Most iron is delivered to cells bound to plasma transferrin via a process that involves transferrin receptor 1, divalent metal-ion transporter 1 and several other proteins. Non-transferrin-bound iron can also be taken up efficiently by cells, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Cells can divest themselves of iron via the iron export protein ferroportin in conjunction with an iron oxidase. The linking of an oxidoreductase to a membrane permease is a common theme in membrane iron transport. At the systemic level, iron transport is regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin which acts on ferroportin to control iron release to the plasma. PMID:19484405

  10. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insuffici...

  11. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do and...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar......Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...

  12. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  13. Synthesis and spectral characterization of mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes derived from 2-benzoylpyridine-N⁴-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: crystal structure of a novel sulfur bridged copper(II) box-dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, K; Sithambaresan, M; Aiswarya, N; Kurup, M R Prathapachandra

    2015-03-15

    Mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine-N(4)-methyl thiosemicarbazone (HL) were prepared and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Structural evidence for the novel sulfur bridged copper(II) iodo binuclear complex is obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex [Cu2L2I2], a non-centrosymmetric box dimer, crystallizes in monoclinic C2/c space group and it was found to have distorted square pyramidal geometry (Addison parameter, τ=0.238) with the square basal plane occupied by the thiosemicarbazone moiety and iodine atom whereas the sulfur atom from the other coordinated thiosemicarbazone moiety occupies the apical position. This is the first crystallographically studied system having non-centrosymmetrical entities bridged via thiolate S atoms with Cu(II)I bond. The tridentate thiosemicarbazone coordinates in mono deprotonated thionic tautomeric form in all complexes except in sulfato complex, [Cu(HL)(SO4)]·H2O (1) where it binds to the metal centre in neutral form. The magnetic moment values and the EPR spectral studies reflect the binuclearity of some of the complexes. The spin Hamiltonian and bonding parameters are calculated based on EPR studies. In all the complexes g||>g⊥>2.0023 and the g values in frozen DMF are consistent with the d(x2-y2) ground state. The thermal stabilities of some of the complexes were also determined. PMID:25546494

  14. Synthesis and spectral characterization of mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes derived from 2-benzoylpyridine-N4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Crystal structure of a novel sulfur bridged copper(II) box-dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, K.; Sithambaresan, M.; Aiswarya, N.; Kurup, M. R. Prathapachandra

    2015-03-01

    Mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine-N4-methyl thiosemicarbazone (HL) were prepared and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Structural evidence for the novel sulfur bridged copper(II) iodo binuclear complex is obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex [Cu2L2I2], a non-centrosymmetric box dimer, crystallizes in monoclinic C2/c space group and it was found to have distorted square pyramidal geometry (Addison parameter, τ = 0.238) with the square basal plane occupied by the thiosemicarbazone moiety and iodine atom whereas the sulfur atom from the other coordinated thiosemicarbazone moiety occupies the apical position. This is the first crystallographically studied system having non-centrosymmetrical entities bridged via thiolate S atoms with Cu(II)sbnd I bond. The tridentate thiosemicarbazone coordinates in mono deprotonated thionic tautomeric form in all complexes except in sulfato complex, [Cu(HL)(SO4)]·H2O (1) where it binds to the metal centre in neutral form. The magnetic moment values and the EPR spectral studies reflect the binuclearity of some of the complexes. The spin Hamiltonian and bonding parameters are calculated based on EPR studies. In all the complexes g|| > g⊥ > 2.0023 and the g values in frozen DMF are consistent with the dx2-y2 ground state. The thermal stabilities of some of the complexes were also determined.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  16. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  17. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin ... The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells and myoglobin is found ...

  18. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from ... iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such as focusing more on green leafy vegetables, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  4. Iron Therapy for Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    Preterm infants are at risk for both iron deficiency and iron overload. The role of iron in multiple organ functions suggests that iron supplementation is essential for the preterm infant. Conversely, the potential for iron overload and the poorly developed anti-oxidant measures in the preterm infant argues against indiscriminate iron supplementation in this population. The purpose of this article is to review the predisposing factors and consequences of iron deficiency and iron overload in t...

  5. Special thermite cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Zhiguts

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  6. Alternative iron making routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, P.; Sharma, T. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India)

    2002-07-01

    The versatile route of iron production 'blast furnace' technique is being replaced by widely accepted Corex technology, Midrex process using Fastmelt ironmaking, eco-friendly Romelt process, more innovative Ausmelt & Hismelt technology, TATA KORF Mini blast furnace improvement, 'quickest iron through Orbiting Plasma', Direct iron ore smelting process, Conred, AISI-Hyl, Inred processes, Direct iron ore reduction methods, their comparison and proposed modifications. 18 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Iron deficiency and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  8. A monotonic increase of formal metal–metal bond orders from one to five upon loss of carbonyl groups from binuclear benzene chromium carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Density functional theory studies on (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)n (n = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) are reported. • The predicted Cr–Cr distances in (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)n (n = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) decrease monotonically as CO groups are lost. • The formal Cr–Cr bond orders in (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)n (n = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) increase monotonically from 1 to 5 as CO groups are lost. • Comparison of the (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)n and (C5H5)2Mn2(CO)n systems are made. - Abstract: Benzene forms a binuclear chromium carbonyl derivative (η6-C6H6)2Cr2(μ-CO)3, shown by X-ray crystallography to have a very short Cr≡Cr distance, suggesting the formal triple bond required to give each chromium atom the favored 18-electron configuration. We now describe theoretical studies on the entire series of binuclear benzene chromium carbonyls (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)n (n = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1). The predicted Cr–Cr distances in the lowest energy singlet structures determined by the BP86 method decrease monotonically as carbonyl groups are lost starting from 2.95 Å in (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)5 to 1.95 Å in (C6H6)2Cr2(CO) corresponding to a steady increase in the formal bond order from one to five. This increase in formal Cr–Cr bond order is also supported by a monotonic increase in the Wiberg bond indices ranging from 0.29 for the single bond in (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)5 to ∼2 for the formal quintuple bond in (C6H6)2Cr2(CO)

  9. Binuclear Cu(A) Formation in Biosynthetic Models of Cu(A) in Azurin Proceeds via a Novel Cu(Cys)2His Mononuclear Copper Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Polen, Michael J; Chacón, Kelly N; Wilson, Tiffany D; Yu, Yang; Reed, Julian; Nilges, Mark J; Blackburn, Ninian J; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Cu(A) is a binuclear electron transfer (ET) center found in cytochrome c oxidases (CcOs), nitrous oxide reductases (N₂ORs), and nitric oxide reductase (NOR). In these proteins, the Cu(A) centers facilitate efficient ET (kET > 10⁴s⁻¹) under low thermodynamic driving forces (10-90 mV). While the structure and functional properties of Cu(A) are well understood, a detailed mechanism of the incorporation of copper into the protein and the identity of the intermediates formed during the Cu(A) maturation process are still lacking. Previous studies of the Cu(A) assembly mechanism in vitro using a biosynthetic model Cu(A) center in azurin (Cu(A)Az) identified a novel intermediate X (Ix) during reconstitution of the binuclear site. However, because of the instability of Ix and the coexistence of other Cu centers, such as Cu(A)' and type 1 copper centers, the identity of this intermediate could not be established. Here, we report the mechanism of Cu(A) assembly using variants of Glu114XCuAAz (X = Gly, Ala, Leu, or Gln), the backbone carbonyl of which acts as a ligand to the Cu(A) site, with a major focus on characterization of the novel intermediate Ix. We show that Cu(A) assembly in these variants proceeds through several types of Cu centers, such as mononuclear red type 2 Cu, the novel intermediate Ix, and blue type 1 Cu. Our results show that the backbone flexibility of the Glu114 residue is an important factor in determining the rates of T2Cu → Ix formation, suggesting that Cu(A) formation is facilitated by swinging of the ligand loop, which internalizes the T2Cu capture complex to the protein interior. The kinetic data further suggest that the nature of the Glu114 side chain influences the time scales on which these intermediates are formed, the wavelengths of the absorption peaks, and how cleanly one intermediate is converted to another. Through careful understanding of these mechanisms and optimization of the conditions, we have obtained Ix in ∼80

  10. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  11. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented ...

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetism of a macrocyclic binuclear dicopper (II) amino alcohol complex from a metal-directed reaction involving formaldehyde and nitroethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation of the bis(1,5-diaminopentan-3-ol)dicopper(II) ion with formaldehyde and nitroethane in basic methanol yields the macromonocyclic ligand 3,13-dimethyl-3,13-dinitro-1,5,11,15-tetraazaeicosane-8,18-diol as the dicopper(II) complex. Ther perchlorate salt of the binuclear complex is very strongly antiferromagnetically coupled, with the magnetic properties measured from 10-300 K identifying a singlet-triplet energy gap of -860 cm-1 and a magnetic moment at room temperature of 0.48 BM. The discrete, binulcear nature of the complex was confirmed by a crystal structure analysis of the nitrite salt, which crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, a 14.789(6), b 14.560(6), c 12.759(9)Aangstroem, β 99.65(4) degree, and consists of the centrosymmetric macrocycle containing two copper ions each coordinated by two secondary nitrogen donors and two (shared) RO- groups, with water and nitrite oxygens occupying axial sites. The macrocycle donors and the copper ions are essentially coplanar. It is also shown that the nitro (and methyl) groups at extremities of the macrocycle are in anti dispositions. 16 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. A Selective Membrane Electrode for Thiocyanate Ion Based on a Bis-taurine-salicylic Binuclear Copper(Ⅱ) Complex as Ionophore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王福昌; 柴雅琴; 袁若; 陈春华; 戴建远; 徐岚

    2005-01-01

    The response characteristics of a new potentiometric membrane electrode with unique selectivity towards thiocyanate ion were reported. The electrode was prepared by incorporating bis-taurine-salicylic binuclear copper(Ⅱ) complex into a plasticized PVC-membrane. The resulting electrode exhibits anti-Hofmeister selectivity sequence: SCN->I-> ClO4- >Sal-> NO3- > NO2- >Br->Cl-> SO3- > SO42- and a near-Nernstian potential linear range for thiocyanate from 1.0×10-1 to 1.0× 10-6 mol·L-1 with a detection limit of 8.0× 10-7 mol·L-1 and a slope of - 56.5 mV/PCSCN- in phosphate buffer solution of pH 5.0 at 20 ℃. The UV/Vis spectra, IR spectroscopy and AC impedance studies showed that the excellent selectivity to thiocyanate was related to the unique interaction between the central metal and the analyte and a steric effect associated with the structure of the carrier. The electrode was successfully applied to the determination of thiocyanate in waste water and human urine samples.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization, and Biological Studies of Binuclear Copper(II Complexes of (2E-2-(2-Hydroxy-3-Methoxybenzylidene-4N-Substituted Hydrazinecarbothioamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Murali Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four novel binuclear copper(II complexes [1–4] of (2E-2-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene-4N-substituted hydrazinecarbothioamides, (OH(OCH3C6H4CH=NNHC(SNHR, where R = H (L1, Me (L2, Et (L3, or Ph (L4, have been synthesized and characterized. The FT-IR spectral data suggested the attachment of copper(II ion to ligand moiety through the azomethine nitrogen, thioketonic sulphur, and phenolic-O. The spectroscopic characterization indicates the dissociation of dimeric complex into mononuclear [Cu(LCl] units in polar solvents like DMSO, where L is monoanionic thiosemicarbazone. The DNA binding properties of the complexes with calf thymus (CT DNA were studied by spectroscopic titration. The complexes show binding affinity to CT DNA with binding constant (Kb values in the order of 106 M−1. The ligands and their metal complexes were tested for antibacterial and antifungal activities by agar disc diffusion method. Except for complex 4, all complexes showed considerable activity almost equal to the activity of ciprofloxacin. These complexes did not show any effect on Gram-negative bacteria, whereas they showed moderate activity for Gram-positive strains.

  20. Mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes of new hydrazone ligands derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol: Synthesis, spectral studies and antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy; El-ghamry, Mosad A.; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Kishk, Mona A. A.

    Two new hydrazone ligands, H2L1 and H2L2, were synthesized by the condensation of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with 3-hydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine and isatin monohydrazone, respectively. The structures of the ligands were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, electronic and mass spectra. Reactions of the ligands with several copper(II) salts, including AcO-, NO3-, SO42-, Cl- and Br- afforded mono- and binuclear metal complexes. Also, the ligands were allowed to react with Cu(II) ion in the presence of a secondary ligand (L‧) [N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline, N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline or O,O-donor; benzoylacetone]. Characterization and structure elucidation of the prepared complexes were achieved by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, mass and ESR spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ESR spin Hamiltonian parameters of some complexes were calculated. The spectroscopic data showed that the H2L1 ligand acts as a neutral or monobasic tridentate ligand while the H2L2 ligand acts as a bis(monobasic tridentate) ligand. The coordination sites with the copper(II) ion are phenolic oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and triazinic nitrogen (H2L1 ligand) or isatinic oxygen (H2L2 ligand). The metal complexes exhibited octahedral and square planar geometrical arrangements depending on the nature of the anion. The ligands and some metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity.

  1. Novel binuclear μ-oxo diruthenium complexes combined with ibuprofen and ketoprofen: Interaction with relevant target biomolecules and anti-allergic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuanes, Gabriela Campos; Moreira, Mariete Barbosa; Petta, Tânia; de Moraes Del Lama, Maria Perpétua Freire; de Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes; Naal, Rose Mary Zumstein Georgetto; Nikolaou, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of two novel binuclear ruthenium compounds of general formula [Ru2O(carb)2(py)6](PF6)2, where py=pyridine and carb are the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen (1) and ketoprofen (2). Both complexes were characterized by ESI-MS/MS spectrometry. The fragmentation patterns, which confirm the proposed structures, are presented. Besides that, compounds 1 and 2 present the charge transfer transitions within 325-330nm; and the intra-core transitions around 585nm, which is the typical spectra profile for [Ru2O] analogues. This suggests the carboxylate bridge has little influence in their electronic structure. The effects of the diruthenium complexes on Ig-E mediated mast cell activation were evaluated by measuring the enzyme β-hexosaminidase released by mast cells stimulated by antigen. The inhibitory potential of the ketoprofen complex against mast cell stimulation suggests its promising application as a therapeutic agent for treating or preventing IgE-mediated allergic diseases. In addition, in vitro metabolism assays had shown that the ibuprofen complex is metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzymes. PMID:26298864

  2. Two Dawson-templated three-dimensional metal-organic frameworks based on oxalate-bridged binuclear cobalt(II)/Nickel(II) SBUs and Bpy linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Liang, Dadong; Liu, Shuxia; Sun, Chunyan; Cao, Ruige; Gao, Chaoying; Ren, Yuanhang; Su, Zhongmin

    2008-08-18

    The Dawson anion P 2W 18O 62 (6-) has been used as a noncoordinating polyoxoanion template for the construction of two metal-organic frameworks, namely, [M 2(bpy) 3(H 2O) 2(ox)][P 2W 18O 62]2(H 2-bpy). nH 2O (M = Co(II), n = 3 ( 1); M = Ni(II), n = 2 ( 2)) (bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine; ox = C 2O 4 (2-)). Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals that both of the structures exhibit 3D host frameworks constructed from the oxalate-bridged binuclear superoctahedron secondary building units (SBUs) and bpy linkers and the voids of which are occupied by Dawson anions, guest bpy, and water molecules. Magnetic studies reveal that there are antiferromagnetic exchange interactions among the transition-metal centers in compounds 1 and 2. Furthermore, a compound 1-modified carbon paste electrode ( 1-CPE) displays good electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of nitrite. PMID:18620386

  3. Synthesis of a binuclear copper(II) compound and its use as a copper source for preparation of an environmental catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binuclear copper(II) compound [Cu2(NTA)(phen)3]NO3.6H2O was synthesized (NTA = nitrilotriacetate, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline), and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analyses. This compound used as a copper source was decomposed on MnOx-CeO2 in N2 at 400 deg. C and subsequently in air at 500 deg. C to obtain a Cu/MnOx-CeO2 catalyst. The results of catalytic activity test showed that compared with a referential Cu/MnOx-CeO2 catalyst prepared using conventional copper nitrate as a precursor, the obtained Cu/MnOx-CeO2 catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity toward complete oxidation of formaldehyde. Analyses by BET and XRD techniques revealed that CuO with smaller particle sizes was highly dispersed on the external surface of the MnOx-CeO2 mixed oxide, which was responsible for its higher catalytic activity

  4. DNA-binding, catalytic oxidation, C—C coupling reactions and antibacterial activities of binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes: Synthesis and spectral characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Manimaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available New hexa-coordinated binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes of the type {[(B(EPh3(COClRu]2L} (where, E = P or As; B = PPh3 or AsPh3 or pyridine; L = mononucleating NS donor of N-substituted thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–vis and 31P{1H} NMR cyclic voltammetric studies. The DNA-binding studies of Ru(II complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA were investigated by UV–vis, viscosity measurements, gel-electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new complexes have been used as catalysts in C—C coupling reaction and in the oxidation of alcohols to their corresponding carbonyl compounds by using NMO as co-oxidant and molecular oxygen (O2 atmosphere at ambient temperature. Further, the new binucleating thiosemicarbazone ligands and their Ru(II complexes were also screened for their antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sp., Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. From this study, it was found out that the activity of the complexes almost reaches the effectiveness of the conventional bacteriocide.

  5. Macrophage and colon tumor cells as targets for a binuclear silver(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complex, an anti-inflammatory and apoptosis mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Umar, Muhammad Ihtisham; Haque, Rosenani A; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini Bin; Majid, Amin Malik Shah Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Chronic inflammation intensifies the risk for malignant neoplasm, indicating that curbing inflammation could be a valid strategy to prevent or cure cancer. Cancer and inflammation are inter-related diseases and many anti-inflammatory agents are also used in chemotherapy. Earlier, we have reported a series of novel ligands and respective binuclear Ag(I)-NHC complexes (NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene) with potential anticancer activity. In the present study, a newly synthesized salt (II) and respective Ag(I)-NHC complex (III) of comparable molecular framework were prepared for a further detailed study. Preliminarily, II and III were screened against HCT-116 and PC-3 cells, wherein III showed better results than II. Both the compounds showed negligible toxicity against normal CCD-18Co cells. In FAM-FLICA caspase assay, III remarkably induced caspase-3/7 in HCT-116 cells most probably by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) independent intrinsic pathway and significantly inhibited in vitro synthesis of cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and TNF-α in human macrophages (U937 cells). In a cell-free system, both the compounds inhibited cyclooxygenase (COX) activities, with III being more selective towards COX-2. The results revealed that III has strong antiproliferative property selectively against colorectal tumor cells which could be attributed to its pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory abilities. PMID:25699476

  6. Studies with an immobilized metal affinity chromatography cassette system involving binuclear triazacyclononane-derived ligands: automation of batch adsorption measurements with tagged recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Martin; Coghlan, Campbell J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-07-18

    This study describes the determination of the adsorption isotherms and binding kinetics of tagged recombinant proteins using a recently developed IMAC cassette system and employing automated robotic liquid handling procedures for IMAC resin screening. These results confirm that these new IMAC resins, generated from a variety of different metal-charged binuclear 1,4,7-triaza-cyclononane (tacn) ligands, interact with recombinant proteins containing a novel N-terminal metal binding tag, NT1A, with static binding capacities similar to those obtained with conventional hexa-His tagged proteins, but with significantly increased association constants. In addition, higher kinetic binding rates were observed with these new IMAC systems, an attribute that can be positively exploited to increase process productivity. The results from this investigation demonstrate that enhancements in binding capacities and affinities were achieved with these new IMAC resins and chosen NT1A tagged protein. Further, differences in the binding performances of the bis(tacn) xylenyl-bridged ligands were consistent with the distance between the metal binding centres of the two tacn moieties, the flexibility of the ligand and the potential contribution from the aromatic ring of the xylenyl group to undergo π/π stacking interactions with the tagged proteins. PMID:24891160

  7. Antibacterial Activities of Newly Synthesized Azo Anils And its Oxalato-Bridged Binuclear {Cu(II and Zn(II} Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ameen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel oxalato-bridged binuclear metal {Cu(II and Zn(II} complexes; [{(L1M(II}2OX] (L1= 2-({2-hydroxy-5-[(4-nitrophenyldiazenyl]benzylidene}aminobenzoic acid, OX = oxalate and [{(L2M(II}2OX], (L2 = 2-{[(2-hydroxyphenylimino]methyl}-4-[(4-nitrophenyldiazenyl] phenol, OX = oxalate were synthesized. Azo anils and corresponding Metal {Cu((II and Zn(II} complexes were characterised by Elemental Combustion System, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Visible, Spectroscopy and 13C-1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. Elemental Analyses, FTIR and UV-Vis were used for structural characterization of metal complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for M(II complexes came into being. The antibacterial activities of azo anils ligands, oxalate ion, CuCl2.2H2O, Zn(CH3COO2.2H2O and metal {Cu(II and Zn(II} complexes against gram-positive (Bacillis subtilis and gram-negative (Escherichia coli were evaluated. The antibacterial activities were performed to asses inhibition potential of ligand and their metal {Cu(II and Zn(II} complexes. The results revealed that antibacterial activities of azo anils become more pronounced when free ligands were coordinated to central metal atom.

  8. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  10. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅳ) 3.7 Segregation of SG iron The non-uniform distribution of solute elements during solidification results in the micro segregation of SG iron.As for the redistribution of elements in the phases of the solidification structure,there is no intrinsic difference between SG iron and grey iron[132].

  11. Iron regulation by hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone that is involved in the control of iron homeostasis in the body. Physiologically, hepcidin is controlled by iron stores, inflammation, hypoxia, and erythropoiesis. The regulation of hepcidin expression by iron is a complex process that requires the coordination of multiple proteins, including hemojuvelin, bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), hereditary hemochromatosis protein, transferrin receptor 2, matriptase-2, neogenin, BMP receptors, and transferrin. Misregulati...

  12. Iron deficiency anemia Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, İnci

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most frequent and widespread anemia around the world Its prevalence is increased in infants and adolescent girls The etiologic factors may vary but anemia is essentially related to iron deficient nutrition blood loss and malabsorption Children may have paleness cardiovascular and neurologic impacts of anemia pica epithelial changes as koilonychia glossitis angular stomatitis Treatment is by oral or parenteral supplementation of iron Turk Arch Ped 2009; 44 Suppl: ...

  13. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  14. Recalling the Iron Girls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The phrase "iron girl" is symbolic of an era. Widely used in the 1960s and the early 1970s, it was a term that described women who, in the spirit of sexual equality, found in themselves a physical strength that surpassed their psychologi cal expectations. With their might and power, they proved to society that women could do everything that men could. The title of "iron girl" was their pride.The well-known writer Fan Xiaoqing, was one such iron girl. She says the "iron girls" were nothing less than a quest for perfection.

  15. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael; Kamali, Houman; Link, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insufficient iron supply. Here we present a short review on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical symptoms, and treatment of iron deficiency in cancer patients. Special emphasis is given to intravenous iron supplementation and on the benefits and limitations of different formulations. Based on these considerations and recommendations from current international guidelines we developed recommendations for clinical practice and classified the level of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the principles of evidence-based medicine. PMID:26373748

  16. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs ...

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, electrochemistry and biological evaluation of some binuclear transition metal complexes of bicompartmental ONO donor ligands containing benzo[b]thiophene moiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra Raj, K.; Vivekanand, B.; Nagesh, G. Y.; Mruthyunjayaswamy, B. H. M.

    2014-02-01

    A series of new binucleating Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of bicompartmental ligands with ONO donor were synthesized. The ligands were obtained by the condensation of 3-chloro-6-substituted benzo[b]thiophene-2-carbohydrazides and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol. The synthesized ligands and their complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and various spectroscopic techniques. Elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, ESI-mass, UV-Visible, TG-DTA, magnetic measurements, molar conductance and powder-XRD data has been used to elucidate their structures. The bonding sites are the oxygen atom of amide carbonyl, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen for ligands 1 and 2. The binuclear nature of the complexes was confirmed by ESR spectral data. TG-DTA studies for some complexes showed the presence of coordinated water molecules and the final product is the metal oxide. All the complexes were investigated for their electrochemical activity, only the Cu(II) complexes showed the redox property. Cu(II) complexes were square planar, whereas Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were octahedral. Powder-XRD pattern have been studied in order to test the degree of crystallinity of the complexes and unit cell calculations were made. In order to evaluate the effect of antimicrobial activity of metal ions upon chelation, both the ligands and their metal complexes were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The results showed that the metal complexes were found to be more active than free ligands. The DNA cleaving capacities of all the complexes were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis method against supercoiled plasmid DNA. Among the compounds tested for antioxidant capacity, ligand 1 displayed excellent activity than its metal complexes.

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of binuclear Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2013-09-01

    Reactions of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with different cobalt(II) and copper(II) salts viz., OAc-, Cl-, NO3- and SO42-, yielded a new series of binuclear metal complexes. Reactions of the ligand with these metal ions in the presence of a secondary ligand (L‧) [O,O-donor; acetylacetone, N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline or N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylethylenediamine] in 1:2:2 (L:M:L‧) molar ratio yielded mixed-ligand complexes with different molar ratios. The metal complexes were characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The analytical and spectroscopic data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the type of the anion and secondary ligand used, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements showed that all complexes are octahedral with non-electrolytic nature. The profile of ESR spectra of copper(II) complexes suggested the octahedral geometry and the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the complexes were calculated and discussed. Molecular orbital calculations were performed for metal complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results correlated with the experimental data. The free ligand and some of its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  19. Mixed-ligand binuclear copper(II) complex of 5-methylsalicylaldehyde and 2,2'-bipyridyl: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA binding and nuclease activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Perumal Gurumoorthy; Jayaram Ravichandran; Aziz Kalilur Rahiman

    2014-05-01

    A new mixed-ligand binuclear copper(II) complex [Cu(MS)(bpy)]2.(ClO4)2, built of 5-methylsalicylaldehyde and 2,2'-bipyridyl has been synthesized and characterized by using elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Crystal structure of the complex shows that copper(II) ion lies in a square pyramidal coordination environment. The structure consists of two symmetrical half units in which the copper(II) ion of one half unit connected with the phenolate oxygen atom of other half unit along with one perchlorate anion in the crystal lattice as free molecule. Presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anion was also confirmed by IR spectroscopy. Absorption spectroscopy exhibits d-d transition at 628 nm, which further supports the square pyramidal geometry around the copper(II) ions. EPR spectrum of the copper(II) complex at room temperature shows a broad signal without any splitting pattern at ∥ = 2.26, ⊥ = 2.03 and the magnetic moment (eff = 1.31 BM) obtained at room temperature indicate an antiferromagnetic interaction between the two copper(II) ions through phenoxide-bridge. Binding studies reveal that the complex possesses good binding propensity (b = 5.2 ± 1.7 × 104 M-1) and bind to nitrogenous bases of DNA through intercalation. Nuclease activity of the complex with pBR322 DNA shows that the effect of hydrolytic cleavage is dose-dependent and the oxidative cleavage indicates the involvement of hydroxyl radical and singlet-oxygen as reactive oxygen species.

  20. Nature-Inspired, Highly Durable CO2 Reduction System Consisting of a Binuclear Ruthenium(II) Complex and an Organic Semiconductor Using Visible Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Ryo; Matsunaga, Hironori; Nakashima, Takuya; Wada, Keisuke; Yamakata, Akira; Ishitani, Osamu; Maeda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-20

    A metal-free organic semiconductor of mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (C3N4) coupled with a Ru(II) binuclear complex (RuRu') containing photosensitizer and catalytic units selectively reduced CO2 into HCOOH under visible light (λ > 400 nm) in the presence of a suitable electron donor with high durability, even in aqueous solution. Modification of C3N4 with Ag nanoparticles resulted in a RuRu'/Ag/C3N4 photocatalyst that exhibited a very high turnover number (>33000 with respect to the amount of RuRu'), while maintaining high selectivity for HCOOH production (87-99%). This turnover number was 30 times greater than that reported previously using C3N4 modified with a mononuclear Ru(II) complex, and by far the highest among the metal-complex/semiconductor hybrid systems reported to date. The results of photocatalytic reactions, emission decay measurements, and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy indicated that Ag nanoparticles on C3N4 collected electrons having lifetimes of several milliseconds from the conduction band of C3N4, which were transferred to the excited state of RuRu', thereby promoting photocatalytic CO2 reduction driven by two-step photoexcitation of C3N4 and RuRu'. This study also revealed that the RuRu'/Ag/C3N4 hybrid photocatalyst worked efficiently in water containing a proper electron donor, despite the intrinsic hydrophobic nature of C3N4 and low solubility of CO2 in an aqueous environment. PMID:27027822

  1. Analytical development of a binuclear oxo-manganese complex bio-inspired on oxidase enzyme for doping control analysis of acetazolamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machini, Wesley B S; Teixeira, Marcos F S

    2016-05-15

    A bio-inspired electrochemical sensor using a binuclear oxo-manganese complex was evaluated and applied in the detection of a substance associated with doping in sports: acetazolamide (ACTZ). Investigation was made of the influence of different experimental variables on the electrocatalytic oxidation of ACTZ by the bio-inspired sensor, such as pH and interfering species. The bio-inspired sensor showed the best response in the range from 5.00×10(-9) to 7.00×10(-8)molL(-1) ACTZ, with a linear range from 5.00×10(-9) to 2.50×10(-8)molL(-1) and a detection limit of 4.76×10(-9)molL(-1). The sensor exhibited characteristics similar to the Michaelis-Menten model of an enzymatic electrode, due to the use of a multinucleated complex of manganese with μ-oxo units, which was able to mimic the properties of enzymes with manganese as a cofactor in their composition, such as Mn-containing oxidase. The determination of ACTZ with the bio-inspired sensor was evaluated using three different synthetic biological fluids (plasma, saliva, and urine), demonstrating its viability for use with real samples. The analysis of ACTZ in real urine samples using the bio-inspired sensor, simulating the method adopted by the World Anti-Doping Agency, which revealed viable, suggesting a new and promising platform to be used in these analysis. PMID:26745790

  2. Estudo teórico de complexos binucleares de manganês(II com o ligante 2-hidroxibenzilglicina, possíveis miméticos para a catecol oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton T. da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work applies the Density Functional Theory (DFT to study binuclear complexes of Mn2+ with the ligand 2-hydroxibenzilglycine and its substituted derivatives. The results showed the isomer 2 with multiplicity 11-ete as the most stable between all the structures and multiplicities obtained. Then, the most stable complex with the -OCH3, -Br, -Cl and -NO2 substituents were analyzed. Finally, the absolute hardness and the percentage of LUMO orbital participation for the substituted complexes were evaluated. Among them, the complexes with -NO2, -H, -Br groups were more likely to play the catalytic activity, respectively.

  3. The thermodynamic characteristics of formation of mono- and binuclear biladiene Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) chelates in dimethylformamide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamics of 1,2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18,19-decamethylbiladiene-a,c complexing with Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) acetates was studied. Fairmont enthalpies of corresponding metal complexes were analyzed using titration calorimetry. This allowed to calculate full set of thermodynamic properties of processes. Binuclear heteroligand complexes [M2L(AcO)2)] (M = Cd, Hg) formation is most entropy favorable processes, that is evidently conditioned by the deliverance of large number of DMFA molecules from coordinating spheres of two solvate-cations when tetrapyrrole ligand coordination, and it demonstrates high thermodynamic stability of given ligands

  4. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technique, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main source of drinking water. The in situ arsenic removal technique was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions., Its effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The mechanism of arsenic removal by the iron coating was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an electron microprobe, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. A 4-step alternative cycle aquifer iron coating method was developed. A continuous injection of 5 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 hours can create a uniform coating of crystalline goethite on the surface of quartz sand in the columns without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 0.45 cm/min of the injection reagents (vi), the time for arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column was approximately 35 hours, which was much longer than that for tracer fluorescein sodium (approximately 2 hours). The retardation factor of arsenic was 23, and its adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe, leading to an excellent arsenic removal. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As (V) and Fe (II) reagents. When the arsenic content in the groundwater was 233 μg/L, the aqueous phase arsenic was completely removed with an arsenic adsorption of 0.05 mol As per mol Fe. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation, in which arsenic and iron likely formed the arsenic-bearing iron mineral phases with poor crystallinity by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Thus, the high arsenic removal efficiency of the technique likely resulted from the

  5. Hepcidin in iron overload disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Papanikolaou, George; Tzilianos, Michalis; Christakis, John I.; Bogdanos, Dionisios; Tsimirika, Konstantina; MacFarlane, Julie; Goldberg, Y. Paul; Sakellaropoulos, Nikos; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2005-01-01

    Hepcidin is the principal regulator of iron absorption in humans. The peptide inhibits cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export channel ferroportin and inducing its internalization and degradation. Either hepcidin deficiency or alterations in its target, ferroportin, would be expected to result in dysregulated iron absorption, tissue maldistribution of iron, and iron overload. Indeed, hepcidin deficiency has been reported in hereditary hemochromatosis and attributed to mutations in ...

  6. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Susan got counseling on how to improve her health and well-being. She began taking iron supplements and multivitamins to improve her iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such as focusing more on green leafy vegetables, red meats, nuts, dried fruits, and beans. Other ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  10. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should be...... administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause of...... iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  11. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  12. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  13. From Iron Bowl to Iron Stomach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL; L.; O’NEAL

    2009-01-01

    A few decades ago, "Iron Bowl" referred to not having to go hungry in China if you were employed by the Agovernment. The government gave you a job that secured the filling of one’s rice bowl. This concept and practice did create loyalty, as the times were hard. China has moved far past those times to become the

  14. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands as a "working form" of endogenous nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, Anatoly F

    2016-04-01

    The material presented herein is an overview of the results obtained by our research team during the many years' study of biological activities and occurrence of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiol-containing ligands in human and animal organisms. With regard to their dose dependence and vast diversity of biological activities, DNIC are similar to the system of endogenous NO, one of the most universal regulators of biological processes. The role of biologically active components in DNIC is played by their iron-dinitrosyl fragments, [Fe(NO)2], endowed with the ability to generate neutral NO molecules and nitrosonium ions (NO(+)). Their release is effected by heme-and thiol-containing proteins, which fulfill the function of biological targets and acceptors of NO and NO(+). Beneficial regulatory effects of DNIC on physiological and metabolic processes are numerous and diverse and include, among other things, lowering of arterial pressure and accelerated healing of skin wounds. In the course of fast decomposition of their Fe(NO)2 fragments (e.g., in the presence of iron chelators), DNIC produce adverse (cytotoxic) effects, which can best be exemplified by their ability to suppress the development of experimental endometriosis in animals. In animal tissues, DNIC with thiol-containing ligands are predominantly represented by the binuclear form, which, contrary to mononuclear DNIC detectable by the 2.03 signal, is EPR-silent. The ample body of evidence on biological activities and occurrence of DNIC gained so far clearly demonstrates that in human and animal organisms DNIC with thiol-containing ligands represent a "working form" of the system of endogenous NO responsible for its accumulation and stabilization in animal tissues as well as its further transfer to its biological targets. PMID:26820635

  15. Synthesis, Structure and Photoluminescence of a Binuclear Zinc(Ⅱ) Coordination Polymer Based on 2-Carboxycinnamic Acid and Dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]-phenazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-Wei; LI Xiu-Ying; YU Zhi-Xin; LIU Chun-Bo; CHE Guang-Bo; XU Zhan-Lin

    2009-01-01

    A binuclear zinc(Ⅱ) complex with 2-carboxycinnamic acid (2-ccm) and dipyrido-[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (DPPZ), {[Zn2(2-ccm)2(DPPZ)2]·2H2O}n, was synthesized and charac-terized by elemental analysis, IR, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetry and fluo-rescent emission. It crystallizes in monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 13.409(4), b = 25.530(7), c = 13.952(4) A, β = 99.554(3)°, V= 4710(2) A3, Z= 4, C56H36N8O10Zn2, Mr= 1111.67, Dc = 1.568 g/cm3,μ(MoKa) = 1.093 mm-1, F(000) = 2272, R = 0.0422 and wR = 0.0895. In the crystal, the basic unit of 1 is a binuclear Zn2 entity which is linked by 2-ccm ligand to form a ID double chain along the α axis. The O-H…O hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions lead to a 3D supramolecular motif. In addition, thermal and luminescent properties of complex 1 have also been investigated.

  16. A cytosolic iron chaperone that delivers iron to ferritin

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Haifeng; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2008-01-01

    Ferritins are the main iron storage proteins found in animals, plants, and bacteria. The capacity to store iron in ferritin is essential for life in mammals, but the mechanism by which cytosolic iron is delivered to ferritin is unknown. Human ferritins expressed in yeast contain little iron. Human Poly r(C)-Binding Protein 1 (PCBP1) increased the amount of iron loaded into ferritin when expressed in yeast. PCBP1 bound to ferritin in vivo, and bound iron and facilitated iron loading into ferri...

  17. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  18. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Ph.D Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Note: This book consists of five sections: Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Grey Iron, Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, Chapter 4 Vermicular Cast Iron, and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishes this book in several parts serially, starting from the first issue of 2009.

  19. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ This book consists of five sections:Chapter 1 Introduction,Chapter 2 Grey Iron,Chapter 3 Ductile Iron,Chapter 4Vermicular Cast Iron,and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishs this book in several parts serially,starting from the first issue of 2009.

  20. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun, E-mail: xjxie@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pi, Kunfu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, Chongxuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO{sub 4} and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles

  1. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. - Highlights: • An

  2. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. PMID:25956146

  3. A binuclear complex constituted by diethyldithiocarbamate and copper(I) functions as a proteasome activity inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cultures and xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a therapeutic strategy for cancers including pancreatic to inhibit proteasome activity. Disulfiram (DSF) may bind copper (Cu) to form a DSF–Cu complex. DSF–Cu is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by inhibiting proteasome activity. DSF is rapidly converted to diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) within bodies. Copper(II) absorbed by bodies is reduced to copper(I) when it enters cells. We found that DDTC and copper(I) could form a binuclear complex which might be entitled DDTC–Cu(I), and it had been synthesized by us in the laboratory. This study is to investigate the anticancer potential of this complex on pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines, SW1990, PANC-1 and BXPC-3 were used for in vitro assays. Female athymic nude mice grown SW1990 xenografts were used as animal models. Cell counting kit-8 (cck-8) assay and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells. A 20S proteasome assay kit was used in proteasome activity analysis. Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used in tumor sample analysis. The results suggest that DDTC–Cu(I) inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and increased p27 as well as decreased NF-κB expression were detected in tumor tissues of DDTC–Cu(I)-treated group. Our data indicates that DDTC–Cu(I) is an effective proteasome activity inhibitor with the potential to be explored as a drug for pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • A new structure of DDTC–Cu(I) was reported for the first time. • DDTC–Cu(I) dissolved directly in water was for in vitro and in vivo uses. • DDTC–Cu(I) demonstrated significant anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. • DDTC–Cu(I) is capable of inhibiting proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo

  4. A binuclear complex constituted by diethyldithiocarbamate and copper(I) functions as a proteasome activity inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cultures and xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jinbin, E-mail: hanjinbin@gmail.com [Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Clinical Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences/Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Liu, Luming, E-mail: llm1010@163.com [Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yue, Xiaoqiang [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chang, Jinjia [Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shi, Weidong; Hua, Yongqiang [Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is a therapeutic strategy for cancers including pancreatic to inhibit proteasome activity. Disulfiram (DSF) may bind copper (Cu) to form a DSF–Cu complex. DSF–Cu is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by inhibiting proteasome activity. DSF is rapidly converted to diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) within bodies. Copper(II) absorbed by bodies is reduced to copper(I) when it enters cells. We found that DDTC and copper(I) could form a binuclear complex which might be entitled DDTC–Cu(I), and it had been synthesized by us in the laboratory. This study is to investigate the anticancer potential of this complex on pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines, SW1990, PANC-1 and BXPC-3 were used for in vitro assays. Female athymic nude mice grown SW1990 xenografts were used as animal models. Cell counting kit-8 (cck-8) assay and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells. A 20S proteasome assay kit was used in proteasome activity analysis. Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used in tumor sample analysis. The results suggest that DDTC–Cu(I) inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and increased p27 as well as decreased NF-κB expression were detected in tumor tissues of DDTC–Cu(I)-treated group. Our data indicates that DDTC–Cu(I) is an effective proteasome activity inhibitor with the potential to be explored as a drug for pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • A new structure of DDTC–Cu(I) was reported for the first time. • DDTC–Cu(I) dissolved directly in water was for in vitro and in vivo uses. • DDTC–Cu(I) demonstrated significant anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. • DDTC–Cu(I) is capable of inhibiting proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  7. Study of iron fluorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the action of fluorine on iron. Comprehensive descriptions are given of the particular technological methods and of the preparation of the reactants. This fluorination reaction has been investigated over a very broad range of temperature and pressure. A nucleation and growth phenomenon is described. The influence of a pollution of the gas phase by oxygen on the fluorination process is reported. The solid-state reaction between ferric fluoride and iron has been studied by calorimetry and hydrated fluorides βFeF3, 3 H2O and FeF3, H2O have been studied by Moessbauer effect. A special study has been made of the growth of iron deposits by thermal decomposition of gaseous iron fluorides. (author)

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Public Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from ... Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  12. Ocean iron fertilization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    In 2009 and 2010, an Indo-German scientific expedition dusted the ocean with iron to stimulate the biological pump that captures atmosphereic carbon dioxide. Two onboard scientists tell the story of this controversial project. Besides raising...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Contact ... counseling on how to improve her health and well-being. She began taking iron supplements and multivitamins ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health Information Center Health Professionals Systematic Evidence Reviews & Clinical Practice ... and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  17. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Soybeans Dried beans and peas Kidney beans Seeds: Almonds Brazil nuts Vegetables: Broccoli Spinach Kale Collards Asparagus ... infant's additional iron needs are met by breast milk. Infants that are not breastfed should be given ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Contact Us FAQs Home » ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  19. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  20. Iron status in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Anna A Wawer; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Phyo K. Myint

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. ...

  1. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Vermicular graphite cast iron(VG iron for short in the following sections)is a type of cast iron in which the graphite is intermediate in shape between flake and spheroidal.Compared with the normal flake graphite in grey iron, the graphite in VG iron is shorter and thicker and shows a curved, more rounded shape.Because its outer contour is exactly like a worm, hence it is called vermicular graphite.

  2. Fe (Plasma Iron Turnover)

    OpenAIRE

    Montanaro, Zac Kime

    2011-01-01

    Fe (Plasma Iron Turnover) is a work, or compilation of interrelating works, endeavoring to generate a custom strategy for conducting experimental information exploration. Beginning with a single event in world news, the explosion of a gas plant in Western Australia in June of 2008, Fe (Plasma Iron Turnover) teases out the physical, contextual, and subtextual cues of the story to develop and articulate a methodology for discovering related events, both backwards and forwards in history, and fo...

  3. Microbes: Mini Iron Factories

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via con...

  4. Iron and Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fargion, Silvia; Mattioli, Michela; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Fiorelli, Gemino

    2000-01-01

    A mild to moderate iron excess is found in patients with liver diseases apparently unrelated to genetic hemochromatosis. Iron appears to affect the natural history of hepatitis C virus-related chronic liver diseases, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by leading to a more severe fibrosis and thus aiding the evolution to cirrhosis.Ahigher frequency of mutations of the HFE gene, the gene responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis, is found in patients with liver diseases a...

  5. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...... anemia....

  6. A simple protocol for the synthesis of dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione: EPR, optical, chromatographic and biological characterization of reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, Rostislav R; Kubrina, Lyudmila N; Shvydkiy, Vyacheslav O; Lakomkin, Vladimir L; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2013-11-30

    The diamagnetic binuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes (B-DNIC) with glutathione can be easily synthesized in the air at ambient temperature. The synthetic protocol includes consecutive addition to distilled water of glutathione, which decreases the pH of the test solution to 4.0, a bivalent iron salt (e.g., ferrous sulphate) and sodium nitrite at the molar ratio of 2:1:1, with a subsequent increase in pH to neutral values. Under these conditions, the amount of B-DNIC formed is limited by initial nitrite concentration. In the novel procedure, 20mM glutathione, 10mM ferrous sulfate and 10mM sodium nitrite give 2.5mM B-DNIC with glutathione, while 5mM glutathione remains in the solution. Bivalent iron (5mM) is precipitated in the form of hydroxide complexes, which can be removed from the solution by passage through a paper filter. After the increase in рН to 11 and addition of thiols at concentrations exceeding that of DNIC tenfold, B-DNIC are converted into a mononuclear EPR-active form of DNIC (M-DNIC) with glutathione. B-DNIC preparations synthesized by using new method contain negligible amount of nitrite or S-nitrosoglutathione as a contaminations. All the steps of DNIC synthesis were characterized by using optical, EPR and HPLC methods. A long-lasting hypotensive action of DNIC formed was demonstrated. PMID:24018466

  7. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  8. Forging the anthropogenic iron cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Müller, Daniel B; Graedel, T E

    2007-07-15

    Metallurgical iron cycles are characterized for four anthropogenic life stages: production, fabrication and manufacturing, use, and waste management and recycling. This analysis is conducted for year 2000 and at three spatial levels: 68 countries and territories, nine world regions, and the planet. Findings include the following: (1) contemporary iron cycles are basically open and substantially dependent on environmental sources and sinks; (2) Asia leads the world regions in iron production and use; Oceania, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and the Commonwealth of Independent States present a highly production-biased iron cycle; (3) purchased scrap contributes a quarter of the global iron and steel production; (4) iron exiting use is three times less than that entering use; (5) about 45% of global iron entering use is devoted to construction, 24% is devoted to transport equipment, and 20% goes to industrial machinery; (6) with respect to international trade of iron ore, iron and steel products, and scrap, 54 out of the 68 countries are net iron importers, while only 14 are net exporters; (7) global iron discharges in tailings, slag, and landfill approximate one-third of the iron mined. Overall, these results provide a foundation for studies of iron-related resource policy, industrial development, and waste and environmental management. PMID:17711233

  9. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  10. Iron resorption and iron stores in piglets after intramuscular injection of 59Fe-iron dextran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron resorption from intramuscular injection of an iron dextran complex (Fedex) is almost complete in piglets one week after injection. The excess of resorbed iron is stored in liver and spleen. The stored iron is made available for the growing pig since half of the iron recorded on the 14th day after injection is used during the third week. The remaining iron stores might well be enough to cover the needs for the fourth week also, although it is not absolutely necessary for the pigs at this age. (orig.)

  11. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidiz...

  12. Synthesis and X-ray structure analysis of a new binuclear Schiff base Co(II) complex with the ligand N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-butanediamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The title binuclear complex, tris[N,N-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane] dicobalt(II), C60H70Co2N6O15, was prepared by the reaction of the tetradentate Schiff base ligand bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane and Co(CH3COO)2 . 4H2O in a ethanol solution and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This complex has a dinuclear structure where two Co(II) ions are bridged by one N0,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane. The two Co(II) ions, have two distorted octahedral coordination involving two O and two N atoms.

  13. Determination of serum iron and iron binding capacity by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented data show that NMR can measure serum iron and total iron binding capacity of healthy and the examined pathological cases. The data also suggest that the loss of paramagnetic contribution of serum iron upon the addition of ascorbic acid is detectable by MRI. (author)

  14. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  16. Protein degradation and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joel W; Bruick, Richard K

    2012-09-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron's privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22349011

  17. Iron prophylaxis during pregnancy -- how much iron is needed? A randomized dose- response study of 20-80 mg ferrous iron daily in pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Bergholt, Thomas; Eriksen, Lisbeth;

    2005-01-01

    To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.......To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy....

  18. Iron and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, Ehud; Vasil, Michael L.; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Iron serves as a signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development. We examined the influence of mutations in known and putative iron acquisition-signaling genes on biofilm morphology. In iron-sufficient medium, mutants that cannot obtain iron through the high-affinity pyoverdine iron acquisition system form thin biofilms similar to those formed by the parent under low iron conditions. If an iron source for a different iron acquisition system is provided to a pyoverdine mutant, normal biof...

  19. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kelsey J. Weigel; Sharon G. Lynch; Steven M. LeVine

    2014-01-01

    Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis) patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular prote...

  20. Cast iron - a predictable material

    OpenAIRE

    Jorg C. Sturm; Guido Busch

    2011-01-01

    High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI) or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process s...

  1. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Grey Iron(Ⅲ) 2.5 Crystallization of the LTF during final stage of eutectic solidification of grey iron In the final stage of eutectic solidification, eutectic cells grow gradually into large sizes; the liquid iron between the cells enters the last stage of solidification. At this time, the region of the remaining liquid iron is called last to freeze volume, LTF in short, as shown in Fig.2-39.

  2. Phytases for improved iron absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Phytase enzymes present an alternative to iron supplements, because they have been shown to improve iron absorption by means of catalysing the degradation of a potent iron absorption inhibitor: phytic acid. Phytic acid is a hexaphosphate of inositol and is particularly prevalent in cereal grains...

  3. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  4. Iron oxide modified minerals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mashlan, M.; Bartoňková, H.; Jančík, D.; Tuček, J.; Martinec, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 191, 1-3 (2009), s. 151-157. ISSN 0304-3843 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Mössbauer spectroscopy * clay minerals * iron oxide * nanoparticle Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.209, year: 2007 http://www.springerlink.com/content/9870444lu2g66382/fulltext.pdf

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia ... Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the ...

  6. State of the iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinisch, Walter; Staun, Michael; Bhandari, Sunil;

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) frequently occurs in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and negatively impacts their quality of life. Nevertheless, the condition appears to be both under-diagnosed and undertreated. Regular biochemical screening of patients with IBD for anemia...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the ...

  8. Iron oxides photochemical dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was intended to study the light irradiation influence of diverse wave-lengths on iron oxides dissolution in aqueous solutions. The objectives of this work were: the exploration of photochemical processes with the aim of its eventual application in: a) decontamination and chemical cleaning under special conditions; b) materials for solar energy conversion. (Author)

  9. Iron Ore Spies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China has begun to attack industrial spies to prevent state security from being compromised Four employees of Rio Tinto, including Hu Shitai, former head of Rio’s Shanghai office and Rio’s China iron ore division, were detained in Shanghai on July 5, on charges of espionage. A senior executive of

  10. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  11. Iron dominated magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  12. Iron ERRs with Salmonella

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Ferric C.; Weiss, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The hormone hepcidin promotes iron sequestration by macrophages. A recent study by Kim et al (2014) implicates the orphan receptor ERRγ in the regulation of hepcidin production and suggests that targeting the ERRγ-hepcidin axis may be beneficial during infection with the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella.

  13. Development of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  14. Ironing out warming wrinkles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The controversy regarding the fertilization of the ocean with iron to slow down global warming was outlined. The world's oceans absorb up to one-third of annual carbon dioxide released annually from fossil fuels. Some scientists believe they can engineer the oceans to absorb even more carbon if they fertilize them with iron. The iron would promote algae growth which would draw carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Phytoplankton (algae suspended in the ocean water) convert carbon dioxide into biomass. When the algae die, they would sink to the ocean depths and remain there for thousands of years. Other scientists argue that iron fertilization is not a feasible mitigation tool because not enough is known about the effects of fertilization or the potential ramifications. They argue that some changes of this kind may even accelerate global warming. One beneficial effect resulting from the controversy is that it has drawn attention to the philosophical dimension of massive intervention in the earth's biogeochemical cycles. In this context the question that needs to be answered is: if such a tool for large-scale low-cost manipulation of the earth really becomes available, what framework will be used to make decisions about whether such option should be exercised

  15. Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahari

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to draw attention to iron deficiency anemia which is the most common nutritional disturbance in infants and children. Iron deficiency anemia constitutes the most prevalent form of anemia in this age group. The records of infants and children admitted to the Pediatric Department of Tehran University Puhlavi Hospital for various ailments during a one year period (Mnrch l!l63 - HHi-t were analyzed. 262 infants and children out of a total number of an5, or 7t•/., showed iron deficiency anemia detect cd by blood film studies and hemoglobin determination, The majority, 123 or 4{.!t•/., of these patients were infants and children between six months and two years of age. The etiology indicates that faulty feeding is the main cause. Infections, parnsitcs, and hemorrhage were among other causes observed. ,'('itll regard to treatment, parenteral iron was preferred because cf its ef., Icctivcncss in short periods of hospital stay. In conclusion, the routine study of blood films and hemoglobin determiualion, especially in the low socio _ economic group of medically less organized countries is advised

  16. Iron dominated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided

  17. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  18. Ironing out industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes a hazardous waste treatment known as the catalytic extraction process, which also stabilizes and reduces low-level radioactive wastes to a fraction of their original volume, easing their disposal. It uses molten iron and other metals to convert hazardous wastes into useful materials

  19. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well

  20. New findings on iron absorption conditioning factors Novos achados sobre os fatores condicionantes da absorção do ferro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute Cândida Pereira

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors focus iron intake regulation in the body and the probable mechanisms related to iron absorption. They analyze the impact of iron absorption deficiency resulting in iron deficiency anemia, a public health issue of great impact in the world influencing child and maternal health risk increase. This paper aims at highlighting the problems affecting the uptake or inhibiting processes of iron absorption in an attempt to correlate information on conditioning factors and current findings. This study is a document based descriptive study comprising literature review. In food, iron has different forms, such as the heme and non-heme forms following different absorption pathways with different efficiency rates, depending on conditioning factors, such as diet profile, physiological aspects, iron chemical state, absorption regulation, transportation, storing, excretion and the presence of disease, They also discuss the current difficulties in dealing with iron nutritional deficiency in vulnerable groups, children and pregnant women, and focus data on iron consumption, adhesion to breast feeding and the frequency of prenatal care visits.Os autores abordam a regulação da entrada de ferro no organismo e os prováveis mecanismos que permeiam essa regulação. Analisam o impacto da deficiência de absorção de ferro que acarreta anemia ferropriva, que se constitui hoje num problema de saúde pública de grande repercussão e, é reconhecidamente, a doença de maior magnitude em âmbito mundial, concorrendo com elevação de riscos à saúde materna e infantil. O objetivo do trabalho é ressaltar os problemas que afetam o processo de captação ou inibição da absorção do ferro, buscando correlacionar os conhecimentos sobre os fatores condicionantes e os achados atuais. O estudo foi do tipo descritivo, de base documental, compondo uma revisão de literatura. Nos alimentos, o ferro se encontra em formas diferentes, ferro heme e não heme as quais

  1. INTRAVENOUS IRON VERSUS ORAL IRON IN ANTENATAL WOMEN WITH IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN SUB - HIMALAYAN SETTINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Shraddha; Anup

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Compare Intravenous Iron sucrose and Oral Ferrous sulphate in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia during pregnancy. METHOD: 100 sub - himalayan antenatal women between 12 to 36 weeks gestation from Central Referral Hospital with Iron deficiency anemia; hemoglobin 6 – 9 gm/dl, MCV

  2. Iron-fortified milk can improve iron status in young women with low iron stores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz-Ahrens, K.E.; Schaafsma, G.; Kip, P.; Elbers, F.; Boeing, H.; Schrezenmeir, J.

    2004-01-01

    A considerable proportion of the populations of developing and industrialised nations does not meet the recommended daily allowance for iron and are thus at risk of chronic iron-deficiency anaemia. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we investigated whether supplementation with iron-enriched

  3. Iron Deficiency After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: Insufficient Iron Absorption from Oral Iron Supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Gesquiere, Ina; Lannoo, Matthias; Augustijns, Patrick; Matthys, Christophe; Van der Schueren, Bart; Foulon, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) may reduce the absorption of iron, but the extent to which this absorption is impeded is largely unknown. First, we determined the prevalence of iron deficiency following RYGB and explored the risk factors for its development. Second, we examined to what extent oral iron supplements are absorbed after RYGB.

  4. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  5. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer. PMID:26890363

  6. Hepcidin: regulation of the master iron regulator

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient, is required for many diverse biological processes. The absence of a defined pathway to excrete excess iron makes it essential for the body to regulate the amount of iron absorbed; a deficiency could lead to iron deficiency and an excess to iron overload and associated disorders such as anaemia and haemochromatosis respectively. This regulation is mediated by the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin binds to the only known iron export protein, ferroportin (FP...

  7. Iron regulation by hepatocytes and free radicals

    OpenAIRE

    Takami, Taro; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential metallic microelement for life. However, iron overload is toxic. The liver serves an important role as a storehouse for iron in the body. About 20–25 mg of iron is required each day for hemoglobin synthesis. To maintain iron homeostasis, transferrin and transferrin receptors are primarily involved in the uptake of iron into hepatocytes, ferritin in its storage, and ferroportin in its export. Moreover, hepcidin controls ferroportin and plays a central role in the iron meta...

  8. Iron pages of HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data are presented on the superconducting and electronic properties of iron-based high-temperature superconductors in the normal and superconducting states. The following topics are discussed: lattice structure; structure of magnetic vortices; magnetic penetration depth; Fermi surface; isotope effect; and critical magnetic fields both in oxide compounds of 1111 type and oxide-free compounds of 122, 111, and 011 types as a function of the doping level, temperature, and external pressure.

  9. Superparamagnetic iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (AMI 25) is a promising new contrast agent for imaging the reticuloendothelial-system. Iron oxide crystals possess a large magnetic susceptibility and enhance proton relaxation rates, especially transverse relaxation (T2). In order to guide the clinical utilization of this contrast media 4 patients with malignant lesions of the liver are analyzed before and after slow intravenous administration (20 μmol Fe/kg) of AMI 25. Two magnetic resonance (MR) sequences are performed at different times using 0.35 T magnet. MR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reticuloendothelial-system (particularly the liver SNR) decrease promptly. The maximum decrease in SNR (67-72 percent for the liver, 46-65 percent for the spleen, 23-41 percent for the bone marrow) is observed 3 h after injection (P<0.01). However, except the peak of contrast enhancement in T1-weighted sequence of splenic tissue, the curve describes a plateau within 30 min and 6 h, allowing a delay between injection and imaging. T2-weighted sequences give a greater contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by adding the spontaneous tumor contrast to the effect yielded by AMI 25. These results suggest that images must be acquired between 1 and 6 h after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide. (author). 18 refs.; 6 figs

  10. Iron and immunity: immunological consequences of iron deficiency and overload

    OpenAIRE

    Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of iron on immune function has been long appreciated. However, the molecular basis for this interaction is less well understood. Recently, there have been several important advances that have shed light on the mechanisms that regulate mammalian iron metabolism. The new insights provide a conceptual framework for understanding and manipulating the cross-talk between iron homeostasis and the immune system. This article will review what is currently known about how disturbances of ...

  11. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  12. The irony of iron -- biogenic iron oxides as an iron source to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eEmerson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  13. INTRAVENOUS IRON VERSUS ORAL IRON IN ANTENATAL WOMEN WITH IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN SUB - HIMALAYAN SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Compare Intravenous Iron sucrose and Oral Ferrous sulphate in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia during pregnancy. METHOD: 100 sub - himalayan antenatal women between 12 to 36 weeks gestation from Central Referral Hospital with Iron deficiency anemia; hemoglobin 6 – 9 gm/dl, MCV<78fl, MCH <30pg, and serum ferritin <15μg/l; were randomized to receive either 200mg ferrous sulphate tablet twice daily for 6 weeks or receive intravenous ferric hydroxide sucrose complex in water after calculating Total dose infusion. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin, RBC indices, serum ferritin and total serum iron. RESULTS: The mean increase in total serum iron following iron sucrose was 40.20±5.11μg/dl compared to a increase of 33.56±3.39 μg/dl with oral ferrous sulphate, which was statistically highly significant (P< 0.0001. Similarly, the mean increase in serum ferritin with iron sucrose was 31.72 ±10.74μg/dl and with ferrous sulphate being 23.31±4.06 μg/dl which was also statistically highly significant (P<0.001. There was no difference in the increase in hemoglobin, MCV and MCHC between the two groups. CONCLUSION : Though increase in hemoglobin an d RBC indices were not significantly higher with iron sucrose, the main highlight of the study was that iron sucrose significantly increased serum ferritin and serum iron, suggesting that it replenishes iron stores much better than oral iron. Iron sucrose also had a more favourable improvement in clinical features with fewer side - effects , and more effective in later months of pregnancy. This may be of relevance to pregnant mothers residing in difficult Sub - Himalayan terrain.

  14. Magnetostructural study of iron sucrose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic and structural analyses have been performed on an iron sucrose complex used as a haematinic agent. The system contains two-line ferrihydrite particles of about 5 nm that are superparamagnetic above approximately 50 K. The observed low-temperature magnetic dynamics of this compound is closer to simple models than in the case of other iron-containing drugs for intravenous use like iron dextran

  15. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yılmaz Keskin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Demir, oksijenin taşınması, DNA sentezi ve hücre çoğalması gibi çeşitli biyolojik reaksiyonlar için vazgeçilmez olduğundan, yaşam için zorunludur. Demir metabolizması ve bu elementin düzenlenmesiyle ilgili bilgilerimiz, son yıllarda belirgin şekilde değişmiştir. Demir metabolizması ile ilgili yeni bozukluklar tanımlanmış ve demirin başka bozuklukların kofaktörü olduğu anlaşılmaya başlamıştır. Hemokromatozis ve demir tedavisine dirençli demir eksikliği anemisi (IRIDA; “iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia” gibi genetik durumlar üzerinde yapılan çalışmalar, vücuttaki demir dengesini kontrol eden moleküler mekanizmalar ile ilgili önemli ipuçları sunmuştur. Bu ilerlemeler, gelecekte, hem genetik hem de kazanılmış demir bozukluklarının daha etkili şekilde tedavi edilmesi amacıyla kullanılabilir. IRIDA, demir eksikliği ile giden durumlarda, hepsidin üretimini baskılayan matriptaz-2’yi kodlayan TMPRSS6 genindeki mutasyonlardan kaynaklanmaktadır. Hastalığın tipik özellikleri, hipokrom, mikrositer anemi, çok düşük ortalama eritrosit hacmi, oral demir tedavisine yanıtsızlık (veya yetersiz yanıt ve parenteral demire kısmi yanıttır. Klasik demir eksikliği anemisinin aksine, serum ferritin değeri genellikle hafif düşük ya da normal aralıkta; serum ve idrar hepsidin değerleri ise, aneminin derecesi ile orantısız şekilde yüksek bulunur. Şimdiye kadar literatürde bildirilmiş olguların sayısı 100’ü geçmediği halde, IRIDA’nın, “atipik” mikrositik anemilerin en sık nedeni olduğu düşünülmektedir. Bu derlemenin amacı, IRIDA hakkındaki güncel bilgileri araştırıcılar ile paylaşmak ve bu alandaki farkındalıklarını arttırmaktır.

  16. Iron and Ferritin Levels in Saliva of Patients with Thalassemia and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Canatan, Duran; Akdeniz, Sevgi Kosaci

    2012-01-01

    Most of the techniques for measuring iron stores such as serum iron concentration, iron binding capacity, serum ferritin level, liver biopsy can be troublesome or invasive for patients with thalassemia. The salivary iron measurement could be of potential advantage being an easy and non invasive approach for diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron overload . The aim of this study was to compare the levels of iron and ferritin in saliva and serum of patients affected by thalassemia or iron defici...

  17. Iron Imports. III. Transfer of iron from the mucosa into circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Transfer of iron from the mucosa is a critical step in dietary iron assimilation that is tightly regulated to ensure the appropriate amount of iron is absorbed to meet the body's demands. Too much iron is highly toxic, and failure to properly control intestinal iron export causes iron overload associated with hereditary forms of hemochromatosis. One form of genetic iron overload, ferroportin disease, originates due to defects in ferroportin, the membrane iron exporter. Ferroportin acts in con...

  18. Iron in Skin of Mice with Three Etiologies of Systemic Iron Overload

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Brian D.; Lazova, Rossitza; Andrews, Nancy C.; Milstone, Leonard M

    2005-01-01

    In human hemochromatosis, tissue toxicity is a function of tissue iron levels. Despite reports of skin toxicity in hemochromatosis, little is known about iron levels in skin of individuals with systemic iron overload. We measured skin iron and studied skin histology in three mouse models of systemic iron overload: mice with a deletion of the hemochromatosis (Hfe) gene, mice fed a high iron diet, and mice given parenteral injections of iron. In Hfe−/− mice, iron content in the epidermis and de...

  19. Phytases for Improved Iron Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial phytases (EC 3.1.3.8) catalyse dephosphorylation of phytic acid, which is the primary storage compound for phosphorous in cereal kernels. The negatively charged phosphates in phytic acid chelate iron (Fe3+) and thus retards iron bioavailability in humans 1. Supplementation of microbial...... phytase can improve iron absorption from cereal-based diets 2. In order for phytase to catalyse iron release in vivo the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. Our work has compared the robustness of five different microbial phytases, evaluating thermal stability...

  20. Duodenal mucosal reductase in wild-type and Hfe knockout mice on iron adequate, iron deficient, and iron rich feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, R.J.; Debnam, E.; Beaumont, N.; Bahram, S; Schümann, K.; Srai, S. K. S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Genetic haemochromatosis is a common hereditary iron loading disorder in humans. The disease is associated with loss of function mutations in the HFE gene. This is thought to change iron stores via increased iron absorption.

  1. Apically linked iron(II) α-dioximate and α-oximehydrazonate bis-clathrochelates: synthesis, structure and electrocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaya, Irina G; Svidlov, Semen V; Dolganov, Alexander V; Zelinskii, Genrikh E; Potapova, Tamara V; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Varzatskii, Oleg A; Bubnov, Yurii N; Voloshin, Yan Z

    2013-10-01

    Iron(II) α-oximehydrazonate and α-dioximate bis-clathrochelates with apical hydrocarbon linkers were obtained by template condensation on an iron(II) ion followed by H(+)-catalyzed macrobicyclization of the bis-semiclathrochelate precursor with formaldehyde and triethyl orthoformate, and by transmetallation of the triethylantimony-containing clathrochelate precursor with diboron-containing bifunctional Lewis acids, respectively. The geometry of the para-phenylenediboron-capped iron(II) bis-clathrochelate studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction is intermediate between a trigonal prism and a trigonal antiprism with a distortion angle of 20.4°; the rigidity of its C6H4 linker results in the presence of the expected three-fold pseudo-rotational B···Fe···B···B···Fe···B axis and a staggered conformation of the cyclohexane-containing chelate moieties. The cyclic voltammograms (CVs) for the oximehydrazonate bis-clathrochelates contain single one-electron (for each metallocentre, and therefore, two electrons per molecule) quasi-reversible reduction waves assigned to the redox-processes of Fe(2+/+), and no interaction is observed between the two encapsulated iron(I)-containing metallocenters; six strong electron-withdrawing ethoxy substituents in the 1,3,5-triazacyclohexane capping fragments substantially affect the potential of this reduction. The corresponding waves for the dioximate complexes are irreversible: due to the structural rigidity of the caging tris-dioximate ligands, their reduced dianionic forms are unstable on the CV time scale. The CV for the hexaethoxy bis-clathrochelate complex contains one two-electron reversible oxidation wave assigned to the metal-centered oxidation of Fe(2+/3+), whereas those for its dioximate analogs are quasi-reversible. The relative lability of the ligand cavity in binuclear oximehydrazonates causes a stabilization of both the oxidized and the reduced forms; the reduced iron(I)-containing species are highly

  2. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  3. Iron-based superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Peter D; Yin, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents an in-depth review of experimental and theoretical studies on the newly discovered Fe-based superconductors.  Following the Introduction, which places iron-based superconductors in the context of other unconventional superconductors, the book is divided into three sections covering sample growth, experimental characterization, and theoretical understanding.  To understand the complex structure-property relationships of these materials, results from a wide range of experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are described that probe the electronic and magnetic prope

  4. DETERMINATION OF FERRITIN AND HEMOSIDERIN IRON IN PATIENTS WITH NORMAL IRON STORES AND IRON OVERLOAD BY SERUM FERRITIN KINETICS

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi; Tomita, Akihiro; Ohashi, Haruhiko; MAEDA, HIDEAKI; Hayashi, Hisao; Naoe, Tomoki

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT We attempted to clarify the storage iron metabolism from the change in the serum ferritin level. We assumed that the nonlinear decrease in serum ferritin was caused by serum ferritin increase in iron mobilization. Under this assumption, we determined both ferritin and hemosiderin iron levels by computer-assisted simulation of the row of decreasing assay-dots of serum ferritin in 11 patients with normal iron stores free of both iron deficiency and iron overload; chronic hepatitis C (C...

  5. Iron is essential for photosynthesis and respiration : iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    HEUVELINK, E.; Kierkels, T.

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays a major role in photosynthesis. That’s why a shortage directly affects the production capacity of the plant. The application of chelates has made iron much more easy to absorb. Nevertheless it’s an element that we have to keep an eye on.

  6. Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.; Fauth, K.; Goering, E.; Johnson, Erik; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Mørup, Steen

    We present studies of the magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. By combining Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to measure the change from a Fe3O4-like to a gamma-Fe2O3-like composition from the interface to the surface. Furthermore, we have...

  7. Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.;

    2004-01-01

    We present studies of the magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. By combining Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to measure the change from a Fe3O4-like to a gamma-Fe2O3-like composition from the interface to the surface. Furthermore, we have...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: African iron overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shedding of excess iron through blood loss in menstruation and childbirth. The prevalence of increased iron stores ... is absorbed through the walls of the small intestine. Ferroportin then transports iron from the small intestine ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  10. The case for iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excess major nutrients occur in offshore areas ranging from the tropical equatorial Pacific to the polar Antarctic. In spite of the great ecological differences in these environments, the authors believe they share a common trait: iron deficiency. Here they present the case of iron; they point out that all of these areas are far from Fe-rich terrestrial sources and that atmospheric dust loads in these regions are among the lowest in the world. The authors summarize experiments performed in three nutrient-rich areas: The Gulf of Alaska, the Ross Sea, and the equatorial Pacific. In general, populations without added Fe doubled at rates 11-40% of the expected maxima at various temperatures. The additions of nanomole quantities of Fe increased these doubling rates by factors of 2-3. In spite of the lack of Fe, tightly coupled phytoplankton/zooplankton communities seem to inhabit these major nutrient-rich areas. Since Fe is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and nitrate reductase, little chlorophyll is found and NH3 is the favored N source. Normal rate values of specific productivity indicate that these populations are healthy, but limited by the insufficient Fe supply. When Fe becomes available either artificially in bottle experiments or in the environment as Fe-rich land masses are approached, diatoms quickly bloom, chlorophyll levels increase, and nutrient stocks are rapidly depleted. These combined results indicate that Fe availability is the primary factor controlling phytoplankton production in nutrient-rich areas of the open sea

  11. Iron Transport Systems in Neisseria meningitidis†

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins-Balding, Donna; Ratliff-Griffin, Melanie; Stojiljkovic, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Acquisition of iron and iron complexes has long been recognized as a major determinant in the pathogenesis of Neisseria meningitidis. In this review, high-affinity iron uptake systems, which allow meningococci to utilize the human host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, hemoglobin, and haptoglobin-hemoglobin as sources of essential iron, are described. Classic features of bacterial iron transport systems, such as regulation by the iron-responsive repressor Fur and TonB-dependent transport act...

  12. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Taifeng Zhuang; Huijun Han; Zhenyu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans) can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iro...

  13. The Role of Hepcidin in Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Hepcidin is the central regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of hepcidin production results in a variety of iron disorders. Hepcidin deficiency is the cause of iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis, iron-loading anemias, and hepatitis C. Hepcidin excess is associated with anemia of inflammation, chronic kidney disease and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of this new knowledge are beginning to emerge. Dr. Ernest Beutler play...

  14. Hepcidin and its role in iron absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, K J

    2004-01-01

    Maintaining the correct iron balance is crucial to good health. Disorders of iron homeostasis have a global distribution. As iron is not actively excreted by the body, understanding the role of proteins involved in regulating iron uptake is essential to our understanding of disease involving iron homeostasis. Over the past 10 years, major advances have been made in understanding the genetics of iron metabolism and this has led to identification of a number of new proteins, including hepcidin,...

  15. The cellular mechanisms of body iron homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    MARCO T NUÑEZ; MARCO A GARATE; MIGUEL ARREDONDO; VICTORIA TAPlA; PATRICIA MUÑOZ

    2000-01-01

    Cells tightly regulate iron levels through the activity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that bind to RNA motifs called iron responsive elements (IREs). When cells become iron-depleted, IRPs bind to IREs present in the mRNAs of ferritin and the transferrin receptor, resulting in diminished translation of the ferritin mRNA and increased translation of the transferrin receptor mRNA. Similarly, body iron homeostasis is maintained through the control of intestinal iron absorption. Intestinal ep...

  16. Studies of iron carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precipitation of carbon in α iron during a thermal treatment was followed using the magnetic after effect. A study was made of the influence of different parameters such as quenching speed, annealing rate, carbon concentration with or without impurity, irradiation effects. A transient sur-saturation occurs during dissolution of carbon in iron at 500 C. (author)

  17. Iron contamination in silicon technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istratov, A. A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E. R.

    This article continues the review of fundamental physical properties of iron and its complexes in silicon (Appl. Phys. A 69, 13 (1999)), and is focused on ongoing applied research of iron in silicon technology. The first section of this article presents an analysis of the effect of iron on devices, including integrated circuits, power devices, and solar cells. Then, sources of unintentional iron contamination and reaction paths of iron during device manufacturing are discussed. Experimental techniques to measure trace contamination levels of iron in silicon, such as minority carrier lifetime techniques (SPV, μ-PCD, and ELYMAT), deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), total X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and vapor-phase decomposition TXRF (VPD-TXRF), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), mass spectrometry and its modifications (SIMS, SNMS, ICP-MS), and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are reviewed in the second section of the article. Prospective analytical tools, such as heavy-ion backscattering spectroscopy (HIBS) and synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques (XPS, XANES, XRF) are briefly discussed. The third section includes a discussion of the present achievements and challenges of the electrochemistry and physics of cleaning of silicon wafers, with an emphasis on removal of iron contamination from the wafers. Finally, the techniques for gettering of iron are presented.

  18. Hunting for Iron Ore Bargains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One of China’s leading steel mills has turned to smaller mines for long-term, lowcost iron ore supplies china’s oldest steel producer is looking to South America to fulfill its iron ore needs in the face of rising prices from

  19. Radiolabeled iron in soybeans: intrinsic labeling and bioavailability of iron to rats from defatted flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soybeans can be efficiently labeled with radiolabeled iron by supplying the iron via a nutrient culture medium as an iron salt or as a chelate. By using dual labeled iron and EDTA, it was determined that none of the chelator was transported to the shoots with the iron. Therefore, the use of chelated iron as the iron source in the nutrient medium should not affect assessments of bioavailability of iron from plants. Bioavailability (determined from whole-body retention curves of 59Fe in rats) of iron from defatted soy flour was relatively high and addition of vitamin C did not significantly enhance absorption of iron from defatted soy flour

  20. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  1. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  2. Pathology of hepatic iron overload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yves Deugnier; Bruno Turlin

    2007-01-01

    Although progress in imaging and genetics allow for a noninvasive diagnosis of most cases of genetic iron overload, liver pathology remains often useful (1) to assess prognosis by grading fibrosis and seeking for associated lesions and (2) to guide the etiological diagnosis, especially when no molecular marker is available.Then, the type of liver siderosis (parenchymal, mesenchymal or mixed) and its distribution throughout the lobule and the liver are useful means for suggesting its etiology: HLA-linked hemochromatosis gene (HFE) hemochromatosis or other rare genetic hemochromatosis,nonhemochromatotic genetic iron overload (ferroportin disease, aceruloplasminemia), or iron overload secondary to excessive iron supply, inflammatory syndrome,noncirrhotic chronic liver diseases including dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome, cirrhosis, and blood disorders.

  3. Instant Noodles and Iron Nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instant noodles represent the biggest category of instant foods in the supermarket. This study was undertaken to determine dietary availability for iron from their varieties without and with an addition of pork and/or vitamin C rich-vegetables by in vitro radiometric (59Fe) method. The results showed that 8 to 13 percent of iron in the noodles was available for absorption of which contributed to 0.79 mg absorbed iron per day. This amount was too low to meet certain requirements for children, adolescents and menstruating women. With added pork or vegetables, iron availability increased by 2 to 3 times, and by 4 times with added pork and collard or cabbage (p<0.001). The amounts as high as 1.5 to 3.4 mg absorbed iron per day can meet the FAO/WHO requirements for most of the high-risk groups

  4. The binuclear nickel center in the A-cluster of acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and two biomimetic dinickel complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrapers, P.; Mebs, S.; Ilina, Y.; Warner, D. S.; Wörmann, C.; Schuth, N.; Kositzki, R.; Dau, H.; Limberg, C.; Dobbek, H.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) is involved in the bacterial carbon oxide conversion pathway. The binuclear nickel sites in ACS enzyme and two biomimetic synthetic compounds containing a Ni(II)Ni(II) unit (1 and 2) were compared using XAS/XES. EXAFS analysis of ACS proteins revealed similar Ni-N/O/S bond lengths and Ni-Ni/Fe distances as in the crystal structure in oxidized ACS, but elongated Ni-ligand bonds in reduced ACS, suggesting more reduced nickel species. The XANES spectra of ACS and the dinickel complexes showed overall similar shapes, but less resolved pre-edge and edge features in ACS, attributed to more distorted square-planar nickel sites in particular in reduced ACS. DFT calculation of pre-edge absorption and Kβ2,5 emission features reproduced the experimental spectra of the synthetic complexes, was sensitive even to the small geometry differences in 1 and 2, and indicated low-spin Ni(II) sites. Comparison of nickel sites in proteins and biomimetic compounds is valuable for deducing structural and electronic differences in response to ligation and redox changes.

  5. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of homo-binuclear, alkoxo bridged homo- and hetero-tetranuclear metal complexes of a bis-N 2O 4 Schiff base ligand derived from ethanolamine and macroacyclic tetranaphthaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoğlu, Kaan; Baran, Talat; Değirmencioğlu, İsmail; Serbest, Kerim

    2011-09-01

    Three new homo-binuclear Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) complexes ( 2-4), homo-tetranuclear Cu(II) complex ( 5), and hetero-tetranuclear Cu(II)-Ni(II) complex ( 6) of a macroacyclic potentially bis-hexadentate N 2O 4 Schiff base have been synthesized. The imino-alcohol ligand, H 4L was obtained by the condensation of ethanolamine with 2,2'-[2,3-bis(1-formyl-2-naphthyloxymethyl)-but-2-ene-1,4-diyldioxy]bis(naphthalene-1-carbaldehyde). The structures of both the Schiff base and its complexes have been proposed by elemental analyses, spectroscopic data i.e. IR, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-vis, electrospray ionisation mass spectra, molar conductivities and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ligand has two similar compartments to bind first primary two metal ions, and acts bi- or tetra-negative, bis-tetradentate forming five membered chelate ring. However, secondary two metal ions (either Cu 2+ or Ni 2+) are ligated with dianionic oxygen atoms of the alcohol groups and are linked to the 1,10-phenanthroline-nitrogen atoms in the tetranuclear complexes ( 5 and 6).

  6. Quantitative analysis of dietary iron utilization for erythropoiesis in response to body iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo-Tezuka, Yukari; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yorozu, Keigo; Shimonaka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis. There are two sources of iron for erythropoiesis, dietary and stored iron; however, their relative contributions to erythropoiesis remain unknown. In this study, we used the stable iron isotope (57)Fe to quantify synthesis of hemoglobin derived from dietary iron. Using this method, we investigated the activities of dietary iron absorption and the utilization of dietary iron for erythropoiesis in responses to stimulated erythropoiesis and to interventions to alter body iron status. Under iron-loaded conditions, the activity of dietary iron absorption was clearly lowered in response to up-regulation of hepcidin, although the estimated activity of iron release from stored iron was not compared with that under control conditions. This result was supported by the observation that two duodenal iron transporters, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin, were downregulated by iron loading, although the levels of expression of ferroportin in iron storage tissues were not changed by iron loading under erythropoietic stimulation by epoetin-β pegol (C.E.R.A., a long-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agent). These results indicate that the dietary iron absorption system is more sensitive to body iron status than are reticuloendothelial iron- release mechanisms. Our data indicated that there could be a regulatory mechanism favoring use of stored iron over dietary iron under iron-loaded conditions. PMID:26911670

  7. Iron pnictide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(CoxFe1-x)PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr2Si2-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe2As2 and EuFe2As2 are characterised and the superconductors Sr1-xKxFe2As2 and Ca1-xNaxFe2As2 are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se1-xTex) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr3Sc2O5Fe2As2 are presented and Ba2ScO3FeAs and Sr2CrO3FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr2CrO3FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is given. Finally, the superconductor Sr2VO3FeAs is scrutinised and necessary prerequisites for superconductivity in this compound are suggested. (orig.)

  8. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  9. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the

  10. Evaluation of Ferric and Ferrous Iron Therapies in Women with Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ilhami Berber; Halit Diri; Mehmet Ali Erkurt; Ismet Aydogdu; Emin Kaya; Irfan Kuku

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Different ferric and ferrous iron preparations can be used as oral iron supplements. Our aim was to compare the effects of oral ferric and ferrous iron therapies in women with iron deficiency anaemia. Methods. The present study included 104 women diagnosed with iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation. In the evaluations performed to detect the aetiology underlying the iron deficiency anaemia, it was found and treated. After the detection of the iron deficiency anaemia aetiolog...

  11. Superparamagnetic iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses the value of MR imaging of hepatic malignant tumors after injection of different concentrations of superparamagnetic iron oxide (AMI-25) at 1.5 T. Fourteen patients with pathologically proved hepatic malignant tumors were imaged on a 1.5 T magnet. T1-weighted (TR = 400 msec, TE = 20 msec) and T2-weighted (TR = 2,000 msec, TE = 40, 90 msec) sequences were obtained before and 1 hour after intravenous injection of varying concentrations of AMI-25 (10-20 μmol/kg). Signal intensity measurements were obtained from tumor, liver, and background noise. The contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated at the lesion-to-liver signal intensity difference scaled to image noise, including ghost artifacts. Statistical tests were then applied to compare the lesion-to-liver contrast before and after injection

  12. CALCIUM CARBONATE REDUCES IRON ABSORPTION FROM IRON SULFATE, BUT NOT WHEN IRON IS PRESENTED AS AN ORGANIC COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. CONCEI�O

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Experimental and epidemiological evidences have demonstrated that calcium inhibits iron absorption; calcium carbonate being one of the most effective calcium sources to reduce iron absorption from dietary origin or from iron sulfate. In the present work, the short-term effect of calcium from calcium carbonate on iron absorption was studied in rats, using different iron compounds (monosodium ferric EDTA, iron-bys-glicine, iron peptide complex with iron sulfate as a control. Eighty (80 animals were divided into groups of 10 animals each with homogeneous weight. After 18h fast, the animals received by gavage 5 mL of a dispersion containing one of the iron compounds (1mg Fe/kg body weight, concomitantly or not with calcium carbonate at a molar ratio of 150:1 (Ca/Fe. Two hours after the administration, the animals were sacrificed and blood was collected for serum iron determination (iron transfer rate from intestinal lumen to blood compartment. Additionally, the intestines were collected for soluble iron determination (available iron. The results demonstrated that calcium ion from calcium carbonate inhibits the iron absorption from iron sulfate, but not from organic iron (di- or trivalent complexes.

  13. Bacterial nitric oxide reductase: a mechanism revisited by an ONIOM (DFT:MM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Amr A A; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) is an important binuclear iron enzyme responsible for the reduction of nitric oxide to nitrous oxide in the catalytic cycle of bacterial respiration. The reaction mechanism of cNOR as well as the key reactive intermediates of the reaction are still under debate. Here, we report a computational study based on ONIOM (DFT:MM) calculations aimed at investigating the reaction mechanism of cNOR. The results suggest that the reaction proceeds via the mono-nitrosyl mechanism which starts off by the binding of an NO molecule to the heme b3 center, N-N hyponitrite bond formation as a result of the reaction with a second NO molecule was found to proceed with an exothermic energy barrier to yield a hyponitrite adduct forming an open (incomplete) ring conformation with the non-heme FeB center (O-N-N-O-FeB). N-O bond cleavage to yield N2O was shown to be the rate-limiting step with an activation barrier of 22.6 kcal mol(-1). The dinitrosyl (trans) mechanism, previously proposed by several studies, was also examined and found unfavorable due to high activation barriers of the resulting intermediates. PMID:25920393

  14. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  15. Iron loss analysis in linear dc motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippner, M.; Yamada, H.; Mizuno, T.

    1999-09-01

    The paper presents analysis of iron loss in a linear dc motor with a solid iron core. The analysis is based on a finite element magnetic field solution. The influence of magnetic bias on the iron loss is discussed. The results of the iron loss calculations are verified experimentally.

  16. Iron Biofortification of Modern Wheat Cultivar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz Darbani; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Tauris, Birgitte;

    2011-01-01

    an iron storage complex. Primary evaluation of Bobwhite cv. has approved that endosperm expression of wheat’s own ferritin, works as a sink for iron and accumulates two to three folds more iron in the endosperm. To bring the bioavailable iron on the people's tables, modern cultivars were applied for...

  17. Assessment of polyphase sintered iron-cobalt-iron boride cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sintering of iron, cobalt and boron powders has been analysed. As a result iron-iron boride, Fe-Fe2B and iron/cobalt boride with a slight admixture of molybdenum, Fe - Co - (FeMoCo)2B cermets have been produced. Iron was introduced to the mixture as the Astalloy Mo Hoeganaes grade powder. Elemental amorphous boron powder was used, and formation of borides occurred both during heating and isothermal sintering periods causing dimensional changes of the sintered body. Dilatometry was chosen to control basic phenomena taking place during multiphase sintering of investigated systems. The microstructure and phase constituents of sintered compacts were controlled as well. The cermets produced were substituted to: metallographic tests, X-ray analysis, measurements of hardness and of microhardness, and of wear in the process of sliding dry friction. Cermets are made up of two phases; hard grains of iron - cobalt boride, (FeCo)2B (1800 HV) constituting the reinforcement and a relatively soft and plastic eutectic mixture Fe2B - Co (400-500 HV) constituting the matrix. (author)

  18. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  19. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound

  20. Intestinal absorbtion from therapeutic iron doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On a total of 105 persons with normal iron stores, iron depletion, and iron deficiency the intestinal absorption from therapeutic iron doses (100 mg Fe and 50 mg Fe as ferrous glycocoll sulphate) of a special galenic form was measured. The measurements were performed by means of a whole-body counter and preparations labelled with radio iron (59Fe). Mean values of absorption rates from 100 mg Fe in healthy males were 5.0% and in healthy females 5.6% whereas in latent iron deficiency and in iron deficiency anemia mean values of 10% and 13% were obtained, respectively. The maximum absorption rate of 20 to 25% is reached already in the late stage of latent iron deficiency. Advancing severeness of iron deficiency is not followed by an increase of iron absorption. Investigations an 21 persons showed no significant difference between absorption rates of the galenic preparations used when administered orally before or after breakfast, respectively. (orig.)

  1. Iron metabolism in the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weina Kong; Xianglin Duan; Zhenhua Shi; Yanzhong Chang

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of body iron homeostasis requires the coordination of multiple regulatory mechanisms of iron metabolism.The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS,composed of monocytes,macrophages,and their precursor cells) is crucial in the maintenance of iron homeostasis.Recycling of iron is carried out by specialized macrophages via engulfment of aged erythrocytes.The iron stores of macrophages depend on the levels of recovered and exported iron.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis in macrophages are poorly understood.Recent studies characterizing the function and regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nrampl),divalent metal transporter 1 (DMTI),HLA-linked hemechromatosis gene (HFE),ferroportin 1 (FPN1),and hepcidin are rapidly expanding our knowledge on the molecular level of MPS iron handling.These studies are deepening our understanding about the molecular mechanism of iron homeostasis and iron-related diseases.

  2. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  3. Niobium in gray cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for utilization of niobium in gray cast iron is appraised and reviewed. Experiments described in literature indicate that niobium provides structural refinement of the eutectic cells and also promotes pearlite formation. (Author)

  4. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  5. Iron oxides in human spleen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáni, M.; Miglierini, M.; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, J.; Čaplovicová, M.; Jakubovský, J.; Boča, R.; Mrazova, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 5 (2015), s. 913-928. ISSN 0966-0844 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : diffraction * iron * magnetic properties Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.503, year: 2014

  6. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Preface Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc.

  7. Galactic cosmic ray iron composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, R.; Enge, W.; Beaujean, R.; Hertzman, S.; Kristansson, K.; Soederstroem, K.

    1980-11-01

    The isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray iron was studied in the energy interval 500-750 MeV/nucleon with a visual track detector system consisting of nuclear emulsion and cellulose nitrate plastic. Stopping iron nuclei were identified from ionization range measurements in the two detector parts. Cone lengths were measured in the plastic sheets and the residual ranges of the particles were measured in plastic and in emulsion. The mass of iron-17 nuclei was determined with an uncertainty of about 0.3 amu. The isotopic composition at the detector level was found to be Fe-52:Fe-53:Fe-54:Fe-55:Fe-56:Fe-57:Fe-58 = 0:1:4:3:8:1:0. These numbers are not in conflict with the assumption that the isotopic composition of cosmic ray iron at the source is similar to the solar system composition.

  8. Discovery of the Iron Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-eight iron isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Investigation of iron status in Terric Histosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokołowska Z.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The iron status in 14 differently transformed muck formations (Terric Histosols was studied. The Moessbauer spectra showed that most of the iron in all the samples was trivalent. An attempt to find the relationship between the iron content and the state of the soil transformation was performed. The w/w percentage of the total iron as well as the (alkaline extractable organic iron increased with the increase of the ratio of humic to fulvic acids.

  10. Hyperferritinaemia in the absence of iron overload

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, J.; Mumford, A.; Lindsay, J.; Hegde, U; Hagan, M.; Hawkins, J.

    1997-01-01

    Background—Serum ferritin is normally a marker of iron overload. Ferritin genes are sited at chromosomes 19 and 11. Regulation of ferritin synthesis involves an interaction between an iron regulatory protein (IRP) and part of the ferritin mRNA designated the iron regulatory element (IRE). A disorder of ferritin synthesis resulting in hyperferritinaemia in the absence of iron overload has been described recently. 
Patients and methods—Hyperferriti- naemia in the absence of iron ove...

  11. Iron in Innate Immunity: Starve the Invaders

    OpenAIRE

    Ganz, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Iron is essential for nearly all living organisms. Innate immunity effectively restricts iron availability to microbial invaders. Some microbes have evolved effective countermeasures that blunt the effect of iron restriction. Recent epidemiologic studies have highlighted the potentiating effect of iron on microbial infections. Laboratory studies have focused on specific immune mechanisms that mediate iron withholding from microbes constitutively and in response to infections. Specialized infl...

  12. Treatment of Iron Deficiency in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Breymann, C; Römer, T.; Dudenhausen, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency with and without anaemia is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in women. Iron deficiency is generally the result of an imbalance between iron loss and iron absorption. In women with symptoms suspicious for iron deficiency, it is important to confirm or exclude the suspicion using proper tests. The use of serum ferritin levels is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. Although the ideal ferritin levels are not unknown the current consent is that le...

  13. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF. PMID:26657161

  14. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life aft...

  15. Streamlining Iron and Steel Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Eliminating unproductive iron and steel facilities is vital to environmental protection and sustainable development of this industry The Chinese Government is once again shutting down unproductive plants in tune with its green policy and the march toward sustainable development.This time it’s the iron and steel industry to feel the brunt of the Chinese Government’s stringent measures. The deafening buzz of factory floors have

  16. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F W Giacobbe

    2003-03-01

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly different from a more typical Chandrasekhar mass limit approach. This technique produced a maximum stellar iron core mass value of 2.69 × 1030 kg (1.35 solar masses). This mass value is very near to the typical mass values found for neutron stars in a recent survey of actual neutron star masses. Although slightly lower and higher neutron star masses may also be found, lower mass neutron stars are believed to be formed as a result of enhanced iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large stars. And, higher mass neutron stars are likely to be formed as a result of fallback or accretion of additional matter after an initial collapse event involving an iron core having a mass no greater than 2.69 × 1030 kg.

  17. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  18. 双核离子液体的合成及其对酯化反应的催化活性%Synthesis of Binuclear Ionic Liquids and Their Catalytic Activity for Esterification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵地顺; 刘猛帅; 葛京京; 张娟; 任培兵

    2012-01-01

    A series of functional binuclear ionic liquids based on bis-(3-methyl-l-imidazole)butylidene double P-toluene sul-fonic acid salt (Im-PTSA), bis-(3-methyl-l-imidazole)butylidene double bisulfate (Im-HSO4), bis-(l-pyridine)butylidene double p-toluene sulfonic acid salt (Py-PTSA), bis-(l-pyridine)butylidene double bisulfate (Py-HSO4) were synthesized by a two-step proceeding and their structures were characterized by FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra. Their thermal stabilities were characterized by TG. In addition, the acidity and solubility of functional binuclear ionic liquids were also studied. The catalytic activity of the binuclear ionic liquids for the esterification of succinic acid with ethanol was measured. The results show that under the optimized conditions of n(succinic acid) : n(ethanol)= 1 : 3, catalyst used dosage 1.90% (wt), 70 ℃ and 2.5 h, the yield of diethyl succinate reached 93.6% and the selectivity was near up to 100%. Im-PTSA was reused at least 8 times without significant decrease in activity after drying under vacuum. Austenitic stainless steel 316L was used for conducting the corrosion test under the above esterificaion condition, the corrosion rates of the steel plates dipped in the systems with these ionic liquids were less than one tenth of that with sulfuric acid. Fischer esterification of monocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids with different alcohols was observed on using Im-PTSA as catalyst which gave high product yield and selectivity. Use of such a reaction catalyst should be appreciated for its convenient separation.%合成了双-(3-甲基-1-咪唑)亚丁基双对甲苯磺酸盐(Im-PTSA)、双-(3-甲基-1-咪唑)亚丁基双硫酸氢盐(Im-HSO4)、双-(1-吡啶)亚丁基双对甲苯磺酸盐(Py-PTSA)、双-(1-吡啶)亚丁基双硫酸氢盐(Py-HSO4)等4种功能化双核离子液体.分别采用红外光谱(FT-IR)、核磁共振氢谱(1H NMR)对合成的离子液体进行结构分析;采用热重(TG)测试了离子液体的热稳

  19. Iron absorption and iron status related to diet : an experimental and epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Tidehag, Per

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of iron from the diet is a major determinant of the iron status of an individual. Accurate measures of iron absorption are thus essential in the determination of the effects of diet composition on iron absorption and status. The aim of these studies have firstly been to investigate different methods to measure iron absorption and effects of diet in both rats and humans. Secondly to describe variations in iron status in a general population and to relate the variations to diet. ...

  20. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Christina N. Kontoghiorghe; Kontoghiorghes, George J.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using ...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of iron, iron oxide and iron carbide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3) and iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles of different geometrical shapes: cubes, spheres, rods and plates, have been prepared by thermal decomposition of a mixture containing the metal precursor Fe(CO)5 and the stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. The thermal decomposition process was performed for 4 or 24 h at ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) (w/v) ratio of 1:1 or 1:5. Elemental iron nanospheres embedded within a mixture of amorphous and graphitic carbon coating were obtained by hydrogen reduction of the prepared iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles at 450 °C. The formation of the graphitic carbon phase at such a low temperature is unique and probably obtained by catalysis of the elemental iron nanoparticles. Changing the annealing time period and the ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) ratio allowed control of the composition, size, size distribution, crystallinity, geometrical shape and magnetic properties of the different magnetic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Thermal decomposition at 300 °C of a mixture of PVP and Fe(CO)5 leads to the formation of magnetic nanoparticles of different phases and shapes. • Changing the annealing time period and the ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) (w/v) ratio allowed control of the nanoparticles different properties. • H2 reduction of the former magnetic nanoparticles leads to the formation of almost pure Fe nanospheres phase

  2. Defect Interaction in Iron and Iron-based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haixuan; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Stoller, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Magnetism has a profound influence on the defect properties in iron and iron-based alloys. For instance, it has been shown from first principles calculations that the helium interstitial occupies the tetrahedral site instead of octahedral site in contrast to all previous work that neglected the magnetic effects. In this study, we explore the effects of magnetism on the defect interaction, primarily interstitial-type defects, in bcc iron and Fe-Cr systems. The magnetic moment change during the interaction of two 1/2 interstitial loops in bcc iron was calculated using the ab initio locally self-consistent multiple-scattering (LSMS) method and a significant fluctuation was observed. Adding Cr significantly modifies the magnetic structure of the defects and defect interactions. In addition, the effects of magnetism on the defect energetics are evaluated. This study provides useful insights on whether magnetism can be used as a effective means to manipulate the defect evolution in iron-based structural alloys. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Defect Physics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  3. Absorption of Iron from Ferritin Is Independent of Heme Iron and Ferrous Salts in Women and Rat Intestinal Segments123

    OpenAIRE

    Theil, Elizabeth C.; Chen, Huijun; Miranda, Constanza; Janser, Heinz; Elsenhans, Bernd; Núñez, Marco T.; Pizarro, Fernando; Schümann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin iron from food is readily bioavailable to humans and has the potential for treating iron deficiency. Whether ferritin iron absorption is mechanistically different from iron absorption from small iron complexes/salts remains controversial. Here, we studied iron absorption (RBC 59Fe) from radiolabeled ferritin iron (0.5 mg) in healthy women with or without non-ferritin iron competitors, ferrous sulfate, or hemoglobin. A 9-fold excess of non-ferritin iron competitor had no significant e...

  4. Comparative study of efficacy, tolerability and compliance of oral iron preparations (iron edetate, iron polymatose complex) and intramuscular iron sorbitol in iron deficiency anaemia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the efficacy, tolerability and compliance of oral iron preparations(iron edetate and Iron polymaltose complex) with each other and with intramuscular iron sorbitol in iron deficiency anaemia in children. A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was carried out at the Paediatric Department of Combined Military Hospital (CMH) from January 2006 to December 2007. In total 146 children, up to 12 years age having haemoglobin (Hb%) less than 8 gm% were included. They were randomly distributed into three groups. Group A(64 cases) received oral sodium iron edetate (SIE), Group B (40 cases) received oral iron polymaltose complex (IPC) and group C (42 cases) received intramuscular iron sorbitol (IS) in recommended dosages. Rise in Hb%>10 gm% was kept as desired target. Maximum duration of treatment planned was 2 weeks for parenteral iron (group C) and 12 weeks for oral iron (groups A and B). Haematological parameters- Hb%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were measured at induction followed at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after start of treatment. Compliance and drop out rates were determined on each visit. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. ANOVA was used to analyze difference in rise in Hb% at various intervals. Statistically significant increase in mean Hb%, MCV, MCHC after 02 weeks was observed in group C (IS). Rise in these parameters became significant in group A (SIE) and B (IPC) after 04 weeks. Persistent rise was observed in oral groups at 08 and 12 weeks. Rise in Hb% was much faster in group C (IS). It took 2 weeks to achieve mean Hb% > 10 gm% and compliance rate was 40.5%, while to achieve same target, duration required was 8 weeks in group A (SIE) and 12 weeks in group B (IPC) and compliance rate was 39% and 30% respectively. Adverse effects were much more common with group A (SIE) as compared to other two groups. Intramuscular iron sorbitol is a reliable and

  5. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  6. Electrochemical recovery of iron from iron and steel pickling wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a study to the problem of treatment and disposal of iron and steel pickling wastes with emphasis directed towards electrochemical regeneration methods. Types of electrochemical cells, their design, separation factor, cost and power consumption associated with various types of cells are also discussed. The report also deals with an experimental investigation on the applicability of porous fixed bed graphite electrode for the removal of iron by cathodic deposition from ferrous ions containing solutions. Iron removal efficiency, current efficiency, and limiting current were investigated and correlated to the feed solution concentration cost of pickling liquors temperature and pH. The anticipated cost of pickling liquors treatment using the present experimental set up was discussed and related to those reported in the literature. 11 fig., 3 tab

  7. Iron requirements of infants and toddlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domellöf, Magnus; Braegger, Christian; Campoy, Cristina;

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide and young children are a special risk group since their rapid growth leads to high iron requirements. Risk factors associated with a higher prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include low birth weight, high cow's milk......, there is not enough evidence to determine the optimal iron concentration in follow-on formula. From the age of 6 months, all infants and toddlers should receive iron-rich (complementary) foods including meat products and/or iron fortified foods. Unmodified cow's milk should not be fed as the main milk...

  8. Iron Age in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor K. Basa

    1991-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I shall discuss the issue of the Iron Age in Southeast Asia under two headings - mainland Southeast Asia and island Southeast Asia. On the mainland, I shall discuss the evidence from Vietnani, Thailand and Peninsular Malaysia, but exclude Burma, Laos and Kampuchea for lack of relevant data. In the islands, I will discuss Indonesia, Sabah, Sarawak and the Philippines. I would argue that the Iron Age as a separate cultural entity is evident on the mainland, but in the islands there is no identifiable Bronze Age preceding the adoption of iron. By the Iron Age, I mean a period associated with iron artefacts, wet rice farming, brisk internal exchange and external trade and, in the lowland at least, a ranked society. This corresponds roughly to the General Period C of Bayard (1984b, 163, see also Higham and Kijngam 1984, 13-21. But two points should be made about this scheme: This is a heuristic device, so all sites in Southeast Asia can not be easily fitted into it.There is as yet no general agreement among scholars regarding the chronology of various periods.

  9. Inoculation Effects of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solidification sequence of graphite eutectic cells of A and D types, as well as globular and cementite eutectics. The morphology of eutectic cells in cast iron, the equations for their growth and the distances between the graphite precipitations in A and D eutectic types were analyzed. It is observed a critical eutectic growth rate at which one type of eutectic transformed into another. A mathematical formula was derived that combined the maximum degree of undercooling, the cooling rate of cast iron, eutectic cell count and the eutectic growth rate. One type of eutectic structure turned smoothly into the other at a particular transition rate, transformation temperature and transformational eutectic cell count. Inoculation of cast iron increased the number of eutectic cells with flake graphite and the graphite nodule count in ductile iron, while reducing the undercooling. An increase in intensity of inoculation caused a smooth transition from a cementite eutectic structure to a mixture of cementite and D type eutectic structure, then to a mixture of D and A types of eutectics up to the presence of only the A type of eutectic structure. Moreover, the mechanism of inoculation of cast iron was studied.

  10. Iron in Parkinson's Disease Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer studies of fresh frozen samples taken at autopsy from different parts of the human brain (globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra (NS), and hippocamp (Hip)) showed a relatively high concentration of iron in these structures. Moessbauer data, biochemical results and transmission electron micrographs lead to the conclusion that in all above-mentioned structures iron is located mainly within ferritin. However, the Moessbauer doublets obtained from most brain samples at 90 K are slightly asymmetric. This asymmetry could be caused by the presence of a small amount of non-ferritin-like iron. Measurements at 4.1 K showed besides the six-line spectra characteristic for ferritin-like iron, an additional doublet with Moessbauer parameters different from ferritin. We found a slightly higher asymmetry and intensity of the 4.1 K doublet in Moessbauer spectra of Parkinsonian SN than in control SN. As Parkinson's disease is a progressive degeneration of nervous cells in SN and iron may be involved in this degeneration process, this may suggest that the factors evoking these phenomena are related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

  11. Iron availability from Venezuelan diets and iron fortification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking the advantages of the Proyecto Venezuela, a national survey on growth, nutrition and family carried out from 1918 to 1985 in people of various socioeconomic strata living in all regions of Venezuela, a research group have concentrated their work in the last three years on the studies of iron availability from diets in different regions of the Country, consumed by people of different socioeconomic strata and the iron fortification of staple food consumed by the people with low income. This paper contains a summary of the results from these studies. 3 refs, 8 tabs

  12. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  13. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  14. Neutron spectrometry measurements in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact structure was prepared for use in making measurements of neutron penetration in iron which could serve as reference data and as a check for computer codes. About 30 iron plates were put together giving a useful overall length of 130 cm. At various depths along the central axis of the iron block, measurements were made with liquid scintillator spectrometers and proton recoil proportional counters. The energy band explored was between 14 KeV and 10 MeV. Here we report the original spectra of the impulses and the neutron spectra found by the NE213 code based on the differential method and by unfolding with the SPEC4 code for liquid scintillation counters and proton recoil spectrometers, respectively. 12 figs., 60 tabs., 6 refs

  15. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeala eShaked

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically-bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as spectrum rather than an absolute all or nothing. We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe compounds and environments, and for gauging the contribution of various Fe substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  16. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey J. Weigel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen.

  17. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.)

  18. Amorphous yttrium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of amorphous yttrium-iron alloys Ysub(1-x)Fesub(x) have been studied over a wide concentration range 0.32 2Fe17 alloys, lead in the amorphous state to spin-glass behaviour and asperomagnetic order. The dominant positive interactions produce short-range ferromagnetic correlations which persist up to room temperature. However magnetic saturation cannot be achieved for any of the alloys in applied fields of up to 180 kOe, indicating that strong negative interactions are also present. Exchange interactions become increasingly positive with increasing x, and the magnetic properties of iron-rich alloys approach those of a normal ferromagnet. (author)

  19. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  20. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 1017 - 1019 nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix

  1. Selected properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Important properties of iron aluminides have been compiled in order to help engineers and scientists to be able to quickly assess this materials system. This compilation is by no means exhaustive, but it represents a reasonable first effort to summarize the properties of iron aluminides. Considerable care has been, used in assembling the data into tables. However, no guarantee can be made that all the values compiled here are correct; and in case of doubt, or in order to obtain more detailed information, the original sources should always be consulted.

  2. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat iron deficiency. Good sources of iron include: Apricots Chicken, turkey, fish, and other meats Dried beans, ... Professor of Pediatrics, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. ...

  3. Ferride geochemistry of Swedish precambrian iron ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loberg, B. E. H.; Horndahl, A.-K.

    1983-10-01

    Chemical analysis for major and trace elements have been performed on 30 Swedish Precambrian iron ores and on some from Iran and Chile. The Swedish ores consist of apatite iron ores, quartz-banded iron ores, skarn and limestone iron ores from the two main ore districts of Sweden, the Bergslagen and the Norrbotten province. Some Swedish titaniferous iron ores were also included in the investigation. The trace element data show that the Swedish ores can be subdivided into two major groups: 1. orthomagmatic and exhalative, 2. sedimentary. Within group 1 the titaniferous iron ores are distinguished by their high Ti-contents. From the ferride contents of the Kiruna apatite iron ores, the ores are considered to be mobilization products of skarn iron ores from the Norbotten province.

  4. Iron, hepcidin and the metal connection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eLoréal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of new players in iron metabolism, such as hepcidin, which regulates ferroportin and divalent metal transporter 1 expression, has improved our knowledge of iron metabolism and iron-related diseases. However, from both experimental data and clinical findings, iron-related proteins appear to also be involved in the metabolism of other metals, especially divalent cations. Reports have demonstrated that some metals may affect, directly or indirectly, the expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism. Throughout their lives, individuals are exposed to various metals during personal and/or occupational activities. Therefore, better knowledge of the connections between iron and other metals could improve our understanding of iron-related diseases, especially the variability in phenotypic expression, as well as a variety of diseases in which iron metabolism is secondarily affected. Controlling the metabolism of other metals could represent a promising innovative therapeutic approach.

  5. Iron Metabolism in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Raffaella; Trombini, Paola; Pozzi, Matteo; Piperno, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    There are two main mechanisms by which iron overload develops in thalassemias: increased iron absorption due to ineffective erythropoiesis and blood transfusions. In nontransfused patients with severe thalassemia, abnormal dietary iron absorption increases body iron burden between 2 and 5 g per year. If regular transfusions are required, this doubles the rate of iron accumulation leading to earlier massive iron overload and iron-related damage. Iron metabolism largely differs between thalasse...

  6. Fatal anaphylactic reaction to iron sucrose in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Mishra; Nikhil Dave; Kishor Viradiya

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy can have serious deleterious effects for both mother and fetus. Parenteral iron therapy in iron-deficiency anemia is recommended in patients where oral iron therapy is ineffective due to malabsorption states and non-compliance. Compared to oral iron therapy, intravenous iron results in much more rapid resolution of iron-deficiency anemia with minimal adverse reactions. Iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile and is an alternative to other forms of paren...

  7. Iron Chelation Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Saglio; Daniela Cilloni; Emanuela Messa

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous disorder of the hematopoietic stem cells, frequently characterized by anemia and transfusion dependency. In low-risk patients, transfusion dependency can be long lasting, leading to iron overload. Iron chelation therapy may be a therapeutic option for these patients, especially since the approval of oral iron chelators, which are easier to use and better accepted by the patients. The usefulness of iron chelation in MDS patients is still unde...

  8. The role of iron in pulmonary pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Khiroya, Heena; Turner, Alice M

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory disease accounts for a large proportion of emergency admissions to hospital and diseaseassociated mortality. Genetic association studies demonstrate a link between iron metabolism and pulmonary disease phenotypes. IREB2 is a gene that produces iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2), which has a key role in iron homeostasis. This review addresses pathways involved in iron metabolism, particularly focusing on the role of IREB2. In addition to this, environmental factors also influence phe...

  9. Development of Sintered Iron Driving Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Khanna

    1974-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation reports some detailed studies carried out on the development testing and proving of sintered Iron Driving Bands. Sintering studies on two different types of iron powders together with a few Fe-Cu compositions have been made and based on the results there of, parameters for development iron driving bands have been standardised. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that substitution of copper by sintered iron is highly practicable alternative.

  10. Iron: An emerging factor in colorectal carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Anita CG; Klopcic, Borut; Lawrance, Ian C; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    The carcinogenic potential of iron in colorectal cancer (CRC) is not fully understood. Iron is able to undergo reduction and oxidation, making it important in many physiological processes. This inherent redox property of iron, however, also renders it toxic when it is present in excess. Iron-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species via the Fenton reaction, if uncontrolled, may lead to cell damage as a result of lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA and protein damage. This may promote ca...

  11. Identification of an iron-hepcidin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Farnaud, Sébastien Jean-Claude; Rapisarda, Chiara; Tam T T Bui; Drake, Alex F.; Cammack, Richard; Evans, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Following its identification as a liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide, the hepcidin peptide was later shown to be a key player in iron homoeostasis. It is now proposed to be the 'iron hormone' which, by interacting with the iron transporter ferroportin, prevents further iron import into the circulatory system. This conclusion was reached using the corresponding synthetic peptide, emphasizing the functional importance of the mature 25-mer peptide, but omitting the possible functionality of i...

  12. Iron and learning potential in childhood.

    OpenAIRE

    B. Lozoff

    1989-01-01

    Cognitive function. There is reasonably good evidence that mental and motor developmental test scores are lower among infants with iron deficiency anemia. Although the research on cognitive function in iron deficient older children and adults is sparse and diverse, it suggests that there may be alterations in attentional processes associated with iron deficiency. Iron therapy has not yet been shown effective in completely correcting many of the observed disturbances. Although some aspects of ...

  13. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose. PMID:25162093

  14. Iron Homeostasis and the Inflammatory Response

    OpenAIRE

    Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Iron and its homeostasis are intimately tied to the inflammatory response. The adaptation to iron deficiency, which confers resistance to infection and improves the inflammatory condition, underlies what is probably the most obvious link: the anemia of inflammation or chronic disease. A large number of stimulatory inputs must be integrated to tightly control iron homeostasis during the inflammatory response. In order to understand the pathways of iron trafficking and how they are regulated, t...

  15. Why are biotic iron pools uniform across high- and low-iron pelagic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, P. W.; Strzepek, R. F.; Ellwood, M. J.; Hutchins, D. A.; Nodder, S. D.; Twining, B. S.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Dissolved iron supply is pivotal in setting global phytoplankton productivity and pelagic ecosystem structure. However, most studies of the role of iron have focussed on carbon biogeochemistry within pelagic ecosystems, with less effort to quantify the iron biogeochemical cycle. Here we compare mixed-layer biotic iron inventories from a low-iron (~0.06 nmol L-1) subantarctic (FeCycle study) and a seasonally high-iron (~0.6 nmol L-1) subtropical (FeCycle II study) site. Both studies were quasi-Lagrangian, and had multi-day occupation, common sampling protocols, and indirect estimates of biotic iron (from a limited range of available published biovolume/carbon/iron quotas). Biotic iron pools were comparable (~100 ± 30 pmol L-1) for low- and high-iron waters, despite a tenfold difference in dissolved iron concentrations. Consistency in biotic iron inventories (~80 ± 24 pmol L-1, largely estimated using a limited range of available quotas) was also conspicuous for three Southern Ocean polar sites. Insights into the extent to which uniformity in biotic iron inventories was driven by the need to apply common iron quotas obtained from laboratory cultures were provided from FeCycle II. The observed twofold to threefold range of iron quotas during the evolution of FeCycle II subtropical bloom was much less than reported from laboratory monocultures. Furthermore, the iron recycling efficiency varied by fourfold during FeCycle II, increasing as stocks of new iron were depleted, suggesting that quotas and iron recycling efficiencies together set biotic iron pools. Hence, site-specific differences in iron recycling efficiencies (which provide 20-50% and 90% of total iron supply in high- and low-iron waters, respectively) help offset the differences in new iron inputs between low- and high-iron sites. Future parameterization of iron in biogeochemical models must focus on the drivers of biotic iron inventories, including the differing iron requirements of the resident biota

  16. Iron deficiency and iron excess damage mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Patrick B.; Knutson, Mitchell D.; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Lee, Sonia; Xu, Yu; Viteri, Fernando E; Ames, Bruce N.

    2002-01-01

    Approximately two billion people, mainly women and children, are iron deficient. Two studies examined the effects of iron deficiency and supplementation on rats. In study 1, mitochondrial functional parameters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage were assayed in iron-deficient (≤5 μg/day) and iron-normal (800 μg/day) rats and in both groups after daily high-iron supplementation (8,000 μg/day) for 34 days. This dose is equivalent to the daily dose commonly given to iron-deficient humans. Iron-...

  17. Iron mobilization using chelation and phlebotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flaten, T. P.; Aaseth, J.; Andersen, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    . Iron overload has many different causes, both genetic and environmental. The two most common iron overload disorders are hereditary haemochromatosis and transfusional siderosis, which occurs in thalassaemias and other refractory anaemias. The two most important treatment options for iron overload are...

  18. Iron nanoparticles as potential magnetic carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a sequential synthesis offered by reverse micelles, stable magnetic nanoparticles based on iron can be formed. Sequential synthesis allows an iron core to be passivated by a thin layer of gold. These nanocomposite materials offer enhanced magnetic properties over existing iron oxide-based particles as well as reduced non-specific binding of proteins due to the small size

  19. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  20. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...

  1. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  2. The Luster of Iron Ore Prices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China battles its way out of an iron ore stalemate by finding alternative supplier After months of seesawing, China’s iron ore negotiators appear to be breaking through the tight encirclement of suppliers. On August 17, the China Iron and Steel Association (CISA) announced that Fortescue

  3. Water oxidation: High five iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of water is essential to the sustainable production of fuels using sunlight or electricity, but designing active, stable and earth-abundant catalysts for the reaction is challenging. Now, a complex containing five iron atoms is shown to efficiently oxidize water by mimicking key features of the oxygen-evolving complex in green plants.

  4. Effect of Iron Treatment on Nutritional Status of Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Agustian, Leon; Sembiring, Tiangsa; Ariani, Ani; Lubis, Bidasari

    2009-01-01

    Background Iron has been shown to improve growth in children with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), as indicted by increases in height and weight. Frequently, malnutrition and iron deficiency coexist. Objective To determine the effect of iron treatment on nutritional status in children with IDA. Methods A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at Bilah Hulu, a subdistrict of Labuhan Batu, North Sumatera, Indonesia, between November 2006 and February 2007. Iron deficie...

  5. Ferritin iron minerals are chelator targets, antioxidants, and coated, dietary iron

    OpenAIRE

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular ferritin is central for iron balance during transfusions therapies; serum ferritin is a small fraction of body ferritin, albeit a convenient reporter. Iron overload induces extra ferritin protein synthesis but the protein is overfilled with the extra iron that damages ferritin, with conversion to toxic hemosiderin. Three new approaches that manipulate ferritin to address excess iron, hemosiderin, and associated oxidative damage in Cooley’s Anemia and other iron overload conditions, a...

  6. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha eSpottiswoode

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to coinfections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world.

  7. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores. PMID:26663936

  8. Hepcidin in the diagnosis of iron disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, Domenico; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin in 2001 has revolutionized our understanding of iron disorders, and its measurement should advance diagnosis/treatment of these conditions. Although several assays have been developed, a gold standard is still lacking, and efforts toward harmonization are ongoing. Nevertheless, promising applications can already be glimpsed, ranging from the use of hepcidin levels for diagnosing iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia to global health applications such as guiding safe iron supplementation in developing countries with high infection burden. PMID:27044621

  9. Hepcidin in the diagnosis of iron disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, Domenico; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin in 2001 has revolutionized our understanding of iron disorders, and its measurement should advance diagnosis/treatment of these conditions. Although several assays have been developed, a gold standard is still lacking, and efforts toward harmonization are ongoing. Nevertheless, promising applications can already be glimpsed, ranging from the use of hepcidin levels for diagnosing iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia to global health applications such as guiding safe iron supplementation in developing countries with high infection burden. PMID:27044621

  10. Hepcidin, a new iron regulatory peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Viatte, Lydie; Bennoun, Myriam; Beaumont, Carole; Kahn, Axel; Vaulont, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    Maintaining normal iron homeostasis is essential for the organism, as both iron deficiency and iron excess are associated with cellular dysfunction. Recently, several lines of evidence have suggested that hepcidin, a peptide mainly produced by the liver, plays a major role in the control of body iron homeostasis. The subject of this paper is to summarize the advances toward the understanding of function and regulation of hepcidin in iron metabolism and to provide new data on the regulation of hepcidin gene expression by erythropoietin, the major regulator of mammalian erythropoiesis. PMID:12547223

  11. Minocycline Attenuates Iron-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fan; Xi, Guohua; Liu, Wenqaun; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our previous study found minocycline reduces iron overload after ICH. The present study examined the effects of minocycline on the subacute brain injury induced by iron. Rats had an intracaudate injection of 50 μl of saline, iron, or iron + minocycline. All the animals were euthanized at day 3. Rat brains were used for immunohistochemistry (n = 5-6 per each group) and Western blotting assay (n = 4). Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and iron-handling proteins were measured. We found that intracerebral injection of iron resulted in brain swelling, BBB disruption, and brain iron-handling protein upregulation (p < 0.05). The co-injection of minocycline with iron significantly reduced iron-induced brain swelling (n = 5, p < 0.01). Albumin, a marker of BBB disruption, was measured by Western blot analysis. Minocycline significantly decreased albumin protein levels in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p < 0.01). Iron-handling protein levels in the brain, including ceruloplasmin and transferrin, were reduced in the minocycline co-injected animals. In conclusion, the present study suggests that minocycline attenuates brain swelling and BBB disruption via an iron-chelation mechanism. PMID:26463975

  12. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  13. Radiation stability of iron nanoparticles irradiated with accelerated iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uglov, V.V., E-mail: uglov@bsu.by [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Remnev, G.E., E-mail: remnev06@mail.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Kvasov, N.T.; Safronov, I.V.; Shymanski, V.I. [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic processes in nanoparticles after ion irradiation were studied. • The mechanism of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was showed. • The criteria of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was proposed. - Abstract: In the present work the dynamic processes occurring in a nanoscale iron particle exposed to irradiation with iron ions of different energies are studied in detailed. It is shown that the elastic and thermoelastic crystal lattice responses to irradiation form force factors affecting the evolution of defect-impurity system, which, in turn, leads to a decrease in the number of structural defects. Quantitative estimations of the spatial distribution of defects resulting in their migration to the surface were obtained. Such self-organization of nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation can be used as a basis for the production of radiation-resistant nanostructured materials capable of sustaining a long-term radiation influence.

  14. Magnetic transport properties in iron/iron-oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron/iron-oxide granular films were fabricated using reactive dc magnetron sputtering. Their structural, magnetic and transport properties were systematically studied. XPS and TEM confirmed the coexistence of Fe, FeO and Fe2O3. A metal-insulator transition was observed with the increasing of the oxygen component in the film. The temperature dependencies of longitudinal resistivity ρxx and anomalous Hall resistivity ρxy were discussed. We found the enhancement of ρxy and investigated the scaling law between anomalous Hall coefficient Rs and ρxx. In all the samples, Rs was found to be proportional to ρxx when ρxx is small, which indicated the skew scattering is dominant

  15. Iron in haemoglobinopathies and rare anaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Porter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload in haemoglobinopathies and rare anaemias may develop from increased iron absorption secondary to hepcidin suppression, and/or from repeated blood transfusions. While the accumulation of body iron load from blood transfusion is inevitable and predictable from the variable rates of transfusion in the different conditions, there are some important differences in the distribution of iron overload and its consequences between these. Transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (TDT is the best described condition in which transfusional overload occurs. Initially iron loads into macrophages, subsquently hepatocytes, and then the endocrine system including the anterior pituiatry and finally the myocardium. The propensity to extrahepatic iron spread increases with rapid transfusion and with inadequate chelation therapy but there is considerable interpatient and interpopulation variability in this tendency. The conduits though which iron is delivered to tissues is through non transferrin iron species (NTBI which are taken into liver, endocrine tissues and myocardium through L-type calcium channells and possibly through other channells. Recent work by the MSCIO group1 suggests that levels of NTBI are determined by three mechanisms: i increasing with iron overload; ii increasing with ineffective erythropoieis; iii and decreasing when level of transferrin iron utilisation is high. In TDT all three mechanisms increase NTBI levels because transferrin iron utilisation is suppressed by hypertransfusion. It is hypothesized that the transfusion regimen and target mean Hb may have a key impact on NTBI levels because high transfusion regimes may suppress the ‘sink’ effect of the erythron though decreased clearance of transferrin iron. In sickle cell disease (SCD without blood transfusion the anaemia results mainly from haemolysis rather than from ineffective erythropoiesis.2 Thus there is a tendency to iron depletion because of urinary iron loss from

  16. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  17. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  18. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  19. Control of iron homeostasis by an iron-regulated ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisht, Ajay A; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Huang, Xinhua; Powers, David N; Durazo, Armando; Sun, Dahui; Bhaskaran, Nimesh; Persson, Anja; Uhlen, Mathias; Sangfelt, Olle; Spruck, Charles; Leibold, Elizabeth A; Wohlschlegel, James A

    2009-10-30

    Eukaryotic cells require iron for survival and have developed regulatory mechanisms for maintaining appropriate intracellular iron concentrations. The degradation of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) in iron-replete cells is a key event in this pathway, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for its proteolysis has remained elusive. We found that a SKP1-CUL1-FBXL5 ubiquitin ligase protein complex associates with and promotes the iron-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of IRP2. The F-box substrate adaptor protein FBXL5 was degraded upon iron and oxygen depletion in a process that required an iron-binding hemerythrin-like domain in its N terminus. Thus, iron homeostasis is regulated by a proteolytic pathway that couples IRP2 degradation to intracellular iron levels through the stability and activity of FBXL5. PMID:19762596

  20. Ineffective erythropoiesis and regulation of iron status in iron loading anaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara; Nai, Antonella

    2016-02-01

    The definition 'iron loading anaemias' encompasses a group of inherited and acquired anaemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, low hepcidin levels, excessive iron absorption and secondary iron overload. Non-transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia is the paradigmatic example of these conditions that include dyserythropoietic and sideroblastic anaemias and some forms of myelodysplasia. Interrupting the vicious cycle between ineffective erythropoiesis and iron overload may be of therapeutic benefit in all these diseases. Induction of iron restriction by means of transferrin infusions, minihepcidins or manipulation of the hepcidin pathway prevents iron overload, redistributes iron from parenchymal cells to macrophage stores and partially controls anaemia in β-thalassaemic mice. Inhibition of ineffective erythropoiesis by activin ligand traps improves anaemia and iron overload in the same models. Targeting iron loading or ineffective erythropoiesis shows promise in preclinical studies; activin ligand traps are in clinical trials with promising results and may be useful in patients with ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:26491866

  1. Influence of inflammatory disorders and infection on iron absorption and efficacy of iron-fortified foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Richard F

    2012-01-01

    The provision of iron- fortified foods is a common strategy to prevent iron deficiency; however, ensuring adequate iron absorption is a challenge. Iron bioavailability depends on the choice of iron compound, the presence enhancers and inhibitors of absorption in the food matrix, and the physiological state of the consumer, including iron status, other nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory disorders. Inflammation associated with infections and inflammatory disorders would be expected to decrease iron absorption and reduce the efficacy of iron- fortified foods. The decreased absorption is due to an increase in circulating hepcidin in response to inflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin degrades ferroportin and blocks the passage of iron from the intestinal cell to the plasma. This is the innate immune response to infections and aims to restrict pathogen growth by restricting iron supply. Stable isotope studies have reported women and children with chronic malaria parasitemia or febrile malaria to have increased inflammatory cytokines, increased hepcidin and much decreased iron absorption. No studies have specifically investigated the efficacy of iron- fortified foods in the absence and presence of infections. In contrast, inflammation and increased hepcidin associated with adiposity in overweight have been linked to both lower iron absorption and the decreased efficacy of iron- fortified foods. PMID:25762975

  2. Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, C.; Grant, C.; Taua, N; C. Wilson; Thompson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To compare iron fortified follow-on milk (iron follow-on), iron fortified partially modified cows' milk (iron milk), and iron medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in hospitalised infants.

  3. A new layered iron fluorophosphate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Choudhury

    2002-04-01

    A new iron fluorophosphate of the composition, [C6N4H21] [Fe2F2(HPO4)3][H2PO4]·2H2O, I has been prepared by the hydrothermal route. This compound contains iron fluorophosphate layers and the H2PO$_{4}^{-}$ anions are present in the interlayer space along with the protonated amine and water molecules. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group 21/. ( = 13.4422(10) Å, = 9.7320(10) Å, = 18.3123(3) Å, = 92.1480 °, = 2393.92(5) Å3, = 4, = 719.92, calc = 1.997 g cm-3, 1 = 0.03 and 2 = 0.09).

  4. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease.Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  5. Saturation magnetization of polycrystalline iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, D. R.; Hegland, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The magnetic moment per gram, sigma (H sub I, T), where H sub I is the internal field and T is the temperature, was measured for a polycrystalline iron sphere with the vibrating-sample magnetometer. The instrument was calibrated by using a method utilizing the high permeability of an iron sphere. The spontaneous moment, sigma(0, T),was obtained from plots of sigma(H sub I, T) as a function of H sub I for temperatures from 4.2 K to room temperature. The value of the spontaneous moment, sigma(0, T), at 298.9 K was 217.5 + or -0.4 emu/g. The extrapolated moment, sigma(0, 0),at absolute zero from a plot of sigma(0, T) as a function of T to 3/2 power was 221.7 + or - 0.4 emu/g.

  6. When Less is More: Novel Mechanisms of Iron Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Bayeva, Marina; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Wu, Rongxue; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of iron homeostasis are very common, yet the molecular mechanisms of iron regulation remain understudied. Over 20 years have passed since the first characterization of iron regulatory proteins (IRP) as mediators of cellular iron deficiency response in mammals through iron acquisition. However, little is known about other mechanisms necessary for adaptation to low-iron states. In this review we present recent evidence that establishes existence of a new iron regulatory pathway aimed ...

  7. Graphitization in chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    LECOMTE-BECKERS, Jacqueline; Terziev, L.; Breyer, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Some trials with graphite Hi-Cr iron rolls have been done mainly in Japan, for the rolling of stainless steel. This material could lead to good compromise between oxidation, wear and thermal behaviour. By using thermal analysis and resistometry, the conditions for secondary graphite formation have been studied. The amount and volume of free graphite may be strongly increased by a suitable heat treatment, allowing a good thermal conductivity as well as high wear and mechanical properties.

  8. Iron oxides in human brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cesnek, M.; Miglierini, M.; Lančok, Adriana

    Bratislava : SUT, 2015 - (Vajda, J.; Jamnický, I.), s. 225-229 ISBN 978-80-227-4373-0. [International Conference on Applied Physics of Condensed Matter /21./. Štrbské Pleso (SK), 24.06.2014-26.06.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK165 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Iron oxides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry http://kf.elf.stuba.sk/~apcom/proceedings/pdf/225_cesnek.pdf

  9. Lessons from the Iron Dome

    OpenAIRE

    Yiftah S. Shapir

    2013-01-01

    Israel has been under rocket attack for many years. Over the years, the State of Israel has developed a doctrine for defense against high trajectory weapons, of which rocket fire is one type. This article focuses on the Iron Dome system, which entered into operational service in early 2011 and demonstrated what it was capable of within a few months of its deployment. The article attempts to examine the lessons from the system's deployment and to reassess the decision about purchasing the syst...

  10. Calculating iron transport in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of high levels of iron in the final feedwater of nuclear plants is undesirable and can have a significant contribution to plant operations and maintenance (O and M) costs. A number of options are available to reduce the iron concentration, but tend to be expensive. Recently a method was developed to quantitatively determine the contribution of each iron source, such that reduction options can be quantitatively compared. The method is based on industry experience that the majority of iron has been released by flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). FAC is one of the most predictable forms of corrosion and a well-developed predictive model has been developed and also encoded in the CHECWORKS. A combination of CHECWORKS and supplemental calculations have been used to model the iron transport in a number of US BWRs and PWRs. The iron generated by FAC in all the normally operating piping systems has been calculated using the results of CHECWORKS predictions and a special post processor. The post processor accounts for the differences between the maximum corrosion rate calculated by CHECWORKS and the average corrosion (iron generation) rate for a pipe-fitting or length of pipe. It also calculates the amount of iron generated within the fitting or pipe. Supplemental calculations have been used to determine the iron generation from the major, in-line components - high and low pressure turbines, moisture separators, feedwater heaters and the condenser. All of the iron generation rates for the equipment and piping were appropriately summed and iron concentrations estimated throughout the steam-feedwater system. Predicted iron concentrations have agreed well with plant measurements. The availability of specific iron generation rates allows plant management to make reasoned decisions about the countermeasures to deal with iron generation and transport. The countermeasures that have been examined to reduce the amount of iron transport include installing additional water

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN INTRAVENOUS IRON SUCROSE AND ORAL IRON FOR TREATMENT OF POST PARTUM ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AIMS & OBJECTIVES: The aim of study was to compare the efficacy, safety and compliance of intravenous iron sucrose complex with oral Iron therapy in treatment of postpartum anemia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 60 postpartum women who had delivered within 24 -48 hours and having hemoglobin 0.05. Intravenous iron sucrose did not result in any serious adverse reactions. CONCLUSION: Intravenous iron sucrose is more effective, rapid and safe in increasing hemoglobin level in women with postpartum anemia in comparison with oral iron therapy. It also replenishes iron stores more rapidly without any serious adverse effects.

  12. Guidelines on iron chelation therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and transfusional iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattermann, Norbert

    2007-12-01

    Experts believe that iron overload is an important problem which could be avoided with suitable treatment. Guidelines on treating myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) include sections on using iron chelation therapy to prevent or ameliorate transfusional iron overload. The proportion of MDS patients who may benefit from iron chelation therapy is 35-55%, depending on the length of survival necessary for iron to accumulate to a detrimental level. Candidates for iron chelation are mainly patients with dyserythropoietic and cytopenic subtypes of disease, which fall into the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) Low-risk or Intermediate-1-risk categories, with median survival of 3-6 years. PMID:18037413

  13. Iron-tolerant Cyanobacteria as a Tool to Study Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Iron Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Cooksey, K. E.; McKay, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    We are investigating biological mechanisms of terrestrial iron deposition as analogs for Martian hematite recently confirmed by. Possible terrestrial analogs include iron oxide hydrothermal deposits, rock varnish, iron-rich laterites, ferricrete soils, moki balls, and banded iron formations (BIFs). With the discovery of recent volcanic activity in the summit craters of five Martian volcanoes, renewed interest in the iron dynamics of terrestrial hydrothermal environments and associated microorganisms is warranted. In this study we describe a new genus and species of CB exhibiting elevated dissolved iron tolerance and the ability to precipitate hematite on the surface of their exopolymeric sheathes.

  14. Avaliação por métodos in vitro e in vivo da biodisponibilidade de sulfato ferroso microencapsulado In vitro and in vivo evaluation of iron bioavailability from microencapsulated ferrous sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia Cocato

    2007-06-01

    .1%, 3.4 (standard deviation=0.1% and 3.6 (standard deviation=0.0% for FeSO4.7H2O, Ferlim and Fe0 respectively (p0.05. The absorption percentages of the relative biological value of FeSO4.7H2O were 94.2 (standard deviation=23.8% for the Ferlim group and 79.7 (standard deviation=26.6% for the Fe0 group; the differences were not significant (p>0.05. In numerical values (p>0.05, the Fe0 group presented the lowest mean relative biological value absorption (% and concentration of total iron, heme iron and non-heme iron in the liver. CONCLUSION: Microencapsulation of ferrous sulfate with alginate retains its bioavailability therefore it is a good alternative for the fortification of solid mixtures.

  15. Bioavailability of caseinophosphopeptide-bound iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Oukhatar, Nabil; Peres, Jean Michel; Bouhallab, Said; Neuville, Dominique; Bureau, Francois; Bouvard, Gerard; Arhan, Pierre; Bougle, Dominique

    2002-10-01

    Iron deficiency, one of the main worldwide nutritional deficiencies, results from the low bioavailability of most dietary iron, including cow milk. Hydrolysis of the cow milk protein casein produces low molecular weight caseinophosphopeptides (CPPs). Binding of iron to CPPs keeps it soluble in the digestive tract and prevents the formation of high molecular weight ferric hydroxides, which are poorly absorbed. Previous experimental studies have shown that iron bound to the phosphopeptide containing the first 25 amino acids of beta-casein, or beta-CN (1-25), is well absorbed and corrects efficiently iron deficiency. We sought to assess in vivo iron absorption and uptake by tissues involved in iron metabolism and storage (liver, spleen, bone marrow), using radiolabeled iron. beta-CN (1-25)-Fe displayed better absorption and tissue uptake by the vascularized rat loop model compared with a control substance, ferric ascorbate. The metabolism of beta-CN (1-25)-Fe labeled with iron 59, added to cow milk, was also studied in young women. Although the absorption of beta-CN (1-25)-Fe was not significantly higher than that of ferrous sulfate, it displayed significantly higher tissue uptake. This increase was transient and had disappeared by the 14th day of the study, suggesting that iron was used for metabolic purposes. PMID:12389027

  16. Iron uptake and transport across physiological barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Connor, James R

    2016-08-01

    Iron is an essential element for human development. It is a major requirement for cellular processes such as oxygen transport, energy metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin synthesis. Despite its crucial role in these processes, iron in the ferric form can also produce toxic reactive oxygen species. The duality of iron's function highlights the importance of maintaining a strict balance of iron levels in the body. As a result, organisms have developed elegant mechanisms of iron uptake, transport, and storage. This review will focus on the mechanisms that have evolved at physiological barriers, such as the intestine, the placenta, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where iron must be transported. Much has been written about the processes for iron transport across the intestine and the placenta, but less is known about iron transport mechanisms at the BBB. In this review, we compare the established pathways at the intestine and the placenta as well as describe what is currently known about iron transport at the BBB and how brain iron uptake correlates with processes at these other physiological barriers. PMID:27457588

  17. Iron-Tolerant Cyanobacteria: Ecophysiology and Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Lindsey, J.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Although the iron-dependent physiology of marine and freshwater cyanobacterial strains has been the focus of extensive study, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs have been conducted. One of the few studies that have been conducted [B. Pierson, 1999] found that cyanobacterial members of iron depositing bacterial mat communities might increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ and that ferrous iron concentrations up to 1 mM significantly stimulated light dependent consumption of bicarbonate, suggesting a specific role for elevated iron in photosynthesis of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs. Our recent studies pertaining to the diversity and physiology of cyanobacteria populating iron-depositing hot springs in Great Yellowstone area (Western USA) indicated a number of different isolates exhibiting elevated tolerance to Fe(3+) (up to 1 mM). Moreover, stimulation of growth was observed with increased Fe(3+) (0.02-0.4 mM). Molecular fingerprinting of unialgal isolates revealed a new cyanobacterial genus and species Chroogloeocystis siderophila, an unicellular cyanobacterium with significant EPS sheath harboring colloidal Fe(3+) from iron enriched media. Our preliminary data suggest that some filamentous species of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria are capable of exocytosis of iron precipitated in cytoplasm. Prior to 2.4 Ga global oceans were likely significantly enriched in soluble iron [Lindsay et al, 2003], conditions which are not conducive to growth of most contemporary oxygenic cyanobacteria. Thus, iron-tolerant CB may have played important physiological and evolutionary roles in Earths history.

  18. The reproductive ecology of iron in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive ecology focuses on the sensitivity of human reproduction to environmental variation. While reproductive ecology has historically focused on the relationship between energy status and reproductive outcomes, iron status is equally critical to women's reproductive health, given the wide-ranging detrimental effects of iron-deficiency anemia on maternal and infant well-being. This review interprets the vast literature on iron status and women's reproduction through an evolutionary framework. First, it will critique the evidence for iron deficiency caused by blood loss during menstruation, reinterpreting the available data as ecological variation in menses within and between populations of women. Second, it will highlight the scant but growing evidence that iron status is implicated in fertility, a relationship that has deep evolutionary roots. Third, this review proposes a new hypothesis for the transfer of iron from mother to infant via pregnancy and breastfeeding: reproductive iron withholding. In this hypothesis, mothers transfer iron to infants in a manner that helps infants avoid iron-mediated infection and oxidative stress, but trades off with potential risk of maternal and infant iron deficiency. Finally, this review explores two main factors that can modify the relationship between iron status and the gestation-lactation cycle: (1) the relationship between long-term reproductive effort (parity) and iron status and (2) supplementation schemes before and during pregnancy. The review concludes by suggesting continued research into iron homeostasis in women using evolutionary, ecological, and biocultural frameworks. Am J Phys Anthropol 159:S172-S195, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26808104

  19. Distinct Mechanisms of Ferritin Delivery to Lysosomes in Iron-Depleted and Iron-Replete Cells ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Asano, Takeshi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Ishikawa, Fuyuki; Mizushima, Noboru; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Ferritin is a cytosolic protein that stores excess iron, thereby protecting cells from iron toxicity. Ferritin-stored iron is believed to be utilized when cells become iron deficient; however, the mechanisms underlying the extraction of iron from ferritin have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that ferritin is degraded in the lysosome under iron-depleted conditions and that the acidic environment of the lysosome is crucial for iron extraction from ferritin and utilization by ce...

  20. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INJECTABLE IRON-SUCROSE VERSUS ORAL IRON IN POSTPARTUM MODERATE ANEMIA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patange

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postpartum anemia can develop after delivery because of unforeseen medical problems during and after delivery which could complicate a mother’s ability to properly care for her newborn child. The current treatment for postpartum anemia is oral iron supplementation but this treatment has been associated with gastrointestinal side effects. Alternative treatment includes blood transfusions and intravenous iron therapy. Since blood transfusions are very costly, intravenous iron treatments have become more popular. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the hematological parameters and to compare the efficacy and safety of postpartum moderate anemic patients while being treated with IV iron sucrose and oral ferrous sulphate. METHODS: A randomized comparative prospective clinical study was conducted in our hospital. In this study 100 women with postpartum anemia with hemoglobin (Hb between 6 to 8 gm. percent after 24 hours postpartum were randomized into two groups. Group A consisted of 50 women who received 100 mg of IV iron sucrose on alternate day for 3 days along with 0.5mg of folic acid. Group B consisted of 50 women who received two tablets of ferrous sulphate 200mg twice daily for 30 days. RESULTS: Significant rise in Hb level was seen on day 7.14and 30 with IV iron as compared to oral iron. Mean rise in Hb level was 4.1 gm. % with IV iron as compared to 3.4 gm. % with oral iron on day 30 of treatment with P value less than 0.0001 which was significant. Mean rise in PCV level was 12.22% with IV iron and 10.46% with oral iron on day 30. Mean rise in MCV was 12.65u3 with IV iron and 7.9u3 with oral iron. Mean rise in MCH was 5.86pg with IV iron and 3.31pg with oral iron. Mean rise in MCHC was 5.52% with IV iron and 4.17% with oral iron. Mean rise in serum iron was 24.09ug/dl with IV iron and 18.95ug/dl with oral iron. TIBC levels drop by 185.14ug/dl with IV iron and 168.94Ug/dl with oral iron on day 30. CONCLUSION

  1. CALCIUM CARBONATE REDUCES IRON ABSORPTION FROM IRON SULFATE, BUT NOT WHEN IRON IS PRESENTED AS AN ORGANIC COMPLEX

    OpenAIRE

    E. C. CONCEI�O; Machado, A.A.; C. IZUMI; O. Freitas

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidences have demonstrated that calcium inhibits iron absorption; calcium carbonate being one of the most effective calcium sources to reduce iron absorption from dietary origin or from iron sulfate. In the present work, the short-term effect of calcium from calcium carbonate on iron absorption was studied in rats, using different ir...

  2. Comparison of response between food supplemented with powdered iron and iron in syrup form for iron deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the response between food supplemented with iron in powdered and iron in syrup forms for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children aged 1-5 years. Results: Over half (51 %) of the patients were between 1-2 years of age. One hundred thirty-two were males and 68 females. Most of the patients belonged to poor socioeconomic class. The iron in powder form was better tolerated than iron syrup as this group witnessed fewer episodes of gastrointestinal disturbances. The rise in mean Hb level after 6 weeks of treatment in group A and B was 1.6 g/dl and 1.9 g/dl respectively. Hemoglobin rise in group B was more than group A but this was statistically non-significant (p>0.05). There was small but significant (p<0.05) rise in serum ferritin in both the groups. There was no significant difference between the two groups for response to the two forms of iron administration. Conclusion: The powdered form of iron is a cost-effective and better tolerated method of iron administration in children and can be considered as an alternate option for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children. (author)

  3. Binuclear trans-bis(β-iminoaryloxy)palladium(II) complexes doubly linked with pentamethylene spacers: structure-dependent flapping motion and heterochiral association behavior of the clothespin-shaped molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Masaya; Souda, Hiroyuki; Koori, Hiroshi; Komiya, Naruyoshi; Naota, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    The synthesis, structure, and solution-state behavior of clothespin-shaped binuclear trans-bis(β-iminoaryloxy)palladium(II) complexes doubly linked with pentamethylene spacers are described. Achiral syn and racemic anti isomers of complexes 1-3 were prepared by treating Pd(OAc)2 with the corresponding N,N'-bis(β-hydroxyarylmethylene)-1,5-pentanediamine and then subjecting the mixture to chromatographic separation. Optically pure (100 % ee) complexes, (+)-anti-1, (+)-anti-2, and (+)-anti-3, were obtained from the racemic mixture by employing a preparative HPLC system with a chiral column. The trans coordination and clothespin-shaped structures with syn and anti conformations of these complexes have been unequivocally established by X-ray diffraction studies. (1)H NMR analysis showed that (±)-anti-1, (±)-anti-2, syn-2, and (±)-anti-3 display a flapping motion by consecutive stacking association/dissociation between cofacial coordination planes in [D8]toluene, whereas syn-1 and syn-3 are static under the same conditions. The activation parameters for the flapping motion (ΔH(≠) and ΔS(≠)) were determined from variable-temperature NMR analyses as 50.4 kJ mol(-1) and 60.1 J mol(-1)  K(-1) for (±)-anti-1, 31.0 kJ mol(-1) and -22.7 J mol(-1)  K(-1) for (±)-anti-2, 29.6 kJ mol(-1) and -57.7 J mol(-1)  K(-1) for syn-2, and 35.0 kJ mol(-1) and 0.5 J mol(-1)  K(-1) for (±)-anti-3, respectively. The molecular structure and kinetic parameters demonstrate that all of the anti complexes flap with a twisting motion in [D8]toluene, although (±)-anti-1 bearing dilated Z-shaped blades moves more dynamically than I-shaped (±)-anti-2 or the smaller (±)-anti-3. Highly symmetrical syn-2 displays a much more static flapping motion, that is, in a see-saw-like manner. In CDCl3, (±)-anti-1 exhibits an extraordinary upfield shift of the (1)H NMR signals with increasing concentration, whereas solutions of (+)-anti-1 and the other

  4. Binuclear Complexes and Extended Chains Featuring Pt(II)-Tl(I) Bonds: Influence of the Pyridine-2-Thiolate and Cyclometalated Ligands on the Self-Assembly and Luminescent Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Jesús R; Lalinde, Elena; Martín, Antonio; Moreno, M Teresa; Sánchez, Sergio; Shahsavari, Hamid R

    2016-08-15

    Platinum solvate complexes [Pt(C6F5)(C^N)(S)] [C^N = phenylpyridinyl (ppy), S = dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (A); C^N = benzoquinolinyl (bzq), S = CH3COCH3 (B)] react with [Tl(Spy)] (Spy = 2-pyridinethiolate) to afford binuclear [{Pt(C6F5)(C^N)}Tl(Spy)] [C^N = ppy (1) and bzq (2)] species containing a Pt-Tl bonding interaction, supported by a μ-Spy-κN,S bridging ligand, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction. However, the related reactions with [Tl(SpyCF3-5)] [SpyCF3-5 = 5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinethiolate] give neutral extended chains [{Pt(C6F5)(C^N)}Tl(SpyCF3-5)]n [C^N = ppy (3) and bzq (4)]. 3 features a zigzag -Pt-Tl···S-Pt- chain, generated by Pt-Tl and Tl···S bonds, with the SpyCF3 acting as a μ-κN:κ(2)S bridging ligand, whereas 4 displays an unsupported ···Tl-Pt···Tl-Pt··· backbone (angle of ca. 158.7°). The lowest-energy absorption bands in the UV-vis spectra in CH2Cl2, associated with (1)L'LCT transitions with minor (1)LC/(1)MLCT (L' = Spy or SpyCF3-5; L = C^N) character, are similar for all complexes 1-4, demonstrating that for 3 and 4 the chains break down in solution to yield similar bimetallic Pt-Tl units. For 2, two different forms, 2-o (orange) and 2-y (yellow), exhibiting different colors and emissions were found depending on the isolation conditions. Slow crystallization favors formation of the thermodynamically more stable yellow form (2-y), which exhibits a high-energy (HE) structured emission band, whereas fast crystallization gives rise to the orange form (2-o), with a remarkably lower energy structureless emission. Complexes 1 and 3 exhibit dual luminescence in the solid state at 298 K: an unstructured low-energy band associated with (3)ππ* excimeric emission due to π···π (C^N) interactions and a more structured HE band, assigned, with support of density functional theory calculations, to an intraligand (3)LC (C^N) excited state mixed with some ligand (SPy)/platinum-to-ligand (C^N)(3)[(L' + M)LCT] charge transfer. Chain

  5. Dextran-modified iron oxide nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji(r)í Hradil; Alexander Pisarev; Michal Babi(c); Daniel Horák

    2007-01-01

    Dextran-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by precipitation of Fe(Ⅱ) and Fe(Ⅲ) salts with ammonium hydroxide by two methods.Iron oxide was precipitated either in the presence of dextran solution, or the dextran solution was added after precipitation. In the second method,the iron oxide particle size and size distribution could be controlled depending on the concentration of dextran in the solution. The nanoparticles were characterized by size-exclusion chromatography, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Optimal conditions for preparation of stable iron oxide colloid particles were determined. The dextran/iron oxide ratio 0-0.16 used in precipitation of iron salts can be recommended for synthesis of nanoparticles suitable for biomedical applications, as the colloid does not contain excess dextran and does not coagulate.

  6. Phosphorus in antique iron music wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodway, M

    1987-05-22

    Harpsichords and other wire-strung musical instruments were made with longer strings about the beginning of the 17th century. This change required stronger music wire. Although these changes coincided with the introduction of the first mass-produced steel (iron alloyed with carbon), carbon was not found in samples of antique iron harpsichord wire. The wire contained an amount of phosphorus sufficient to have impeded its conversion to steel, and may have been drawn from iron rejected for this purpose. The method used to select pig iron for wire drawing ensured the highest possible phosphorus content at a time when its presence in iron was unsuspected. Phosphorus as an alloying element has had the reputation for making steel brittle when worked cold. Nevertheless, in replicating the antique wire, it was found that lowcarbon iron that contained 0.16 percent phosphorus was easily drawn to appropriate gauges and strengths for restringing antique harpsichords. PMID:17812747

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal iron absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul Sharp; Surjit Kaila Srai

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace metal in the human diet due to its obligate role in a number of metabolic processes.In the diet, iron is present in a number of different forms, generally described as haem (from haemoglobin and myoglobin in animal tissue) and non-haem iron (including ferric oxides and salts, ferritin and lactoferrin).This review describes the molecular mechanisms that co-ordinate the absorption of iron from the diet and its release into the circulation. While many components of the iron transport pathway have been elucidated, a number of key issues still remain to be resolved. Future work in this area will provide a clearer picture regarding the transcellular flux of iron and its regulation by dietary and humoral factors.

  8. The Iron Abundance of IOTA Herculis From Ultraviolet Iron Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, J.; Mulliss, C.; Baer, G.

    1995-03-01

    We have obtained (Adelman 1992, 1993, private comunication) coadded, high-resolution IUE spectra of Iota Herculis (B3 IV) in both short wavelength (SWP) and long wavelength (LWP) regions. The spectra span the ultraviolet spectrum from 110 - 300 nm and have a SNR of roughly 30 -50; they are described in Adelman et. al. (1993, ApJ 419, 276). Abundance indicators were 54 lines of Fe II and 26 lines of Fe III whose atomic parameters have been measured in the laboratory. LTE synthetic spectra for comparison with observations were produced with the Kurucz model atmosphere and spectral synthesis codes ATLAS9/SYNTHE (Kurucz 1979, ApJS 40,1; Kurucz and Avrett 1981, SAO Special Report 391). Model parameters were chosen from the literature: effective temperature = 17500 K, log g =3.75, v sin i= 11 km/s, and turbulent velocity = 0 km/s. (Peters and Polidan 1985, in IAU Symposium 111, ed. D. S. Hayes et al. (Dordrecht: Reidel), 417). We determined the equivalent widths of the chosen lines by fitting gaussian profiles to the lines and by measuring the equivalent widths of the gaussians. We derived abundances by fitting a straight line to a plot of observed equivalent widths vs. synthetic equivalent widths; we adjusted the iron abundance of the models until a slope of unity was achieved. The abundances derived from the different ionization stages are in agreement: Fe II lines indicate an iron abundance that is 34 +15/-10% the solar value([Fe/H]=-0.47 +0.16-0.15dex), while from Fe III lines we obtain 34 +/- 10% ([Fe/H]=-0.47 +0.11/-0.15 dex). A search of the literature suggests that no previous investigations of this star's iron abundance have found agreement between the different ionization stages. We thank Saul Adelman for his generous assistance, and the Faculty Research Fund Board of Wittenberg University for support of this research.

  9. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of the Binuclear Complex [Pr2(C10H8N2O4)2(C10H9N2O4)2(H2O)4]·3H2O·C6H6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wang-Ting; CHEN Feng-Ying; HE Shui-Yang; HU Huai-Ming; YANG Meng-Lin; WANG Yao-Yu

    2006-01-01

    The binuclear praseodymium(Ⅲ) complex with N-(1-carboxyethylidene)-salicylhydrazide (C10H10N2O4, H2L)determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The crystal complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with spacegroup P-1, and in the structure each Pr atom is 9-coordinated by carboxyl O and acyl O and azomethine N atoms oftwo tridentate ligands to form two stable five-membered rings sharing one side in keto-mode and two water mole-cules. The coordination polyhedron around Pr3+ was described as a monocapped square antiprism geometry. In anindividual molecule, four tridentate ligands were coordinated by two negative univalent (HL) and two bivalentforms (L) respectively. Two negative univalent ligands were coordinated via μ2-bridging mode.

  10. Actividad química de los ligandos puente difósforo y difosfenilo en los complejos binucleares (Mo2Cp2(n-PCy2) (n-K2:K2-P2)(CO)2)-y (Mo2Cp2(n-PCy2)(n-K2:K2-P2Me)(CO)2)

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Rivera, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    El trabajo de investigación que se recoge en la presente Memoria comprende un amplio estudio de la reactividad de complejos metálicos binucleares con ligandos puente difósforo y metildifosfenilo procedentes de la activación directa del fósforo blanco. Por un lado, se ha llevado a cabo un amplio análisis del comportamiento químico de la especie aniónica [Mo2Cp2(¿-PCy2)(¿-¿2:¿2-P2)(CO)2]- frente a electrófilos de distinta naturaleza, tales como clorofosfinas y complejos metálicos generadores...

  11. Ferrous versus Ferric Oral Iron Formulations for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency: A Clinical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release, and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form. The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies.

  12. Out of Balance—Systemic Iron Homeostasis in Iron-Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea U. Steinbicker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential element in our daily diet. Most iron is required for the de novo synthesis of red blood cells, where it plays a critical role in oxygen binding to hemoglobin. Thus, iron deficiency causes anemia, a major public health burden worldwide. On the other extreme, iron accumulation in critical organs such as liver, heart, and pancreas causes organ dysfunction due to the generation of oxidative stress. Therefore, systemic iron levels must be tightly balanced. Here we focus on the regulatory role of the hepcidin/ferroportin circuitry as the major regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. We discuss how regulatory cues (e.g., iron, inflammation, or hypoxia affect the hepcidin response and how impairment of the hepcidin/ferroportin regulatory system causes disorders of iron metabolism.

  13. Iron deficiency and overload in relation to nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg MQI; Jansen EHJM; LEO

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional iron intake in the Netherlands has been reviewed with respect to both iron deficiency and iron overload. In general, iron intake and iron status in the Netherlands are adequate and therefore no change in nutrition policy is required. The following aspects and developments, however, need

  14. Iron Metabolism: Interactions with Normal and Disordered Erythropoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies and other disorders of erythroid cells are often associated with abnormal iron homeostasis. We review the molecular physiology of intracellular and systemic iron regulation, and the interactions between erythropoiesis and iron homeostasis. Finally, we discuss iron disorders that affect erythropoiesis as well as erythroid disorders that cause iron dysregulation.

  15. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Silva, Sebastião William da; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos de [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo César [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel, E-mail: jafeli@iq.unesp.br [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g{sup −1} and 131 emu g{sup −1}, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  16. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe3O4 with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe3O4) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g−1 and 131 emu g−1, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy

  17. Making iron aluminides out of scrap

    OpenAIRE

    Doris Feijó Leão Borges; Denise Crocce Romano Espinosa; Cláudio Geraldo Schön

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of iron and aluminum raw materials is often quoted as a strategic advantage of iron aluminides against other competing materials (not only stainless steels, but also nickel and titanium aluminides). These raw materials, however, are not only abundant in the form of ores in earth's crust, but also as scrap produced in the extensive technological activity associated with these base metals. The present work reports results of two prospective experiments designed for obtaining iron ...

  18. Hepcidin in human iron disorders: diagnostic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kroot, J.J.C.; Tjalsma, H.; Fleming, R E; Swinkels, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The peptide hormone hepcidin plays a central role in regulating dietary iron absorption and body iron distribution. Many human diseases are associated with alterations in hepcidin concentrations. The measurement of hepcidin in biological fluids is therefore a promising tool in the diagnosis and management of medical conditions in which iron metabolism is affected. CONTENT: We describe hepcidin structure, kinetics, function, and regulation. We moreover explore the therapeutic poten...

  19. Ferric Iron Reduction by Acidophilic Heterotrophic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, D. Barrie; McGinness, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Fifty mesophilic and five moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria were tested for the ability to reduce ferric iron in liquid and solid media under aerobic conditions; about 40% of the mesophiles (but none of the moderate thermophiles) displayed at least some capacity to reduce iron. Both rates and extents of ferric iron reduction were highly strain dependent. No acidophilic heterotroph reduced nitrate or sulfate, and (limited) reduction of manganese(IV) was note...

  20. Iron and Mechanisms of Emotional Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jonghan; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Iron is required for appropriate behavioral organization. Iron deficiency results in poor brain myelination and impaired monoamine metabolism. Glutamate and GABA homeostasis is modified by changes in brain iron status. Such changes not only produce deficits in memory/learning capacity and motor skills, but also emotional and psychological problems. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that both energy metabolism and neurotransmitter homeostasis influence emotional behavior, and both fun...